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nyheder2019januar07

George, Reclusive Hawaiian Snail And Last Of His Kind, Dies At 14

While he was but one very lonely Achatinella apexfulva , his death takes place amid a crisis for Hawaii's native snails, whose populations have been decimated by invasive species. (Image credit: David Sischo/Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources)

1h

Scientists could engineer a spicy tomato. Is it worth it?

Science It's not just good news for lovers of salsa. Capsaicinoids, a group of chemical compounds found in peppers, have useful properties beyond making food taste delicious.

1h

TESS discovers its third new planet, with longest orbit yet

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, TESS, has discovered a third small planet outside our solar system, scientists report.

22min

Why more female penguins are washing up dead in South America

Female Magellanic penguins are more likely to become stranded in South America because they travel further.

20min

Clues into early development of autism spectrum disorder

Researchers compared stem cells created from individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) against stem cells created from those without ASD to uncover, for the first time, measurable differences in the patterns and speed of development in the ASD-derived cells.

22min

Intel Lakefield Brings Its 3-D Chip-Stacking Tech to LifeCES Intel Ice Lake

Weeks after introducing Foveros, its 3-D logic stacking technology, Intel has shown off a motherboard that puts it to use.

25min

Recording of "Sonic Attack" in Cuba Was Crickets: Scientists

Biologists say a sound suspected to have caused headaches, nausea, and possible brain damage among diplomats is actually of insects chirping.

44min

Past President of the AACR, Waun Ki Hong, Dies

The former head of cancer medicine at MD Anderson Cancer Center helped change clinical practice for laryngeal cancer and helped establish chemoprevention.

44min

The Atlantic Daily: Political Speak

What We’re Following Especially in the Trump era, politicians are continually vying to appear “authentic” and “relatable” in every place and on every platform where constituents might be gathered. Representative Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez has used her preternatural media savvy to connect with her constituents on social media , thus showing an “ability to program around both the news media and the pa

55min

Another Day, Another Exoplanet: NASA’s TESS Keeps Counting More

The latest discovery is a lumbering, dense ball of gas that orbits a red dwarf star 53 light-years away in the constellation Reticulum.

1h

Top Cancer Doctor, Forced Out Over Ties to Drug Makers, Joins Their Ranks

AstraZeneca has hired Dr. José Baselga, the former chief medical officer at Memorial Sloan Kettering, to lead its cancer research unit.

1h

The Lancet Child & Ado. Health: Caring for preterm babies in single family rooms may help prevent sepsis and improve exclusive breastfeeding

Caring for preterm babies in single family rooms appears to reduce the incidence of sepsis and improve exclusive breastfeeding rates compared with traditional open ward neonatal units, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal.

1h

One in 4 women at sexual health clinics reports coercion over their reproductive lives

As many as one in four women attending sexual and reproductive healthcare services say they are not allowed to take control of their own reproductive lives, reveals a review of the available evidence, published today in BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health.

1h

Over half of UK female surgeons have experience of workplace discrimination, poll suggests

More than half of female surgeons in the UK have faced or witnessed discrimination in the workplace, suggest the results of a confidential online poll, published in the online journal BMJ Open.

1h

US health care spending highest among developed countries

Americans on average continue to spend much more for health care — while getting less care — than people in other developed countries, according to a new study.

2h

Rising drug prices linked to older products — not just newer, better medications

Drug companies cite R&D as the reason for ever-increasing drug prices, but a new study shows it's actually price hikes on older drugs that's driving the trend.

2h

Hyundai's Elevate Concept Uses Legs and Wheels to Go Anywhere

The automaker's CES concept uses multiple modes of locomotion to move through any territory.

2h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Shutdown Is 17 Going on 18

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, January 7. President Donald Trump said he’ll address the nation on Tuesday night about the ongoing government shutdown, which is now in its 17th day. Trump also plans to visit the U.S.-Mexico border on Thursday. A Revealing Conversation: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s interview with Anderson Cooper on 60 Minutes over the weekend suggests that the incoming repre

2h

Venice will now start charging tourists an entrance fee

If a romantic gondola ride in Venice is on your bucket list for 2019, it will cost you slightly more for the experience now the Italian city has introduced a new 'tax' on tourists. The new charge – known as contributo di sbarco or disembarkation contribution – was announced in a tweet by the city's mayor Luigi Brugnaro at the end of December with the words: "Now the landing contribution to #Venez

2h

TESS discovers its third new planet, with longest orbit yet

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, TESS, has discovered a third small planet outside our solar system, scientists announced this week at the annual American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle.

2h

TESS discovers its third new planet, with longest orbit yet

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, TESS, has discovered a third small planet outside our solar system, scientists announced this week at the annual American Astronomical Society winter meeting in Seattle.

2h

Screening donated blood for Zika not cost-effective

Universal screening of individual blood donations for Zika virus, which began in 2016, was not cost-effective in the 50 states during the first year. Widespread screening would only be cost-effective in the high mosquito season in Puerto Rico and never in the 50 states. Findings from a microsimulation study are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

2h

Environmental groups withdraw from Oregon wolf plan talks

Environmental groups in Oregon announced Monday they have withdrawn from talks on how to manage the state's rebounding wolf population because of what they called a "broken" process, and concerns that state wildlife officials want to make it easier to kill wolves that eat livestock without trying other alternatives.

3h

'Realistic' new model points the way to more efficient and profitable fracking

A new computational model could potentially boost efficiencies and profits in natural gas production by better predicting previously hidden fracture mechanics while accurately accounting for the known amounts of gas released during the process.

3h

The Milky Way could crash into another galaxy way sooner than we thought

Space The Large Magellanic Cloud isn’t just a pretty satellite galaxy—it’s also a future threat. A large, furious body of hot energy and gas is going to hurtle into our little home, throwing all the different pieces that make up the galaxy into a horrific scene of…

3h

Exposure to sugary breakfast cereal advertising directly influences children's diets

Laboratory studies have shown that kids will request and prefer brands they have seen recently advertised on TV. A new naturalistic study bridges the gap between lab studies and a real world setting, demonstrating that kids who were exposed to TV ads for high-sugar cereals aired during the programs they watched were more likely to subsequently eat the brands of cereals they had seen advertised.

3h

Salk team reveals clues into early development of autism spectrum disorder

Researchers at the Salk Institute compared stem cells created from individuals with ASD against stem cells created from those without ASD to uncover, for the first time, measurable differences in the patterns and speed of development in the ASD-derived cells.

3h

'Realistic' new model points the way to more efficient and profitable fracking

The mathematical and computational model is the first to predict branching while being consistent with the amount of gas that is known to be released from the shale.

3h

Dropping individual mandate penalty could reduce coverage enrollment, increase premiums

A new study reports the results of a survey asking Californians enrolled in the individual marketplace in 2017 whether they would have purchased health insurance without the penalty.

3h

Nonprofit groups join industry in self-driving campaign

Advocacy groups representing the elderly and the blind joined automotive and tech firms Monday to launch an educational campaign to explain the benefits of self-driving cars.

3h

Mysterious Sounds Recorded at Cuba Embassy Were … Crickets

Crickets may have produced the sounds that sickened U.S. Embassy staffers.

3h

Older people who use hearing aids still report hearing challenges

A high proportion of older people with hearing aids, especially those with lower incomes, report having trouble hearing and difficulty accessing hearing care services, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

3h

Dropping individual mandate penalty could reduce coverage enrollment, increase premiums

A new study conducted by investigators at the Mongan Institute Health Policy Center at Massachusetts General Hospital reports the results of a survey asking Californians enrolled in the individual marketplace in 2017 whether they would have purchased health insurance without the penalty.

3h

US health care spending highest among developed countries

The United States, on a per capita basis, spends much more on health care than other developed countries; the chief reason is not greater health care utilization, but higher prices, according to a study from a team led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researcher.

3h

Rising drug prices linked to older products, not just newer, better medications

Drug companies cite R&D as the reason for ever-increasing drug prices, but a new study shows it's actually price hikes on older drugs that's driving the trend.

3h

Amazon emerges as most valuable US firm amid market turmoil

Amazon has eclipsed Microsoft as the most valuable publicly traded company in the U.S. as a see-sawing stock market continues to reshuffle corporate America's pecking order.

3h

Fossil of prehistoric deer found in Argentina

The well-preserved fossil of a prehistoric deer has been discovered just to the north of Buenos Aires, the La Matanza University revealed on Monday.

3h

Cuban crickets, not weapon, heard by ill US diplomats: study

A noise heard by US diplomats in Cuba who suffered mysterious brain injuries came not from technological weapons but local crickets, a new study suggests.

3h

CES 2019: Buzz remains as autonomous cars take back seat

The CES 2019 gadget show is revving up in Las Vegas. Here are the latest findings and observations from Associated Press reporters on the ground as technology's biggest trade event gets underway.

4h

LG flexes roll-up TV as screens start to bendLG CES Signature OLED TV R

LG on Monday unveiled a roll-up television screen as a trend of bendable displays began taking shape at a consumer electronics extravaganza in Las Vegas.

4h

Socio-economic study looks at boosting Panama Canal reliability

A recently completed research project led by University of Wyoming researchers allowed novel socio-economic analysis aimed at finding out if ecological infrastructure investments are feasible in various scenarios to improve reliability of the Panama Canal.

4h

Bottle feeding may play role in whether kids are left-handed

Bottle feeding infants is associated with left-handedness, according to a new study. The study finds that the prevalence of left-handedness is lower among breastfed infants as compared to bottle-fed infants. The researchers identified this finding in about 60,000 mother-infant pairs and they accounted for known risk factors for handedness. The results provide further insight into the development

4h

Global Health: A Virus Even More Dangerous Than Zika to Pregnant Woman

The Zika virus must take the “side roads” into the placenta to infect a fetus, one researcher said — but the Rift Valley fever virus takes the “expressway.”

4h

When the Illness Is a Mystery, Patients Turn to These Detectives

The Undiagnosed Diseases Network takes on the toughest cases, patients whose symptoms have defied explanation.

4h

Bell's Nexus Air Taxi Brings Flying Cars Down to Earth

The company behind the V-22 Osprey and V-280 Valor brings its experience to the pie-in-the-sky flying car industry.

4h

A little squid sheds light on evolution with bacteria

Bacteria, which are vital for the health of all animals, also played a major role in the evolution of animals and their tissues. In an effort to understand just how animals co-evolved with bacteria over time, researchers have turned to the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes.

4h

These are the top 10 new motorcycles we’re dying to ride in 2019Harley-Davidson LiveWire

Technology Top picks from the editors at Cycle World. Velocity and variety are both available in 2019 as the motorcycle space is full of motorcycles we’re dying to ride next year.

4h

What Is E. Coli?

E. coli is to blame for why you sometimes can't eat certain foods, like romaine lettuce.

4h

Scientists reveal for first time the exact process by which chaotic systems synchronize

Synchronization, in which two different systems oscillate in an identical way, underlies numerous collective phenomena observed in nature, providing an example for emergent behaviors ranging from the acoustic unison of cricket choruses to the behavior of the human brain.

4h

Socio-economic study looks at boosting Panama Canal reliability

The research project met its goals to advance hydrological understanding in the steep humid tropics; understand factors affecting landowner decisions relative to paid land management plans; and combine these findings into an integrated assessment of the potential of long-term payments for hydrological ecosystem services in the Panama Canal Watershed.

4h

Prescribed opioids raise risk of pneumonia in patients with and without HIV

Taking prescribed opioids raises the risk of pneumonia in individuals with and without HIV, a new study finds.

4h

Ungdommelig drøm fra unge psykiatere

I realiteternes verden er der heldigvis en erkendelse af, at de lidelser, psykiatrien beskæftiger sig med, er så komplekse, at ingen enkelt faggruppe kan have hele overblikket.

4h

Exposure to sugary breakfast cereal advertising directly influences children's diets

Laboratory studies have shown that kids will request and prefer brands they have seen recently advertised on TV. A new naturalistic Dartmouth study bridges the gap between lab studies and a real world setting, demonstrating that kids who were exposed to TV ads for high-sugar cereals aired during the programs they watched were more likely to subsequently eat the brands of cereals they had seen adve

4h

A little squid sheds light on evolution with bacteria

In a new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team of researchers, led by UConn associate professor of molecular and cell biology Spencer Nyholm, sequenced the genome of this little squid to identify unique evolutionary footprints in symbiotic organs, yielding clues about how organs that house bacteria are especially suited for this par

4h

How the brain decides whether to hold 'em or fold 'em

Why do people make high-risk decisions — in casinos or in other aspects of their lives — even when they know the odds are stacked against them?

4h

New study of MRSA spread provides framework for community-based infection surveillance

The identification of the recent spread of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in a Brooklyn religious enclave is helping medical experts better understand how certain high-risk populations can drive the evolution of antimicrobial resistance and identify steps that can be taken to curtail its spread, according to a new study.

4h

A century and half of reconstructed ocean warming offers clues for the future

Due to a scarcity of data, most global estimates of ocean warming start only in the 1950s. However, a team of scientists at the University of Oxford has now succeeded in reconstructing ocean temperature change from 1871 to 2017.

4h

Satellite images reveal global poverty

How far have we come in achieving the UN's sustainable development goals that we are committed to nationally and internationally? Yes, it can be difficult to make a global assessment of poverty and poor economic conditions, but with an eye in the sky, researchers are able to give us a very good hint of the living conditions of populations in the world's poor countries.

4h

Evolution used same genetic formula to turn animals monogamous

According to a new study that looked at 10 species of vertebrates, evolution used a kind of universal formula for turning non-monogamous species into monogamous species — turning up the activity of some genes and turning down others in the brain.

4h

Harley-Davidson's Electric LiveWire Motorcycle Debuts at CES

Unveiled today at CES, the LiveWire will hit 60 mph in 3.5 seconds and cover 110 miles between charging stops.

4h

Nonfiction: Could Immunotherapy Offer a Cure for Cancer?

In “The Breakthrough,” Charles Graeber recounts the long history of researchers’ attempts to mobilize the body’s immune system to fight disease.

5h

Satellitbilleder fortæller mere, end du tror: Afslører fattige områder

Ved hjælp af satellitdata kan forskere kortlægge fattigdom i ulande helt ned til hver enkelt husstand.

5h

Today's TV Mom Is Raising Us for a More Real World

From 'Pose' to 'Jane the Virgin', mothers on TV are getting much more complex—and that's a good thing.

5h

Shellfish tops list of U.S. adult food allergies

More than 10 percent of adults in the United States—over 26 million—are estimated to have food allergy, and almost twice as many people believe they do, according to new research. “While we found that one in 10 adults have food allergy, nearly twice as many adults think that they are allergic to foods, while their symptoms may suggest food intolerance or other food related conditions,” says Ruchi

5h

Global warming of oceans equivalent to an atomic bomb per second

Seas absorb 90% of climate change’s energy as new research reveals vast heating over past 150 years Global warming has heated the oceans by the equivalent of one atomic bomb explosion per second for the past 150 years, according to analysis of new research. More than 90% of the heat trapped by humanity’s greenhouse gas emissions has been absorbed by the seas, with just a few per cent heating the

5h

Base paired up: study suggests genetic formula to monogamy

Scientists compared DNA of 10 species and found 24 genes which marked out males that stayed with their mates It could be a handy riposte for the stalwart commitment-phobe. When challenged on their reluctance to be tied down, half-hearted partners could shrug and claim their neural gene expression profiles made them that way. That is, at least, if research on smaller animals holds true in humans.

5h

Evolution used same genetic formula to turn animals monogamous

Why are some animals committed to their mates and others are not? According to a new study led by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin that looked at 10 species of vertebrates, evolution used a kind of universal formula for turning non-monogamous species into monogamous species—turning up the activity of some genes and turning down others in the brain.

5h

Satellite images reveal global poverty

How far have nations come in achieving the U.N.'s sustainable development goals? It can be difficult to make a global assessment of poverty and poor economic conditions, but with an eye in the sky, researchers are able to provide a good hint of the living conditions of populations in the world's poor countries.

5h

A century and half of reconstructed ocean warming offers clues for the future

Over the past century, increased greenhouse gas emissions have given rise to an excess of energy in the Earth system. More than 90% of this excess energy has been absorbed by the ocean, leading to increased ocean temperatures and associated sea level rise, while moderating surface warming.

5h

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call. No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate. None Shapr is a completely free tool for building your professional network. Whether looking to grow your network in a new industry, seeking cofounders and investors for your start

5h

Long-term breastfeeding sheds light on whether an infant becomes right- or left-handed

Bottle feeding infants is associated with left-handedness, according to a new study.

5h

Exact process by which chaotic systems synchronize

Physicists analyzed the Rossler system, a well-known chaotic system which physicists have studied thoroughly for almost 40 years. Looking at this system from a fresh perspective, they discovered new phenomena that have been overlooked until now. For the first time the researchers were able to measure the fine grain process that leads from disorder to synchrony, discovering a new kind of synchroniz

5h

'DeepSqueak' helps researchers decode rodent chatter

Scientists have developed a software program called DeepSqueak, which promotes broad adoption of rodent vocalization research.

5h

PAC1R mutation may be linked to severity of social deficits in autism

If the pilot findings are corroborated in larger, multi-center studies, the research represents the first step toward identifying a potential novel biomarker to guide interventions and better predict outcomes for children with autism.

5h

New biomarker for colorectal cancers Identified

Researchers have identified a protein involved in cell proliferation and the development of new blood vessels that could serve as a marker for the early detection of colorectal cancers.

5h

Should researchers engineer a spicy tomato?

With the latest gene-editing techniques, it could be possible, although challenging, to make a tomato produce capsaicinoids (the compounds that make peppers spicy), researchers argue. Their objective isn't to start a hot, new culinary fad — although that's not completely off the table — but to have an easier means of mass producing large quantities of capsaicinoids for commercial purposes.

5h

Why people reject city trees

Why did nearly one-quarter of eligible residents in Detroit turn down free street trees? That's the mystery researchers solve in one of the first studies to explore opposition to city tree planting programs. As cities from New York to L.A. embark on tree planting initiatives, the research helps to explain why more than 1,800 of 7,425 eligible Detroit residents — roughly 25 percent — submitted 'n

5h

All the cool new stuff from CES 2019 day one: Fancy TVs, wearable sensors, and a smart toilet

Technology Great news for people who like to watch stuff on big screens and also poop. Follow along with all the CES announcements without having to brave the Vegas show floor.

5h

Earthquake devastation will be our fault

Environment One seismologists's crusade to prepare our cities for the next Big One. One seismologists is on a crusade to prepare our cities for the next Big One.

5h

Can artificial intelligence tell a teapot from a golf ball?

How smart is the form of artificial intelligence known as deep learning computer networks, and how closely do these machines mimic the human brain? They have improved greatly in recent years, but still have a long way to go, according to a team of cognitive psychologists.

5h

Bats carry a new type of Ebola-like virus

Researchers have identified and characterized a new genus of filovirus from a Rousettus bat in China. Bat-borne viruses around the world pose a threat to human and animal health. Filoviruses, especially Ebola virus and Marburg virus, are notoriously pathogenic and capable of causing severe and often fatal fever diseases in humans by affecting many organs and damaging blood vessels. “Studying the

5h

BU finds high-risk drinking common in South Africa

Adults in South Africa consume more alcohol than adults in most other countries; previous research has shown this comes with high rates of fetal alcohol syndrome and is a driver of the country's leading causes of death: sexually transmitted infections and interpersonal violence.

5h

PAC1R mutation may be linked to severity of social deficits in autism

If the pilot findings are corroborated in larger, multi-center studies, the research published in Autism Research represents the first step toward identifying a potential novel biomarker to guide interventions and better predict outcomes for children with autism.

5h

Anxiety-depressive disorder changes brain genes activity

Russian neuroscientists discovered that anxiety-depressive disorder in mice is associated with impaired energy metabolism in the brain. The obtained data provides a fresh look at the depression development mechanism and other psycho-emotional diseases formation. The results of the study supported by Russian Science Foundation are published in the BMC Neuroscience.

5h

Trump Is Grinding the System to a Halt

The nation’s roughly 15,000 air-traffic controllers don’t do exactly what some people might imagine—namely, keep airplanes from completely losing their way or falling out of the sky. As William Langewiesche memorably described in The Atlantic back in 1997 in ”Slam and Jam,” planes and flight crews are perfectly capable of taking off and landing on their own (as smaller planes do at the vast major

5h

Thermo Fisher Scientific: Nucleic Acid Sample Storage Solutions

Nucleic acids are pivotal to a myriad of downstream applications, so choosing suitable storage consumables and devices is no small task. Appropriate sample storage devices will prevent freeze-thaw effects and contamination, as well as have superior features to ensure appropriate, safe storage. The correct consumable-equipment combination enables seamless labeling, automation, and organization of h

6h

Senescent cell research moves into human trials

Researchers have published findings from a safety and feasibility clinical trial on the removal of senescent cells from a small group of patients with pulmonary fibrosis.

6h

Scientists developed new mouse model of Hirschsprung's disease

Researchers have developed a new mouse model of Hirschsprung's disease and associated enterocolitis and shed light on the disease progression.

6h

Photos of the 2019 Harbin Ice and Snow Festival

Every year, in northeastern China’s Heilongjiang province, the city of Harbin hosts the Harbin International Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival, which features massive ice and snow sculptures—and attracts more than 1 million visitors. At night, the sculptures are colorfully illuminated and visitors can climb and play on some of the structures. This year, the 35th-annual festival opened on January 5,

6h

'DeepSqueak' helps researchers decode rodent chatter

Two scientists at the University of Washington School of Medicine developed a software program called DeepSqueak, which promotes broad adoption of rodent vocalization research.

6h

New key mechanism of epileptic seizures revealed

Russian scientists investigated the changes in the temporal lobe cortex of a rat brain during prolonged epileptic seizures. Despite the complex interaction of neural signals, biologists and physicists managed to build their mathematical model and identified the key factor leading to the seizures. This work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation and published in Frontiers in Cellular Neuro

6h

Long-term breastfeeding sheds light on whether an infant becomes right- or left-handed

Bottle feeding infants is associated with left-handedness, according to a new study from the University of Washington.

6h

Scientists reveal for first time the exact process by which chaotic systems synchronize

In a study published in Physical Review E, physicists analyzed the Rossler system, a well-known chaotic system which physicists have studied thoroughly for almost 40 years. Looking at this system from a fresh perspective, they discovered new phenomena that have been overlooked until now. For the first time the researchers were able to measure the fine grain process that leads from disorder to sync

6h

6h

Insect biological control shields tropical forests

An international team of scientists, involving entomologists, conservation biologists, agro-ecologists and geographers, has just revealed how on-farm biological control can slow the pace of tropical deforestation and avert biodiversity loss on a macro-scale. The case study concerns biological control of the invasive mealybug Phenacoccus manihoti with the introduced host-specific parasitic wasp Ana

6h

Whites struggle to tell real from fake smiles on black faces

White people and non-black minorities have a harder time telling the difference between genuine and fake smiles on black faces than they do on white faces, a problem black people don't have.

6h

New bat-borne virus related to Ebola

Newly discovered Mengla virus is evolutionarily closely related to Ebola virus and Marburg virus and shares several important functional similarities with them. For example, the genome organization of the Menglà virus is consistent with other filoviruses, coding for seven genes. The Menglà virus also uses the same molecular receptor, a protein called NPC1, as Ebola virus and Marburg virus to gain

6h

These Whales Are Serenaders of the Seas. It’s Quite a Racket.

Why do whales sing? Scientists still aren’t certain, and maybe the whales aren’t, either.

6h

Freud versus Jung: a bitter feud over the meaning of sex

On 27 February 1907, at Berggasse 19 in Vienna, Sigmund Freud fell in love. The object of his affection was Carl Gustav Jung: 19 years younger than Freud, the young psychiatrist was already the clinical director of the prestigious Burghölzli Hospital and a professor at the University of Zurich. Jung had gained international recognition for his invention of the word-association test, and his pract

6h

"Vi finder nok ud af det": Øplan er blot en 'vision'

Der er ikke tale om et projekt med faste rammer – men en vision, fastslår Hvidovres borgmester. Budgettet vil blive ændret, efterhånden som projektet skrider frem, siger erhversvminister Rasmus Jarlov.

6h

Seawater turns into freshwater through solar energy: A new low-cost technology

Engineers have developed an innovative, low-cost technology to turn seawater into drinking water, thanks to the use of solar energy alone.

6h

Hubble takes gigantic image of the Triangulum Galaxy

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the most detailed image yet of a close neighbor of the Milky Way — the Triangulum Galaxy, a spiral galaxy located at a distance of only three million light-years. This panoramic survey of the third-largest galaxy in our Local Group of galaxies provides a mesmerizing view of the 40 billion stars that make up one of the most distant objects visible t

6h

Udbreder Europa-Parlamentet fake news om Lyme borreliose?

EU-forskningsmidler spildes på at jage Borrelia-spøgelser, når der gives midler til projekter uden velbegrundet videnskabeligt grundlag.

6h

6h

Brain imaging predicts response to public health campaign

Neuroimaging data obtained from a small group of smokers predicts the influence of a large anti-smoking media campaign targeting likely smokers, shows a new study published in JNeurosci. This approach could help improve informational materials designed to change people's attitudes and behaviors.

6h

Stroke produces dysfunctional brain cells

Mice produce new neurons in the hippocampus following a stroke that fail to develop properly, finds new research published in JNeurosci. Intervening in the production of these cells may help to mitigate stroke-induced memory impairments.

6h

Prefrontal cortex development and mental illness

Faulty wiring of the prefrontal cortex during development leads to abnormal brain activity and cognitive impairments related to mental illness, according to a mouse study published in JNeurosci.

6h

Some HIV patients have faulty ‘seesaw’ immune receptor

An immune receptor that normally keeps the balance of the immune system in check doesn’t work properly in some people with HIV, a new study shows. The finding could explain why so many people with HIV struggle with other health complications, including neurocognitive disorders, cardiovascular issues, diabetes, and chronic inflammation. The SLAMF7 immune receptor normally tones down the body’s imm

7h

Tholins: The red goo critical to life in the universe

Tholins are a broad group of organic compounds formed when simpler molecules are irradiated. They are extremely common in our solar system, and studies have shown that their properties are incredibly useful to emerging life. By tracking and understanding tholins, we might be able to find extraterrestrial life and even explain how life began on Earth. None It was no easy feat for life to get start

7h

From Dams to Coastal Barriers: How the U.S. Is Fighting Flooding in 2019

Several projects face opposition from local residents and environmental groups — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Netflix and Amazon Binged Wins at the Golden Globes

And 'Aquaman' continues to rule the box office.

7h

Half of the people who think they have food allergies actually don't

Health But that doesn’t mean you’re imagining things. Food allergies can be confusing to figure out. Once a food item has wreaked havoc on any part of your body, whether its an itchy rash or a bout of diarrhea, its easy to…

7h

What are we really doing here? 10 quotes from Yuval Noah Harari

In Sapiens , Yuval Noah Harari investigated the last half-million years to understand how we've arrived here. In Homo Deus , he speculated on how our present course will influence the future of humanity. Harari's insights are strongly influenced by his thoughts on religion, sexuality, and animal rights. None Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari made his mark investigating the transition from Neand

7h

When voters choose candidates, politics beats policy

Voters are more likely to vote for candidates of their own party even when they run on policies that come from the opposing party or are outright anti-democratic, according to new research. Imagine you are a fairly mainstream Republican voter and are considering Republican candidate Luis Vasquez. He says he wants to raise taxes on the wealthy and believes government should do more to prevent disc

7h

How the internet went nuts for New York’s squirrel influencers

First there was pizza rat, now the egg roll- and avocado-loving squirrels are the city’s latest social media stars Name: New York squirrels. Also known as: The eastern gray squirrel. Continue reading…

7h

Insect biological control shields tropical forests

Though often perceived as an environmentally-risky practice, biological control of invasive species can restore crop yields, ease land pressure and contribute to forest conservation. This paper illustrates the positive impacts of biological control using the cassava mealybug Phenacoccus manihoti (Hemiptera) as an example. Cassava is a key food, feed and fiber crop grown on around 4 million ha in t

7h

Whites struggle to tell real from fake smiles on black faces

White people and non-black minorities have a harder time telling the difference between genuine and fake smiles on black faces than they do on white faces, a problem black people don't have, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

7h

Insect biological control shields tropical forests

An international team of scientists*, involving entomologists, conservation biologists, agro-ecologists and geographers, has just revealed how on-farm biological control can slow the pace of tropical deforestation and avert biodiversity loss on a macro-scale. The case study concerns biological control of the invasive mealybug Phenacoccus manihoti with the introduced host-specific parasitic wasp An

7h

Can artificial intelligence tell a polar bear from a can opener?

How smart is the form of artificial intelligence known as deep learning computer networks, and how closely do these machines mimic the human brain? They have improved greatly in recent years, but still have a long way to go, a team of UCLA cognitive psychologists reports in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.

7h

Climate model uncertainties ripe to be squeezed

The latest climate models and observations offer unprecedented opportunities to reduce the remaining uncertainties in future climate change, according to a new article.

7h

Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture

Scientists have shown that their pioneering single atom technology can be adapted to building 3D silicon quantum chips — with precise interlayer alignment and highly accurate measurement of spin states. The 3D architecture is considered a major step in the development of a blueprint to build a large-scale quantum computer.

7h

How game theory can bring humans and robots closer together

Researchers have for the first time used game theory to enable robots to assist humans in a safe and versatile manner.

7h

Yeast makes ethanol to prevent metabolic overload

Why do some yeast cells produce ethanol? Scientists have wondered about this apparent waste of resources for decades. Now scientists think they have a solution: yeast cells produce ethanol as a 'safety valve,' to prevent overload when their metabolic operation reaches a critical level. The implications of this new theory could be far-reaching, as it also explains why cancer cells waste energy by p

7h

What Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s 60 Minutes Interview Actually Reveals

Ever since Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez won an insurgent primary campaign in June against a well-established party elder, it hasn’t been clear whether she plans to push or pull the Democratic Party to the left. Will the former Bernie Sanders volunteer and self-identified democratic socialist try to push House leadership on policy while remaining well outside the party’s power structure? Or will the y

7h

Can artificial intelligence tell a polar bear from a can opener?

How smart is the form of artificial intelligence known as deep learning computer networks, and how closely do these machines mimic the human brain? They have improved greatly in recent years, but still have a long way to go, a team of UCLA cognitive psychologists reports in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.

7h

Hubble takes gigantic image of the Triangulum Galaxy

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the most detailed image yet of a close neighbour of the Milky Way—the Triangulum Galaxy, a spiral galaxy located at a distance of only three million light-years. This panoramic survey of the third-largest galaxy in our Local Group of galaxies provides a mesmerising view of the 40 billion stars that make up one of the most distant objects visible to

7h

Senescent cell research moves into human trials

Mayo Clinic researchers, along with collaborators from Wake Forest School of Medicine and the The University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, have published findings from a safety and feasibility clinical trial on the removal of senescent cells from a small group of patients with pulmonary fibrosis. The findings appear in EBioMedicine.

7h

Hubble takes gigantic image of the Triangulum Galaxy

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the most detailed image yet of a close neighbor of the Milky Way — the Triangulum Galaxy, a spiral galaxy located at a distance of only three million light-years. This panoramic survey of the third-largest galaxy in our Local Group of galaxies provides a mesmerizing view of the 40 billion stars that make up one of the most distant objects visible t

7h

Seawater turns into freshwater through solar energy: A new low-cost technology

A study conducted at Politecnico di Torino and published by the journal Nature Sustainability promotes an innovative and low-cost technology to turn seawater into drinking water, thanks to the use of solar energy alone. In the future, this innovation could have a positive impact on the quality of life in regions affected by drinking water scarcity.

7h

New research looks at the promise of 'digital neuropsychology'

'Digital neuropsychology,' or the assessment of neuropsychological function using digital devices represents 'a critical and potentially game-changing set of methodologies that can get at aspects of cognitive functioning that were previously inaccessible.'

7h

Trilobites: Free Trees? Many Detroit Residents Say No Thanks

It’s not that residents don’t like trees, a recent study found. They just don’t quite trust the city to take care of them.

8h

Increased risk of comorbid neck injury in females with a concussion-related ED visit

In a study of neck injury comorbidity in concussion-related emergency department (ED) visits in Ontario, Canada, females had significantly higher odds than males of sustaining a comorbid neck injury in a multitude of circumstances and stages of their lives.

8h

New bat-borne virus related to Ebola discovered by Singapore team

Newly discovered Mengla virus is evolutionarily closely related to Ebola virus and Marburg virus and shares several important functional similarities with them. For example, the genome organisation of the Menglà virus is consistent with other filoviruses, coding for seven genes. The Menglà virus also uses the same molecular receptor, a protein called NPC1, as Ebola virus and Marburg virus to gain

8h

Is Our Future Really Written in Our Genes?

A recent book argues your DNA can predict your future from birth with 100 percent reliability. That assertion is not 100 percent reliable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Adults with autism can read complex emotions in others

New research shows for the first time that adults with autism can recognize complex emotions such as regret and relief in others as easily as those without the condition.

8h

First-in-human trial of senolytic drugs encouraging

Researchers publish the first data on the treatment of an age-related disease with drugs called senolytics. The results in patients with deadly idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are encouraging and indicate the feasibility of larger clinical trials.

8h

Introducing gun safety into health care providers' checklists to prevent teen suicide

Mental health services researchers at UMass Amherst and elsewhere assessed the needs of stakeholders who would implement a new approach to promoting a program, the Firearm Safety Check. They found some support for promoting firearm safety in pediatric primary care as a universal suicide prevention strategy for adolescents.

8h

Human brain allocates attention based on known size of objects

Researchers have gained important insights into how the human brain processes information and allocates attention. Their study shows people pay attention to objects based on their real-world size, rather than how they are perceived by the eye.

8h

Faulty immune receptor could be reason why many face HIV complications

Scientists have discovered SLAMF7, an immune receptor, has the ability to tone down the body's immune response when activated on certain white blood cells, called 'monocytes.' The finding was made after studying both healthy and HIV-infected patients. Yet, for certain HIV patients who experience a myriad of health issues, the researchers found that these patients' receptors don't work properly.

8h

Opioids fueled a doubling of suicides and overdoses in the US

Suicides and drug overdoses kill American adults at twice the rate today as they did just 17 years ago, and opioids are a key contributor to that rise, according to a new review and analysis. Reversing this deadly double trend will take investment in programs that have been proven to prevent and treat opioid addiction.

8h

Meds: Important discovery for 'smart' films and encapsulation

New study has found that the properties of a material commonly used to create conductive or protective films and encapsulate drug compounds — and the conditions in which this material will disassemble to release that medication — may be different than initially thought.

8h

Why the Best Place to Find Dark Matter May Be in a Rock

In nearly two dozen underground laboratories scattered all over the earth, using vats of liquid or blocks of metal and semiconductors, scientists are looking for evidence of dark matter . Their experiments are getting more complicated, and the search is getting more precise, yet aside from a much-contested signal coming from a lab in Italy, nobody has found direct evidence of the mysterious mater

8h

Faulty immune receptor could be reason why many face HIV complications

Michigan State University scientists have discovered SLAMF7, an immune receptor, has the ability to tone down the body's immune response when activated on certain white blood cells, called 'monocytes.' The finding was made after studying both healthy and HIV-infected patients. Yet, for certain HIV patients who experience a myriad of health issues, the researchers found that these patients' recepto

8h

25 Movies to Look Forward to in 2019

Last year was a record one for Hollywood, at least in terms of box office , powered by superheroes such as Black Panther and the Avengers, surprise smash hits such as Crazy Rich Asians and A Star Is Born , and the quick rise and fall of subscription-based ticket services such as MoviePass . Such a constantly evolving industry might have difficulty replicating that success, but 2019 has plenty of

8h

Female penguins are getting stranded along the South American coast

Every year, thousands of Magellanic penguins are stranded along the South American coast — from northern Argentina to southern Brazil — 1,000 kilometers away from their breeding ground in northern Patagonia. Now researchers have new evidence to explain the observation that the stranded birds are most often female: female penguins venture farther north than males do, where they are apparently mor

8h

New approach may curb treatment-related skin fibrosis in cancer patients

A clinical-scientific team specializing in head-and-neck cancer has identified a way to manipulate metabolism to potentially curb skin fibrosis — a common side effect of radiotherapy affecting quality of life of cancer survivors.

8h

Stem cell signal drives new bone building

In experiments in rats and human cells, researchers say they have added to evidence that a cellular protein signal that drives both bone and fat formation in selected stem cells can be manipulated to favor bone building. If harnessed in humans,

8h

Human brain allocates attention based on known size of objects

Researchers at the George Washington University gained important insights into how the human brain processes information and allocates attention. Their study, "Attention Scales According to Inferred Real-World Object Size," shows people pay attention to objects based on their real-world size, rather than how they are perceived by the eye.

8h

Introducing gun safety into health care providers' checklists to prevent teen suicide

Mental health services researchers at UMass Amherst and elsewhere assessed the needs of stakeholders who would implement a new approach to promoting a program, the Firearm Safety Check. They found some support for promoting firearm safety in pediatric primary care as a universal suicide prevention strategy for adolescents.

8h

First-in-human trial of senolytic drugs encouraging

UT Health San Antonio, Mayo Clinic and Wake Forest School of Medicine researchers publish the first data on the treatment of an age-related disease with drugs called senolytics. The results in patients with deadly idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are encouraging and indicate the feasibility of larger clinical trials.

8h

Scientists developed new mouse model of Hirschsprung's disease

Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, have developed a new mouse model of Hirschsprung's disease and associated enterocolitis and shed light on the disease progression.

8h

Adults with autism can read complex emotions in others

New research shows for the first time that adults with autism can recognise complex emotions such as regret and relief in others as easily as those without the condition.

8h

Stem cell signal drives new bone building

In experiments in rats and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that a cellular protein signal that drives both bone and fat formation in selected stem cells can be manipulated to favor bone building. If harnessed in humans,

8h

How game theory can bring humans and robots closer together

Researchers at the University of Sussex, Imperial College London and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have for the first time used game theory to enable robots to assist humans in a safe and versatile manner.

8h

Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture

UNSW scientists have shown that their pioneering single atom technology can be adapted to building 3D silicon quantum chips — with precise interlayer alignment and highly accurate measurement of spin states. The 3D architecture is considered a major step in the development of a blueprint to build a large-scale quantum computer.

8h

Climate model uncertainties ripe to be squeezed

The latest climate models and observations offer unprecedented opportunities to reduce the remaining uncertainties in future climate change, according to a paper published in Nature Climate Change by a team of 29 international authors.

8h

Duke-NUS researchers discover new bat-borne virus related to Ebola

A new genus of filovirus from a species of bat has been discovered by researchers studying emerging infectious diseases. The virus–a relative of Ebola–may be capable of infecting many other species, including humans.

8h

USC science races against tick-borne virus

Two groundbreaking discoveries by USC researchers could lead to medications and a vaccine to treat or prevent a hemorrhagic fever transmitted by a new tick species before it spreads across the United States.

8h

Scientists identify new fuel-delivery route for cells

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a previously unknown route for cellular fuel delivery, a finding that could shed light on the process of aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it.

8h

Should researchers engineer a spicy tomato?

With the latest gene-editing techniques, it could be possible, although challenging, to make a tomato produce capsaicinoids (the compounds that make peppers spicy), researchers argue in an opinion article publishing Jan. 7, 2019, in the journal Trends in Plant Science. Their objective isn't to start a hot, new culinary fad — although that's not completely off the table — but to have an easier me

8h

How does solid stress from brain tumors cause neuronal loss, neurologic dysfunction?

A Massachusetts General Hospital-led research team has demonstrated, for the first time, how solid stress — the physical forces exerted by the solid components of a tumor — impacts the tissue surrounding brain tumors and contributes to resulting neurological dysfunction and neuronal cell death.

8h

Yeast makes ethanol to prevent metabolic overload

Why do some yeast cells produce ethanol? Scientists have wondered about this apparent waste of resources for decades. Now, University of Groningen scientists think they have a solution: yeast cells produce ethanol as a 'safety valve,' to prevent overload when their metabolic operation reaches a critical level. The implications of this new theory, published in Nature Metabolism on Jan. 7, could be

8h

Changes in flavored tobacco product use among youth tobacco users

Self-reported use of flavored tobacco products by middle and high school students decreased from 2014 to 2016 but climbed back up in 2017 in an analysis of national survey data. Flavored noncigarette tobacco products are widely available in the US. This study examined changes in self-reported use of flavored tobacco products by youth who use tobacco.

8h

Racial differences in Alzheimer's disease unveiled

A new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis finds disparities between African-Americans and Caucasians in a key biomarker for Alzheimer's disease — suggesting that tools to diagnose the disease in Caucasian populations may not work as well in African-Americans.

8h

Mayo study uses AI to create inexpensive, widely available early detector of heart disease

A Mayo Clinic study finds that applying artificial intelligence (AI) to a widely available, inexpensive test — the electrocardiogram (EKG) — results in a simple, affordable early indicator of asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction, which is a precursor to heart failure. The research team found that the AI/EKG test accuracy compares favorably with other common screening tests, such as mammogra

8h

Prescribed opioids raise risk of pneumonia in patients with and without HIV

Taking prescribed opioids raises the risk of pneumonia in individuals with and without HIV, a new Yale-led study finds.

8h

New approach may curb treatment-related skin fibrosis in cancer patients

A clinical-scientific team specializing in head-and-neck cancer has identified a way to manipulate metabolism to potentially curb skin fibrosis — a common side effect of radiotherapy affecting quality of life of cancer survivors.

8h

Female penguins are getting stranded along the South American coast

Every year, thousands of Magellanic penguins are stranded along the South American coast–from northern Argentina to southern Brazil — 1,000 kilometers away from their breeding ground in northern Patagonia. Now researchers reporting in Current Biology on Jan. 7 have new evidence to explain the observation that the stranded birds are most often female: female penguins venture farther north than ma

8h

You can be buried or cremated. Soon there will be a third option.

Recomposition is the process of turning human bodies into soil. Recompose founder Katrina Spade dreamed up her company after learning about livestock being composted. Washington might be the first state in the nation to legally add this as a viable option for the deceased. None Funerals are rarely joyous occasions. This is a matter of culture, not an unalterable fact of death. The ceremony, as pr

8h

Female penguins 'get stranded more because they travel further'

Longer journeys may exhaust birds, say scientists tracking them off South American coast Every year, thousands of Magellanic penguins get stranded along the coast of South America – but puzzlingly, about 75% of those that get stuck are female. Now scientists say they have worked out what is behind the gender imbalance: the females migrate further north than males. Magellanic penguins finish breed

9h

Gene editing could create spicy tomatoes, say researchers

Scientists also looking at altering colour of kiwis and taste of strawberries Spicy tomatoes could soon be on the menu thanks to the rise of genome-editing technology, say researchers. It is not the first time experts have claimed the techniques could help to precisely and rapidly develop fruits and vegetables with unusual traits: scientists have already been looking at changing the colour of kiw

9h

Yeast makes ethanol to prevent metabolic overload

Why do some yeast cells produce ethanol? Scientists have wondered about this apparent waste of resources for decades. Now, University of Groningen scientists think they have a solution: yeast cells produce ethanol as a 'safety valve' to prevent overload when their metabolic operation reaches a critical level. The new theory, which was published in Nature Metabolism on 7 January, could have far-rea

9h

Scientists identify new fuel-delivery route for cells

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a previously unknown route for cellular fuel delivery, a finding that could shed light on the process of aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it.

9h

Recent research suggests new therapeutic role for caffeine in neuropsychiatric disorders

An important new article reviews recently discovered properties of adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor (A2AR-D2R) and adenosine A1 receptor-dopamine D1 receptor (A1R-D1R) heteromers — both of which are main targets for caffeine — and discusses the therapeutic implications of these findings.

9h

Researchers make important discovery for 'smart' films and encapsulation

New study from Notre Dame has found that the properties of a material commonly used to create conductive or protective films and encapsulate drug compounds — and the conditions in which this material will disassemble to release that medication — may be different than initially thought.

9h

A weird type of zirconium soaks up neutrons like a sponge

Zirconium-88 captures neutrons with extreme efficiency, and scientists don’t yet know why.

9h

Female penguins are getting stranded along the South American coast

Every year, thousands of Magellanic penguins are stranded along the South American coast—from northern Argentina to southern Brazil—1,000 kilometers away from their breeding ground in northern Patagonia. Now researchers reporting in Current Biology on January 7 have new evidence to explain the observation that the stranded birds are most often female: female penguins venture farther north than mal

9h

Researchers discover new bat-borne virus related to Ebola

Researchers from Singapore's Duke-NUS Medical School, in collaboration with scientists in China, have identified and characterised a new genus of filovirus from a Rousettus bat in China. Their findings were published in the journal Nature Microbiology.

9h

Science races against tick-borne virus

Two groundbreaking discoveries by USC researchers could lead to medications and a vaccine to treat or prevent a hemorrhagic fever transmitted by a new tick species before it spreads across the United States.

9h

Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3-D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture

UNSW researchers at the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) have shown for the first time that they can build atomic precision qubits in a 3-D device—another major step towards a universal quantum computer.

9h

Climate model uncertainties ripe to be squeezed

The latest climate models and observations offer unprecedented opportunities to reduce the remaining uncertainties in future climate change, according to a paper published in Nature Climate Change by a team of 29 international authors.

9h

Should researchers engineer a spicy tomato?

The chili pepper, from an evolutionary perspective, is the tomato's long-lost spitfire cousin. They split off from a common ancestor 19 million years ago but still share some of the same DNA. While the tomato plant went on to have a fleshy, nutrient-rich fruit yielding bountiful harvests, the more agriculturally difficult chili plant went defensive, developing capsaicinoids, the molecules that giv

9h

Researchers make important discovery for 'smart' films and encapsulation

A study from the University of Notre Dame has found that the properties of a material commonly used to create conductive or protective films and encapsulate drug compounds—and the conditions in which this material will disassemble to release that medication—may be different than initially thought.

9h

Balanced diet, exercise may not prevent gestational diabetes

A new study is the latest evidence that the 'first-line' strategy for preventing gestational diabetes mellitus isn't working. Over the past five years, more than 5,000 pregnant women took part in clinical trials focused on limiting weight gain in order to prevent gestational diabetes. The moms-to-be improved their diet quality, ate less, and increased their physical activity. They also developed g

9h

Implicit attitudes can change over the long term

Data from more than 4 million tests completed between 2004 and 2016 show that Americans' explicit and implicit attitudes toward certain social groups are becoming less biased over time.

9h

Deep low-frequency earthquakes indicate migration of magmatic fluids beneath Laacher See Volcano

Magma could rise from the upper mantle into the middle and upper crust beneath the Laacher See Volcano (Germany). The scientists present evidence of deep and low-frequency earthquakes caused by magma movements under the Laacher See Volcano.

9h

Green catalysts with Earth-abundant metals accelerate production of bio-based plastic

Scientists have developed and analyzed a novel catalyst for the oxidation of 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, which is crucial for generating new raw materials that replace the classic non-renewable ones used for making many plastics.

9h

2D materials: Researchers discover multilayer band gap using its own technology

Korean researchers have proved the existence of the second band gap in a 2D structure. The result is expected to be used in various fields such as the development of emerging materials, solar cells, and catalysts.

9h

Stock options worth more for women, senior managers, study finds

A novel new way of determining the value of employee stock options has yielded some surprising insights: Options granted to woman and senior managers are worth more because they hold them longer. And options that vest annually rather than monthly are worth more for the same reason.

9h

The story of a parent's transition and a son's redemption | Paula Stone Williams and Jonathan Williams

Paula Stone Williams knew from a young age that she was transgender. But as she became a parent and prominent evangelical pastor, she feared that coming out would mean losing everything. In this moving, deeply personal talk, Paula and her son Jonathan Williams share what Paula's transition meant for their family — and reflect on their path to redemption. As Jonathan says: "I cannot ask my father

9h

What American Men Do With Their Extra Half Hour of Daily Leisure Time

There is a leisure gap in America: The average man has about five and a half hours of free time a day, according to government data . The average woman has a minute shy of five. What are men doing with that extra half hour? Some of it is spent socializing, exercising, and simply relaxing, among other things. But “about half of the gap is from TV,” says Liana Sayer, a sociologist at the University

9h

Symptom-assessment questionnaire should improve understanding, treatment of menopause

A new questionnaire being developed through a collaboration between the Massachusetts General Hospital Midlife Women's Health Center and the North American Menopause Society is designed to improve knowledge of the extent and impact on women of genitourinary symptoms of menopause.

9h

Opioids fueled a doubling of suicides and overdoses in the US

Suicides and drug overdoses kill American adults at twice the rate today as they did just 17 years ago, and opioids are a key contributor to that rise, according to a new review and analysis. Reversing this deadly double trend will take investment in programs that have been proven to prevent and treat opioid addiction.

9h

Powerful X-ray beams unlock secrets of nanoscale crystal formation

High-energy X-ray beams and a clever experimental setup allowed researchers to watch a high-pressure, high-temperature chemical reaction to determine for the first time what controls formation of two different nanoscale crystalline structures in the metal cobalt. The technique allowed continuous study of cobalt nanoparticles as they grew from clusters including tens of atoms to crystals as large a

9h

Ny behandling mod hustruvold: Virtual reality kan forvandle bøddel til offer

Ændrer dit køn eller din hudfarve sig, så gør dine tanker også.

9h

Poll: Older Americans are really worried about health insurance

A new national poll suggests that many people in their 50s and early 60s harbor serious worries about their health insurance status, now and in the future. Forty-five percent of Americans ages 50 to 64 say they have little or no confidence that they’ll be able to afford health coverage once they retire. And 27 percent say they’re not sure they’d be able to afford their coverage over the next year

9h

Boeing og Sikorsky kappes om at revolutionere helikopteren

PLUS. Men konkurrenten Bell har allerede testet sin kandidat i mere end et år.

9h

Laser-cooled plasma paves way for star simulations

Physicists have created the world’s first laser-cooled neutral plasma, completing a 20-year quest that sets the stage for simulators that recreate exotic states of matter found inside Jupiter and white dwarf stars. The findings involve new techniques for laser cooling clouds of rapidly expanding plasma to temperatures about 50 times colder than deep space. “We don’t know the practical payoff yet,

9h

Deep low-frequency earthquakes indicate migration of magmatic fluids beneath Laacher See

Magma could rise from the upper mantle into the middle and upper crust beneath the Laacher See Volcano (Germany). This is the result of a study conducted by the Seismological Survey of Southwest Germany, together with GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Seismological Survey of North Rhine-Westphalia. The scientists present evidence of deep an

9h

Implicit attitudes can change over the long term

Data from more than 4 million tests completed between 2004 and 2016 show that Americans' explicit and implicit attitudes toward certain social groups are becoming less biased over time, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

9h

New reference values for cancer patients' quality of life

Researchers and practitioners across the globe frequently use the 'EORTC' questionnaire to measure self-reported quality of life of cancer patients. For the first time, a group of researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have determined general population quality of life normative data for 15 individual countries. These data allow for a more meaningful interpretation of questionnaire

9h

Balanced diet, exercise may not prevent gestational diabetes

A new study is the latest evidence that the 'first-line' strategy for preventing gestational diabetes mellitus isn't working. Over the past five years, more than 5,000 pregnant women took part in clinical trials focused on limiting weight gain in order to prevent gestational diabetes. The moms-to-be improved their diet quality, ate less, and increased their physical activity. They also developed g

9h

Researchers say auditory testing can identify children for autism screening

The authors note a strong connection between auditory dysfunction and autism, suggesting that hearing issues identified at birth can be a clue to monitor the child for autism. Uncovering hearing issues would also improve outcomes for all children because the finding would trigger early interventions.

9h

Why people reject city trees

Why did nearly one-quarter of eligible residents in Detroit turn down free street trees? That's the mystery UVM researcher Christine Carmichael solves in one of the first studies to explore opposition to city tree planting programs.As cities from New York to L.A. embark on tree planting initiatives, the research helps to explain why more than 1,800 of 7,425 eligible Detroit residents — roughly 25

9h

New research to explore how skill influences result of animal fights

The role of skill in determining the outcome of animal contests is to be explored in new research by the University of Plymouth.

10h

CES 2019: It's all about the games (and AI)

The CES 2019 gadget show is revving up in Las Vegas. Here are the latest findings and observations from Associated Press reporters on the ground as technology's biggest trade event gets underway.

10h

Study explains why thousands of Detroit residents rejected city's tree planting efforts

Trees are a hallmark of vibrant neighborhoods. So why did nearly one-quarter of eligible residents in Detroit, Michigan, turn down free street trees? That's the mystery University of Vermont researcher Christine Carmichael solves in one of the first studies to explore opposition to city tree planting programs.

10h

200 hurtigladestationer skyder op på tre år

E.ON er på vej med hurtigladestationer ved motorvejsnettet i syv store lande. Lignende anlæg kan komme på plads centralt i storbyerne.

10h

'Flipped' metal oxide cage can sort CO2 from CO

Scientists have studied host-guest interactions in vanadate clusters. V12 is a spherical bowl that hosts small molecules in its interior. The team created empty (guest-free) V12 for the first time. One of the 12 units of VO5 was found to flip inwards to fill the void vacated by the guest. Empty V12 could absorb CO2 but rejected CO, offering a way to separate these molecules for CO2 capture.

10h

CES 2019 Liveblog Day 1: News and Photos From CES in Las Vegas

This year's CES, one of the biggest consumer tech showcases in the world, starts Monday morning. Join us for live updates from the show in Las Vegas, Nevada.

10h

Machine learning and quantum mechanics team up to understand water at the atomic level

Why is water densest at around 4 degrees Celsius? Why does ice float? Why heavy water has a different melting point compared to normal water? Why do snowflakes have a six-fold symmetry? A collaborative study, led by researchers in EPFL and just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides physical insights into these questions by marrying data-driven machine learning

10h

Disruptive technology to predict faults on train tracks and in stations

Train delays could be a thing of the past, thanks to a system that predicts when part of a train track, signaling equipment or other devices at a station are likely to fail. It does this by using thousands of sensors and 3-D modeling that taps into big data.

10h

Stock options worth more for women, senior managers, study finds

A novel new way of determining the value of employee stock options has yielded some surprising insights: Options granted to woman and senior managers are worth more because they hold them longer. And options that vest annually rather than monthly are worth more for the same reason.

10h

Dansk økonom bag et af 2018´s vigtigste forskningsresultater

Din livsstil og dit helbred er i høj grad formet af sundhed og sygdom blandt dine nærmeste,…

10h

Image: Multi-wavelength view of a supernova remnant

New Year's Eve may be past, but we are not done with fireworks just yet. This image, which includes data from ESA's Herschel Space Observatory, shows the remnants of an explosion – not of the colourful type ignited during celebrations, but of the stellar kind.

10h

CubeSats joining Hera mission to asteroid system

When ESA's planned Hera mission journeys to its target binary asteroid system, it will not be alone. The spacecraft will carry two tiny CubeSats for deployment around – and eventual landing on – the Didymos asteroids. Each companion spacecraft will be small enough to fit inside a briefcase, as compared to the desk-sized Hera.

10h

The best tech for working from home

DIY Stay focused and on-task. Working from home doesn't have to mean a dip in productivity. These apps and gadgets will help you stay focused, motivated, and on-task.

10h

Would you vote for a Democrat who behaves like a Republican?

Imagine you are a fairly mainstream Republican voter and are considering Republican candidate Luis Vasquez. He says he wants to raise taxes on the wealthy and believes government should do more to prevent discrimination against racial minorities. Would you still vote for him?

10h

Stock options worth more for women, senior managers, study finds

A novel new way of determining the value of employee stock options has yielded some surprising insights: Options granted to woman and senior managers are worth more because they hold them longer. And options that vest annually rather than monthly are worth more for the same reason.

10h

Researchers discover multilayer band gap using its own technology

Korean researchers have proved the existence of the second band gap in a 2D structure. The result is expected to be used in various fields such as the development of emerging materials, solar cells, and catalysts.

10h

Green catalysts with Earth-abundant metals accelerate production of bio-based plastic

Scientists at Tokyo Tech have developed and analyzed a novel catalyst for the oxidation of 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, which is crucial for generating new raw materials that replace the classic non-renewable ones used for making many plastics.

10h

Would you vote for a Democrat who behaves like a Republican?

The Bright Line Watch team tested how committed the American public really is to its democracy. Are there universal democratic principles that, if violated by politicians, would generate resistance from the public, and would citizens of all political stripes be equally willing to punish candidates for such violations?The team's finding is striking: partisanship outweighs all other factors for both

10h

'Flipped' metal oxide cage can sort CO2 from CO

A Japanese research team led by Kanazawa University studied host-guest interactions in vanadate clusters. V12 is a spherical bowl that hosts small molecules in its interior. The team created empty (guest-free) V12 for the first time. One of the 12 units of VO5 was found to flip inwards to fill the void vacated by the guest. Empty V12 could absorb CO2 but rejected CO, offering a way to separate the

10h

3-D scans of bat skulls help natural history museums open up dark corners of their collections

Picture a natural history museum. What comes to mind? Childhood memories of dinosaur skeletons and dioramas? Or maybe you still visit to see planetarium shows or an IMAX feature? You may be surprised to hear that behind these public-facing exhibits lies a priceless treasure trove that most visitors will never see: a museum's collections.

10h

Powerful X-ray beams unlock secrets of nanoscale crystal formation

High-energy X-ray beams and a clever experimental setup allowed researchers to watch a high-pressure, high-temperature chemical reaction to determine for the first time what controls formation of two different nanoscale crystalline structures in the metal cobalt. The technique allowed continuous study of cobalt nanoparticles as they grew from clusters including tens of atoms to crystals as large a

10h

Drones caused havoc at Gatwick, so why are governments still spending billions on tanks and aircraft carriers?

The disruption caused by reports of drones flying over Gatwick airport in December 2018 was a magnificent illustration of the uselessness of the UK's big-ticket defence spending. The United Kingdom is not short of high-end military kit. Apart from its nuclear deterrent (which may or may not be in working order), the nation's £37 billion annual defence spending has allowed it to build, buy and main

10h

Rovibrational quantum state resolution of the C60 fullerene

A central objective of chemical and molecular physics is to understand molecules as quantum mechanical systems. The complex internal dynamics of such systems evolve across wide energy and time scales, exhibited by a variety of electronic, vibrational, rotational and spin degrees of freedom. Since its original discovery, the unique properties of buckminsterfullerene (C60) have attracted intense res

10h

Neutrinos become less and less mysterious

The authors of a study published in Physical Review D have shown that coherent neutrino scattering with nuclei provides a novel way to measure the neutrino charge radii. This interaction was theoretically predicted more than 40 years ago, but the difficulty of measuring the very small nuclear recoil inhibited its experimental observation until 2017 by the COHERENT experiment.

10h

Alcohol-related treatment among American Indians and Alaska natives

A new study from researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapter Hill in the Gillings School of Global Public Health and the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation in Berkeley, California, examines the proportions of AIAN who seek treatment for lifetime alcohol use disorder and the characteristics associated with those who seek treatment.

10h

Powerful X-ray beams unlock secrets of nanoscale crystal formation

High-energy X-ray beams and a clever experimental setup allowed researchers to watch a high-pressure, high-temperature chemical reaction to determine for the first time what controls formation of two different nanoscale crystalline structures in the metal cobalt. The technique allowed continuous study of cobalt nanoparticles as they grew from clusters including tens of atoms to crystals as large a

10h

Why South Africa will find it hard to break free from its vicious teaching cycle

Half of all South African pupils who attended school for five years can't do basic calculations. This is according to a 2015 TIMMS report on mathematics achievements among Grade 5 learners in South Africa.

10h

Breakthrough study uncovers origin of plant sperm

A large international team of researchers has uncovered the origin of an ancient genetic mechanism needed for plant fertility.

10h

Q&A: The Games Animals Play

In some species, youngsters play to develop skills they’ll need as adults. But in other animals, adults seem to frolic for the fun of it.

11h

3-D-printed guns may be more dangerous to their users than targets

Despite fears that guns made with 3-D printers will let criminals and terrorists easily make untraceable, undetectable plastic weapons at home, my own experience with 3-D manufacturing quality control suggests that, at least for now, 3-D-printed firearms may pose as much, or maybe even more, of a threat to the people who try to make and use them.

11h

Researchers develop novel maps to help protect crucial Arctic ecosystems

A team of researchers lead by the University of Manitoba has finally mapped some of the best places to eat in the North American Arctic.

11h

How to Calculate the Physics in 'Super Smash Bros. Ultimate'

Using the videogame's training mode, you can figure out the rules governing how the various characters jump and move.

11h

Why we want to build a machine that can predict a person's attractiveness

It is an age-old question – what makes someone attractive? We often say things like "beauty is in the eye of the beholder" but while this romantic notion may bring comfort to those dealt a poor hand in life, it also gives the impression that the foundations of attractiveness are elusive and unpredictable. It suggests that what each of us sees as an attractive trait – whether physical or psychologi

11h

How do carrier proteins transport ADP and ATP in and out of mitochondria?

Scientists at the MRC-MBU in Cambridge, U.K., have discovered how a key transport protein, called the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier, transports adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the chemical fuel of the cell. This process is vital to keep us alive, every second of our lives, for all of our lives. This work will help us understand how mutations can affect the function of these proteins, resulting in a

11h

Incredible 'sea monster' skull revealed in 3D

Face-to-face with the marine reptile that swam the ancient seas 200 million years ago.

11h

Soil minerals hang on to a whole lot of carbon

The minerals in soil can hold on to a significant amount of carbon pulled from the atmosphere, a new study shows. The finding could prove beneficial as the world tries to shift its carbon economy, researchers say. “We’ve known for quite a long time that the carbon stored on minerals is the carbon that sticks around for a long time,” says Oliver Chadwick of the University of California, Santa Barb

11h

Scientists call for more diversity in genomic research

Genomic studies have generated important discoveries regarding human health and behavior, but new research suggests that scientific advancement is limited by a lack of diversity. They show that the people studied in genetic discovery research continue to be overwhelmingly of European descent, but also for the first time reveal that subjects are concentrated in a handful of countries — the UK, US

11h

What is really eating Apple – and why Steve Jobs would not be doing a lot better

Apple has started the new year by disappointing investors with its first profit warning in 17 years. The company said that poor sales of its latest range of iPhones has helped to weaken its first financial quarter (September to December 2018). Apple now expects revenues of US$84 billion (£66 billion) with a gross profit margin of 38%, having initially expected between US$89 billion and US$93 billi

11h

Three new open clusters discovered in the Milky Way

Using data from ESA's Gaia satellite, Brazilian astronomers have detected three new open clusters in the Milky Way. The clusters, designated UFMG 1, UFMG 2 and UFMG 3, were found in the Sagittarius arm of the galaxy. The discovery is reported in a paper published December 27 on the arXiv.org pre-print server.

11h

Jair Bolsonaro can be stopped from trashing the Amazon – here's how

The inauguration of Brazil's new president, Jair Bolsonaro, has triggered fears that rates of deforestation in the Amazon will increase. There are indeed good reasons for concern about Bolsonaro's administration. But several factors, both domestic and transnational, could constrain its ability to wreak environmental damage.

11h

11h

Using big databases to find superconductors of the future

Japanese researchers have found an approach to more quickly and successfully identify superconducting materials.

11h

Sowing seeds for snapper habitat

In an Australian first, recreational fishers will have a crack at restoring the lost seagrass meadows of Cockburn Sound.

11h

Fluctuating personal income may be associated with an increased heart disease risk

Young adults who had two or more significant drops in income over a 15-year period had nearly double the risk of cardiovascular disease or dying prematurely.

11h

Low cervical cancer screening rates

The percentage of women who are screened for cervical cancer may be far lower than national data suggests, according to a recent study.

11h

New materials could 'drive wound healing' by harnessing natural healing methods

Researchers have developed new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing.

11h

100 millioner kroner til naturvidenskabelig begejstring

Kriblekrable-projekt til de alleryngste, virtuelt observatorium ved Brorfelde og 17 andre projekter har fået del i Novo Nordisk Fondens støtte til naturvidenskabelig uddannelse og formidling.

11h

Amelia Earhart Would Have a Hard Time Disappearing in 2019

From the early years of aviation up until about 2000, the main way pilots navigated was by playing connect-the-dots across a map.

11h

Eating your veggies, even in space

Fresh food is so attractive to astronauts that they celebrated with salad when they were able to cultivate a few lettuce heads on the International Space Station three years ago. In 2021, scientists hope to grow beans in space in high-tech planters developed at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

11h

From dreams to fire: How Aboriginal Australians shaped biodiversity

For many wild species, Aboriginal Australians shaped their diversity and distribution and even helped them thrive.

11h

Fermilab scientists lead quest to find elusive fourth kind of neutrino

Neutrinos, ghostly fundamental particles that are famously difficult to study, could provide scientists with clues about the evolution of the universe.

11h

Bluefin tuna are back around the UK and a new study explains why

Bluefin tuna are back in the sea around the U.K. after decades of absence and a new study says that warming seas can explain why. Bluefin tuna are one of the biggest, most valuable and most endangered fish in the oceans. Sportfishermen excited at the prospect of catching a fish that can grow to over 900 kg have already launched a U.K. campaign to allow recreational fishing for one of game fishing'

11h

Essential amino acid in humans, methionine, controls cell growth programs

A recent study from the Laxman lab elucidates how a small metabolite and amino acid, methionine, acts as a growth signal for cells by setting into motion a metabolic program for cell proliferation.

11h

Why do sharks dive?

Is it to regulate their body temperature? Conserve energy? Find food?

11h

Better ‘tagging’ yields detailed look at flu virus

By repurposing an existing biological tool known as site-specific labeling, researchers have devised a new approach to studying influenza, one that offers clues about how the virus remains so successful. Scientists have known for decades that a flu virus in a human body can be a lot different than viruses grown in a lab. As opposed to the uniform, spherical, textbook-style viruses in a petri dish

11h

Hopkins researchers ID new biomarker for colorectal cancers

Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a protein involved in cell proliferation and the development of new blood vessels that could serve as a marker for the early detection of colorectal cancers.

11h

UMN researchers describe need for health systems to improve care of gender non-binary patients

A perspective piece authored by UMN Medical School researchers and published in the New England Journal of Medicine uncovers significant healthcare disparities for individuals who identify as neither male nor female or may not identify as having a gender.

11h

The iconic periodic table could have looked very different

Science On its 150th anniversary, a chemist looks back at the various tables we almost ended up with. The periodic table didn’t actually start with Mendeleev. Many had tinkered with arranging the elements.

12h

Eksperter om faldende smartphonesalg: Ingen argumenter for at købe den nyeste model

Udviklingen i de nye modeller er for beskeden til at lokke køberne til, mener eksperter.

12h

Image of the Day: Embryo in Blue

A bright blue stain highlights the sensory nerves of a developing mouse embryo.

12h

Americans are happier in states that spend more on libraries, parks and highways

Americans are happier in states where governments spend more on public goods, among them libraries, parks, highways, natural resources and police protection, a new study has found.

12h

Environmental greenness may not improve student test scores, study finds

Researchers at the University of Illinois and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service suggest in a new study that environmental greenness may not be associated with higher test scores in schoolchildren after all.

12h

New robot can sense plankton optically and acoustically

Oceanographers and engineers at the University of California San Diego collaborated to modify a common physical oceanography instrument to be able to image zooplankton as it glides through the ocean.

12h

Scientists open up new world for biologics—inside the cell

The vast majority of top-selling drugs are biologics—also known as proteins. Proteins are used today to treat many debilitating diseases, including arthritis, Crohn's disease, and several forms of cancer. They have helped to improve the lives of many millions of people worldwide. And proteins have the potential to help many millions more, but they can't, because most are unable to pass through the

12h

Manipulation of gossypol-containing glands in cotton can boost plant's natural defenses

Development of a cotton plant with stronger natural defenses due to a greater gland density and thus more gossypol in the leaves could soon be a reality, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research plant biotechnologist in College Station.

12h

Revised Brazilian forest code may lead to increased legal deforestation in Amazon

Up to 15 million hectares of tropical rainforest in the Brazilian Amazon could lose protection and be clear-cut because of an article in the country's new Forest Code. The warning comes from Brazilian researchers at the University of São Paulo's Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ-USP) and Swedish researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm and Chalmers University of Te

12h

New materials could 'drive wound healing' by harnessing natural healing methods

Imperial researchers have developed new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing.

12h

Mayo researchers find 'unacceptable low' cervical cancer screening rates

The percentage of women who are screened for cervical cancer may be far lower than national data suggests, according to a Mayo Clinic study recently published in the Journal of Women's Health.

12h

Illuminating how nitrogenase makes ammonia

A team of researchers led by PNNL computational scientist Simone Raugei have revealed new insights about how this complex enzyme does its job, finding that the seemingly wasteful formation of hydrogen has an essential purpose. Their paper, "Critical computational analysis illuminates the reductive-elimination mechanism that activates nitrogenase for N2 reduction," was published in the Proceedings

12h

Ancient urban villa with shrine for ancestor worship discovered in Egypt

Excavation work led by the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute team has unearthed a large urban villa dating back to the early New Kingdom, about 1500-1450 B.C.E. The findings at the site of Tell Edfu in southern Egypt include a large hall containing a rare and well-preserved example of a domestic shrine dedicated to family ancestors.

12h

Chandra detection of a circumnuclear torus

Most galaxies host supermassive black holes at their nuclei, each with millions or billions of solar-masses of material. There is thought to be a torus of dust and gas around the black holes, and an accreting disk that becomes very hot as material falls onto it, in turn heating the torus and circumnuclear gas and dust. Such an active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiates across the spectrum while the du

13h

Female age and laying order drive variation of egg quality in blue tits

Little more than 50 years after the German ornithologist Wolfgang Makatsch published his book titled No Egg Is Like Another (Kein Ei gleicht dem anderen), new research at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry and the University of Hohenheim reveals exactly how right he was. The study describes for the first time the egg albumen and

13h

Bitcoin Exposed Silicon Valley's Ultimate Aim: Making Money

Bitcoin is a prime example of how Silicon Valley touts "democratization" and "decentralization" as righteous motives when wealth is the ultimate goal.

13h

The Star Wars Franchise Will Return in Full Force in 2019

Is your New Year's resolution to consume more 'Star Wars' content? The universe has delivered.

13h

Green darner dragonflies migrate a bit like monarch butterflies

Some dragonflies do a north-south annual migration that takes at least three generations.

13h

Crowdfunding: The fuel for cancer quackery (part 2)

In September, The Good Thinking Society released a study estimating the scope of crowdfunding for cancer quackery in the UK. Now, Jeremy Snyder and Tim Caulfield have done the same for the US, specifically for homeopathy for cancer. The results are alarming. Truly, crowdfunding is the fuel for cancer quackery. But will GoFundMe and other crowdfunding sites clean up their acts?

13h

New materials could 'drive wound healing' by harnessing natural healing methods

Materials are widely used to help heal wounds: Collagen sponges help treat burns and pressure sores, and scaffold-like implants are used to repair bones. However, the process of tissue repair changes over time, so scientists are developing biomaterials that interact with tissues as healing takes place.

13h

How Big Pharma secures drug monopolies

Drug companies start monopolies by cornering the market on emerging drugs. After cornering the market, these giant corporations inflate the prices to gouge the consumer. Lowering drug prices could be obtained by starting first in the patent office.

13h

Dear Therapist: My Co-workers Think I’m Rude, and I’m Not Sure How to Change

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I recently received some feedback at work, and I'm having trouble adjusting to it. Apparently, some of the things I do at work come off as belittling or arrogant to some of the people I work with. However, I w

13h

Better Diagnostics Could Help in the Fight against Flu

So-called molecular tests can be quicker and more accurate than what doctors use now — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Here's Where J.K. Rowling Got Her Magical Ideas for Harry Potter (Photos)

J.K. Rowling drew inspiration from many historical magical ideas when she penned Harry Potter.

13h

Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Triggered Mile-High Tsunami That Spread Through Earth's Oceans

When the dinosaur-killing asteroid collided with Earth more than 65 million years ago, it did not go gently into that good night. Rather, it blasted a nearly mile-high tsunami through the Gulf of Mexico that caused chaos throughout the world's oceans.

13h

Ancient DNA from Viking Graves Proves the Fierce Fighters Rode Male Horses

In Iceland, manly Viking warriors were buried with their male horses.

13h

Impending Galactic Crash Could Rip Open the Black Hole at the Milky Way’s Center

The end of the Milky Way as we know it may come 2 billion years ahead of schedule.

13h

China May Have Put a Working Electromagnetic Gun on a Warship. Is This a Big Deal?

China appears to have beaten the U.S. in the race to mount a rail gun on a battleship. Does it matter?

13h

Fishy Smarts: Archerfish Can Recognize Human Faces in 3-D

The finding suggests this visual ability may be more “primitive” than scientists thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

We could drill water wells in Martian ice to survive on the Red Planet

Future Martian explorers will need water if they are going to survive. They may be able to melt it out of underground ice sheets using a type of well already used in Antarctica

13h

NHS 10-year-plan aims to expand digital healthcare and genetic testing

A plan for the future of the UK’s National Health Service aims to improve mental health services and provide genome sequencing for all children with cancer

14h

Techtopia #86: Hvad sker der i 2019?

Vi letter på nytårshatten og hilser et nyt år velkomment. Det sker med et tilbageblik på techåret, der gik, og et blik i krystalkuglen for 2019.

14h

#54 Kroppen i rummet

Professor i rummedicin Peter Norsk og astronaut Andreas Mogensen forklarer, hvordan menneskekroppen bliver påvirket af at være i rummet.

14h

The Supreme Court Could Make Gerrymandering Worse

The Supreme Court’s decision on Friday to take up partisan-gerrymandering cases from North Carolina and Maryland brought to mind a saying attributed to Judy Garland : Behind every cloud is another cloud. The now firmly conservative Court likely took the cases not to announce that such activities violate the Constitution, but to reverse the lower courts that said they do. Down the road, the Court

14h

The Political Question of the Future: But Are They Real?

T he bully pulpit is getting smaller. Open your phone, and there’s the Democratic rock star Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the newly elected representative from New York, live-streaming on Instagram as she whips up some mac and cheese. Now it’s a video of maybe–presidential hopeful Beto O’Rourke pouring a batter of “slime” with his daughter on a well-lit kitchen island . Now it’s Senator Elizabeth War

14h

When America Stared Into the Abyss

T he Treasury secretary’s voice exuded tension and urgency. “A very serious situation is developing,” Henry Paulson warned House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on the phone. “Nothing we can say will calm the situation until we come up with a policy that is overwhelming force!” Later that Thursday afternoon, Pelosi received the same dire message when she telephoned Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke; fin

14h

Samfundskritiske sektorer ruster sig mod cyberangreb

Danmark er i »meget-høj« risiko for at blive ramt af cyberangreb. Derfor offentliggøres cybersikkerheds-strategier for seks kritiske sektorer i dag, som en del af »National strategi for cyber- og informationssikkerhed«

14h

Trafikstyrelsen udsender advarsel mod lommevogne

Efter ulykken på Storebæltsbroen advarer styrelsen mod at benytte såkaldte lommevogne til at fragte lastbiltrailere med godstog.

14h

Fluctuating personal income may be associated with an increased heart disease risk

Young adults who had two or more significant drops in income over a 15-year period had nearly double the risk of cardiovascular disease or dying prematurely.

14h

Privacy becomes a selling point at tech show

Apple is not among the exhibitors at the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show, but that didn't prevent the iPhone maker from sending a message to attendees on a large billboard.

15h

Japan billionaire says 'free cash' tweet most shared of all time

Billionaire Japanese tycoon and future space tourist Yusaku Maezawa said Monday his tweet promising a cash giveaway of nearly $10,000 was the most retweeted ever.

15h

Scientists call for more diversity in genomic research

A growing number of genomic studies have generated important discoveries regarding human health and behaviour, but new research from the University of Oxford suggests that scientific advancement is limited by a lack of diversity. They show that the people studied in genetic discovery research continue to be overwhelmingly of European descent, but also for the first time reveal that subjects are co

15h

7,6 millioner spillerkonti lækket fra populært onlinespil

Onlinespillet »Town of Salem« har fået lækket kontooplysninger på stort set hele spillerbasen, herunder kodeord hashet med usikker algoritme.

15h

Sikkerhedschef: Vi kender ikke baggrunden for vindrestriktioner på Vestbroen

Banedanmark erkender, at man ikke kender baggrund for vindkrav på Vestbroen, selvom man for nylig har strammet dem.

15h

Regeringen vil anlægge ni nye øer ud for København

Området kan blive Europas Silicon Valley, mener optimistisk direktør for Dansk Erhverv. Pris og finansiering er dog ikke klar.

15h

Scientists call for more diversity in genomic research

Genomic studies have generated important discoveries regarding human health and behaviour, but new research from the University of Oxford suggests that scientific advancement is limited by a lack of diversity. They show that the people studied in genetic discovery research continue to be overwhelmingly of European descent, but also for the first time reveal that subjects are concentrated in a hand

15h

Ghosn to appear in court: what happens next?

The case of auto tycoon Carlos Ghosn has gripped Japan and the business world since his stunning arrest in November, and now he is finally getting his day in court.

17h

Most police forces fail to meet fingerprint evidence standards

UK forensic science regulator warns of shortcomings that could cause cases to collapse Less than 10% of police forces have met basic quality standards for fingerprint evidence, the government’s forensic science regulator has warned. All UK forces were ordered three years ago to ensure their laboratories met international standards for analysing prints found at crime scenes. But only three forces

17h

US gadget love forecast to grow despite trust issues

The trade group behind the Consumer Electronics Show set to start here Tuesday forecast that US gadget love will grow despite trust and privacy issues hammering the tech world.

17h

Thousands stung in Australian jellyfish 'invasion'

Highly venomous jellyfish have stung more than three thousand people on Australia's northeastern shores in just a few days, authorities said Monday, forcing the closure of several beaches.

17h

Renault alliance 'not in danger': Nissan CEO tells AFP

Nissan's alliance with France's Renault is not in danger "at all", the Japanese automaker's CEO told AFP on Monday, despite tensions exposed by the arrest of the partnership's chief Carlos Ghosn.

17h

Breadmaking robot startup eyes fresh connections

The robot breadmaker came to Las Vegas this week, aiming to bring some freshness to a sector that may be ready for disruption.

17h

Sidestepping trade war, Musk breaks ground on Tesla Shanghai plant

Tesla boss Elon Musk presided Monday over the ground-breaking for a Shanghai factory that will allow the electric-car manufacturer to dodge the China-US tariff crossfire and sell directly to the world's biggest market for "green" vehicles.

17h

Hundreds of federal scientists miss conferences in shutdown

The world's largest airborne observatory was supposed to be parked in Seattle this week, so thousands of scientists attending the "Super Bowl of Astronomy" could behold this marvel: a Boeing 747 outfitted with a massive telescope used to study the fundamental mysteries of the universe.

17h

CES 2019: People will buy more smart stuff, fewer TVs

The CES 2019 gadget show is revving up in Las Vegas. Here are the latest findings and observations from Associated Press reporters on the ground as technology's biggest trade event gets underway.

17h

China's Huawei unveils chip for global big data market

Huawei Technologies Ltd. unveiled a processor chip Monday for data centers and cloud computing in a bid by the biggest global maker of telecom equipment to expand into new markets despite Western warnings the company might be a security risk.

17h

Americans are happier in states that spend more on libraries, parks and highways

Americans are happier in states where governments spend more on public goods, among them libraries, parks, highways, natural resources and police protection, a Baylor University study has found."Public goods are things you can't exclude people from using—and one person using them doesn't stop another from doing so," said researcher Patrick Flavin, Ph.D., associate professor of political science in

17h

The Golden Globes Just Threw a Wrench Into the Oscars Race

On Sunday, the Golden Globes declared that the best films of 2018 were Green Book and Bohemian Rhapsody —a surprising pair of wins that helped throw the Oscars race into chaos just weeks before that ceremony’s nominations are announced. Green Book , a mostly fuzzy ode to the friendship between the musician Don Shirley and his driver, Tony Vallelonga, won Best Musical or Comedy; it beat out the mo

17h

GDPR-ret er ikke suveræn: Kun i få tilfælde kan du få dine kommunale data slettet

Bente Agerholm fra Thisted fik jobcentret til at slette et notat om, at hun var »doven og psykisk ustabil«. Men retten til at få data slettet er ikke suveræn: Kun ved berettiget interesse og lovhjemmel kan man få slettet persondata fra offentlige systemer.

19h

India scientists dismiss Einstein theories

Speakers at a major conference have been criticised for making irrational claims based on Hindu mythology.

19h

Americans are happier in states that spend more on libraries, parks and highways

Americans are happier in states where governments spend more on public goods, among them libraries, parks, highways, natural resources and police protection, a Baylor University study has found.

19h

Suicide risk increases significantly following a cancer diagnosis

New research indicates that the risk of suicide increases significantly in the first year following a diagnosis of cancer, and this increase varies by the type of cancer diagnosed. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings point to the importance of screening for suicide risk in newly diagnosed patients and ensuring that patients have ac

19h

Cardiac events, stroke lead to loss of work, reduced income in survivors of working age

People who have experienced a heart attack (myocardial infarction), stroke or cardiac arrest are significantly less likely to be working than healthy people, and if they are working, on average have lower incomes, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

19h

Sandra Oh Wins a Golden Globe—And the Night

The Golden Globes have long had a reputation for being Hollywood’s most rollicking awards show, but Sunday evening’s proceedings began with a tender moment of reflection amid the romp and the revelry. “I said yes to the fear of being on this stage tonight because I wanted to be here, to look out onto this audience and witness this moment of change,” the Killing Eve star Sandra Oh said as she clos

20h

Tungmetaller i byen øger forekomsten af antibiotikaresistens

Undersøgelse fra Københavns Universitet viser, at tungmetaller i byjord giver antibiotikaresistente bakterier rig mulighed for at sprede deres gener til andre organismer.

21h

CES 2019: Samsung TVs Score iTunes and a MicroLED Upgrade

Samsung shows off new televisions at CES, and says iTunes will soon join its smart TV offerings.

21h

Jazmine Barnes Case Shows How Trauma Can Affect Memory

Eyewitness testimony is unreliable because people try to understand a traumatic event by using what they know about the world and fill in gaps, experts said.

23h

Opioid crisis roadmap overlooks gender

Women's Health Research at Yale (WHRY) is calling on a government committee to revise its report on a coordinated response to the opioid epidemic so that it reflects the unique needs of women.

23h

India outcry after scientists claim ancient Hindus invented stem cell research

The organisers of a major Indian science conference said they were concerned by speakers citing religious texts and ideas at the event The organisers of a major Indian science conference distanced themselves on Sunday from speakers who used the prestigious event to dismiss Einstein’s discoveries and claim ancient Hindus invented stem cell research. The Indian Scientific Congress Association expre

1d

Study identifies 'clinical risks' and biomarkers to screen patients with heart condition

Researchers at the University of Birmingham have found two biomarkers that could be used to identify a heart condition known as atrial fibrillation in patients who have three 'clinical risks.'

1d

Digital Mindfulness for Entrepreneurs

submitted by /u/Curious_Willingness [link] [comments]

1d

Starwatch: Mars and the Moon on show

Our only satellite and our nearest planet appear close together in the night sky this weekend but have little else in common This coming weekend, keep a look out for the Moon as it slides past the red planet Mars. The chart shows the view looking south at 18:00 GMT on 12 January. The view will be similar on the days either side of this. Mars is about twice the physical diameter of the Moon but ap

1d

'Sonic attack' on US embassy in Havana could have been crickets, say scientists

Noise which saw diplomats complaining of headaches and nausea could be song of Indies short-tailed cricket The US embassy in Havana more than halved its staff in 2017 when diplomats complained of headaches, nausea and other ailments after hearing penetrating noises in their homes and nearby hotels. The mysterious wave of illness fuelled speculation that the staff had been targeted by an acoustic

1d

The NHS 10-year plan: what we already know

Changes will include a mental health overhaul and advances in diabetes care As the government prepares to unveil its 10-year-plan for the NHS on Monday, here are some of the details we already know about. Continue reading…

1d

Four things Apple needs to do to bounce back in 2019

For 11 years, consumers have made Apple technology's jewel, selling hundreds of millions of iPhones happily every year, even as prices increased steadily.

1d

Death toll from Philippine storm, landslides climbs to 126

The death toll from a storm that devastated the Philippines shortly after Christmas rose to 126, authorities said Sunday, adding landslides caused by torrential rain were the top cause.

1d

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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