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nyheder2019januar04

A mathematical approach for understanding intra-plant communication

A team of researchers at the Gran Sasso Science Institute (GSSI) and Istituto Italiano di Technologia (IIT) have devised a mathematical approach for understanding intra-plant communication. In their paper, pre-published on bioRxiv, they propose a fully coupled system of non-linear, non-autonomous discontinuous and ordinary differential equations that can accurately describe the adapting behavior a

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Tidligere chef-operatør: Vi havde en lignende ulykke med godstog

PLUS. Den svenske jernbaneoperatør Hector Rail oplevede for fem år siden et uheld, der på flere måder minder om ulykken på Storebælt, fortæller tidligere chef.

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Fungi cause brain infection and impair memory in mice

Researchers report that the fungus Candida albicans can cross the blood-brain barrier and trigger an inflammatory response that results in the formation of granuloma-type structures and temporary mild memory impairments in mice.

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LATEST

Where will the world's next Zika, West Nile or Dengue virus come from?

Scientists from the University of California, Davis, have identified wildlife species that are the most likely to host flaviviruses such as Zika, West Nile, dengue and yellow fever. They created a global flavivirus hotspot map from their findings.

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The Titan Games Isn’t About Bodies—It’s About Minds

“This. Is. Awesome .” A commentator on The Titan Games , watching Spandex-clad humans engaged in feats of superhuman strength, channeled the same, simple thing I’d been thinking while viewing the premiere of the show on Thursday evening: It was awesome. And NBC’s latest entry in the expanding category of televised muscletainment was especially compelling the way I’d happened to experience it. Ear

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Parker's Gravel Test for Gold | Gold Rush

Despite Parker's skepticism, Dean believes there's enough gold in the gravel to make money. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discov

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The Samsung Space Monitor Liberates Your Desk

By sitting flush against the wall when you don't need it, and tilting any which way when you do, the Space Monitor adds some Marie Kondo to your workspace.

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Laser-Blasted Plasma Is Colder Than Deep Space…Literally

Laser-cooled plasma has all the chill.

20min

Why ‘Mandarin’ Doesn’t Come From Chinese

Since the mandarin duck appeared in Central Park last fall, his unexpected presence has stirred up many questions: Where did he come from? Why is he so hot? Can such beauty survive in our garbage world? And, for the linguistics nerds out there, where do mandarin ducks get their name? Yes, true, mandarin ducks are native to China, where Mandarin is the official language. But the word “mandarin” ha

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Men and women need different glioblastoma treatments

Scientists have identified distinct molecular signatures of the deadly brain tumor glioblastoma based on sex. The discovery suggests tailoring treatment for men and women may offer a way to improve survival. For decades, scientists have recognized that more men die from many types of cancer, including glioblastoma, and say the new findings may explain the disparities in patients’ response to trea

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Skanning kan spare mænd for risikabel kræft-undersøgelse

Ny teknik for undersøgelse af prostatakræft kan sikre op til 30 procent færre nålebiopsier.

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Nutritional status in adolescent girls

In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health, Smitha Malenahalli Chandrashekarappa et al. consider socio-demographic variables that might be contributing to malnutrition in the age group between 16-19 years (late adolescence).

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Predictors of successfully quitting smoking among smokers registered at the quit smoking clinic at a public hospital in northeastern Malaysia

In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health, Nur Izzati Mohammad et al. consider how cigarette smoking is one of the risk factors leading to noncommunicable diseases such as cardiovascular and respiratory system diseases and cancer.

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Relationship between glycemic control and family support among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus seen in a rich kinship network in Southwest Nigeria

In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health, Nnenna A. Osuji et al. describe how Nigeria and other sub-Saharan African countries are currently experiencing a rapid increase in the incidence of noncommunicable diseases, especially diabetes mellitus (DM), as a result of increasing urbanization and changing lifestyles.

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Study shows the brains of people with schizophrenia-related disorders aren't all the same

A new multi-site brain imaging study in The American Journal of Psychiatry shows that sub-groups of people use their brains differently when imitating emotional faces — a task that reflects their ability to interact socially. Interestingly, individuals with schizophrenia do not have categorically different social brain function than those without mental illness, but fall into different sub-groups

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Comprehensive AIDS prevention programs in prisons: A review study

In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 4, 2018; DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0118: , Somayeh Zare et al. discuss how studies show that suitable design of educational programs can affect prisoners' awareness of AIDS.

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Efficiency of community health centers in China during 2013-2015

In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 4, 2018; DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0119, Lin Zhao et al. evaluate of the efficiency of CHCs in China at the national and regional level.

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Factors associated with visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure in hypertensive patients at a Primary Health Care Service, Tabanan, Bali, Indonesia

In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 4, 2018; DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0124, Gusti Ayu Riska Pertiwi et al. provide an overview of visit-to-visit variability (VVV) in hypertension blood pressure management in a primary health care service setting.

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The long memory of the Pacific Ocean

Cold waters that sank in polar regions hundreds of years ago during the Little Ice Age are still impacting deep Pacific Ocean temperature trends. While the deep Pacific temperature trends are small, they represent a large amount of energy in the Earth system.

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Computers can be a real pain in the neck

Many people slouch or strain their necks while working at the computer. A new study by San Francisco State University researchers shows how jutting the head forward to read more closely compresses the neck and leads to neck and shoulder problems.

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How the Partial Government Shutdown Is Hampering Climate Efforts

Travel and research by scientists with NASA, NOAA and the EPA is being impacted — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Trump-Centric Case for Jim Webb as Defense Secretary

Last night I mentioned the latest Trump-appointment rumor: that the successor at the Pentagon to James Mattis, Marine Corps combat veteran and retired four-star general, might be James Webb, Marine Corps combat veteran and, among other distinctions, a former secretary of the Navy in a Republican administration and U.S. senator as a Democrat. My argument was that it would be good for the country i

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What does 'dead' mean?

Marking the 50-year legacy of a landmark Harvard report on brain death, a new special report published by The Hastings Center examines lingering questions about the definition of death, implications for organ transplantation, and lessons from the case of Jahi McMath.

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Gut microbiome in digestive health: a new frontier in research

Research on the gut microbiome is one of the most promising areas of science today. In a new special issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) has taken the deep-dive into the gut microbiome that both scientists and the public are looking for to help them better understand the effects of the microbiome on health and disease. Clinical Gast

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How baby aspirin saves lives (video)

Low-dose 'baby' aspirin is rarely given to children anymore. Instead, people at risk of a heart attack may take a daily aspirin to decrease their risk. In this video, Reactions explains how low-dose aspirin works to inhibit blood clotting and help prevent heart attacks.

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To boldly go into my neighbour’s garden | Brief letters

Clive Lewis’s ‘wafer-thin’ majority | A miniature Christmas Carol | Positive news, please | Hope, Derbyshire | Pennsylvania, Gloucestershire | Moon landing Your article on the Labour MP Clive Lewis ( ‘Switch to green lifestyles must start now’ , 2 January) refers to his Norwich South majority prior to 2017 as “wafer-thin”. It was in fact 7,654 in 2015 . I was canvassing as the Green party candidat

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Recurrent miscarriage linked to faulty sperm

Multiple miscarriages may be linked to the poor quality of a man's sperm, suggests new research.

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ADHD drugs are unlikely to cause cardiac damage in children who take them, study finds

The results of a long-term NIH-funded study published last month could allay concerns that ADHD drugs can cause cardiac damage in children.

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New Ultima Thule discoveries from NASA's New Horizons

Data from NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, which explored Kuiper Belt object Ultima Thule earlier this week, is yielding scientific discoveries daily.

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In fimo, we trust: Finally a name for the experimental examination of excrement

To study gut bacteria, scientists focus much of their attention on excrement, which is teeming with bacteria that used to live in the gastrointestinal tract; for the sake of scientific accuracy, this experimental poop has needed a name, and now it has one.

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Tech's big gadget show edges closer to gender equity

The world's largest tech conference has apparently learned a big lesson about gender equity.

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Plant hedges to combat near-road pollution exposure

Urban planners should plant hedges, or a combination of trees with hedges—rather than just relying on roadside trees—if they are to most effectively reduce pollution exposure from cars in near-road environments, finds a new study from the University of Surrey.

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Navy engineer gets New Year's Day patent for dual mode slotted antenna

On New Year's Day, 2019, Navy engineer David A. Tonn received his twenty-eighth U.S. patent, according to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

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Montana State research shows gut microbiome protects against acute arsenic toxicity

Doctoral candidate Michael Coryell's research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the gut microbiome is essential for full protection against acute arsenic poisoning.

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Plant hedges to combat near-road pollution exposure

Urban planners should plant hedges, or a combination of trees with hedges — rather than just relying on roadside trees — if they are to most effectively reduce pollution exposure from cars in near-road environments, finds a new study.

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Revealing hidden spin: Unlocking new paths toward high-temperature superconductors

Researchers have discovered that electron spin is key to understanding how cuprate superconductors can conduct electricity without loss at high temperature.

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Forest soundscapes monitor conservation efforts inexpensively, effectively

Recordings of the sounds in tropical forests could unlock secrets about biodiversity and aid conservation efforts around the world, according to a new article.

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A model for describing the hydrodynamics of crowds

By studying the movement of runners at the start of marathons, researchers have just shown that the collective movements of these crowds can be described as liquid flows. The flows observed before a 2016 race in Chicago subsequently helped predict those of thousands of runners in the starting corral of the 2017 Paris marathon.

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Discovery in cell development changes understanding of how genes shape early embryos

Until now, it was unclear how this DNA packing affected development in early embryos. Researchers found that in mouse embryos — only eight days after fertilization — compacted regions along the genome increase at protein-coding genes.

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Next up: Ultracold simulators of super-dense stars

Physicists have created the world's first laser-cooled neutral plasma. The research opens a frontier where experimental atomic and plasma physicists can coax matter to behave in bizarre new ways.

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How common are food allergies?

Survey data suggest at least one in 10 US adults are food allergic and nearly one in five believe they have a food allergy. Food allergies are expensive and potentially life-threatening conditions. In this nationally representative survey study of more than 40,000 US adults, nearly half of food-allergic adults developed allergies during adulthood, many reported being allergic to multiple foods, an

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Study examines association between prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs and ADHD in children

This study examined whether prenatal exposure to valproate and other antiepileptic drugs was associated with increased risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. More than 913,000 children in Denmark were included in the observational study, and exposure to antiepileptic drugs was defined as pregnancies where mothers redeemed one or more prescriptions for the medications.

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Holocaust survivors had higher rates of chronic conditions, lower rates of death

Holocaust survivors had higher rates of chronic conditions but lower rates of death than a comparison group of individuals insured by the same healthcare services organization in Israel. Biological and psychosocial reasons that may help to explain the findings need more study but researchers suggest unique characteristics of resilience among Holocaust survivors and better health literacy may be am

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One in 10 adults in US has food allergy, but nearly 1 in 5 think they do

Over 10 percent of adults in the US — over 26 million — are estimated to have food allergy.

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Toads on a python, and five other animals hitching rides on bigger animals

Animals Giddy up! This week, heavy rains and flooding in Australia flushed a small army of cane toads out of their burrows. In an attempt to escape rising waters, 10 of those toads…

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Half of people who think they have a food allergy do not – study

US study finds some people needlessly avoid foods while others do not have life-saving medication The number of adults who think they have a food allergy is almost double the figure who actually have one, research has revealed. While the study was conducted in the US, experts say a similar situation is also seen in other countries, including the UK. The researchers found that many people with an

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Trump Is Making It Easier to Get Away With Discrimination

The Trump administration stands ready to fulfill a longstanding dream of insurance companies, big banks, and many conservative legal scholars: making it safe to enact policies that are neutral in theory, but which have unequal effects in practice. On Thursday, The Washington Post reported that the administration intends to roll back regulations that bar discrimination on the basis of “disparate i

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Ingeniør skal stå i spidsen for stormomsust A-kasse

Akademikernes A-kasse har netop valgt IDA-formand Thomas Damkjær Petersen som ny formand. En af hans første opgaver bliver ansættelsen af en ny direktør »som ikke slår ud med armene,« lyder det fra den nyvalgte A-kasseformand.

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Self-cleaning spacesuits could help astronauts cope with Martian dust

Mars and the Moon are covered in abrasive dust that will stick to and shred spacesuits – but not if those spacesuits are made using non-stick carbon nanotube-based materials

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The secrets of learning a new language | Lýdia Machová

Want to learn a new language but feel daunted or unsure where to begin? You don't need some special talent or a "language gene," says Lýdia Machová. In an upbeat, inspiring talk, she reveals the secrets of polyglots (people who speak multiple languages) and shares four principles to help unlock your own hidden language talent — and have fun while doing it.

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Plant hedges to combat near-road pollution exposure

Urban planners should plant hedges, or a combination of trees with hedges — rather than just relying on roadside trees — if they are to most effectively reduce pollution exposure from cars in near-road environments, finds a new study from the University of Surrey.

2h

Recurrent miscarriage linked to faulty sperm

Multiple miscarriages may be linked to the poor quality of a man's sperm, suggests new research.

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Genetic testing does not cause undue worry for breast cancer patients

As genetic testing for breast cancer has become more complex, evaluating a panel of multiple genes, it introduces more uncertainty about the results. But a new study finds that newer, more extensive tests are not causing patients to worry more about their cancer risk.

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Historical cooling periods are still playing out in the deep Pacific

Researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Harvard University have found that the deep Pacific Ocean lags a few centuries behind in terms of temperature and is still adjusting to the advent of the Little Ice Age. Whereas most of the ocean is responding to modern warming, the deep Pacific may be cooling.

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Walking and howling with wolves

The Travel Show's Christa Larwood takes two wolves for a stroll and learns how to howl with them.

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The Books Briefing: To All the Books I’ve Yet to Read

Whether your resolutions for 2019 involve tackling your most persistent demons or simply finishing all the books you’ve started, the new year is a good time to turn over a new leaf. John Kaag finds an antidote to both modern ennui and self-improvement platitudes in the epigraph of Friedrich Nietzsche’s graduate dissertation, while Karen Swallow Prior writes that the very process of thoughtful rea

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Hackers have leaked personal details of hundreds of German politicians

A significant data breach has exposed the personal information of chancellor Angela Merkel along with hundreds of other German politicians

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Chinese Spacecraft Lands On Far Side Of The Moon

Chinese scientists have landed a spacecraft on the far side of the moon. Rachel Martin speaks with Brown University planetary scientist James Head about whether it is a big milestone.

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BU's service-learning initiative to teach hands-only CPR to high school students is successful

PumpStart, a community service-learning program created by students at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), that teaches hands-only CPR to the general public, is effective for both teaching high school students a life-saving skill and providing medical students with an opportunity to engage in public health and medical education.

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How Comments Became the Best Part of Instagram

When Ashley, a 16-year-old who asked to be referred to by a pseudonym, scrolls through Instagram, her eyes barely skim the photos and videos that take up the majority of space in her feed. She double-taps anything she sees from her close friends, but the main thing she cares about is the comments below each pic. “Comments are the easiest to communicate. It’s just the easiest way to find people wi

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Fairy Tales for Young Socialists

Two years into Donald Trump’s presidency, some progressive parents (and savvy publishers) have turned to children’s books as a kind of palliative political education for the young during uneasy times. Among the recent offerings in this vein, there’s Jill Twiss’s A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo , a defense of same-sex marriage and a satire of the children’s book written by Charlotte Pence, the v

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Targeting ‘slowpoke’ molecule gives aging worms gusto

New research reveals a cause of motor function decline and increased frailty in aging worms—and suggests a way to slow it down. As reported in Science Advances , targeting a specific molecule improves motor function in worms. The findings indicate that similar pathways could work in aging mammals, researchers say. As humans and animals age, our motor functions progressively deteriorate. Millimete

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Obsessive compulsive symptoms in youth may be a red flag for other psychological issues

Engaging in repetitive and ritualistic behaviors is part of typical child development. However, behaviors that develop into obsessive and compulsive symptoms may represent a red flag for serious psychiatric conditions.

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Ravenmaster Christopher Skaife Tells of His Relationships with the Tower of London's Resident Birds

His job is for the avians — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fewer affected in Marriott hack, but passports a red flag

Fewer Marriott guest records than previously feared were compromised in a massive data breach, but the largest hotel chain in the world confirmed Friday that approximately 5.25 million unencrypted passport numbers were accessed.

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The best way to pack up your holiday decorations so your future self doesn't hate you

DIY Avoid detangling duty next year. If you simply toss your holiday decorations in a closet, you’ll have to detangle them next Christmas. Here’s how to pack them neatly and simplify setup for next year.

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Chang'e-4: Chinese rover now exploring Moon

A Chinese robotic rover is getting its wheels dirty after rolling off its landing craft and onto the lunar surface.

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Bluetooth implant uses light to ease overactive bladder

A soft, implantable device can detect over-activity in the bladder and then use light from tiny, biointegrated LEDs to tamp down the urge to urinate. The device works in laboratory rats and could one day help people who suffer incontinence bypass the need for medication or electronic stimulators, researchers say. Overactive bladder, pain, burning, and a frequent need to urinate are common and dis

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Strategies to keep students and teachers from dropping out of school

America's schools are in a state of crisis. By the end of the day, 7,000 students will have dropped out of high school, or just over 1 million every year. Meanwhile, 40 percent of teachers will leave the profession within five years, resulting in an increasingly dire shortage of qualified instructors.

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Danmarks Tekniske Museum vil rykke til Svanemølleværket

Danmarks Tekniske Museum, der i dag ligger i Helsingør, har planer om at flytte til Københavns Nordhavn i 2023.

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Researchers reveal new mechanism to 'activate' the immune system against cancer

A new mechanism for activating the immune system against cancer cells allows immune cells to detect and destroy cancer cells better than before, and most effectively in lung cancer and melanoma.

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A new hope in treating neurodegenerative disease

Korean researchers have clarified the fundamentals of coiled toxin protein which causes neurodegenerative brain disorders. The result is expected to speed the development of treatment for neurodegenerative disorder.

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Eating your veggies, even in space

Travelling to Mars will require astronauts to grow their own food. The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) is creating the planters for cultivating veggies in space. Now that researchers have finished lettuce-growing experiments, they'll be embarking on bean trials.

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Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future

Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future.

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Why the UK using less electricity is weirdly bad news for the climate

In some ways it is great news that electricity demand in the UK is falling, but paradoxically to meet climate goals it should be rising

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Climate warming experiment finds unexpected results

Tropical forests store about a third of Earth's carbon and about two-thirds of its above-ground biomass. Most climate change models predict that as the world warms, all of that biomass will decompose more quickly, which would send a lot more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. But new research presented at the American Geophysical Union's 2018 Fall Meeting contradicts that theory.

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Democrats Are Wrong About Defense Spending

The Democrats seeking their party’s 2020 presidential nomination will surely disagree about a great many things, such as the wisdom of Medicare for all, whether to embrace a Green New Deal, and how far to go when raising taxes. One emerging consensus, though, is that, as Senator Elizabeth Warren recently argued in the latest edition of Foreign Affairs , “the Pentagon’s budget has been too large f

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Letters: ‘Evolution Just Pushes Mindlessly Forward’

It Will Take Millions of Years for Mammals to Recover From Us In October, Ed Yong described how humans have damaged the phylogenetic and functional diversity of other mammals: “ The story of mammals,” he wrote, “is one of self-destruction.” I found this article very eye-opening, and it made me feel deeply sad that humans have had such an enormous negative impact on this beautiful planet. I feel l

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Revealing hidden spin: Unlocking new paths toward high-temperature superconductors

In the 1980s, the discovery of high-temperature superconductors known as cuprates upended a widely held theory that superconductor materials carry electrical current without resistance only at very low temperatures of around 30 Kelvin (or minus 406 degrees Fahrenheit). For decades since, researchers have been mystified by the ability of some cuprates to superconduct at temperatures of more than 10

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Microbial aromas might save crops from drought

In her book Silent Spring, Rachel Carson writes: "The sense of smell, almost more than any other, has the power to recall memories…."

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High-speed video reveals physics tricks for shooting a rubber band

To fire a rubber band flawlessly, use a wide band and don’t pull too hard, physicists suggest.

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A Wildfire Was Extra Close to Home for This LA Photographer

Kevin Cooley nearly lost his house to the La Tuna fire, LA's biggest wildfire in recent history, but he captured these extraordinary images.

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Ex-'Hearthstone' Designers Are Working on a New Marvel Game

Plus unfortunate controversy in the competitive 'Overwatch' scene, a publishing giant goes on the market, and more gaming news.

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Hen 3-160 is a symbiotic binary with Mira variable star, study suggests

A new study conducted by a team of astronomers from Poland and South Africa provides more insights into the nature of Hen 3-160, a symbiotic binary system in the southern Milky Way. The research, presented in a paper published December 22 on arXiv.org, proposes that this object is a symbiotic binary containing a Mira variable star.

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Excitons pave the way to more efficient electronics

After developing a method to control exciton flows at room temperature, EPFL scientists have discovered new properties of these quasiparticles that can lead to more energy-efficient electronic devices.

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Essential amino acid in humans, methionine, controls cell growth programs

A recent study from the Laxman lab elucidates how a small metabolite and amino acid, methionine, acts as a growth signal for cells, by setting into motion a metabolic program for cell proliferation.

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A high-performance material at extremely low temperatures: High-entropy alloy

In this paper, the mechanical properties of CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloys were deeply studied. Researchers found that twinning-dominated deformation mechanism in this alloy lead to the serration behavior on the stress-strain curves, and together with the FCC-HCP transition result in the superior mechanical property at liquid-helium temperatures.

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Revealing hidden spin: Unlocking new paths toward high-temperature superconductors

Researchers from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have discovered that electron spin is key to understanding how cuprate superconductors can conduct electricity without loss at high temperature.

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It's Time to Get Arsenic and Other Toxic Substances out of Baby Food

It’s time to get arsenic and other heavy metals out of our infants’ diets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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German court opens way for diesel case against Daimler

A German court said Friday it had opened the way for shareholders to join a collective legal action against Mercedes-Benz parent Daimler for diesel cheating that mirrors one already brought against VW.

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Shining light on recombination mechanisms in solar cell materials

Hybrid perovskites are spectacularly efficient materials for photovoltaics. Just a few years after the first solar cells were fabricated, they have already achieved solar conversion efficiencies greater than 22 percent. Interestingly, the fundamental mechanisms that are responsible for this high efficiency are still being vigorously debated.

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Damaged sperm could be to blame for repeated miscarriages

Imperial College scientists find DNA damage in sperm could be undetected cause Men should undergo tests when couples suffer repeated miscarriages, according to researchers who say the health of the man’s sperm may sometimes be a factor. The focus is usually on the woman’s body when multiple pregnancies fail, with tests usually looking for immune system problems or infection. But a small governmen

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Creating a 'virtual seismologist'

Understanding earthquakes is a challenging problem—not only because they are potentially dangerous but also because they are complicated phenomena that are difficult to study. Interpreting the massive, often convoluted data sets that are recorded by earthquake monitoring networks is a herculean task for seismologists, but the effort involved in producing accurate analyses could significantly impro

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Greener hydrogen from water

The idea of using hydrogen as the basis of a clean sustainable energy source, often termed a hydrogen economy, has been a topic of conversation for decades. Hydrogen fuel, for example, doesn't emit any carbon dioxide and is considered more sustainable than traditional fossil fuels.

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Engineers create an inhalable form of messenger RNA

Messenger RNA, which can induce cells to produce therapeutic proteins, holds great promise for treating a variety of diseases. The biggest obstacle to this approach so far has been finding safe and efficient ways to deliver mRNA molecules to the target cells.

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Schools fall short when it comes to helping students in grief – here's how they can improve

An adolescent experiences the death of his mother after a lengthy illness.

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Amelia Earhart would have a hard time disappearing in 2019

When Amelia Earhart took off in 1937 to fly around the world, people had been flying airplanes for only about 35 years. When she tried to fly across the Pacific, she – and the world – knew it was risky. She didn't make it, and was declared dead in January 1939. In the 80 years since then, many other planes have been lost around the world and never found again – including the 2014 disappearance of

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1.32 Million Jews Were Killed in Just Three Months During the Holocaust

Operation Reinhard, known as the single largest murder campaign during the Holocaust, was worse than historians imagined.

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Will China's moon landing launch a new space race?

China became the third country to land a probe on the Moon on Jan. 2. But, more importantly, it became the first to do so on the far side of the moon, often called the dark side. The ability to land on the far side of the moon is a technical achievement in its own right, one that neither Russia nor the United States has pursued.

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The Prickle1 gene regulates the differentiation of frontal bone osteoblasts in a new animal model

A mechanically compromised skull can result from enlarged fontanelles and smaller frontal bones due to defective migration and differentiation of osteoblasts in the skull primordia (developing skull). The Wnt/Planar cell polarity signaling pathway (Wnt/PCP), usually regulates cell migration and movement in tissues during embryonic development. In a recent study, conducted by Yong Wan and colleague

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What muscles do squats work?

Muscle Month Like deadlifts, squats exercise way more than the obvious bits. Unbeknownst to the bros who skip leg day, squats are an incredible exercise for many reasons.

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Will China's Moon Landing Launch a New Space Race?

China just became the first country to land a probe on the far side of the moon. It's a technological achievement and another sign of China's capabilities and ambitions in space.

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Excitons pave the way to higher-performance electronics

After developing a method to control exciton flows at room temperature, EPFL scientists have discovered new properties of these quasiparticles that can lead to more energy-efficient electronic devices.

4h

A model for describing the hydrodynamics of crowds

Precise simulations of the movement and behavior of crowds can be vital to the production of digital sequences or the creation of large structures for crowd management. However, the ability to quantitatively predict the collective dynamic of a group responding to external stimulation remains a largely open issue, based primarily on models in which each individual's actions are simulated according

4h

Researchers locate the body's largest cell receptor

A giant toadstool that swallows up vitamins and nutrients in the intestines and kidneys: This is how one receptor that absorbs B12 vitamins in the small intestine looks. For the first time, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have an insight into an as-yet unknown biology which has persisted for hundreds of millions of years of evolution.

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Study finds that severe air pollution affects the productivity of workers

Economists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have completed an extensive study revealing that exposure to air pollution over several weeks is not just unhealthy, it can also reduce employee productivity.

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Tidying Up With Marie Kondo Isn’t Really a Makeover Show

About halfway through “The Downsizers,” the third episode of the new Netflix series Tidying Up With Marie Kondo , the 11-year-old Kayci Mersier and her 12-year-old brother, Nolan, are sorting through gigantic piles of clothing, piece by piece. They bid a grateful farewell to the things they no longer wear, and let others—the ones that “spark joy”—know they will be happily worn in the future. “You

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The group dynamics that make terrorist teams work

Acts of terrorism are harrowing and can cause extensive damage and tragic deaths, and they have been occurring with alarming frequency over the last decade.

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Protecting proboscis monkeys from deforestation

A 10-year study of proboscis monkeys in Borneo has revealed that forest conversion to oil palm plantations is having a significant impact on the species.

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Blockchain Can Wrest the Internet From Corporations' Grasp

Opinion: It's time to restore the open source, community-led ethos of the original internet—with crypto.

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An AI conference warns us why we need to mind our language

We’re using the wrong words to talk about artificial intelligence. The 11th of our 12 Days of Culture shows where we’ve gone wrong and why it really matters

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Video: Climate change—it (doesn't have to be) what's for dinner

A recent study led by researchers at UConn suggests that if Americans directed their food purchases away from meats and other animal proteins, they could help reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

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Researchers find bottom of Pacific getting colder, possibly due to Little Ice Age

A pair of researchers, one with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the other Harvard University, has found evidence of deep ocean cooling that is likely due to the Little Ice Age. In their paper published in the journal Science, Jake Gebbie and Peter Huybers describe their study of Pacific Ocean temperatures over the past 150 years and what they found.

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China's space journey, to the moon's far side and beyond

China has come a long way since the founding of its space program in 1956.

5h

Image of the Day: Nature by Hand

Scientist D. Allan Drummond’s study of life in sculpture aims to provoke curiosity and wonder about the world.

5h

Humans Evolved to Exercise

Unlike our ape cousins, humans require high levels of physical activity to be healthy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Japan’s plan to resume commercial whaling could actually help whales

Japan’s move is bad news for whales within its waters, but spells the end of high seas whaling, says Matthew Collis

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Huge Layers of Rocks on Early Earth Vanished. And Stealthy Scientists May Have Finally Found Them.

Hundreds of millions of years of missing sedimentary rock may have been bulldozed away by the glaciers of Snowball Earth.

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Fruit flies help to shed light on the evolution of metabolism

Diet choice of animal species is highly variable. Some species are specialists feeding only on one food source, such as a sugar-rich fruit or protein-rich meat. Other species, like humans, are generalists that can feed on multiple types of food sources.

5h

Engineers create an inhalable form of messenger RNA

In an advance that could lead to new treatments for lung disease, MIT researchers have now designed an inhalable form of mRNA. This aerosol could be administered directly to the lungs to help treat diseases such as cystic fibrosis, the researchers say.

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Unborn Baby Shark Filmed Swimming Around Inside Its Mother

In July 2016, Kiyomi Murakumo of the Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium was giving a pregnant tawny nurse shark an ultrasound, when she saw the unmistakable outline of a moving baby shark. It’s not unusual to see a shark swimming around. It’s far more unusual when that shark hasn’t been born yet. And in this case, the unborn shark wasn’t just fidgeting—it swam from one of its mother’s two uteri to the oth

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Video: Artificial intelligence putting an end to poaching

When placed in protected areas, the TrailGuard artificial intelligence camera uses AI inference at the edge to detect possible poachers and alert park rangers in near real-time, allowing them to take action before animals can be harmed.

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Using the sun and agricultural waste to control pests

Farmers spend a lot of time and money controlling weeds and other pests, and often have to turn to chemical fumigants to keep the most destructive pests at bay. Farmers also wrestle with what to do with low-value byproducts of crop production, such as skin, seeds and hulls from fruit, vegetable and nut processing.

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How to fund roads and ensure electric vehicles pay their share

Since electric vehicles use no gasoline, their drivers pay no gasoline tax. And as more people drive EVs, gas-tax revenue for road repairs is dwindling. So how can California and the rest of the country avoid road-funding shortfalls and ensure that EV drivers pay their share of needed repairs?

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Strength in weakness: Fragile DNA regions key to vertebrate evolution

DNA regions susceptible to breakage and loss are genetic hot spots for important evolutionary changes, according to a Stanford study. The findings may lead to new understanding of human evolution.

5h

Satellites make mapping hot spots of ammonia pollution easier

There’s a more accurate way to estimate ammonia emissions.

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Our addiction to flying is ruining the climate, but it doesn’t have to

From simply flying planes in straighter lines to sucking fuel from thin air, a raft of new technologies that could help us fly guilt-free are in the offing

6h

Rabbits that don’t eat their own faeces are small and weak

We know that rabbits eat some of their own faeces – they may do so in order to better metabolise their food so they can grow larger

6h

Forget the iPhone Shortfall. Apple's All About Services Now

Like others before it, Apple must navigate a shift from selling devices to selling content and services like the App Store.

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We Need to Not Freak Out About the Robot Revolution

A former Obama advisor says we’ll work alongside the machines—but we also need to be smarter about apprenticeships and job retraining.

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Controllable fast, tiny magnetic bits

For many modern technical applications, such as superconducting wires for magnetic resonance imaging, engineers want as much as possible to get rid of electrical resistance and its accompanying production of heat.

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A Novel Way to Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria

Host-directed therapy can boost a patient’s immune response instead of relying only on antibiotics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Five emerging cyber-threats to worry about in 2019

The risks include AI-powered deepfake videos and the hacking of blockchain-powered smart contracts.

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Inside This Cult Temple of the 'Flayed Lord,' Sacrificial Horrors Took Place

The first temple to Xipe Tótec, the "Flayed Lord," has been discovered in Mexico.

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No sign of 'distressed sperm whale' in loch

The sperm whale was reported to be tangled up in rope when it was first spotted earlier this week.

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Harsh Nazi Parenting Guidelines May Still Affect German Children of Today

The Nazi regime urged German mothers to ignore their toddlers’ emotional needs—the better to raise hardened soldiers and followers. Attachment researchers say that the harmful effects of… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Our Universe Could Be An Expanding Bubble in an Extra Dimension

Is our universe sitting on the edge of an expanding bubble?

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Microsoft vil give dig kontrol over de data, nettet har om dig

Projekt Bali vil hjælpe dig med at få overblik over, hvilken data en lang række hjemmesider har på dig, så du selv kan styre det. Bali er dog kun i sin opstartsfase, og projektets hjemmeside er med lynets hast flået offline igen, men her er, hvad vi ved.

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Største læk i tysk historie: Politikere og kunstneres data smidt på nettet

Ministerchat, Merkels mailadresse og hundredevis af andre fortrolige oplysninger er blevet lækket i Tysklands største datalæk.

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Google moved almost 20 bn euros to Bermuda in 2017: report

US internet giant Google used a legal mechanism to transfer almost 20 billion euros from the Netherlands to Bermuda in 2017 for tax purposes, a Dutch newspaper report said Friday.

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The Truth About the Soviet War in Afghanistan

When the Soviet Union shocked the world by sending troops into Afghanistan 40 years ago this December, few Western observers guessed it was more thanks to accident and blunder than a conscious decision to invade. Eager to foment a quick coup that would prop up a flailing fellow Communist government and prevent U.S. influence from filling a geopolitical vacuum, the Soviet leaders believed they wer

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What to Expect From the 2019 Golden Globes

The Golden Globes has always occupied the same place in Hollywood’s calendar: It’s the boozy kickoff to awards season, a more raucous ceremony than the Oscars, but also a helpful preview for it. What films and actors triumph at the Globes is less a matter of taste—the 90-odd members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association are notorious for their unreliability—and more an act of guesswork for w

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Chinese rover Jade Rabbit 2 sets off to explore far side of moon – video

The rover from China's Chang'e 4 probe separated from its lander on Thursday evening after the probe touched down on the far side of the moon. It is the first spacecraft in the world to achieve a lunar soft landing 'One giant leap': China's Chang'e 4 rover Jade Rabbit 2 sets off on moon mission Continue reading…

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Great scientific discoveries hide in boring places

In 1964, two American radio astronomers, Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, discovered the Cosmic Microwave Background by accident. Their resulting work earned them the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1978. They had long been trying to get rid of the annoying "noise" in their data (even thinking it was all the pigeon poop in their telescope) only to realize the noise was the treasure. They had stumbled up

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8 Things to Expect From CES 2019: AI, 5G, 8K, and More

When CES 2019 kicks off next week in Las Vegas, companies will be promising faster, smarter tech products. That's partly true.

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Cognitive impairment risk increased in hypertensive patients with progressive cerebral small vessel disease

Hypertension patients experienced abnormalities in the brain's small vessels that were associated with cognitive impairment, which may be an early sign of dementia. Researchers found that patients with a progression of abnormalities in what's called periventricular white matter disease on MRI, had a six-fold increased risk of cognitive decline.

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How to Run for President While You’re Running a City

LOS ANGELES —A few months ago, Eric Garcetti met with a well-connected Democrat—the type whom people planning presidential campaigns have spent the past year talking to. The Los Angeles mayor, who’s in the final stages of deciding whether to run for the White House, talked up his ideas for a campaign. They chitchatted. Then Garcetti, as he always does to be polite, asked for advice. The response:

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Back to work blues? What we can learn from slackers

Our culture demonises those who don’t work – but maybe it’s time we were more like Homer Simpson and Jeffrey ‘The Dude’ Lebowski, writes Josh Cohen In 1999, crowds of art lovers, many of them baffled, filed into London’s Tate gallery to view My Bed , a work quickly established as one of the most iconic and notorious of our age. Tracey Emin’s installation painstakingly recreated her bed as it appe

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German politicians' data reportedly hacked, posted online

Data and documents belonging to hundreds of German politicians have been hacked and posted online via Twitter, a German broadcaster reported Friday.

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Don’t panic about children’s screen time, try these tips instead

Alleged dangers of screen time have been exaggerated, worrying parents. Here are some guidelines to ensure screens are used positively, says paediatrician Max Davie

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