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nyheder2019januar09

Astronomers discover first direct evidence of white dwarf stars solidifying into crystals

The first direct evidence of white dwarf stars solidifying into crystals has been discovered by astronomers at the University of Warwick, and our skies are filled with them.

41min

Trump Has Defeated Himself

Well, that was the shortest, most easily resolved national emergency in U.S. history. Twelve hours ago, the president was preparing to set aside the regular process of law. By 9 p.m. eastern time? Not so much. Perhaps somebody pointed out that 15-year civil-engineering projects do not look very convincingly like emergency measures. “My house is burning! Time to begin the process of calling for de

14h

Center for Cybersikkerhed vil overvåge virksomheders datatrafik uden at spørge om lov

Et nyt lovforslag vil give Center for Cybersikkerhed mulighed for at placere sikkerhedssoftware i samfundsvigtige virksomheders servere og interne netværk ved tvang.

8h

Top 5 messages sent to alien civilizations

Ever since we've had the capability, humanity has been desperately trying to make contact with other life in the universe. While we've been beaming out information passively through our television and radio broadcasts, we've also sent more intentional messages. Looking at these messages tells us how humanity wants to think of itself and what kind of relationship we hope to have with alien life. N

21min

How trees and turnips grow fatter

Two international research teams have identified key regulatory networks controlling how plants grow 'outwards,' which could help us to grow trees to be more efficient carbon sinks and increase vegetable crop yields.

22min

Liverpool scientists design new responsive porous material inspired by proteins

Scientists from the University of Liverpool have, for the first time, synthesized a new material that exhibits structural change and triggered chemical activity like a protein.

22min

First evidence of gigantic remains from star explosions

Astrophysicists have found the first ever evidence of gigantic remains being formed from repeated explosions on the surface of a dead star in the Andromeda Galaxy, 2.5 million light years from Earth. The remains or 'super-remnant' measures almost 400 light years across. The super-remnant — larger than almost all known remnants of supernova explosions — is consistent with being built up by freque

22min

Thousands of stars turning into crystals

The first direct evidence of white dwarf stars solidifying into crystals has been discovered by astronomers at the University of Warwick, and our skies are filled with them.

22min

Astronomers map 'light echoes' of newly discovered black hole

A team of astronomers led by Erin Kara, the Neil Gehrels Prize Postdoctoral Fellow in the University of Maryland's Department of Astronomy, has charted the environment surrounding a relatively small, 'stellar mass' black hole that is 10 times the mass of the sun. The observations provide the clearest picture to date of how these small black holes consume matter and emit energy.

22min

Astronomers observe evolution of a black hole as it wolfs down stellar material

Astronomers observe evolution of a black hole as it wolfs down stellar material.

22min

Genes on the move help nose make sense of scents

With today's study, researchers have pinpointed a genomic mechanism by which a finite number of genes can ultimately help distinguish a seemingly near-infinite number of scents.

22min

Canada's CHIME telescope detects second repeating fast radio burst

A Canadian-led team of scientists has found the second repeating fast radio burst (FRB) ever recorded. The discovery of the extragalactic signal is among the first, eagerly awaited results from the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME). The repeating FRB was one of a total of 13 bursts detected over a period of just three weeks during the summer of 2018, while CHIME was in its pre

22min

Scientists design protein that prods cancer-fighting T-cells

Scientists have created a new protein that mimics a key immune regulatory protein, interleukin 2 (IL-2). IL-2 is a potent anticancer drug, but with toxic side effects. In a paper in the Jan. 10 issue of Nature, the researchers report using computer programs to design a protein that they have shown in animal models to have the same ability to stimulate cancer-fighting T-cells as IL-2, but without t

22min

Earth's Sun Will Turn into a Pure Crystal Ball Before It Dies

Before a star dies, it first turns to crystal.

23min

Sexual desire can spark a real connection

Sex helps initiate romantic relationships between potential partners, a new study finds. “Sex may set the stage for deepening the emotional connection between strangers,” says lead author Gurit Birnbaum, a social psychologist and associate professor of psychology at Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya in Israel. “This holds true for both men and women. Sex motivates human beings to connect, regardl

29min

1 knee replacement surgery sets the stage for another

Nearly a quarter of people who have total knee replacement surgery are likely to need a second surgery on their other knee within five years, research shows. This may be the result of abnormal walking patterns after surgery. “If we can change the way someone moves or improve their walking ability after surgery while also reducing the need for a second knee replacement, we may also be able to redu

29min

Mysterious radio signals from deep space detected

A telescope picks up bursts of radio waves from a distant galaxy, shedding light on an astrophysical puzzle.

29min

Income equality is getting worse. Can the co-op model solve this problem?

The cooperative model accounts for $154B every year in America. America leads the world with cooperatives, with over 30,000 businesses operating under this model. Co-op advocate Nathan Schneider believes this model can help level the economic playing field. What is a Co-operative? Nathan Schneider plays a game at strip malls. The activist-journalist and University of Colorado Boulder media studie

32min

Humpback Whales Plagiarize the Tunes of Other Whales (Even Oceans Away)

Humpback whales aren't just talented singers, they learn and steal each other's' songs.

34min

A second repeating fast radio burst has been tracked to a distant galaxy

Astronomers have spotted a second repeating fast radio burst, and it looks a lot like the first.

36min

What’s Better Than One Mysterious Cosmic Signal?

The mysterious signals come from all directions in the sky. Astronomers don’t know exactly what they are, or what causes them, but they have detected dozens over the past decade . The signals, known as fast radio bursts, originate from deep within the cosmos, well beyond the Milky Way galaxy. The radio waves travel across space for billions of years, moving at the speed of light. When they reach

40min

Scientists design new responsive porous material inspired by proteins

Scientists from the University of Liverpool have, for the first time, synthesized a new material that exhibits structural change and triggered chemical activity like a protein.

41min

First evidence of gigantic remains from star explosions

Astrophysicists have found the first ever evidence of gigantic remains being formed from repeated explosions on the surface of a dead star in the Andromeda Galaxy, 2.5 million light years from Earth. The remains or "super-remnant" measures almost 400 light years across. For comparison, it takes just 8 minutes for light from the Sun to reach us.

41min

Astronomers observe evolution of a black hole as it wolfs down stellar material

On March 11, an instrument aboard the International Space Station detected an enormous explosion of X-ray light that grew to be six times as bright as the Crab Nebula, nearly 10,000 light years away from Earth. Scientists determined the source was a black hole caught in the midst of an outburst—an extreme phase in which a black hole can spew brilliant bursts of X-ray energy as it devours an avalan

41min

Canada's CHIME telescope detects second repeating fast radio burst

A Canadian-led team of scientists has found the second repeating fast radio burst (FRB) ever recorded. FRBs are short bursts of radio waves coming from far outside our Milky Way galaxy. Scientists believe FRBs emanate from powerful astrophysical phenomena billions of light years away.

41min

Genes on the move help nose make sense of scents

The human nose can distinguish one trillion different scents—an extraordinary feat that requires 10 million specialized nerve cells, or neurons, in the nose, and a family of more than 400 dedicated genes. But precisely how these genes and neurons work in concert to pick out a particular scent has long puzzled scientists. This is in large part because the gene activity inside each neuron—where each

41min

How trees and turnips grow fatter

Two international research teams have identified key regulatory networks controlling how plants grow 'outwards', which could help us to grow trees to be more efficient carbon sinks and increase vegetable crop yields.

41min

Carrots or candy bars? Context shapes choice of healthy foods

Pop quiz: Given a choice between indulgent and healthy foods, what will most people pick? The answer may depend on what foods sit nearby on the grocery shelf, suggests new Duke University research. Paradoxically, the nearby presence of an indulgent treat such as Snickers or Oreos can cause more people to opt for a healthy food, such as salmon or grapefruit, said study co-author Scott Huettel. Cont

43min

Speakers At Indian Science Congress Say Newton Was Wrong, Ancient Demon Had Planes

Nobel laureates spoke at the 106th annual Indian Science Congress this month. So did some so-called scientists, who criticized Newton and claimed that an ancient demon had aircraft. (Image credit: Pardeep Pandit/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)

47min

Can mosquito ‘birth control’ fight disease?

A protein in mosquitos that is critical to the process of producing viable eggs could pave the way for “mosquito birth control,” researchers report. Depending on where you live, the buzz of a nearby mosquito can be a nuisance, or it can be deadly. Worldwide, more than 500 million people suffer from diseases the blood-feeding insects transmit, including malaria, Dengue Fever, Zika, and West Nile.

50min

How the Nazi’s inhumane parenting guidelines may still be affecting German children

In 1934, a German pulmonologist wrote a book that contained child-rearing advice that promoted extreme forms of neglect in order to encourage toughness in children. The Nazis later incorporated these principles into a mothers' training program that millions of German women undertook. Some German therapists suggest that the effects of these harsh parenting styles are still being felt by German adu

54min

Is Stunning an Animal Before Slaughter More Humane? Some Religious Leaders Say No

Two regions of Belgium are banning kosher and halal slaughter, arguing that not using stunning is cruel. But Jewish and Muslim leaders say their traditions minimize an animal’s suffering.

59min

Bringing Thunderstorm-Level Detail to World Weather Forecasts

Bringing Thunderstorm-Level Detail to World Weather Forecasts New system uses a supercomputer and crowd-sourced observations to improve short-term world weather predictions. IndiaMonsoon2018_3km_resolution.jpg An image of an August 2018 monsoon in India, at the 3 kilometer resolution of the new Global High-Resolution Atmospheric Forecasting System. Image credits: IBM Earth Wednesday, January 9, 2

1h

The Exceptions to the Rulers

Conservatives’ obsession with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez may seem ridiculous. Ever since the 29-year-old former bartender wrested the Democratic primary nomination from the 10-term incumbent Joe Crowley, right-wing media has fixated on the unapologetically left-wing representative. From her clothes to her nickname to her high school to her childhood home , conservatives seem particularly intent on

1h

Stem cell study offers clues for optimizing bone marrow transplants and more

A new USC and Stanford study, conducted in mice, shows that successfully transplanted stem cells don't behave 'normally' as in a healthy person without a transplant. Instead, the radiation and high-dose chemotherapy used to wipe out diseased stem cells prior to transplantation appear to trigger 'extreme behavior' in the newly transplanted cells.

1h

Hubble Space Telescope's premier camera shuts down

The Hubble Space Telescope's premier camera has shut down.

1h

Trump campaign firm pleads guilty in Facebook data case

A UK consultancy working on Donald Trump's US election campaign pleaded guilty and was fined by a London court Wednesday over its refusal to release personal data it secretly hoovered off Facebook.

1h

Model predicts lithium-ion batteries most competitive for storage applications by 2030

Researchers have developed a model to determine the lifetime costs of 9 electricity storage technologies for 12 different applications between 2015 and 2050. The model, which predicts lithium-ion batteries to be the cheapest technology in the coming decades.

1h

Beech trees are dying, and nobody's sure why

A confounding new disease is killing beech trees in Ohio and elsewhere, and plant scientists are sounding an alarm while looking for an explanation. Researchers and naturalists in northeastern Ohio report on the emerging 'beech leaf disease' epidemic, calling for speedy work to find a culprit so that work can begin to stop its spread.

1h

Amazon's Bezos, world's wealthiest man, to divorceJeff Bezos M.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, rated the world's wealthiest person, announced Wednesday on Twitter that he and his wife MacKenzie Bezos were divorcing after a long separation.

1h

Researchers diversify drug development options with new metal catalyst

A University of Illinois team of researchers led by chemistry professor M. Christina White has developed a new manganese-based catalyst that can change the structure of druglike molecules to make new drugs, advancing the pace and efficiency of drug development.

1h

Elephants take to the road for reliable resources

An elephant never forgets. This seems to be the case, at least, for elephants roaming about Namibia, looking for food, fresh water, and other resources.

1h

Beech trees are dying, and nobody's sure why

A confounding new disease is killing beech trees in Ohio and elsewhere, and plant scientists are sounding an alarm while looking for an explanation.

1h

Missing Galaxies? Now There’s Too Many

Gaze skyward from the Southern Hemisphere and it’s hard to miss the Large Magellanic Cloud. The fact that it looks like one of the Milky Way’s spiral arms, albeit smaller, reveals that it’s a small galaxy roughly 30,000 light-years across with a few billion stars. Indeed, any small telescope will show that it’s scattered with glowing nebulae that are punctured by dark dollops of dust. And it isn’

1h

Study finds women and men are equally effective at wage-labor negotiations

The gender pay gap in the United States persists across all demographics and industries, according to the American Association of University Women (AAUW), a leading voice in promoting equity and education for women and girls.

1h

Study finds two billion birds migrate over Gulf Coast

A new study combining data from citizen scientists and weather radar stations is providing detailed insights into spring bird migration along the Gulf of Mexico and how these journeys may be affected by climate change. Findings on the timing, location, and intensity of these bird movements are published in the journal Global Change Biology.

1h

Paul Manafort Is Bad at Basic Tech, From Passwords to PDFs

The former Trump campaign chair keeps getting in trouble thanks at least in part to subpar digital security.

1h

A New Idea about What Triggers Alzheimer's

Changes in brain cells’ DNA may be responsible—and if so, medicines already developed for other diseases might be used to treat it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Elephants take to the road for reliable resources

Landscapes can change from day-to-day and year-to-year, and many animals will move about according to resource availability. But do they remember past resource conditions? Just how important is memory and spatial cognition when seeking to understand wildlife movement?Researchers in Etosha National Park, Namibia, examined this question through African elephants.

1h

Metabolite produced by gut microbiota from pomegranates reduces inflammatory bowel disease

The microbial metabolite, Urolithin A, derived from a compound found in berries and pomegranates, can reduce and protect against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Urolithin A (UroA) and its synthetic counterpart, UAS03, mitigate IBD by increasing proteins that tighten epithelial cell junctions in the gut and reducing gut inflammation in animal models. Tight junctions in the gut barrier prevent ina

1h

Change of teeth causes yo-yo effect in elephants' weight

The weight of elephants living in zoos fluctuates over the course of their adult lives in cycles lasting around a hundred months, researchers at the University of Zurich have found. The fluctuation is linked to the particular pattern of tooth change in elephants, which results in them having more or less chewing surface available.

1h

Following Nepal's devastating 2015 earthquake, crisis in childhood malnutrition averted

Despite widespread destruction, including severe agricultural-related losses caused by the 2015 earthquake in Nepal, child nutrition remained stable in the hardest hit areas, a new study finds.

1h

Researchers diversify drug development options with new metal catalyst

A University of Illinois team of researchers led by chemistry professor M. Christina White has developed a new manganese-based catalyst that can change the structure of druglike molecules to make new drugs, advancing the pace and efficiency of drug development.

1h

Geoscientists reconstruct 'eye-opening' 900-year Northeast climate record

Deploying a new technique for the first time in the region, geoscientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have reconstructed the longest and highest-resolution climate record for the Northeastern United States, which reveals previously undetected past temperature cycles and extends the record 900 years into the past, well beyond the previous early date of 1850.

1h

Lab safety, 10 years later

On December 29, 2008, staff scientist Sheri Sangji was working on a chemical synthesis in a lab at the University of California, Los Angeles, when one of the reagents ignited. Sangji's clothes caught fire, causing injuries that led to her death on January 16, 2009, at age 23. Now, a decade later, chemists discuss ongoing efforts to improve academic lab safety in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN),

1h

1h

BellBrook Labs Launches Transcreener cGAS Activity Assay to Accelerate Drug Discovery

The newTranscreenercGAMPcGASAssay directly measures the productcGAMP, in acGASenzymatic reaction allowing researchers to screen vast compound libraries for modulators of the enzyme. The assay will be used to discover and develop new treatments for autoimmune diseases and cancer by strategically targeting thecGAS-STING pathway.

2h

Controlling children's behavior with screen time leads to more screen time, study reveals

University of Guelph researchers investigated the impact of parenting practices on the amount of time young children spend in front of screens. They found a majority of parents use screen time to control behavior, especially on weekends. This results in children spending an average of 20 minutes more a day on weekends in front of a screen. Researchers say this is likely because using it as a rewar

2h

Beech trees are dying, and nobody's sure why

A confounding new disease is killing beech trees in Ohio and elsewhere, and plant scientists are sounding an alarm while looking for an explanation. In a study published in the journal Forest Pathology, researchers and naturalists from the Ohio State University and metroparks in northeastern Ohio report on the emerging 'beech leaf disease' epidemic, calling for speedy work to find a culprit so tha

2h

Study finds women and men are equally effective at wage-labor negotiations

First study to look at gender differences in trustworthiness and perceptions of benevolence in the context of hierarchical negotiations, such as wage-labor agreements, finds that women and men reach very similar negotiations outcomes in a neutral setting. The study is co-authored by Holona Ochs of Lehigh University and Andrew B. Whitford of University of Georgia.

2h

Last flu season was historically bad. Here's how this year's is shaping up.

Health An update as kids and adults alike head back after the holiday break. Last year’s season was historically bad, both in terms of the total number of folks who fell ill and the total number of people who died.

2h

CES 2019 day two: Smart ovens, VR headsets, and more really big TVs

Gadgets Get the CES experience without the walking or dehydration. The 2019 Consumer Electronics Show is in full swing.

2h

Two to Tango: Twitter Fact-Checks the Fact-Checkers

Last night an Associated Press tweet claimed that, in placing blame for the government shutdown, "it takes two to tango." Twitter thought otherwise.

2h

Drug sponge could minimize side effects of cancer treatment

Catheters are used today to deliver drugs directly to tumors to avoid broadcasting toxic chemotherapy agents throughout the body. Nevertheless, half of the drug can escape to the rest of the body, causing side effects. Doctors treating liver cancer teamed up with chemical engineers to design a polymer-coated device that can be temporarily placed in the vein coming out of the liver to absorb unused

2h

Spinning Black Holes Could Open Up Gentle Portals for Hypersonic Spacecraft

Feel like visiting another star system or dimension? You can do this by traveling through a spacetime portal of a black hole. But you better choose carefully. All black holes are not created equal.

2h

A tomato for everyone: 'Sunviva' for the good of all

Plant breeders at the University of Göttingen and Agrecol have launched a joint initiative to protect seeds as common property. Agrecol developed an 'Open Source Seed Licence,' which legally protects seeds as commons (i.e., a natural resource accessible to all members of society) and thus protects them from patenting and similar issues such as 'plant variety protection.' The results were published

2h

UMass Amherst geoscientists reconstruct 'eye-opening' 900-year Northeast climate record

Deploying a new technique for the first time in the region, geoscientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have reconstructed the longest and highest-resolution climate record for the Northeastern United States, which reveals previously undetected past temperature cycles and extends the record 900 years into the past, well beyond the previous early date of 1850.

2h

Widely used physical health drugs may help treat serious mental illness

Medications commonly used to combat physical health diseases, such as high blood pressure, could bring significant benefits to people with serious mental illnesses (SMI) such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or non-affective psychoses, according to a large cohort study led by UCL.

2h

Perceived barriers to minority medical students pursuing dermatology

The specialty of dermatology is one of the least diverse medical fields. In this study, a survey was conducted among 155 medical students (58 percent of whom were nonwhite) to understand perceived barriers to pursuing a career in dermatology by minority medical students.

2h

Model predicts lithium-ion batteries most competitive for storage applications by 2030

Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a model to determine the lifetime costs of 9 electricity storage technologies for 12 different applications between 2015 and 2050. The model, which predicts lithium-ion batteries to be the cheapest technology in the coming decades, appears Jan. 9 in the journal Joule, and is available open access.

2h

67.000 solcelleejere slap for flexafregning i første omgang

Ved årsskiftet blev omkring 18.000 årsafregnede solcelleejere overflyttet til flexafregning. Resten af de i alt 85.000 vil blive overført løbende, oplyser Energinet.

2h

Voter preference for Trump linked to bullying in middle schools

Bullying rates among middle school students in the spring of 2017 were 18 percent higher in localities where voters had favored Donald Trump than in those that had supported Hillary Clinton, according to a new study.

2h

Schizophrenia linked with abnormal immune response to Epstein-Barr virus

New research shows that people in the study with schizophrenia also have higher levels of antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis, so-called mono.

2h

Are your Facebook friends making you feel sick?

As social networking activity has become pervasive, researchers have been taking a closer look at its impact on our psychological and physical health.

2h

Insomnia has many faces

Researchers have revealed that there are five types of insomnia. Type 1 scores high on many distressing traits such as neuroticism and feeling down or tense. Types 2 and 3 experienced less distress and were distinguished by their high versus low sensitivity to reward. Type 4 and 5 experienced even less distress and differed by the way their sleep responded to stressful life events.

2h

Cancer mortality milestone: 25 years of continuous decline

A steady, 25-year decline has resulted in a 27 percent drop in the overall cancer death rate in the United States, translating to approximately 2.6 million fewer cancer deaths between 1991 and 2016.

2h

Overtones can provide faster data communication

For the first time researchers have succeeded in producing what are known as spin wave overtones. The technology paves the way for increasing the data transmission rate of wireless communication.

2h

Two-thirds of stroke survivors are in exceptionally good mental health

Two-thirds of stroke survivors are in complete mental health despite the impact of their stroke, according to a large, nationally representative Canadian study conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work.

2h

Ohio State research finds toilet stool may solve common bowel issues

One in six Americans experience constipation, but far fewer want to talk about it. However, avoiding the conversation with your doctor and ignoring issues in the bathroom can not only make you feel bad, but can lead to more serious health issues. Now, a new study finds the solution to these common bowel issues may be as simple as boosting your feet on a stool.

2h

How words get an emotional meaning

Everyday objects and people have an emotional meaning. A wool sock might have an emotional value if it was the last thing grandmother knitted before her death. The same applies to words. A stranger's name has no emotional value, but if a loving relationship develops, the name suddenly has positive connotations. Researchers at the University of Göttingen investigated how the brain processes such st

2h

New technique offers rapid assessment of radiation exposure

Researchers have developed a new technique that allows them to assess radiation exposure in about an hour using an insulator material found in most modern electronics. The technique can be used to triage medical cases in the event of a radiological disaster.

2h

Study finds 2 billion birds migrate over Gulf Coast

A new study combining data from citizen scientists and weather radar stations is providing detailed insights into spring bird migration along the Gulf of Mexico and how these journeys may be affected by climate change. Findings on the timing, location, and intensity of these bird movements are published in the journal Global Change Biology.

2h

Lab safety, 10 years later

On Dec. 29, 2008, staff scientist Sheri Sangji was working on a chemical synthesis in a lab at the University of California, Los Angeles, when one of the reagents ignited. Sangji's clothes caught fire, causing injuries that led to her death on Jan. 16, 2009, at age 23. Now, a decade later, chemists discuss ongoing efforts to improve academic lab safety in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the we

2h

Stick insect study shows the significance of passive muscle force for fast movements

Zoologists from the University of Cologne gain new insights into the motor function of limbs of different sizes. They have now published their results in 'Current Biology'.

2h

George the Snail, the Last and Loneliest of His Kind, Dies

George the snail won't be leaving any more silvery trails in his wake. The 14-year-old champ — the last known snail of his species — died in captivity on New Year's Day, 2019.

2h

U.S. Emissions in 2018 Saw the Second Largest Spike Since 1996

The uptick came despite significant coal plant closures, pointing to the growing influence of other greenhouse gas sources — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

New technique offers rapid assessment of radiation exposure

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new technique that allows them to assess radiation exposure in about an hour using an insulator material found in most modern electronics. The technique can be used to triage medical cases in the event of a radiological disaster.

2h

Tesla sued over 2018 fatal crash

Tesla was sued Tuesday by the family of a passenger killed in a 2018 crash which they allege was due to a defective car battery, attorneys said.

2h

Ultra-sensitive sensor with gold nanoparticle array

Scientists from the University of Bath (UK) and Northwestern University (USA) have developed a new type of sensor platform using a gold nanoparticle array, which is 100 times more sensitive than current similar sensors.

2h

Sunscreen and cosmetics compound may harm coral by altering fatty acids

Although sunscreen is critical for preventing sunburns and skin cancer, some of its ingredients are not so beneficial to ocean-dwelling creatures. In particular, sunscreen chemicals shed by swimmers are thought to contribute to coral reef decline. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry say that one such chemical, octocrylene (OC), which is also in some cosmetics and hair p

2h

This algorithm browses Wikipedia to auto-generate textbooks

Wikipedia is a valuable resource. But it’s not always obvious how to collate the content on any given topic into a coherent whole.

2h

Bor internettet ikke i skyen? Nej, i kasser lige om hjørnet

Når du søger på Google eller ser film på Netflix, rejser dine data ofte ikke længere end nogle kilometer til datacentre placeret i Danmark.

2h

What should electric cars sound like? | Renzo Vitale

Electric cars are extremely quiet, offering some welcome silence in our cities. But they also bring new dangers, since they can easily sneak up on unsuspecting pedestrians. What kind of sounds should they make to keep people safe? Get a preview of what the future may sound like as acoustic engineer and musician Renzo Vitale shows how he's composing a voice for electric cars.

2h

Trees change inside as drought persists

Scientists have found that trees change their anatomy in response to prolonged drought.

2h

New synthesis strategy for chiral drugs: Versatile chiral chemical species from aldehydes

Chirality is a geometric property of some molecules and ions, and a chiral molecule/ion is non-superposable on its mirror image, just like our right and left hands. A number of chiral molecules can be found in the world of chemistry, while their constituting atoms and alignment are the same. Enantiomers, which are chiral molecules, have similar chemical and physical characteristics but their biolo

2h

School counselors reflect on their experience following student deaths

When five school counselors who were part of a counseling team were interviewed to learn how they professionally and personally experienced the deaths of multiple students in one year in their school while attending to the needs of the school community, several themes emerged. The Journal of Counseling & Development study's first theme, gravity of the losses, related to the significance of the los

2h

Better outcomes in depression therapy with new innovations in treatment planning

Adolescents with depression who were treated with interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-A) had significantly better outcomes when their therapists regularly assessed depression symptoms and augmented treatment for insufficient responders after four weeks of therapy rather than waiting until Week 8.

2h

Research explains public resistance to vaccination

A new study explains why it is so hard to increase public vaccination levels even when evidence indicates that vaccines are safe and beneficial.

2h

Scientists forecast where is the highly invasive fall armyworm to strike next

Known to be feeding on many economically important crops, including maize, sugarcane, beet, tomato, potato and cotton, the larvae of the native to the Americas fall armyworm moth already seem to present a huge threat to the world's yield. Moreover, it only took 2 years for the pest to establish throughout sub-Saharan Africa. A study looks into the factors and likelihood for it to spread to other r

2h

Remember virtual reality? Its buzz has faded at CES 2019

Just a few years ago, virtual reality was poised to take over the world. After decades of near misses, the revolution finally seemed imminent, with slick consumer headsets about to hit the market and industries from gaming and entertainment to social media ready to hop on the bandwagon.

3h

Parental CPTSD increases transmission of trauma to offspring of Tutsi genocide survivors

Nearly 25 years after the genocide against the Tutsi of Rwanda took the lives of up to one million victims, the offspring of Tutsi survivors, who weren't even born at the time, are among those most affected by trauma, according to a new study published by researchers at Bar-Ilan University, in collaboration with a Rwandan therapist and genocide survivor.

3h

Sunscreen and cosmetics compound may harm coral by altering fatty acids

Although sunscreen is critical for preventing sunburns and skin cancer, some of its ingredients are not so beneficial to ocean-dwelling creatures. In particular, sunscreen chemicals shed by swimmers are thought to contribute to coral reef decline. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry say that one such chemical, octocrylene (OC), which is also in some cosmetics and hair p

3h

By using recorded audio feedback academics can reduce workload mentally and physically

Academics experience that by using the Recorded Audio Feedback (RAF) in higher education they can give more relaxed and dialogic feedback for their learners and reduce their own workload both mentally and physically.

3h

Lifting the veil on star formation in the Orion Nebula

Writing in 'Nature', an international research team including astronomers from Cologne describe their discovery that stellar wind from a newborn star in the Orion Nebula is preventing more stars from forming nearby.

3h

Stressed mothers — overweight children

Every tenth child is overweight, every twentieth even obese. Scientists at the Berlin Institute of Health / Berlin Institute of Health, together with colleagues at the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research in Leipzig, have now elucidated a relationship that has not extensively been studied so far.

3h

Ultra-sensitive sensor with gold nanoparticle array

Scientists from the University of Bath (UK) and Northwestern University (USA) have developed a new type of sensor platform using a gold nanoparticle array, which is 100 times more sensitive than current similar sensors.

3h

Leafcutter ants emit as much N2O as wastewater treatment tanks

Tropical forests are one of the largest natural sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O), and a tiny insect may play a big role in how those emissions are spread out across the landscape.

3h

Almost every brand of tuna on supermarket shelves shows why modern slavery laws are needed

What is the chance the last tin of tuna you ate was made using slave labour? If it came from Thailand, the odds may be a lot higher than you imagine.

3h

Census data could be used to improve city neighbourhoods

A new analysis of the 2011 census has revealed that social differences among city populations significantly influence how neighbourhoods take shape. Researchers hope that their insights could help councils to make better planning decisions.

3h

Guiding the way to a more sustainable energy future

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released an alarming report this October about what it would take to cap rising global temperatures at 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. Hitting this target has motivated countries to start developing and executing plans for decarbonization of their power generation and energy matrix, as well as other options, such as removing CO2 out of the at

3h

How James Baldwin’s Writings About Love Evolved

A notable contender this awards season, Barry Jenkins’s film If Beale Street Could Talk is an exquisite adaptation of James Baldwin’s novel about black intimacy against the backdrop of white racism. The movie also offers viewers a chance to reflect on the work of an author who is as indispensable today as he was in his own lifetime. Baldwin’s literary career spanned four decades, from 1947 to 198

3h

New research is using drones to tackle climate change

A team of Nottingham scientists is using drones to survey woody climbing plants and better understand how they may affect the carbon balance of tropical rainforests.

3h

Maternal stress leads to overweight in children

As part of the LiNA mother-child study coordinated by the UFZ, researchers were able to identify mother's perceived stress during the first year of the child's life as a risk factor for developing overweight in infancy. According to the study recently published in the BMC Public Health specialist magazine, researchers from the UFZ, the University of Bristol and the Berlin Institute of Health found

3h

BRCA Exchange aggregates data on thousands of BRCA variants to understand cancer risk

A global resource that includes data on thousands of inherited variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes is available to the public. The BRCA Exchange was created through the BRCA Challenge, a long-term demonstration project initiated by the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) to enhance sharing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 data.

3h

Lower tau levels may obscure early Alzheimer’s in black patients

Researchers have identified racial disparities between black and white patients in the level of a key biomarker that can indicate Alzheimer’s disease. African-Americans may be twice as likely as whites to develop Alzheimer’s disease, but nobody knows why because studies investigating the underlying causes of illness have historically drawn from a nearly all-white pool of research participants. Co

3h

Trees change inside as drought persists

James Cook University scientists in Australia have found that trees change their anatomy in response to prolonged drought.

3h

New tool could treat blood infections quickly

Bloodstream infections are notoriously deadly. Not because they're untreatable, but because they work fast and are hard to diagnose. To figure out what medication to give patients, doctors need to culture the bacteria or fungi causing the infection, which takes several days.

3h

Researchers seek origin of salinity leading to crop yield reduction

If you've ever seen a field covered in what looks like a layer of white soil, you may not know that that "soil" is actually salt. Over time, salt can build up and create a crust on top of the soil, making it difficult for water to penetrate and grow crops. If salt buildup on top of and within soils continues for years or decades, the soil becomes unusable.

3h

China's Yutu-2 rover is on the move on the far side of the moon

The China National Space Administration (CNSA) accomplished a historic feat last week (Thurs. Jan. 3rd) by landing a robotic mission on the "dark side" of the moon. Known as the Chang'e-4 mission, this lander-rover combination will explore the moon's South Pole-Aitken Basin as part of China's ongoing effort to conduct lunar exploration.

3h

Still no word from Opportunity

Could this be the end of the Opportunity rover? There's been no signal from the rover since last summer, when a massive global dust storm descended on it. But even though the craft has been silent and unreachable for six-and-a-half months, NASA hasn't given up.

3h

Danske blodprøver skal afsløre luftforureningens konsekvenser

Et stort projekt på Aarhus Universitet skal koble tusindvis af blodprøver med partikelmålinger i hele landet. Målet er at finde den konkrete kobling mellem luftforurening og sygdom.

3h

Better workplaces for nurses lead to better care for kids

Hospitals that have better work environments for nurses have safer care for the youngest—and often most vulnerable—patients. A 1999 Institute of Medicine report showed that preventable medical errors were responsible for as many as 98,000 deaths in hospitals each year. In the nearly two decades since, hospitals in the United States have prioritized patient safety more than ever. But has that emph

3h

Scientists orchestrate a symphony of the stars

A new stellar library has been created by UK and US scientists to, for the first time, give us a window of understanding on to our and other galaxies.

3h

Power cut: Engineers create a wireless charger you can easily cut to shape

Researchers from the University of Tokyo developed a new system to charge electronic devices such as smartphones and smartwatches wirelessly. The method involves a cuttable, flexible power transfer sheet which charges devices wirelessly and can be molded or even cut with scissors to fit different-shaped surfaces and objects.

3h

Holographic color printing for optical security

Researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have invented a new type of anti-counterfeiting technology called holographic colour prints for securing important documents such as identity cards, passports and banknotes. The research team led by Associate Professor Joel Yang demonstrated an optical device that appears as a regular colour print under white light, but proj

3h

Flies release neuronal brakes to fly longer

While mechanical and biophysical aspects of insect flight are well studied, the neurobiology and circuitry underlying it remain poorly understood. For insects, while muscles provide the power for flying, the brain coordinates strategic planning. In the case of a hungry fly, this could mean using its powerful olfaction to sense food, such as a rotten banana, and then navigating the distance to reac

3h

Lægeforeningen ønsker differentieret behandlingsgaranti

Patienters ret til at blive behandlet inden for 30 dage er for rigid og bør afskaffes, da det er med til at presse sygehusvæsenet, mener Lægeforeningens formand.

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Kræftudredning uden for kræftpakker varierer meget

Ny rapport viser stor forskel i kræftudredning uden for kræftpakker på tværs af landet. Fem anbefalinger skal sikre, at udredningen af patienter med kræft, bliver mere ensartet.

3h

Researchers uncover new mechanism of gene regulation involved in tumor progression

Genes contain all the information needed for the functioning of cells, tissues and organs. Gene expression, meaning when and how the genes are read and executed, is thoroughly regulated like an assembly line with several activities happening one after another.

3h

How to take better photos with your smartphone, thanks to computational photography

Each time you snap a photo with your smartphone – depending on the make and model – it may perform more than a trillion operations for just that single image.

3h

Image: Storm hunter in action

The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor – ASIM – is performing well outside the European Columbus laboratory module on the International Space Station.

3h

Astronomers develop new tool to find merging galaxies

Today, at the 233rd AAS meeting in Seattle, astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) announce that they have developed a new tool to find otherwise-hidden galaxy mergers in data from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey of SDSS. These results show that by going beyond simple searches for merging galaxies based just on how they look, astronomers will no

3h

Student simulates thousands of black holes

Lia Medeiros, a doctoral student at the University of Arizona, is developing mathematical models that will allow researchers to pit Einstein's Theory of General Relativity against the most powerful monsters of nature: supermassive black holes such as Sgr A*, which lurks at the center of the Milky Way.

3h

Citizen scientists find new world with NASA telescope

Using data from NASA's Kepler space telescope, citizen scientists have discovered a planet roughly twice the size of Earth located within its star's habitable zone, the range of orbital distances where liquid water may exist on the planet's surface. The new world, known as K2-288Bb, could be rocky or could be a gas-rich planet similar to Neptune. Its size is rare among exoplanets—planets beyond ou

3h

The quest for the missing proteins in rice

Researchers have identified over 5,700 new proteins in rice and are calling for a global effort to find the remaining missing proteins, in a new study co-authored by Macquarie University.

3h

The mystery material that can survive 75 nuclear blasts

A professional hairdresser and amateur chemist invented an unbelievably heat-resistant coating called Starlite. Military applications brought governments running, but the inventor's odd negotiating style ruined discussions. Was Starlite lost when he died, or had it already been stolen? None Maurice Ward was a ladies hairdresser and amateur chemist from Hartlepool, Yorkshire, England, and in 1986

3h

Millions of College Students Are Going Hungry

As the costs of college have climbed, some students have gone hungry. When they’ve voiced frustration , they’ve often been ridiculed : “Ramen is cheap ,” or “ Just eat cereal .” But the blight of food insecurity among college students is real, and a new report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO), a nonpartisan congressional watchdog, highlights the breadth of those affected. There are

3h

Mice sleeping fitfully provide clues to insomnia

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis — working with mice with sleep problems similar to those experienced by people with the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) — believe the animals will help shed light on insomnia linked to NF1 or other factors.

3h

Let's map our DNA and save billions each year in health costs

A UniSA scientist has called for Australia to embrace pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing to deliver medication more effectively and slash around $2.4 billion wasted each year through unsafe and ineffective drug prescriptions.

3h

Metabolite from pomegranate diet reduces inflammatory bowel diseases

A team of scientists from inStem, Bangalore, and University of Louisville, USA, have ascertained that a microbial metabolite (Urolithin A) derived from berries and pomegranates, and its novel synthetic analog, can mitigate IBD by increasing proteins that tighten epithelial cell junctions in the gut thereby reducing the gut inflammation.

3h

Photo Gallery: A Family's Nuclear Legacy, Etched in Silver

Michael Koerner's collodion "chemigrams" reveal a lifetime of inherited genetic mutations.

3h

CES 2019 Liveblog Day 3: Wednesday’s News and Photos, Live From Las Vegas

This year’s CES, one of the biggest consumer tech showcases in the world, continues Wednesday. Join us for live updates from the show in Las Vegas, Nevada.

3h

Dark Energy Survey completes six-year mission

After scanning in depth about a quarter of the southern skies for six years and cataloguing hundreds of millions of distant galaxies, the Dark Energy Survey (DES) will finish taking data tomorrow, on Jan. 9.

3h

The shape of a perfect storm: Saving lives by predicting firestorms

Firestorms are a nightmare for emergency services and anyone in their path. They occur when a bushfire meets a 'perfect storm' of environmental conditions and creates a thunderstorm.

3h

Study pinpoints how Salmonella sneaks into plant roots

In recent years, contamination of salad vegetables by E. coli and salmonella bacteria—the most common causes of food poisoning—have led to large-scale recalls. Although most salmonella outbreaks are linked to contamination from post-harvest handling and transportation, this infectious bacterium can also enter the plant earlier, from contaminated soil.

3h

How to Train for a Long Distance Race

Whether it is a full marathon or a 10k, training for a race can have less than desirable consequences if you are not prepared — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Leader of Evo-Devo Field, Rudy Raff, Dies

The Indiana University professor was known for his research on the evolution of organismal development.

3h

Rotating black holes may serve as gentle portals for hyperspace travel

One of the most cherished science fiction scenarios is using a black hole as a portal to another dimension or time or universe. That fantasy may be closer to reality than previously imagined.

3h

Can you make it through the world’s hardest maze?

Head Trip It's trickier than it looks. In a typical maze, the entrance leads to the exit. This one is different. Rules determine where and how you can move.

3h

The World Shifts When a Black Widow Squats

A spider’s web is more than a trap or a home. It is also an extension of the spider’s senses . By paying attention to vibrations traveling through the silken threads, the arachnid can learn about its surroundings. Certain vibrations might mean ensnared prey. A different frequency might reveal a nearby mate. And since spiders extrude their webs from their bodies, they can also change the stiffness

3h

Lithium-matrix anode protected by a solid electrolyte layer for stable lithium metal batteries

A house-like Li anode was designed. The house matrix was composed of carbon fiber and affords a stable structure to relieve the volume change. The housed Li|LiFePO4 batteries exhibited over 95 percent capacity retention after 500 cycles in coin cell and 85 percent capacity retention after 80 cycles in pouch cell. The rationally combination of solid electrolyte layer and housed framework in Li meta

4h

New method to study biomechanical changes in tissues after laser surgery

Although currently laser surgery is a very popular tool for various vision disorders correction, it is still difficult to ensure proper control over the accuracy, efficiency and safety of such procedures. Therefore, Russian scientists proposed a new method that helps to describe tissue changes after such operations. This method was described in a series of publications in the Journal of Biophotoni

4h

First pregnancy after robot-assisted uterus transplant

The well-known research on uterine transplantation in Gothenburg is now supported by robotic surgery. This change has made operating on the donors considerably less invasive. After the technical modification, a first woman is now pregnant.

4h

New synthesis strategy for chiral drugs — versatile chiral chemical species from aldehydes

We developed a new method of asymmetric synthesis for versatile chiral chemicals from aldehydes. A chiral hydroxycarbanion was formed from an aldehyde using a chiral copper?N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst and a palladium catalyst, which enabled subsequent synthetic processes to take place in one flask while maintaining enantioselectivity. Since many drugs exhibit chirality-dependent effectiveness,

4h

Self-sorting through molecular geometries

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Communications Chemistry that certain pentagonal and hexagonal organic molecules exhibit self-sorting. The effect can be used to grow multilayered tubular structures that preserve the geometry of the initial cavities.

4h

Mechanism for impaired allergic inflammation in infants may explain hygiene hypothesis

Research published in the journal Immunity describes a mechanism in a mouse model of asthma that supports the hygiene hypothesis — researchers found that infant mice need a higher exposure to a bacterial endotoxin, compared to adult mice, to avoid developing asthma-like reactions to house dust mites. The hygiene hypothesis suggests that decreased exposure to microbial products in industrialized n

4h

UM researchers: Leafcutter ants emit as much N2O as wastewater treatment tanks

Tropical forests are one of the largest natural sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O), and a tiny insect may play a big role in how those emissions are spread out across the landscape.

4h

New catalysts for better fuel cells

Researchers in Korea have fabricated nano-sized catalysts that could improve the performance and production of clean energy fuel cells.

4h

Trees change inside as drought persists

James Cook University scientists in Australia have found that trees change their anatomy in response to prolonged drought.

4h

Fighting another virus? Blame your parents

Genetics may play a bigger role in the body's disease-fighting ability than scientists previously thought, according to the results from a new study of twins in Queensland, Australia.

4h

New simulation technology to discover causes of congestion at airports in a few minutes

Waseda University and Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. developed a new technology that automatically analyzes the factors leading to congestion based on the results of human behavior simulations.

4h

Circular economy: Ancient populations pioneered the idea of recycling waste

The circular economy is typically seen as the progressive alternative to our wasteful linear economy, where raw materials are used to make the products that feed today's rampant consumerist hunger, which are then thrown away. The idea of the circular economy only took off in the 1980s, but this doesn't mean that the practices at the core of a circular economy, such as repairing, recycling, refurbi

4h

New Caledonian crows found able to infer weight of an object by watching how it behaves in the wind

A team of researchers with members affiliated with the University of Auckland, the University of Cambridge, Bertha von Suttner University and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has found evidence that suggests New Caledonian crows can infer the weight of an object by watching how it behaves in the wind. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the grou

4h

Twitter sentiment

Sentiment analysis is an increasingly important part of data mining, especially in the age of social media and social networking where there is endless opinion and commentary that could be of use to a wide range of stakeholders in commerce, other businesses, and even politics.

4h

For night vision, snakes see a clear choice

San Diego State University doctoral student Hannes Schraft wanted to learn whether rattlesnakes find their way around at night with their eyes alone, or get an assist from the same thermal-sensing abilities they use to hunt prey.

4h

Optoacoustic microscopy at multiple discrete frequencies

Optoacoustic imaging powered by short bursts of continuous wave (CW) lasers can stimulate the emission of ultrasound waves inside an animal or in human subjects. The method can noninvasively capture blood flow and produce 3-D images of cellular microarchitecture. Writing in Light: Science & Applications, Stephan Kellnberger and colleagues at the Institute of Biological and Medical Imaging, now rep

4h

Little Foot's inner ear sheds light on her movement and behaviour

MicroCT scans of the 3.67-million-year-old Australopithecus fossil known as Little Foot shed some light on how she lived and moved.

4h

New research is using drones to tackle climate change

A team of Nottingham scientists is using drones to survey woody climbing plants and better understand how they may affect the carbon balance of tropical rainforests.

4h

Evidence found of oysters syncing valve behavior with lunar cycle

A team of researchers from the University of Bordeaux and CNRS, EPOC, UMR has found evidence that suggests oysters sync their valve behavior with the lunar cycle. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of oysters in the wild over three and a half lunar cycles and what they observed.

4h

Proba-V view of Aral Sea

This Proba-V view shows all that is left of the Aral Sea, once one of the four largest lakes in the world and now one of the world's major ecological disaster areas. It has shrunk into separate lakes, surrounded by Earth's youngest desert.

4h

Scientists confirm that chromosomes are formed by stacked layers

A new study based on electron microscopy techniques at low temperatures demonstrates that during mitosis, chromosome DNA is packed in stacked layers of chromatin. The research, published in EMBO Journal, confirms a surprising structure proposed by UAB researchers over a decade ago, but criticized due to the limitations of the technique used.

4h

Are your Facebook friends making you feel sick?

As social networking activity has become pervasive, researchers have been taking a closer look at its impact on our psychological and physical health.

4h

Schizophrenia linked with abnormal immune response to Epstein-Barr virus

New research from Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System shows that people in the study with schizophrenia also have higher levels of antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis, so-called mono.

4h

About half of US adolescents report having private time with healthcare providers

Only about half of young people 13 to 26 years old in the United States report ever having time with their regular healthcare provider without a parent or someone else in the room, despite professional guidelines that recommend adolescents and young adults have access to confidential services and time for private discussions. Young people who report having private time or discussing confidentialit

4h

Study finds link between voter preference for Trump and bullying in middle schools

Bullying rates among middle school students in the spring of 2017 were 18 percent higher in localities where voters had favored Donald Trump than in those that had supported Hillary Clinton, according to a study published online today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

4h

‘ANYmal’ robot stalks dark sewers to test its navigation

Researchers are working to make sure a seeing, hearing, door-opening robot called “ANYmal” can also function in extreme conditions—a mission that takes them to the labyrinth of drains and tunnels below Zurich. Their aim is to determine whether ANYmal—a robot that ANYbotics, an ETH Zurich spin-off company, jointly developed with Robotic Systems Lab—could one day be useful in sewer systems. It migh

4h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan kan universet udvide sig, hvis det er uendeligt?

En læser og hans søn undrer sig over, hvordan man kan sige, at universet udvider sig, når det er uendeligt stort. Hvordan kan uendeligt blive større? Det svarer postdoc fra NBI på.

4h

Childhood stress of mice affects their offspring behavior

Russian neuroscientists report that the stress experienced by mice during their first weeks of life affects not only them, but also their offspring. The data will help to understand how negative experience in early life affects the mammalian brain. The results are published in Genes, Brain and Behavior.

4h

The new green alternative for drug production

Most of the processes for the production of drugs, pesticides and smartphone displays are cost-intensive and generate a large amount of waste. Scientists at the University of Göttingen have now succeeded in developing a resource-saving "green" alternative. The results were published in Nature Catalysis.

4h

Artificial intelligence detects the presence of viruses

Many biosensing applications rely on characterization of specific analytes such as proteins, viruses and bacteria, among many other targets, which can be accomplished by using micro- or nano-scale particles. In such biosensors, these particles are coated with a surface chemistry that makes them stick to the target analyte forming clusters in response. The higher the target analyte concentration is

4h

New technology serves as fish body double

Hundreds of surrogate "fish" will be put to work at dams around the world through an agreement between ATS—Advanced Telemetry Systems—and the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to improve operations and increase sustainability.

4h

The ocean garbage patch is tiny compared to our carbon footprint

Last summer, I volunteered in Indonesia on the islands of Simeulue and Bangkaru. During this unique opportunity, I helped to monitor and protect the local green sea turtle population, and I witnessed firsthand the effects of waste on the environment. Despite Bangkaru's lack of human inhabitants—aside from the occasional small group of volunteers and two wildlife rangers—nearly all of its shores we

4h

Study shows younger children and chimps less likely to make irrational decisions when social comparison is in play

A team of researchers affiliated with the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Yale University and the University of Göttingen, has found that older children are more likely to make seemingly irrational decisions when social comparison is at play. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the group describes experiments they carried out wit

4h

Biodegradable sensor wraps around healing artery

A new device that monitors the flow of blood through an artery could make it easier for doctors to monitor the success of blood vessel surgery. The sensor is biodegradable, battery-free, and wireless, doesn’t need removal, and can send out a warning if there is a blockage. “Measurement of blood flow is critical in many medical specialties, so a wireless biodegradable sensor could impact multiple

4h

Professor bag dansk demensforskning modtager Marie og August Krogh Prisen

Novo Nordisk Fondens Marie og August Krogh Pris 2019 går til Gunhild Waldemar, fordi hun i mere end 30 år har arbejdet for at sætte demens på den politiske dagsorden.

4h

Identifying lower-energy neutrinos with a liquid-argon particle detector

An experiment at the Department of Energy's Fermilab has made a significant advance in the detection of neutrinos that hide themselves at lower energies.

4h

T. rex bite 'no match for a finch'

Tyrannosaurus rex, renowned for being one of the most fearsome creatures to have ever lived, evolved a bite that was less impressive in relation to its body size than a tiny Galapagos ground finch, scientists say.

4h

Autonomous robot that interacts with humans using natural language and vision processing

Purdue University researchers in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering are developing integrative language and vision software that may enable an autonomous robot to interact with people in different environments and accomplish navigational goals.

4h

Astronomers investigate open cluster NGC 6530

Italian astronomers have investigated the young open cluster NGC 6530 by conducting a statistical study of its global properties. The research, which provides important insights on the cluster membership, was presented in a paper published December 29 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

4h

How Tech Shaped 'The Scream,' 'The Kiss,' and 'American Gothic'

These three iconic historical paintings pulse with intense anxieties about electricity, hematology, and astronomy.

4h

Earthquake Warning App ShakeAlertLA Debuts in Los Angeles

The app gives city residents a few seconds' warning when an earthquake hits. It's the first publicly available app to do so in the US.

4h

Better outcomes in depression therapy with new innovations in treatment planning

Adolescents with depression who were treated with interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-A) had significantly better outcomes when their therapists regularly assessed depression symptoms and augmented treatment for insufficient responders after four weeks of therapy rather than waiting until Week 8, reports a study published in the January 2019 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and A

4h

AI App Identifies Rare Genetic Disorders from Photos of Patients' Faces

Deep-learning algorithms could help doctors narrow in on the causes of certain medical conditions, say researchers.

4h

Images really matter for selling stuff on eBay

On secondhand marketplaces like eBay, people trust online sellers who post their own high-quality photos of items for sale more than they trust those who use stock images or poor-quality photos, according to a new study. The findings could help online marketplaces improve trust in their sites by offering guidelines on how to take better photos or introducing augmented reality features that instru

5h

Trump’s Oval Office Address Was Classic Stephen Miller

Almost from the moment the camera blinked on in the Oval Office, it was clear that President Donald Trump was delivering a Stephen Miller special. The 33-year-old White House speechwriter has a hand in virtually everything the president reads from a teleprompter. But as one of the most strident immigration hawks in the West Wing, Miller has been especially influential over the past two years in s

5h

Drug sponge could minimize side effects of cancer treatment

Catheters are used today to deliver drugs directly to tumors to avoid broadcasting toxic chemotherapy agents throughout the body. Nevertheless, half of the drug can escape to the rest of the body, causing side effects. UC San Francisco doctors treating liver cancer teamed up with UC Berkeley chemical engineers to design a polymer-coated device that can be temporarily placed in the vein coming out

5h

'Environmentally friendly' flame retardant could degrade into less safe compounds

To reduce the risk of fire, many everyday products — from building materials to furniture to clothing — contain flame retardants. In recent years, some of these compounds were shown to have harmful effects on the environment, causing them to be replaced by more eco-friendly alternatives. However, a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, indicates that heat or ultraviolet l

5h

Capturing chemotherapy drugs before they can cause side effects

Although chemotherapy can kill cancer cells very effectively, healthy cells also suffer. If doctors could remove excess chemotherapy drugs from a patient's bloodstream after the medicines have done their job, they might reduce side effects such as hair loss and nausea. Now, researchers have developed a 3D-printed device that absorbs excess chemo drugs before they spread throughout the body. They r

5h

Artificial bug eyes

Single lens eyes, like those in humans and many other animals, can create sharp images, but the compound eyes of insects and crustaceans have an edge when it comes to peripheral vision, light sensitivity and motion detection. That's why scientists are developing artificial compound eyes to give sight to autonomous vehicles and robots, among other applications. Now, a report in ACS Nano describes t

5h

This powder could cheaply capture carbon pollution from power plants

Nexus Media News Engineers have developed a way for even developing nations to prevent the worst effects of global warming. Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a powder that can scrub carbon from power plant emissions.

5h

DSAM-formand: Vi skal turde prioritere fagligt

I det nye år vil Anders Beich have stor fokus på, hvordan de sparsomme ressourcer i almen praksis udnyttes bedst muligt. Det kræver modige fravalg og et fokus på kvalitetsarbejde og den dokumenterede indsats. DSAM vil fortsætte kampen for ægte brugerinddragelse i delingen af sundhedsdata.

5h

Kunstig intelligens hjælper ordblinde med at læse

Et gratis program fra Københavns Universitet forenkler svære tekster, så ordblinde…

5h

Trump’s Oval Office Speech Was Never Going to Succeed

On Tuesday, Donald Trump delivered a televised Oval Office address, hoping to marshal the gravitas of the presidency to get his way on a border wall. The gambit was doomed from the start. Insofar as prime-time addresses from the White House have power, it is rooted in the public’s belief that there is dignity in the office, that its occupant possesses moral authority, and that he or she would ask

5h

Image of the Day: Wisdom Teeth Lost

A study of tiny monkey skulls and teeth suggests that shrinking body size didn’t crowd out wisdom teeth during evolution.

5h

How Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Shapes a New Political Reality

The newly elected congressmember offers older colleagues a master class in social media.

5h

VW's EV Chargers Make Paying for Power Easier Than Ever

VW's Electrify America program is adding a capability that identifies the driver by their car, and bills them automatically.

5h

Ocean Cleanup's Plastic Catcher Is Busted. So What Now?

First, the 600-meter-long plastic catcher didn't catch plastic. Then it split in two. What is the right way, then, to cleanse our oceans of the plastic menace?

5h

Testing for Caffeine Could Help Foil Fake Urine Scam

The absence of substances originating from coffee, chocolate, nicotine and blood in pee could indicate foul play — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

'Environmentally friendly' flame retardant could degrade into less safe compounds

To reduce the risk of fire, many everyday products—from building materials to furniture to clothing—contain flame retardants. In recent years, some of these compounds were shown to have harmful effects on the environment, causing them to be replaced by more eco-friendly alternatives. However, a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, indicates that heat or ultraviolet light c

5h

Drug sponge could minimize side effects of cancer treatment

With the help of sponges inserted in the bloodstream to absorb excess drugs, doctors are hoping to prevent the dangerous side effects of toxic chemotherapy agents or even deliver higher doses to knock back tumors, like liver cancer, that don't respond to more benign treatments.

5h

Artificial bug eyes

Single lens eyes, like those in humans and many other animals, can create sharp images, but the compound eyes of insects and crustaceans have an edge when it comes to peripheral vision, light sensitivity and motion detection. That's why scientists are developing artificial compound eyes to give sight to autonomous vehicles and robots, among other applications. Now, a report in ACS Nano describes t

5h

Cancer Death Rate Continues to Decline

The new data are in – cancer deaths continue to decline at a steady rate.

5h

Magellanic Clouds prove it's never too late to get active

Wondering about that New Year's Resolution to get more exercise?

5h

Researcher creates 'minimal chair' that can ship flat, take seconds to assemble with no tools

A Purdue University researcher has designed what he calls a "minimal chair" that can be shipped in a thin flat box, taking only seconds to assemble without tools, as part of an effort to create furniture design processes that could significantly change lean manufacturing across the world.

5h

Reimagining information processing

Because technology is a part of our everyday lives, it may be difficult to imagine what the future of technology will look like, let alone what it has the potential of accomplishing.

6h

6h

Smart cities could be lousy to live in if you have a disability

Cities sometimes fail to make sure the technologies they adopt are accessible to everyone. Activists and startups are working to change that.

6h

The Thoughtful Raunch of Sex Education

The Netflix algorithm is getting stronger. Consider Sex Education , a new British dramedy patched together so perspicaciously from pieces of existing hits that you can virtually see the stitches. Like The End of the F***ing World , it’s a zany teen romance set in a mysterious Anglo-American hinterland that looks like a John Hughes movie but whose cultural references are pure Blighty ( Butlin’s ,

6h

The Orchid and the Dandelion by W Thomas Boyce review – which are you?

Are you sensitive or resilient? This study by a paediatric health expert considers why children with the greatest potential are also the ones most likely to falter Some people seem to have terrible childhoods and yet manage to thrive despite them. Others grow up in loving homes but suffer from mental and physical health difficulties, even if their siblings do not. Why? Research shows that about 1

6h

Ignore 5G, for Now

Want the super-fast mobile speeds promised by 5G technology? Come back in a year.

6h

CES 2019: More of the Coolest Stuff We've Seen So Far

We've played with a bunch of great new consumer products here at CES. Here are the neatest things we saw on day two.

6h

Gallup Poll: Labeling Sites May Help Stop Fake News Spread

A new Gallup survey suggests people are less likely to share stories from sites that are clearly marked as untrustworthy.

6h

Studies can be in vitro, in vivo and now ‘in fimo’ — in poop

Scientists have coined a new term — “in fimo” — to describe studies focused on feces.

6h

Cowi: Der er jord nok i København til de nye Holme

I alt regner Cowi med, at der skal bruges svimlende 23 millioner m3 jord til opfyldningen af de 3,1 millioner kvadratmeter store øer. Hvis det bliver svært at skaffe jord kan det true hele projektets businesscase.

6h

In Photos: Ancient Stone Monument Discovered in Scotland

This stone circle near the village of Alford, west of Aberdeen, may turn out to be one of the last Neolithic monumental structures to be found in Scotland.

6h

Lassen Volcanic National Park: The West’s Most Beautiful, Least-Visited Wonderland (Photos)

The national park is full of steaming vents, snowy trails, diverse wildlife, colorful wildflowers and heavenly night-sky views.

6h

Rare Stonehenge-Like Monument in Scotland Has Single 'Recumbent' Stone

The exquisite stone circle may be 4,500 years old and is located in a remote patch of farmland in a Scottish village.

6h

Another Casualty of the Government Shutdown: Hurricane Preparedness

Weather models are not being updated and training sessions might be canceled during the budget standoff — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

PLO-formand: 2019 risikerer at drukne i regions-slagsmål

For PLO er 2019 året, hvor de mange politiske skåltaler og positive tilkendegivelser om almen praksis skal omsættes til konkrete fremskridt. Men det politiske slagsmål om regionerne risikerer at overskygge alt i det nye år, og derfor tager Christian Freitag hul på det fagpolitiske arbejde med en lettere bekymret mine.

7h

Svensk ingeniør vinder over Oregon: Må gerne bruge sin titel

Det var et brud på ytringsfriheden, da en svensk ingeniør fik en bøde for at bruge sin ingeniør-titel.

7h

With 86% Drop, California’s Monarch Butterfly Population Hits Record Low

The monarchs’ declining wintertime numbers are “potentially catastrophic,” according to the nonprofit conservation group that conducted the count.

7h

Feature: How Beauty Is Making Scientists Rethink Evolution

The extravagant splendor of the animal kingdom can’t be explained by natural selection alone — so how did it come to be?

7h

Longleat koala Wilpena put down after kidney disease

Wilpena was one of five koalas to arrive from Australia as part of a conservation programme.

7h

Region Hovedstaden nedsætter udsatteråd

Et nyt udsatteråd skal sikre en mere lige adgang til sundhed og sætte fokus på socialt udsatte borgere.

7h

Nyt lægehus i Haderup risikerer at lukke igen

Blot fire måneder efter åbningen af en ny satellit-praksis i Haderup, sås der tvivl om den fortsatte drift. 150 borgere skal tilknyttes klinikken inden for få måneder, hvis ikke nøglen skal drejes om.

7h

How to be a good parent to artificial intelligence

Until we can design a mind that's superhuman and flawless, we'll have to settle for instilling plain old human values into artificial intelligence. But how to do this in a world where values are constantly evolving? Many of our life choices today would be considered immoral by people in the Middle Ages — or even the 1970s, says Ben Goertzel, whose family personally experienced the sad state of LG

7h

Why Trump Is Trying to Create a Crisis

Donald Trump devoted remarkably little of his Tuesday-night Oval Office address to persuading Americans to support a border wall. He discussed his beloved barrier for only a few sentences and didn’t rebut any of the criticisms commonly leveled at it. He never explained how the federal government would take possession of the land needed to build the wall, why migrants wouldn’t be able to climb ove

7h

Why Federal Workers Still Have to Show Up Even If They’re Not Being Paid

Eric Young is the president of the union that represents the approximately 30,000 employees of the Federal Bureau of Prisons who are working during the government shutdown. Young’s members, scattered at 122 facilities located in largely rural areas across the country, aren’t being paid and don’t know when their next paycheck will come. Like the leaders of virtually every federal-employee union du

7h

What Tucker Carlson Gets Right

The Fox News host Tucker Carlson delivered a monologue on the market and the family last week. It quickly found a large audience, becoming a viral sensation online. It also attracted a host of critics from across the political spectrum. Some of the fiercest criticism came from conservatives, including writers such as Ben Shapiro and David French , who attacked the very argument that we believe Ca

7h

Version2-opgørelse: Offentlige websites kører danske cms’er

Der er klar dansk dominans, når det offentlige vælger content management-systemer, viser Version2s undersøgelse.

7h

Cityringen får nye togsæt i gamle klæder

Knap 17 år efter åbningen af første etape, får København atter nye metrotog. Og de ligner til forveksling de gamle. Alligevel er der tale om et helt nyt togsystem. MobilityTech har besøgt Metroselskabet.

8h

Ny kampagne skal oplyse udsatte borgere om medicintilskud

En ny oplysningskampagne skal informere udsatte borgere og borgere med lav indkomst om muligheder for at få adgang til nødvendig medicin.

8h

Patienter er meget tilfredse med almen praksis

De mest tilfredse patienter er tilknyttet en lægepraksis på PLO-overenskomst, men udbuds- og regionsklinikker følger godt med, viser undersøgelse fra PLO.

8h

Scientists realize a three-dimensional 'topological' medium for electromagnetic waves

Topological insulators are exotic states of matter that physicists have been intensely studying for the past decade. Their most intriguing feature is that they can be rigorously distinguished from all other materials using a mathematical concept known as "topology." This mathematical property grants topological insulators the ability to transport electric signals without dissipation, via special q

8h

Internettet under pres: Flere lande lukker for forbindelserne

Asiatiske og afrikanske regeringer lukker i stigende grad helt ned for internettet i perioder. I den demokratiske republik Congo har borgere ikke kunne tilgå internettet eller sms-services siden valget 30. december.

9h

Help us by participating in our CogSci study about attitudes!

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9h

'New' apple and pear varieties found in Wales

About 200 trees were DNA-tested to find and preserve unrecorded varieties unique to Wales.

9h

Nyt initiativ skal samle og formidle viden om diabetes bedre

En række organisationer skal skabe initiativet »Vidensbro«, der skal samle og formidle viden om diabetes. Det skal komme sundhedspersonale, patienter og pårørende til gode.

10h

Apple's Tim Cook got big pay bump in 2018: filing

Apple gave its chief executive Tim Cook a hefty 22 percent pay raise in 2018, bringing his total compensation for the year to almost $15.7 million according to a filing submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

10h

Scientists forecast where is the highly invasive fall armyworm to strike next

Known to be feeding on many economically important crops cultured across the world, including maize, rice, sugarcane, sorghum, beet, tomato, potato, cotton and pasture grasses, the larvae of the native to the Americas fall armyworm moth seem to have already found a successful survival strategy in a diverse and changing world.

11h

Shutdown keeps US experts away from scientific conferences

This week, the American Astronomical Society is meeting in Seattle, but no one from NASA is attending.

11h

Energy-related carbon emissions rose in US in 2018: study

Carbon dioxide emissions significantly increased in the United States in 2018, according to a study released Tuesday by research firm Rhodium Group.

11h

High society wants its fine foods to also be ethical

Truffles and caviar have traditionally been delicacies of the upper class, but a new study by UBC sociology professor Emily Huddart Kennedy and colleagues from the University of Toronto finds that free-range and fair-trade foods are becoming increasingly important among the elite.

11h

Giant singers from neighboring oceans share song parts over time

Singing humpback whales from different ocean basins seem to be picking up musical ideas from afar, and incorporating these new phrases and themes into the latest song, according to a newly published study in Royal Society Open Science that's helping scientists better understand how whales learn and change their musical compositions.

11h

School counselors reflect on their experience following student deaths

When five school counselors who were part of a counseling team were interviewed to learn how they professionally and personally experienced the deaths of multiple students in one year in their school while attending to the needs of the school community, several themes emerged.

11h

Ancient gene duplication gave grasses multiple ways to wait out winter

If you've ever grown carrots in your garden and puzzled over never once seeing them flower, don't blame your lack of a green thumb.

11h

Japan court rejects Ghosn release bid

A Japanese court on Wednesday rejected a bid by former Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn to end his detention over alleged financial misconduct, a day after he denied all accusations in a dramatic court appearance.

11h

Facebook CEO plans 2019 forums on tech's role in society

Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg unveiled his personal goal for 2019 on Tuesday: convening a series of public forums on how technology can better serve society.

11h

Scientists discover a process that stabilizes fusion plasmas

Scientists seeking to bring the fusion reaction that powers the sun and stars to Earth must keep the superhot plasma free from disruptions. Now researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have discovered a process that can help to control the disruptions thought to be most dangerous.

11h

Singapore eco-tourism plan sparks squawks of protest

Singapore is creating a vast eco-tourism zone in a bid to bring in more visitors, but environmentalists fear the development will damage natural habitats and are already blaming it for a series of animal deaths.

11h

High-tech border wall plan on display at CES

The same technology used in self-driving cars is being touted as a potential high-tech solution to the US border wall conundrum—with some added benefits.

11h

US startup eyes next generation of burgers with relish

Can a "high-tech" burger help save the planet?

11h

For auto tech at CES, 'user experience' becomes the key

Technology firms tackling the challenge of autonomous driving are focusing on the "user experience" of vehicles that are increasingly becoming an extension of people's digital life.

11h

Kosher high-tech office lures Jerusalem's ultra-Orthodox

The office in central Jerusalem at first glance resembles many other start-ups—until you notice the religious books and entrepreneurs in traditional black suits.

11h

We're techy, too! Deere, Tide maker head to CES gadget show

The companies founded by blacksmith John Deere and candle-and-soap-making duo Procter & Gamble may not be the hip purveyors of new technology they were in 1837.

11h

German airports brace for Thursday strike

Thousands of passengers in Germany face disruption on Thursday following a strike call by security staff at three major airports, the powerful Verdi union said.

11h

Nissan unveils new Leaf car after Ghosn's arrest delays it

Nissan is showing the beefed up version of its hit Leaf electric car as the Japanese automaker seeks to distance itself from the arrest of its star executive Carlos Ghosn.

11h

Derfor advarede Datatilsynet ikke GoMentor om datalæk

En systemteknisk fejl var årsagen datalækket, og netop derfor var bevissikringen mere kompliceret end normalt, forklarer Datatilsynet.

11h

Constant cravings: is addiction on the rise?

From sex to sugar to social media, people are in the grip of a wider range of compulsive behaviours. But what is driving them – and what can be done? Addiction was once viewed as an unsavoury fringe disease, tethered to substances with killer withdrawal symptoms, such as alcohol and opium. But now the scope of what humans can be addicted to seems to have snowballed, from sugar to shopping to soci

12h

CO2-mængden stiger stadig: 2018 er blandt de varmeste år nogensinde registreret

Nye data bekræfter, at 2018 var det fjerde år i træk med exceptionelt varmt vejr. Samtidigt steg indholdet af CO2 i atmosfæren – igen.

12h

Study shows how specific gene variants may raise bipolar disorder risk

Research from MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory directly links genetic variants found in people with bipolar disorder to reduced expression, function of protein CPG2, with specific effects on synapses and neural circuits.

13h

Lack of standard dosage for blood thinners can lead to bleeding during bariatric surgery

Rutgers researchers have found a way to reduce bleeding in patients following bariatric surgery.

13h

Scientists forecast where is the highly invasive fall armyworm to strike next

Known to be feeding on many economically important crops, including maize, sugarcane, beet, tomato, potato and cotton, the larvae of the native to the Americas fall armyworm moth already seem to present a huge threat to the world's yield. Moreover, it only took 2 years for the pest to establish throughout sub-Saharan Africa. A study in the open-access journal NeoBiota looks into the factors and li

13h

Misinterpretation of WHI results decreased use of hormones, even in women not at risk

Few studies have been as responsible for changing the course of treatment of menopause symptoms to the extent that the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) did. The number of women taking hormones dramatically dropped as a result of the study, leaving many women to needlessly abandon a treatment that offered symptomatic relief. That's according to a new study published online in Menopause, the journal

13h

School counselors reflect on their experience following student deaths

When five school counselors who were part of a counseling team were interviewed to learn how they professionally and personally experienced the deaths of multiple students in one year in their school while attending to the needs of the school community, several themes emerged.The Journal of Counseling & Development study's first theme, gravity of the losses, related to the significance of the loss

13h

Negative social media behaviors may be associated with depression in millennials

Certain social media factors were linked with major depressive disorder (MDD) in a Journal of Applied Biobehavioural Research study of millennials.

13h

Investigational cream may help patients with inflammatory skin disease

A study published in the British Journal of Dermatology indicates that an investigational nonsteroidal topical cream (PAC-14028) may be effective for treating atopic dermatitis, one of the most common inflammatory skin diseases.

13h

Depression and obesity linked to greater likelihood of hip pain

In a representative sample of the German population, older age, obesity, and depressive disorder were associated with experiencing chronic hip pain.In the Musculoskeletal Care study of 2,515 adults, 4.9 percent reported chronic hip pain and an additional 1.5 percent reported chronic hip pain that was disabling.

13h

Does PTSD affect heart disease and cancer risk?

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was associated with cardiovascular disease and cancer, as well as the metabolic syndrome, in a new study.In the Journal of Neuroscience Research study of 84 individuals diagnosed with PTSD (39 victims of terrorist attacks and 45 victims of other traumatic events), males were more likely to have circulatory and metabolic complications, whereas females had a high

13h

Certain psychiatric drugs linked with elevated pneumonia risk

A review of published studies indicates that use of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine related drugs (BZRDs), which are prescribed to treat various psychiatric diseases, may increase the risk of pneumonia.The International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry analysis included 12 reports related to 10 studies involving more than 120,000 pneumonia cases.

13h

Couples intervention may help partners of patients with diabetes

A new Diabetic Medicine study reveals that couples interventions may have beneficial effects for partners of individuals with type 2 diabetes.

13h

Finger joint enlargements may be linked to knee osteoarthritis

Heberden's nodes (HNs) are bony enlargements of the finger joints that are readily detectable in a routine physical exam and are considered hallmarks of osteoarthritis. A new Arthritis & Rheumatology study found that the presence of HNs may also indicate structural damage associated with knee osteoarthritis.

13h

Tobacco use linked with higher use of opioids and sedatives

Tobacco is a known risk factor for the misuse of prescription opioids. In addition, concurrent use of opioids and sedative-hypnotics is a risk factor for opioid overdose or addiction. In an American Journal on Addictions study, tobacco users were more likely to receive prescriptions for opioid analgesics with muscle relaxants and/or benzodiazepines than people who did not use tobacco.

13h

Cigarette smoking may contribute to worse outcomes in bladder cancer patients

In a study of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who had undergone radical cystectomy, cigarette smoking was linked with poor response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Also, current smokers in the study, published in BJU International, were at significantly higher risk of cancer recurrence compared with former and never smokers.

13h

Global colorectal cancer mortality rates predicted to rise

In the first effort to predict the future burden of colorectal cancer mortality globally, researchers note that colon and rectal cancer mortality rates are projected to decrease in most countries apart from some Latin American and Caribbean countries, but increases are predicted for several countries from Europe, North America and Oceania. The findings are published in the International Journal of

13h

Newborns face risks when born to women with the flu

Pregnant women with influenza are more likely to experience complications, but how this affects infants is unclear. A new Birth Defects Research study uncovers the potential risks to infants.

13h

Research explains public resistance to vaccination

A new study explains why it is so hard to increase public vaccination levels even when evidence indicates that vaccines are safe and beneficial.

13h

Research explains public resistance to vaccination

Why is it so challenging to increase the number of people who get vaccinated? How does popular resistance to vaccination remain strong even as preventable diseases make a comeback?

13h

Inhaled RNA Might Help Heal Cystic Fibrosis

Scientists are working to correct a genetic defect in cystic fibrosis patients by having them inhale RNA. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Regningen for Niels Bohr Bygningen stiger med 150-185 mio. kr.

OPDATERET: Teknikentreprenøren Inabensa har ifølge Vejdirektoratet begået flere fejl i arbejdet på Niels Bohr Bygningen, end det tidligere har været fremme. Derfor ser skandalebyggeriet nu ud til at blive endnu dyrere.

14h

Science T-shirts that'll get you compliments

Gadgets Plus you can wear them to work (if you work at Popular Science). I own a lot of science T-shirts—but when you work at Popular Science , you have to stay on brand. Here are just a few of the T-shirts I love wearing on a daily basis.

14h

What Was the Point of Trump’s Oval Office Address?

A president only gets one chance to make his first Oval Office address—making Donald Trump’s reiteration of familiar talking points in a short speech Tuesday night all the more puzzling. Over the course of roughly 10 minutes, Trump brought his case for more spending on border security directly to the American people, saying there is “a growing humanitarian and security crisis at our Southern bord

15h

A Tesla-Robot ‘Crash’ Stunt Shows We Need Robocar Schooling

The seemingly hoax-y death of 'Promobot' is a handy justification for the newly launched Partnership for Automated Vehicle Education.

16h

Finding an elusive mutation that turns altruism into selfish behavior among honeybees

For the first time, researchers have finally found the root cause responsible for thelytoky syndrome — which dramatically turns bees from altruistic helpers to selfish mercenaries.

17h

Juul’s Answer to Its PR Crisis? The Millennial Marlboro Man

E-cigarette maker Juul will air TV ads beginning later this year.

17h

High society wants its fine foods to also be ethical

Truffles and caviar have traditionally been delicacies of the upper class, but a new study finds that free-range and fair-trade foods are becoming increasingly important among the elite.

17h

Climate change: 'Right to repair' gathers force

EU and US states are to introduce laws helping people to mend appliances that break down.

18h

Climate change: Which are the best vegan milks?

With sales of vegan foods on the rise, check the environmental impact of plant-based milks.

18h

The Atlantic Daily: The Cuban Cricket Crisis

What We’re Following The quiz question in the Monday, January 7 edition of the Daily incorrectly referred to T.M. Landry as a “New Orleans” private school. The school is located in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana. Thanks to our many sharp-eyed readers for pointing out the error. Instagram meme accounts take on child porn. The platform is notoriously adept at ferreting out nudity, but users are still usi

18h

What’s the point of a riderless motorcycle?

Technology BMW's prototype will never see the streets, but tech like this could make bikes safer. A motorcycle without a rider might not seem to make sense, but BMW says that tech like this has a point.

18h

Moonlight influences opening and closing of oysters' shells

Molluscs not only have tidal and circadian clocks but are attuned to lunar rhythms, experts say The gentle glow of moonlight on water has moved musicians, poets and painters – and, it turns out, molluscs. Researchers have discovered the opening and shutting of oysters’ shells appears to be tied to the lunar cycle. Biological clocks have intrigued scientists for centuries, and researchers in the f

18h

Bee mite arrival in Hawaii causes pathogen changes in honeybee predators

The reddish-brown varroa mite, a parasite of honeybees and accidentally introduced in the Big Island of Hawaii in 2007-08, is about the size of a pinhead. Yet, its effects there are concerning to entomologists because the mite is found nearly everywhere honeybees are present.

18h

Bee mite arrival in Hawaii causes pathogen changes in honeybee predators

Entomologists have performed a study on the Big Island and found viruses associated with the varroa mite, a parasite of honeybees, have spilled over into the western yellowjacket, a honeybee predator and honey raider. The result is a hidden, yet remarkable, change in the genetic diversity of viruses associated with the larger pathogen community of the mite and wasp, with repercussions yet to be un

18h

Ancient gene duplication gave grasses multiple ways to wait out winter

New research shows how grasses count the short days of winter to prepare for flowering. The findings provide valuable insight into how winter-adapted grasses gain the ability to flower in spring, which could be helpful for improving crops, like winter wheat, that rely on this process.

18h

Researchers overcome hurdle in CRISPR gene editing for muscular dystrophy

The gene editing technique known as CRISPR is a revolutionary approach to treating inherited diseases. However, the tool has yet to be used to effectively treat long-term, chronic conditions. A research team has identified and overcome a barrier in CRISPR gene editing that may lay the foundation for sustained treatments using the technique.

18h

Giant singers from neighboring oceans share song parts over time

Singing humpback whales from different ocean basins seem to be picking up musical ideas from afar, and incorporating these new phrases and themes into the latest song, according to a newly published study that's helping scientists better understand how whales learn and change their musical compositions.

18h

Keep a Daily Planner in 2019—for Yourself and Nobody Else

Does your planner need to be Insta-worthy? No. But a decorative, multi-colored, stickered planner just might help you love your to-do list.

19h

Here’s how the government shutdown could affect your health

Health Some agencies that keep us healthy have run out of money, or will run out soon. The United States is rolling into the third week with a partially shutdown government, with no signs of a re-opening any time soon. Thousands of federal employees are…

19h

Attack on Ethereum Classic Highlights a Crypto Weakness

Attackers appear to have gained control of 51 percent of the computers on the Ethereum Classic network, allowing them to spend cryptocurrency that wasn't theirs.

19h

Bee mite arrival in Hawaii causes pathogen changes in honeybee predators

A team led by entomologists at the University of California, Riverside, performed a study on the Big Island and found viruses associated with the varroa mite, a parasite of honeybees, have spilled over into the western yellowjacket, a honeybee predator and honey raider. The result is a hidden, yet remarkable, change in the genetic diversity of viruses associated with the larger pathogen community

19h

Brain plasticity restored in adult mice through targeting specific nerve cell connections

Research in mice finds a new molecular mechanism that is essential for maturation of brain function and may be used to restore plasticity in aged brains. Unlike previous research that broadly manipulated brain plasticity and affected the entire brain, this work targets for the first time a specific molecule acting on a single type of neuronal connection to modulate brain function. The findings may

19h

Scientists discover a process that stabilizes fusion plasmas

New research describes a newly discovered stabilizing effect of an underappreciated 1983 finding that variations in plasma temperature can influence the growth of magnetic islands that lead to disruption of fusion plasmas.

19h

'Missing' galactic mergers come to light with new technique

Researchers have developed a new technique for finding galaxy mergers — events in which two galaxies join together in sometimes-dramatic bursts of light.

19h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Wall-to-Wall Coverage

What We’re Following Today It’s Tuesday, January 8. President Donald Trump will address the country at 9 p.m. ET about immigration, his proposed border wall, and the ongoing government shutdown, which is now in its 18th day. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer will deliver a joint response from the Capitol, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders will live-stream his ow

19h

19h

There’s No Winning for the Networks

When David Westin was the president of ABC News during the Clinton, Bush, and early Obama years, the occasional request from the White House for a prime-time presidential address was almost always granted, debated only privately among network executives deciding whether to give up their airwaves. “It was more or less assumed that we would take them … When we had prime-time addresses in the Oval O

20h

The 'Captain Marvel' Trailer Is the Teaser the Movie Needed

Finally, a clip that gets people excited to see the MCU's newest hero in action.

20h

Don’t believe the keto hype

Keto diets have attracted a lot of media attention lately, and are becoming quite the rage in wellness circles. But while it might make you lose weight in the short term, it's doing one heck of a number on your body. Fitness and nutrition expert Jillian Michaels walks us through why keto might be a no-no. The 6 Keys: Unlock Your Genetic Potential for Ageless Strength, Health, and Beauty List Pric

20h

What Trump Can and Can’t Do to Get His Border Wall

President Donald Trump tonight will hold a nationally televised speech to address the impasse over the border wall. Because Democrats have refused to appropriate approximately $5 billion for the construction project, Trump is reportedly mulling alternative avenues to deliver on his campaign promise. Here’s what he can do under the law, and what he can’t. Trump has two traditional statutory avenue

20h

Finding an elusive mutation that turns altruism into selfish behavior among honeybees

For the first time, a group led by Denise Aumer and Eckart Stolle, at the Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg's Institute of Biology, have finally found the root cause responsible for thelytoky syndrome–which dramatically turns bees from altruistic helpers to selfish mercenaries.

20h

'Missing' galactic mergers come to light with new technique

Researchers have developed a new technique for finding galaxy mergers — events in which two galaxies join together in sometimes-dramatic bursts of light.

20h

'Missing' galactic mergers come to light with new technique

Galaxy mergers—in which two galaxies join together over billions of years in sometimes-dramatic bursts of light—aren't always easy for astronomers to spot. Now, scientists from the University of Colorado Boulder have developed a new technique for finding these cosmic couplings in surveys of the night sky.

20h

Finding an elusive mutation that turns altruism into selfish behavior among honeybees

Among the social insects, bees have developed a strong and rich social network, where busy worker bees tend to the queen, who in turn, controls reproduction for the benefit of the hive.

20h

Intimacy in the Early Days of Online Dating

August 2011. Gus, a 19-year-old homeschooled Christian from Joliet, Illinois, is trawling Facebook. He’s just recovered from a debilitating bout of depression, and he’s looking for someone to talk to. Through an online personality test, he finds a match: Jiyun, a 20-year-old from Korea, who moved to New York City with her family for her brother’s cancer treatment. Gus messages her, and they begin

20h

New study looks at costs and benefits of paying for ecosystem services

People who live within a particular ecosystem can have great influence on its ecology, particularly if they are motivated by economic forces. Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) programs may lead to improved environmental health by offering landowners economic incentives to use their land in ecologically sound ways. A recent study by Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) scientists and

20h

Scientists discover a process that stabilizes fusion plasmas

Feature describes newly discovered stabilizing effect of underappreciated 1983 finding that variations in plasma temperature can influence the growth of magnetic islands that lead to disruption of fusion plasmas.

20h

U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Once Again On The Rise

A newly released report shows that the United States' CO2 emissions spiked last year. A booming economy and busy transportation sector are to blame. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

21h

Less than a year after launch, TESS is already finding bizarre worlds

The TESS exoplanet hunter has spotted eight confirmed worlds in its first four months, and several of them are really weird.

21h

High society wants its fine foods to also be ethical

Truffles and caviar have traditionally been delicacies of the upper class, but a new study by UBC sociology professor Emily Huddart Kennedy and colleagues from the University of Toronto finds that free-range and fair-trade foods are becoming increasingly important among the elite.

21h

Giant singers from neighboring oceans share song parts over time

Singing humpback whales from different ocean basins seem to be picking up musical ideas from afar, and incorporating these new phrases and themes into the latest song, according to a newly published study in Royal Society Open Science that's helping scientists better understand how whales learn and change their musical compositions.

21h

Ancient gene duplication gave grasses multiple ways to wait out winter

New research shows how grasses count the short days of winter to prepare for flowering. The findings provide valuable insight into how winter-adapted grasses gain the ability to flower in spring, which could be helpful for improving crops, like winter wheat, that rely on this process.

21h

Researchers overcome hurdle in CRISPR gene editing for muscular dystrophy

The gene editing technique known as CRISPR is a revolutionary approach to treating inherited diseases. However, the tool has yet to be used to effectively treat long-term, chronic conditions. A research team led by Dongsheng Duan, PhD, at the University of Missouri School of Medicine has identified and overcome a barrier in CRISPR gene editing that may lay the foundation for sustained treatments u

21h

Using Genetic Genealogy To Identify Unknown Crime Victims, Sometimes Decades Later

DNA combined with the study of family history has been used to solve high-profile cold cases such as the Golden State Killer. Now, volunteers are using the technique to identify crime victims. (Image credit: Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images)

21h

How Did 'Miracle' Man Come Back from Dangerous Brain Swelling?

Doctors thought their patient had experienced a stroke. Fortunately, they were wrong.

21h

Maternal programming during pregnancy induces long-term postpartum obesity

In a new study using a mouse model, researchers suggest that long-term postpartum weight gain may be due not so much to retained fat as to reprogramming of maternal energy metabolism.

21h

Immigrant kids in U.S. deliberately build STEM skills

US immigrant children study more math and science in high school and college, which leads to their greater presence in STEM careers, according to new findings.

21h

New CRISPR-based technology developed to control pests with precision-guided genetics

Using the CRISPR gene editing tool, researchers have developed a new way to control and suppress populations of insects, potentially including those that ravage agricultural crops and transmit deadly diseases. The 'precision-guided sterile insect technique' alters key genes that control insect sex determination and fertility. When pgSIT eggs are introduced into targeted populations, only adult ste

21h

How India's smartphone revolution is creating a new generation of readers and writers | Chiki Sarkar

India has the second largest population of any country in the world — yet it has only 50 decent bookstores, says publisher Chiki Sarkar. So she asked herself: How do we get more people reading books? Find out how Sarkar is tapping into India's smartphone revolution to create a new generation of readers and writers in this fun talk about a fresh kind of storytelling.

21h

Scenes From Underground

Caves and tunnels have always been part of human life. We’ve grown more adept at shaping these underground shelters and passages over the millennia, and today we dig for hundreds of reasons. We excavate to find both literal and cultural treasures, digging mines and unearthing archaeological discoveries. We use caverns for stable storage, for entertainment, and for effective shelter from natural a

22h

Giant 'Fatberg' of Grease and Baby Wipes Jams British Sewer

A 210-foot-long (64 meters) monster made from grease and used baby-wipes has clogged up a sewer in Sidmouth in southwestern England.

22h

11 things to make dirtbike camping easier

Gadgets Tools to ensure a better moto experience. From an all-around utility axe, to specialty lighting, to camp mats, chairs, and even a pizza oven, these tools will help build a better moto camping experience.

22h

Maternal programming during pregnancy induces long-term postpartum obesity

In a new study using a mouse model, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine suggest that long-term postpartum weight gain may be due not so much to retained fat as to reprogramming of maternal energy metabolism.

22h

Study: Immigrant kids deliberately build STEM skills

US immigrant children study more math and science in high school and college, which leads to their greater presence in STEM careers, according to new findings from scholars at Duke University and Stanford University.

22h

Found in fruit, rutin helps combat the effects of jararaca viper venom

A study conducted in Brazil showed protective effects of flavonoid rutin against bleeding and inflammation due to snakebite.

22h

Early choice of math among U.S. immigrant kids lead to STEM careers

U.S. immigrant children study more math and science in high school and college, which leads to their greater presence in STEM careers, according to new findings from scholars at Duke University and Stanford University.

22h

Asteroid-circling spacecraft grabs cool snapshot of home

An asteroid-circling spacecraft has captured a cool snapshot of home.

22h

The Clever Clumsiness of a Robot Teaching Itself to Walk

Researchers make robots teach themselves how to walk through trial and error, like babies, to navigate the real world.

22h

Programming light on a chip

Researchers have developed a new integrated photonics platform that can store light and electrically control its frequency (or color) in an integrated circuit.

22h

Obesity surgery leads to emergence of new microbial strains in the human fecal community

Using a unique bioinformatics technique, researchers have detected the emergence of new strains of microbes in the human fecal microbiota after obesity surgery. These new strains emerged after surgical disruption of the stomach and upper small intestine. In contrast, the researchers found that strains of the human gut fecal microbiota resembled those found pre-surgery following surgery in the colo

22h

Rusty Gage Named President of Salk Institute

The neuroscientist had been serving as interim president since Elizabeth Blackburn stepped down last year following gender discrimination lawsuits against the institute.

22h

A rollable TV? LG's latest OLED TV television packs a futuristic 'wow' factor

Televisions have long been a staple at CES. LG's latest OLED TV, however, takes the traditional TV experience and flips it. Or rather, rolls it.

22h

Obesity surgery leads to emergence of new microbial strains in the human fecal community

Using a unique bioinformatics technique developed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, UAB researchers have detected the emergence of new strains of microbes in the human fecal microbiota after obesity surgery. These new strains emerged after surgical disruption of the stomach and upper small intestine. In contrast, the researchers found that strains of the human gut fecal microbiota resemb

22h

Having a second child worsens parents’ mental health: new research

Children are a wonderful gift, bringing joy, laughter, and love. But, then there are the toys, the sleepless nights, the constant barrage of “why?" questions and the plethora of sticky handprints. For many parents, the decision to have a second child is made with the expectation that two can't be more work than one. But our research on Australian parents shows this logic is flawed: second childre

22h

As temperatures rise, so will China’s energy use

Chinese residential electricity consumption will increase a lot because of climate change, a new study estimates. By the end of the 21st century, each degree Celsius increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) would raise average Chinese residential electricity use by about 9 percent. Peak electricity use will rise 36 percent for every increased degree Celsius. By 2099, scientists estimate

22h

Google Assistant will soon be on nearly 1 billion devices, company says at CES 2019

Deep in a battle with Amazon's Alexa for the dominant voice companion, Google Assistant will be on 1 billion devices by the end of January, the company said.

22h

A survey machine and a data trove: Dark Energy Survey's rich legacy

On the night of Jan. 9, 2019, the V. M. Blanco 4-meter telescope at the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), high in the mountains of Chile, will close the camera's shutter on the final image from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) — a survey that has mapped 5,000 square degrees of the heavens, almost one-quarter of the southern sky.

22h

Nature's magnifying glass reveals unexpected intermediate mass exoplanets

Astronomers have found a new exoplanet that could alter the standing theory of planet formation. With a mass that's between that of Neptune and Saturn, and its location beyond the 'snow line' of its host star, an alien world of this scale was supposed to be rare.

22h

Fighting human disease with birth control … for mosquitoes

A newly discovered protein that is crucial for egg production in mosquitoes opens a possibility for 'mosquito birth control.' The approach might offer a way to reduce mosquito populations in areas of human disease transmission without harming beneficial insects such as honey bees.

22h

Having more than one chronic disease amplifies costs of diseases

Having two or more non-communicable diseases (multimorbidity) costs the country more than the sum of those individual diseases would cost, according to a new study.

22h

Mutation links dog ‘screwtail’ and rare human syndrome

New research finds the genetic basis for the unusual appearance of certain dog breeds—Boston terriers, bulldogs, and French bulldogs—and links it to a rare inherited syndrome in humans. Bulldogs, French bulldogs, and Boston terriers aren’t the only dogs with short, wide heads, but they do share a feature not found in other breeds: a short, kinked tail or “screwtail,” says Danika Bannasch, profess

22h

Google's latest Doodle featuring dinosaurs created by a second grader

A second grader dreamt up Google's latest playful take on its logo.

22h

Programming light on a chip

Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new integrated photonics platform that can store light and electrically control its frequency (or color) in an integrated circuit.

22h

States take the lead in creating more health protective drinking water guidelines

A new analysis shows variation in the way state and federal regulators manage PFAS contaminants in drinking water, with some states adopting guideline levels that are more health protective than the non-enforceable levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

22h

Gel Packed with Chemical "Scavengers" Protects against Sarin Gas

Nanotech particles tucked into a gel coating can prevent poisoning by deadly organophosphates for a week or more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

If you want to remember an event, don't take a picture

Science Selfies could be subtly reshaping your memory. For many people, taking hundreds, if not thousands, of pictures is now a crucial part of going on holiday – documenting every last detail and posting it on social…

22h

Intermittent fasting could improve obese women's health

Research shows that obese women lost more weight and improved their health by fasting intermittently while following a strictly controlled diet.

22h

Close flu vaccine supply gaps to ease flu seasons, make pandemics less deadly

Gaps in the logic of how we restock flu vaccines may be costing hundreds of lives, or more. A new model to tweak the gaps could save hundreds to hundreds-of-thousands of people and millions to multiple millions of dollars in medical costs.

22h

Ketogenic supplements delay tonic-clonic seizures without dietary restrictions

Researchers have discovered supplementing a normal, carbohydrate-rich diet with specific ketogenic agents may significantly delay tonic-clonic seizures caused by exposure to high levels of oxygen.

22h

Genetics may influence the effects of vitamin E on cancer risk

A new study has investigated whether taking vitamin E supplements could affect risk of cancer and found that genetic variations in the gene COMT influenced whether vitamin E decreased or increased risk of developing cancer during and after the study periods.

22h

Physics can show us the inside of tumors

A team of physicists has demonstrated the potential, for oncology, of an imaging technique based only on the physical properties of tumors. It can differentiate populations of malignant cells and monitor how effective an anticancer treatment is. These results should help in the design of new therapeutic molecules and in the personalization of treatments.

22h

Hormone therapy may be best defense against knee osteoarthritis

There is an ongoing debate regarding the relationship between knee osteoarthritis and hormone therapy (HT), with small-scale studies providing mixed results. A new large-scale study from Korea shows that women receiving HT had a significantly lower prevalence of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis compared with women who did not take hormones.

22h

Nanophysicists developed a high-performance organic phototransistor

Converting light into electrical signals is essential for a number of future applications including imaging, optical communication and biomedical sensing. Researchers have now developed a new molecular device enabling to detect light and translate it with high efficiency to detectable electronical current.

22h

Bacterial immunity and infectious disease

Patients with cystic fibrosis are often infected by pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that infects the lungs and prevents breathing, often causing death. P. aeruginosa itself can also be infected by viruses, which can affect the clinical outcomes of cystic fibrosis patients. Researchers have now used P. aeruginosa as a kind of 'model system' for understanding how bacteria's interactions with vir

22h

How locusts switch colors in different settings

Scientists have discovered how locusts change their body color to adapt to different environments.

22h

Young planets orbiting red dwarfs may lack ingredients for life

Rocky planets orbiting red dwarf stars may be bone dry and lifeless, according to a new study using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Water and organic compounds, essential for life as we know it, may get blown away before they can reach the surface of young planets.

22h

Space microbes aren't so alien after all

A new study has found that — despite its seemingly harsh conditions — the ISS is not causing bacteria to mutate into dangerous, antibiotic-resistant superbugs. The bacteria are instead simply responding, and perhaps evolving, to survive in a stressful environment.

23h

Scientists provide new insight on how gene expression is controlled

Researchers have provided new insight on the mechanism underlying the control of gene expression in all living organisms, according to a new study.

23h

New physics rule to find mechanical strain

Addressing a physics problem that dates back to Galileo, three researchers this week propose a new approach to the theory of how thin sheets can be forced to conform to 'geometrically incompatible' shapes — think gift-wrapping a basketball — that relies on weaving together two fundamental ideas of geometry and mechanics that were long thought to be irreconcilable.

23h

The new green alternative for drug production

For the production of drugs, pesticides and smartphone displays, most of the processes are cost-intensive and generate a large amount of waste. Scientists have now succeeded in developing a resource-saving 'green' alternative.

23h

Engineers identify improved membranes to capture CO2 at coal-fired power plants

A computational modeling method may help to fast-track the identification and design of new carbon capture and storage materials for use by the nation's coal-fired power plants that would provide a more economical solution than current methods, with a predicted cost of less than $50 per ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) removed.

23h

Future of planet-cooling tech: Study creates roadmap for geoengineering research

A new study sets out to establish a roadmap for responsible exploration of geoengineering.

23h

Myth of Mona Lisa's magical gaze debunked

The 'Mona Lisa Effect' refers to the impression that the eyes of the person portrayed in an image seem to follow the viewer as they move in front of the picture. Researchers now demonstrate that this effect does not occur with Leonardo da Vinci's world-famous painting 'Mona Lisa'.

23h

How today's high school cliques compare to yesterday's

Changing demographics, cultural influences and the increasing number of college-bound youth have led to the emergence of new peer groups and perceptions among adolescents.

23h

Technique boosts omega 3 fatty acid levels in brain 100 fold

Researchers report that adding a lysophospholipid form of EPA (LPC-EPA) to the diet can increase levels of EPA in the brain 100-fold in mice.

23h

How common pain relievers may promote Clostridium difficile infections

Clostridium difficile causes the most common and most dangerous hospital-born infections in the United States and around the world. People treated with antibiotics are at heightened risk because those drugs disturb the microbial balance of the gut, but observational studies have also identified a link between severe C. difficile infections and use of NSAIDs, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug

23h

High-fat diets appear bad for blood pressure in younger males and females

There's more evidence that a high-fat diet is bad for both younger males and females, but exactly how it's harmful may differ between the sexes, scientists report.

23h

TESS rounds up its first planets, snares far-flung supernovae

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has found three confirmed exoplanets, or worlds beyond our solar system, in its first three months of observations.

23h

Apple CEO confident of prospects despite naysayers

Shares of Apple nudged higher on Tuesday after Chief Executive Tim Cook touted the company's technology pipeline and characterized worries about the company's future as overwrought.

23h

CES 2019: Local weather for the rest of the world

The CES 2019 gadget show opened its doors Tuesday, with tech companies from giants to tiny startups showing off their latest products and services.

23h

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