Search Posts

nyheder2019januar03

Catastrophic galactic collision could send Solar System flying into space

A nearby galaxy is hurtling towards the Milky Way on a collision course that could fling our Solar System into interstellar space.

9h

That Viral Video of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Dancing Is a Meta-Meme

The only reason you can watch it now is because of a copyright battle that was settled five years ago.

7h

Amerikanske baser satser på grøn energi

Militæret er afhængigt af et robust elnet. På flere og flere amerikanske baser integrerer man vedvarende energikilder og batterier i nødstrømsanlæg.

1h

Data mining adds evidence that war is baked into the structure of society

A new study of wars over 600 years shows conflict following a universal mathematical law, suggesting that the current period of relative peace could be more fragile than many have thought.

32min

DNA-studier af forhistoriske mennesker er vigtigste forskningsresultat i 2018

PLUS. En stor del af vores viden om folkevandringerne fra de eurasiske stepper til Europa og fra Asien til Amerika stammer fra et dna-laboratorium på Københavns Universitet. Eske Willerslev & co. har efter Ingeniørens opfattelse leveret årets største danske forskningsresultat.

33min

Bremseklods for afsmeltningen fra Antarktis

PLUS. Forskere fra DTU Space har observeret ualmindeligt store og hurtige landhævninger, der kan stabilisere iskappen på Vestantarktis. Målingerne var blandt de nominerede til årets bedste danske forskningsresultat.

33min

Aarhus-forskere sætter antiverdenen under lup

PLUS. På Cern spiller forskere fra Aarhus Universitet en hovedrolle i studier af antibrint. Deres resultater var blandt de nominerede til årets bedste forskningsresultat.

33min

Første nye tuberkulosevaccine med dokumenteret virkning

PLUS. Ny danskudviklet vaccine kan blive den længe ventede afløser for calmettevaccinen. Og den var blandt de nominerede til årets bedste danske forskningsresultat.

33min

Calciumsignal er nøglen til forståelse af hvordan planeter dannes

PLUS. Forskere på Københavns ­Universitet har lanceret ny ­model, som rokker ved vores opfattelse af, hvordan Jorden og Månen opstod. Den var blandt de nominerede til årets danske forskningsresultat.

33min

Podcast-special: Her er årets bedste forskningsresultat

Ingeniøren udpeger hvert år de fem bedste danske forskningsresultater inden for teknik og naturvidenskab. Vinderen kombinerer arkæologi og genetik til et helt nyt forskningsfelt.

33min

Lokofører: Trykbølge fik muligvis trailer til at rive sig fri

Lokoføreren i ulykkestoget fortæller – gennem sin advokat – hvordan han fornemmede, at trykbølgen fra IC4-toget fik trailer til at rive sig fri.

33min

With slump in iPhone sales, are we post Peak Smartphone?

Behind Apple's disconcerting news of weak iPhone sales lies a more sobering truth: The tech industry has hit Peak Smartphone, a tipping point when everyone who can afford one already owns one and no breakthroughs are compelling them to upgrade as frequently as they once did.

1h

Australians care if politicians tell lies, but people in the US don’t

Fact-checking politicians' statements alters both the views and the voting intentions of people in Australia – but makes far less difference in the US

1h

The Drugless Doctor’s ADHD Nonsense

The Drugless Doctor isn't a doctor, and as a chiropractor is totally unqualified to provide medical advice on almost everything, including ADHD.

1h

Bolivian bees under threat from coca pesticides

High up in the Bolivian cloud forest, a woman tends to her bees, smoker in hand, working from hive to hive under a canopy of leaves to delicately gather panels of honeycomb. It's a bucolic scene that experts say won't last, for the bees are dying.

2h

Chinese rover beings exploring 'dark' side of moon

China's space agency has posted a photo of a lunar rover making tracks on the surface shortly after leaving a spacecraft that had made the first-ever landing on the moon's far side.

2h

Ghosn set for court hearing in Japan over detention

Former Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn is likely to appear in a Japanese court to hear the reasons for his detention, possibly within days, after his lawyers deployed a little-used article of the Constitution.

2h

In Siberia, Chinese demand for prehistoric tusks fuels 'mammoth rush'

Crouching near a wooden shed in his snowy backyard, Prokopy Nogovitsyn lifts up a grey tarpaulin and takes out a vertebra the size of a saucer: part of a mammoth skeleton.

2h

Archaeologists find Mexico temple to god of skinning sacrifices

Archaeologists in Mexico have found the first temple to the pre-Hispanic deity Xipe Totec, a god of fertility and war who was worshipped by sacrificing and skinning captives.

2h

Buzz grows on 'flying cars' ahead of major tech show

Will flying cars take off at the upcoming Consumer Electronics Show?

2h

Apple's bombshell and the trillion-dollar question

Apple's bombshell news—a sharply weaker revenue outlook and lower iPhone sales—has raised questions over the future of the California giant, which until recently had been seen as the undisputed innovation leader in the tech sector.

2h

NeuWriteSD celebrates “NeuYears”!

As we begin a new year for NeuWriteSD, we’d like to reflect on our progress in 2018, as well as some of our goals (or “NeuYears Resolutions”, if you will) for 2019! NeuWriteSD celebrates 5 years 2018 marked the 5-year anniversary of NeuWriteSD’s official founding by members of the UCSD Neurosciences Graduate Program back in […]

3h

Forest soundscapes monitor conservation efforts inexpensively, effectively

Recordings of the sounds in tropical forests could unlock secrets about biodiversity and aid conservation efforts around the world, according to a perspective paper published in Science.

3h

'One giant leap': China's Chang'e 4 rover Jade Rabbit 2 sets off on moon mission

Project leader echoes Neil Armstrong’s quote after rover’s successful separation from lander China’s space agency has posted the first photo of its Chang’e 4 lunar rover on the far side of the moon after its groundbreaking touchdown on Thursday. The rover – named Yutu 2, or Jade Rabbit 2 – left the spacecraft, drove off a ramp and began making tracks on the moon’s surface at 10.22pm on Thursday,

3h

Catastrophic galactic collision could send Solar System flying into space

New research led by astrophysicists at Durham University, UK, predicts that the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) could hit the Milky Way in two billion years' time.

3h

New nanosatellite system captures better imagery at lower cost

Ben-Gurion University researchers have developed a new satellite imaging system that could revolutionize the economics and imagery available from space-based cameras and even earth-based telescopes.

3h

Vaping by young people remains a burning issue among health experts

Despite much debate in UK and US there is still little agreement over how safe e-cigarettes are Sifting through contradictory evidence is common when it comes to choosing the right thing to do to improve our health, not least at new year when many of us promise to leave old habits behind and make a fresh start. One topic that is almost guaranteed to provoke arguments is e-cigarettes. Thousands of

3h

Did a supervolcano cause the dinosaurs' demise? – Science Weekly podcast

Some scientists are beginning to question whether it really was an asteroid impact that led to the dinosaurs’ extinction – instead, they think it may have been a supervolcano in India. Graihagh Jackson investigates When we were children, many of us learned about dinosaurs and their demise. A massive asteroid , larger than Mount Everest is tall, smashed into the Earth, causing chaos in the form of

3h

To save us from a Kafkaesque future, we must democratise AI | Stephen Cave

The history of artificial intelligence is entwined with state and corporate power. It must now reflect those it has excluded Picture a system that makes decisions with huge impacts on a person’s prospects – even decisions of life and death. Imagine that system is complex and opaque: it sorts people into winners and losers, but the criteria by which it does so are never made clear. Those being ass

3h

Did a supervolcano cause the dinosaurs' demise? – Science Weekly podcast

Some scientists are beginning to question whether it really was an asteroid impact that led to the dinosaurs’ extinction – instead, they think it may have been a supervolcano in India. Graihagh Jackson investigates

3h

Fejl i Google Chrome på Android blev først patchet tre år efter første advarsel

Sikkerhedsfejl i browseren Google Chrome lækkede oplysninger om Android-telefoners hardware og firmware – og sladrede indirekte om telefonens patch-niveau i forhold til sikkerhedsrettelser.

4h

New nanosatellite system captures better imagery at lower cost

'This is an invention that completely changes the costs of space exploration, astronomy, aerial photography, and more,' says Angika Bulbul, a BGU Ph.D. candidate under the supervision of Prof. Joseph Rosen in the BGU Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

4h

Adolescents who self-harm more likely to commit violent crime

Young people who self-harm are three times more likely to commit violent crime than those who do not, according to new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University. The study also found young people who self-harm and commit violent crime — 'dual harmers' — are more likely to have a history of childhood maltreatment and lower self-control than those who self-harm only.

4h

Kvinde arver peanut-allergi fra organdonor

Amerikansk kvinde har udviklet allergi for peanuts efter at have fået en ny lunge. Dansk overlæge kalder det overraskende.

4h

The Man Who Made Air Travel Better Has Died

Almost everything that is “positive” about the modern air-travel experience, is positive thanks to Southwest Airlines. Upbeat staff and crew attitude, straightforward rather than hyper-opaque pricing, even the more-or-less egalitarian boarding process—these are all associated with Southwest. In the past few years, Southwest’s on-time performance has declined to just-average , and in 2018 it had i

5h

It Took On the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Now It’s in Pieces.

A giant boom was dispatched to tackle the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, but the forces of nature may have been too much for it. Its inventors plan to try again.

7h

Will James Webb Be the Next Secretary of Defense?

One of the odd-but-positive political rumors at the start of this odd year is that Donald Trump is considering former Senator James Webb as a successor to James Mattis as secretary of defense. Among the reasons why this would be odd: Webb last held office as a Democrat, and even ran for the Democratic presidential nomination in the 2016 race. Webb is a famously independent-minded character with n

8h

Archaeologists Find Pre-Columbian Temple of ‘Flayed Lord’ in Central Mexico

Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History said archaeologists had found the first temple dedicated to an important fertility god, whose worshipers were said to wear the skin of sacrificial victims.

8h

The Atlantic Daily: New Congress, Same Shutdown

What We’re Following Still Down: New year, new U.S. Congress, new Speaker of the House, same government shutdown. In its first order of business, the House elected Nancy Pelosi as speaker, mostly along party lines (here’s a less often-cited milestone: she’s the first person in more than six decades to reclaim the position ). Now in the majority, House Democrats started the 116 th Congress looking

8h

Edinburgh scientists discover mammoth secret in ivory DNA

Researchers at Edinburgh Zoo have found woolly mammoth DNA inside ivory trinkets from the illegal trade.

9h

Misperceptions about vaping common among UK smokers

Research from King's College London finds smokers and ex-smokers in the UK overestimate the harm from vaping, with fewer than 6 out of 10 accurately believing that e-cigarettes are less harmful than tobacco cigarettes. Misperceptions appear to be on the increase and are particularly strong in smokers and those who have never tried vaping.

9h

Nearby galaxy set to collide with Milky Way, say scientists

Collision will ‘cause fireworks’ but probably won’t happen for about 2.5 billion years As if battered post-Christmas finances, a looming disorderly Brexit and the prospect of a fresh nuclear arms race were not enough to dampen spirits, astronomers have declared that a nearby galaxy will slam into the Milky Way and could knock our solar system far into the cosmic void. The unfortunate discovery wa

9h

Saudi Arabia Won't Be the Last Country to Censor Netflix

As more governments around the world pass restrictive internet laws, targeting critics like Hasan Minhaj could become the norm.

9h

A 'bran' new way to preserve healthy food with natural ingredients

A natural antioxidant found in grain bran could preserve food longer and replace synthetic antioxidants currently used by the food industry, according to researchers.

9h

Long-term trauma outcomes heavily impacted by gender and education level

Researchers find sociodemographic factors more predictive of worse outcomes than injury severity.

9h

'Christmas berry' plant compound could fight Uveal melanoma

A molecule derived from a type of primrose could prove to be a potent inhibitor of metastatic growth for a rare and aggressive cancer.

9h

What Einstein meant by ‘God does not play dice’

'The theory produces a good deal but hardly brings us closer to the secret of the Old One,' wrote Albert Einstein in December 1926. 'I am at all events convinced that He does not play dice.' Einstein was responding to a letter from the German physicist Max Born. The heart of the new theory of quantum mechanics, Born had argued, beats randomly and uncertainly, as though suffering from arrhythmia.

9h

‘Spit test’ detects malaria before symptoms begin

Researchers have developed an easy-to-use saliva test to screen for the parasite that causes malaria. The non-invasive “spit test” could be a key tool in efforts to eradicate malaria, which kills about 500,000 children each year, mostly under the age of 5 in sub-Saharan Africa. Clinicians currently test for malaria using a blood test, which requires skin pricks that often are stressful for childr

9h

Mars motivation

What China's Chang'e-4 mission could tell us about the far side of the Moon.

9h

A cosmic collision may be coming for our galaxy sooner than we thought

The nearby Large Magellanic Cloud may be on a collision course with the Milky Way – and it could make our galaxy less strange when they smash in 2 billion years

9h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Nancy Drew Enough Votes

What We’re Following Today It's Thursday, January 3. More than 100 congressional freshmen were sworn in today. Here’s what we were keeping an eye on: New Speaker: Members of the 116th Congress, the most diverse Congress in America’s history, were sworn in. Nancy Pelosi was elected as speaker—despite a few Democratic defections, many from freshmen representatives—of the now Democrat-controlled Hou

10h

A NASA spacecraft is orbiting a tiny asteroid, and that’s a big deal

Space It’s not easy to just cozy up to a rock barely longer than the Empire State Building. NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft has finally entered asteroid Bennu’s orbit, after more than two years of hurtling through space toward the rock.

10h

Reach out, listen, be patient. Good arguments can stop extremism

Many of my best friends think that some of my deeply held beliefs about important issues are obviously false or even nonsense. Sometimes, they tell me so to my face. How can we still be friends? Part of the answer is that these friends and I are philosophers, and philosophers learn how to deal with positions on the edge of sanity. In addition, I explain and give arguments for my claims, and they

10h

Finally, New Horizons' First Photos of Ultima Thule

On the first day of the year, NASA’s New Horizon Spacecraft captured an icy world 4 billion miles away. Here’s what the photos tell us about the fringes of our solar system.

10h

How AI is learning to convert brain signals into speech

The technique involves training neural networks to associate patterns of brain activity with human speech. Several research teams have managed to get neural networks to "speak" intelligible words. Although similar technology might someday help disabled people regain the power to speak, decoding imagined speech is still far off. None Several research groups have recently made significant progress

10h

'Wound Botulism' Outbreak in San Diego Linked to Black Tar Heroin

Nine people in San Diego developed a rare but serious illness called wound botulism after using black tar heroin.

11h

Roomba's flagship vacuum learns your home and empties its own dirt—for a price

Technology This robot cleaner can follow a 'smart map' of your place. We tried out the Cadillac of Roombas.

11h

Trump’s Strange, Fleeting Briefing-Room Cameo

With the government shutdown headed for the two-week mark with no end in sight, President Donald Trump had a succinct message for the press and the nation on Thursday: Please look at me . All the attention in Washington had been concentrated down Pennsylvania Avenue for the swearing-in of the new Congress, and especially its new Democratic House majority. As my colleagues Russell Berman and Elain

11h

China's lunar rover nabs the first surface photos of the moon's 'dark' side

China's lunar rover is outfitted with cameras and other equipment designed to collect data from a crater near the moon's southern pole. Studying the far side of the moon could provide scientists with a better understanding of what gave rise to the conditions necessary for life on Earth. In addition to scientific discoveries, China also likely plans to use the data from its mission to better plan

11h

'Christmas berry' plant compound could fight Uveal melanoma

A molecule derived from a type of primrose could prove to be a potent inhibitor of metastatic growth for a rare and aggressive cancer.

11h

How kugelblitz black holes could power future spacecraft

We think of black holes as traditionally being formed when matter is packed so densely that the gravity they exert prevents even light from escaping their event horizon. However, Einstein showed that energy and matter are equivalent; rather than taking the enormous amount of matter required to make a sufficiently sized black hole, we could make one using light, known as a kugelblitz. If we had th

12h

Study finds ADHD drugs are unlikely to cause cardiac damage in children who take them

The results of a long-term NIH-funded study published last month could allay concerns that ADHD drugs can cause cardiac damage in children.

12h

Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops

Scientists have re-engineered photosynthesis, a foundation of life on Earth, creating genetically modified plants that grow faster and bigger. They hope it leads to bigger harvests of food. (Image credit: Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project)

12h

Former Taiwanese National Academy Head Cleared of Corruption

Wong Chi-huey, who was the president of Academia Sinica until 2016, was found not guilty of taking bribes from a pharmaceutical company.

12h

Forest soundscapes monitor conservation efforts inexpensively, effectively

Recordings of the sounds in tropical forests could unlock secrets about biodiversity and aid conservation efforts around the world, according to a perspective paper published in Science.

12h

These Water Molecules Have Been Sitting Untouched in the Deep Pacific for 700 Years

Echoes of the Little Ice Age still persist more than a mile down in the Pacific Ocean, even as ocean warming looms.

12h

Long-term trauma outcomes heavily impacted by gender and education level

Researchers find sociodemographic factors more predictive of worse outcomes than injury severity.

12h

DNA on auto-pilot

In new research appearing in the current issue of the journal Science Advances, Hao Yan and his colleagues, in collaboration with scientists at MIT, describe a method allowing for the automation of DNA origami construction, vastly accelerating and simplifying the process of crafting desired forms, and opening the world of DNA architecture to a broader audience.

12h

There are only two supplements proven to help you build muscle

Muscle Month A balanced diet is best, but these additions could help. Take a look at any weightlifting or bodybuilding forum and it’s easy to feel out of the loop. People throw around advice about BCAAs and HMB and various kinds of protein…

13h

The science behind why our brains make us cooperate (or disagree)

Neuroscientists identify the parts of the brain that affect our social decision-making. Guilt has a large affect on social interactions, find the researchers. To find ways to cooperate, people need to let go of fear and anxiety, suggest studies None Why do we decide to work on a project or pursue a goal with someone? Or why do we treat some people like there's no way we can find any common langua

13h

A 'bran' new way to preserve healthy food with natural ingredients

A natural antioxidant found in grain bran could preserve food longer and replace synthetic antioxidants currently used by the food industry, according to researchers at Penn State.

13h

New measure of equality reveals a fuller picture of male well-being

Researchers say a new way of measuring gender inequality is fairer to both men and women, and presents a simplified but more accurate picture of peoples' well-being than previous calculations. The new Basic Index of Gender Inequality (BIGI) focuses on three factors — educational opportunities, healthy life expectancy and overall life satisfaction.

13h

Artificial intelligence advances threaten privacy of health data

Advances in artificial intelligence, including activity trackers, smartphones and smartwatches, threaten the privacy of people's health data, according to new research.

13h

DNA design that anyone can do

Researchers have designed a computer program that allows users to translate any free-form drawing into a two-dimensional, nanoscale structure made of DNA.

13h

Experimental treatment shows promise against triple-negative breast cancer

A naturally occurring protein called Tinagl1 reduced the spread of triple-negative breast cancer in a study conducted in mice.

13h

Obese mice lose anxiety when 'zombie cells' exit their brain

Researchers have shown in mice that obesity increases the level of 'zombie' or senescent cells in the brain, and that those cells, in turn, are linked to anxiety. When senolytic drugs are used to clear those cells, the anxious behaviors in the mice dissipate.

13h

Surprise discovery reveals second visual system in mouse cerebral cortex

The visual system is probably the best understood part of the brain. Over the past 75 years, neuroscientists have assembled a detailed account of how light waves entering your eyes allow you to recognize your grandmother's face, to track a hawk in flight, or to read this sentence. But a new study is calling a fundamental aspect of vision science into question, showing that even the best-studied pa

13h

Gut immune cells cut inflammation in multiple sclerosis

Researchers have discovered that the intestine is the source of immune cells that reduce brain inflammation in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and that increasing the number of these cells blocks inflammation entirely in a preclinical model of the disease.

13h

Photos: A Collection of Lunar Firsts

Fifty years after humankind first laid eyes on the far side of the moon, a Chinese spacecraft called Chang’e 4 gently touched down and released a rover onto the unexplored terrain Thursday. The far side is incredibly difficult to reach; mission control can’t send radio signals to spacecraft if they’re out of sight. To communicate with Chang’e 4, China put a separate probe in orbit around the moon

13h

2018 Had the Biggest Box Office Ever. Thanks, 'Black Panther'

Moviegoers spent $12 billion going to the multiplex last year and Disney flicks led the pack.

13h

Side of the moon you can't see 'is not dark, it's just far'

Despite the name of Pink Floyd's best-selling album, the side of the moon you can't see isn't always dark. But it is far.

13h

Buchli, Kavandi selected for US Astronaut Hall of Fame

Veteran astronauts James Buchli and Janet Kavandi have been selected for induction into the United States Astronaut Hall of Fame.

13h

GM and DoorDash to deliver food with self-driving cars

Food delivery service DoorDash on Thursday announced it is teaming up with General Motors to test using self-driving cars to deliver meals and groceries in San Francisco.

13h

The mystery material that can survive 75 nuclear blasts

A professional hairdresser and amateur chemist invented an unbelievably heat-resistant coating called Starlite. Military applications brought governments running, but the inventor's odd negotiating style ruined discussions. Was Starlite lost when he died, or had it already been stolen? None Maurice Ward was a ladies hairdresser and amateur chemist from Hartlepool, Yorkshire, England, and in 1986

13h

Newborn genomic sequencing detects unanticipated disease risk factors

The BabySeq research team reports that genomic sequencing can identify risk for a wide range of disorders that may not be detected otherwise. Importantly, early knowledge about several of these conditions can lead to surveillance and interventions that could improve health outcomes for newborns and their families.

13h

An errant editing enzyme promotes tumor suppressor loss and leukemia propagation

Researchers have found a stem cell enzyme copy edits more than 20 tumor types, providing new therapeutic target for preventing cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy and radiation.

13h

Ritalin is unlikely to hurt children’s hearts

Exposure to a common drug for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) isn’t likely to increase cardiovascular risk in healthy kids, according to a new study with monkeys. With more than 1.8 million children in the US being treated annually with drugs for ADHD, the possibility that such drugs could damage their hearts has been a significant cause of concern for parents and physicians alike

13h

Artificial intelligence advances threaten privacy of health data

Advances in artificial intelligence, including activity trackers, smartphones and smartwatches, threaten the privacy of people's health data, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

13h

There Are Plants and Animals on the Moon Now (Because of China)

China's Chang'e-4 lander contains a living experiment that could lay the groundwork for agriculture at its future lunar base.

13h

Scientists engineer shortcut for photosynthetic glitch, boost crop growth 40%

Most crops on the planet are plagued by a photosynthetic glitch, and to deal with it, evolved an energy-expensive process called photorespiration that drastically suppresses their yield potential. Researchers reportthat crops engineered with a photorespiratory shortcut are 40 percent more productive in real-world agronomic conditions.

13h

Technology and doctors combine to detect patients who don't take their pills

Almost everyone does it at some point — skip a dose of a medication, decide to not schedule a recommended follow-up appointment or ignore doctor's orders to eat or exercise differently. Such nonadherence can seem harmless on an individual level, but costs the U.S. health care system billions of dollars a year. Now, researchers have shown how to best identify nonadherent patients, combining techno

13h

Overweight dogs may live shorter lives

New research reveals overweight dogs are more likely to have shorter lives than those at ideal body weights.

13h

A cause of possible genetic problems in mitochondria is revealed

The loss of mitochondrial information and of mitochondria gives rise to defective cell metabolism. As well as the lack of capacity to generate the energy necessary for the cells, the loss of mitochondrial information can generate an increase in oxygen free radicals that attack and damage the genetic material or produce Iron-Sulphur protein deficiencies. All this brings about incorrect cell functio

13h

Egg metabolites in blood related to lower risk of type 2 diabetes

Consumption of one egg every day seems to associate with a blood metabolite profile that is related to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, a new study shows.

13h

Severe air pollution affects the productivity of workers

Economists have completed an extensive study which reveals that exposure to air pollution over several weeks is not just unhealthy, it can also reduce employee productivity.

13h

Persistent hot flashes may lead to increased risk of breast cancer

Studies examining the association between vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and breast cancer are not new, but results have been inconsistent. A new larger-scale study concludes that women participating in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) trials who had persistent VMS are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than women who never experienced VMS.

13h

Improved treatment for alcohol use disorders, chronic pain, mood disorders

Scientists are making drug discoveries to support millions around the world dealing with alcohol use disorders, chronic pain and mood disorders. They discovered that two peptides — which are naturally metabolic products of Rubisco, a large protein found in many plants like spinach — may aid in the development of new medications.

13h

New measure of equality reveals a fuller picture of male well-being

Researchers from the University of Missouri and University of Essex in the United Kingdom say a new way of measuring gender inequality is fairer to both men and women, and presents a simplified but more accurate picture of peoples' well-being than previous calculations. The new Basic Index of Gender Inequality (BIGI) focuses on three factors—educational opportunities, healthy life expectancy and o

13h

New measure of equality reveals a fuller picture of male well-being

Researchers from the University of Missouri and University of Essex in the United Kingdom say a new way of measuring gender inequality is fairer to both men and women, and presents a simplified but more accurate picture of peoples' well-being than previous calculations. The new Basic Index of Gender Inequality (BIGI) focuses on three factors — educational opportunities, healthy life expectancy an

14h

For experts in aging, a new take on learning to lead with Tideswell-AGS-ADGAP ELIA program

With the publication of new research on the Emerging Leaders in Aging (ELIA) Program, geriatrics experts hope to chart a course toward leveraging long-distance mentoring and project-based learning to empower the emerging innovators we will need in greater and growing numbers as more of us age.

14h

Genetically modified 'shortcut' boosts plant growth by 40%

Scientists overcome a natural restriction in plants that could boost yields from important food crops.

14h

What We’ve Learned About Ultima Thule From NASA’s New Horizons Mission

The team that manages the spacecraft will have to wait 20 months for all of the data and images it recorded, but they have reported some early findings.

14h

China’s Moon Landing: Lunar Rover Begins Its ExplorationChina Chang e 4 Moon

Reaction in China to the landing was muted — a sign that the novelty of space missions has faded. But it also appeared to reflect political and economic anxieties.

14h

Sexual partner violence against teens isn’t all the same

Young women who experience sexual partner violence in their first relationships don’t all experience it the same way, researchers say. The new study, which identifies the various risk factors linked to sexual violence, suggests predicting teen partner rape could be a step toward preventing it. “There’s this idea that sexual violence doesn’t happen in relationships—certainly not in young women’s f

14h

Gene engineers make super-size plants that are 40% larger

Researchers hope to create a new “green revolution” by improving photosynthesis.

14h

A model for describing the hydrodynamics of crowds

By studying the movement of runners at the start of marathons, researchers from a laboratory* affiliated with the CNRS, l'ENS de Lyon, and l'Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 have just shown that the collective movements of these crowds can be described as liquid flows. The flows observed before a 2016 race in Chicago subsequently helped predict those of thousands of runners in the starting corral

14h

Cold reminders of Earth's last great cold snap revealed in the deep Pacific

Chilly reminders of a centuries-long cold snap can be found deep within the Pacific, a new study finds.

14h

Viral genome sequencing in the heart of a Lassa outbreak

The first researchers to deploy a mobile nanopore sequencing technology to evaluate viral genomics at the height of a Lassa virus outbreak in 2018 now report their results.

14h

Do large human crowds exhibit a collective behavior?

By observing the collective movement of thousands of Chicago Marathon runners queueing up to the starting line, researchers find that the motion of large crowds is fluid-like and mathematically predictable.

14h

The transgenic key to more productive crops

Transgenic tobacco plants engineered with synthetic metabolic pathways designed to bypass the inefficient and costly side effects of natural photorespiration show large increases in productivity — as much as 40 percent over unmodified tobacco plants, a new study says.

14h

Scientists engineer shortcut for photosynthetic glitch, boost crop growth by 40 percent

Most crops on the planet are plagued by a photosynthetic glitch, and to deal with it, evolved an energy-expensive process called photorespiration that drastically suppresses their yield potential. Researchers report in the journal Science that crops engineered with a photorespiratory shortcut are 40 percent more productive in real-world agronomic conditions.

14h

Discovery in cell development changes understanding of how genes shape early embryos

Until now, it was unclear how this DNA packing affected development in early embryos. Researchers found that in mouse embryos — only eight days after fertilization — compacted regions along the genome increase at protein-coding genes.

14h

Next up: Ultracold simulators of super-dense stars

Rice University physicists have created the world's first laser-cooled neutral plasma. The research, which appears online this week in Science, opens a frontier where experimental atomic and plasma physicists can coax matter to behave in bizarre new ways.

14h

Surprise discovery reveals second visual system in mouse cerebral cortex

The visual system is probably the best understood part of the brain. Over the past 75 years, neuroscientists have assembled a detailed account of how light waves entering your eyes allow you to recognize your grandmother's face, to track a hawk in flight, or to read this sentence. But a new study by UC San Francisco researchers is calling a fundamental aspect of vision science into question, showi

14h

Pre-Medicare years bring health insurance worries for many

With the dawn of a new year, most Americans have just started a new health insurance coverage period — whether they receive their coverage through a job, buy it themselves or have a government plan. But a new national poll suggests that many people in their 50s and early 60s harbor serious worries about their health insurance status, now and in the future.

14h

Can a video game-based 'digital medicine' help children with autism and co-occurring ADHD?

Researchers evaluated a digital medicine tool designed as an investigational treatment for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and co-occurring attention/deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

14h

Botulinum toxin reduces chronic migraine attacks, compared to placebo

A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injections in reducing the frequency of chronic migraine headaches, concludes an updated review and analysis.

14h

'Bionic face' experiments could lead to new treatment approach for facial paralysis

An implantable neuroprosthetic device may one day provide a new approach to restoring more natural facial movement in patients with one-sided facial paralysis (hemifacial palsy), suggests a new study.

14h

Could this widely used food additive cause celiac disease?

A bacterial enzyme that is used to improve food texture and shelf-life has been linked in several studies to celiac disease — but it is unlabeled and hidden from public knowledge.

14h

Fixing a flaw in photosynthesis could massively boost food production

Compensating for a fundamental flaw in photosynthesis boosts biomass in tobacco by up to 40 per cent – next up are food crops

14h

Why the Far Side of the Moon Matters So Much

Humankind first laid eyes on the far side of the moon in 1968. “The backside looks like a sand pile my kids have been playing in for a long time,” the astronaut Bill Anders told NASA mission control. For millennia, people had gazed up at the same view of the Earth’s companion—the same craters, cracks, and fissures. As the Apollo spacecraft floated over the unfamiliar lunar surface, Anders describ

14h

How to Turn Schools Into Happier Places

When the Trump administration released its school-safety report last month, it landed with a thud—and only partly because it’s a clunky 180 pages . Many of the recommendations in the report, authored by the Federal Commission on School Safety, are aimed at fostering a better school climate—how a school feels to the students who attend it—whether that’s through improved access to counseling and me

14h

Prague zoo hopes rare lion insemination sows seed for survival

After two suitors failed to get a rare Asiatic lioness pregnant, Prague zoo now hopes that artificial insemination will finally plant the seed for her species' survival.

14h

DNA tests of Lassa virus mid-outbreak helped Nigeria target its response

New technology for analyzing genetic data quickly in the field guided how Nigeria dealt with an outbreak of Lassa fever in 2018.

14h

14h

Cancer cells steer a jagged path

Researchers define the role of a jagged ligand, JAG1, in cancer cells' ability to differentiate and metastasize, making them harder to track down and eliminate.

14h

Does mountaintop removal also remove rattlesnakes?

Timber rattlesnakes, according to the study's author, are among the most docile creatures in Appalachia. They choose places to hibernate that are more likely to be surface mined due to their ridgetop locations. Mining thus put this species at a disadvantage and reduces the biodiversity of the area.

14h

Making cell phones and power lines more durable

Researchers have developed a way to make cell phones and power lines more durable.

14h

Slime proves valuable in developing method for counting salmon in Alaska

Scientists have published a novel method for counting Pacific salmon — analyzing DNA from the slime the fish leave behind in their spawning streams.

14h

Carrying and releasing nanoscale cargo with 'nanowrappers'

Scientists made hollow nanosized boxes with corner holes, demonstrating how these "nanowrappers" can carry and release DNA-coated nanoparticles.

14h

The opioid crisis: What we should learn from the AIDS epidemic

There are important lessons to be learned from the successes and failures of the AIDS response that could inform our response to the opioid epidemic. Decades of HIV research have demonstrated that the existence of an effective biomedical treatment is rarely, in and of itself, sufficient to combat an epidemic, suggesting that both a social as well as a biomedical response to the opioid crisis are n

14h

What makes two species different?

For most of the 20th century, scientists believed that the reproductive incompatibility between species evolved gradually as a by-product of adapting to different environments. New research has shown there are more factors at play — specifically the presence of 'selfish genes,' whose flow among species may dictate whether two species converge or diverge.

14h

Bulldogs' screw tails linked to human genetic disease

With their small size, stubby faces and wide-set eyes, bulldogs, French bulldogs and Boston terriers are among the most popular of domestic dog breeds. Now researchers have found the genetic basis for these dogs' appearance, and linked it to a rare inherited syndrome in humans.

14h

Bristol-Myers Squibb to Buy Celgene for 74 Billion

The deal between the two biopharmaceutical giants will boost the purchaser's cancer drug portfolio.

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

Biology in the bank

[no content]

14h

14h

14h

Flowing crowds

[no content]

14h

14h

14h

14h

Improving crop yield

[no content]

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

A backward current

[no content]

14h

14h

Deep Pacific cooling

[no content]

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

Roots of acne

[no content]

14h

14h

Ending a relationship

[no content]

14h

14h

Dynamic response and hydrodynamics of polarized crowds

Modeling crowd motion is central to situations as diverse as risk prevention in mass events and visual effects rendering in the motion picture industry. The difficulty of performing quantitative measurements in model experiments has limited our ability to model pedestrian flows. We use tens of thousands of road-race participants in starting corrals to elucidate the flowing behavior of polarized c

14h

Rovibrational quantum state resolution of the C60 fullerene

The unique physical properties of buckminsterfullerene, C 60 , have attracted intense research activity since its original discovery. Total quantum state–resolved spectroscopy of isolated C 60 molecules has been of particularly long-standing interest. Such observations have, to date, been unsuccessful owing to the difficulty in preparing cold, gas-phase C 60 in sufficiently high densities. Here w

14h

Counter-propagating charge transport in the quantum Hall effect regime

The quantum Hall effect, observed in a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas subjected to a perpendicular magnetic field, imposes a 1D-like chiral, downstream, transport of charge carriers along the sample edges. Although this picture remains valid for electrons and Laughlin’s fractional quasiparticles, it no longer holds for quasiparticles in the so-called hole-conjugate states. These states are exp

14h

Fluorine-programmed nanozipping to tailored nanographenes on rutile TiO2 surfaces

The rational synthesis of nanographenes and carbon nanoribbons directly on nonmetallic surfaces has been an elusive goal for a long time. We report that activation of the carbon (C)–fluorine (F) bond is a reliable and versatile tool enabling intramolecular aryl-aryl coupling directly on metal oxide surfaces. A challenging multistep transformation enabled by C–F bond activation led to a dominolike

14h

Laser cooling of ions in a neutral plasma

Laser cooling of a neutral plasma is a challenging task because of the high temperatures typically associated with the plasma state. By using an ultracold neutral plasma created by photoionization of an ultracold atomic gas, we avoid this obstacle and demonstrate laser cooling of ions in a neutral plasma. After 135 microseconds of cooling, we observed a reduction in ion temperature by up to a fac

14h

A collicular visual cortex: Neocortical space for an ancient midbrain visual structure

Visual responses in the cerebral cortex are believed to rely on the geniculate input to the primary visual cortex (V1). Indeed, V1 lesions substantially reduce visual responses throughout the cortex. Visual information enters the cortex also through the superior colliculus (SC), but the function of this input on visual responses in the cortex is less clear. SC lesions affect cortical visual respo

14h

The Little Ice Age and 20th-century deep Pacific cooling

Proxy records show that before the onset of modern anthropogenic warming, globally coherent cooling occurred from the Medieval Warm Period to the Little Ice Age. The long memory of the ocean suggests that these historical surface anomalies are associated with ongoing deep-ocean temperature adjustments. Combining an ocean model with modern and paleoceanographic data leads to a prediction that the

14h

Metagenomic sequencing at the epicenter of the Nigeria 2018 Lassa fever outbreak

The 2018 Nigerian Lassa fever season saw the largest ever recorded upsurge of cases, raising concerns over the emergence of a strain with increased transmission rate. To understand the molecular epidemiology of this upsurge, we performed, for the first time at the epicenter of an unfolding outbreak, metagenomic nanopore sequencing directly from patient samples, an approach dictated by the highly

14h

An elephant-sized Late Triassic synapsid with erect limbs

Here, we describe the dicynodont Lisowicia bojani , from the Late Triassic of Poland, a gigantic synapsid with seemingly upright subcursorial limbs that reached an estimated length of more than 4.5 meters, height of 2.6 meters, and body mass of 9 tons. Lisowicia is the youngest undisputed dicynodont and the largest nondinosaurian terrestrial tetrapod from the Triassic. The lack of lines of arrest

14h

DNA fragility in the parallel evolution of pelvic reduction in stickleback fish

Evolution generates a remarkable breadth of living forms, but many traits evolve repeatedly, by mechanisms that are still poorly understood. A classic example of repeated evolution is the loss of pelvic hindfins in stickleback fish ( Gasterosteus aculeatus ). Repeated pelvic loss maps to recurrent deletions of a pelvic enhancer of the Pitx1 gene. Here, we identify molecular features contributing

14h

Structure of the posttranslational Sec protein-translocation channel complex from yeast

The Sec61 protein-conducting channel mediates transport of many proteins, such as secretory proteins, across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane during or after translation. Posttranslational transport is enabled by two additional membrane proteins associated with the channel, Sec63 and Sec62, but its mechanism is poorly understood. We determined a structure of the Sec complex (Sec61-Sec63-Se

14h

Functionally diverse type V CRISPR-Cas systems

Type V CRISPR-Cas systems are distinguished by a single RNA-guided RuvC domain-containing effector, Cas12. Although effectors of subtypes V-A (Cas12a) and V-B (Cas12b) have been studied in detail, the distinct domain architectures and diverged RuvC sequences of uncharacterized Cas12 proteins suggest unexplored functional diversity. Here, we identify and characterize Cas12c, -g, -h, and -i. Cas12c

14h

14h

Synaptotagmin-3 drives AMPA receptor endocytosis, depression of synapse strength, and forgetting

Forgetting is important. Without it, the relative importance of acquired memories in a changing environment is lost. We discovered that synaptotagmin-3 (Syt3) localizes to postsynaptic endocytic zones and removes AMPA receptors from synaptic plasma membranes in response to stimulation. AMPA receptor internalization, long-term depression (LTD), and decay of long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic

14h

Commensal-specific T cell plasticity promotes rapid tissue adaptation to injury

Barrier tissues are primary targets of environmental stressors and are home to the largest number of antigen-experienced lymphocytes in the body, including commensal-specific T cells. We found that skin-resident commensal-specific T cells harbor a paradoxical program characterized by a type 17 program associated with a poised type 2 state. Thus, in the context of injury and exposure to inflammato

14h

Exceptional points in optics and photonics

Exceptional points are branch point singularities in the parameter space of a system at which two or more eigenvalues, and their corresponding eigenvectors, coalesce and become degenerate. Such peculiar degeneracies are distinct features of non-Hermitian systems, which do not obey conservation laws because they exchange energy with the surrounding environment. Non-Hermiticity has been of great in

14h

Synthetic glycolate metabolism pathways stimulate crop growth and productivity in the field

Photorespiration is required in C 3 plants to metabolize toxic glycolate formed when ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase oxygenates rather than carboxylates ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate. Depending on growing temperatures, photorespiration can reduce yields by 20 to 50% in C 3 crops. Inspired by earlier work, we installed into tobacco chloroplasts synthetic glycolate metabolic pathways th

14h

The physics of fluids explains how crowds of marathon runners move

A new liquid-inspired theory can predict the movements of marathoners lining up for a race.

14h

A new way to genetically tweak photosynthesis boosts plant growth

A new chemical road map for a process called photorespiration in plant cells could reduce energy waste to increase plant productivity.

14h

Scientists engineer shortcut for photosynthetic glitch, boost crop growth by 40 percent

Plants convert sunlight into energy through photosynthesis; however, most crops on the planet are plagued by a photosynthetic glitch, and to deal with it, evolved an energy-expensive process called photorespiration that drastically suppresses their yield potential. Researchers from the University of Illinois and U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service report in the journal Sci

14h

Next up: Ultracold simulators of super-dense stars

Rice University physicists have created the world's first laser-cooled neutral plasma, completing a 20-year quest that sets the stage for simulators that re-create exotic states of matter found inside Jupiter and white dwarf stars.

14h

Slime proves valuable in developing method for counting salmon in Alaska

Scientists have published a novel method for counting Pacific salmon—analyzing DNA from the slime the fish leave behind in their spawning streams.

14h

An ant colony has memories that its individual members don’t have

Like a brain, an ant colony operates without central control. Each is a set of interacting individuals, either neurons or ants, using simple chemical interactions that in the aggregate generate their behaviour. People use their brains to remember. Can ant colonies do that? This question leads to another question: what is memory? None For people, memory is the capacity to recall something that hap

15h

Why Your Doctor Should Also Be a Scientist

Opinion: Physician-scientists are an endangered species. Without them, patients could lose out on the next generation of life-saving treatments.

15h

Slime proves valuable in developing method for counting salmon in Alaska

Scientists have published a novel method for counting Pacific salmon — analyzing DNA from the slime the fish leave behind in their spawning streams.

15h

‘Selfish’ genes make different species incompatible

Sex chromosomes evolve to be genetically incompatible between species faster than the rest of the genetic chromosomes, research shows, and reveals the factors at play in this incompatibility. Most evolutionary biologists distinguish one species from another based on reproductivity: members of different species either won’t or can’t mate with one another, or, if they do, the resulting offspring ar

15h

Does mountaintop removal also remove rattlesnakes?

On the Cumberland Plateau in eastern Kentucky, surface coal mining is destroying ridgelines and mountaintops, and along with them, the habitat of a surprisingly gentle reptile species—the timber rattlesnake.

15h

Researchers design a more durable MEMS switch

Researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a way to make cell phones and power lines more durable.

15h

Trump’s New Catchphrase Is an Attempt to Delegitimize Dissent

Donald Trump is a devoted sloganeer, from “You’re fired” to “Make America great again.” But slogans grow tired and lose their oomph with time and repetition, which means it’s important to keep refreshing and replacing them. Enter “presidential harassment.” On Thursday, with the government shutdown in its 13th day, with no sign of abating, and the new Democratic majority taking over the House, the

15h

NASA releases close-up images of Ultima Thule, farthest object ever probed

Ultima Thule, officially known as (486958) 2014 MU69, is a space rock located in the Kuiper belt outside of our solar system. NASA's New Horizons probe flew past Ultima Thule on New Year's Day, snapping hundreds of photos in the process. The data gathered by the probe will hopefully help scientists better understand how planets form. None In the early hours of New Year's Day, NASA's New Horizons

15h

How Does Photography Affect You? We Tried to Find Out

We've all got cameras in our pockets—but how do those countless photos we take every year change our brains and emotions?

15h

Research could lead to more durable cell phones and power lines

Researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a way to make cell phones and power lines more durable.

15h

Does mountaintop removal also remove rattlesnakes?

Timber rattlesnakes, according to the study's author, are among the most docile creatures in Appalachia. They choose places to hibernate that are more likely to be surface mined due to their ridgetop locations. Mining thus put this species at a disadvantage and reduces the biodiversity of the area.

15h

Antibacterial stuff is giving dust drug-resistance

An antimicrobial chemical called triclosan is abundant in dust—and linked to changes in its genetic makeup, according to a new study. The result is dust with organisms that could cause an antibiotic-resistant infection. “There is this conventional wisdom that says everything that’s in dust is dead, but that’s not actually the case. There are things living in there,” says study leader Erica Hartma

15h

Apple's bombshell raises trillion-dollar question

Apple's bombshell news—a sharply weaker revenue outlook and lower iPhone sales—has raised questions over the future of the California giant, which until recently had been seen as the undisputed innovation leader in the tech sector.

15h

First photo of Chinese Yutu-2 rover exploring far side of the moon

On 3 January, the Chinese lander Chang’e 4 became the first spacecraft ever to land on the far side of the moon, and it has just rolled out its rover, Yutu-2

15h

China just accomplished the first landing on the far side of the moonChina Chang e 4 Moon

Space It's the first time a working rover has touched down on the far side. China successfully landed its robotic Chang’e 4 probe on the surface of the far side of the moon on Thursday, around noon Beijing time.

15h

Commute wearing you out? Try looking at this

With an unfortunate abundance of traffic jams and train delays, getting to and from work can sometimes be a job in itself — and a stressful one at that. But your surroundings might just hold the solution you've been looking for. Science backs this up: A recent study from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) shows that commuting through stretches of nature everyday can work wonders

16h

Cancer cells steer a jagged path

Researchers at Rice University and the Duke University School of Medicine define the role of a jagged ligand, JAG1, in cancer cells' ability to differentiate and metastasize, making them harder to track down and eliminate.

16h

US auto consumers tap the brakes, swerve away from small cars

Major automakers on Thursday announced slowing 2018 sales in the US even as the industry maintained close to its overall total from the previous year, defying expectations.

16h

Apple rival paves way for ban on some iPhones in Germany

US chipmaker Qualcomm said Thursday it had fulfilled the requirements set out by a court in a patent dispute case against Apple to ban the sale of older iPhone models in Germany.

16h

Ultima Thule and the Apes of Earth

As the New Horizons mission approached Ultima Thule, Rowan University paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara put our close-up study of the Kuiper Belt object into a deep-time perspective. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

Greenhouse Gasses: Causes, Sources and Environmental Effects

Greenhouse gases are atmospheric gases that absorb infrared radiation and trap heat in the atmosphere. Increases in emissions of these gases are leading to climate change and global warming.

16h

The Elite Intel Team Still Fighting Meltdown and Spectre

One year after a pair of devastating processor vulnerabilities were first disclosed, Intel's still dealing with the fallout.

16h

What makes two species different?

Most evolutionary biologists distinguish one species from another based on reproductivity: members of different species either won't or can't mate with one another, or, if they do, the resulting offspring are often sterile, unviable, or suffer some other sort of reduced fitness.

16h

Let’s Invent a New Holiday

Late in 2018, The Atlantic ’s Family section asked readers to share some of the unique traditions their families engaged in during the year-end holiday season. The rituals you all shared with us were often quirky (one of them involved a Speedo-clad George Michael made of marzipan) and uniformly delightful. And they made us think: Why concentrate all these fantastic festivities into one always-too

16h

These are the world’s longest straight lines

What links a small town in Portugal and a huge port city in China? The answer may surprise even inhabitants of both places: the world's longest straight line over land That line and its maritime equivalent were determined not by exploration but by calculation What connects the Chinese port of Quanzhou with Sagres, a tiny parish in southern Portugal? No, it's not the New Silk Route, the Sino-Europ

16h

Computer program can translate a free-form 2-D drawing into a DNA structure

Researchers at MIT and Arizona State University have designed a computer program that allows users to translate any free-form drawing into a two-dimensional, nanoscale structure made of DNA.

16h

Cosmic Collision Created "Snowman" MU69—the Farthest World Ever Explored

Close-up images from NASA’s New Horizons probe show the space rock has two distinct lobes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

The US and China are in a quantum arms race that will transform warfare

Radar that can spot stealth aircraft and other quantum innovations could give their militaries a strategic edge.

16h

Dark matter on the move

Scientists have found evidence that dark matter can be heated up and moved around, as a result of star formation in galaxies. The findings provide the first observational evidence for the effect known as 'dark matter heating', and give new clues as to what makes up dark matter.

16h

Disrupted networks link overlapping cognitive deficits in psychiatric disorders

Psychiatric disorders share common alterations of functional connectivity between three core brain networks involved in cognition, according to a meta-analysis.

16h

Fruit flies help to shed light on the evolution of metabolism

Researchers have discovered that the ability to use sugar as food varies strongly between closely related fruit fly species. They have also identified the genetic basis of this variation. In the future, it will be interesting to explore whether human populations with different dietary histories may respond differently to modern diets rich in sugars.

16h

Første besøg på Månens bagside: Kina forbereder bemandet mission

Ingen tvivl om, at Kina igen vil sætte mennesker på Månen, siger dansk planetforsker.

16h

How Space and Time Could Be a Quantum Error-Correcting Code

In 1994, a mathematician at AT&T Research named Peter Shor brought instant fame to “quantum computers” when he discovered that these hypothetical devices could quickly factor large numbers — and thus break much of modern cryptography. But a fundamental problem stood in the way of actually building quantum computers: the innate frailty of their physical components. Unlike binary bits of informatio

16h

Microplastics and plastic additives discovered in ascidians all along Israel's coastline

A new study finds that microplastics — tiny pieces of plastic ingested by aquatic life — are present in solitary ascidians, sac-like marine invertebrate filter feeders, all along the Israeli coastline. The research also confirmed the presence of plastic additives, i.e. 'plasticizers,' in ascidians.

16h

Biological markers that could guide treatment for prostate cancer

Genetic alterations in low-risk prostate cancer diagnosed by needle biopsy can identify men that harbor higher-risk cancer in their prostate glands, researchers have discovered. The research found for the first time that genetic alterations associated with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer also may be present in some cases of low-risk prostate cancers.

16h

Archeological discovery yields clues to how our ancestors may have adapted to their environment

During the Stone Age ancestral humans lived with a variety of animal species along what was an area of wetlands in the middle of the Jordanian desert. The site, in the town of Azraq Basin, has been excavated and has revealed an abundance of tools and animal bones from up to 250,000 years ago, leading to better understanding of how ancestral humans have adapted to this changing environment.

16h

Researchers locate the body's largest cell receptor

A giant toadstool that swallow up vitamins and nutrients in the intestines and kidneys. This is how the receptor, which e.g. absorbs B12 vitamin in the small intestine, looks. For the first time, researchers have an insight into an as yet unknown biology which has survived hundreds of millions of years during the evolution of life.

16h

Who's tougher? Baby sharks or daddy sharks?

One would assume that since humans and many animals tend to get stiffer and perhaps tougher as they reach adulthood, the same would be true for sharks. A new study finds the opposite in these swift-swimming marine predators. The youngest sharks were stiffer and tougher than older sharks. Another key finding is that while scientists have historically looked at alternating patterns of mineralization

16h

Extraordinary treefrog discovered in the Andes of Ecuador

A dazzling new species of treefrog was discovered at a remote tabletop mountain in the Ecuadorian Andes. The new species has an extraordinary characteristic, the presence of claw-like appendages at the base of the thumbs.

16h

Bulldogs' screw tails linked to human genetic disease

With their small size, stubby faces and wide-set eyes, bulldogs, French bulldogs and Boston terriers are among the most popular of domestic dog breeds. Now researchers at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine have found the genetic basis for these dogs' appearance, and linked it to a rare inherited syndrome in humans.

16h

How your brain makes you overeat

The brain's reward system releases dopamine when tasting food. Researchers at Max Planck discovered a second dopamine release in the stomach, affecting higher cognitive functions. The more we desire a food, the weaker the second release, which might lead to overeating. None As if losing weight wasn't hard enough. A new study from researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research rev

16h

Donald Trump Finally Has a White House Science Adviser

Senate confirms meteorologist Kelvin Droegemeier to lead the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

An Awkward Beginning to Democratic Control of the House

Updated on January 3 at 4:13 p.m. ET This was not how Democrats expected, much less hoped, to begin their new House majority. After the blue wave crested, ever so slowly, in November, the start of the 116th Congress on Thursday loomed as a moment of potential drama, a Constitutionally-mandated deadline for the party to decide whether to make a generational change in leadership. In the weeks after

16h

Green Flash: The Beautiful and Elusive Sunset Phenomenon

Sometimes, at sunset, the sun appears to suddenly and briefly change color. Blink, and you'll miss it.

17h

Chinese Scientist Who Claimed to Edit Babies' Genes May Be Under House Arrest

This is the first reported sighting of Chinese researcher Jiankui He since his appearance at a conference in November.

17h

Sugar Substitutes May Not Help You Lose Weight, New Review Finds

There's no "compelling evidence" for important health benefits from sugar substitutes, according to the review.

17h

What makes two species different?

For most of the 20th century, scientists believed that the reproductive incompatibility between species evolved gradually as a by-product of adapting to different environments. New Rochester research has shown there are more factors at play — specifically the presence of 'selfish genes,' whose flow among species may dictate whether two species converge or diverge.

17h

The opioid crisis: What we should learn from the AIDS epidemic

There are important lessons to be learned from the successes and failures of the AIDS response that could inform our response to the opioid epidemic. Decades of HIV research have demonstrated that the existence of an effective biomedical treatment is rarely, in and of itself, sufficient to combat an epidemic, suggesting that both a social as well as a biomedical response to the opioid crisis are n

17h

Carrying and releasing nanoscale cargo with 'nanowrappers'

Scientists made hollow nanosized boxes with corner holes, demonstrating how these "nanowrappers" can carry and release DNA-coated nanoparticles.

17h

New insight into the process of generation of new neurons in the adult brain

Researchers have discovered a novel and unexpected function of nestin, the best known marker of neural stem cells.

17h

Why the number of single male Magellanic penguins is rising at this breeding colony

Female Magellanic penguins are more likely to die at sea as juveniles, which has caused a skewed sex ratio of nearly three adult males to every female, as well as population decline of more than 40 percent since 1987 at one of their largest breeding colonies — Punta Tombo in Argentina.

17h

Melting ice sheets release tons of methane into the atmosphere

The Greenland Ice Sheet emits tons of methane according to a new study, showing that subglacial biological activity impacts the atmosphere far more than previously thought.

17h

Radiation doses from CT scans should be more consistent, say experts

Large differences in radiation doses used for CT scans are mainly due to how the scanners are used by medical staff rather than differences in the patients scanned or the machines used, finds a new study.

17h

No compelling evidence for health benefits of non-sugar sweeteners

There is no compelling evidence to indicate important health benefits of non-sugar sweeteners, and potential harms cannot be ruled out, suggests a new review.

17h

The world this week

[no content]

17h

KAL’s cartoon

[no content]

17h

American Immigrants and the Dilemma of ‘White-Sounding’ Names

“As a foreigner in the U.S., since the first day I arrived,” says Xian Zhao, “I have been constantly asking myself this question: Should I adopt an Anglo name?” Zhao, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Toronto, says that his cousin and his aunt changed their name from Pengyuan and Guiqing to Jason and Susan, respectively, upon moving to the U.S. Some of his grad-school peers made similar

17h

Study of zircon crystals casts doubt on evidence for early development of magnetic field

A combined team of researchers from the University of Cambridge and the University of California has found evidence that casts doubt on the use of zircon crystals as evidence of early development of the Earth's magnetic field. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes testing they conducted on the crystals and what they found.

17h

China Makes Historic First Landing on Mysterious Far Side of the Moon

The milestone marks a turning point for China’s space exploration, and may unlock deep secrets of lunar history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

MU69 is the most distant object we’ve ever visited—and it looks like a space snowman

Space New high-res images from New Horizons reveal a very blobby space rock. NASA began 2019 with a bang, when the agency’s New Horizons spacecraft completed a flyby of 2014 MU69, the most distant object ever visited by humans, in the wee hours…

17h

Babies’ Genomes Identify Risks Overlooked by Newborn Screens

A trial called BabySeq, in which researchers performed genomic sequencing on 159 newborns, identified children susceptible to diseases that regular screening doesn’t look for.

17h

An errant editing enzyme promotes tumor suppressor loss and leukemia propagation

UC San Diego researchers have found a stem cell enzyme copy edits more than 20 tumor types, providing new therapeutic target for preventing cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy and radiation.

17h

Sandia microneedles technique may mean quicker diagnoses of major illnesses

Microneedles able to draw relatively large amounts of interstitial fluid — a liquid that lurks just under the skin — opens new possibilities. Previously, microneedles — tiny, hollow, stainless steel needles — have drained tiny amounts of interstitial fluid needed to analyze electrolyte levels but could not draw enough fluid to make more complicated medical tests practical. The new method's lar

17h

Laryngeal symptoms may be caused by cranial nerve 9 and 10 compression at the brain stem

The Laryngoscope, December 24, 2018 issue, reports Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) investigator findings that compression of cranial nerves nine and ten is often responsible for unexplained laryngeal symptoms like chronic cough, vocal fold paralysis and hoarseness. Surgical decompression provided highly effective treatment with surgical patients experiencing significant, long-term impr

17h

DNA design that anyone can do

Researchers at MIT and Arizona State University have designed a computer program that allows users to translate any free-form drawing into a two-dimensional, nanoscale structure made of DNA.

17h

The most important hair on your head is on the inside

Researchers are learning more about how minuscule wavy hairs called cilia in the cavities of your brain keep it healthy and function well.

17h

Newborn genomic sequencing detects unanticipated disease risk factors

In a paper published in the American Journal of Human Genetics, the BabySeq research team reports that genomic sequencing can identify risk for a wide range of disorders that may not be detected otherwise. Importantly, early knowledge about several of these conditions can lead to surveillance and interventions that could improve health outcomes for newborns and their families.

17h

Gut immune cells cut inflammation in multiple sclerosis

Researchers at the University of Toronto and UC San Francisco have discovered that the intestine is the source of immune cells that reduce brain inflammation in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and that increasing the number of these cells blocks inflammation entirely in a preclinical model of the disease.

17h

Experimental treatment shows promise against triple-negative breast cancer

A naturally occurring protein called Tinagl1 reduced the spread of triple-negative breast cancer in a study conducted in mice.

17h

BabySeq project explores impacts of genetic disease testing in newborns

In the era of increasingly common genomic sequencing, an effort called the BabySeq Project aims to explore the medical, behavioral, economic, and ethical impacts of adding genetic testing to the roster of newborn screenings. Some of the first findings from the project are being reported Jan. 3 in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

17h

Obese mice lose anxiety when 'zombie cells' exit their brain

Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators have shown in mice that obesity increases the level of 'zombie' or senescent cells in the brain, and that those cells, in turn, are linked to anxiety. When senolytic drugs are used to clear those cells, the anxious behaviors in the mice dissipate. These findings appear in Cell Metabolism.

17h

Lunar tunes: culture's fascination with the dark side of the moon

From Pink Floyd’s mental hell to the secret lair of space Nazis, artists have striven unceasingly to sketch the side of the moon China’s Chang’e 4 just reached ‘I’ll see you on the dark side of the moon.” These could easily have been the words of the Chinese team behind Chang’e 4, shortly before it set off on its successful journey to the moon’s far side . But as any rock fan will tell you, they

17h

China just landed the first spacecraft on the moon's farside

China’s Chang’e-4 lander and rover just became the first spacecraft to land on the farside of the moon.

17h

Genome sequencing reveals disease risk in otherwise healthy babies

Sequencing the genomes of healthy newborns has helped identify genetic mutations that can result in childhood-onset diseases

17h

Drinking a little after heart failure diagnosis isn’t a problem

People over age 65 with a new heart failure diagnosis can continue to drink moderate amounts of alcohol without worsening their condition, a new study suggests. The study shows a survival benefit for moderate drinkers compared with those who abstained from alcohol. On average, survival for moderate drinkers was just over a year longer than abstainers, a difference that was statistically significa

17h

Trump Calls Wall 'Moral' Because Vatican Has One. So What's Its History?

Any border wall between the United States and Mexico can't be immoral, President Trump said at a Cabinet meeting yesterday (Jan. 2), because the Vatican has one, too.

17h

What predicts teen partner rape?

If teen partner rape could be predicted, it could be better prevented. Social scientists from Michigan State University are helping close that gap by identifying risk factors linked to sexual violence in young women's first relationships in life.

17h

Researchers locate the body's largest cell receptor

A giant toadstool that swallow up vitamins and nutrients in the intestines and kidneys. This is how the receptor, which e.g. absorbs B12 vitamin in the small intestine, looks. For the first time, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have an insight into an as yet unknown biology which has survived hundreds of millions of years during the evolution of life.

17h

How to break bad management habits before they reach the next generation of leaders | Elizabeth Lyle

Companies are counting on their future leaders to manage with more speed, flexibility and trust than ever before. But how can middle managers climb the corporate ladder while also challenging the way things have always been done? Leadership expert Elizabeth Lyle offers a new approach to breaking the rules while you're on your way up, sharing creative ways organizations can give middle managers the

17h

Dangerous powder from lost cargo found on Dutch island (Update)

A bag containing dangerous powder washed up on a small Dutch island on Thursday, a day after some 270 containers tumbled from one of the world's biggest cargo ships in rough weather, as authorities scramble to clean debris-strewn beaches.

18h

Archeological discovery yields clues to how our ancestors may have adapted to their environment

During the Stone Age ancestral humans lived with a variety of animal species along what was an area of wetlands in the middle of the Jordanian desert. The site, in the town of Azraq Basin, has been excavated and has revealed an abundance of tools and animal bones from up to 250,000 years ago, leading to better understanding of how ancestral humans have adapted to this changing environment.

18h

GRAFIK: Sådan burde lastbilstrailer være fastgjort til ulykkestog

En særlig låseanordning sikrer lastbilstrailere fra at blive blæst af godsvogne. Alligevel gik det galt den 2. januar, da en trailer kolliderede med et IC4-tog

18h

Archeological discovery yields clues to how our ancestors may have adapted to their environment

During the Stone Age ancestral humans lived with a variety of animal species along what was an area of wetlands in the middle of the Jordanian desert. The site, in the town of Azraq Basin, has been excavated and has revealed an abundance of tools and animal bones from up to 250,000 years ago, leading to better understanding of how ancestral humans have adapted to this changing environment.

18h

Mayo Clinic discovers biological markers that could guide treatment for prostate cancer

Genetic alterations in low-risk prostate cancer diagnosed by needle biopsy can identify men that harbor higher-risk cancer in their prostate glands, Mayo Clinic has discovered. The research, which is published in the January edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, found for the first time that genetic alterations associated with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer also may be present in some c

18h

Greenland Has Yet Another Methane Leak

As the Arctic warms, melting glaciers could be an underestimated source of the potent greenhouse gas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Why Is Trump Spouting Russian Propaganda?

It was only one moment in a 90-minute stream of madness. President Donald Trump convened a Cabinet meeting, at which he invited all its members to praise him for his stance on the border wall and the government shutdown. There’s always a lively competition to see which member of the Cabinet can grovel most abjectly. The newcomer Matthew Whitaker may be only the acting attorney general, but despit

18h

Why the New Democratic Majority Could Work Better Than the Last

The new Democratic majority that takes command of the House on Thursday starts with 21 fewer seats than the party held the last time it elected Nancy Pelosi as speaker. But this new majority may prove easier for the party to both manage legislatively and defend electorally. Though slightly smaller, the Democratic caucus that’s assuming power is far more ideologically and geographically cohesive t

18h

Researchers suggest missing crust layer can be blamed on 'Snowball Earth'

An international team of researchers has found evidence supporting a theory that suggests a missing crust layer can be blamed on "Snowball Earth." In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes the evidence they found and why they believe it supports their theory.

18h

Snacks on wheels: PepsiCo tests self-driving robot delivery

Forget vending machines, PepsiCo is testing a way to bring snacks directly to college students.

18h

Waning iPhone demand highlights Chinese consumer anxiety

Apple's $1,000 iPhone is a tough sell to consumers in China unnerved by an economic slump and the trade war with the U.S.

18h

Microplastics and plastic additives discovered in ascidians all along Israel's coastline

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that microplastics—tiny pieces of plastic ingested by aquatic life—are present in solitary ascidians all along the Israeli coastline. Ascidians are sac-like marine invertebrate filter feeders. The research also confirmed the presence of plastic additives, i.e. "plasticizers," in ascidians. Plasticizers are substances added to plastics to increase their flexibi

18h

Sustainable choices on palm oil must be easier for consumers, says new study

Consumer goods companies and retailers need to be upfront about where palm oil in their products comes from to relieve consumers of the burden of making sustainable choices.

18h

Video: How baby aspirin saves lives

Low-dose "baby" aspirin is rarely given to children anymore.

18h

Dark matter on the move

Scientists have found evidence that dark matter can be heated up and moved around, as a result of star formation in galaxies. The findings provide the first observational evidence for the effect known as 'dark matter heating', and give new clues as to what makes up dark matter. The research is published today in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

18h

'Bionic face' experiments could lead to new treatment approach for facial paralysis

An implantable neuroprosthetic device may one day provide a new approach to restoring more natural facial movement in patients with one-sided facial paralysis (hemifacial palsy), suggests a study in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

18h

Could this widely used food additive cause celiac disease?

A bacterial enzyme that is used to improve food texture and shelf-life has been linked in several studies to celiac disease — but it is unlabeled and hidden from public knowledge, according to a review published in Frontiers in Pediatrics.

18h

Microplastics and plastic additives discovered in ascidians all along Israel's coastline

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that microplastics — tiny pieces of plastic ingested by aquatic life — are present in solitary ascidians, sac-like marine invertebrate filter feeders, all along the Israeli coastline. The research also confirmed the presence of plastic additives, i.e. 'plasticizers,' in ascidians.

18h

Botulinum toxin reduces chronic migraine attacks, compared to placebo

A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injections in reducing the frequency of chronic migraine headaches, concludes an updated review and analysis in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

18h

Sustainable choices on palm oil must be easier for consumers, says new study

Consumer goods companies and retailers need to be upfront about where palm oil in their products comes from to relieve consumers of the burden of making sustainable choices.That is a key finding of new research from the University of Cambridge (UK). It publishes today in Environmental Research Letters.

18h

Improved treatment for alcohol use disorders, chronic pain, mood disorders

A Purdue University team is making drug discoveries to support millions around the world dealing with alcohol use disorders, chronic pain and mood disorders. They discovered that two peptides — which are naturally metabolic products of Rubisco, a large protein found in many plants like spinach — may aid in the development of new medications.

18h

Egg metabolites in blood related to lower risk of type 2 diabetes

Consumption of one egg every day seems to associate with a blood metabolite profile that is related to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, a new study conducted in the University of Eastern Finland shows. The findings were published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research.

18h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvor mange døre og vinduer skal et soveværelse have?

Et par læsere spørger til soveværelsesindretning. Hvor mange vinduer og døre skal der være, og risikerer man iltmangel, hvis der ikke er åbninger nok. Det svarer Bolius på.

18h

Forskere borer hul til mystisk sø under isen på Antarktis

En sø under isen på Antarktis skal gøre forskere klogere på muligt liv på Mars.

18h

Drug makes sex less painful for women with fibromyalgia

The oral medication gabapentin can reduce pain and increase sexual desire and satisfaction for women with fibromyalgia, research shows. Women with chronic pain or discomfort around the vulva showed improved sexual function with the oral nerve pain medication that people take for pain resulting from previous herpes infection as well as fibromyalgia, according to the study. The study, which was the

18h

Viasat expands Carlsbad headquarters, highlighting tech and beach vibe

Painted on a prominent wall at Viasat's latest headquarters expansion is the phrase, "There is always a better way."

18h

Broken Symmetries review: the art of seeing science afresh

On the 10th of our 12 Days of Culture, artists from CERN’s Collide International Residency show how they tackle the problem of describing science like it is

18h

China in space

China has successfully landed on the far side of the moon, but that is not the limit of its ambitions.

18h

Luminous gamma-ray flare detected from the blazar DA 193

An international group of astronomers has detected an intense and extremely luminous gamma-ray flare from one of high-redshift blazars known as DA 193. The new detection, reported in a paper published December 18 on arXiv.org, is an uncommon finding as such bright flares are rarely observed from high-redshift sources.

18h

In fimo, we trust: Finally a name for the experimental examination of poop

Why, you might ask, do we need a scientifically accurate term based in Latin for the study of poop? The answer is quite simple: because so many scientific words are based in Latin and there hasn't been one for the experimental study of excrement, even though the scientific study of human waste is now at the forefront of biomedical research.

18h

Melting ice sheets release tons of methane into the atmosphere, study finds

The Greenland Ice Sheet emits tons of methane according to a new study, showing that subglacial biological activity impacts the atmosphere far more than previously thought.

18h

Vibration app annoys you to keep phone time in check

Researchers have developed an app that uses negative reinforcement, in the form of persistent smartphone vibrations, to remind users they’ve exceeded their predetermined time limit In his research on college students’ productivity, graduate student Fabian Okeke heard many accounts of time lost to social media, beginning with a click over to Facebook or YouTube for a quick distraction. But the dis

18h

What could Chang'e 4 discover on far side of the moon?

Chang’e 4 will test soil composition, try to grow plants, and listen for traces of Big Bang When we look up at the full moon, we only ever see one face: the “man in the moon” is always gazing back at us. Scientists believe that the far side, eternally hidden from view, may hold the key to fundamental mysteries about the moon’s formation and its earliest history. China’s Chang’e 4 mission could re

18h

What Ails a Woman's Heart

The more we look, the more we find sex differences in cardiovascular disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Pocket-size food scanner

According to a study by the environmental organization WWF Germany, ten million metric tons of food are thrown in the garbage every year in Germany despite still being edible. A mobile food scanner will allow consumers and supermarket operators in the future to test whether food items have gone bad. The pocket-size device uses infrared measurements to determine the ripeness and shelf life of produ

19h

Alvorlig kritik fra Datatilsynet: Kriminalforsorgen slækkede på krav om dataansvar, oplysningspligt og indsigtsret

»Yderst bekymrende og langtfra tilfredsstillende,« lyder ordene i Datatilsynets alvorlige kritik af Kriminalforsorgen.

19h

Optimizing the use of cleaning technologies

We know it from our own homes: bulky kitchen utensils and appliances are difficult to clean. In industry, complex components are more the rule than the exception and present big challenges for the design of cleaning systems. A simulation will be able to help in the future. In the Learning Factory for Industrial Cleaning Technologies, which will open at the end of 2019 at the Fraunhofer Institute f

19h

NUS study finds that severe air pollution affects the productivity of workers

Economists from the National University of Singapore have completed an extensive study which reveals that exposure to air pollution over several weeks is not just unhealthy, it can also reduce employee productivity.

19h

Days following thyroid surgery are highest for risk of readmission

An analysis of nationwide data shows patients with symptoms are most likely to return to the hospital within a week of their thyroid surgery, suggesting avenues for better care.

19h

Fruit flies help to shed light on the evolution of metabolism

Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered that the ability to use sugar as food varies strongly between closely related fruit fly species. They have also identified the genetic basis of this variation. In the future, it will be interesting to explore whether human populations with different dietary histories may respond differently to modern diets rich in sugars.

19h

Disrupted networks link overlapping cognitive deficits in psychiatric disorders

Psychiatric disorders share common alterations of functional connectivity between three core brain networks involved in cognition, according to a meta-analysis published in Biological Psychiatry.

19h

Persistent hot flashes may lead to increased risk of breast cancer

Studies examining the association between vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and breast cancer are not new, but results have been inconsistent. A new larger-scale study concludes that women participating in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) trials who had persistent VMS are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than women who never experienced VMS. Study results are published online today in Meno

19h

A cause of possible genetic problems in mitochondria is revealed

The loss of mitochondrial information and of mitochondria gives rise to defective cell metabolism. As well as the lack of capacity to generate the energy necessary for the cells, the loss of mitochondrial information can generate an increase in oxygen free radicals that attack and damage the genetic material or produce Iron-Sulphur protein deficiencies. All this brings about incorrect cell functio

19h

Dark matter on the move

Scientists have found evidence that dark matter can be heated up and moved around, as a result of star formation in galaxies. The findings provide the first observational evidence for the effect known as 'dark matter heating', and give new clues as to what makes up dark matter.

19h

Want to declutter your life? These apps help you get paid to do it.

DIY Sell, digitize, organize, and clean up your junk. We all manage to accumulate random objects that we never use. These decluttering apps help you take stock of all your stuff and then get rid of the unwanted junk.

19h

Watch: Very Large Telescope uses giant lasers in hunt for black holes

On a mountaintop in Chile sits the world’s most powerful optical telescope, searching for the edge of black holes, and using huge lasers to guide its gaze

19h

Al Gore: America Is Close to a ‘Political Tipping Point’ on Climate Change

Al Gore is mostly done with politics these days. Though he popped up at a campaign stop with Hillary Clinton in 2016, he’s otherwise safely in the very small group of nationally known Democrats not thinking of running for president in 2020. But Gore remains engaged on his signature policy issue: climate change, for which the national political conversation is just starting to catch up to his warn

19h

Clean water for Southern Africa

Over 100 million people in Southern Africa have no access to clean water – many sources in rural areas are contaminated. In the SafeWaterAfrica project, African and European partners are working closely to develop a decentralized system solution for water purification that can be operated and maintained autonomously by rural inhabitants. The system covers the clean water needs of several hundred p

19h

Restored Pompeii gladiator building open to public

A 2,000-year-old building where gladiators trained in Pompeii is now open to visitors, eight years after its collapse following rainfall.

19h

Drop beef and save millions of lives, slash emissions: WEF

Switching from beef to alternative proteins could save millions of lives and dramatically slash greenhouse gas emissions, the World Economic Forum said Thursday.

19h

19h

Who's tougher? Baby sharks or daddy sharks?

It's not just their teeth and jaws that people find intriguing. It's also their funky shapes and unique skeletal makeup that capture attention. Unlike humans and most land animals, sharks have mineralized cartilage skeletons instead of bones. This allows them to move at unbelievable speeds through the water. Since cartilage weighs less than bone and is less dense, sharks can bend, swim, and maneuv

19h

Emotion-reading tech fails the racial bias test

Facial recognition technology has progressed to point where it now interprets emotions in facial expressions. This type of analysis is increasingly used in daily life. For example, companies can use facial recognition software to help with hiring decisions. Other programs scan the faces in crowds to identify threats to public safety.

19h

Get ready for these rocket milestones in 2019

From moon missions to crewed launches, it’s going to be an eventful year for space exploration. Strap yourself in.

19h

Research reveals overweight dogs may live shorter lives

New research from the University of Liverpool and Mars Petcare's WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition reveals overweight dogs are more likely to have shorter lives than those at ideal body weights.

19h

New insight into the process of generation of new neurons in the adult brain

Researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, in collaboration with research groups in Finland, Canada, and Slovenia, have discovered a novel and unexpected function of nestin, the best known marker of neural stem cells.

19h

Who's tougher? Baby sharks or daddy sharks?

One would assume that since humans and many animals tend to get stiffer and perhaps tougher as they reach adulthood, the same would be true for sharks. A new study finds the opposite in these swift-swimming marine predators. The youngest sharks were stiffer and tougher than older sharks. Another key finding is that while scientists have historically looked at alternating patterns of mineralization

19h

See invisible into HER catalysis

Chinese scientists makes a big step forward in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from water electrolysis! They put forward a powerful solution by revealing the secrets of catalytic processes via synchrotron radiation, the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) announced on Jan 1st, 2019.

19h

Why the number of single male Magellanic penguins is rising at this breeding colony

Female Magellanic penguins are more likely to die at sea as juveniles, which has caused a skewed sex ratio of nearly three adult males to every female, as well as population decline of more than 40 percent since 1987 at one of their largest breeding colonies — Punta Tombo in Argentina.

19h

Major tsunami struck southern China in 1076, say scientists

A major tsunami struck China's southern coast in 1076 causing "drastic cultural decline", Chinese researchers say, in a study with implications for a densely populated region boasting multiple coastal nuclear power plants.

19h

How climate change caused the world's first empire to collapse

Gol-e-Zard Cave lies in the shadow of Mount Damavand, which at more than 5,000 metres dominates the landscape of northern Iran. In this cave, stalagmites and stalactites are growing slowly over millennia and preserve in them clues about past climate events. Changes in stalagmite chemistry from this cave have now linked the collapse of the Akkadian Empire to climate changes more than 4,000 years ag

19h

372,000 German drivers join legal action against Volkswagen

Some 372,000 German owners of Volkswagen cars fitted with motors that cheated emissions tests have joined a collective legal action against the auto giant, official figures showed Thursday.

19h

How Does a 'Martian'-Style Gravity Assist Actually Work?

It's basically a perfectly elastic collision, like two bouncy balls colliding.

19h

Bereaved people unconsciously suppress thoughts of lost loved ones

Brain scanning has revealed that grieving people can actively suppress thoughts of a dead relative without realising that they are doing it

19h

Glassy carbon microneedles: A new transdermal drug delivery device

Microneedles are designed to infuse medications transdermally (through the skin) and relatively painlessly during clinical applications. In a recent study, Richa Mishra and her colleagues developed a new technique to convert polymer films into a fracture-resistant glassy form of carbon to develop microneedles. The optimized transdermal drug delivery device was fabricated using photolithography to

19h

Drugmaker Bristol-Myers Squibb says to buy Celgene in $74bn deal

New York-based pharmaceutical giant Bristol-Myers Squibb announced Thursday it will buy US biotech firm Celgene in a massive $74 billion cash and stock deal to create a specialized biopharma company.

19h

Post-millennial entrepreneurs view higher education as vital to their startups

Today's college students – dubbed Generation Z – are beginning to make their mark on the workplace with a distinctly unconventional and often irreverent approach to problem-solving. In my day-to-day interactions with our students, I find that this group doesn't only ask "Why?" they ask "How can I fix that?" And their curiosity, independence, energy and assertiveness are transforming the entreprene

19h

Scrubbing Carbon from the Sky

Can we remove enough CO2 from the atmosphere to slow or even reverse climate change? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Study: Technology and doctors combine to detect patients who don't take their pills

Almost everyone does it at some point — skip a dose of a medication, decide to not schedule a recommended follow-up appointment or ignore doctor's orders to eat or exercise differently. Such nonadherence can seem harmless on an individual level, but costs the U.S. health care system billions of dollars a year. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown how to best identify nonadherent patients, co

19h

Why microbeads are such a threat and why they're so hard to handle

Plastic is everywhere. It is used across a spectrum of applications from durable industrial equipment, household appliances to throw-away single-use items and even the clothes we wear. This wide scope of uses is ascribed to its versatility, low-cost and because it's extremely durable.

20h

How do hair follicles get their start?

Researchers have discovered how hair follicles emerge from seemingly uniform skin cells during embryonic development. The discovery could lead to strategies for regenerating lost hair follicles in adults. To gain insight into early hair follicle development, the researchers combined the study of genetically engineered mouse models with single-cell RNA methods to examine the molecular and cellular

20h

Havariundersøger: »Vi undersøger alle dele …også kongetappen«

Vragdele fra ulykken på Storebæltsbroen hober sig op hos Havarikommissionen midt i en tidskrævende opgave med at registrere alt.

20h

Human error major driver of food waste

Human errors caused by a lack of standardised procedures and insufficient training are the major drivers behind loss in food manufacturing, a new study has found.

20h

How can we use the National Climate Assessment to prepare for climate change?

Every four years, the National Climate Assessment evaluates the state of climate science and the impact of climate change in the U.S., now and into the future. The most recent NCA was released on Black Friday, and although the Trump Administration has done its best to ignore it, many cities, states, businesses, and local communities are ready to take action on climate change—and they're wondering

20h

A cause of possible genetic problems in mitochondria is revealed

A group of researchers from the Andalusian Centre for Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (CABIMER) has revealed the importance of eliminating any excess of defective products that might have accumulated in the mitochondria, as its presence generates mitochondrial instability and information loss on the mitochondrial genome. The study offers new ways to understand the molecular basis of so

20h

Dangerous sneaker waves puzzle scientists

On January 16, 2016, a sudden swath of large and powerful waves swept through seaside communities along 450 kilometers (280 miles) of Pacific Northwest coastline. From Washington to northern California, water rushed past normal tide lines and filled beaches and streets, stretching hundreds of meters inland.

20h

Researchers survey beachgoers on potential implications for offshore wind farms

As the United States moves closer to developing offshore wind farms, one of the most important questions for coastal communities is how those wind farms are going to affect recreation and tourism.

20h

Floating parks made from plastic waste could unite communities to tackle pollution

The equivalent of one truck of plastic waste is dumped into the ocean every minute, but what if it could be caught and removed before it drifted out to sea? One such solution, called the Recycled Park Project, is being floated in Rotterdam. Developed over the last five years, the idea is turning plastic waste into islands.

20h

Carrying and releasing nanoscale cargo with "nanowrappers"

This holiday season, scientists at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)—a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory—have wrapped a box of a different kind. Using a one-step chemical synthesis method, they engineered hollow metallic nanosized boxes with cube-shaped pores at the corners and demonstrated how these "nanowrappers" can be used t

20h

Elon Musk is wrong. Working extremely long hours doesn't make you better at your job.

Science Our culture celebrates long work days, but they don't make us more productive. It’s a counterintuitive result to mention today, particularly in a culture that rewards a burn-the-midnight-oil, work-until-you-drop mentality. But over a century of…

20h

Stop vandtyveri: Brandhaner kobles på internettet

Nye bevægelsessensorer registrerer brugen af brandhaner i Skanderborg. Det er bare første skridt i udviklingen af nye Internet of Things-løsninger i vandsektoren der udklækkes i Skanderborg

20h

The Best Skin-Care Trick Is Being Rich

As a longtime resident of New York City, I’ve developed a little game I play when I’m alone in one of Manhattan’s especially ritzy neighborhoods: “Famous or Just Rich?” To play, all you have to do is notice a person and try to decide if they’ve caught your eye because they’re famous. It will feel as if they’re famous. But more often than not, it’ll just be a regular person who looks like a celebr

20h

Revisiting the Deep Sense of Place in Alice Munro’s Debut, 50 Years Later

On December 21, 1968, writing in the Winnipeg Free Press , the reviewer William Morgan starts out admiring of Alice Munro’s debut story collection. He says that the author, in her fictitious small towns, creates a “strange mixture of physical freedom and emotional claustrophobia.” By the end of that review, however, those same features will come to annoy him. Morgan laments that the “characters a

20h

Quantifying the Holocaust: Measuring murder rates during the Nazi genocide

Even though the Holocaust is one of the best documented genocides in a historical sense, there is surprisingly little quantitative dataavailable, even on major critical events.

20h

Sociologists ensure water equity flows near and far

Will there be enough water for everyone in the near future? Water equity affects us all and is one of the 21st century's key environmental justice issues. While people may look to CSU's engineers and watershed scientists for answers, the Department of Sociology also has an important role in ensuring water quality and access.

20h

Image of the Day: In Sync

At playtime together, parents' brain activity mimics that of their infant children.

20h

The 25 Movies We Already Can’t Wait to See in 2019

From 'Avengers: Endgame' to 'It: Chapter 2' and from a Scorsese epic to ensemble dramas, there's a lot to look forward to this year.

20h

New App Helps People Remember Faces

An app could help those with face blindness but has raised concerns among privacy experts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Research reveals overweight dogs may live shorter lives

New research from the University of Liverpool and Mars Petcare's WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition reveals overweight dogs are more likely to have shorter lives than those at ideal body weights.

21h

Germany’s Leading Magazine Published Falsehoods About American Life

The word spiegel means “mirror” in German, and since its postwar founding, Der Spiegel has proudly held a mirror up to the world. When the magazine published top-secret information about the dire state of West Germany’s armed forces in 1962, the government accused it of treason, raided its offices, and arrested its editors. The resulting “ Spiegel affair ” led to mass demonstrations against polic

21h

New discovery is big on nanoscale

Imagine if you could look at a small amount of an unidentified chemical element – less than 100 atoms in size – and know what type of material the element would become in large quantities before you actually saw the larger accumulation.

21h

Microneedles technique may mean quicker diagnoses of major illnesses

When people are in the early stages of an undiagnosed disease, immediate tests that lead to treatment are the best first steps. But a blood draw—usually performed by a medical professional armed with an uncomfortably large needle—might not be quickest, least painful or most effective method, according to new research.

21h

250 years after Captain Cook's arrival, we still can't be sure how many Māori lived in Aotearoa at the time

Two hundred and fifty years ago this year, James Cook's ship the Endeavour arrived off the eastern coast of New Zealand. The following circumnavigation marked the beginning of ongoing European contact with the indigenous population, and eventually mass British immigration from 1840.

21h

Melting ice sheets release tons of methane into the atmosphere, study finds

The Greenland Ice Sheet emits tons of methane according to a new study, showing that subglacial biological activity impacts the atmosphere far more than previously thought.

21h

China Makes 1st-Ever Landing on Moon's Mysterious Far Side

China's robotic Chang'e 4 mission touched down inside the huge South Pole-Aitken basin Wednesday (Jan. 2), pulling off the first-ever soft landing on the largely unexplored lunar far side.

21h

Code-Name 'Corona': Earliest Spy-Satellite Images Reveal Secrets of Ancient Middle East

Images captured by the United States' first spy satellites have a new audience: scientists.

21h

This 2,300-Year-Old Egyptian Fortress Had an Unusual Task: Guarding a Port That Sent Elephants to War

The enormous fortress was constructed at a time when Egypt was ruled by the Ptolemies, a dynasty of pharaohs descended from one of Alexander the Great's generals.

21h

Photos: 2,300-Year-Old Fortress Discovered Along the Red Sea

The fortress would have protected a port that was used to transport war elephants.

21h

The number of single male Magellanic penguins is rising at this breeding colony—here's why

Like most of their stout-bodied, flippered kin, Magellanic penguins spend much of their lives in the ocean. From late autumn through winter and into spring in the Southern Hemisphere, these South American penguins swim off the coast of southern Brazil, Uruguay and northern Argentina in search of anchovies, sardines and squid.

21h

Pre-Medicare years bring health insurance worries for many, U-M/AARP poll finds

With the dawn of a new year, most Americans have just started a new health insurance coverage period — whether they receive their coverage through a job, buy it themselves or have a government plan. But a new national poll suggests that many people in their 50s and early 60s harbor serious worries about their health insurance status, now and in the future.

21h

Want to thwart climate change? Here are 8 steps you can take

Now that the New Year's Eve party is over, it's time to lay off the balloons and glitter – both are scourges to the environment.

21h

How to End Government Shutdowns, Forever

As the third government shutdown of the Donald Trump presidency drags on, the miserable effects are piling up. Federal workers, hundreds of thousands of whom are furloughed, are struggling to pay their bills and picking up temporary gigs to make ends meet; the Office of Personnel Management has encouraged them to bargain with their creditors and offer to do chores for their landlords. Contractors

21h

Is It Netflix’s Turn in the Barrel?

The stock market, at least, values Netflix like a technology company. Its streaming service does send content over the internet after all. But as the tech industry has been publicly flogged for the past several years, Netflix has only burnished its brand, with tech workers , Millennials , and the general public . Two recent stories suggest that Netflix may not stay outside the critic zone forever

21h

How a Feel-Good AI Story Went Wrong in Flint

M ore than a thousand days after the water problems in Flint, Michigan, became national news, thousands of homes in the city still have lead pipes, from which the toxic metal can leach into the water supply. To remedy the problem, the lead pipes need to be replaced with safer, copper ones. That sounds straightforward, but it is a challenge to figure out which homes have lead pipes in the first pl

21h

VW's Mobile Chargers Could Help EVs Conquer the World

These behemoths hold enough juice for 15 electric cars, and are meant to supplement areas with sub-par charging networks.

21h

Carnival Medallion Cruises Now Overlay Personalized Avatars

The world’s largest cruise company has developed a ship-wide location-tracking platform that provides you with a personalized digital cruise experience.

21h

Probiotics don’t help puking kids, two large trials suggest

Parents might want to spend their money on ginger ale and Jell-O instead.

21h

World’s most powerful telescope takes us to the edge of a black hole

On a desert mountain in Chile, a mega telescope is peering over the event horizon of a black hole – the aim is to test Einstein's theories to the limit

21h

The space race is back on – and is China in the lead? | Mary Dejevsky

With its Chang’e 4 landing, China has eclipsed US and Russian achievements. Expect them to take fresh interest in the moon China’s achievement in landing a spacecraft on the far side of the moon , announced by Beijing’s state media this morning, has ramifications that go far beyond the simple statement of this being a “first” for mankind. It puts China on the map of international space exploration

21h

Researchers simulate focusing effect of traveling ionospheric disturbances on solar dynamic spectra

Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are among the Earth's ionosphere irregularities. They represent wave-like electron density structures propagating in the ionosphere. The motion of TIDs modulates the electron density distribution in space. It leads to a modification of plasma parameters, namely the refractive index, and affects the propagation of radio waves. In particular cases, the varia

21h

Who You Gonna Call? The Firebusters!

An international team of teens is working on ways to fight wildfires made worse by climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

The Dark Magic of Mary Poppins Returns

The 2013 film Saving Mr. Banks is the story of tragedy as much as it is the story of magic. Nominally the tale of the genesis of Mary Poppins , the 1964 movie, the film is also a biopic by another means: an exploration of the childhood of P. L. Travers, the author of the Mary Poppins book series that informed the iconic Disney film. Mary Poppins , Saving Mr. Banks suggests, was rooted in sadness:

22h

22h

You asked: To Go Bare Down There?

Many women do it, but it is important to understand the risks of pubic hair removal before you do.

22h

Fetal sharks may look for food by swimming around inside their mothers

Tawny nurse shark fetuses have been discovered swimming from one uterus to another inside their mothers, likely looking for undeveloped eggs to eat

22h

Humans take psychedelics. Should robots?

The illegal status of psychedelic substances is a terrible thing, says Ben Goertzel. With everything happening behind closed doors, our societies are not developing the right set of cultural institutions to guide people in the productive use of psychedelics. Once scientists have mastered artificial general intelligence (AGI), the psychedelic experience could be engineered for the modern world – i

22h

23h

Kinesisk rover landet på bagsiden af Månen

Kl. 3.26 i nat landede den kinesiske rumsonde Chang’e 4 på Månens bagside med en rover om bord. Det er første gang i historien, at et fartøj bevæger sig derom.

23h

China’s Chang’e 4 makes historic first landing on the moon’s far side

A lander and rover have touched down on the side of the moon that never faces Earth. The Chang’e 4 mission marks the first time anyone has explored the far side

23h

1d

'Dark side' of the moon: China's Chang'e 4 probe makes historic landing – video explainer

A Chinese spacecraft has made the first landing on the far side of the moon, touching down in the South Pole-Aitken basin. The mission aims to take detailed measurements of the moon’s terrain and mineral composition Chang'e 4 landing: China probe makes historic touchdown on far side of the moon Continue reading…

1d

China Becomes First Country To Land On Far Side Of Moon, State Media Announce

Lunar lander Chang'e 4 successfully touched down on Thursday morning. China's Xinhua News published a photo it says was taken by the probe "on the never-visible side of the moon." (Image credit: Imaginechina via AP)

1d

Ice from the Alps reveals Europeans ditched gold for silver in AD 660

The people of north-west Europe embraced a silver currency instead of gold in the seventh century, and this may have fuelled a post-Roman economic boom

1d

Apple cuts outlook, sees 'challenges' in China, emerging markets

Apple cut its revenue outlook for the latest quarter Wednesday, citing steeper-than-expected "economic deceleration" in China and emerging markets.

1d

Could Tesla price cuts mean demand is slowing?

Tesla made about 9,300 more vehicles than it delivered last year, raising concerns among industry analysts that inventory is growing as demand for the company's electric cars may be starting to wane.

1d

China lands probe on far side of moon in world first

A Chinese lunar rover landed on the far side of the moon on Thursday, in a global first that boosts Beijing's ambitions to become a space superpower.

1d

Extraordinary treefrog discovered in the Andes of Ecuador

A new treefrog species was discovered during a two-week expedition to a remote tabletop mountain at Cordillera del Cóndor, a largely unexplored range in the eastern Andes.

1d

Physicists uncover new competing state of matter in superconducting material

A team of experimentalists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and theoreticians at University of Alabama Birmingham discovered a remarkably long-lived new state of matter in an iron pnictide superconductor, which reveals a laser-induced formation of collective behaviors that compete with superconductivity.

1d

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image