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nyheder2019januar05

The Neuroscience of Creativity: A Q & A with Anna Abraham

The latest state of the field of the neuroscience of creativity. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

55min

Japan finds a huge cache of scarce rare-earth minerals

Enough rare earth minerals have been found off Japan to last centuries Rare earths are important materials for green technology, as well as medicine and manufacturing Where would we be without all of our rare-earth magnets? Rare earth elements are a set of 17 metals that are integral to our modern lifestyle and efforts to produce ever-greener technologies . The "rare" designation is a bit of a mi

56min

Fem ting du skal vide, før du lægger dit eget søkabel

Internettet i hele verden er forbundet med søkabler. Der er over en million kilometer af dem.

4h

Chinese rover powers up devices in pioneering moon mission

All systems are go as a Chinese spacecraft and rover power up their observation equipment after making a first-ever landing on the far side of the moon, the Chinese National Space Administration said.

4h

Kig op! 2019 byder på 8 blændende begivenheder i solsystemet

Januar starter med en blodrød måneformørkelse, og resten af det astronomiske år 2019 skuffer bestemt heller ikke.

4h

Revised Brazilian forest code may lead to increased legal deforestation in Amazon

Researchers show that up to 15 million hectares of forest risk losing protection owing to a new clause in the law under which state governments can let private landowners protect only 50 percent of their property, down from 80 percent previously, if over 65 percent of the state is protected by conservation units or indigenous reservations.

7h

Stopping cancer from recruiting immune system double agents

Cancerous tumors trick myeloid cells, an important part of the immune system, into perceiving them as a damaged part of the body; the tumors actually put myeloid cells to work helping them grow and metastasize (spread). Researchers have now discovered a potential therapy that can disrupt this recruitment and abnormal function of myeloid cells in laboratory mice.

46min

The meteor shower that brought Tunguska is due in June

Analysis of the Tunguska tree-fall patters suggests a familiar source for the asteroid that caused it Its timing also fits perfectly with a late June annual meteor shower Nonetheless, it's more interesting than dangerous. Put down that helmet. It's just after seven in the morning on June 30, 1908 as a man sits on the front porch of a trading post in Vanavara, Siberia. That is, until a sudden blas

56min

Winter birds thrill Norfolk wildlife photographers

"We haven't seen many this winter so it's no wonder these have caught people's attention."

1h

Allergic Reaction to Airborne Fish Proteins May Have Led to Boy’s Death in Brooklyn

The boy, Cameron Jean-Pierre, 11, had asthma and was allergic to fish and peanuts. Experts said a combination of the two conditions could have caused a fatal reaction.

2h

The real life people behind Timothée Chalamet and Steve Carrell’s film Beautiful Boy

The story of one family’s struggle with drugs has become a Hollywood film – and is showing others they aren’t alone Nic was a lovely child, though of course I’m prejudiced. I’m his father. According to the external barometers we often use to measure how our kids are doing, as Nic grew up – in California where we live – he was doing great. He was a good student, had good friends and his teachers d

2h

The Trumpification of Political Discourse

Thursday was a day of historic firsts. The first indigenous woman elected to Congress took the oath of office. So did the first Muslim congresswoman, and some of the first openly gay and bisexual members of the House and Senate. It was also quite possibly the first time a president has been publicly called a “motherfucker” by a sitting member of the House. During a reception hours after her swear

3h

Default ringtones are boring. Here’s how to make your own notifications.

DIY Create your own audio. Your phone chirps all the time. Why not customize those noises? Here's how to create your own smartphone ringtones and notifications.

3h

SAS er blandt verdens sikreste flyselskaber

En top-20-liste med få overraskelser kårer årets sikreste flyselskaber i et år præget af få, men voldsomme ulykker i luftfarten.

3h

The Hunt Is On for Moons Around Ultima Thule

The most distant celestial object ever explored may well have moons, and astronomers are trying hard to find them.

3h

Should You Take Off Your Shoes Indoors?

Your home contains thousands of uninvited bacteria. Should you be worried?

3h

Dino Graveyard: Photos of Dinosaur National Monument

The world's richest quarry of dinosaur fossils is located in the American West, at Dinosaur National Monument.

3h

Eclipse Season 2019 Kicks Off with a Partial Solar Eclipse This Weekend!

Eclipse season kicks off with a partial solar eclipse this weekend.

3h

The 'Twinning' Fad, the Weather Channel, and More Security News

A rogue PewDiePie fan, Marriott hack details, and more of the week's top security news.

3h

Golden Globe Awards 2019: How to Watch

It's like an Oscars-Emmys mashup, but with better taste and more alcohol. Here's how to tune in, TV or not.

3h

Sci-Fi Writers Are Grappling with a Post-Trump Reality

The latest edition of 'The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy' proves it.

3h

The Fight over Abortion Heats Up, 1969; The Price of Helium, 1919

Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Prehistoric Shark May Have Caught a Dinner on the Wing

A fossil tooth hints at a startling interaction between an ancient shark and a flying reptile.\ — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

The Milky Way Could Crash Into Another Galaxy Billions of Years Earlier Than Predicted

Ah, the Milky Way, our glittering home in the cosmos. Seen in an unencumbered night sky, far from the glare of city lights, it seems magnificent and eternal in its enormity. Nothing could shift this ancient web of stars, nothing could disturb its transcendent stoicism. Except, that is, another galaxy. Galaxies orbit millions of light-years apart, but gravity, the immutable magnet of the cosmos, c

4h

Knock Knock. Who’s There? Kids. Kids Who? Kids Tell Terrible Jokes.

When I was four, my favorite joke to tell my family members went like this: “Knock, knock.” “Who’s there?” “Guitar.” “Guitar who?” “Guitar if you don’t have a house!” Every time I delivered the punch line, I would look expectantly at my audience, who would, after a moment, either politely chuckle or just squint in bewilderment. Guitar if you don’t have a house? Literally nothing is funny or cleve

4h

Space Photos of the Week: A Cosmic Light Show Rings in 2019

We start with a view of Earth, then speed out past the Kuiper Belt into deep space.

4h

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending January 5, 2019)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

4h

Biological Cartographers Seek To Map The Trillions Of Cells In The Human Body

There's an effort underway to make a new atlas of all the cells in the human body, and to describe each cell type using all the powerful tools of today's genetic technology.

4h

Surviving R. Kelly Is an Uncomfortable, Visual Testimony

“Robert is a master manipulator,” the R&B singer Stephanie “Sparkle” Edwards says in the second episode of Lifetime’s new docuseries, Surviving R. Kelly . “Everybody knows it now. They didn’t know it back then.” Her voice is resigned in this sequence, a precursor to forthcoming scenes in which Edwards tearily expresses remorse for introducing the singer to her then 12-year-old niece , the alleged

5h

Moscow's Little-Noticed Islamic Outreach Effort

Russia’s growing presence in the Middle East is generally discussed in military and economic terms. Moscow’s 2015 intervention in Syria to prop up the regime of Bashar al-Assad increased its influence with Iran and enabled it to draw a wedge between Turkey and the United States. In the last few years, Moscow has also drawn closer to Washington’s traditional allies in the Persian Gulf, in the form

5h

Marie Kondo Is All of Us in This Year of Self-Optimization

In 2018, all we wanted was tea and sympathy. But by the look of Twitter, 2019’s vibe is slanting towards dogged, intentional improvement.

5h

What Is XR, and How Do I Get It?

A new shiny thing called XR—an umbrella term encompassing augmented, virtual, and mixed reality technologies—is the industry's new favorite buzz word.

5h

14 Tech and Outdoors Deals: Mario Kart, Apple HomePod , Lift Tickets, Garmin

From smart speakers to PopSockets, we have your weekend shopping covered.

5h

Elizabeth Warren and the Down-to-Earth Trap

“Hold on a sec, I’m gonna get me a beer.” With those simple words, Elizabeth Warren unleashed a wave of social-media mockery for what her critics see as a ham-handed attempt to convey down-home authenticity. Warren’s comment was made during an Instagram livestream broadcast from her family kitchen on New Year’s Eve, soon after announcing her candidacy to run for president in the 2020 Democratic p

2min

Short-term thinking is politics’ most epic failure

The Republican Party was founded in 1854 in Wisconsin as the "party of reform". It was the first U.S. political party to be founded by women as well as by men, the first party to support suffrage, and the first party to support equal rights. It was the party of Abe Lincoln! So what changed? In the 1970s, Ronald Regan made the mistake that ultimately dooms all political parties: He made a short-te

16min

Books of 2019: Our pick of the best forthcoming reads

From what to do about Einstein to tricks for survival to doing away with sexist neurotrash, it is looking like a good year for books

1h

Fugleflugtslinjen vil aflaste Storebæltsoverfarten

Et halvt århundrede før Femern-tunnellen blev projekteret, var det den nye tog- og færgeforbindelse mellem Danmark og Tyskland, der trak overskrifter i Ingeniøren. Blandt andet i dette temanummer om Fugleflugtslinjen.

1h

Dit internet går gennem mudder, saltvand og et hus på vestkysten

Du tror måske, det er trådløst, men internettet bor faktisk i kilometerlange kabler, der ligger på havbunden.

1h

Floods, blackouts after Thai storm, but tourist islands spared

Floods and blackouts caused by Tropical Storm Pabuk left nearly 30,000 people in evacuation shelters across southern Thailand Saturday, as relieved tourists stranded on islands further north were spared the worst and began to plot routes home.

4h

Trump to Apple: 'Make your product in the United States'

President Donald Trump called on Apple Friday to make its iPhones in the United States, saying that China is "the biggest beneficiary" of the California tech giant.

4h

Embraer shares dive after Bolsonaro voices wariness at Boeing venture

Shares in Brazilian planemaker Embraer plunged nearly five percent Friday after new President Jair Bolsonaro voiced wariness about a $5.2-billion tie-up it is planning with US giant Boeing.

4h

Record $3.1 million paid in New Year's tuna auction at Japan's new market

A Japanese sushi entrepreneur paid a record $3.1 million for a giant tuna Saturday as Tokyo's new fish market, which replaced the world-famous Tsukiji late last year, held its first pre-dawn New Year's auction.

4h

Invisible Killers Hitchhike on Native Plant Seedlings

More than a quarter of the seedlings sampled at native plant nurseries were infected with pathogens—which could hamper restoration work. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

The Simple Engineering That Will Keep NYC's L Train Rolling

Governor Andrew Cuomo says there’s an easy way to fix the Canarsie Tunnel without shutting down the line for several years. And it’s already been used in other cities.

8h

Burden of Genius review: The story of the first liver transplants

On the last of our 12 Days of Culture, a film about pioneering liver transplant surgeon Thomas Starzl is one of sacrificing family life for medical advance

11h

The Atlantic Daily: Here's Some Slightly Less Apocalyptic Climate News

What We’re Following Keeping It 2100: Climate-change updates can sometimes feel like one dire prognostication after another, but today came a morsel of not-as-awful news : An ominous prediction from two years ago that quickly melting glaciers in Antarctica will destroy the homes of 150 million people by 2100 looks to be less likely than the researchers initially thought. Still, the revised figure

11h

F.D.A. Accuses Juul and Altria of Backing Off Plan to Stop Youth Vaping

Commissioner Scott Gottlieb says the terms of the new partnership between the two companies appear to undermine pledges they made to keep flavored nicotine pods off store shelves.

11h

Why some coastal regions flood more easily than others

Nexus Media News Sea levels are rising, but it's happening unevenly. Some coastal regions are more at risk of flooding than others. That's because sea waters are rising unevenly.

11h

New York’s L Train Shutdown Is Canceled. Now What?

Organizers and transit companies wonder how the averted shutdown will affect its silver lining: the city's plans to rethink its transportation system.

12h

Matter: The Sounds That Haunted U.S. Diplomats in Cuba? Lovelorn Crickets, Scientists Say

Diplomatic officials may have been targeted with an unknown weapon in Havana. But a recording of one “sonic attack” actually is the singing of a very loud cricket, a new analysis concludes.

12h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: My Shutdown Will Go On

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, January 4, the two-week mark of the government shutdown. The longest previous shutdown spanned 21 days under President Bill Clinton, from 1995 to 1996. Here’s what we’ve been keeping an eye on today: On and On and On: During a meeting with congressional leaders at the White House, President Donald Trump said that the government shutdown could go on for “mon

12h

Maybe we should all be using Facebook Messenger Kids

Technology Limited apps are often better apps. Less is more when it comes to apps.

12h

What Is the Dark Side of the Moon?

Yes, China recently landed there, but you're kind of asking the wrong question.

12h

Doctors Thought a Woman Was Having a Panic Attack. She Actually Had Rabies.

The U.S. woman acquired the infection while on a yoga retreat in India.

13h

The Family Weekly: Let’s Create a New Holiday

This Week in Family In response to the Family section’s piece about unusual holiday traditions, The Atlantic ’s Culture desk has come up with a challenge for readers: If you were going to create a new holiday altogether, what would it be? To get the creative juices flowing, some potential ideas include a National Stress-Bake Day, Resolution Revision Day, and Turn Off the Internet Day. If you have

13h

The Happiest Animal

On Rottnest Island, off the coast of western Australia, a peculiar marsupial has captivated the hearts of Instagram users worldwide—and supported a booming tourism economy. The quokka, a close cousin of the kangaroo, rocketed to internet fame when tourists began taking selfies with the animal, which is unafraid of humans and appears to smile for pictures. “They are like living teddy bears,” filmm

13h

Will the Government Ever Reopen?

The longest-ever shutdown of the federal government lasted 21 days. To hear President Donald Trump talk on Friday afternoon, that record—set at around this time 23 years ago, during the Clinton administration—could soon be demolished. During a two-hour meeting that both parties acknowledged was contentious, the president told Democratic leaders that the current partial shutdown of federal departm

13h

The brain rhythms of focused attention and… is that my phone?

In a large bowl, dissolve yeast and one tablespoon of sugar into lukewarm water. Whisk in the oil, and then add four eggs one at a time. Now gradually add eight cups of flour: One…two…three…was that three? Four… five… a sudden BUZZ-BUZZ from my apron pocket interrupts my counting. I’ve been expecting a phone call sometime today from my boss. Could this be her calling now with important news, or i

13h

Stopping cancer from recruiting immune system double agents

Cancerous tumors trick myeloid cells, an important part of the immune system, into perceiving them as a damaged part of the body; the tumors actually put myeloid cells to work helping them grow and metastasize (spread). A research team co-led by scientists at Rush University Medical Center have discovered a potential therapy that can disrupt this recruitment and abnormal function of myeloid cells

14h

Revised Brazilian forest code may lead to increased legal deforestation in Amazon

Researchers show that up to 15 million hectares of forest risk losing protection owing to a new clause in the law under which state governments can let private landowners protect only 50 percent of their property, down from 80 percent previously, if over 65 percent of the state is protected by conservation units or indigenous reservations.

14h

4 ways to tackle ocean trash besides Ocean Cleanup’s broken system

Here are three approaches to reducing ocean pollution that might be more effective than a controversial plan to fish trash out of the Pacific.

14h

The Quest to Topple Science-Stymying Academic Paywalls

Scientific publishers charge so much that even Harvard can’t afford it anymore. A new publishing infrastructure could help.

14h

A Dredge Landing Disaster for the Dakotas | Gold Rush: White Water

Disaster strikes after the Dakotas try landing their dredge on a remote river via a helicopter. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: White Water: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush-white-water/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://www.

14h

Zero is just 1,500 years old. Before it, there was nothing.

Science How humans invented zero—and why some tried desperately to do without it. Life without zero is unimaginable. But the concept is only 1,500 years old.

14h

A Major Hacking Spree Gets Personal for German PoliticiansAngela Merkel German

Hundreds of German politicians who have had their private digital lives exposed online are victims of a hacking campaign with unclear motives.

14h

AI Can Now Decode Words Directly from Brain Waves

The technology could help people with diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) speak via a brain-computer interface.

14h

The New Old Age: Dementia May Never Improve, but Many Patients Still Can Learn

In “cognitive rehabilitation,” therapists train patients in simple tasks that can make daily life much easier.

15h

Kevin Hart Is Not a Martyr

There is a vast conspiracy against Kevin Hart, Kevin Hart thinks. “That’s an attack,” the comedian told Ellen DeGeneres, during a bewildering appearance on the host’s talk show Friday. Hart was speaking about giving up the Academy Awards hosting gig after renewed backlash from his past gay jokes. “This was to destroy me. This was to end all partnerships, all brand relationships, all investment op

15h

You might be predisposed to T.B. and not even know it

Scientists have discovered a genetic variant that predisposes people who have it to tuberculosis. It’s surprisingly common—but if you carry it, you likely will never know. The research also revealed genetic mutations that rob the immune system of its ability to combat more ubiquitous germs of the same bacterial family, mycobacteria. A new study in Science Immunology clarifies molecular abnormalit

15h

Over half of urban renters face a kind of housing insecurity

The majority of renters in 25 US metropolitan areas experience some form of housing insecurity, research shows. The study, published in Housing Policy Debate , uses a new housing insecurity index with measures in four key dimensions: overcrowding, unaffordability, poor physical conditions, and recent experience of eviction or a forced move. “This index provides a way to expand our understanding o

15h

Does manual labor boost happiness?

Working with your hands affects brain chemistry in a positive way. Automation technologies can strip away a sense of agency and meaning in our lives. Using your hands connects you with your environment in a way that most technologies cannot. None Violence has become such a part of the fabric of American society that many stories pass without much commentary. Mass shootings need to be bigger and g

22h

Evaluating surgeon gowning steps for optimal sterile operating room techniques

For surgeons getting ready to enter the operating room (OR), the chances of contamination may be lower if they put their gowns on by themselves — without the assistance of a surgical technician, according to an experimental study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

22h

Do you really want to know what's in your baby's genome?

Health It's unclear how much information is helpful, and how much is hurtful. In the age of readily available genetic testing, there are a lot of questions about how—or if—an in-depth test might help or hurt the health of a baby…

22h

Photos of the Week: Space Snowman, Chilean Puma, Frozen Beak

A wild encounter in Scotland, a lunar landing made by China, the 116th Congress begins in the U.S., Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro is sworn in, New Year celebrations in Australia, surfing in Hawaii, snow on the Grand Canyon, ice castles in Utah, and much more

22h

Mammoth DNA found in Cambodia market items

Scientists tackling the illegal trade in elephant ivory got more than they bargained for when they found woolly mammoth DNA in trinkets on sale in Cambodia, they revealed Friday.

22h

Tiny satellites could be 'guide stars' for huge next-generation telescopes

Researchers design CubeSats with lasers to provide steady reference light for telescopes investigating distant planets.

22h

Computers can be a real pain in the neck

Many people slouch or strain their necks while working at the computer. A new study shows how jutting the head forward to read more closely compresses the neck and leads to neck and shoulder problems.

22h

Where will the world's next Zika, West Nile or Dengue virus come from?

Scientists have identified wildlife species that are the most likely to host flaviviruses such as Zika, West Nile, dengue and yellow fever. They created a global flavivirus hotspot map from their findings.

22h

Genetic testing does not cause undue worry for breast cancer patients

As genetic testing for breast cancer has become more complex, evaluating a panel of multiple genes, it introduces more uncertainty about the results. But a new study finds that newer, more extensive tests are not causing patients to worry more about their cancer risk.

22h

Scientists Suffer in Continued Government Shutdown

As the second full week of lapsed funding comes to a close, some 800,000 federal employees are stuck at home, including some biologists.

22h

Switch Your Devices to Dark Mode to Give Your Eyes a Break

For many users, white-on-black displays offer relief from the eyestrain of reading dark text on a light background all day.

22h

Tiny satellites could be 'guide stars' for huge next-generation telescopes

There are more than 3,900 confirmed planets beyond our solar system. Most of them have been detected because of their "transits"—instances when a planet crosses its star, momentarily blocking its light. These dips in starlight can tell astronomers a bit about a planet's size and its distance from its star.

22h

Tiny satellites could be 'guide stars' for huge next-generation telescopes

Researchers design CubeSats with lasers to provide steady reference light for telescopes investigating distant planets.

22h

What does 'dead' mean?

Marking the 50-year legacy of a landmark Harvard report on brain death, a new special report examines lingering questions about the definition of death, implications for organ transplantation, and lessons from the case of Jahi McMath.

22h

Gut microbiome protects against acute arsenic toxicity

New research shows that the gut microbiome is essential for full protection against acute arsenic poisoning.

22h

Brains of people with schizophrenia-related disorders aren't all the same

A new multi-site brain imaging study shows that sub-groups of people use their brains differently when imitating emotional faces — a task that reflects their ability to interact socially. Interestingly, individuals with schizophrenia do not have categorically different social brain function than those without mental illness, but fall into different sub-groups that may respond to different types o

22h

One in 10 adults in US has food allergy, but nearly 1 in 5 think they do

Over 10 percent of adults in the US — over 26 million — are estimated to have food allergy.

22h

Engineers create an inhalable form of messenger RNA

In an advance that could lead to new treatments for lung disease, researchers have now designed an inhalable form of mRNA. This aerosol could be administered directly to the lungs to help treat diseases such as cystic fibrosis, the researchers say.

22h

New nanosatellite system captures better imagery at lower cost

Researchers have developed a new satellite imaging system that could revolutionize the economics and imagery available from space-based cameras and even earth-based telescopes.

22h

New mechanism to 'activate' the immune system against cancer

A new mechanism for activating the immune system against cancer cells allows immune cells to detect and destroy cancer cells better than before, and most effectively in lung cancer and melanoma.

22h

Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future

Diabetes is caused by damaged or non-existing insulin cells inability to produce insulin, a hormone that is necessary in regulating blood sugar levels. Many diabetes patients take insulin supplements to regulate these levels.

22h

A new hope in treating neurodegenerative disease

Researchers have clarified the fundamentals of coiled toxin protein which causes neurodegenerative brain disorders. The result is expected to speed the development of treatment for neurodegenerative disorder.

22h

Excitons pave the way to more efficient electronics

After developing a method to control exciton flows at room temperature, scientists have discovered new properties of these quasiparticles that can lead to more energy-efficient electronic devices.

22h

Many People Who Claim to Have a Food Allergy Actually Don’t

Self-diagnosing a food allergy can lead to mistaken conclusions.

23h

Trilobites: An Elephant-Size Relative of Mammals That Grazed Alongside Dinosaurs

Paleontologists believed dicynodonts died out as dinosaurs conquered the world, but fossils found in Poland suggest they survived millions of years more.

23h

Genetically Engineered Tobacco Does Photosynthesis More Efficiently

The modification beefed up plant biomass by 40 percent in field tests.

23h

Embracing Apple's Boring Future

Apple, a smartphone company that also makes computers, lost almost 10 percent of its stock value yesterday after the company lowered its earnings projections. Just a few months ago, the company became the first to reach a trillion-dollar valuation . Now it’s worth about $675 billion, having shed almost a third of its value since its summer high. In a lengthy letter to shareholders explaining the

23h

A Terrifying Sea-Level Prediction Now Looks Far Less Likely

One of the scariest scenarios for near-term, disastrous sea-level rise may be off the table for now, according to a new study previewed at a recent scientific conference. Two years ago, the glaciologists Robert DeConto and David Pollard rocked their field with a paper arguing that several massive glaciers in Antarctica were much more unstable than previously thought. Those key glaciers—which incl

23h

Nancy Roman obituary

Nasa’s first chief of astronomy who oversaw the early development of the Hubble space telescope Nancy Roman, who has died aged 93, was Nasa’s first chief of astronomy. She was the first woman to hold an executive position at America’s space agency and had direct oversight of the planning and early development of what became the Hubble space telescope . This led Nasa to call her “mother of Hubble”.

23h

The long memory of the Pacific Ocean

Cold waters that sank in polar regions hundreds of years ago during the Little Ice Age are still impacting deep Pacific Ocean temperature trends. While the deep Pacific temperature trends are small, they represent a large amount of energy in the Earth system.

23h

Fungi cause brain infection and impair memory in mice

Researchers report that the fungus Candida albicans can cross the blood-brain barrier and trigger an inflammatory response that results in the formation of granuloma-type structures and temporary mild memory impairments in mice.

23h

Essential amino acid in humans, methionine, controls cell growth

A recent study from the Laxman lab elucidates how a small metabolite and amino acid, methionine, acts as a growth signal for cells, by setting into motion a metabolic program for cell proliferation.

23h

Obsessive compulsive symptoms in youth may be a red flag for other psychological issues

Engaging in repetitive and ritualistic behaviors is part of typical child development. However, behaviors that develop into obsessive and compulsive symptoms may represent a red flag for serious psychiatric conditions.

23h

Service-learning initiative to teach hands-only CPR to high school students is successful

PumpStart, a community service-learning program created by students, that teaches hands-only CPR to the general public, is effective for both teaching high school students a life-saving skill and providing medical students with an opportunity to engage in public health and medical education.

23h

Could marijuana help the first Martians with anxiety?

The first human colonists on Mars are expected to endure intense amounts of stress while adapting to the planet. Their maintaining mental wellbeing is critical for successful colonization efforts. In a 2018 study, participants perceived a 58 percent reduction in anxiety and stress following cannabis use. Atop a plume of smoke, Yuri Gagarin blasted out of Earth's atmosphere on April 12, 1961. In d

23h

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