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nyheder2019januar08



EurekAlert!
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The first case of a Portuguese beetle living exclusively in groundwater. A diving beetle demonstrating various adaptations to the life underground, including depigmentation and evolutionary loss of eyes, was discovered in the cave Soprador do Carvalho, Portugal. This new to science species is the first known representative of the whole order of beetles to exclusively inhabit the underground waters of Portugal. The insect is described by the team of Dr Ignacio Ribera an
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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The Networks Blew the Call. O n Tuesday night , Donald Trump is planning to give an address on immigration, the southern border, and the government shutdown that has arisen from his insistence that any budget measure must include money for "the wall." When plans for the speech were announced on Monday evening, I opined on Twitter that it would be better for the major broadcasts not to carry the speech. There would have been
Published: 08 Jan 2019

MIT Technology Review
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Electric nanoparticles can target and kill cancer cells by zapping them. Particles that produce electrical signals when bombarded with ultrasound could be a way to direct a cell-killing treatment directly to tumors.
Published: 07 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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The Suicide of a Great Democracy. We had made plans to go to Washington weeks ago, and there was no way to change the trip. The train was almost empty when it pulled into Union Station on Friday night. The next morning, we went out into the dead heart of the city. The government shutdown was in its third week. Nearly all the museums that would have interested the kids were closed, and so were the ones that would have bored them.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Science News
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How the periodic table went from a sketch to an enduring masterpiece. 150 years ago, Russian chemist Dmitrii Mendeleev created the periodic table of the elements, revolutionizing chemistry.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

New York Times
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U.S. Carbon Emissions Surged in 2018 Even as Coal Plants Closed. America's carbon dioxide emissions rose by 3.4 percent in 2018, the biggest increase in eight years.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Viden (Danmarks Radio)
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Vi presser naturen til det yderste: Fem dyr, vi snart har udslettet. Fiskeri, krybskytteri og ødelæggelse af levesteder er nogle af årsagerne til, at mange dyr nu uddør.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Scientific American
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All Sand on Earth Could Be Made of Star Stuff. Silica, a common ingredient in sand, concrete and glass, may have its origins in supernovae
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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How writing technology shaped classical thinking. The Roman poet Lucretius' epic work "De rerum natura," or "On the Nature of Things," is the oldest surviving scientific treatise written in Latin. Composed around 55 B.C.E., the text is a lengthy piece of contrarianism. Lucreutius was in the Epicurean school of philosophy: He wanted an account of the world rooted in earthly matter, rather than explanations based on the Gods and religion.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

MIT Technology Review
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Never mind killer robots-here are six real AI dangers to watch out for in 2019. Last year a string of controversies revealed a darker (and dumber) side to artificial intelligence.
Published: 07 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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New way of switching exotic properties on and off in topological material. A weird feature of certain exotic materials allows electrons to travel from one surface of the material to another as if there were nothing in between. Now, researchers have shown that they can switch this feature on and off by toggling a material in and out of a stable topological state with pulses of light. The method could provide a new way of manipulating materials that could be used in future
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
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Essential nutrient may help fight Alzheimer's across generations. Researchers are exploring a safe and simple treatment for one of the most devastating and perplexing afflictions: Alzheimer's disease (AD). They are investigatign the effects of choline, an important nutrient that may hold promise in the war against the memory-stealing disorder.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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Worse Than Watergate. For decades, Watergate has served as the benchmark against which all other presidential scandals are measured. One sign of its continuing importance in the popular imagination is the use of the "-gate" suffix to indicate scandal: "Billygate," "Lewinskygate," "Plamegate," and far too many others to mention here. But Watergate's time as the gold standard of presidential malfeasance might well be co
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Live Science
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Cancer Death Rates Reach 25-Year Low. U.S. cancer death rates have declined continuously for the last quarter of a century, according to a new report.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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New CRISPR-based technology developed to control pests with precision-guided genetics. Using the CRISPR gene editing tool, Nikolay Kandul, Omar Akbari and their colleagues at UC San Diego and UC Berkeley devised a method of altering key genes that control insect sex determination and fertility.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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Computer simulation sheds new light on colliding stars. Unprecedented detail of the aftermath of a collision between two neutron stars depicted in a 3-D computer model created by a University of Alberta astrophysicist provides a better understanding of how some of the universe's fundamental elements form in cosmic collisions.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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Scientists provide new insight on how gene expression is controlled. Researchers have provided new insight on the mechanism underlying the control of gene expression in all living organisms, according to a study published today in eLife.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
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Evolution used same genetic formula to turn animals monogamous. According to a new study that looked at 10 species of vertebrates, evolution used a kind of universal formula for turning non-monogamous species into monogamous species — turning up the activity of some genes and turning down others in the brain.
Published: 07 Jan 2019

Science News
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A protein in mosquito eggshells could be the insects' Achilles' heel. A newly discovered protein found exclusively in mosquitoes may one day help control their numbers.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

NPR
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Meet The Granary Weevil, The Pantry Monster Of Our Own Creation. Granary weevils are different from similar species: They can't fly. That's because they figured out how to use humans to get around the globe, and we are getting tired of this clingy relationship. (Image credit: Biophoto Associates/Getty Images/Science Source)
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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Don't Reply to Your Emails. The day after Christmas, I spent seven hours sifting through more than 2,700 unread emails I had accumulated over the previous month. Like many other people, I intended to begin 2019 with a fresh inbox and zero unread messages. Since the idea of "Inbox Zero" was first coined in 2007 by Merlin Mann, a blogger who championed " finding the time and attention to do your best creative work ," it has b
Published: 08 Jan 2019

New York Times
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Australian Jellyfish Swarm Stings Thousands, Forcing Beach Closings. Bluebottle jellyfish are normally found far from shore, but they have been descending on Australia's east coast in what officials called a "relentless" assault.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

MIT Technology Review
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Cheaper AI for everyone is the promise with Intel and Facebook's new chip. Companies hoping to use artificial intelligence should benefit from more efficient chip designs.
Published: 07 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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The Personality Trait That Makes People Feel Comfortable Around You. Some people can walk into a room and instantly put everyone at ease. Others seem to make teeth clench and eyes roll no matter what they do. A small body of psychology research supports the idea that the way a person tends to make others feel is a consistent and measurable part of his personality. Researchers call it "affective presence." This concept was first described nearly 10 years ago in a s
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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U.S. Carbon Pollution Surged in 2018, After Years of Stasis. C arbon-dioxide emissions from the United States spiked sharply in 2018, bucking a three-year trend and making it more likely that the country will fail to meet its promises under the Paris Agreement on climate change, according to a preliminary analysis published Tuesday. The new study-written by the Rhodium Group, an energy-research firm-found that emissions of the heat-trapping gas leaped by 3
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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Why Mike Pence Couldn't End the Shutdown. Mike Pence was set up to fail. It seemed that way a lot over the past three weeks. In the days ahead of the federal funding deadline in December, it was the vice president who told Senate Republicans that the president would back a short-term spending bill to keep the government open. (The president then announced that he would not.) And it was Pence who, once the partial government shutdown was
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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How Corning Makes Super-Pure Glass for Fiber-Optic Cable. The glass company can't just melt silica. The process involves glass soot particles and a grain silo of sorts.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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Animals Keep Creating Mysteries by Sounding Weird. In late 2016, American diplomats living in Cuba started hearing a strange noise in their homes . It was high-pitched, deafening, and persistent-and no one could work out where it was coming from. In the following years, the mystery ballooned into an international incident. Many of the diplomats experienced dizziness, insomnia, hearing loss, and other troubling symptoms. A team from the University
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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Mueller Investigation 2019: Indictments, Witnesses, and More. The special counsel has lots of unfinished business on his to-do list this year, including a final report. Here's a rundown.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

New York Times
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ScienceTake: Watch Scientists Brew Their Own Lava. In controlled experiments, high-speed cameras caught video of explosions that occur when water hits hot liquid rock.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

MIT Technology Review
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Israel's "startup nation" is under threat from the tech giants that nurtured it. Global companies trying to tap into Tel Aviv's unique innovation ecosystem are threatening to destroy the very thing they came for.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

BBC News
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Report: US 2018 CO2 emissions saw biggest spike in years. Following three years of decline, US carbon emissions spiked in 2018, according to new research.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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Teens Are Spamming Instagram to Fight an Apparent Network of Child Porn. Updated at 2:00 p.m. ET on January 8, 2018. A hashtag war has been brewing on Instagram between users who appear to be trading child pornography and the memers intent on stopping them. A network of users on the platform has allegedly been using the hashtag #dropboxlinks to find and share explicit photos of underage children. Once these users connect, they are thought to trade the illicit material
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Big Think
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Could Kevin Hart have 'evolved' since posting his controversial tweets? Yes, says science.. Decade-old tweets by Kevin Hart, directed at gay men, have recently enflamed controversy. 2016 studies suggest that people's outlook and opinions can dramatically change over time. His hosting the Academy Awards ceremony could signal a message of redemption in terms of LGBT alliance. We live in interesting times, an age where more – it certainly seems – is expected from comedians, in terms of wha
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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The Shutdown Shows Just How Vital Government Scientists Are. As federal scientists sit at home, the many industries that rely on them are already beginning to feel their absence.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

BBC News
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The 210ft fatberg lurking in Sidmouth sewer. Take a look at the 210ft (64m) mass of congealed fat and rubbish clogging up Sidmouth's sewers.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Scientific American
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Pluto Probe Encounters a Pristine World in the Solar System's Suburbs. Ultima Thule, the most-distant object ever visited by a spacecraft, is revealing our solar system's deepest history-and, just maybe, revolutionizing planetary science
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Popular Science
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The three strength exercises everyone should do. Muscle Month Even if you're not trying to get swole, these movements will help you with everyday movements. Lifting weights can often seem reserved for the fittest among us, those muscle-laden guys and gals pumping iron and getting swole on a daily basis.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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The U.S. Isn't Really Leaving Syria and Afghanistan. President Donald Trump caused a political furor when he announced in December that he would quickly withdraw all 2,000 American troops in Syria, together with half of the 14,000 U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan. Democrats (and many Republicans) condemned the exit strategy as a boon for America's enemies. Secretary of Defense James Mattis resigned in protest, as did the special envoy for the counter-
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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A YubiKey for iOS Will Soon Free Your iPhone From PasswordsYubico has finally gotten the green light from Apple to make a hardware authentication token that works on iPhones and iPads.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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How Health Care Data and Lax Rules Help China Prosper in AI. Gathering health care data is much easier for Chinese companies than for their US counterparts-a boost for machine-learning algorithms.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Big Think
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Could Kevin Hart have 'evolved' since posting his controversial tweets? Yes, says science.. Decade-old tweets by Kevin Hart, directed at gay men, have recently enflamed controversy. 2016 studies suggest that people's outlook and opinions can dramatically change over time. His hosting the Academy Awards ceremony could signal a message of redemption in terms of LGBT alliance. We live in interesting times, an age where more – it certainly seems – is expected from comedians, in terms of wha
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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CES 2019 Liveblog Day 2: Tuesday's News and Photos, Live From Las Vegas. This year's CES, one of the biggest consumer tech showcases in the world, continues Tuesday. Join us for live updates from the show in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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Educated Americans Paved the Way for Divorce-Then Embraced Marriage. The countercultural revolution of the 1960s and 1970s threw the American family into chaos. Young adults-educated liberals especially-revolted against the constraints of 1950s family life, engaging seriously with formerly fringe ideas like open marriage and full-time employment for mothers. The old rules were in tatters, and nobody really knew what the new rules were. The likelihood that a given
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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CES 2019: All the Coolest Stuff We've Seen So Far. In the sea of consumer products that is CES 2019, a few gems stand out. This is the neatest tech we've seen at the show.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

MIT Technology Review
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You can now help IBM's debating AI come up with its speeches
Published: 08 Jan 2019

MIT Technology Review
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Hackers may have just stolen $1 million from the Ethereum Classic blockchain in a "51%" attack. [no content]
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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Variable venom-why are some snakes deadlier than others?. An international collaboration led by scientists from the National University of Ireland, Galway, The University of St Andrews, Trinity College Dublin and the Zoological Society of London has uncovered why the venom of some snakes makes them so much deadlier than others.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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A Third of Americans Use Ride-Hail. Uber and Lyft Need More. That number has doubled since 2015, but Uber and Lyft have made little progress on their bigger goal: attracting regular riders.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Big Think
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Your dog's personality is rooted in its breed's DNA, study finds. A new study compared behavioral data on dogs, obtained from owner surveys, with genetic information to identify genes associated with specific traits like aggression and attachment. The study found 131 locations in a dog's genome that seemed to be linked to 14 behavioral traits across various breeds. Some of these specific gene-behavior associations can also be found in humans, suggesting that fu
Published: 07 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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Bohemian Rhapsody, A Star Is Born, and the Myth of Authenticity. Accepting the Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Drama Motion Picture, Rami Malek thanked Freddie Mercury: "You beautiful man. This is for and because of you, gorgeous." He also gave a shout-out to the members of Queen who produced the Mercury biopic that shocked Hollywood by winning Best Drama on Sunday night. "To you, Brian May, and to you, Roger Taylor," he said, "for ensuring that authenticity
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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The Buzz Behind an App That Can Monitor Beehives Remotely. Sensors embedded in the hive let beekeepers assess the health of their pollinators via the internet.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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HERE Is Challenging Uber by Uniting the World's Cab Drivers. SoMo is a new app from mapping company HERE that pushes back against ride-hail dominance by giving other drivers a common platform.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Live Science
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Thousands of Female Penguins Are Being Stranded in South America. Why are thousands of female penguins washing up dead in South America?
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Quanta Magazine
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Jellyfish Genome Hints That Complexity Isn't Genetically Complex. An overarching theme in the story of evolution, at least over the past half billion years or so, is rising complexity . There are other themes, of course, but life has undoubtedly become more complicated since its origin. Early cells globbed together to form multicellular coalitions . Those developed more complex bodies and lifestyles as the millennia passed, finding ever more varied ways to make
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Big Think
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Study: Americans have become less biased-explicitly and implicitly-since 2004. The study examined the results of more than 4 million tests designed to measure implicit and explicit biases. The tests measured attitudes toward groups defined by age, disability, body weight, race, skin tone, and sexuality. All explicit biases decreased during the study's timeframe, while several categories of implicit bias diminished. None In an era when identity is brought to the forefront of
Published: 07 Jan 2019

Ingeniøren
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Havarikommission: Godstog kan køre rundt med ulåste vogne, selv om alle regler er overholdt. Selv når alle regler og procedurer bliver overholdt, kan såkaldte lommevogne med lastbiltrailere vise sig ikke at være låst og sikret, viser Havarikommissionens undersøgelser af ulykken på Storebæltsbroen.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Science-Based Medicine
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Osteopenia: When Does Decreased Bone Density Become a Disease Requiring Treatment?. Osteoporosis is routinely treated with bisphosphonates to prevent fractures. A new study suggests that osteopenia should be treated too. But questions remain.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Popular Science
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One day, 199 tornadoes. Environment Here's what a terrifying tornado outbreak looks like. In 2011, an outbreak slammed through a large swatch of the Southern and Eastern U.S.-not of disease, but of tornadoes.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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15 Games We Can't Wait for in 2019, From 'Metro Exodus' to 'Anthem'. From fantastic IP-crossing adventures to all-new exosuit epics, our consoles and PCs have plenty to look forward to this year.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Live Science
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If Aliens Are Causing Weird Dimming of 'Tabby' Star,' They Aren't Using Lasers to Do It. The evidence for aliens around one of the weirdest stars in our galaxy – Boyajian's star – is not looking promising.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Popular Science
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How is a rainbow formed?. Science These optical illusions require a mix of the right weather, eye direction, and luck. Because of their colorful and unique display, rainbows have generated countless legends and myths throughout history. Among the most popular is the Irish folklore that…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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The Peaceful Transition of Government Twitter Accounts. The various committees of the House of Representatives are strange, human institutions. They are staffed by whoever holds the majority, which, since January of 2011, had been the Republicans, but is now the Democrats. And with that change, the committees must deal with important business, such as establishing new chairpeople, deciding on organizing principles, and … handling the committee Twitter
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Guardian
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Teaching chemistry students how to cook? That's an experiment I can get behind | Rhik Samadder. Through cooking I have learned a lot about science, despite being a chemistry brain-dud. Maybe it can work the other way around Imperial College London is including cookery lessons in its chemistry degree courses, starting this September. The Introduction to Culinary Practice module, created in collaboration with the chef Jozef Youssef from the Basque Culinary Centre, will allow students to "expe
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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Researchers study bacterial immunity to understand infectious disease. Patients with cystic fibrosis are often infected by pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that infects the lungs and prevents breathing, often causing death.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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How police body cam videos impact jurors differently than dashcam videos. A team of researchers at Northwestern University has found that people serving as mock jurors tend to view police officer intent differently when viewing events captured using body cams versus dash cams. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study, in which they used volunteers as stand-ins for jurors watching either real or staged p
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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Scientists move quantum optic networks a step closer to reality. Scientists have moved quantum optic networks a step closer to reality. The ability to precisely control the interactions of light and matter at the nanoscale could help such a network transmit larger amounts of data more quickly and securely than an electrical network.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Ingeniøren
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Trafikstyrelsen udsteder øjeblikkeligt forbud mod sættevogne på jernbanen. Havarikommissionen har sammen med Trafikstyrelsen fundet et »forholdsmæssigt for stort antal fejl« i låsemekanismen efter kontrolundersøgelser hos DB Cargo.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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Climate change: Effect on sperm could hold key to species extinction. Since the 1980s, increasingly frequent and intense heatwaves have contributed to more deaths than any other extreme weather event. The fingerprints of extreme events and climate change are widespread in the natural world, where populations are showing stress responses.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Guardian
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How Instagram takes a toll on influencers' brains. Research suggests the platform fosters anxiety as we compare ourselves to others Like many 24-year-olds, Alexandra Mondalek, a fashion reporter in New York, found herself obsessing over social media. Her rapidly growing fashion-focused Instagram account, @hautetakes , was gaining attention, with a little more than 1,000 followers, and it was all she could think about. She wasn't making money from
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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Is Tony Soprano Dead or Not?. The Sopranos Sessions , by Matt Zoller Seitz and Alan Sepinwall, was published today. And while I have only skimmed early excerpts and fractions of the whole-I downloaded my copy in the wee, small hours of the morning-it looks to be the definitional take on the show that many of us had anticipated. Careful dissections of every episode, extended interviews with the famously recalcitrant creator Da
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Live Science
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Global Weather Forecasts Could Soon Get Much Better, According to IBM. Global weather forecasts are getting a big technology upgrade, thanks to a new project from IBM and The Weather Company.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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The Viral 'Half Summer, Half Winter' Manhattan Aerial Photo. Paul Seibert digitally blended two photographs he took from a helicopter, thousands of feet above New York City.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

TED Talks
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What are you willing to give up to change the way we work? | Martin Danoesastro. What does it take to build the fast, flexible, creative teams needed to challenge entrenched work culture? For transformation expert Martin Danoesastro, it all starts with one question: "What are you willing to give up?" He shares lessons learned from companies on both sides of the innovation wave on how to structure your organization so that people at all levels are empowered to make decisions fa
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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The first case of a Portuguese beetle living exclusively in groundwater. A diving beetle demonstrating various adaptations to the life underground, including depigmentation and evolutionary loss of eyes, was discovered at the bottom of a clay pound in the cave Soprador do Carvalho, Portugal. The species turned out to be the very first in the whole order of beetles (Coleoptera) to be known exclusively from the underground waters of the country.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Viden (Danmarks Radio)
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Tv som rullegardin præsenteret i Las Vegas: Kæmpefjernsyn kan foldes sammen. Vi ser stadig mere tv på stuens store fladskærm, som bliver større og skarpere. Nu kan den også rulles sammen.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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The Instant Pot Will Not Solve All of Life's Problems. There are a lot of fundamental problems with existence, but among the most pressing is that you need to feed yourself three times a day, basically every day, for, like, 80 years. If you're an American woman, the stakes of food preparation are likely to be even higher. Statistically, you'll probably get married and have at least one kid, and although your family will probably need you to get a ful
Published: 08 Jan 2019

New York Times
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Trilobites: Giant Fungus Is Older, Bigger and Rarely Mutates. New genetic analysis shows that an underground parasitic mold in Michigan is about 2,500 years old and has a low mutation rate.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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Myth of Mona Lisa's magical gaze debunked. In science, the "Mona Lisa Effect" refers to the impression that the eyes of the person portrayed in an image seem to follow the viewer as they move in front of the picture. Two researchers from the Cluster of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology (CITEC) at Bielefeld University demonstrate that, ironically enough, this effect does not occur with Leonardo da Vinci's world-famous painting "Mo
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Wired
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Google's New Interpreter Mode Translates Your Conversation. If you want to ask a favor of the Parisian concierge, but maybe your French is too rusty, let Google do the talking.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Scientific American
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Lots of Scientists Won Office in 2018, but…. …we need more to step up in 2019 and beyond
Published: 08 Jan 2019

NPR
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Why Consumers Systematically Give Inflated Grades For Poor Service. A study shows that rating systems for online marketplaces are prone to inflation, because raters feel pressured to leave high scores.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

New York Times
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The Science of Exploding Lava. Scientists from the University at Buffalo study the explosive reaction between water and lava.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Big Think
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What would it take to create a fully immersive virtual reality?. Immersion would consist of a complete perception of existing in another world. This idea has been the backbone of numerous stories and would be akin to The Matrix world. Our current VR technology is nowhere near close to giving us this science fiction experience. Immersive virtual reality is the theoretical holy grail of future technologies. A fully immersive VR world would be able to encompass e
Published: 07 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
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The Most Anticipated TV Shows of 2019. At this time last year, it was almost possible to write a straightforward preview of the year in television. In 2019: not so much. Peak TV might not have peaked yet, but it's fast approaching in mind-numbing proportions-the kind of moment where so many shows are in the offing that, say, Nicole Kidman starring in an HBO limited series by David E. Kelley or Renée Zellweger headlining a Netflix dram
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
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Volcano erupts on remote Papua New Guinea island. One of Papua New Guinea's most active volcanoes has erupted, authorities said Tuesday, pummelling villages on a remote island with volcanic rock before subsiding.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Fighting human disease with birth control … for mosquitoes. A newly discovered protein that is crucial for egg production in mosquitoes opens a possibility for 'mosquito birth control.' The approach might offer a way to reduce mosquito populations in areas of human disease transmission without harming beneficial insects such as honey bees.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Having more than one chronic disease amplifies costs of diseases, study finds. Having two or more non-communicable diseases (multimorbidity) costs the country more than the sum of those individual diseases would cost, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Tony Blakely from the University of Otago, New Zealand, and colleagues.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Mosquito-specific protein may lead to safer insecticides. A protein required for development of mosquito eggs may provide a mosquito-selective target for insecticide development, according to a new study publishing on Jan. 8 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by Jun Isoe of the University of Arizona and colleagues. Because the protein is specific to mosquitoes, it may be possible to interrupt their egg formation without harming other insects.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Big Think
Sparkling water: Healthy alternative or millennial fad?. Sparkling waters are en vogue as a healthy, refreshing alternative to soft drinks and alcohol. Some claim sparkling water has injurious effects, such as reducing bone mineral density, but research shows such claims are overstated or outright myths. Not all sparkling waters are created equal, though. While some are just as hydrating as plain water, others can be unhealthy if not consumed in modera
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
US Supreme Court takes on tribal rights, treaties and elk hunting. Does an 1868 treaty protect the rights of Native Americans to hunt on unpopulated federal forest lands?
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
French Renault workers unmoved as CEO Ghosn faces trial in Japan. As Renault's chief executive Carlos Ghosn made his first appearance in a Japanese court Tuesday over salary fraud charges, few of the carmaker's French workers were rushing to his defence.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Drone sighting briefly halts Heathrow Airport flights. London's Heathrow Airport, Europe's busiest hub, suspended all departing flights for around an hour Tuesday following a drone sighting, just three weeks after a similar incident at Gatwick caused havoc.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Live Science
No, Bacteria Aren't Mutating into Superbugs on the International Space Station. Bacteria on the International Space Station are evolving and changing in the strange orbital environment. But they don't seem to be any more dangerous to humans.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Live Science
What Are the Different Types of Ice Formations Found on Earth?. Glaciers, icebergs and sea ice, oh, my – exploring the different types of ice found on planet Earth.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Scientific American
NASA Exoplanet Hunter Racks Up Bizarre Worlds and Exploding Stars. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite has identified at least eight planets, including one with a mass more than 20 times that of Earth
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Nature's magnifying glass reveals unexpected intermediate mass exoplanets. Astronomers have found a new exoplanet that could alter the standing theory of planet formation. With a mass that's between that of Neptune and Saturn, and its location beyond the "snow line" of its host star, an alien world of this scale was supposed to be rare.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Popular Science
The Impossible Burger 2.0 is a plant-based beef replacement that's meatier than ever. Technology The new formula uses soy instead of wheat protein so it can take on new forms. Impossible Burger 2.0 isn't limited to patties thanks to a new soy-based formula.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Great potential for floating solar photovoltaics systems. Researchers estimate that installing floating solar photovoltaics on the more than 24,000 human-made US reservoirs could generate about 10 percent of the nation's annual electricity production. Their findings reveal for the first time the potential for floating PV to produce electricity in the United States.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Exposure to cannabis and stress in adolescence can lead to anxiety disorders in adulthood. A new study conducted on laboratory animals shows that exposure to cannabis and stress during adolescence may lead to long-term anxiety disorders characterized by the presence of pathological fear.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Researchers uncover new mechanism of gene regulation involved in tumor progression. Researchers have discovered a new mechanism controlling the expression of a set of genes important for cell proliferation and tumor progression. Their research responds to a very fundamental question about how key genes lead to tumors growth by maintaining their active expression. This finding opens the possibility to better target and develop new therapies for certain types of cancer.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Algae thrive under Greenland sea ice. Microscopic marine plants flourish beneath the ice that covers the Greenland Sea, according to a new study. These phytoplankton create the energy that fuels ocean ecosystems, and the study found that half of this energy is produced under the sea ice in late winter and early spring, and the other half at the edge of the ice in spring.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Researchers create a wireless, battery-free, biodegradable blood flow sensor. Transforming super-sensitive touch sensors, engineers and medical researchers build a way to wirelessly monitor blood flow after surgery.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Pyronaridine-artesunate for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Researchers have looked at the efficacy of using a novel artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), pyronaridine-artesunate, to treat malaria in areas where resistance to other ACTs is becoming a problem. The analysis finds it at least as effective as the currently used ACTs, if not better.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
How herpesviruses shape the immune system. Scientists have developed an analytic method that can very precisely detect viral infections using immune responses.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Inside Science
Can Scientists Make Birth Control for Mosquitoes?. Can Scientists Make Birth Control for Mosquitoes? The discovery of a gene that helps female mosquitoes make healthy eggs could lead to a new way to fight the disease-spreading insects. Mosquito_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Monica R. via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Creature Tuesday, January 8, 2019 – 14:00 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) — Scientists searching for environmenta
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Study details how today's high school cliques compare to yesterday's. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Texas at Austin, have found that while many high school peer crowds and influences have remained constant over time, changing demographics, cultural influences and the increasing number of college-bound youth have led to the emergence of new peer groups and perceptions.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Fighting human disease with birth control … for mosquitoes. Depending on where you live, the buzz of a nearby mosquito can be a nuisance, or it can be deadly. Worldwide, more than 500 million people suffer from diseases transmitted by the blood-feeding insects, including malaria, Dengue Fever, Zika, and West Nile, and nearly a million deaths are attributed to mosquito-borne illnesses each year.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Atlantic
The Shutdown Makes Trump's Priorities Painfully Clear. During the government shutdown, the Secret Service is protecting President Donald Trump and his administration without pay-yet the deportation of Africans continues apace. This week, 800,000 federal employees are expected to stop receiving paychecks, but Immigration and Customs Enforcement is shelling out for a pricey charter flight in an effort to remove a small handful of Mauritanian immigrants
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Dental flossing and other behaviors linked with higher levels of PFAS in the body. A new study suggests certain types of consumer behaviors, including flossing with Oral-B Glide dental floss, contribute to elevated levels in the body of toxic PFAS chemicals. The findings provide new insight into how these chemicals end up in people's bodies and how consumers can limit their exposures by modifying their behavior.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Nature's magnifying glass reveals unexpected intermediate mass exoplanets. Astronomers have found a new exoplanet that could alter the standing theory of planet formation. With a mass that's between that of Neptune and Saturn, and its location beyond the 'snow line' of its host star, an alien world of this scale was supposed to be rare.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Live Science
Top-Secret UFO Program Revealed in TV's 'Project Blue Book'. Discover the incredible true story of a secret, decades-long federal investigation of alien encounters.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Mitosis: Chromosome DNA packed in stacked layers. A new study based on electron microscopy techniques at low temperatures demonstrates that, during mitosis, chromosome DNA is packed in stacked layers of chromatin. The research, published in EMBO Journal, confirms a surprising structure proposed by UAB researchers over a decade ago, but criticized due to the limitations of the technique used.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
New complex carbohydrate discovered in barley. Researchers have discovered a new complex carbohydrate in barley. The first of its kind to be discovered in over 30 years, the cereal polysaccharide has potential applications in food, medicine and cosmetics.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Different brain areas linked to smoking and drinking. Academics have found that low functional connectivity of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex that is associated with the tendency to smoke is associated with increased impulsiveness — which may contribute to the tendency to smoke. The high connectivity of the reward-related medial orbitofrontal cortex in drinkers may increase the tendency to be attracted to the reward of alcohol consumption.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Power cut: Engineers create a wireless charger you can easily cut to shape. Researchers have developed a new system to charge electronic devices such as smartphones and smartwatches wirelessly. The method involves a cuttable, flexible power transfer sheet which charges devices wirelessly and can be molded or even cut with scissors to fit different-shaped surfaces and objects.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Post-traumatic stress disorder: alleviating flashbacks by playing Tetris. A behavioral intervention procedure including the computer game Tetris could help people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to alleviate involuntarily recurring visual memories of traumatic experiences. Following an intervention involving playing Tetris, the number of flashbacks for the stressful events decreased.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Flies release neuronal brakes to fly longer. In a new study, researchers describe how groups of different neurons connect up to make insect flight possible for longer periods.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Futurity.org
'DeepSqueak' program decodes rat speak. Mice and rats are social and chatty. But what are they saying? A new software program called DeepSqueak will help figure that out. Not only can humans not hear many rodent vocalizations, but existing computer programs to detect these vocalizations have flaws. They pick up other noises, are slow to analyze data, and rely on inflexible, rules-based algorithms to detect calls. The new program takes
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Optical stimulation of cardiac cells with a polymer-supported silicon nanowire matrix [Engineering]. Electronic pacemakers can treat electrical conduction disorders in hearts; however, they are invasive, bulky, and linked to increased incidence of infection at the tissue-device interface. Thus, researchers have looked to other more biocompatible methods for cardiac pacing or resynchronization, such as femtosecond infrared light pulsing, optogenetics, and polymer-based cardiac patches…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Near doubling of Brazil's intensive row crop area since 2000 [Sustainability Science]. Brazil has become a global leader in the production of commodity row crops such as soybean, sugarcane, cotton, and corn. Here, we report an increase in Brazilian cropland extent from 26.0 Mha in 2000 to 46.1 Mha in 2014. The states of Maranhão, Tocantins, Piauí, Bahia (collectively MATOPIBA), Mato Grosso,…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Arithmetic of arithmetic Coxeter groups [Mathematics]. In the 1990s, J. H. Conway published a combinatorial-geometric method for analyzing integer-valued binary quadratic forms (BQFs). Using a visualization he named the "topograph," Conway revisited the reduction of BQFs and the solution of quadratic Diophantine equations such as Pell's equation. It appears that the crux of his method is…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Clocked atom delivery to a photonic crystal waveguide [Physics]. Experiments and numerical simulations are described that develop quantitative understanding of atomic motion near the surfaces of nanoscopic photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs). Ultracold atoms are delivered from a moving optical lattice into the PCW. Synchronous with the moving lattice, transmission spectra for a guided-mode probe field are recorded as functions…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Conserved fungal effector suppresses PAMP-triggered immunity by targeting plant immune kinases [Agricultural Sciences]. Plant pathogens have optimized their own effector sets to adapt to their hosts. However, certain effectors, regarded as core effectors, are conserved among various pathogens, and may therefore play an important and common role in pathogen virulence. We report here that the widely distributed fungal effector NIS1 targets host immune…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
HOPS-dependent endosomal fusion required for efficient cytosolic delivery of therapeutic peptides and small proteins [Biochemistry]. Protein therapeutics represent a significant and growing component of the modern pharmacopeia, but their potential to treat human disease is limited because most proteins fail to traffic across biological membranes. Recently, we discovered a class of cell-permeant miniature proteins (CPMPs) containing a precisely defined, penta-arginine (penta-Arg) motif that traffics readily…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
SENCR stabilizes vascular endothelial cell adherens junctions through interaction with CKAP4 [Cell Biology]. SENCR is a human-specific, vascular cell-enriched long-noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that regulates vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell (EC) phenotypes. The underlying mechanisms of action of SENCR in these and other cell types is unknown. Here, levels of SENCR RNA are shown to be elevated in several differentiated human EC…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
LAMP-2B regulates human cardiomyocyte function by mediating autophagosome-lysosome fusion [Cell Biology]. Mutations in lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2) gene are associated with Danon disease, which often leads to cardiomyopathy/heart failure through poorly defined mechanisms. Here, we identify the LAMP-2 isoform B (LAMP-2B) as required for autophagosome-lysosome fusion in human cardiomyocytes (CMs). Remarkably, LAMP-2B functions independently of syntaxin 17 (STX17), a protein…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Two separate functions of NME3 critical for cell survival underlie a neurodegenerative disorder [Cell Biology]. We report a patient who presented with congenital hypotonia, hypoventilation, and cerebellar histopathological alterations. Exome analysis revealed a homozygous mutation in the initiation codon of the NME3 gene, which encodes an NDP kinase. The initiation-codon mutation leads to deficiency in NME3 protein expression. NME3 is a mitochondrial outer-membrane protein capable…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
IL-15 is a component of the inflammatory milieu in the tumor microenvironment promoting antitumor responses [Immunology and Inflammation]. Previous studies have provided evidence that IL-15 expression within human tumors is crucial for optimal antitumor responses; however, the regulation of IL-15 within the tumor microenvironment (TME) is unclear. We report herein, in analyses of mice implanted with various tumor cell lines, soluble IL-15/IL-15Rα complexes (sIL-15 complexes) are abundant in…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Differential control of human Treg and effector T cells in tumor immunity by Fc-engineered anti-CTLA-4 antibody [Immunology and Inflammation]. Anti-CTLA-4 mAb is efficacious in enhancing tumor immunity in humans. CTLA-4 is expressed by conventional T cells upon activation and by naturally occurring FOXP3+CD4+ Treg cells constitutively, raising a question of how anti-CTLA-4 mAb can differentially control these functionally opposing T cell populations in tumor immunity. Here we show that…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inhibition of de novo lipogenesis targets androgen receptor signaling in castration-resistant prostate cancer [Medical Sciences]. A hallmark of prostate cancer progression is dysregulation of lipid metabolism via overexpression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key enzyme in de novo fatty acid synthesis. Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) develops resistance to inhibitors of androgen receptor (AR) signaling through a variety of mechanisms, including the emergence of…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dnase1l3 deletion causes aberrations in length and end-motif frequencies in plasma DNA [Medical Sciences]. Circulating DNA in plasma consists of short DNA fragments. The biological processes generating such fragments are not well understood. DNASE1L3 is a secreted DNASE1-like nuclease capable of digesting DNA in chromatin, and its absence causes anti-DNA responses and autoimmunity in humans and mice. We found that the deletion of Dnase1l3…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mitochondria modulate programmed neuritic retraction [Neuroscience]. Neuritic retraction in the absence of overt neuronal death is a shared feature of normal aging and neurodegenerative disorders, but the intracellular mechanisms modulating this process are not understood. We propose that cumulative distal mitochondrial protein damage results in impaired protein import, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and focal activation of…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Modular reconfiguration of an auditory control brain network supports adaptive listening behavior [Neuroscience]. Speech comprehension in noisy, multitalker situations poses a challenge. Successful behavioral adaptation to a listening challenge often requires stronger engagement of auditory spatial attention and context-dependent semantic predictions. Human listeners differ substantially in the degree to which they adapt behaviorally and can listen successfully under such circumstances. How cortical networks.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bipolar switching by HCN voltage sensor underlies hyperpolarization activation [Physiology]. Despite sharing a common architecture with archetypal voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs), hyperpolarization- and cAMP-activated ion (HCN) channels open upon hyperpolarization rather than depolarization. The basic motions of the voltage sensor and pore gates are conserved, implying that these domains are inversely coupled in HCN channels. Using structure-guided protein engineering, we…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Comparing mutagenesis and simulations as tools for identifying functionally important sequence changes for protein thermal adaptation [Physiology]. Comparative studies of orthologous proteins of species evolved at different temperatures have revealed consistent patterns of temperature-related variation in thermal stabilities of structure and function. However, the precise mechanisms by which interspecific variations in sequence foster these adaptive changes remain largely unknown. Here, we compare orthologs of cytosolic malate dehydrogenase..
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A salivary effector enables whitefly to feed on host plants by eliciting salicylic acid-signaling pathway [Agricultural Sciences]. Phloem-feeding insects feed on plant phloem using their stylets. While ingesting phloem sap, these insects secrete saliva to circumvent plant defenses. Previous studies have shown that, to facilitate their feeding, many phloem-feeding insects can elicit the salicylic acid- (SA-) signaling pathway and thus suppress effective jasmonic acid defenses. However, the…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanistic insights from plant heteromannan synthesis in yeast [Biochemistry]. Heteromannan (HM) is one of the most ancient cell wall polymers in the plant kingdom, consisting of β-(1-4)-linked backbones of glucose (Glc) and mannose (Man) units. Despite the widespread distribution of HM polysaccharides, their biosynthesis remains mechanistically unclear. HM is elongated by glycosyltransferases (GTs) from the cellulose synthase-like A (CSLA)…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Crystal structure of the DENR-MCT-1 complex revealed zinc-binding site essential for heterodimer formation [Biochemistry]. The density-regulated protein (DENR) and the malignant T cell-amplified sequence 1 (MCT-1/MCTS1) oncoprotein support noncanonical translation initiation, promote translation reinitiation on a specific set of mRNAs with short upstream reading frames, and regulate ribosome recycling. DENR and MCT-1 form a heterodimer, which binds to the ribosome. We determined the crystal…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cryo-EM structures of the archaeal PAN-proteasome reveal an around-the-ring ATPase cycle [Biophysics and Computational Biology]. Proteasomes occur in all three domains of life, and are the principal molecular machines for the regulated degradation of intracellular proteins. They play key roles in the maintenance of protein homeostasis, and control vital cellular processes. While the eukaryotic 26S proteasome is extensively characterized, its putative evolutionary precursor, the archaeal…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Optimizing model representation for integrative structure determination of macromolecular assemblies [Biophysics and Computational Biology]. Integrative structure determination of macromolecular assemblies requires specifying the representation of the modeled structure, a scoring function for ranking alternative models based on diverse types of data, and a sampling method for generating these models. Structures are often represented at atomic resolution, although ad hoc simplified representations based on generic…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Autocrine regulation of mesenchymal progenitor cell fates orchestrates tooth eruption [Developmental Biology]. Formation of functional skeletal tissues requires highly organized steps of mesenchymal progenitor cell differentiation. The dental follicle (DF) surrounding the developing tooth harbors mesenchymal progenitor cells for various differentiated cells constituting the tooth root-bone interface and coordinates tooth eruption in a manner dependent on signaling by parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PT
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Secondary magnetite in ancient zircon precludes analysis of a Hadean geodynamo [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]. Zircon crystals from the Jack Hills, Western Australia, are one of the few surviving mineralogical records of Earth's first 500 million years and have been proposed to contain a paleomagnetic record of the Hadean geodynamo. A prerequisite for the preservation of Hadean magnetization is the presence of primary magnetic inclusions…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Tropical forests can maintain hyperdiversity because of enemies [Ecology]. Explaining the maintenance of tropical forest diversity under the countervailing forces of drift and competition poses a major challenge to ecological theory. Janzen−Connell effects, in which host-specific natural enemies restrict the recruitment of juveniles near conspecific adults, provide a potential mechanism. Janzen−Connell is strongly supported empirically, but existing theory does…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Climate shapes and shifts functional biodiversity in forests worldwide [Ecology]. Much ecological research aims to explain how climate impacts biodiversity and ecosystem-level processes through functional traits that link environment with individual performance. However, the specific climatic drivers of functional diversity across space and time remain unclear due largely to limitations in the availability of paired trait and climate data. We…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Two-step pathway for isoprenoid synthesis [Engineering]. Isoprenoids comprise a large class of chemicals of significant interest due to their diverse properties. Biological production of isoprenoids is considered to be the most efficient way for their large-scale production. Isoprenoid biosynthesis has thus far been dependent on pathways inextricably linked to glucose metabolism. These pathways suffer from inherent…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Genetic legacy of state centralization in the Kuba Kingdom of the Democratic Republic of the Congo [Genetics]. Few phenomena have had as profound or long-lasting consequences in human history as the emergence of large-scale centralized states in the place of smaller scale and more local societies. This study examines a fundamental, and yet unexplored, consequence of state formation: its genetic legacy. We studied the genetic impact of…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Geometry and arithmetic of crystallographic sphere packings [Mathematics]. We introduce the notion of a "crystallographic sphere packing," defined to be one whose limit set is that of a geometrically finite hyperbolic reflection group in one higher dimension. We exhibit an infinite family of conformally inequivalent crystallographic packings with all radii being reciprocals of integers. We then prove a…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Analysis of research intensity on infectious disease by disease burden reveals which infectious diseases are neglected by researchers [Medical Sciences]. Infectious diseases are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although human, financial, substantial, and time resources are limited, it is unknown whether such resources are used effectively in research to manage diseases. The correlation between the disability-adjusted life years to represent disease burden and number of publications as a…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mutational landscape of primary, metastatic, and recurrent ovarian cancer reveals c-MYC gains as potential target for BET inhibitors [Medical Sciences]. Ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. We analyzed the mutational landscape of 64 primary, 41 metastatic, and 17 recurrent fresh-frozen tumors from 77 patients along with matched normal DNA, by whole-exome sequencing (WES). We also sequenced 13 pairs of synchronous bilateral ovarian cancer (SBOC) to evaluate the evolutionary…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Semaphorin signaling via MICAL3 induces symmetric cell division to expand breast cancer stem-like cells [Medical Sciences]. Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are expanded in the CSC niche by increased frequency of symmetric cell divisions at the expense of asymmetric cell divisions. The symmetric division of CSCs is important for the malignant properties of cancer; however, underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. Here, we show a cytokine, semaphorin…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
How optical excitation controls the structure and properties of vanadium dioxide [Physics]. We combine ultrafast electron diffraction and time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements to link structure and electronic transport properties during the photoinduced insulator-metal transitions in vanadium dioxide. We determine the structure of the metastable monoclinic metal phase, which exhibits antiferroelectric charge order arising from a thermally activated, orbital-selective phase tr
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Early patterns of skill acquisition and immigrants' specialization in STEM careers [Social Sciences]. We provide empirical evidence of immigrants' specialization in skill acquisition well before entering the US labor market. Nationally representative datasets enable studying the academic trajectories of immigrant children, with a focus on high-school course-taking patterns and college major choice. Immigrant children accumulate skills in ways that reinforce comparative advantages in…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Semisoft clustering of single-cell data [Statistics]. Motivated by the dynamics of development, in which cells of recognizable types, or pure cell types, transition into other types over time, we propose a method of semisoft clustering that can classify both pure and intermediate cell types from data on gene expression from individual cells. Called semisoft clustering with…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Anthropogenic drivers of 2013-2017 trends in summer surface ozone in China [Sustainability Science]. Observations of surface ozone available from ∼1,000 sites across China for the past 5 years (2013-2017) show severe summertime pollution and regionally variable trends. We resolve the effect of meteorological variability on the ozone trends by using a multiple linear regression model. The residual of this regression shows increasing ozone…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Climate change and residential electricity consumption in the Yangtze River Delta, China [Sustainability Science]. Estimating the impact of climate change on energy use across the globe is essential for analysis of both mitigation and adaptation policies. Yet existing empirical estimates are concentrated in Western countries, especially the United States. We use daily data on household electricity consumption to estimate how electricity consumption would change…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Path-dependent institutions drive alternative stable states in conservation [Sustainability Science]. Understanding why some renewable resources are overharvested while others are conserved remains an important challenge. Most explanations focus on institutional or ecological differences among resources. Here, we provide theoretical and empirical evidence that conservation and overharvest can be alternative stable states within the same exclusive-resource management system because of path-dependen
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multiomics of azacitidine-treated AML cells reveals variable and convergent targets that remodel the cell-surface proteome [Systems Biology]. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are diseases of abnormal hematopoietic differentiation with aberrant epigenetic alterations. Azacitidine (AZA) is a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor widely used to treat MDS and AML, yet the impact of AZA on the cell-surface proteome has not been defined. To identify potential therapeutic targets…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]. Climate and forest biodiversity H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon. Few studies have examined how environmental conditions affect trait diversity among organisms within an ecosystem on a global scale. To uncover how climate affects the functional diversity of forests, Daniel Wieczynski et al. (pp. 587-592) analyzed data from 421 tree…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Genetic insights into the past, present, and future of a keystone species [Environmental Sciences]. In a new paper in PNAS, Thompson et al. (1) examine the genetic legacy of a struggling keystone species-and the implications for a phoenix-like recovery from its genetic remnants. For thousands of years before European contact, indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest of North America eagerly anticipated a critical spring…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A ray of light for treating cardiac conduction disorders [Engineering]. Implantable cardiac pacemakers have been employed for the treatment of various arrhythmias beginning in the 1950s. Throughout the years, developments in microfabrication technologies, as well as advances in surgical procedures and the understanding of electrophysiology, have brought forth next-generation cardiac pacemakers. These are much smaller, capable of feedback regulation, and…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Stepping up protein degradation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]. Cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) has revolutionized knowledge of protein remodeling and unfolding by ATPases of the AAA (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) family, including those associated with energy-dependent proteolysis. A study in PNAS by Majumder et al. (1) provides insight into evolutionary conserved functions of AAA-ATPases through cryo-EM single-particle analysis…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Shedding new light on the mysteries of tooth eruption [Developmental Biology]. In PNAS, Takahashi et al. (1) shed light on the mysteries of tooth eruption, identify putative stem cells that surround the tooth, and provide insight into the function of parathyroid hormone-related peptide [PTHrP; or parathyroid hormone-like hormone (PTHLH)]. These researchers at the University of Michigan, Showa University, and Harvard Medical…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
States and their genetic consequences in central Africa [Genetics]. Archaeogenetics and State Dynamics Archaeogenetic analyses are usually aimed at elucidating the demographic history of small-scale societies, although frequently over large geographic and temporal scales. There has been significantly less attention paid to the analysis of state-level societies, except sometimes as a political framework within which smaller-scale interactions took place….
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structured environments fundamentally alter dynamics and stability of ecological communities [Biophysics and Computational Biology]. The dynamics and stability of ecological communities are intimately linked with the specific interactions-like cooperation or predation-between constituent species. In microbial communities, like those found in soils or the mammalian gut, physical anisotropies produced by fluid flow and chemical gradients impact community structure and ecological dynamics, even in structurally isotropic…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
N-degron and C-degron pathways of protein degradation [Biochemistry]. This perspective is partly review and partly proposal. N-degrons and C-degrons are degradation signals whose main determinants are, respectively, the N-terminal and C-terminal residues of cellular proteins. N-degrons and C-degrons include, to varying extents, adjoining sequence motifs, and also internal lysine residues that function as polyubiquitylation sites. Discovered in 1986,…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Modeling stochastic processes in disease spread across a heterogeneous social system [Applied Biological Sciences]. Diffusion processes are governed by external triggers and internal dynamics in complex systems. Timely and cost-effective control of infectious disease spread critically relies on uncovering underlying diffusion mechanisms, which is challenging due to invisible infection pathways and time-evolving intensity of infection cases. Here, we propose a new diffusion framework for…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Fixation probabilities in weakly compressible fluid flows [Applied Physical Sciences]. Competition between biological species in marine environments is affected by the motion of the surrounding fluid. An effective 2D compressibility can arise, for example, from the convergence and divergence of water masses at the depth at which passively traveling photosynthetic organisms are restricted to live. In this report, we seek…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Predicting growth rate from gene expression [Biophysics and Computational Biology]. Growth rate is one of the most important and most complex phenotypic characteristics of unicellular microorganisms, which determines the genetic mutations that dominate at the population level, and ultimately whether the population will survive. Translating changes at the genetic level to their growth-rate consequences remains a subject of intense interest,…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Exploring the challenges of computational enzyme design by rebuilding the active site of a dehalogenase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]. Rational enzyme design presents a major challenge that has not been overcome by computational approaches. One of the key challenges is the difficulty in assessing the magnitude of the maximum possible catalytic activity. In an attempt to overcome this challenge, we introduce a strategy that takes an active enzyme (assuming…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Imaging electron-density fluctuations by multidimensional X-ray photon-coincidence diffraction [Chemistry]. The ultrafast spontaneous electron-density fluctuation dynamics in molecules is studied theoretically by off-resonant multiple X-ray diffraction events. The time- and wavevector-resolved photon-coincidence signals give an image of electron-density fluctuations expressed through the four-point correlation function of the charge density in momentum space. A Fourier transform of the signal provides a
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Opinion: How can we boost the impact of publications? Try better writing [Social Sciences]. Peer-reviewed articles are the currency of science. They create knowledge and enable discovery. Despite this fundamental role, peer-reviewed articles tend to be written in a dry, dense, and impersonal style that can be challenging to read and understand (1-4). There are many potential benefits for writing in a more accessible…
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Live Science
Ancient Sea Monster's Head Holds Big Teeth … and Fake Bones. A new analysis of a nearly 200-million-year-old sea-monster skull has surprised scientists, but not merely because the skull was enormous or because it was exquisitely preserved and not squashed, like many other Jurassic-period fossils are.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
New anti-Wolbachia drug with potential to treat onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Researchers have successfully optimized a hit from a whole cell screening of a 10000-compound library to deliver the first novel fully synthetic and rationally designed anti-Wolbachia drug, AWZ1066S, which could potentially be used to treat onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis (LF).
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
In VR boys learn best when the teacher is a drone — girls lean better from virtual Marie. The teacher is just as important in a virtual learning environment as in a normal classroom, but a new study shows that boys and girls differ greatly in terms of how they learn best: Boys learn best when their virtual teacher comes in the form of a drone, while girls get more knowledge from VR-teaching when they are taught by a young, female researcher-type named Marie.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Experts warn against mega-dams in lowland tropical forests. Mega-dams should not be built in lowland tropical forest regions due to the threat they pose to biodiversity and ecosystems, according to experts.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Variable venom: Why are some snakes deadlier than others?. By comparing records of venom potency and quantity for over 100 venomous snake species, researchers have discovered that the potency of a snake's venom depends on what it eats.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Scientist
Swiss Researchers Struggle to Get Animal Experiments Approved. Scientists say that increasingly rigorous licensing procedures have complicated research efforts–and in some cases, stopped experiments completely.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Guardian
Nasa spacecraft spots gaseous planet 23 times the size of Earth. 'Super-Earth' among trio of planets and six supernovae detected by Tess mission Three new planets and six supernovae outside our solar system have been observed by Nasa's planet-hunting Tess mission in its first three months. Since it started surveying the sky in July, the MIT-led Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite project has identified Pi Mensae b, a "super-Earth" that travels around its sta
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Space microbes aren't so alien after all. A new Northwestern University study has found that — despite its seemingly harsh conditions — the ISS is not causing bacteria to mutate into dangerous, antibiotic-resistant superbugs. The bacteria are instead simply responding, and perhaps evolving, to survive in a stressful environment.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

NPR
Hello, Ultima Thule. What do we know about the furthest object we've ever observed from space? (Image credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute via Getty Images))
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Viden (Danmarks Radio)
Dødsensfarlig og hård som cement: Sådan opstår en lavine. Er forholdene rigtige, så kræver det blot en enkelt skiløber, før sneen ruller.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Scientist
Eli Lilly Will Buy Loxo Oncology for $8 billion. Loxo focuses on cancer treatments based on tumor genetics, which will contribute to Lilly's push in the cancer drug space.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Scientific American
Bevy of Mysterious Fast Radio Bursts Spotted by Canadian Telescope. Bounty includes second known example of a repeating burst
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Engineers identify improved membranes to capture CO2 at coal-fired power plants. A computational modeling method developed at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering may help to fast-track the identification and design of new carbon capture and storage materials for use by the nation's coal-fired power plants. The hypothetical mixed matrix membranes would provide a more economical solution than current methods, with a predicted cost of less than $50 per to
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Antibiotic resistance in the environment linked to fecal pollution. A study shows that 'crAssphage', a virus specific to bacteria in human feces, is highly correlated to the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental samples.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Holographic color printing for optical security. Researchers have invented a new type of anti-counterfeiting device that can be useful for counterfeit deterrence of important documents such as identity cards, passports and banknotes.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
NREL details great potential for floating PV systems. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers estimate that installing floating solar photovoltaics on the more than 24,000 man-made U.S. reservoirs could generate about 10 percent of the nation's annual electricity production. Their findings, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, reveal for the first time the potential for floating PV to produce electricity in the
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Study shows algae thrive under Greenland sea ice. Microscopic marine plants flourish beneath the ice that covers the Greenland Sea, according to a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans. These phytoplankton create the energy that fuels ocean ecosystems, and the study found that half of this energy is produced under the sea ice in late winter and early spring, and the other half at the edge of the ice in spring.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Space microbes aren't so alien after all. Microbes stranded in the International Space Station (ISS) are just trying to survive, man.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, January 2019. ORNL story tips: Automated pellet press speeds production of Pu-238 to fuel NASA's deep space exploration; new memory cell circuit design may boost storage with less energy in exascale, quantum computing; free app eases installation, repair of HVAC systems that use low GWP refrigerants; ORNL microscopy analyzes magnesium as lower-cost catalyst alternative in fuel cells for vehicles; neutrons inves
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Future of planet-cooling tech: Study creates roadmap for geoengineering research. Simply reducing greenhouse gas emissions probably is not going to be sufficient for the planet to escape catastrophic damage from climate change, scientists say.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

MIT Technology Review
IBM has just unveiled this cool-looking quantum computer-but will hide it in the cloud
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Researchers offer new physics rule to find mechanical strain. Addressing a physics problem that dates back to Galileo, three University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers this week propose a new approach to the theory of how thin sheets can be forced to conform to "geometrically incompatible" shapes-think gift-wrapping a basketball-that relies on weaving together two fundamental ideas of geometry and mechanics that were long thought to be irreconcilable.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Stanford researchers create a wireless, battery-free, biodegradable blood flow sensor. Transforming super-sensitive touch sensors, Stanford engineers and medical researchers build a way to wirelessly monitor blood flow after surgery.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Study shows algae thrive under Greenland sea ice. Microscopic marine plants flourish beneath the ice that covers the Greenland Sea, according to a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans. These phytoplankton create the energy that fuels ocean ecosystems, and the study found that half of this energy is produced under the sea ice in late winter and early spring, and the other half at the edge of the ice in spring.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Researchers uncover new mechanism of gene regulation involved in tumor progression. Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, Spain, have discovered a new mechanism controlling the expression of a set of genes important for cell proliferation and tumor progression. Their research, which has been published in Molecular Cell, responds to a very fundamental question about how key genes lead to tumors growth by maintaining their active expression. This find
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Childhood stress of mice affects their offspring behavior. Russian neuroscientists discovered that the stress experienced by mice during their first weeks of life, affects not only them but also their offspring. The obtained data will help to understand how negative experience in the early period of life affects the mammalian brain. The results are published in Genes, Brain and Behavior.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
NREL details great potential for floating PV systems. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers estimate that installing floating solar photovoltaics on the more than 24,000 man-made US reservoirs could generate about 10 percent of the nation's annual electricity production. Their findings, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, reveal for the first time the potential for floating PV to produce electricity in the U
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
UIC study details how today's high school cliques compare to yesterday's. Changing demographics, cultural influences and the increasing number of college-bound youth have led to the emergence of new peer groups and perceptions among adolescents.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Pitt, NETL engineers identify improved membranes to capture CO2 at coal-fired power plants. A computational modeling method developed at the University of Pittsburgh and NETL may help to fast-track the identification and design of new carbon capture and storage materials for use by the nation's coal-fired power plants that would provide a more economical solution than current methods, with a predicted cost of less than $50 per ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) removed.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Boeing flies past Airbus with 2018 aircraft deliveries. Boeing reported record commercial plane deliveries for the second straight year on Tuesday and although short of the company's forecast the figures still beat those of Boeing's European rival Airbus.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Scientific American
Major Missions Will Probe the Changing Climate in 2019. From melting Antarctic glaciers to solar geoengineering, here are key climate projects to watch this year
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
The new green alternative for drug production. For the production of drugs, pesticides and smartphone displays, most of the processes are cost-intensive and generate a large amount of waste. Scientists at the University of Göttingen have now succeeded in developing a resource-saving 'green' alternative. The results were published in Nature Catalysis.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
A survey machine and a data trove: Dark Energy Survey's rich legacy. On the night of Jan. 9, 2019, the V. M. Blanco 4-meter telescope at the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), high in the mountains of Chile, will close the camera's shutter on the final image from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) — a survey that has mapped 5,000 square degrees of the heavens, almost one-quarter of the southern sky.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Futurity.org
Cow milk production follows a yearly rhythm. Internal, annual biological rhythms appear to influence the amount and composition of dairy cows' milk more than environmental factors like heat and humidity do, research shows. Although researchers have long recognized an annual pattern of milk composition in dairy cattle-with higher milk fat and protein concentrations observed during the winter and lower levels occurring in the summer-the rhyth
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Futurity.org
Here's what you need to know about flu season. This year's influenza outbreak is increasing nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which reports more than 6,400 confirmed cases and 24 states with widespread flu activity through December 29. "You cannot get the flu from the flu shot…" The 2017-2018 flu season was the most deadly in decades with more than 80,000 deaths, including over 170 pediatric flu deaths.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Future of planet-cooling tech: Study creates roadmap for geoengineering research. A new study, "Mission-Driven Research for Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering," published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, sets out to establish a roadmap for responsible exploration of geoengineering.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Scientific American
9 Ocean Conservation Groups You Don't Know about…but Should. Big environmental groups get most of the press, but there are also many unsung heroes
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Technique boosts omega 3 fatty acid levels in brain 100 fold. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago report that adding a lysophospholipid form of EPA (LPC-EPA) to the diet can increase levels of EPA in the brain 100-fold in mice.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
UMass Amherst Researchers offer new physics rule to find mechanical strain. Addressing a physics problem that dates back to Galileo, three University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers this week propose a new approach to the theory of how thin sheets can be forced to conform to 'geometrically incompatible' shapes — think gift-wrapping a basketball — that relies on weaving together two fundamental ideas of geometry and mechanics that were long thought to be irreconcila
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Exposure to cannabis and stress in adolescence can lead to anxiety disorders in adulthood. A new study conducted on laboratory animals shows that exposure to cannabis and stress during adolescence may lead to long-term anxiety disorders characterized by the presence of pathological fear. The work carried out by the Neuropharmacology Laboratory-NeuroPhar at Pompeu Fabra University, was led by the researchers Fernando Berrendero, now at Francisco de Vitoria University, and Rafael Maldonad
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Science News
150 years on, the periodic table has more stories than it has elements. The organized rows and columns of the Periodic Table hide a rich and twisting history.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Scientific American
Alzheimer's Attack on the Brain May Vary with Race. A new study finds African-Americans with dementia have less buildup of certain toxic proteins in their brains than do whites
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Melanoma: dabrafenib and trametinib have added benefit. This combination showed advantages in survival and recurrence. An added benefit was not proven for another combination used in advanced disease.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Pitt bioengineers look deeper into how electrical stimulation activates neurons. Electrical stimulation of the brain is common practice in neuroscience research and is an increasingly common and effective clinical therapy for a variety of neurological disorders. However, there is limited understanding of why this treatment works at the neural level. A paper published by Takashi D. Y. Kozai, assistant professor of bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Genetics may influence the effects of vitamin E on cancer risk. A new study led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital investigated whether taking vitamin E supplements could affect risk of cancer and found that genetic variations in the gene COMT influenced whether vitamin E decreased or increased risk of developing cancer during and after the study periods. Their results are published online in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Brain plasticity restored in adult mice through targeting specific nerve cell connections. Research in mice finds a new molecular mechanism that is essential for maturation of brain function and may be used to restore plasticity in aged brains. Unlike previous research that broadly manipulated brain plasticity and affected the entire brain, this work targets for the first time a specific molecule acting on a single type of neuronal connection to modulate brain function. The findings may
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Medical marketing has skyrocketed in the past two decades, while oversight remains limited. In an article recently published in the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice reviewed medical marketing (the marketing of prescription drugs, disease awareness, laboratory tests and health services to consumers and professionals) over a 20-year period from 1997 through 2016 and found that while it had incre
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Study sheds light on why checkpoint blockade therapy succeeds or fails. A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital in collaboration with colleagues at the Broad Institute examines the effects of checkpoint blockade therapies on different populations of T cells, a key class of immune cells in tumors. The team's surprising results point to a population of T cells that have been overlooked in the past and led to the identification of a molecular f
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Medical marketing increased over past 2 decades. The amount of money spent on medical marketing has increased substantially in the United States over the last two decades. An analysis estimates spending on medical marketing of drugs, disease awareness campaigns, health services and laboratory testing increased to $29.9 billion in 2016 from $17.7 billion in 1997. Most of the 2016 spending ($20.3 billion) was on marketing to professionals, while d
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
How locusts switch colours in different settings. Scientists have discovered how locusts change their body colour to adapt to different environments, according to new research published in eLife.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Ingeniøren
Trafikstyrelsen skærper vilkår for vindfølsom godstrafik på Storebælt. Ud over vindhastighed indgår hensyn til vindretningen nu også i Trafikstyrelsens krav til vindfølsomme godskøretøjer. Samtidig offentliggør Banedanmark nu vindmålingerne fra den skæbnesvangre morgen.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Dagens Medicin
Regionspolitiker føler sig overhørt i beslutning om flytning af kardiologi til Roskilde. Koncerndirektør i Sjælland vurderer at beslutningen om at flytte kardiologien til Roskilde ligger inden for de administrative rammer. Regionspolitiker mener, at ændringen er af så stor strukturel karakter, at udvalg skulle være taget på råd.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Big Think
Study of lookalikes refutes popular personality theory. Scientists looked at pairs of people who looked like each other but were not twins. The results showed that genetics plays a stronger role in personality formation than how alike people were treated by others. Behaving similarly is a stronger social glue than physical resemblance. None People have many misconceptions and strange theories about twins and people who look alike. One great one courte
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Scientists provide new insight on how gene expression is controlled. Researchers have provided new insight on the mechanism underlying the control of gene expression in all living organisms, according to a study published today in eLife.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Nanophysicists developed a high-performance organic phototransistor. Converting light into electrical signals is essential for a number of future applications including imaging, optical communication and biomedical sensing. Researchers have now developed a new molecular device enabling to detect light and translate it with high efficiency to detectable electronical current.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
How locusts switch colours in different settings. Scientists have discovered how locusts change their body colour to adapt to different environments, according to new research published in eLife.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Hormone therapy may be best defense against knee osteoarthritis. There is an ongoing debate regarding the relationship between knee osteoarthritis and hormone therapy (HT), with small-scale studies providing mixed results. A new large-scale study from Korea shows that women receiving HT had a significantly lower prevalence of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis compared with women who did not take hormones. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journ
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Blog » Languages » English
Baby Boomers vs Millenials: Intergenerational Battle. Ah yes the generational divide. A tale as old as time itself. Let's look at two generations whose presence has made a great mark on modern society, and compare notes! Perhaps we can all learn a bit more about each other. Or perhaps we can just duel it out for the spot as #1 generation! Let the games begin! The competition starts at 11 AM ET on 1/10 Baby Boomers Baby Boomers, sometimes just known
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Scientific American
How to Stop Feeling Overly Responsible. Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen offers four signs of over-responsibility, plus three ways to overcome it
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Drinking water guidelines in the US vary widely from state to state. In response to the growing problem of drinking water contaminated with per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), a new analysis shows that many states are establishing their own guideline levels for two types of PFAS–PFOA and PFOS–that differ from federal guidelines.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Roaming cats prey on their owners' minds. Many cat owners worry about their pets wandering the streets, but perceive cats hunting mice and birds to be unavoidable instinct, researchers have found.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
The first case of a Portuguese beetle living exclusively in groundwater. A diving beetle demonstrating various adaptations to the life underground, including depigmentation and evolutionary loss of eyes, was discovered in the cave Soprador do Carvalho, Portugal. This new to science species is the first known representative of the whole order of beetles to exclusively inhabit the underground waters of Portugal.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Drinking water guidelines in the US vary widely from state to state. In response to the growing problem of drinking water contaminated with per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), a new analysis shows that many states are establishing their own guideline levels for two types of PFAS-PFOA and PFOS-that differ from federal guidelines. The new study appears in the Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology, which is published by Springer Nature. Acc
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Futurity.org
U.S. health care spending is way higher than other countries. The United States spends much more per person on health care than other developed countries. But it's largely because prices are higher, not because Americans get more care, according to a new study. Among other factors, the researchers found that higher drug prices, higher salaries for doctors and nurses, higher hospital administration costs, and higher prices for many medical services are reaso
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Big Think
New study finds vloggers and viewers share emotions. A new study finds that what you watch can influence how you feel and that how you feel influences what you watch. Strangely, it seems to be the first study to investigate these notions as they relate to online videos. The findings are in line with previous studies of other text-based social media platforms. It has often been said that "like attracts like" or that "birds of a feather flock togethe
Published: 07 Jan 2019

Ingeniøren
35 år gammelt søkabel lækker olie nær Hornbæk. Energinet og Svenska Kraftnät er med dykkere på vej ned for helt præcis at lokalisere lækken på et 400 kV-kabel ud for Ellekilde Hage. Flydespærringer og miljøskib holder styr på olien
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Assessments could reduce end-of-life hospital stays for seniors. Better use of standard assessment tools could help long-term care homes identify which new residents are at risk of hospitalization or death in the first 90 days of admission.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Physics can show us the inside of tumors. A team of physicists from the CNRS and Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 has demonstrated the potential, for oncology, of an imaging technique based only on the physical properties of tumors. It can differentiate populations of malignant cells and monitor how effective an anticancer treatment is. These results, published in Physical Review Letters on January 8, 2019, should help in the design of ne
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Researchers study bacterial immunity to understand infectious disease. Patients with cystic fibrosis are often infected by pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that infects the lungs and prevents breathing, often causing death. P. aeruginosa itself can also be infected by viruses, which can affect the clinical outcomes of cystic fibrosis patients. University of Illinois Professor of Microbiology Rachel Whitaker and her team had the idea to use P. aeruginosa as a kind
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Family Medicine and Community Health Journal volume six, issue number four publishes. Family Medicine and Community Health Journal volume six, issue number four publishes.The Winter 2018 issue includes five original research articles, a review article, a letter to the editor and a China Focus article addressing various topics in family medicine in both China and internationally.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Medical scanner helps to unlock the mysteries of a giant prehistoric marine reptile. A nearly meter-long skull of a giant fossil marine ichthyosaur found in a farmer's field more than 60 years ago has been studied for the first time. Using cutting-edge computerized tomography (CT) scanning technology, the research reveals new information including details of the rarely preserved braincase. The almost 200-million-year-old fossil, which was found in 1955 at Fell Mill Farm in Warwick
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Older people who use hearing aids still report hearing challenges. A high proportion of older people with hearing aids, especially those with lower incomes, report having trouble hearing and difficulty accessing hearing care services, according to a new study.
Published: 07 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Over half of UK female surgeons have experience of workplace discrimination, poll suggests. More than half of female surgeons in the UK have faced or witnessed discrimination in the workplace, suggest the results of a confidential online poll.
Published: 07 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Myth of Mona Lisa's magical gaze debunked. In science, the "Mona Lisa Effect" refers to the impression that the eyes of the person portrayed in an image seem to follow the viewer as they move in front of the picture. Two researchers from the Cluster of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology (CITEC) at Bielefeld University demonstrate that, ironically enough, this effect does not occur with Leonardo da Vinci's world-famous painting "Mo
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Ketogenic supplements delay seizures without dietary restrictions. Researchers have discovered supplementing a normal, carbohydrate-rich diet with specific ketogenic agents may significantly delay tonic-clonic seizures caused by exposure to high levels of oxygen.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Scientists confirm that chromosomes are formed by stacked layers. A new study based on electron microscopy techniques at low temperatures demonstrates that, during mitosis, chromosome DNA is packed in stacked layers of chromatin. The research, published in EMBO Journal, confirms a surprising structure proposed by UAB researchers over a decade ago, but criticized due to the limitations of the technique used.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Cancer mortality milestone: 25 years of continuous decline. A steady, 25-year decline has resulted in a 27 percent drop in the overall cancer death rate in the United States, translating to approximately 2.6 million fewer cancer deaths between 1991 and 2016. The data come from Cancer Statistics, 2019, the American Cancer Society's widely-quoted annual report on cancer rates and trends.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Age and foaming-how to predict when a volcano will erupt. The eruption of a volcano can have devastating consequences – killing people and destroying livelihoods, as well as releasing vast amounts of ash into the sky that disrupts air travel and alters the climate. Knowing what goes on underground, however, would facilitate better warnings for when an eruption will occur – and help save lives while keeping damage to a minimum.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Smartphones: The cultural, individual and technical processes that make them smart. Has there ever been an invention so integral to our lives, and so intimate, as the smartphone? Yet they are slippery things. Smartphones are both a step change in the ability of human beings to communicate with each other and become informed, and a new point of vulnerability to penetration by the outside world. They are at once talismans of our freedom and connectivity and tokens of the corporatio
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
How herpesviruses shape the immune system. DZIF scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed an analytic method that can very precisely detect viral infections using immune responses.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Pyronaridine-artesunate for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Researchers from LSTM have looked at the efficacy of using a novel artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), pyronaridine-artesunate, to treat malaria in areas where resistance to other ACTs is becoming a problem. The analysis finds it at least as effective as the currently used ACTs, if not better.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Insomnia has many faces. Researchers at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience revealed that there are five types of insomnia. Type 1 scores high on many distressing traits such as neuroticism and feeling down or tense. Types 2 and 3 experienced less distress and were distinguished by their high versus low sensitivity to reward. Type 4 and 5 experienced even less distress and differed by the way their sleep responded
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Drinking water guidelines in the US vary widely from state to state. In response to the growing problem of drinking water contaminated with per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), a new analysis shows that many states are establishing their own guideline levels for two types of PFAS–PFOA and PFOS–that differ from federal guidelines. The new study appears in the Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology, which is published by Springer Nature.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Flies release neuronal brakes to fly longer. How does the insect brain coordinate the timing for such long flight bouts? A group of scientists at the National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, have answered this question in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Scientific American
A Touch to Remember. The sense of touch generates surprisingly powerful and long-lasting memories
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Understanding enterprise 'ecosystem' can increase number of women-owned businesses. Making an economic case for female entrepreneurship will do more to increase the number of women-owned businesses rather than treating it as a diversity issue, according to new research led by the University of Dundee.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Experts warn against mega-dams in lowland tropical forests. Mega-dams should not be built in lowland tropical forest regions due to the threat they pose to biodiversity and ecosystems, according to experts at the University of Stirling.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Holographic color printing for optical security. Researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have invented a new type of anti-counterfeiting device that can be useful for counterfeit deterrence of important documents such as identity cards, passports and banknotes.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Antibiotic resistance in the environment linked to fecal pollution. A study shows that 'crAssphage', a virus specific to bacteria in human feces, is highly correlated to the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental samples.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Experts warn against mega-dams in lowland tropical forests. Mega-dams should not be built in lowland tropical forest regions due to the threat they pose to biodiversity and ecosystems, according to experts at the University of Stirling.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
In VR boys learn best when the teacher is a drone — girls lean better from virtual Marie. The teacher is just as important in a virtual learning environment as in a normal classroom, but a new study shows that boys and girls differ greatly in terms of how they learn best: Boys learn best when their virtual teacher comes in the form of a drone, while girls get more knowledge from VR-teaching when they are taught by a young, female researcher-type named Marie.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
New anti-Wolbachia drug with potential to treat onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Researchers from LSTM and the University of Liverpool have successfully optimised a hit from a whole cell screening of a 10000-compound library to deliver the first novel fully synthetic and rationally designed anti-Wolbachia drug, AWZ1066S, which could potentially be used to treat onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis (LF).
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Discovered: Different brain areas linked to smoking and drinking. Academics at the University of Warwick have found that low functional connectivity of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex that is associated with the tendency to smoke is associated with increased impulsiveness — which may contribute to the tendency to smoke. The high connectivity of the reward-related medial orbitofrontal cortex in drinkers may increase the tendency to be attracted to the reward of
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
RCSI researchers develop new tuberculosis treatment. Led by researchers at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland), a team of researchers has developed a new treatment for tuberculosis (TB). This work could offer a practical treatment that has the potential to be scaled-up and mass-produced for clinical testing.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Defective immune cells in the brain cause Alzheimer's disease. Mutations of the TREM2 gene can significantly increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Scientists from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich now shed light on the reasons why TREM2 is so important for brain health. They show that TREM2 activates brain immune cells to eliminate toxic deposits, first and foremost in the early stages of
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Cambrian integrative stratigraphy and timescale of China. The review paper briefly summarizes the historical narrative of the present international chronostratigraphic framework of the Cambrian System and recent advances and problems of the undefined Cambrian stage GSSPs, in particular the authors challenge the global correlation of the GSSP for the Cambrian base, in addition to Cambrian chemostratigraphy and geochronology.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Post-traumatic stress disorder: alleviating flashbacks by playing Tetris. A behavioural intervention procedure including the computer game Tetris could help people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to alleviate involuntarily recurring visual memories of traumatic experiences. This is the conclusion reached by a team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum together with a researcher from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden following a study of 20 inpatients with PTSD. Foll
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Ingeniøren
Svanemølleværket slukker for varmen i 2023. I 2023 skal Ørsteds Svanemølleværk nedlægges og varmen i stedet produceres på et lille, nyt spidslastværk, som Hofor bliver ejer af.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Drug can temporarily boost long-term memory of objects. Allergy sufferers may use antihistamines to reduce symptoms, but new research reveals that better long-term memory might be possible with pro-histamine treatment. Long-term memory is used to remember anything before 48 hours ago.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Mechanical properties of tumors measured by Brillouin light scattering. A team of physicists at the Institut Lumière Matière (CNRS/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1), in collaboration with the Cancer Research Center of Lyon (CNRS/INSERM/ Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1/Centre Léon Bérard/Hospices civils de Lyon), has demonstrated the potential of an imaging technique based only on the physical properties of tumors. It can differentiate populations of malignant cells a
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Understanding punishment and crime control in South Africa's marginalized communities. Inadequate policing, vigilantism, social inequality, the legacy of apartheid: these are the complex factors affecting the landscape of law and justice in South Africa's informal shack settlements. University of Toronto Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Gail Super is trying to untangle them and learn how they relate to state formation in her new study, "Precarious penality on the periphe
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Blockchains in real time. Blockchains promise widescale open Internet applications that are organised decentrally, but this comes at the price of slow performance for every transaction processed by the system. Cryptography researchers working with Professor Sebastian Faust have achieved global awareness with their approach to facilitating real-time transactions using blockchains such as Ethereum.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Ex-Nissan boss Ghosn 'could spend six months in jail'. Former Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn could spend another six months behind bars before his case comes to trial, his lawyer said Tuesday.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Researchers track hurricane's effects on river pollution and beneficial bacteria. On a rainy Saturday in October, graduate students Arianna Sherman and Weitao Shuai parked their car by a bridge on a rural road in Hillsborough, North Carolina. In rubber boots, they waded into a muddy stream to begin investigating how farm waste and a giant storm may have disrupted an ecosystem.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Safer mining practices reduce hazardous exposures in small-scale mining in Nigeria. Doctors Without Borders and Occupational Knowledge International are reporting on a successful pilot project demonstrating significant gains in reducing severe lead poisoning in mining communities in Nigeria. Since 2010 MSF has been treating thousands of poisoned children in response to the world's worst lead poisoning outbreak in Northern Nigeria. The introduction of safer mining practices reduce
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Close flu vaccine supply gaps to ease flu seasons, make pandemics less deadly. Gaps in the logic of how we restock flu vaccines may be costing hundreds of lives, or more. A new model to tweak the gaps could save hundreds to hundreds-of-thousands of people and millions to multiple millions of dollars in medical costs.
Published: 07 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Intermittent fasting could improve obese women's health. Research carried out at the University of Adelaide shows that obese women lost more weight and improved their health by fasting intermittently while following a strictly controlled diet.
Published: 07 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Thin layers of sediment point to early arrival of life on land. New clues emerging from fossils found in the oldest soils on Earth suggest that multicellular, land-dwelling organisms possibly emerged much earlier than thought.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Defeating credit card fraud. Online behavioural targeting and device fingerprinting could be used to combat credit card fraud according to a team from Botswana International University of Science and Technology, in Palapye, Botswana. Writing in the International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics, Motlhaleemang Moalosi, Hlomani Hlomani, and Othusitse Phefo explain how there are numerous existing credit card
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Antibiotic resistance in the environment linked to fecal pollution. Increased levels of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment may have different causes. It could be a consequence of on-site selection from antibiotic residues in the environment, hence promoting the evolution of new forms of resistance. Alternatively, it is simply due contamination by fecal bacteria that often tend to be more resistant than other bacteria. Understanding which explanation
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Hair dye is toxic – could natural alternatives be made to work?. Do you really know what you're putting on your hair? Many hair dyes you can buy in the shops or hairdresser contain toxic chemicals that can cause skin problems or even increase the chances of DNA mutations (a potential cause of cancer). As a result (and to save money), many people are turning to supposed natural alternatives, with the internet showcasing a plethora of home-made and plant-based co
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Futurity.org
How our gambling brains decide when to double down. Our most recent run of luck influences our high-risk choices at the poker table or in our everyday lives, a new study suggests. The decision to "up the ante" even against long odds, or to be conservative, can result from an internal predisposition that those recent results form, the researchers report. That predisposition involves a "push-pull" dynamic between the brain's two hemispheres, the tea
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Global natural disasters wreak $160 bn damage in 2018: Munich Re. Natural disasters including wildfires, hurricanes and tsunamis inflicted $160 billion of damage and claimed 10,400 lives in 2018, German reinsurer Munich Re said Tuesday.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Samsung, like Apple, feels sting of slowing global growth. Samsung expects its quarterly operating profit to fall 29 percent compared with last year, adding to the tech sector's unease about the effect of slowing global economic growth on the industry.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Study finds tiny cavities in Banksia trees are nests for native bees. A new study from Curtin University has found pre-formed cavities in Banksia trees to be an important nesting home for a tiny native Western Australian bee.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Europe's first samurai wasps found in stink bug eggs. Food crops are continuously threatened by invasive pest species. One such pest that began to appear in Europe over the last decade or so is the Halyomorpha halys, commonly known as the brown marmorated stink bug. Native to eastern Asia, the bug is highly polyphagous, feeding on more than 170 plant species – including tree fruit, nuts, vegetables and field crops – and causing significant crop damag
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Dagens Medicin
Borgere kan nu oprette behandlingstestamenter. Borgere kan med det nye juridisk bindende behandlingstestamente tilkendegive, at de ikke ønsker livsforlængende behandling.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Dagens Medicin
Ny lægefaglig direktør i Psykiatri og Social i Midtjylland. Phuong Le Reisinia er ansat som ny lægefaglig direktør for Psykiatri og Social i Region Midtjylland.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Socio-economic study looks at boosting Panama Canal reliability. A recently completed research project allowed novel socio-economic analysis aimed at finding out if ecological infrastructure investments are feasible in various scenarios to improve reliability of the Panama Canal.
Published: 07 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
How the brain decides whether to hold 'em or fold 'em. Why do people make high-risk decisions — in casinos or in other aspects of their lives — even when they know the odds are stacked against them?
Published: 07 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Power cut: UTokyo engineers create a wireless charger you can easily cut to shape. Researchers from the University of Tokyo developed a new system to charge electronic devices such as smartphones and smartwatches wirelessly. The method involves a cuttable, flexible power transfer sheet which charges devices wirelessly and can be molded or even cut with scissors to fit different-shaped surfaces and objects.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
New insights into a rare type of cancer open novel avenues of study. Undifferentiated uterine sarcoma is a very rare but extremely aggressive cancer type. It can be divided into four groups with different characteristics of clinical importance — a new study at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden reveals. The results, published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, also show that the survival rate of patients with a certain type of tumour is better than predicted.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
New complex carbohydrate discovered in barley. University of Adelaide researchers have discovered a new complex carbohydrate in barley. The first of its kind to be discovered in over 30 years, the cereal polysaccharide has potential applications in food, medicine and cosmetics.
Published: 07 Jan 2019

Futurity.org
Fossils indicate life on land arrived earlier than we thought. Multicellular, land-dwelling organisms may have emerged much earlier than thought, new clues from fossils from the oldest soils on Earth suggest. The evidence for this conclusion comes from fossil assemblages, previously considered to be ocean organisms, found in thin layers of silt and sand located between thicker sandstone beds in South Australia. The sediments date to between 542 million to 63
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Delayed adaptation favors coexistence. Soil bacteria must be able to adapt to varying environmental conditions. – But a new study by LMU researchers indicates that rapid adaptation can be counterproductive, while delayed adjustment facilitates coexistence of different species.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Should we say farewell to the Arctic's unique nature?. Temperatures are rising faster in the Arctic than any other place on Earth. If these changes continue, it is likely that the unique and diverse Arctic tundra will change into a more uniform vegetation dominated by shrubs.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

cognitive science
Raymond Tallis – a neuroscientist and philosopher – argues that biology and the computational sciences can't explain our sense of time & capacity for shared intentionality. Podcast.. submitted by /u/NousTree [link] [comments]
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Researchers develop miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance for oil and gas exploration. Donhee Ham, Gordon McKay Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics, has been awarded $1.7 million from the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to develop miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) electronics. The devices' small size and low cost lend themselves to broad deployment in Earth's deep subsurface, enabling imaging of rock forma
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Colorado's Lake Dillon is warming rapidly. The surface waters of Lake Dillon, a mountain reservoir that supplies water to the the Denver area, have warmed by nearly 5 degrees Fahrenheit (2.5 degrees Celsius) in the last 35 years, which is twice the average warming rate for global lakes. Yet surprisingly, Dillon does not show adverse environmental changes, such as nuisance algal blooms, often associated with warming of lakes.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Futurity.org
U.S. overdoses and suicides double in 17 years. Suicides and drug overdoses kill American adults at twice the rate today as they did just 17 years ago. Opioids are a key contributor to that rise, a new study shows. Reversing this deadly double trend will take investment in programs proven to prevent and treat opioid addiction, experts say. Experts need to identify who's most at risk of deliberate or unintentional opioid overdoses, so they get
Published: 07 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Businesses think they're on top of carbon risk, but tourism destinations have barely a clue. The directors of most Australian companies are well aware of the impact of carbon emissions, not only on the environment but also on their own firms as emissions-intensive industries get lumbered with taxes and regulations designed to change their behaviour.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Dagens Medicin
Ny strategi skal beskytte sundhedssektoren mod hackere. Sundhedssektorens parter har udarbejdet en strategi, der skal styrke sektorens forsvar mod trusler fra hackere.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Futurity.org
Bran antioxidant keeps food fresh longer. A natural antioxidant found in grain bran could preserve food longer and replace synthetic antioxidants currently in use, according to new research. "Currently, there's a big push within the food industry to replace synthetic ingredients with natural alternatives, and this is being driven by consumers," says Andrew S. Elder, doctoral candidate in food science at Penn State. "Consumers want clean
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Nearly a third of all galaxy clusters may have been previously unnoticed. In 1933, Fritz Zwicky, famous American astronomer of Swiss origin, arrived at the astonishing conclusion that even though galaxies are the signposts of galaxy clusters, their contribution to the total cluster mass is minuscule in comparison to a dominant dark matter component. Current estimates of a cluster total mass indicates that the contributions are roughly:
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Adolescence can be awkward. Here's how parents can help their child make and maintain good friendships. Secondary school can be a lonely place for adolescents who don't have a best friend or a group of trusted friends. Young people will be more skilled in the art of making genuine friends (and keeping them) if they know how to be assertive, are optimistic about life, have some basic social skills and have a relationship with a parent/carer that includes honest talk.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Very risky business: The pros and cons of insurance companies embracing artificial intelligence. It's a new day not very far in the future. You wake up; your wristwatch has recorded how long you've slept, and monitored your heartbeat and breathing. You drive to work; car sensors track your speed and braking. You pick up some breakfast on your way, paying electronically; the transaction and the calorie content of your meal are recorded.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Essential nutrient may help fight Alzheimer's across generations. In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Institute explore a safe and simple treatment for one of the most devastating and perplexing afflictions: Alzheimer's disease (AD).Lead authors Ramon Velazquez and Salvatore Oddo, along with their colleagues in the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center (NDRC), investigate the effects of choline, an important nutrient that may hold promise
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Do you recognize this image?. Allergy sufferers may use antihistamines to reduce symptoms, but new research reveals that better long-term memory might be possible with pro-histamine treatment. Long-term memory is used to remember anything before 48 hours ago.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
How to increase your lottery winnings (and succeed in business) by being contrary. No rational person would ever enter the lottery. The chance of picking the right six numbers and hitting the jackpot in the UK's Lotto is approximately one in 14m.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Building wind turbines where they're not wanted brings down property values. The question of whether or not wind turbines have decreased property values in Ontario has been a point of contention in recent years, and fuelled by the rapid expansion of the wind energy industry following the implementation of the Green Energy Act in 2009. (The current provincial government is in the process of repealing the act.)
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Artificial neural networks make life easier for hearing aid users. For people with hearing loss, it can very difficult to understand and separate voices in noisy environments. This problem may soon be history thanks to a new groundbreaking algorithm that is designed to recognise and separate voices efficiently in unknown sound environments.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

The Scientist
Image of the Day: It's a Shark!. A newly developed underwater ultrasound reveals a fetal shark swimming between the two uteri of its mother.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
TikTok: the world's most valuable startup that you've never heard of. Anticipation has long been building about the impending takeover of the tech world by Chinese digital giants like Alibaba, Tencent, Baidu, and JD. Efforts so far, however, have been largely disappointing. The most popular messaging app in the West is WhatsApp, not WeChat; people use PayPal, not Alipay, for digital payments; Google dominates the search market, not Baidu.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Existentialism: A guiding philosophy for tackling climate change in cities?. The evidence of human-induced climate change is clear. At minimum, climate change will cost us dearly due to the economic impacts and lives lost from the increased frequency and severity of extreme weather events. At worst, it presents an existential threat.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Holographic teachers were supposed to be part of our future. What happened?. Cast your mind back to the turn of last century. Experts predicted that by now classrooms would no longer feature human teachers, and holographic virtual entities would deliver lessons instead.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Researchers discover multilayer band gap using its own technology. Korean researchers at DGIST have proven the existence of the upper band gap of atomic rhenium disulfide (ReS2) layers in the conductive atomic structure of ionization energy. The work resulted from a joint study with Professor Jong-hyun Ahn's research team at Yonsei University.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Study shows single atoms can make more efficient catalysts. Catalysts are chemical matchmakers: They bring other chemicals close together, increasing the chance that they'll react with each other and produce something people want, like fuel or fertilizer.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Deep low-frequency earthquakes indicate migration of magmatic fluids beneath Laacher See. A German study shows that magma could rise from the upper mantle into the middle and upper crust beneath the Laacher See Volcano (Rhineland-Palatinate). This is the result of a study conducted by the Seismological Survey of Southwest Germany (Erdbebendienst Südwest), together with GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Seismological Survey of No
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Green catalysts with Earth-abundant metals accelerate production of bio-based plastic. Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed and analyzed a novel catalyst for the oxidation of 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, which is crucial for generating new raw materials that replace the classic non-renewable ones used for making many plastics.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
'Flipped' metal oxide cage can sort carbon dioxide from carbon monoxide. How do you separate carbon dioxide from carbon monoxide? One way, showcased by a new study from Kanazawa University, is to use a bowl of vanadium. More precisely, a hollow, spherical cluster of vanadate molecules can discriminate between CO and CO2, allowing potential uses in CO2 storage and capture.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Medical scanner helps to unlock the mysteries of a giant prehistoric marine reptile. A nearly meter-long skull of a giant fossil marine ichthyosaur found in a farmer's field more than 60 years ago has been studied for the first time.Using cutting-edge computerized tomography (CT) scanning technology, the research reveals new information including details of the rarely preserved braincase. The almost 200-million-year-old fossil, which was found in 1955 at Fell Mill Farm in Warwicks
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Flu vaccine is safe for hospitalized patients. Hospitalized patients who received the flu vaccine had no increased risk of outpatient visits or hospital readmission within seven days of discharge, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Tackling greenhouse gases. The images are ubiquitous: A coastal town decimated by another powerful hurricane, satellite images showing shrinking polar ice caps, a school of dead fish floating on the surface of warming waters, swaths of land burnt by an out-of-control wildfire. These dire portrayals share a common thread-they offer tangible evidence that climate change is affecting every corner of the globe.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
New complex carbohydrate discovered in barley. University of Adelaide researchers have discovered a new complex carbohydrate in barley. The first of its kind to be discovered in over 30 years, the cereal polysaccharide has potential applications in food, medicine and cosmetics.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Ingeniøren
Teknisk briefing: Det ved vi om de kunstige øer ved Avedøre. Efter et pressemøde, hvor det stod ganske småt til med konkrete informationer, er der kommet en række faktuelle ting frem om det ambitiøse københavner-projekt.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Big Think
We could cut the opioid death rate by 50% – but we're not. Drug companies make huge profits by flooding the market with overly powerful – and highly addictive – drugs. Some high profile deaths over the last several years have brought this problem to the headlines . It's everyone, not just middle America, who is getting hooked. Why do we let Big Pharma rule over? Journalist and author Maia Szalavitz investigates. Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Medical scanner helps to unlock the mysteries of a giant prehistoric marine reptile. A nearly metre-long skull of a giant fossil marine ichthyosaur found in a farmer's field more than 60 years ago has been studied for the first time.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
How common pain relievers may promote Clostridium difficile infections. Clostridium difficile causes the most common and most dangerous hospital-born infections in the United States and around the world. People treated with antibiotics are at heightened risk because those drugs disturb the microbial balance of the gut, but observational studies have also identified a link between severe C. difficile infections and use of NSAIDs, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Viden (Danmarks Radio)
Fire unge har ordet: Fem gode råd fra teenagere til voksne. Hvordan hjælper man bedst sin hormonramte teenager? Forældre kan få svaret her.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Ingeniøren
Nationalmuseets plastekspert skal hjælpe med at tackle mikroplasten i havene. Yvonne Shashoua er ekspert i nedbrydning af plast. Nu skal hun samarbejde med forskere i marinmiljøet for at undersøge, hvordan store stykker plast bliver til mikroplast.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Ingeniøren
Ekspert om cyberstrategier: Et fokus på papirarbejde skaber ikke reel it-sikkerhed. De nye sektorspecifikke cybersikkerhedsstrategier fokuserer alt for meget på standarder og præventiv kontrol i stedet for operationel it-sikkerhed. Sådan lyder det fra cybersikkerhedskonsulent Michael Weng, der savner aktiv threat hunting.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Austria's Post Office under fire over data sharing. Austria's national post office found itself under fire Tuesday for collecting and selling information about customers' political allegiances in what privacy campaigners say bears similarities to the Facebook data-sharing scandal.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
New CRISPR-based technology developed to control pests with precision-guided genetics. Using the CRISPR gene editing tool, researchers have developed a new way to control and suppress populations of insects, potentially including those that ravage agricultural crops and transmit deadly diseases. The 'precision-guided sterile insect technique' alters key genes that control insect sex determination and fertility. When pgSIT eggs are introduced into targeted populations, only adult ste
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Hospital SIESTA project reduces inpatient sleep interruptions. Hospitals often prioritize patient testing and treatment over the restorative virtues of patient sleep. Frequent overnight awakenings, however, can cause complications. The SIESTA study found that a commitment to sleep-friendly routines and changes to the electronic health record system could reduce nighttime disruptions and improve the patient experience.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Ingeniøren
Hacker overtager australsk varslingssystem og udsender besked. En hacker har sendt beskeder via et kompromitteret varslingssystem i Australien.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Ingeniøren
Elproduktion fra sol slog rekord i hedt 2018. Et solrigt og vindfattigt år har betydet et dyk i elproduktion fra vind, men rekord fra solcellerne.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Apple's sales struggles could translate into new iPhone deals from wireless carriers. Apple has an iPhone upgrade problem. That much is very clear after Wednesday afternoon's investor note from CEO Tim Cook in which the company lowered its expected revenue to $84 billion from its initial projections of between $89 billion and $93 billion for its most recent quarter ending Dec. 29.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
CES 2019: "Alexa, I'm still waiting for you to flush the potty". The Numi toilet from Kohler was impossible to ignore.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Is cutting the cord part of your New Year's Resolution? Here's what you need to know. Perhaps your New Year's resolution goes like this: Stop sending hundreds of dollars monthly to cable and satellite companies in 2019. Cut the cord and save.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Turkey's 12,000-year-old town about to be engulfed. From the ancient citadel overlooking the valley, Ridvan Ayhan looks at the Tigris with a furrowed brow. The river that supported his family's town for generations will soon destroy it.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
SoftBank scaling back WeWork investment: report. SoftBank is scaling back plans for fresh investment in shared-office provider WeWork, reports said Tuesday, slashing a multi-billion-dollar injection in the loss-making company.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Samsung Electronics flags near-30% slump in Q4 operating profit. Samsung Electronics on Tuesday flagged its first quarterly profit drop in two years and painted a grim outlook owing to mounting competition from Chinese smartphone makers and declining chip prices.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Giving up gas: China's Shenzhen switches to electric taxis. One of China's major cities has reached an environmental milestone: an almost entirely electric-powered taxi fleet.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Phys.org
Roaming cats prey on their owners' minds. Many cat owners worry about their pets wandering the streets, but perceive cats hunting mice and birds to be unavoidable instinct, researchers at the University of Exeter have found.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Ingeniøren
Cyberstrategi med hacker-tests af sygehuse: »Der mangler penge og detailplaner«. Den nye strategi for cybersikkerhed i sundhedssektoren lægger op til skærpede krav til medicinsk udstyr der er koblet på nettet, og flere scenariebaserede red team-tests fra whitehat hackere. Men der mangler detailplanlægning, anfører fagmand.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Saving sight: Using AI to diagnose diabetic eye disease. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of vision loss in adults, with 191 million people set to be affected by 2030. There are no early-stage symptoms and the disease may already be advanced by the time people start losing their sight. Now a team of Australian-Brazilian researchers have developed an image-processing algorithm that can automatically detect one of the key signs of the disease, fl
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
High-fat diets appear bad for blood pressure in younger males and females. There's more evidence that a high-fat diet is bad for both younger males and females, but exactly how it's harmful may differ between the sexes, scientists report.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Some Facebook users perceive worsening physical health. Facebook use linked to perceptions of worsening physical health, new research from the University of Surrey, reports.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Variable venom — why are some snakes deadlier than others?. By comparing records of venom potency and quantity for over 100 venomous snake species, researchers have discoverd that the potency of a snake's venom depends on what it eats.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Environmental sustainability should be inherent to dietary guidance. It is the position of the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior (SNEB) that environmental sustainability should be inherent to dietary guidance, whether working with individuals or groups about their dietary choices or in setting national dietary guidance. Improving the nutritional health of a population is a long-term goal that requires ensuring the long-term sustainability of the food sys
Published: 08 Jan 2019

EurekAlert!
Roaming cats prey on their owners' minds. Many cat owners worry about their pets wandering the streets, but perceive cats hunting mice and birds to be unavoidable instinct, researchers at the University of Exeter have found.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

Ingeniøren
Robotter skal holde øje med kloakrørene. Nyt forskningsprojekt skal udvikle autonome robotter til at finde fejl i kloaksystemet. Teknologien kan potentielt spare forsyningsselskaberne for stort millionbeløb.
Published: 08 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
Satellite images reveal global poverty. How far have we come in achieving the UN's sustainable development goals that we are committed to nationally and internationally? Yes, it can be difficult to make a global assessment of poverty and poor economic conditions, but with an eye in the sky, researchers are able to give us a very good hint of the living conditions of populations in the world's poor countries.
Published: 07 Jan 2019

ScienceDaily
A century and half of reconstructed ocean warming offers clues for the future. Due to a scarcity of data, most global estimates of ocean warming start only in the 1950s. However, a team of scientists has now succeeded in reconstructing ocean temperature change from 1871 to 2017.
Published: 07 Jan 2019

ArXiv Query
Primes in prime number races. Rubinstein and Sarnak have shown, conditional on the Riemann hypothesis (RH) and the linear independence hypothesis (LI) on the non-real zeros of $\zeta(s)$, that the set of real numbers $x\ge2$ for which $\pi(x)>$ li$(x)$ has a logarithmic density, which they computed to be about $2.6\times10^{-7}$. A natural problem is to examine the actual primes in this race. We prove, assuming RH and LI, that
Published: 05 Jan 2019

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