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nyheder2019januar11


Scientists discover a process that stabilizes fusion plasmas

Scientists seeking to bring the fusion reaction that powers the sun and stars to Earth must keep the superhot plasma free from disruptions. Now researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have discovered a process that can help to control the disruptions thought to be most dangerous.

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Visitors Chainsaw Iconic Joshua Trees in National Park During Gov't Shutdown

Joshua trees are beautiful, but humans can be pretty awful.

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Astronomers discover first direct evidence of white dwarf stars solidifying into crystals

The first direct evidence of white dwarf stars solidifying into crystals has been discovered by astronomers at the University of Warwick, and our skies are filled with them.

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The more pets you meet as a baby, the lower your risk of allergies

Children that are exposed to multiple cats and dogs in their first year of life go on to have lower rates of asthma, hay fever and eczema later in life

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Excessive body fat around the middle linked to smaller brain size, study finds

Carrying extra body fat, especially around the middle, may be linked to brain shrinkage, according to new research. For the study, researchers determined obesity by measuring body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio in study participants and found those with higher ratios of both measures had the lowest brain volume.

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Trump Has Defeated Himself

Well, that was the shortest, most easily resolved national emergency in U.S. history. Twelve hours ago, the president was preparing to set aside the regular process of law. By 9 p.m. eastern time? Not so much. Perhaps somebody pointed out that 15-year civil-engineering projects do not look very convincingly like emergency measures. “My house is burning! Time to begin the process of calling for de

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New York Faces Worst Measles Outbreak in Decades

In one county alone, more than 100 cases have been confirmed since October.

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Secreted amyloid-{beta} precursor protein functions as a GABABR1a ligand to modulate synaptic transmission

Amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, yet its physiological function remains unresolved. Accumulating evidence suggests that APP has a synaptic function mediated by an unidentified receptor for secreted APP (sAPP). Here we show that the sAPP extension domain directly bound the sushi 1 domain specific to the -aminobutyric acid type B receptor subu

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Great tits are killing birds and eating their brains. Climate change may be to blame.

Animals A bird murder mystery, solved. Every year, little black-and-white birds called pied flycatchers make the lengthy trek from sub-saharan Africa to northern Europe to feast on caterpillars, claim a nest,…

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Laser triggers electrical activity in thunderstorm for the first time

A team of European scientists has deliberately triggered electrical activity in thunderclouds for the first time, according to a new paper in the latest issue of Optics Express, the Optical Society's (OSA) open-access journal. They did this by aiming high-power pulses of laser light into a thunderstorm.

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Termites mitigate the effects of drought in tropical rainforest

Termites perform key ecological functions in tropical ecosystems, are strongly affected by variation in rainfall, and respond negatively to habitat disturbance. However, it is not known how the projected increase in frequency and severity of droughts in tropical rainforests will alter termite communities and the maintenance of ecosystem processes. Using a large-scale termite suppression experimen

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Why a Medieval Woman Had Lapis Lazuli Hidden in Her Teeth

What Anita Radini noticed under the microscope was the blue—a brilliant blue that seemed so unnatural, so out of place in the 1,000-year-old dental tartar she was gently dissolving in weak acid. It was ultramarine, she would later learn, a pigment that a millennium ago could only have come from lapis lazuli originating in a single region of Afghanistan. This blue was once worth its weight in gold

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Researchers overcome hurdle in CRISPR gene editing for muscular dystrophy

The gene editing technique known as CRISPR is a revolutionary approach to treating inherited diseases. However, the tool has yet to be used to effectively treat long-term, chronic conditions. A research team led by Dongsheng Duan, PhD, at the University of Missouri School of Medicine has identified and overcome a barrier in CRISPR gene editing that may lay the foundation for sustained treatments u

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Oceans are warming even faster than previously thought

Heat trapped by greenhouse gases is raising ocean temperatures faster than previously thought, concludes an analysis of four recent ocean heating observations. The results provide further evidence that earlier claims of a slowdown or 'hiatus' in global warming over the past 15 years were unfounded.

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Government Shutdown Curtails F.D.A. Food Inspections

While the Agriculture Department continues to inspect domestic meat and poultry, the F.D.A. has reduced inspections of fruits, vegetables and other foods.

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Ocean Warming Is Accelerating Faster Than Thought, New Research Finds

An analysis concluded that Earth’s oceans are heating up 40 percent faster on average than a United Nations panel estimated five years ago, a finding with dire implications for climate change.

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Nematic-to-columnar mesophase transition by in situ supramolecular polymerization

Disk- and rod-shaped molecules are incompatible in coassembly, as the former tend to stack one-dimensionally whereas the latter tend to align in parallel. Because this type of incompatibility can be more pronounced in condensed phases, different-shaped molecules generally exclude one another. We report that supramolecular polymerization of a disk-shaped chiral monomer in nematic liquid crystals c

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Problem-solving males become more attractive to female budgerigars

Darwin proposed that mate choice might contribute to the evolution of cognitive abilities. An open question is whether observing the cognitive skills of an individual makes it more attractive as a mate. In this study, we demonstrated that initially less-preferred budgerigar males became preferred after females observed that these males, but not the initially preferred ones, were able to solve ext

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Ice-filled Martian crater is a permanent winter wonderland

The European Space Agency's Mars Express probe captured this striking view of ice-filled Korolev Crater, near the north pole of the Red Planet

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Mysterious radio signals from deep space detected

A telescope picks up bursts of radio waves from a distant galaxy, shedding light on an astrophysical puzzle.

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Steam-propelled spacecraft prototype can theoretically explore celestial objects "forever"

Using steam to propel a spacecraft from asteroid to asteroid is now possible, thanks to a collaboration between a private space company and the University of Central Florida.

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FBI Agents Say the Shutdown Is a Threat to National Security

They’ve weathered blistering attacks from the president, the exposure of sensitive sources, and the politicization of classified information. And now they’re not getting paid. “I’m not going to try to candy-coat it,” Tom O’Connor, a special agent and president of the FBI Agents Association, told me this week. “We really feel that the financial insecurities we are facing right now equate to a nati

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Thousands of stars turning into crystals

The first direct evidence of white dwarf stars solidifying into crystals has been discovered by astronomers, and our skies are filled with them.

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Trump the Toddler

Donald Trump wants his wall, and he’ll hold your breath until he gets it. Twenty days into a partial government shutdown, the impact on government workers, their families, and basic services is coming into view. Food is not being inspected . Transportation Security Administration workers are calling in sick rather than working without pay . Millions could be evicted from their home , hundreds of

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Forbud mod lastbiltrailere på godstog kan føre til flere ulykker på vejene

Efter dødsulykken på Storebælt er det blevet forbudt at køre med lastbiltrailere på godstog. Det vil flytte tusindvis af trailere ud på de danske veje og medføre flere dødsfald, end godstog nogensinde kan komme op på, siger tidligere sikkerhedschef.

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X-ray pulse detected near event horizon as black hole devours star

On Nov. 22, 2014, astronomers spotted a rare event in the night sky: A supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy, nearly 300 million light years from Earth, ripping apart a passing star. The event, known as a tidal disruption flare, for the black hole's massive tidal pull that tears a star apart, created a burst of X-ray activity near the center of the galaxy. Since then, a host of observa

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High intake of dietary fiber and whole grains associated with reduced risk of non-communicable diseases

Observational studies and clinical trials conducted over nearly 40 years reveal the health benefits of eating at least 25g to 29g or more of dietary fiber a day, according to a series of systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

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Birth of a black hole or neutron star captured for first time

A Northwestern University-led international team is getting closer to understanding the mysteriously bright object that burst in the northern sky this summer.

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Australians care if politicians tell lies, but people in the US don't

Fact-checking politicians' statements alters both the views and the voting intentions of people in Australia – but makes far less difference in the US

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Cosmic telescope zooms in on the beginning of time

Observations from Gemini Observatory identify a key fingerprint of an extremely distant quasar, allowing astronomers to sample light emitted from the dawn of time. Astronomers happened upon this deep glimpse into space and time thanks to a foreground galaxy acting as a gravitational lens, which magnified the ancient light. The Gemini observations provide critical pieces of the puzzle in confirming

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A Biologist Reconstructs the Grotesque Efficiency of the Nazis' Killing Machine

Lewi Stone used his statistical prowess to reveal the furious intensity of the Holocaust’s industrial-scale genocide during three months of 1942 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Center for Cybersikkerhed vil overvåge virksomheders datatrafik uden at spørge om lov

Et nyt lovforslag vil give Center for Cybersikkerhed mulighed for at placere sikkerhedssoftware i samfundsvigtige virksomheders servere og interne netværk ved tvang.

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Scientists discover a process that stabilizes fusion plasmas

Feature describes newly discovered stabilizing effect of underappreciated 1983 finding that variations in plasma temperature can influence the growth of magnetic islands that lead to disruption of fusion plasmas.

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Birth of a black hole or neutron star captured for first time

After combining several imaging sources, including hard X-rays and radiowaves, a team now speculates that the telescopes captured the exact moment a star collapsed to form a compact object, such as a black hole or neutron star. The stellar debris, approaching and swirling around the object's event horizon, caused The Cow's remarkably bright glow.

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A hormone released during exercise might protect against Alzheimer's

Exercise improves mental performance and this may be due to a hormone called Irisin. The hormone may help protect against Alzheimer's disease too

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Oceans are warming even faster than previously thought

Heat trapped by greenhouse gases is raising ocean temperatures faster than previously thought, concludes an analysis of four recent ocean heating observations. The results provide further evidence that earlier claims of a slowdown or "hiatus" in global warming over the past 15 years were unfounded.

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Fake news shared by very few, but those over 65 more likely to pass on such storiesFake News Facebook

A small percentage of Americans, less than 9 percent, shared links to so-called "fake news" sites on Facebook during the 2016 presidential election campaign, but this behavior was disproportionately common among people over the age of 65, finds a new analysis by researchers at New York University's Social Media and Political Participation (SMaPP) Lab and Princeton University.

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How Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Shapes a New Political Reality

The newly elected congressmember offers older colleagues a master class in social media.

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Fake news: Bedstemor og bedstefar spreder mest misinformation

Amerikansk forskning viser, at folk over 65 deler falske nyhedshistorier langt oftere end unge.

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LATEST


First photo of Chinese Yutu-2 rover exploring far side of the moon

On 3 January, the Chinese lander Chang’e 4 became the first spacecraft ever to land on the far side of the moon, and it has just rolled out its rover, Yutu-2

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Next generation photonic memory devices are 'light-written,' ultrafast and energy efficient

Light is the most energy-efficient way of moving information. Yet, light shows one big limitation: it is difficult to store. As a matter of fact, data centers rely primarily on magnetic hard drives. However, in these hard drives, information is transferred at an energy cost that is nowadays exploding. Researchers of the Institute of Photonic Integration of the Eindhoven University of Technology (T

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Researchers make complex molecule that spontaneously folds like a protein

A team of researchers from the Netherlands, Italy and Poland has developed a way to make complex molecules that spontaneously fold like proteins. In their paper published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the group describes their approach to manipulating molecules in useful ways, what they discovered, and the ways they believe their results might be used.

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Discovery adapts natural membrane to make hydrogen fuel from water

A chemical reaction pathway central to plant biology have been adapted to form the backbone of a new process that converts water into hydrogen fuel using energy from the sun.

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X-ray pulse detected near event horizon as black hole devours star

New findings are the first demonstration of a tidal disruption flare being used to estimate a black hole's spin.

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Cosmic telescope zooms in on the beginning of time

Observations from Gemini Observatory identify a key fingerprint of an extremely distant quasar, allowing astronomers to sample light emitted from the dawn of time. Astronomers happened upon this deep glimpse into space and time thanks to an unremarkable foreground galaxy acting as a gravitational lens, which magnified the quasar's ancient light. The Gemini observations provide critical pieces of t

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The Exceptions to the Rulers

Conservatives’ obsession with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez may seem ridiculous. Ever since the 29-year-old former bartender wrested the Democratic primary nomination from the 10-term incumbent Joe Crowley, right-wing media has fixated on the unapologetically left-wing representative. From her clothes to her nickname to her high school to her childhood home , conservatives seem particularly intent on

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Research explains public resistance to vaccination

Why is it so challenging to increase the number of people who get vaccinated? How does popular resistance to vaccination remain strong even as preventable diseases make a comeback?

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Brain plasticity restored in adult mice through targeting specific nerve cell connections

Research in mice finds a new molecular mechanism that is essential for maturation of brain function and may be used to restore plasticity in aged brains. Unlike previous research that broadly manipulated brain plasticity and affected the entire brain, this work targets for the first time a specific molecule acting on a single type of neuronal connection to modulate brain function. The findings may

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Rice plants engineered to be better at photosynthesis make more rice

A new bioengineering approach for boosting photosynthesis in rice plants could increase grain yield by up to 27 percent, according to a new study. The approach, called GOC bypass, enriches plant cells with CO2 that would otherwise be lost through a metabolic process called photorespiration. The genetically engineered plants were greener and larger and showed increased photosynthetic efficiency and

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Unusual supernova opens a rare window on the collapse of a star

An unusual supernova studied by multiple telescopes, including the SOAR telescope and other telescopes at the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) and NSF's Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), is thought to herald the birth of a new black hole or neutron star, caught at the exact moment of its creation. Observations made with facilities ranging from

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IBM unveils its first commercial quantum computer

IBM's sleek-looking Q System One is its first commercial quantum computer. It will be available for clients to access over the internet

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Scuba-diving lizard can stay underwater for at least 16 minutes

The water anole of Costa Rica dives underwater to escape from predators such as birds by blowing out and re-inhaling a large bubble of air

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Nevada City, California's 'Goat Fund Me' to Prevent Fires

Spooked by massive wildfires, a California city launches a crowdfunding campaign to hire goats to clear brush at the edges of town.

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All aboard the Flat Earth cruise – just don’t tell them about nautical navigation

Flat earthers, who believe the Earth is a large disk, may be shocked to find the ship’s navigation is based on a spherical planet A group of people who believe the Earth is flat have announced their “biggest, boldest, best adventure yet”: a Flat Earth cruise scheduled for 2020. The cruise, organized by the Flat Earth International Conference , promises to be a lovely time. Flat earthers – who inc

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Giant singers from neighboring oceans share song parts over time

Singing humpback whales from different ocean basins seem to be picking up musical ideas from afar, and incorporating these new phrases and themes into the latest song, according to a newly published study in Royal Society Open Science that's helping scientists better understand how whales learn and change their musical compositions.

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Fixing a flaw in photosynthesis could massively boost food production

Compensating for a fundamental flaw in photosynthesis boosts biomass in tobacco by up to 40 per cent – next up are food crops

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Trump’s Typos Reveal His Lack of Fitness for the Presidency

The president of the United States has many faults, but let’s not ignore this one: He cannot write sentences. If a tree falls in a forrest and no one is there to hear it … wait: Pretty much all of you noticed that mistake, right? Yet Wednesday morning, the president did not; he released a tweet referring to “forrest fires” twice , as if these fires were set by Mr. Gump. Trump’s serial misuse of p

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Cancer: Drug fights formation of metastasis

The most deadly aspect of breast cancer is metastasis. It spreads cancer cells throughout the body. Researchers have now discovered a substance that suppresses the formation of metastases.

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Women's Sexuality Is Still Taboo for Tech—at Least at CES

Sex robots and VR porn are fine, but a robotic vibrator that delivers a blended orgasm to women is immoral and profane? Oh, the hypocrisy.

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Starchy food may reduce autoimmune reactions in people with lupus

A study in mice shows that certain gut bacteria may exacerbate lupus, but eating starch can halt their growth, hinting at a possible treatment

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Traditional Masculinity Can Hurt Boys, Say New A.P.A. Guidelines

Men die earlier than women and commit more acts of violence. But the American Psychological Association did not have a guide for working with males, in part because they were historically considered the norm.

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The biology of gender, from DNA to the brain | Karissa Sanbonmatsu

How exactly does gender work? It's not just about our chromosomes, says biologist Karissa Sanbonmatsu. In a visionary talk, she shares new discoveries from epigenetics, the emerging study of how DNA activity can permanently change based on social factors like trauma or diet. Learn how life experiences shape the way genes are expressed — and what that means for our understanding of gender.

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Scientists Have Discovered a Mysterious Repeating Radio Signal from Deep Space

Don't look now, but Earth is being bombarded with mysterious, invisible light.

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Indian Science Congress Speakers Say Newton Was Wrong, Ancient Demon-King Had Planes

The remarks, which also included a claim that a Hindu god created the dinosaurs, sparked an uproar among scientists and congress organizers and on Twitter. (Image credit: Pardeep Pandit/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)

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Hubble Space Telescope's premier camera shuts down

The Hubble Space Telescope's premier camera has shut down because of a hardware problem.

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Citizen scientists find new world with NASA telescope

Using data from NASA's Kepler space telescope, citizen scientists have discovered a planet roughly twice the size of Earth located within its star's habitable zone, the range of orbital distances where liquid water may exist on the planet's surface. The new world, known as K2-288Bb, could be rocky or could be a gas-rich planet similar to Neptune. Its size is rare among exoplanets—planets beyond ou

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Trump’s Oval Office Address Was Classic Stephen Miller

Almost from the moment the camera blinked on in the Oval Office, it was clear that President Donald Trump was delivering a Stephen Miller special. The 33-year-old White House speechwriter has a hand in virtually everything the president reads from a teleprompter. But as one of the most strident immigration hawks in the West Wing, Miller has been especially influential over the past two years in s

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Cancer Death Rate Continues to Decline

The new data are in – cancer deaths continue to decline at a steady rate.

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With 86% Drop, California’s Monarch Butterfly Population Hits Record Low

The monarchs’ declining wintertime numbers are “potentially catastrophic,” according to the nonprofit conservation group that conducted the count.

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Why Federal Workers Still Have to Show Up Even If They’re Not Being Paid

Eric Young is the president of the union that represents the approximately 30,000 employees of the Federal Bureau of Prisons who are working during the government shutdown. Young’s members, scattered at 122 facilities located in largely rural areas across the country, aren’t being paid and don’t know when their next paycheck will come. Like the leaders of virtually every federal-employee union du

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The FASEB Journal: Fish oil supplementation can slow muscle loss during immobilization

A study published in The FASEB Journal demonstrated that dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids (or fish oils) reduced the rate at which young women lost muscle mass during a period of immobilization.

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How junk food can make you pick something healthier

Whether we pick healthy or indulgent foods may depend on what other foods sit nearby on the grocery shelf, new research suggests. Paradoxically, the nearby presence of an indulgent treat can cause more people to opt for a healthy food, says study coauthor Scott Huettel, professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University. Context, in other words, affects food choices. “When people choose

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Schizophrenia linked to Epstein-Barr virus

People with schizophrenia can have higher levels of antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus, a herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis, new research suggests. Researchers didn’t design the study to pinpoint cause and effect, but say there are at least two possible explanations: Schizophrenia might alter immune systems and make patients more susceptible to the Epstein-Barr virus, or EBV in

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‘ANYmal’ robot stalks dark sewers to test its navigation

Researchers are working to make sure a seeing, hearing, door-opening robot called “ANYmal” can also function in extreme conditions—a mission that takes them to the labyrinth of drains and tunnels below Zurich. Their aim is to determine whether ANYmal—a robot that ANYbotics, an ETH Zurich spin-off company, jointly developed with Robotic Systems Lab—could one day be useful in sewer systems. It migh

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Sexual desire can spark a real connection

Sex helps initiate romantic relationships between potential partners, a new study finds. “Sex may set the stage for deepening the emotional connection between strangers,” says lead author Gurit Birnbaum, a social psychologist and associate professor of psychology at Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya in Israel. “This holds true for both men and women. Sex motivates human beings to connect, regardl

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Can more ‘flags’ help CRISPR treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy?

Researchers have overcome a barrier in CRISPR gene editing that may make it an effective way to treat long-term chronic conditions, like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The body’s natural defensive ability to fend off viruses inspired CRISPR gene editing. The technology allows scientists to cut out and replace a mutation in the genome to alter DNA sequences, which has the potential to treat a

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Cell-autonomous clock of astrocytes drives circadian behavior in mammals

Circadian (~24-hour) rhythms depend on intracellular transcription-translation negative feedback loops (TTFLs). How these self-sustained cellular clocks achieve multicellular integration and thereby direct daily rhythms of behavior in animals is largely obscure. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the fulcrum of this pathway from gene to cell to circuit to behavior in mammals. We describe cell t

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KAL’s cartoon

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The MOOC pivot

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New role for brain's support cells in controlling circadian rhythms

An Medical Research Council funded study published today in the journal Science, has found that astrocytes, previously thought of as just supporting neurons in regulating circadian rhythms, can actually lead the tempo of the body's internal clock and have been shown for the first time to be able to control patterns of daily behaviour in mammals.

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Trump’s Bizarre California Fire Threat Is Serious

Eighty-six Americans lost their lives last year in the Camp Fire, the largest and deadliest wildfire in California’s modern history. More than 11,000 people lived through the blaze but saw their homes destroyed . On Wednesday, President Donald Trump threatened to cut off relief for survivors and communities affected by that blaze, amid an ongoing political standoff with high-ranking California po

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Oceans Are Warming Faster Than Predicted

Earth’s seas are absorbing excess heat 40 percent faster than previous estimates — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Powerful microscope captures first image of nanoscaffold that promotes cell movement

There are many times when our cells need to move. Mobile cells guide our body's formation (embryonic development). Immune cells roam to capture unwanted intruders. And healing cells (fibroblasts) migrate to mend wounds. But not all movement is desirable: Tumors are most dangerous when cancer cells gain the ability to travel throughout the body (metastasis). Certain bacteria and viruses can harness

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Another Casualty of the Government Shutdown: Hurricane Preparedness

Weather models are not being updated and training sessions might be canceled during the budget standoff — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Biggest Issues for Wildlife and Endangered Species in 2019

It’s going to be a rough year, but we’ll also see some progress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How auto-darkening lenses work

Technology Here we're talking about motorcycle lenses in particular. Auto-darkening lenses are better than ever. Here’s how they work.

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Ultra-sturdy bones, with a surprising origin, suggest new osteoporosis approach

A handful of brain cells deep in the brain may play a surprising role in controlling women's bone density, according to new research. Researchers showed that blocking a particular set of signals from these cells causes female (but not male) mice to build extraordinarily strong bones and maintain them into old age, raising hopes for new approaches to preventing or treating osteoporosis in older wom

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2-D materials may enable electric vehicles to get 500 miles on a single charge

Lithium-air batteries are poised to become the next revolutionary replacement for currently used lithium-ion batteries that power electric vehicles, cell phones and computers.

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DNA from 6000-year-old chewing gum reveals how an ancient woman lived

Lola lived 6000 years ago and made glue by chewing birch bark pitch. By analysing DNA left on the pitch we know about her diet, appearance, and ancestry

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Exercise may lower high blood pressure as much as medication

An analysis of nearly 400 trials suggests that exercise might be as effective for people with high blood pressure as taking the most commonly-used drugs

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New technique more precisely determines the ages of stars

How old are each of the stars in our roughly 13-billion-year-old galaxy? A new technique for understanding the star-forming history of the Milky Way in unprecedented detail makes it possible to determine the ages of stars at least two times more precisely than conventional methods, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University researchers reported Jan. 10 at the American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting.

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Optoacoustic microscopy at multiple discrete frequencies

Optoacoustic imaging powered by short bursts of continuous wave (CW) lasers can stimulate the emission of ultrasound waves inside an animal or in human subjects. The method can noninvasively capture blood flow and produce 3-D images of cellular microarchitecture. Writing in Light: Science & Applications, Stephan Kellnberger and colleagues at the Institute of Biological and Medical Imaging, now rep

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Magnetar mysteries in our galaxy and beyond

In a new Caltech-led study, researchers from campus and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have analyzed pulses of radio waves coming from a magnetar—a rotating, dense, dead star with a strong magnetic field—that is located near the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way galaxy. The new research provides clues that magnetars like this one, lying in close proximity to a black hole,

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Giant singers from neighboring oceans share song parts over time

Singing humpback whales from different ocean basins seem to be picking up musical ideas from afar, and incorporating these new phrases and themes into the latest song, according to a newly published study in Royal Society Open Science that's helping scientists better understand how whales learn and change their musical compositions.

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Five-hundred fifty million barrels of oil discovered off Ghana coast

Norway's Aker Energy on Thursday said it had discovered oil in commercial quantities off Ghana, which the government welcomed as a potential boost to the economy.

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Evidence found of oysters syncing valve behavior with lunar cycle

A team of researchers from the University of Bordeaux and CNRS, EPOC, UMR has found evidence that suggests oysters sync their valve behavior with the lunar cycle. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of oysters in the wild over three and a half lunar cycles and what they observed.

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Cygnus A: Ricocheting black hole jet discovered by Chandra

A ricocheting jet blasting from a giant black hole has been captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, as reported in our latest press release. In this composite image of Cygnus A, X-rays from Chandra (red, green, and blue that represent low, medium and high energy X-rays) are combined with an optical view from the Hubble Space Telescope of the galaxies and stars in the same field of view. Chan

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China broadcasts spacecraft pictures from moon's far side

China on Friday broadcast pictures taken by its rover and lander on the moon's far side, in what its space program hailed as another triumph for the groundbreaking mission to the less-understood sector of the lunar surface.

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New Caledonian crows found able to infer weight of an object by watching how it behaves in the wind

A team of researchers with members affiliated with the University of Auckland, the University of Cambridge, Bertha von Suttner University and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has found evidence that suggests New Caledonian crows can infer the weight of an object by watching how it behaves in the wind. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the grou

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Vitamin D supplements do not reduce the risk of cancer or cardiovascular disease

Vitamin D has been widely touted as beneficial for preventing cancer and cardiovascular disease. A large, well-conducted clinical trial now show that it has no effect.

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Elon Musk reveals Starship test rocket that looks like 1950s sci-fiElon Musk Starship

The SpaceX founder says the suborbital rocket should fly in the coming weeks, and is designed to test landing technology for a larger orbital rocket

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Crows can guess the weight of an object by watching it sway in wind

New Caledonian crows are famous for their clever tool-making abilities. Now it seems they are also able to guess an object's weight by watching it move

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There’ll be a domino effect as we trigger ecosystem tipping points

There are lots of interconnected tipping points linking the climate and environment, so drastic changes to the planet will have many unexpected consequences

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Gel made from birch bark reduces skin scarring from cuts and burns

A dressing made from birch bark – which has long been used in traditional medicine to wrap wounds – allows cuts and burns to heal faster with less scarring

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Mysterious fast radio bursts from deep space ‘could be aliens’

Repeating bursts of radio waves detected for first time since initial accidental discovery in 2007 Astronomers have detected mysterious, ultra-brief repeating energy bursts from deep space for only the second time in history, and some experts suggested they could be evidence of advanced alien life. The origin of fast radio bursts (FRBs), millisecond-long pulses of radio waves, is unknown, but mos

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Climate change: 'Right to repair' gathers force

EU and US states are to introduce laws helping people to mend appliances that break down.

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What Was the Point of Trump’s Oval Office Address?

A president only gets one chance to make his first Oval Office address—making Donald Trump’s reiteration of familiar talking points in a short speech Tuesday night all the more puzzling. Over the course of roughly 10 minutes, Trump brought his case for more spending on border security directly to the American people, saying there is “a growing humanitarian and security crisis at our Southern bord

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Millions of College Students Are Going Hungry

As the costs of college have climbed, some students have gone hungry. When they’ve voiced frustration , they’ve often been ridiculed : “Ramen is cheap ,” or “ Just eat cereal .” But the blight of food insecurity among college students is real, and a new report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO), a nonpartisan congressional watchdog, highlights the breadth of those affected. There are

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US Cancer Death Rate Dropped for 25 Years Starting in 1991

Better treatment and detection have helped more people survive, but economic disparities in outcomes for some preventable cancers have gotten worse.

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AI App Identifies Rare Genetic Disorders from Photos of Patients' Faces

Deep-learning algorithms could help doctors narrow in on the causes of certain medical conditions, say researchers.

2d


Decreased deep sleep linked to early signs of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have uncovered part of the explanation for why poor sleep is linked to Alzheimer's disease. They found that older people who have less slow-wave sleep — the deep sleep you need to consolidate memories and wake up feeling refreshed — have higher levels of the brain protein tau. Elevated tau is a sign of Alzheimer's disease and has been linked to brain damage and cognitive decline.

2d


Controlling children's behavior with screen time leads to more screen time, study reveals

Researchers investigated the impact of parenting practices on the amount of time young children spend in front of screens. They found a majority of parents use screen time to control behavior, especially on weekends. This results in children spending an average of 20 minutes more a day on weekends in front of a screen. Researchers say this is likely because using it as a reward or punishment heigh

1d


Parental CPTSD increases transmission of trauma to offspring of Tutsi genocide survivors

Nearly 25 years after the genocide against the Tutsi of Rwanda took the lives of up to one million victims, the offspring of Tutsi survivors, who weren't even born at the time, are among those most affected by trauma.

1d


Voter preference for Trump linked to bullying in middle schools

Bullying rates among middle school students in the spring of 2017 were 18 percent higher in localities where voters had favored Donald Trump than in those that had supported Hillary Clinton, according to a new study.

2d


Giant singers from neighboring oceans share song parts over time

Singing humpback whales from different ocean basins seem to be picking up musical ideas from afar, and incorporating these new phrases and themes into the latest song, according to a newly published study that's helping scientists better understand how whales learn and change their musical compositions.

2d


Space microbes aren't so alien after all

A new study has found that — despite its seemingly harsh conditions — the ISS is not causing bacteria to mutate into dangerous, antibiotic-resistant superbugs. The bacteria are instead simply responding, and perhaps evolving, to survive in a stressful environment.

3d


Woman with Rare Condition Couldn’t Hear Male Voices

What is reverse-slope hearing loss?

1h


Chemists solve persistent problem after four decades

After almost four decades, Leiden and Eindhoven chemists have resolved the discussion about the correct model regarding the simplest chemical reaction in heterogeneous catalysis, which is essential for fuel cells. Using a unique curved platinum surface, Ludo Juurlink and Ph.D. candidate Richard van Lent from Leiden and Michael Gleeson from DIFFER showed which model correctly describes the reaction

7h


Atomic-scale capillaries block smallest ions, thanks to graphene

Researchers at The University of Manchester's National Graphene Institute in the UK have succeeded in making artificial channels just one atom in size for the first time. The new capillaries, which are very much like natural protein channels such as aquaporins, are small enough to block the flow of smallest ions like Na+ and Cl- but allow water to flow through freely. As well as improving our fund

10h


$5 Billion Could Buy a Lot of Border Security

As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump pledged to reduce illegal immigration from Central America, and since taking office he has paired that vow with professed concerns about not just the flow of asylum seekers into the United States, but the smuggling of drugs and the potential entry of terrorists, too. That, in his telling, is why he wants $5 billion from Congress for a wall along the U.S.

4h


‘Little Foot’ skeleton reveals a brain much like a chimp’s

An ancient skeleton dubbed Little Foot points to the piecemeal evolution of various humanlike traits in hominids, two studies suggest.

1d


10 essential apps for your new iPad Pro

DIY The best picks for the advanced tablet. You've invested in a new iPad Pro tablet—now it's time to arm it with the best apps around. These programs help you with digital art, office work, video editing, and…

1d


11 things to make dirtbike camping easier

Gadgets Tools to ensure a better moto experience. From an all-around utility axe, to specialty lighting, to camp mats, chairs, and even a pizza oven, these tools will help build a better moto camping experience.

3d


15-meter-long ancient whale Basilosaurus isis was top marine predator

The stomach contents of ancient whale Basilosaurus isis suggest it was an apex predator, according to a new study.

2d


15-meter-long ancient whale Basilosaurus isis was top marine predator

The stomach contents of ancient whale Basilosaurus isis suggest it was an apex predator, according to a study published January 9, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Manja Voss from the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Germany, and colleagues.

2d


2018’s weirdest stories: Friendly horses, toddler robots and moonmoons

New Scientist has covered some strange scientific findings this year. Here is our round-up of the weirdest and wackiest

1d


2D materials may enable electric vehicles to get 500 miles on a single charge

A number of 2D materials, when incorporated into experimental lithium-air batteries as the catalyst, enabled a battery to hold up to 10 times more energy than lithium-air batteries containing traditional catalysts, according to new research.

1d


3 Simple Facts About the Shutdown

Today’s life-in-DC gazette: a little while ago I was in a line at a coffee shop with a middle-aged man, who from his accent I guessed (correctly) was from Nigeria. We talked while we were waiting. His was a standard life-in-our times story: He came to the US about 30 years ago. Now a citizen and small-business owner. Children all born here and in, or headed to, college. One of his nephews is a TS

1d


50 years ago, scientists studied orcas in the wild for the first time

The study of killer whales has come a long way since the capture of seven in 1968 allowed scientists to study the animals in their habitat.

1d


67.000 solcelleejere slap for flexafregning i første omgang

Ved årsskiftet blev omkring 18.000 årsafregnede solcelleejere overflyttet til flexafregning. Resten af de i alt 85.000 vil blive overført løbende, oplyser Energinet.

2d


A $3 billion problem: Miami-Dade's septic tanks are already failing due to sea rise

Miami-Dade has tens of thousands of septic tanks, and a new report reveals most are already malfunctioning—the smelly and unhealthy evidence of which often ends up in people's yards and homes. It's a billion-dollar problem that climate change is making worse.

7h


A Blue Clue In Medieval Teeth May Bespeak A Woman's Artistry Circa A.D. 1000

Analysis of fossilized dental tartar of a medieval woman buried in a German monastery reveals specks of blue to be lapis lazuli — a luxurious pigment used to create gorgeous illuminated manuscripts. (Image credit: Christina Warinner/Science Advances)

2d


A Border Is Not a Wall

Borders are an invention, and not even an especially old one. Predated by the printing press by a good 200 years, borders are constantly under revision. Even the zone of a border itself, the Supreme Court has held , extends far beyond the technical outline of a nation. Imagine a border as the human-made thing that it is, and it’s no longer surprising that it takes a multitude of forms: a line on

1d


A cosmic collision may be coming for our galaxy sooner than we thought

The nearby Large Magellanic Cloud may be on a collision course with the Milky Way – and it could make our galaxy less strange when they smash in 2 billion years

2h


A drill built for Mars is being used to bore into Antarctic bedrock

An autonomous drill originally designed for work on Mars has its first mission in Antarctica.

2h


A Dying Star Sent Out an SOS Pointing to Its Killer: A Buzz-Saw Black Hole

The crumbs left over from a supermassive black hole's recent meal have allowed scientists to calculate the monster's rotation rate, and the results are mind-boggling.

1d


A ghostly trick produces X-ray images with a lower dose of radiation

Producing X-rays using a technique called ghost imaging, in which only some of the radiation passes through the subject, could reduce the dose required for cancer screening

1d


A Growing Frontier for Terrorist Groups: Unsuspecting Chat Apps

Opinion: As Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube crack down on extremist propaganda, ISIS recruiters are exploiting lesser-known messenger apps.

2d


A handy guide to the tech buzzwords from CES 2019

Technology What the heck are haptics and why do you want them? What's the difference between VR, AR, and XR? You're about to find out.

1d


A Look at CRISPR and the First Genetically-Modified Humans

Cracking Pandora’s Box – New Tools and New Frontiers In November of 2018, Chinese scientist He Jiankui revealed to the world that he had orchestrated the genetic modification and birth of two twin girls in China[1]. Psuedonymed Nana and Lulu, these newborns are the first known human babies to be born following modification of their […]

1d


A Magic Wand? Nope, Just Good Ol’ Fashioned Physics

What looks like magic is actually the electrostatic force in action, suspending objects in air by manipulating their electrons.

1d


A Man Overdosed on an Erectile Dysfunction Drug. Then He Saw 'Doughnut-Shaped' Spots in his Vision

A man in Massachusetts developed vision loss after consuming an entire bottle of an erectile dysfunction drug, according to a new report.

1d


A Mirror Image of Our Universe May Have Existed Before the Big Bang

Before the Big Bang, time may have run in reverse.

9h


A neural network can learn to organize the world it sees into concepts—just like we do

Generative adversarial networks are not just good for causing mischief. They can also show us how AI algorithms “think.”

1d


A new app tracks breathing to detect an opioid overdose

A smartphone app called Second Chance could help save opioid users who shoot up alone.

2d


A New Approach to Understanding How Machines Think

If a doctor told that you needed surgery, you would want to know why — and you’d expect the explanation to make sense to you, even if you’d never gone to medical school. Been Kim, a research scientist at Google Brain, believes that we should expect nothing less from artificial intelligence. As a specialist in “interpretable” machine learning, she wants to build AI software that can explain itself

1d


A New Idea about What Triggers Alzheimer's

Changes in brain cells’ DNA may be responsible—and if so, medicines already developed for other diseases might be used to treat it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2d


A second repeating fast radio burst has been tracked to a distant galaxy

Astronomers have spotted a second repeating fast radio burst, and it looks a lot like the first.

2d


A step closer to a data superhighway for future internet

An international team of researchers led by ANU is helping to build a safe data superhighway for the highly anticipated quantum internet, which promises a new era of artificial intelligence and ultra-secure communication.

1d


A Strange Kind of Data Tracks the Weather—and Pirate Ships

Weather forecasters may soon use a technique called radio occultation, which infers the state of the atmosphere from various broadcasts.

9h


A survey machine and a data trove: Dark Energy Survey's rich legacy

On the night of Jan. 9, 2019, the V. M. Blanco 4-meter telescope at the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), high in the mountains of Chile, will close the camera's shutter on the final image from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) — a survey that has mapped 5,000 square degrees of the heavens, almost one-quarter of the southern sky.

3d


A swarming asexual midge is island hopping towards Antarctica

Biologists say biosecurity measures need to be stepped up to prevent a non-biting midge reaching Antarctica, because it could radically change the continent

1d


A Tesla-Robot ‘Crash’ Stunt Shows We Need Robocar Schooling

The seemingly hoax-y death of "Promobot" is a handy justification for the newly launched Partnership for Automated Vehicle Education.

2d


A world map of Virgin Mary apparitions

For centuries, the Virgin Mary has appeared to the faithful, requesting devotion and promising comfort. These maps show the geography of Marian apparitions – the handful approved by the Vatican, and many others. Historically, Europe is where most apparitions have been reported, but the U.S. is pretty fertile ground too. None The divine is supernatural, but religion is very much of this world. The

1d


A Worldwide Hacking Spree Uses DNS Trickery to Nab Data

Security researchers suspect that Iran has spent the last two years pilfering data from telecoms, governments, and more.

6h


AI can identify rare genetic disorders by the shape of someone’s face

Doctors use facial features to diagnose common genetic disorders, but that’s tricky to do with some rare ones – artificial intelligence can help

1d


AI created images of food just by reading the recipes

AI can read a recipe and guess what the food will look like. Some of the results look like food you might cook at home, others look like inedible mush

1d


'Alexa, call my lawyer!' Are you legally liable if someone makes a purchase using your virtual assistant?

When Amazon launched its Alexa virtual assistant in 2014, it probably didn't think that a bird would expose a potentially significant legal issue with the device. But an African grey parrot named Rocco, living in Blewbury, England, appears to have done just that.

7h


Alien theories understandable after mysterious signals, say scientists

Fast radio bursts have caused more suspicion about extraterrestrial activity In the 400 years since Galileo Galilei first held a telescope to the heavens, astronomers have laid bare some of the deepest mysteries of the cosmos. They have seen comets crash into planets, found oceans inside moons, and witnessed the shudder of spacetime as black holes collide. But space remains a realm of the unknown

16h


Almost every brand of tuna on supermarket shelves shows why modern slavery laws are needed

What is the chance the last tin of tuna you ate was made using slave labour? If it came from Thailand, the odds may be a lot higher than you imagine.

2d


America’s Housing Crisis Could Imperil Trump’s Presidency

Donald Trump is right that the United States desperately needs more walls. He’s just wrong about their ideal dimension, purpose, and location. The U.S. need not spend tens of billions of dollars on a single barrier extending along the southern border between the United States and Mexico. Rather, what the suddenly wobbly U.S. economy could really use is millions of walls at 90-degree angles. I mea

1d


Americans want to regulate AI but don’t trust anyone to do it

The public thinks that human-level AI is likely to cause more harm than good, a new report has shown.

1d


An exploding space cow could be linked to a newborn black hole

Space The first time we've caught a baby black hole in action. We’re finding more clues for what that mysterious bright flash was last year, but we’re still not sure what exactly it was.

6h


Anak Krakatau: Finnish radar satellite eyes tsunami volcano

The innovative ICEYE radar spacecraft views the changing shape of the collapsed volcano.

1d


Ancient gene duplication gave grasses multiple ways to wait out winter

If you've ever grown carrots in your garden and puzzled over never once seeing them flower, don't blame your lack of a green thumb.

2d


2d


Anti-vaccine movement is powered by ‘hysteresis’, study reveals

A new study explores society's relatively poor vaccination coverage through the lens of hysteresis, a phenomenon that describes how systems are dependent on their history. The results show how 'imperfect vaccines' and episodes of public confusion can result in sharp drops in population-wide immunization rates, and how it can take years for those rates to recover. By promoting an individual's choi

6h


Artificial bug eyes

Single lens eyes, like those in humans and many other animals, can create sharp images, but the compound eyes of insects and crustaceans have an edge when it comes to peripheral vision, light sensitivity and motion detection. That's why scientists are developing artificial compound eyes to give sight to autonomous vehicles and robots, among other applications. Now, a new report describes the prepa

1d


Artificial intelligence detects the presence of viruses

Many biosensing applications rely on characterization of specific analytes such as proteins, viruses and bacteria, among many other targets, which can be accomplished by using micro- or nano-scale particles. In such biosensors, these particles are coated with a surface chemistry that makes them stick to the target analyte forming clusters in response. The higher the target analyte concentration is

2d


Asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs caused a mile-high tsunami

The asteroid that crashed into the Yucatan caused a mile-high tsunami. The wave was 52 times higher and 2,600 times more energetic than the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami that killed over 227,000 people. Sediment was disturbed 3,700 miles from the site of the crash. None Becoming a fossil is no easy matter. There are a number of conditions that have to be met, according to Paige Williams, author of Th

1d


Asteroid-circling spacecraft grabs cool snapshot of home

An asteroid-circling spacecraft has captured a cool snapshot of home.

3d


Astronomers develop new tool to find merging galaxies

Today, at the 233rd AAS meeting in Seattle, astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) announce that they have developed a new tool to find otherwise-hidden galaxy mergers in data from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey of SDSS. These results show that by going beyond simple searches for merging galaxies based just on how they look, astronomers will no

2d


Astronomers find signatures of a 'messy' star that made its companion go supernova

Astronomers announced that they have identified the type of companion star that made its partner in a binary system, a carbon-oxygen white dwarf star, explode. Through repeated observations of SN 2015cp, a supernova 545 million light years away, the team detected hydrogen-rich debris that the companion star had shed prior to the explosion.

1d


Astronomers find signatures of a 'messy' star that made its companion go supernova

Many stars explode as luminous supernovae when, swollen with age, they run out of fuel for nuclear fusion. But some stars can go supernova simply because they have a close and pesky companion star that, one day, perturbs its partner so much that it explodes.

1d


Astronomers have seen dying stars slowly crystallise and turn solid

Data from the Gaia satellite has revealed that the oldest stars in the Milky Way are crystallising as they cool down, a process that will take billions of years

1d


Astronomers investigate open cluster NGC 6530

Italian astronomers have investigated the young open cluster NGC 6530 by conducting a statistical study of its global properties. The research, which provides important insights on the cluster membership, was presented in a paper published December 29 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

2d


Astronomers observe evolution of a black hole as it wolfs down stellar material

On March 11, an instrument aboard the International Space Station detected an enormous explosion of X-ray light that grew to be six times as bright as the Crab Nebula, nearly 10,000 light years away from Earth. Scientists determined the source was a black hole caught in the midst of an outburst — an extreme phase in which a black hole can spew brilliant bursts of X-ray energy as it devours an ava

2d


Astronomers observe evolution of a black hole as it wolfs down stellar material

On March 11, an instrument aboard the International Space Station detected an enormous explosion of X-ray light that grew to be six times as bright as the Crab Nebula, nearly 10,000 light years away from Earth. Scientists determined the source was a black hole caught in the midst of an outburst—an extreme phase in which a black hole can spew brilliant bursts of X-ray energy as it devours an avalan

2d


Atmospheric Mystery on Saturn's Largest Moon

The haze that blankets Titan has a high-altitude layer which sometimes detaches from the rest—and nobody is quite sure why — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d


Attack on Ethereum Classic Highlights a Crypto Weakness

Attackers appear to have gained control of 51 percent of the computers on the Ethereum Classic network, allowing them to spend cryptocurrency that wasn't theirs.

2d


Baby chicks could be given faecal transplants to ward off infections

Farmed chickens often carry diseases like Campylobacter, which can cause food poisoning, but faecal transplants dramatically slow the spread of the bacteria

2h


Bacteria help discover human cancer-causing proteins

A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Texas at Austin has applied an unconventional approach that used bacteria to discover human proteins that can lead to DNA damage and promote cancer. Reported in the journal Cell, the study also proposes biological mechanisms by which these proteins can cause damage to DNA, opening possibilities for future cancer treatmen

1d


Bee mite arrival in Hawaii causes pathogen changes in honeybee predators

Entomologists have performed a study on the Big Island and found viruses associated with the varroa mite, a parasite of honeybees, have spilled over into the western yellowjacket, a honeybee predator and honey raider. The result is a hidden, yet remarkable, change in the genetic diversity of viruses associated with the larger pathogen community of the mite and wasp, with repercussions yet to be un

2d


Bee mite arrival in Hawaii causes pathogen changes in honeybee predators

The reddish-brown varroa mite, a parasite of honeybees and accidentally introduced in the Big Island of Hawaii in 2007-08, is about the size of a pinhead. Yet, its effects there are concerning to entomologists because the mite is found nearly everywhere honeybees are present.

2d


Beech trees are dying, and nobody's sure why

A confounding new disease is killing beech trees in Ohio and elsewhere, and plant scientists are sounding an alarm while looking for an explanation. Researchers and naturalists in northeastern Ohio report on the emerging 'beech leaf disease' epidemic, calling for speedy work to find a culprit so that work can begin to stop its spread.

2d


Bereaved people unconsciously suppress thoughts of lost loved ones

Brain scanning has revealed that grieving people can actively suppress thoughts of a dead relative without realising that they are doing it

2h


Best Winter TV Shows, From ‘Black Monday’ to ‘Russian Doll’

Just because it's winter doesn't mean there's not plenty of new stuff on the way. Gather 'round the glowing magic box.

2d


Beta's Ava Is the Edward Scissorhands of Flying Cars

The eVTOL aircraft may look strange, but it's a clever machine built for the coming age of air taxis.

1d


Bike gear to get a beginner ready for multi-day trips

Gadgets For new cyclists looking to take it up a notch. Bike gear to get a new cyclist ready for multi-day trips.

5h


Biotech Could Modify Trees to Protect against Pests

Tree breeding and gene editing could help reverse the deteriorating health of U.S. forests — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d


Bizarre 'bristle-jaw' creatures finally placed on tree of life

Chaetognaths, whose name means "bristle-jaw," can be found all over world, swimming in brackish estuaries, tropical seas and above the deep dark ocean floor. Also known as arrow worms, the creatures have been around since the Cambrian Period, but their precise place in evolutionary history has long eluded scientists. Now, researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate Univ

1d


Blue tooth reveals unknown female artist from medieval times

Rare paint particles found in the teeth of a medieval nun indicate that she was an unknown illustrator of sacred texts.

2d


Blue Whales: The Most Enormous Creatures on Earth

Blue whales are the largest animals ever to live on Earth, but many of the details of their lives remain a mystery to the biologists who study them.

2d


Bor internettet ikke i skyen? Nej, i kasser lige om hjørnet

Når du søger på Google eller ser film på Netflix, rejser dine data ofte ikke længere end nogle kilometer til datacentre placeret i Danmark.

2d


Breastfeeding Improvement Initiatives May Increase Risk of Newborn Falls

Newborn falls during the postpartum period are a serious potential adverse event and are almost always a result of maternal fatigue. There is reason to be concerned that well-meaning but overzealous promotion of breastfeeding may increase the risk.

10h


Brint og brændselsceller giver drone 70 minutters flyvetid

Kort flyvetid begrænser anvendeligheden af droner, men nu har et hold britiske virksomheder udviklet en brintdrevet drone, der kan flyve i 70 minutter med fem kilos last. Brændselsceller er for dyre i dag, men vil kunne konkurrere med batterier om tre års tid, vurderer SDU-forsker

7h


Broadcasting from Deep Space, a Mysterious Series of Radio Signals

Astronomers have identified a second set of odd radio bursts from the distant universe. Aliens probably aren’t causing it, but what is?

23h


Bumblebees lose sleep looking after the young by napping half as much

Worker bees tend to their queen’s eggs, feeding and grooming her offspring until they grow into adults – and they lose a significant amount of sleep doing the job

1d


Can you make it through the world’s hardest maze?

Head Trip It's trickier than it looks. In a typical maze, the entrance leads to the exit. This one is different. Rules determine where and how you can move.

2d


Canada's CHIME telescope detects second repeating fast radio burst

A Canadian-led team of scientists has found the second repeating fast radio burst (FRB) ever recorded. FRBs are short bursts of radio waves coming from far outside our Milky Way galaxy. Scientists believe FRBs emanate from powerful astrophysical phenomena billions of light years away.

2d


Canada's CHIME telescope detects second repeating fast radio burst

Scientists have found the second repeating fast radio burst (FRB) ever recorded. The discovery of the extragalactic signal is among the first, eagerly awaited results from the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME). The repeating FRB was one of a total of 13 bursts detected over a period of just three weeks during the summer of 2018, while CHIME was in its pre-commissioning phase.

2d


Carriers Swore They'd Stop Selling Location Data. Will They Ever?

Months after Sprint, AT&T, T-Mobile, and Verizon promised to stop selling user location data, the practice continues.

1d


Cartilage could be key to safe 'structural batteries'

Your knees and your smartphone battery have some surprisingly similar needs, a University of Michigan professor has discovered, and that new insight has led to a "structural battery" prototype that incorporates a cartilage-like material to make the batteries highly durable and easy to shape.

1d


Census data could be used to improve city neighbourhoods

A new analysis of the 2011 census has revealed that social differences among city populations significantly influence how neighbourhoods take shape. Researchers hope that their insights could help councils to make better planning decisions.

2d


CES 2019 day three: A superhero helicopter, a bike with Alexa, and a connected kettlebell

Technology The latest news from the Consumer Electronics Show, no visit to Vegas needed. We singled out some of the coolest products at CES this year.

1d


CES 2019 day two: Smart ovens, VR headsets, and more really big TVs

Gadgets Get the CES experience without the walking or dehydration. The 2019 Consumer Electronics Show is in full swing.

2d


CES 2019 in Photos: The March of the Gadget Fanatics

WIRED photographer Amy Lombard captures the glory, chaos, and optimism of CES 2019.

10h


CES 2019 Liveblog Day 3: Wednesday’s News and Photos, Live From Las Vegas

This year’s CES, one of the biggest consumer tech showcases in the world, continues Wednesday. Join us for live updates from the show in Las Vegas, Nevada.

2d


CES 2019 Liveblog Day 4: Thursday’s News and Photos, Live From Las Vegas

This year’s CES, one of the biggest consumer tech showcases in the world, continues Thursday. Join us for live updates from the show in Las Vegas, Nevada.

1d


CES 2019: More of the Coolest Stuff We've Seen So Far

We've played with a bunch of great new consumer products here at CES. Here are the neatest things we saw on day two.

2d


Chang'e 4: why the moon’s far side looks red in new images

Space It's not actually dark and it's definitely not red. If you’ve been looking closely at the pictures of the moon's far side, you could be forgiven for thinking that the far side of the moon is red.

1d


Chang'e 4: Why the moon's far side looks red in new images

The first ever images taken from the surface of the far side of the moon have been released following the Chinese National Space Administration's (CNSA) successful landing there. The lander Chang'e 4 and rover Yutu 2 follow from Chang'e 3 and the original Yutu rover that were deployed on the moon's near side in 2013.

1d


Chang'e-4: China Moon probes take snaps of each other

A Chinese rover and static lander put on the far side of the Moon take pictures of each other.

11h


Chicago’s New 311 System Is a Huge Win for Public Works

When cities hand off infrastructure projects to private companies, they often end up screwed. Now, they're learning.

1d


Childhood stress of mice affects their offspring behavior

Russian neuroscientists report that the stress experienced by mice during their first weeks of life affects not only them, but also their offspring. The data will help to understand how negative experience in early life affects the mammalian brain. The results are published in Genes, Brain and Behavior.

2d


China moon rover 'Jade Rabbit' wakes from 'nap'

China's lunar rover got back to work on the far side of the moon Thursday after waking from a five-day hibernation, its official social media page announced.

1d


4h


Cityringen får nye togsæt i gamle klæder

Knap 17 år efter åbningen af første etape, får København atter nye metrotog. Og de ligner til forveksling de gamle. Alligevel er der tale om et helt nyt togsystem. MobilityTech har besøgt Metroselskabet.

2d


Climate change: Which vegan milk is best?

With sales of vegan foods on the rise, check the environmental impact of plant-based milks.

2d


Climate change: Will insect-eating dogs help?

A pet food manufacturer says switching to a dog food made of soldier flies will protect the environment.

1d


CO2-mængden stiger stadig: 2018 er blandt de varmeste år nogensinde registreret

Nye data bekræfter, at 2018 var det fjerde år i træk med exceptionelt varmt vejr. Samtidigt steg indholdet af CO2 i atmosfæren – igen.

2d


1d


Constant cravings: is addiction on the rise?

From sex to sugar to social media, people are in the grip of a wider range of compulsive behaviours. But what is driving them – and what can be done? Addiction was once viewed as an unsavoury fringe disease, tethered to substances with killer withdrawal symptoms, such as alcohol and opium. But now the scope of what humans can be addicted to seems to have snowballed, from sugar to shopping to soci

2d


Core set of genes explain why some animals stick to one mate at a time

Across a wide range of species, from mice to fish, a common set of genetic changes appear to be linked to monogamous behaviour

1d


Could a “brain drain” hit the U.S.?

Brain drain is a terrible phenomenon with a long and ignoble history. Recently, it has occurred in several countries that were doing well even a few years ago. Can it happen here? Many of us who have ever dared to complain about the place we live in have heard the juvenile rebuttal "If you don't like it, why don't you leave?" As it turns out, sometimes people take that advice. When a country's ed

1d


Cowi: Der er jord nok i København til de nye Holme

I alt regner Cowi med, at der skal bruges svimlende 23 millioner m3 jord til opfyldningen af de 3,1 millioner kvadratmeter store øer. Hvis det bliver svært at skaffe jord kan det true hele projektets businesscase.

2d


Crashing tidal waves may lurk beneath the surface of icy moons

Enceladus and Europa both have liquid oceans under their shells of ice, and they may be full of tidal waves bouncing energy between their cores and surfaces

2h


Curricular changes show success by fourth year

In a four-year study, a group of science faculty finds that student buy-in to a new curriculum, and therefore satisfaction, increases with each successive undergraduate cohort—and learning gains did not suffer. The researchers say the results of their longitudinal study should help encourage college faculty and administration to create, adapt, and support innovative courses for their students.

3h


Danske blodprøver skal afsløre luftforureningens konsekvenser

Et stort projekt på Aarhus Universitet skal koble tusindvis af blodprøver med partikelmålinger i hele landet. Målet er at finde den konkrete kobling mellem luftforurening og sygdom.

2d


Debussy’s Radical Search for Simplicity

In 1889, Achille-Claude Debussy, then in his mid-20s, was one of 30 million people to walk through the iron arches of the newly completed Eiffel Tower. Throughout that year, the arches served as the grand entryway to the Exposition Universelle , a world’s fair celebrating the cultural, technological, and colonial prowess of France a century after the revolution. A stunning variety of sights greet

1d


Decapitated Skeletons, with Heads Between Their Legs, Unearthed in Roman Cemetery

The discovery of a Roman cemetery in England has archaeologists scratching their heads.

1d


Der Spiegel Made Up Stories. How Can It Regain Readers’ Trust?

BERLIN—On the Wednesday before Christmas, Christoph Scheuermann apprehensively called up a 99-year-old former member of the anti-Nazi resistance who had been imprisoned during World War II. The Washington bureau chief of Der Spiegel , a German news magazine, needed to ask her a question no journalist wants to reckon with: Did his colleague, a now-disgraced star reporter, invent an interview with

1d


Device that works like a lung makes clean fuel from water

A device inspired by human lungs can split water into oxygen and hydrogen. If successfully scaled up it could help make clean fuel for hydrogen cars

1d


Did older Facebook users sharing fake news really help elect Trump?

Nearly 1 in 10 Facebook users shared fake news during the 2016 US election. Most were Republicans over 65, but we still don't know whether this influenced the result

1d


Disabled Researchers Are Vital to the Strength of Science

We need a more inclusive environment for scientists with life-altering conditions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h


Disconnect between brain's dopamine system and cocaine addiction

Researchers have revealed significant insight into cocaine addiction, a phenomenon which has grown significantly in the United States since 2015.

1d


Discovery adapts natural membrane to make hydrogen fuel from water

Scientists have combined two membrane-bound protein complexes to perform a complete conversion of water molecules to hydrogen and oxygen.

1d


Distant space rock Ultima Thule looks like a spinning bowling pin

NASA’s New Horizons probe has sent back the first blurry pictures of the most distant object we’ve ever visited

2h


Ditching Facebook could reduce stress but also make you less happy

People who took a five-day break from Facebook had a decreased level in the stress hormone cortisol, but also reported a lower life satisfaction

1d


Do Floppy-Eared Dogs Look Friendlier? The T.S.A. Thinks So

The T.S.A. said it favors floppy-eared dogs over pointy-eared dogs in airport jobs because floppy-eared dogs appear friendlier and less aggressive. There is a scientific explanation behind the perception.

1d


Do we really want a nationalistic future in space?

The annals of science fiction are full of visions of the future. Some are techno-utopian like "Star Trek" in which humanity has joined together in peace to explore the cosmos. Others are dystopian, like the World State in "Brave New World." But many of these stories share one thing in common – they envision a time in which humanity has moved past narrow ideas of tribe and nationalism. That assumpt

1d


Dogma of cancer metabolism theory overturned

Scientists have discovered that squamous cell skin cancers do not require increased glucose to power their development and growth, contrary to a long-held belief about cancer metabolism. The findings could bring about a better understanding of many cancers' metabolic needs and lead to the development of more effective therapies for squamous cell skin cancer and other forms of epithelial cancer.

2d


Dolphins have best friends but also shun those outside their clique

In a group of dolphins in the Adriatic sea, long-term friendships blossomed, but so did exclusive cliques where some dolphins shun each other

1d


Don’t believe the keto hype

Keto diets have attracted a lot of media attention lately, and are becoming quite the rage in wellness circles. But while it might make you lose weight in the short term, it's doing one heck of a number on your body. Fitness and nutrition expert Jillian Michaels walks us through why keto might be a no-no. The 6 Keys: Unlock Your Genetic Potential for Ageless Strength, Health, and Beauty List Pric

3d


Don’t panic about children’s screen time, try these tips instead

Alleged dangers of screen time have been exaggerated, worrying parents. Here are some guidelines to ensure screens are used positively, says paediatrician Max Davie

2h


Dr. Lewis L. Judd, Advocate of Brain Science, Dies at 88

At the National Institute of Mental Health, he helped put in place an ambitious research agenda focused on biology as the key to understanding psychiatric problems.

1d


Drones are causing airport chaos – why can't we stop them?

For the second time in less than a month a drone has shutdown an airport, here's why they wreak so much havoc and what would happen if one hit a plane

1d


Drug Overdose Death Rates in US Women Rise 260% in 2 Decades

Drug overdose death rates in women in the United States have increased by 260 percent in the past two decades, according to a new report.

1d


Drug sponge could minimize side effects of cancer treatment

With the help of sponges inserted in the bloodstream to absorb excess drugs, doctors are hoping to prevent the dangerous side effects of toxic chemotherapy agents or even deliver higher doses to knock back tumors, like liver cancer, that don't respond to more benign treatments.

2d


Earthquake Warning App ShakeAlertLA Debuts in Los Angeles

The app gives city residents a few seconds' warning when an earthquake hits. It's the first publicly available app to do so in the US.

2d


Earth's Sun Will Turn into a Pure Crystal Ball Before It Dies

Before a star dies, it first turns to crystal.

2d


Elephants take to the road for reliable resources

An elephant never forgets. This seems to be the case, at least, for elephants roaming about Namibia, looking for food, fresh water, and other resources.

2d


Elephants take to the road for reliable resources

Landscapes can change from day-to-day and year-to-year, and many animals will move about according to resource availability. But do they remember past resource conditions? Just how important is memory and spatial cognition when seeking to understand wildlife movement? Researchers in Etosha National Park, Namibia, examined this question through African elephants.

2d


Ella Kissi-Debrah 'pollution' death: Backing for new inquest

Nine-year-old Ella died from asthma but her family believe air pollution caused her health to fail.

10h


Endometriosis study 'sheds light on links to infertility' say scientists

South Korea and US teams say infertility could be linked to deficiency of a protein in womb A new study has cast light on why some women with endometriosis experience infertility, with scientists saying the finding could lead to new treatment options. Endometriosis is an inflammatory condition in which cells that usually form the lining of the uterus are present elsewhere, such as the ovaries, fa

2d


Essex little owls win wildlife photographer's affection

"I love their facial expressions," says wildlife cameraman Russell Savory.

12h


Even the Ancient Egyptians Had Homework, Preserved Tablet Shows

Thousands of years ago, young students still had to do their homework.

2d


Exercise produces irisin — irisin might prevent Alzheimer’s, researchers say

Irisin, a hormone in the human body that is generated by muscle tissue and is carried throughout the body in the bloodstream, can play a part in Alzheimer's onset and effects. In tests on mice, it has become clear that irisin plays a key part in memory and learning; the removal and subsequent adding back of the hormone showed dramatic changes in memory and learning. Researchers think a supplement

1d


Experimental antibody 'cocktail' protects animals from three deadly Ebola viruses

Scientists have developed a combination of monoclonal antibodies that protected animals from all three Ebola viruses that cause human disease. The antibody 'cocktail,' called MBP134, is the first experimental treatment to protect monkeys against Ebola virus (formerly known as Ebola Zaire), as well as Sudan virus and Bundibugyo virus, and could lead to a broadly effective therapeutic.

22h


Extinct Human Relative from 'Miracle' Excavation Moved Like a Chimp

Inner ear bones in an ancient human relative reveal how she moved.

1d


6h


Facing Legal Action, Insurer Now Will Cover People Taking Truvada, an H.I.V.-Prevention Drug

Regulators had accused Mutual of Omaha of denying policies to applicants, mostly gay men, who took medication to protect against the infection.

22h


Far-ranging fin whales find year-round residence in Gulf of California

Researchers from Mexico and the United States have concluded that a population of fin whales in the rich Gulf of California ecosystem may live there year-round — an unusual circumstance for a whale species known to migrate across ocean basins.

1d


Feature: How Beauty Is Making Scientists Rethink Evolution

The extravagant splendor of the animal kingdom can’t be explained by natural selection alone — so how did it come to be?

2d


Feds, states can help biochar live up to its soil-saving potential

Even though every dollar spent on soil improvement can save much more in environmental costs down the road, startup costs can sometimes make it hard for farmers to implement best environmental practices. A team of researchers from Rice and North Dakota State universities argues that this is especially true for using biochar, but that the problem can be addressed through well-designed policy.

6h


Finch's Bite Is 320 Times More Powerful Than T. Rex's

A T. rex's bite — for its body size — is outmatched by a tiny modern relative.

9h


Finding an elusive mutation that turns altruism into selfish behavior among honeybees

Among the social insects, bees have developed a strong and rich social network, where busy worker bees tend to the queen, who in turn, controls reproduction for the benefit of the hive.

3d


Finding an elusive mutation that turns altruism into selfish behavior among honeybees

For the first time, researchers have finally found the root cause responsible for thelytoky syndrome — which dramatically turns bees from altruistic helpers to selfish mercenaries.

2d


First evidence of gigantic remains from star explosions

Astrophysicists have found the first ever evidence of gigantic remains being formed from repeated explosions on the surface of a dead star in the Andromeda Galaxy, 2.5 million light years from Earth. The remains or "super-remnant" measures almost 400 light years across. For comparison, it takes just 8 minutes for light from the Sun to reach us.

2d


Fish farmers of the Caribbean

There are only so many fish in the sea. And our appetite for seafood has already stressed many wild fisheries to the breaking point. Meanwhile, the planet's growing population will only further increase the need for animal protein, one of the most resource-intensive types of food to produce.

1d


Five things to know about January's total lunar eclipse

This month's rare total eclipse will be the last one visible from the United States until 2022.

1d


Flippable DNA switches help bacteria resist antibiotics and are more common than thought

Bacteria have a number of well-known tricks available to them to adapt to changing environments, such as mutation and sharing snippets of DNA with each other. Less studied is a mechanism that allows bacteria to hedge their bets against rapid environmental changes by fine tuning their use of particular genes or pathways, a process known as "phase variation."

7h


Floating seabirds provide a novel way to trace ocean currents

Seabirds idly drifting with ocean currents provide a novel way to track and understand how these flows change with time and location.

1d


Flowers hear bees and make sweeter nectar when they’re buzzing nearby

Evening primrose flowers appear to be sensitive to the sounds of bees, increasing the sugar level of their nectar by 20 per cent when exposed to their buzzing

1d


For these birds, climate change spells a rise in fatal conflicts

Researchers have found yet another way in which climate change has been detrimental to migrating birds. As European winters have become warmer, pied flycatchers traveling from Africa to reach breeding grounds in the Netherlands are arriving to find that resident great tits have already claimed nesting sites for the season. As a result, the number of flycatchers killed in great tit nests has risen

1d


For these birds, climate change spells a rise in fatal conflicts

Researchers have found yet another way in which climate change has been detrimental to migrating birds. As European winters have become warmer, pied flycatchers traveling from Africa over long distances to reach breeding grounds in the Netherlands are arriving to find that resident great tits have already claimed nesting sites for the season. As a result, the number of flycatchers killed in great

1d


Ford Shuts Down Its Chariot Shuttle Service

Despite a change in strategy, the app-based service couldn't make its business work.

21h


Forsvarsministeren besvarer byge af spørgsmål om Huawei og sikkerhed – sådan da

Der er formelt kommet svar på en stribe spørgsmål om den kinesiske leverandør Huawei i relation til sikkerheden i dansk teleinfrastruktur.

1d


Future of planet-cooling tech: Study creates roadmap for geoengineering research

A new study sets out to establish a roadmap for responsible exploration of geoengineering.

3d


Gallup Poll: Labeling Sites May Help Stop Fake News Spread

A new Gallup survey suggests people are less likely to share stories from sites that are clearly marked as untrustworthy.

2d


Gamblers predicted Brexit before financial traders, study finds

International finance markets lagged behind punters having a flutter when it came to getting the Brexit result right on EU referendum night, according to research.

13h


Gel Packed with Chemical "Scavengers" Protects against Sarin Gas

Nanotech particles tucked into a gel coating can prevent poisoning by deadly organophosphates for a week or more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3d


Genes on the move help nose make sense of scents

The human nose can distinguish one trillion different scents—an extraordinary feat that requires 10 million specialized nerve cells, or neurons, in the nose, and a family of more than 400 dedicated genes. But precisely how these genes and neurons work in concert to pick out a particular scent has long puzzled scientists. This is in large part because the gene activity inside each neuron—where each

2d


Genes on the move help nose make sense of scents

With today's study, researchers have pinpointed a genomic mechanism by which a finite number of genes can ultimately help distinguish a seemingly near-infinite number of scents.

2d


Genetics may influence the effects of vitamin E on cancer risk

A new study has investigated whether taking vitamin E supplements could affect risk of cancer and found that genetic variations in the gene COMT influenced whether vitamin E decreased or increased risk of developing cancer during and after the study periods.

3d


Genome sequencing reveals disease risk in otherwise healthy babies

Sequencing the genomes of healthy newborns has helped identify genetic mutations that can result in childhood-onset diseases

2h


George the Snail, Believed to Be the Last of His Species, Dies at 14 in Hawaii

Scientists say George, an inch-long mollusk about 14 years old, was most likely the last of Achatinella apexfulva, a species of land snail that lived only in Hawaii.

1d


George the Snail, the Last and Loneliest of His Kind, Dies

George the snail won't be leaving any more silvery trails in his wake. The 14-year-old champ — the last known snail of his species — died in captivity on New Year's Day, 2019.

2d


Geoscientists reconstruct 'eye-opening' 900-year Northeast climate record

Deploying a new technique for the first time in the region, geoscientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have reconstructed the longest and highest-resolution climate record for the Northeastern United States, which reveals previously undetected past temperature cycles and extends the record 900 years into the past, well beyond the previous early date of 1850.

2d


Geoscientists reconstruct 'eye-opening' 900-year Northeastern U.S. climate record

Deploying a new technique for the first time in the region, geoscientists have reconstructed the longest and highest-resolution climate record for the Northeastern United States, which reveals previously undetected past temperature cycles and extends the record 900 years into the past, well beyond the previous early date of 1850.

1d


German airports brace for Thursday strike

Thousands of passengers in Germany face disruption on Thursday following a strike call by security staff at three major airports, the powerful Verdi union said.

2d


Giant 'Fatberg' of Grease and Baby Wipes Jams British Sewer

A 210-foot-long (64 meters) monster made from grease and used baby-wipes has clogged up a sewer in Sidmouth in southwestern England.

3d


Giant hi-tech tomato glasshouse set to produce millions of the fruit

The facility is set to produce 150 million tomatoes a year, helped by red LED lights and bees.

5h


Giant pattern discovered in the clouds of planet Venus

A Japanese research group has identified a giant streak structure among the clouds covering planet Venus based on observation from the spacecraft Akatsuki. The team also revealed the origins of this structure using large-scale climate simulations. The group was led by Project Assistant Professor Hiroki Kashimura (Kobe University, Graduate School of Science) and these findings were published on Jan

1d


Giant pattern discovered in the clouds of planet Venus

Astronomers have identified a giant streak structure among the clouds covering planet Venus based on observation from the spacecraft Akatsuki. The team also revealed the origins of this structure using large-scale climate simulations.

1d


Giving Cas9 an 'on' switch for better control of CRISPR gene editing

CRISPR-Cas9 is a revolutionary tool in part because of its versatility: created by bacteria to chew up viruses, it works equally well in human cells to do all sorts of genetic tricks, including cutting and pasting DNA, making pinpoint mutations and activating or inactivating a gene.

1d


Glass Is M. Night Shyamalan at His Weirdest

One of the greatest superhero movies of all time is Tim Burton’s Batman Returns , a bleak fantasia about three comic-book characters (Batman, Catwoman, and the Penguin) whose identities were forged in trauma, and whose costumed alter egos are exaggerated responses to that pain. Batman Returns came out in 1992, before the costumed-hero drama became Hollywood’s predominant genre. At the time, the m

1d


Good news: space bacteria (probably) aren’t evolving to destroy us

Space Microbes on ISS are changing their genes, but don’t worry. We’ve all read science fiction stories about a disease going rogue on a space ship, decimating the crew. While space holds plenty of other terrors, new research suggests…

1d


2d


Gopler invaderer havene: Forurening og klimaforandringer er guf for dem

Giftige blæregopler invaderer de australske kyster. Men også i Danmark får vi flere gopler i fremtiden.

1d


Government Shutdown Causes Slowdown In Scientific Research

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Keith Seitter, executive director of the American Meteorological Society, about the absence of federal scientists slows down life-saving research.

1d


Green light implant relieves urinary incontinence in rats

A device that modulates nerve signals by shining green light on them has been found to restore bladder control in rats that urinate too often

2h


Group of telescopes finds X-ray engine inside mysterious supernova

ESA's high-energy space telescopes Integral and XMM-Newton have helped to find a source of powerful X-rays at the centre of an unprecedentedly bright and rapidly evolving stellar explosion that suddenly appeared in the sky earlier this year.

10h


Græsbøffer og falske fisk: 5 fødevarer du kommer til at sætte tænderne i

I et nyt projekt skal græs forarbejdes til brug i fødevarer. Men græs er ikke det eneste, vi skal vænne os til at spise.

2d


Guardian's In-Car Camera Watches the Driver—And Everyone Else

Expect to see more systems like Guardian's Optical Cabin Control as cars start to drive themselves—and need to watch their masters.

10h


Hackers are stealing computer power to make millions in cryptocurrency

Cryptojacking uses other people's computer power to mine cryptocurrency, the technique has netted one hacker gang $18 million

6h


Hackers have leaked personal details of hundreds of German politicians

A significant data breach has exposed the personal information of chancellor Angela Merkel along with hundreds of other German politicians

2h


Hate lawyers? Can’t afford one? Blockchain smart contracts are here to help.

Mainstream online legal services are getting serious about using crypto to automate bits of what they do—and lower the bar to entry for us all.

3h


Having a second child worsens parents’ mental health: new research

Children are a wonderful gift, bringing joy, laughter, and love. But, then there are the toys, the sleepless nights, the constant barrage of “why?" questions and the plethora of sticky handprints. For many parents, the decision to have a second child is made with the expectation that two can't be more work than one. But our research on Australian parents shows this logic is flawed: second childre

3d


Health Misinformation Is Rampant on Instagram

When it comes to health advice, don’t take Instagram’s word for it. The platform is rampant with misinformation about wellness, argues the Atlantic staff writer Amanda Mull. Behind many fads are Instagram influencers with perceived authority on health and wellness—the majority of whom have no real nutritional training or expertise. Take celery juice, for example. In the latest Atlantic Argument,

1d


Here’s how the government shutdown could affect your health

Health Some agencies that keep us healthy have run out of money, or will run out soon. The United States is rolling into the third week with a partially shutdown government, with no signs of a re-opening any time soon. Thousands of federal employees are…

2d


Holographic color printing for optical security

Researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have invented a new type of anti-counterfeiting technology called holographic colour prints for securing important documents such as identity cards, passports and banknotes. The research team led by Associate Professor Joel Yang demonstrated an optical device that appears as a regular colour print under white light, but proj

2d


Holy cow! Mysterious blast studied with NASA telescopes

A brief and unusual flash spotted in the night sky on June 16, 2018, puzzled astronomers and astrophysicists across the globe. The event—called AT2018cow and nicknamed "the Cow" after the coincidental final letters in its official name—is unlike any celestial outburst ever seen before, prompting multiple theories about its source.

10h


Hormone therapy may be best defense against knee osteoarthritis

There is an ongoing debate regarding the relationship between knee osteoarthritis and hormone therapy (HT), with small-scale studies providing mixed results. A new large-scale study from Korea shows that women receiving HT had a significantly lower prevalence of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis compared with women who did not take hormones.

3d


House plants don’t clean your air that much – but this GM pothos might

The air-cleaning properties of house plants have been over-hyped. A GM house plant that breaks down indoor pollutants linked to cancer may do a better job

1d


How Astounding Saw the Future

Tracing the evolution of the mid-20th-century magazine whose pages gave rise to the genre of science fiction.

1d


How Chummy Are Junk Food Giants and China’s Health Officials? They Share Offices.

A life sciences institute funded by Coca-Cola and other multinational beverage and snack companies even has offices inside the government’s health ministry.

1d


How common pain relievers may promote Clostridium difficile infections

Clostridium difficile causes the most common and most dangerous hospital-born infections in the United States and around the world. People treated with antibiotics are at heightened risk because those drugs disturb the microbial balance of the gut, but observational studies have also identified a link between severe C. difficile infections and use of NSAIDs, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug

3d


How Did 'Miracle' Man Come Back from Dangerous Brain Swelling?

Doctors thought their patient had experienced a stroke. Fortunately, they were wrong.

3d


How Divorces Work for the Super-Wealthy

On Wednesday, Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon and currently the richest person in the world , and MacKenzie Bezos, a novelist, announced that they are ending their marriage after 25 years . In a joint statement posted on Twitter , the couple said they see “wonderful futures ahead, as parents, friends, partners in ventures and projects, and as individuals pursuing ventures and adventures.” One s

1d


How dynamite became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst explains how dynamite became a million dollar idea.

6h


How fast fashion hurts environment, workers, society

The overabundance of fast fashion—readily available, inexpensively made clothing—has created an environmental and social justice crisis, claims a new paper from an expert on environmental health at Washington University in St. Louis.

1d


How India's smartphone revolution is creating a new generation of readers and writers | Chiki Sarkar

India has the second largest population of any country in the world — yet it has only 50 decent bookstores, says publisher Chiki Sarkar. So she asked herself: How do we get more people reading books? Find out how Sarkar is tapping into India's smartphone revolution to create a new generation of readers and writers in this fun talk about a fresh kind of storytelling.

3d


How James Baldwin’s Writings About Love Evolved

A notable contender this awards season, Barry Jenkins’s film If Beale Street Could Talk is an exquisite adaptation of James Baldwin’s novel about black intimacy against the backdrop of white racism. The movie also offers viewers a chance to reflect on the work of an author who is as indispensable today as he was in his own lifetime. Baldwin’s literary career spanned four decades, from 1947 to 198

2d


How microbial communities thrive in hydraulically fractured shale wells

In survival game shows, contestants are whisked away to a foreign location, where they face unfamiliar stresses. To stay in the game, they must adapt to the surroundings and often need to work together with fellow competitors.

7h


How Tech Shaped 'The Scream,' 'The Kiss,' and 'American Gothic'

These three iconic historical paintings pulse with intense anxieties about electricity, hematology, and astronomy.

2d


How the Middling Green Book Became an Oscars Front-Runner

The Oscars have always been the guardians of mainstream film taste, for better and for worse. The definition of a “prestige movie,” a term often deployed with derision, is a film made to attract the votes of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) and that thus often tries to win the broadest consensus possible from a group that trends old, white, and male. This approach explains

6h


How the Nazi’s inhumane parenting guidelines may still be affecting German children

In 1934, a German pulmonologist wrote a book that contained child-rearing advice that promoted extreme forms of neglect in order to encourage toughness in children. The Nazis later incorporated these principles into a mothers' training program that millions of German women undertook. Some German therapists suggest that the effects of these harsh parenting styles are still being felt by German adu

2d


How to be a good parent to artificial intelligence

Until we can design a mind that's superhuman and flawless, we'll have to settle for instilling plain old human values into artificial intelligence. But how to do this in a world where values are constantly evolving? Many of our life choices today would be considered immoral by people in the Middle Ages — or even the 1970s, says Ben Goertzel, whose family personally experienced the sad state of LG

2d


How to build a 3-D-printed particle trap with free CERN schematics

CERN is synonymous with accelerators, designed to boost particles to close to the speed of light. But what if you want to slow down a particle and hold it in place while you study it? Particle traps are devices that use electromagnetic fields to suspend particles – macroscopic or elementary – in stasis long enough to do so. At CERN, experiments such as GBAR use ion traps to capture antihydrogen io

1d


How to reduce light pollution, an underestimated threat to our environment

DIY With the lights out, it's less dangerous. Light pollution damages our health, environment, and way of life in ways that often go unnoticed. Here’s what you can do to help fix it.

8h


How to Train for a Long-Distance Race

Whether it is a full marathon or a 10K, training for a race can have less than desirable consequences if you are not prepared — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2d


How today's high school cliques compare to yesterday's

Changing demographics, cultural influences and the increasing number of college-bound youth have led to the emergence of new peer groups and perceptions among adolescents.

3d


How trees and turnips grow fatter

Two international research teams have identified key regulatory networks controlling how plants grow 'outwards', which could help us to grow trees to be more efficient carbon sinks and increase vegetable crop yields.

2d


How will we travel to another star?

Eventually, humanity will want to travel to a new solar system to propagate the human race, explore, and maybe find signs of alien life. But our closest neighbor, Proxima Centauri, is so far away that current methods could take tens of thousands of years. How will we surmount this incredible distance and the other challenges associated with interstellar travel? None Alpha Centauri, the closest st

18h


How worm blobs behave like a liquid and a solid

Blobs of worms flow like a fluid, plop like a solid and fascinate scientists.

4h


Hubble and the government are broken at the same time, and that's a problem

Space A lack of personnel makes the problem more precarious. Hubble has always had hiccups here and there, but the government shutdown makes this problem more precarious than usual.

2d


Hubble loses best camera but discovers brightest ever quasar

Nasa working on fix after space telescope’s wide-field camera broke down The Hubble space telescope is operating without its best camera after a hardware problem forced it to shut down. Nasa said the camera stopped working on Tuesday but three other science instruments were still operating and able to continue celestial observations. Continue reading…

1d


Hubble Telescope camera breaks – and US shutdown might delay repair

The wide-field camera on the Hubble Space Telescope has developed a fault – just as key NASA staff are unable to work because of the US government shutdown

1d


Hubbles bedste kamera er gået i stykker

Fejlretning forsinkes af nedlukningen af den amerikanske statsadministration.

1d


Humpback Whales Plagiarize the Tunes of Other Whales (Even Oceans Away)

Humpback whales aren't just talented singers, they learn and steal each other's' songs.

2d


Ice from the Alps reveals Europeans ditched gold for silver in AD 660

The people of north-west Europe embraced a silver currency instead of gold in the seventh century, and this may have fuelled a post-Roman economic boom

2h


Identifying lower-energy neutrinos with a liquid-argon particle detector

An experiment at the Department of Energy's Fermilab has made a significant advance in the detection of neutrinos that hide themselves at lower energies.

2d


If you want to remember an event, don't take a picture

Science Selfies could be subtly reshaping your memory. For many people, taking hundreds, if not thousands, of pictures is now a crucial part of going on holiday – documenting every last detail and posting it on social…

3d


Ignore 5G, for Now

Want the super-fast mobile speeds promised by 5G technology? Come back in a year.

2d


Illuminating women's role in the creation of medieval manuscripts

During the European Middle Ages, literacy and written texts were largely the province of religious institutions. Richly illustrated manuscripts were created in monasteries for use by members of religious institutions and by the nobility. Some of these illuminated manuscripts were embellished with luxurious paints and pigments, including gold leaf and ultramarine, a rare and expensive blue pigment

2d


Image of the Day: What We've Dumped

Researchers collected trash that washed up at Gulf Coast shoreline sites over two years. Most of it was plastic.

1d


Image of the Day: Wisdom Teeth Lost

A study of tiny monkey skulls and teeth suggests that shrinking body size didn’t crowd out wisdom teeth during evolution.

2d


Immigrant kids in U.S. deliberately build STEM skills

US immigrant children study more math and science in high school and college, which leads to their greater presence in STEM careers, according to new findings.

3d


Immune system's front-line defense freezes bacteria in their tracks

In the moments leading up to assault by a short, peculiar peptide, the bacteria are happily growing, their DNA jiggling around the cell in the semi-random motions characteristic of life.

10h


In Photos: Ancient Stone Monument Discovered in Scotland

This stone circle near the village of Alford, west of Aberdeen, may turn out to be one of the last such monumental structures to be found in Scotland.

2d


In the Middle East, Is Trump the Anti-Obama or Obama 2.0?

During a visit on Thursday to the nerve center of the Arab world, Mike Pompeo declared that reports of America’s departure from the Middle East under Donald Trump had been greatly exaggerated, and that it was Barack Obama who had abandoned the region—to devastating effect. And yet the irony is that while the conduct of Obama and Trump in the Middle East couldn’t be more different, they’ve in fact

1d


Income equality is getting worse. Can the co-op model solve this problem?

The cooperative model accounts for $154B every year in America. America leads the world with cooperatives, with over 30,000 businesses operating under this model. Co-op advocate Nathan Schneider believes this model can help level the economic playing field. What is a Co-operative? Nathan Schneider plays a game at strip malls. The activist-journalist and University of Colorado Boulder media studie

2d


Influenzasæsonen er over os – men den bliver formentlig mildere i år

Ledende overlæge spår en mildere influenzasæson i år, men influenza kan dog være uforudsigelig.

6h


Inhaled RNA Might Help Heal Cystic Fibrosis

Scientists are working to correct a genetic defect in cystic fibrosis patients by having them inhale RNA. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2d


Intelligent males may make female birds swoon: study

Male birds are often the ones with the most vibrant feathers, or the most elaborate songs, but researchers said Thursday that what female birds could really appreciate is a male who shows his intelligence.

1d


Intermittent fasting could improve obese women's health

Research shows that obese women lost more weight and improved their health by fasting intermittently while following a strictly controlled diet.

3d


Interstellar objects like 'Oumuamua probably crash into the sun every 30 years

On October 19th, 2017, the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System-1 (Pan-STARRS-1) in Hawaii announced the first-ever detection of an interstellar object, named 1I/2017 U1 (aka. 'Oumuamua). In the months that followed, multiple follow-up observations were conducted to learn more about this visitor, as well as resolve the dispute about whether it was a comet and an asteroid.

9h


Intimacy in the Early Days of Online Dating

August 2011. Gus, a 19-year-old homeschooled Christian from Joliet, Illinois, is trawling Facebook. He’s just recovered from a debilitating bout of depression, and he’s looking for someone to talk to. Through an online personality test, he finds a match: Jiyun, a 20-year-old from Korea, who moved to New York City with her family for her brother’s cancer treatment. Gus messages her, and they begin

3d


Is Stunning an Animal Before Slaughter More Humane? Some Religious Leaders Say No

Two regions of Belgium are banning kosher and halal slaughter, arguing that not using stunning is cruel. But Jewish and Muslim leaders say their traditions minimize an animal’s suffering.

2d


It looks like dark matter can be heated up and moved around

Look at a galaxy, what do you see? Probably lots of stars. Nebulae too. And that's probably it. A whole bunch of stars and gas in a variety of colorful assortments; a delight to the eye. And buried among those stars, if you looked carefully enough, you might find planets, black holes, white dwarves, asteroids, and all sorts of assorted chunky odds and ends. The usual galactic milieu.

9h


It’s Easier Than Ever to Log Your Kid’s Data—But Should You?

Meet the quantified kid: More gadgets let you track data from before birth and into their teens. But it probably won’t make you a better parent.

1d


Japan’s plan to resume commercial whaling could actually help whales

Japan’s move is bad news for whales within its waters, but spells the end of high seas whaling, says Matthew Collis

2h


Jeff Bezos' Divorce Could Cost Him Billions in Amazon Stock

Also: The new Dune movie has found its villain, and Lady Gaga wants her R. Kelly collaboration to step off of streaming services.

1d


Juul’s Answer to Its PR Crisis? The Millennial Marlboro Man

E-cigarette maker Juul will air TV ads beginning later this year.

2d


Kamala Harris’s Political Memoir Is an Uneasy Fit for the Digital Era

Depending on whom you ask, Kamala Harris is either a hip Hillary Clinton or a political Beyoncé . Since the election of Donald Trump, the 54-year-old California senator has emerged as one of the Democratic Party’s most visible, viral faces. In addition to speaking frequently about the ills of discrimination of any sort, the former prosecutor has of late courted a liberal fandom—and many retweets—

6h


Keep a Daily Planner in 2019—for Yourself and Nobody Else

Does your planner need to be Insta-worthy? No. But a decorative, multi-colored, stickered planner just might help you love your to-do list.

2d


Ketogenic supplements delay tonic-clonic seizures without dietary restrictions

Researchers have discovered supplementing a normal, carbohydrate-rich diet with specific ketogenic agents may significantly delay tonic-clonic seizures caused by exposure to high levels of oxygen.

3d


Lady Gaga’s R. Kelly Apology Is a Reminder That Abuse Isn’t Provocative

Lady Gaga lies on an operating table, R. Kelly reaches under her sheet and toward her groin, and Gaga moans. Sedatives kick in, and Kelly and a crew of scantily clad nurses start gyrating on her sleeping body. Yikes. So went the leaked footage from the never-released music video for Gaga’s 2013 single “Do What U Want.” At the time of its production, a source who’d seen the footage—which was shot

2h


Lassen Volcanic National Park: The West’s Most Beautiful, Least-Visited Wonderland (Photos)

The national park is full of steaming vents, snowy trails, diverse wildlife, colorful wildflowers and heavenly night-sky views.

2d


Last flu season was historically bad. Here's how this year's is shaping up.

Health An update as kids and adults alike head back after the holiday break. Last year’s season was historically bad, both in terms of the total number of folks who fell ill and the total number of people who died.

2d


Lawsuit Claims Google Board Covered Up Sexual Misconduct

An Alphabet shareholder takes aim at exit payments to executives who had been accused of harassment, including a $90 million package for Andy Rubin.

23h


Leafcutter ants emit as much N2O as wastewater treatment tanks

Tropical forests are one of the largest natural sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O), and a tiny insect may play a big role in how those emissions are spread out across the landscape.

1d


Leafcutter ants emit as much N2O as wastewater treatment tanks

Tropical forests are one of the largest natural sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O), and a tiny insect may play a big role in how those emissions are spread out across the landscape.

2d


Leafcutter ants have their own landfill sites that emit greenhouse gas

Ants that grow fungi inside their nests also make their own landfills – and these release significant amounts of nitrous oxide

2h


Less than a year after launch, TESS is already finding bizarre worlds

The TESS exoplanet hunter has spotted eight confirmed worlds in its first four months, and several of them are really weird.

3d


Let Them Eat Vacation Days

From the PBS account on Twitter . This evening on the PBS Newshour, the chair of the White House’s Council of Economic Advisors, Kevin Hassett, said this about workers who are going without pay as the government shutdown nears its fourth week: Right now about 25% of government workers are furloughed. Which means that they are not allowed to go to work. But then when the shutdown ends, they go bac

19h


Letter: ‘No American Will Be Untouched by This Shutdown’

Why Federal Workers Still Have to Show Up Even If They’re Not Being Paid Since the enactment of the Taft-Hartley Act in 1947, Russell Berman wrote on Wednesday, federal employees have been legally prohibited from striking—which means that during a government shutdown, hundreds of thousands of federal workers who are not on furlough must continue working without pay, indefinitely. My husband is a

1d


Lifting the veil on star formation in the Orion Nebula

The stellar wind from a newborn star in the Orion Nebula prevents more new stars from forming nearby. That is the result of new research conducted by an international research team led by the University of Cologne (Germany) and the University of Leiden (Netherlands) using NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA).

1d


Little Foot's inner ear sheds light on her movement and behaviour

MicroCT scans of the 3.67-million-year-old Australopithecus fossil known as Little Foot shed some light on how she lived and moved.

2d


Longleat koala Wilpena put down after kidney disease

Wilpena was one of five koalas to arrive from Australia as part of a conservation programme.

2d


Lost 'Darwinia' islands could be origin of species in the Galapagos

Millions of years before the Galapagos existed, another island chain may have shaped the evolution of the unusual wildlife that later inspired Charles Darwin

1d


Magellanic Clouds prove it's never too late to get active

Wondering about that New Year's Resolution to get more exercise?

2d


Maggots Will Soon Be Sent to War Zones to Heal the Injured

Maggots can be creepy, crawly and … medicinal?

23h


Malaria vaccine passes test in humans

A vaccine against fatal pregnancy malaria shows promising results in the first tests in humans. The new study has taken a vaccine all the way from discovery of a mechanism through development and production to clinical trials in humans.

1d


Manafort’s Own Lawyers May Have Hastened His Downfall

When Paul Manafort’s lawyers accidentally revealed sensitive information about his contacts with a suspected Russian spy on Tuesday because of a redacting snafu, it wasn’t merely a blip. Rather, it was the latest in a series of apparent missteps the legal team for President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman has made in the nearly two years that it’s been defending the 69-year-old operative

2d


Massive space rock smash-up with Uranus recreated in a riot of colour

Uranus was probably tilted on its side by a giant impact when it was young, and a detailed new simulation of this process is a riot of swirling colours

2h


Maternal programming during pregnancy induces long-term postpartum obesity

In a new study using a mouse model, researchers suggest that long-term postpartum weight gain may be due not so much to retained fat as to reprogramming of maternal energy metabolism.

3d


Maternal stress leads to overweight in children

Researchers were able to identify mother's perceived stress during the first year of the child's life as a risk factor for developing overweight in infancy. Researchers found this to have long-lasting effects on girls' weight development in particular.

1d


Mathematicians Discovered a Computer Problem that No One Can Ever Solve

Researchers working on machine learning have discovered a problem that no one, anywhere in the universe, will ever be able to solve.

9h


Mechanism for impaired allergic inflammation in infants may explain hygiene hypothesis

New research describes a mechanism in a mouse model of asthma that supports the hygiene hypothesis — researchers found that infant mice need a higher exposure to a bacterial endotoxin, compared to adult mice, to avoid developing asthma-like reactions to house dust mites. The hygiene hypothesis suggests that decreased exposure to microbial products in industrialized nations is the main driver of i

1d


Medical marketing has skyrocketed in the past two decades, while oversight remains limited

Researchers have reviewed medical marketing (the marketing of prescription drugs, disease awareness, laboratory tests and health services to consumers and professionals) over a 20-year period from 1997 through 2016 and found that while it had increased dramatically from about $17.7 billion to $29.9 billion, regulation has not.

1d


Medieval dental plaque suggests women played important role as scribes

A rare blue pigment found in a medieval woman's teeth adds to the idea that many scribes at the time were women

1d


Megapixels: New Hubble image offers a detailed look at the Triangulum Galaxy

Space It contains a whopping 665 million pixels. NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has recorded plenty of breathtaking images of the cosmos in the last decade or two.

2d


Men and women remember pain differently

Scientists increasingly believe that one of the driving forces in chronic pain — the number one health problem in both prevalence and burden — appears to be the memory of earlier pain. Research suggests that there may be variations, based on sex, in the way that pain is remembered in both mice and humans.

1d


Metabolite produced by gut microbiota from pomegranates reduces inflammatory bowel disease

The microbial metabolite, Urolithin A, derived from a compound found in berries and pomegranates, can reduce and protect against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Urolithin A (UroA) and its synthetic counterpart, UAS03, mitigate IBD by increasing proteins that tighten epithelial cell junctions in the gut and reducing gut inflammation in animal models. Tight junctions in the gut barrier prevent ina

2d


Michael Atiyah, Mathematician in Newton’s Footsteps, Dies at 89

One of the 20th century’s leading mathematical theorists, he revealed a connection between math and physics not seen since the 17th century.

53min


Millions of years ago a massive whale-eating whale roamed the seas

Huge sharp-toothed whales lived in the oceans million of years ago. An analysis of stomach contents suggests the species was top of the food chain

1d


'Missing' galactic mergers come to light with new technique

Galaxy mergers—in which two galaxies join together over billions of years in sometimes-dramatic bursts of light—aren't always easy for astronomers to spot. Now, scientists from the University of Colorado Boulder have developed a new technique for finding these cosmic couplings in surveys of the night sky.

3d


'Missing' galactic mergers come to light with new technique

Researchers have developed a new technique for finding galaxy mergers — events in which two galaxies join together in sometimes-dramatic bursts of light.

2d


Missing Galaxies? Now There’s Too Many

Gaze skyward from the Southern Hemisphere and it’s hard to miss the Large Magellanic Cloud. The fact that it looks like one of the Milky Way’s spiral arms, albeit smaller, reveals that it’s a small galaxy roughly 30,000 light-years across with a few billion stars. Indeed, any small telescope will show that it’s scattered with glowing nebulae that are punctured by dark dollops of dust. And it isn’

2d


Moonlight influences opening and closing of oysters' shells

Molluscs not only have tidal and circadian clocks but are attuned to lunar rhythms, experts say The gentle glow of moonlight on water has moved musicians, poets and painters – and, it turns out, molluscs. Researchers have discovered the opening and shutting of oysters’ shells appears to be tied to the lunar cycle. Biological clocks have intrigued scientists for centuries, and researchers in the f

2d


More stable light comes from intentionally 'squashed' quantum dots

Intentionally "squashing" colloidal quantum dots during chemical synthesis creates dots capable of stable, "blink-free" light emission that is fully comparable with the light produced by dots made with more complex processes. The squashed dots emit spectrally narrow light with a highly stable intensity and a non-fluctuating emission energy. New research at Los Alamos National Laboratory suggests t

1d


More Trouble for the Hubble Telescope as a Primary Camera Malfunctions

Last year a gyroscope died, now there’s a camera glitch. That’s just the telescope “aging gracefully,” the mission director said.

1d


Murky water keeps fish on edge

Fish become anxious and more cautious when water quality is degraded by sediment, an effect that could stunt their growth and damage their health.

1d


Nanocrystals get better when they double up with MOFs

Out of the box, crystalline MOFs (metal-organic frameworks) look like ordinary salt crystals. But MOFs are anything but ordinary crystals – deep within each crystalline "grain" lies an intricate network of thin, molecular cages that can pull harmful gas emissions like carbon dioxide from the air, and contain them for a really long time.

1d


Nanometer-sized tubes made from simple benzene molecules

For the first time, researchers used benzene, a common hydrocarbon, to create a novel kind of molecular nanotube, which could lead to new nanocarbon-based semiconductor applications.

1d


NASA probe will hurtle past the most distant object we’ve ever visited

In 2015, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft whizzed past Pluto. Now it is about to arrive at Ultima Thule, a tiny space rock 6.6 billion kilometres away from Earth

1d


Nature's magnifying glass reveals unexpected intermediate mass exoplanets

Astronomers have found a new exoplanet that could alter the standing theory of planet formation. With a mass that's between that of Neptune and Saturn, and its location beyond the 'snow line' of its host star, an alien world of this scale was supposed to be rare.

3d


Nerve cells from people with autism grow unusually big and fast

In some forms of autism, nerve cells develop faster than normal, possibly setting the stage for the disorder, a study finds.

11h


New App Uses Sonar to Detect Opioid Overdoses

The technology utilizes smartphone speakers and microphone to monitor breathing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h


'New' apple and pear varieties found in Wales

About 200 trees were DNA-tested to find and preserve unrecorded varieties unique to Wales.

2d


New computer modeling approach could improve understanding of megathrust earthquakes

Years before the devastating Tohoku earthquake struck the coast of Japan in 2011, the Earth's crust near the site of the quake was starting to stir. Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin are using computer models to investigate if tiny tremors detected near this site could be connected to the disaster itself.

1d


New CRISPR-based technology developed to control pests with precision-guided genetics

Using the CRISPR gene editing tool, researchers have developed a new way to control and suppress populations of insects, potentially including those that ravage agricultural crops and transmit deadly diseases. The 'precision-guided sterile insect technique' alters key genes that control insect sex determination and fertility. When pgSIT eggs are introduced into targeted populations, only adult ste

3d


New policy design needed to tackle global environmental threat, according to report

A pioneering new report has devised a seven-point plan to help policymakers devise new, coherent and collaborative strategies to tackle the greatest global environmental threats.

8h


New role for brain's support cells in controlling circadian rhythms

A new study has found that astrocytes, previously thought of as just supporting neurons in regulating circadian rhythms, can actually lead the tempo of the body's internal clock and have been shown for the first time to be able to control patterns of daily behavior in mammals.

21h


New technique offers rapid assessment of radiation exposure

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new technique that allows them to assess radiation exposure in about an hour using an insulator material found in most modern electronics. The technique can be used to triage medical cases in the event of a radiological disaster.

2d


NHS 10-year-plan aims to expand digital healthcare and genetic testing

A plan for the future of the National Health Service in England aims to improve mental health services and provide genome sequencing for all children with cancer

1d


Ocean Cleanup's Plastic Catcher Is Busted. So What Now?

First, the 600-meter-long plastic catcher didn't catch plastic. Then it split in two. What is the right way, then, to cleanse our oceans of the plastic menace?

2d


3h


Opioid overdoses could be prevented by an app that listens to breathing

Many overdoses don’t have to be fatal if they’re caught in time. A new app can identify when you might be in trouble and call for help.

2d


Our Future in Space Will Echo Our Future on Earth

A spacefaring civilization can be expected to transform its home planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d


Overtones can provide faster data communication

For the first time, researchers have succeeded in producing what are known as spin wave overtones. The technology paves the way for increasing the data transmission rate of wireless communication.

1d


Oxygen migration at the heterostructure interface

NUS physicists have developed a methodology to control the electromigration of oxygen atoms in the buried interfaces of complex oxide materials for constructing high mobility oxide heterostructures.

8h


Paint specks in tooth tartar illuminate a medieval woman’s artistry

Tooth tartar unveils an expert female manuscript painter buried at a German monastery.

2d


Paul Manafort Is Bad at Basic Tech, From Passwords to PDFs

The former Trump campaign chair keeps getting in trouble thanks at least in part to subpar digital security.

2d


Paul Whelan Isn’t a Spy, and Putin Knows It

To say that the Cold War shaped Russian President Vladimir Putin and the 21st-century Kremlin is an understatement. Putin has consistently used the skills and contacts he developed during his KGB career to cement control internally and battle foes abroad. Putin describes himself as a proud “Chekist,” referring to Lenin’s bloody, repressive, and brutal secret police, and celebrates the organizatio

1d


Perceptions of chronic fatigue syndrome in the emergency department

Findings from a novel online questionnaire of people with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) suggest the majority of these patients do not receive proper care, say researchers.

20h


Photo Gallery: A Family's Nuclear Legacy, Etched in Silver

Michael Koerner's collodion "chemigrams" reveal a lifetime of inherited genetic mutations.

2d


Photos of the Week: Denver Longhorns, Camel Shaving, Hero Pups

Heavy snow across Central Europe, a partial solar eclipse in China, the Procession of the Black Nazarene in Manila, a sheep rescue in Turkey, the 2019 Dakar Rally in Peru, Carnival season in Spain, a Transformer on the streets of Bogota, a frozen harbor in China, the Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills, Christmas fire in Saint Petersburg, and much more

3h


Photos: Decapitated Romans Found in Ancient Cemetery

A fourth century A.D. Roman cemetery in England has more than a dozen decapitated bodies in it, a new excavation reveals.

1d


Plants Can Hear Animals Using Their Flowers

When people pose the old question about whether a tree falling in an empty forest makes a sound , they presuppose that none of the other plants in the forest are listening in. Plants, supposedly, are silent and unhearing. They don’t make noises, unless rustled or bitten. When Rachel Carson described a spring bereft of birds, she called it silent . But these stereotypes may not be true. According

1d


Poison toilet paper reveals how termites help rainforests resist drought

Novel use of poisoned toilet paper rolls and teabags led to discovery that termites help tropical forests resist droughts.

1d


Psychology Has a New Approach to Building Healthier Men

This week, the American Psychological Association, the country’s largest professional organization of psychologists, did something for men that it’s done for many other demographic groups in the past: It introduced a set of detailed guidelines for clinicians who treat men and boys. The 10 guidelines make suggestions on how to encourage fathers to engage with their kids, how to address problems th

1d


Quantum computing explained in 10 minutes | Shohini Ghose

A quantum computer isn't just a more powerful version of the computers we use today; it's something else entirely, based on emerging scientific understanding — and more than a bit of uncertainty. Enter the quantum wonderland with TED Fellow Shohini Ghose and learn how this technology holds the potential to transform medicine, create unbreakable encryption and even teleport information.

6h


Quantum: Handover for fully flexible satellite

UK engineers complete the build of a novel software-defined telecoms satellite called Quantum.

1d


R. Kelly and the Cost of Black Protectionism

There is still so much to unpack about Lifetime’s docuseries Surviving R. Kelly , a horrifying six-part examination of the sexual-abuse allegations that have followed the superstar singer for more than two decades. The stories of predation told by the women who appear on-screen—some of whom were related to people who worked for Kelly—are vomit-inducing. The heart sinks as one survivor after anoth

2h


Rabbits that don't eat their own faeces are small and weak

We know that rabbits eat some of their own faeces – they may do so in order to better metabolise their food so they can grow larger

1d


Radio Atlantic: How to Fix Social Media

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play Social-media platforms once promised to connect the world. Today’s digital communities, though, often feel like forces for disunity. Anger and discord in 2018 seemed only amplified by the social-media institutions that now dictate our conversations. Executive Editor Matt Thompson sits down with the staff writer Alexis

22h


Radio wave bursts from space keep hitting Earth and we don't know why

Astronomers have found 13 more fast radio bursts from space, and one is only the second seen to repeat – which could help us figure out what creates the mysterious signals

1d


Rare gemstone particles found in an 8th-century nun's mouth shatter a historical misconception

It turns out medieval religious manuscripts were not exclusively the domain of male monks. Fleck of a rare gemstone pigment in fossilized teeth prove women were involved in the making of religious manuscripts. We'll never see these exquisite books the same way again. Surviving medieval religious manuscripts can be quite beautiful, with impeccable calligraphy and adorned with intricately detailed

4h


Rare metals from e-waste

This year, beautifully wrapped laptops, mobile phones or even new TV sets lay under Christmas trees. They are enthusiastically put into use—and the old electronic devices are disposed of. The e-waste contains resources such as neodymium, indium and gold. What happens to the valuable materials? And how much rare metal is contained in mobile phones, computers and monitors that are still in use today

1d


Rare Stonehenge-Like Monument in Scotland Has Single 'Recumbent' Stone

The exquisite stone circle may be 4,500 years old and is located in a remote patch of farmland in a Scottish village.

2d


Reconstruction of trilobite ancestral range in the southern hemisphere

The first appearance of trilobites in the fossil record dates to 521 million years ago in the oceans of the Cambrian Period, when the continents were still inhospitable to most life forms. Few groups of animals adapted as successfully as trilobites, which were arthropods that lived on the seabed for 270 million years until the mass extinction at the end of the Permian approximately 252 million yea

1d


Regningen for Niels Bohr Bygningen stiger med 150-185 mio. kr.

OPDATERET: Teknikentreprenøren Inabensa har ifølge Vejdirektoratet begået flere fejl i arbejdet på Niels Bohr Bygningen, end det tidligere har været fremme. Derfor ser skandalebyggeriet nu ud til at blive endnu dyrere.

2d


Reimagining information processing

Because technology is a part of our everyday lives, it may be difficult to imagine what the future of technology will look like, let alone what it has the potential of accomplishing.

2d


Research explains public resistance to vaccination

A new study explains why it is so hard to increase public vaccination levels even when evidence indicates that vaccines are safe and beneficial.

2d


Research fosters communication between smart buildings and people

Researchers found people connect better with a computer-generated avatar that represents building management — and small talk helped, too.

22h


Researchers correct genetic mutation that causes IPEX, a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome

Researchers have created a method for modifying blood stem cells to reverse the genetic mutation that causes a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome called IPEX.

20h


Researchers develop bioinspired nanoscale drug delivery method

Washington State University researchers have developed a novel way to deliver drugs and therapies into cells at the nanoscale without causing toxic effects that have stymied other such efforts.

1d


Researchers overcome hurdle in CRISPR gene editing for muscular dystrophy

The gene editing technique known as CRISPR is a revolutionary approach to treating inherited diseases. However, the tool has yet to be used to effectively treat long-term, chronic conditions. A research team has identified and overcome a barrier in CRISPR gene editing that may lay the foundation for sustained treatments using the technique.

2d


Respiratory microbiome may influence your susceptibility to flu

Specific respiratory microbiome communities may be linked to influenza susceptibility, according to a new study.

1d


Rice plants engineered to be better at photosynthesis make more rice

A new bioengineering approach for boosting photosynthesis in rice plants could increase grain yield by up to 27%, according to a study publishing January 10 in the journal Molecular Plant. The approach, called GOC bypass, enriches plant cells with CO2 that would otherwise be lost through a metabolic process called photorespiration. The genetically engineered plants were greener and larger and show

1d


Risky decisions: Excessive social media use is comparable to drug addiction

Bad decision-making is a trait oftentimes associated with drug addicts and pathological gamblers, but what about people who excessively use social media? New research shows a connection between social media use and impaired risky decision-making, which is commonly deficient in substance addiction.

1d


Robot hand that plays Jingle Bells could help us make better limbs

A 3D-printed rigid replica of a human hand can play classic tunes on the piano like Jingle Bells without ever moving individual fingers

1d


Rotating black holes may serve as gentle portals for hyperspace travel

One of the most cherished science fiction scenarios is using a black hole as a portal to another dimension or time or universe. That fantasy may be closer to reality than previously imagined.

2d


Scenes From Underground

Caves and tunnels have always been part of human life. We’ve grown more adept at shaping these underground shelters and passages over the millennia, and today we dig for hundreds of reasons. We excavate to find both literal and cultural treasures, digging mines and unearthing archaeological discoveries. We use caverns for stable storage, for entertainment, and for effective shelter from natural a

3d


Schizophrenia linked with abnormal immune response to Epstein-Barr virus

New research shows that people in the study with schizophrenia also have higher levels of antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis, so-called mono.

2d


Science T-shirts that'll get you compliments

Gadgets Plus you can wear them to work (if you work at Popular Science). I own a lot of science T-shirts—but when you work at Popular Science , you have to stay on brand. Here are just a few of the T-shirts I love wearing on a daily basis.

2d


Scientists close to first sighting of black hole in the Milky Way

International team say ‘spectacular’ data hints at historic breakthrough Astronomers attempting to capture the first images of the black hole at the heart of the Milky Way have given early hints that the ambitious project has been successful. The observations, by the Event Horizon Telescope, are expected to be unveiled in the spring in one of the most eagerly awaited scientific announcements of 2

16h


Scientists confirm that chromosomes are formed by stacked layers

A new study based on electron microscopy techniques at low temperatures demonstrates that during mitosis, chromosome DNA is packed in stacked layers of chromatin. The research, published in EMBO Journal, confirms a surprising structure proposed by UAB researchers over a decade ago, but criticized due to the limitations of the technique used.

2d


Scientists discover a process that stabilizes fusion plasmas

New research describes a newly discovered stabilizing effect of an underappreciated 1983 finding that variations in plasma temperature can influence the growth of magnetic islands that lead to disruption of fusion plasmas.

2d


Scientists forecast where is the highly invasive fall armyworm to strike next

Known to be feeding on many economically important crops, including maize, sugarcane, beet, tomato, potato and cotton, the larvae of the native to the Americas fall armyworm moth already seem to present a huge threat to the world's yield. Moreover, it only took 2 years for the pest to establish throughout sub-Saharan Africa. A study looks into the factors and likelihood for it to spread to other r

2d


Scientists orchestrate a symphony of the stars

A new stellar library has been created by UK and US scientists to, for the first time, give us a window of understanding on to our and other galaxies.

2d


Scientists realize a three-dimensional 'topological' medium for electromagnetic waves

Topological insulators are exotic states of matter that physicists have been intensely studying for the past decade. Their most intriguing feature is that they can be rigorously distinguished from all other materials using a mathematical concept known as "topology." This mathematical property grants topological insulators the ability to transport electric signals without dissipation, via special q

2d


Se oversigt: Alle disse mobiler kan låses op med et foto

42 af 110 telefoner svigtede i sikkerhedstest.

11h


Seals Are Stranded in a Canadian Town, and People Wonder What to Do

For more than a week, seals have been in Roddickton-Bide Arms, Newfoundland, and they can’t seem to find their way home.

3h


Seeing Superman Increases Altruism

Subject who saw a Superman poster were more likely to offer help than were people who saw another image. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d


Sejlskibe skal fragte Renault-biler over Atlanten

Den franske virksomhed Neoline vil oprette en sørute mellem Europa og USA, som skal betjenes af skibe med sejl som primær drivkraft. I november kunne virksomheden så præsentere sin første kunde: den franske bilproducent Renault.

13h


Self-cleaning spacesuits could help astronauts cope with Martian dust

Mars and the Moon are covered in abrasive dust that will stick to and shred spacesuits – but not if those spacesuits are made using non-stick carbon nanotube-based materials

2h


Should Hyping Edible Bugs Focus On The Experience Instead Of The Environment?

A new study shows that when ads made hedonistic marketing claims, such as "exotic" or "delicious," rather than targeting environmental interests, more people were willing to try eating insects. (Image credit: Oliver Brachat/for NPR)

1d


Shutdown Means E.P.A. Pollution Inspectors Aren’t on the Job

The E.P.A.'s shutdown furlough of most inspection personnel has halted one of the government’s most important public health activities.

1d


Signals from space: Five theories on what they are

Mysterious cosmic signals have been picked up. What are they and where do they come from?

1d


Sikkerhedskontrol ved Storebæltsbroen blev droppet i 2011

Tidligere kontrollerede et automatisk anlæg togets profil, inden det nåede broen.

10h


Skull scans tell tale of how world's first dogs caught their prey

Analysis of the skulls of lions, wolves and hyenas has helped scientists uncover how prehistoric dogs hunted 40 million years ago.

7h


Smart cities could be lousy to live in if you have a disability

Cities sometimes fail to make sure the technologies they adopt are accessible to everyone. Activists and startups are working to change that.

2d


Social and environmental costs of hydropower are underestimated, study shows

Study shows that deforestation, loss of biodiversity and economic damage done to communities living near dams have not been factored into the cost of these projects. Large dams also ignore the effects of climate change.

1d


Solen vil ende sine dage som en langsomt afkølende kæmpe-krystal

Astronomer bekræfter nu en 15 år gammel teori om, at hvide dværgstjerner dør som kæmpe krystaller, når de løber tør for brændstof.

1d


Solving the ancient mysteries of Easter Island

The ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island, Chile) built their famous ahu monuments near coastal freshwater sources, according to a team of researchers including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

1d


Solving the ancient mysteries of Easter Island

The ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island, Chile) built their famous ahu monuments near coastal freshwater sources, according to a team of researchers including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

1d


South Africa sniffer dog intercepts 116kg of rhino horn

The haul, worth more than $1.3m (£1m), is one of the largest seized in South Africa in recent years.

1d


SpaceX launch completes Iridium satellite refresh

The $3bn refurbishment of the original sat-phone network will help transform air-traffic surveillance.

5h


Spinning Black Holes Could Open Up Gentle Portals for Hypersonic Spacecraft

Feel like visiting another star system or dimension? You can do this by traveling through a spacetime portal of a black hole. But you better choose carefully. All black holes are not created equal.

2d


Spintronics 'miracle material' put to the test

When German mineralogist Gustav Rose stood on the slopes of Russia's Ural Mountains in 1839 and picked up a piece of a previously undiscovered mineral, he had never heard of transistors or diodes or had any concept of how conventional electronics would become an integral part of our daily lives. He couldn't have anticipated that the rock he held in his hand, which he named "perovskite," could be a

1d


Star Trek style translators step closer to reality at gadget show

Once confined to the realms of science fiction, near real-time translation devices that whisper discretely into your ear during a conversation are finally coming of age thanks to leaps in AI and cloud computing.

1d


Steam's Platform Dominance Takes an Epic Hit

Plus a Bungie breakaway, overenthusiastic algorithms, and the rest of the week in gaming news.

8h


Still no word from Opportunity

Could this be the end of the Opportunity rover? There's been no signal from the rover since last summer, when a massive global dust storm descended on it. But even though the craft has been silent and unreachable for six-and-a-half months, NASA hasn't given up.

2d


Struggling with New Year's resolutions? We can help

Nine ways to boost your willpower, from dodging doughnuts to making the most of mornings It is tempting, when your shiny New Year’s resolutions start to crumble, to tell yourself that self-control simply isn’t your strong point. “Oh well,” you might say, surrendering to the desire for a large glass of red. “No willpower, that’s my problem.” But, according to a body of scientific research, willpow

1d


Student simulates thousands of black holes

Lia Medeiros, a doctoral student at the University of Arizona, is developing mathematical models that will allow researchers to pit Einstein's Theory of General Relativity against the most powerful monsters of nature: supermassive black holes such as Sgr A*, which lurks at the center of the Milky Way.

2d


Students create probiotic to help honeybees fight deadly fungus

A team of University of Alberta students are hoping to market a probiotic they created to help honeybees ward off a fungal infection that has wiped out entire hives.

1d


Studies can be in vitro, in vivo and now ‘in fimo’ — in poop

Scientists have coined a new term — “in fimo” — to describe studies focused on feces.

2d


Study finds two billion birds migrate over Gulf Coast

A new study combining data from citizen scientists and weather radar stations is providing detailed insights into spring bird migration along the Gulf of Mexico and how these journeys may be affected by climate change. Findings on the timing, location, and intensity of these bird movements are published in the journal Global Change Biology.

2d


Study shows younger children and chimps less likely to make irrational decisions when social comparison is in play

A team of researchers affiliated with the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Yale University and the University of Göttingen, has found that older children are more likely to make seemingly irrational decisions when social comparison is at play. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the group describes experiments they carried out wit

2d


Study suggests how to treat diastolic heart failure

New research uncovers what causes diastolic heart failure and how it can be treated.

1d


Sunscreen and cosmetics compound may harm coral by altering fatty acids

Although sunscreen is critical for preventing sunburns and skin cancer, some of its ingredients are not so beneficial to ocean-dwelling creatures. In particular, sunscreen chemicals shed by swimmers are thought to contribute to coral reef decline. Now, researchers say that one such chemical, octocrylene (OC), which is also in some cosmetics and hair products, accumulates in coral as fatty acid est

1d


T. rex bite 'no match for a finch'

Tyrannosaurus rex, renowned for being one of the most fearsome creatures to have ever lived, evolved a bite that was less impressive in relation to its body size than a tiny Galapagos ground finch, scientists say.

2d


Taking ginger pills can make disgusting ideas more palatable

A set of experiments using the anti-nausea powers of ginger has revealed the role our gut feelings play in shaping our moral judgements and emotions

1d


Targeting an RNA-binding protein to fight aging

Aging bodies undergo biological changes that cause a decline in the function of cells and tissues. However, most studies attempting to identify molecules involved in age-related dysfunctions have focused only on mechanisms based on mRNA transcription, a very important step in gene expression, but nonetheless only part of the complex regulatory mechanisms in our cells.

1d


Targeting an RNA-binding protein to fight aging

Researchers have found that the RNA-binding protein PUM2 contributes to the accumulation of defective mitochondria, a key feature of the aging process. Targeting PUM2 in old animals protects against age-related mitochondrial dysfunction.

21h


Technique boosts omega 3 fatty acid levels in brain 100 fold

Researchers report that adding a lysophospholipid form of EPA (LPC-EPA) to the diet can increase levels of EPA in the brain 100-fold in mice.

3d


Termites mitigate effects of drought in tropical rainforests

A major new study, led jointly by the University of Liverpool and the Natural History Museum, has discovered that termites mitigate against the effects of drought in tropical rain forests.

1d


Termites mitigate effects of drought in tropical rainforests

Termites are commonly regarded as one of the most destructive insect pests, yet its unknown side was recently revealed by a major new study. Researchers have discovered that termites actually help mitigate against the effects of drought in tropical rainforests.

1d


Terrible Lizards: Dinosaur Statues of Questionable Accuracy

The term dinosaur comes from the ancient Greek root words deinos , or “terrible,” and sauros , or “lizard.” As our understanding of these prehistoric creatures has become more refined over time, attempts to create life-size models of them have, more or less, increased in accuracy and lifelike quality. Of course, many of the thousands of dinosaur statues in the world have been made with an eye mor

2d


Testing for Caffeine Could Help Foil Fake Urine Scam

The absence of substances originating from coffee, chocolate, nicotine and blood in pee could indicate foul play — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2d


The 12 high-school cliques that exist today, and how they differ from past decades

Researchers conducted focus groups with students who recently graduated from high school to ask them about their experience with peer groups. Altogether, the participants identified 12 distinct "peer crowds" and ranked them in a social hierarchy. The results show that, compared to past decades, some groups have risen or fallen in the hierarchy, and a couple new groups have emerged. None How do mo

1d


The aliens are coming. And they’ve caught us with our pants down | James Felton

Radio signals could be signs of extraterrestrial life. But, with Brexit and Trump, could they have chosen a worse time to call? Earlier this week, astronomers announced that they had observed repeated bursts of radio waves coming from deep space, with some experts suggesting this could be evidence of alien life . Is this it? Could extraterrestrials finally be trying to contact us? I hope not. Rela

10h


The Atlantic Daily: Unpaid and Still Required to Work

What We’re Following Welcome to day 19 of the government shutdown. Hundreds of thousands of federal workers are about to miss a paycheck. Some are furloughed, while others—from TSA agents to prison guards— are required to show up for work anyway. Federal government workers technically aren’t allowed to strike due to a 1947 law , and with the prospect of the shutdown dragging on for weeks or month

1d


The Atlantic Daily: What Makes a Border

What We’re Following 1. Negotiations to end the U.S.-government shutdown are still stalled as President Donald Trump remains steadfast in his demand for money to build a southern-border wall—a major campaign promise. Even if a physical wall is built, it might not achieve the president’s desired effect. For one, a border is much more than just a membrane separating one location from another, and “

21h


The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Bye-Bye (Bye)

What We’re Following Today It’s Wednesday, January 9. President Donald Trump had lunch with Senate Republicans on Capitol Hill today to talk about the government shutdown, now in its 19th day. Members said the president urged the caucus to stay strong, and described him as “resolute.” Later in the day, Trump reportedly walked out of a meeting with Democratic leaders because they wouldn’t agree to

1d


The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Wall They or Won’t They

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, January 10, and the partial government shutdown has been going on for 20 days. President Donald Trump visited the southern border in the town of McAllen, Texas, where he continued to push for his proposed wall; before he left, he told reporters he was prepared to declare a national emergency to unlock funding for the project. In a Holding Pattern: Even af

23h


The Best of CES 2019: Laptops, Smart Home, Parenting, TVs

WIRED's picks for the standout products from this year's CES consumer electronics fest.

1d


The Books Briefing: What We Thought About Classic Books When They Were First Published

It’s likely you’ve never read, or even heard of, most of the books Atlantic writers have reviewed since the magazine was founded in 1857. Many have gone out of print; others have faded into obscurity in the decades since their original publication, sinking beneath waves of new works and new literary trends. But some have been buoyed into the upper echelons of literature and cemented as classics,

7h


The 'Captain Marvel' Trailer Is the Teaser the Movie Needed

Finally, a clip that gets people excited to see the MCU's newest hero in action.

3d


The Chill of U.S.-Russia Relations Creeps Into Space

Updated at 11:35 a.m. ET on January 11. On the afternoon of the failed launch, Jim Bridenstine of NASA and Dmitry Rogozin of Roscosmos had only known each other for a few days. Less than one mile from the launchpad, the heads of the American and Russian space agencies watched as the Soyuz system lofted the crew, one man from each country, into the blue sky over Kazakhstan. But then, inside the cr

7h


The Clever Clumsiness of a Robot Teaching Itself to Walk

Researchers make robots teach themselves how to walk through trial and error, like babies, to navigate the real world.

3d


The continued relevance of Phineas Gage

Phineas Gage is considered to be Patient Zero for traumatic brain injury. The story of Gage at the time was that his damaged brain rendered him a different, monstrous person. This wasn't true. Recent studies demonstrate that an injured brain can see an increase in connection in areas associated with touch and learning. Phineas Gage was a railroad foreman in the 19th century. In 1848, while blasti

4h


The Exaggerated Promise of So-Called Unbiased Data Mining

Data Mining for Random Patterns Invites Bias and Lacks Value

8h


The Flawed Logic of R. Kelly’s Most Unlikely Supporters

Last week, many viewers watched Surviving R. Kelly in horror as the documentary highlighted old and new sexual-abuse allegations against the singer. The six-part documentary series, which premiered on Lifetime on January 3, featured dozens of testimonials from survivors, activists, police officers, and legal experts, as well as Kelly’s family members and former employees. Their collective account

1d


The Flu Is Widespread in the U.S., and It’s Not Too Late to Get Vaccinated

In the last three months, 6 to 7 million people have caught the flu, and the season isn’t over yet.

5h


2d


The Impact of the Government Shutdown Is About to Snowball

The partial government shutdown that began during the quiet of the holidays is about to become the longest in the nation’s history . And on Friday, it will start truly hitting home for hundreds of thousands of federal employees: For the first time, their scheduled paychecks will not arrive. The missed payments will represent a turning point in the three-week standoff, inflicting a damaging financ

6h


The Insane Numbers Behind Cycling's Most Masochistic Race

The hour is one of cycling's oldest and most prestigious records: How far can one person ride a bicycle in 60 minutes?

5h


The Instagram-Husband Revolution

Earlier this week, Chrissy Teigen posted a video on Instagram of herself posing artfully on the beach while her husband captured an endless stream of photos, including multiple angles and poses. “Thank u for always supporting my Instagram dreams,” she wrote. “This train only moves because of you(r phone) … you are the tracks that lay the foundation … creating a direct path to hope and possibiliti

9h


The lonely giant: Milky Way-sized galaxy lacking galactic neighbors

Long ago in a galaxy far, far away, fewer galaxies were born than expected — and that could create new questions for galaxy physics, according to a new study.

1d


The lonely giant: Milky Way-sized galaxy lacking galactic neighbors

Long ago in a galaxy far, far away, fewer galaxies were born than expected—and that could create new questions for galaxy physics, according to a new University of Michigan study.

2d


The Magical Gaze of 'Mona Lisa' Is a Myth

Her gaze isn't actually following you, despite what we all thought.

1d


1d


The Most Remarkable Thing About Trump's Proposed National Emergency

Typically, when a president wants to make policy, he has to negotiate a deal with Congress. Because that hasn’t worked out for President Donald Trump in securing his border wall, he’s tried to find another way to lock down the $5 billion he wants to build it. “I have the absolute right to do national emergency if I want,” he told reporters on Wednesday. By Thursday night, administration officials

3h


The Orchid and the Dandelion by W Thomas Boyce review – which are you?

Are you sensitive or resilient? This study by a paediatric health expert considers why children with the greatest potential are also the ones most likely to falter Some people seem to have terrible childhoods and yet manage to thrive despite them. Others grow up in loving homes but suffer from mental and physical health difficulties, even if their siblings do not. Why? Research shows that about 1

2d


The polar vortex split apart. Here’s what to expect.

Environment You'll want a winter coat. The polar vortex is making big changes for the new year, as it broke apart.

9h


The Quiet Ways Automation Is Remaking Service Work

When blue-collar workers go on strike, demands such as wage increases and better hours are usually the objective. But when nearly 8,000 Marriott International employees marched outside hotels for two months in late 2018, one request stood out among the rest: protection against the automated technology that’s remaking the hotel industry. Marriott employees are right to worry. Over the past few yea

9h


The Race to Relearn Hemp Farming

Researchers have a lot to learn about the previously banned crop before it flourishes on U.S. farms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h


The Shutdown Is Making Senate Republicans Squirm

As President Donald Trump descends on the border Thursday to further make his case for a wall, back home in Washington congressional Republicans—the ones whose resolve he needs if he’s going to continue his shutdown campaign—are growing more anxious. While the images Trump broadcasts to the nation may bolster his case to his base, these Republicans are left to talk and share doubts among themselv

1d


The Shutdown Was Never Really Going to End This Week

It was Thursday around lunchtime, and Lindsey Graham was over it. “Right now I am going to the gym,” the South Carolina senator told reporters in the Capitol. “I have never been more depressed about moving forward.” There was reason to be depressed. Thursday was day 20 of the partial government shutdown, and despite the flurry of speeches, meetings, and press releases that had marked these weeks,

7h


The states with the happiest Americans spend more money on ‘public goods’

Study reveals the Americans who live in states that spend more on tangible "public goods" are happier. This spending makes communities "more livable." Pain of higher property taxes largely balanced out by higher property values and quality of life. For those of us who don't have enough money to pave our own roads, pay for security — aka police departments — or develop recreational spaces such as

1d


The Thoughtful Raunch of Sex Education

The Netflix algorithm is getting stronger. Consider Sex Education , a new British dramedy patched together so perspicaciously from pieces of existing hits that you can virtually see the stitches. Like The End of the F***ing World , it’s a zany teen romance set in a mysterious Anglo-American hinterland that looks like a John Hughes movie but whose cultural references are pure Blighty ( Butlin’s ,

2d


The U.S. states hit hardest by the federal government shutdown

A new map from WalletHub, generated by comparing various federal data, shows the states most affected by the government shutdown. About 800,000 federal employees are furloughed or are working without pay. Government shutdowns have become an increasingly common political tool, but it wasn't until the early 1980s that they started resulting in the closing of federal agencies. None Friday marked the

7h


1d


The very first dinosaurs probably evolved in South America

Dinosaurs conquered every major landmass, making it difficult to work out where they originally came from – but two studies both conclude they were southerners

1d


The World Shifts When a Black Widow Squats

A spider’s web is more than a trap or a home. It is also an extension of the spider’s senses . By paying attention to vibrations traveling through the silken threads, the arachnid can learn about its surroundings. Certain vibrations might mean ensnared prey. A different frequency might reveal a nearby mate. And since spiders extrude their webs from their bodies, they can also change the stiffness

2d


There may be a link between erectile dysfunction and type 2 diabetes

A DNA analysis links type 2 diabetes with erectile dysfunction, hinting that having a healthier lifestyle may reduce the chances of getting erectile problems

1d


There’s No Winning for the Networks

When David Westin was the president of ABC News during the Clinton, Bush, and early Obama years, the occasional request from the White House for a prime-time presidential address was almost always granted, debated only privately among network executives deciding whether to give up their airwaves. “It was more or less assumed that we would take them … When we had prime-time addresses in the Oval O

2d


There's a Link Between the Size of Your Belly and the Size of Your Brain

A new study links belly fat, or visceral fat, with brain shrinkage.

2d


These 1,000-year-old, blue-specked teeth could rewrite medieval history

Science Lapis lazuli was hard to get your hands—or mouth—on. A new study uses analysis of dental calculus to show the crucial role a woman played in medieval manuscript illumination.

1d


This algorithm browses Wikipedia to auto-generate textbooks

Wikipedia is a valuable resource. But it’s not always obvious how to collate the content on any given topic into a coherent whole.

2d


This Exploding 'Cow' May Be the First Black Hole Birth Ever Observed

Is this exploding "Cow" the first live birth of a black hole or neutron star ever seen from Earth?

23h


This powder could cheaply capture carbon pollution from power plants

Nexus Media News Engineers have developed a way for even developing nations to prevent the worst effects of global warming. Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a powder that can scrub carbon from power plant emissions.

2d


This protein may help explain why some women with endometriosis are infertile

Infertile women with endometriosis have a reduced amount of a protein found to be important for establishing pregnancy in mice, a study finds.

2d


This robot plants heat-resistant corals to save endangered reefs

Nexus Media News Meet LarvalBot. A pair of Australians scientists developed a robot that will repopulate coral reefs with coral larvae that can withstand warmer waters.

3h


This Unknown Woman May Have Illustrated Elaborate and Sacred Medieval Manuscripts

Archaeologists recently found what might be called the first evidence of "bluetooth."

2d


Top 5 messages sent to alien civilizations

Ever since we've had the capability, humanity has been desperately trying to make contact with other life in the universe. While we've been beaming out information passively through our television and radio broadcasts, we've also sent more intentional messages. Looking at these messages tells us how humanity wants to think of itself and what kind of relationship we hope to have with alien life. N

2d


Top geneticist calls for global rules for ethical human genome editing

Following the shock announcement of the world's first genome-edited babies, geneticist Robin Lovell-Badge says the world must agree a set of safety protocols

1d


'Total success': China broadcasts new images from far side of moon

Pictures taken by Chang’e 4 lander and rover beamed back to Earth and shown on state TV China on Friday broadcast pictures taken by its rover and lander on the far side of the moon, in what its space programme hailed as another triumph for the groundbreaking mission. The pictures, shown on the state broadcaster CCTV, showed the Jade Rabbit 2 rover and the Chang’e 4 spacecraft that transported it

10h


Trees change inside as drought persists

James Cook University scientists in Australia have found that trees change their anatomy in response to prolonged drought.

2d


Trilobites: In an Ancient Nun’s Teeth, Blue Paint — and Clues to Medieval Publishing

A rare blue pigment, discovered in the fossilized plaque of a German nun, hints at a broader role for women in the production of religious texts.

1d


Trump Is Debating the Shutdown on Democrats’ ‘Manufactured’ Terms

When Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer finished their rebuttal to President Donald Trump’s Oval Office address on Tuesday, it was not entirely clear what Democrats were hoping to accomplish. The dual remarks seemed largely like a rehash of familiar talking points. But their effectiveness emerged Thursday when President Trump traveled to McAllen, Texas. On Tuesday, Pelosi, the House speaker, had said

6h


Trump Is Rushing the Syria Withdrawal—And That Could Backfire

After weeks of to-ing and fro-ing about timetables, Donald Trump is keeping his promise—sort of, with adjustments. On Friday, the military announced that it was beginning the process of withdrawing troops from Syria. This a few weeks after the president shocked Washington in December by declaring that he intended to get out, starting “now,” having vowed to do so on the campaign trail more than tw

3h


Trump Is Using the Opioid Crisis to Build His Wall

Donald Trump hasn’t talked about the opioid epidemic much recently. So when he used the peerless pulpit of the Oval Office to discuss it on Tuesday night, it could have been an opportunity to rally the public and to provide meaningful solutions. His words framed the urgency of the situation, which for many Americans may have been out of sight in the past few months. “Our southern border is a pipe

2d


Trump’s Oval Office Speech Was Never Going to Succeed

On Tuesday, Donald Trump delivered a televised Oval Office address, hoping to marshal the gravitas of the presidency to get his way on a border wall. The gambit was doomed from the start. Insofar as prime-time addresses from the White House have power, it is rooted in the public’s belief that there is dignity in the office, that its occupant possesses moral authority, and that he or she would ask

2d


Trump’s Wall Could Cost Him in 2020

President Donald Trump may now be talking more about steel than cement, but his proposed border wall remains the Rosetta Stone for understanding both his conception of the presidency and his political strategy. Nothing better illustrates Trump’s political calculus than his determination to build the wall, a goal that most Americans consistently oppose in polls, even at the cost of shutting down t

1d


Trump's Immigration Speech Won't Change Minds, Science Says

Research shows that direct appeals from the president don't sway people, and neither do fact-checks from the media. But they do keep us talking.

1d


Two billion birds migrate over Gulf Coast

A new study combining data from citizen scientists and weather radar stations is providing detailed insights into spring bird migration along the Gulf of Mexico and how these journeys may be affected by climate change. Findings on the timing, location, and intensity of these bird movements have been published.

1d


Two to Tango: Twitter Fact-Checks the Fact-Checkers

Last night an Associated Press tweet claimed that, in placing blame for the government shutdown, "it takes two to tango." Twitter thought otherwise.

2d


U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Once Again On The Rise

A newly released report shows that the United States' CO2 emissions spiked last year. A booming economy and busy transportation sector are to blame. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

3d


U.S. Emissions in 2018 Saw the Second-Largest Spike Since 1996

The uptick came despite significant coal plant closures, pointing to the growing influence of other greenhouse gas sources — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2d


Ultima Thule is a snowman-shaped rock covered in weird ice

The New Horizons spacecraft just flew past a distant rock called MU69 or Ultima Thule that looks like a snowman – and it may have exotic ices on its surface

2h


Ultima Thule, the Cold War and Trump's Wall

As I learned during my youth in Germany, exploring frontiers beats hiding behind barriers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h


Ultrabright Quasar Lit Up the Early Universe

Astronomers just found a galaxy with a glowing heart that is almost as old as the universe itself.

2d


Ultra-sensitive sensor with gold nanoparticle array

Scientists from the University of Bath (UK) and Northwestern University (USA) have developed a new type of sensor platform using a gold nanoparticle array, which is 100 times more sensitive than current similar sensors.

2d


Unhealthy sperm can play a role in lost pregnancies

Health Bringing a pregnancy to term requires a healthy sperm and egg. According to a new study, though, the sperm of men whose partners’ experience pregnancy losses have increased DNA damage—which is linked to bad outcomes in pregnancy. In…

23h


Universal internet access unlikely until at least 2050, experts say

Half the world’s population is online but lack of skills and investment are slowing growth Parts of the world will be excluded from the internet for decades to come without major efforts to boost education, online literacy and broadband infrastructure, experts have warned. While half the world’s population now uses the internet, a desperate lack of skills and stagnant investment mean the UN’s goa

1d


Using Genetic Genealogy To Identify Unknown Crime Victims, Sometimes Decades Later

DNA combined with the study of family history has been used to solve high-profile cold cases such as the Golden State Killer. Now, volunteers are using the technique to identify crime victims. (Image credit: Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images)

3d


Video shows the moment China's Chang'e 4 landed on moon's far side

The China National Space Administration has released footage from its Chang'e 4 lander showing the moment it landed on the moon's far side on 3 January

11h


VW's EV Chargers Make Paying for Power Easier Than Ever

VW's Electrify America program is adding a capability that identifies the driver by their car and bills them automatically.

2d


Want to know what mice in labs are saying? Try DeepSqueak.

Mice have a vocabulary of about 20 different phrases. A clever new neural-network-based application reveals what mice used in research say. Spoiler: The conversation changes when a female shows up Rodents are chatty little creatures, and even if mice aren't really hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings , as they're portrayed to be in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy , they do seem to speak

2d


Want to know what mice in labs are saying? Try DeepSqueak.

Mice have a vocabulary of about 20 different phrases. A clever new neural-network-based application reveals what mice used in research say. Spoiler: The conversation changes when a female shows up Rodents are chatty little creatures, and even if mice aren't really hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings , as they're portrayed to be in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy , they do seem to speak

2d


Warming oceans likely to raise sea levels 30cm by end of century – study

Seawater temperature is rising faster than predicted, which is likely to worsen extreme weather events around the world The world’s oceans are warming at a faster rate than previously estimated, new research has found, raising fresh concerns over the rapid progress of climate change. Warming oceans take up more space, a process known as thermal expansion , which the study says is likely to raise

1d


Wasp eggs laid on paralysed insects emit gas that keeps victims fresh

The beewolf wasp paralyses its prey then lays eggs on their bodies. The eggs emit a gas that keeps the food fresh for when the offspring hatch

1d


We are starting to wreck the environment around our planet now, too

Our species’ environmental impact extends far beyond Earth. Now one scientist says it’s high time we thought more carefully about what we’re doing to near-Earth space.

1d


We could drill water wells in Martian ice to survive on the Red Planet

Future Martian explorers will need water if they are going to survive. They may be able to melt it out of underground ice sheets using a type of well already used in Antarctica

2h


What 100,000 star factories in 74 galaxies reveal about star formation

Galaxies come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. Some of the most significant differences among galaxies, however, relate to where and how they form new stars. Compelling research to explain these differences has been elusive, but that is about to change.

1d


What are the risks of dying from having the yellow fever vaccine?

The vaccine is very unlikely to cause serious side effects but not all travellers need it as there's also a very low risk of getting the disease

4h


What I Learned From Cancer

M y daughter squirmed on her back, rocking the changing table. She bicycle-kicked her 1-year-old legs. No shoes or pants could be removed. She held her arms down. No shirt could rise over her head. Perhaps she sensed my mood, and my wife’s and Ma’s mood as they talked somewhere outside her closed bedroom door, and responded in kind. But I was not thinking about transference. Irritated, I expected

1d


What should electric cars sound like? | Renzo Vitale

Electric cars are extremely quiet, offering some welcome silence in our cities. But they also bring new dangers, since they can easily sneak up on unsuspecting pedestrians. What kind of sounds should they make to keep people safe? Get a preview of what the future may sound like as acoustic engineer and musician Renzo Vitale shows how he's composing a voice for electric cars.

2d


What Someone Needs to Explain to Trump About ‘National Emergencies’

When the recently arrived White House counsel Pat Cipollone took up his post, he could have had no illusions that the president he served would make his professional life easy. Just weeks into the job, he has been asked to provide legal support for the president’s declaration of a national emergency on the U.S.-Mexico border that would enable him to divert funds to the payment of “a wall.” We don

11h


What the Slowdown in FDA Food Inspections Means for You (Spoiler: Don't Panic Yet)

The ongoing government shutdown has put a halt to some food safety inspections, but that doesn't necessarily mean that your salad or sushi is any more risky to eat than before.

23h


What Trump Can and Can’t Do to Get His Border Wall

President Donald Trump tonight will hold a nationally televised speech to address the impasse over the border wall. Because Democrats have refused to appropriate approximately $5 billion for the construction project, Trump is reportedly mulling alternative avenues to deliver on his campaign promise. Here’s what he can do under the law, and what he can’t. Trump has two traditional statutory avenue

3d


What Tucker Carlson Gets Right

The Fox News host Tucker Carlson delivered a monologue on the market and the family last week. It quickly found a large audience, becoming a viral sensation online. It also attracted a host of critics from across the political spectrum. Some of the fiercest criticism came from conservatives, including writers such as Ben Shapiro and David French , who attacked the very argument that we believe Ca

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What’s Better Than One Mysterious Cosmic Signal?

The mysterious signals come from all directions in the sky. No one knows exactly what they are, or what causes them, but astronomers have detected dozens over the past decade . The signals, known as fast radio bursts, originate from deep within the cosmos, well beyond the Milky Way galaxy. The radio waves travel across space for billions of years, moving at the speed of light. When they reach Ear

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What’s the point of a riderless motorcycle?

Technology BMW's prototype will never see the streets, but tech like this could make bikes safer. A motorcycle without a rider might not seem to make sense, but BMW says that tech like this has a point.

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When Chinese hackers declared war on the rest of us

Many thought the internet would bring democracy to China. Instead it empowered rampant government oppression, and now the censors are turning their attention to the rest of the world.

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When faced with tough choices, your brain secretly tips the scales

Science Why choosing between popcorn and Pringles doesn't paralyze us all. Previous research has clearly shown that people come to feel satisfied with most decisions after the fact, but this study focused on what goes on in our heads at the…

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Why hip surgery wouldn’t help extend Andy Murray’s tennis career

Hip surgery wouldn’t help Andy Murray play professional tennis for longer because it involves cutting key muscles. Stem cell treatments offer hope for the future

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Why Is the National Enquirer So Obsessed With Jeff Bezos?

In some ways, it’s the most expected story in the world. Jeff Bezos, the world’s richest man, and his wife of 25 years, MacKenzie, are getting a divorce, and a tabloid alleges that a Bezos affair was the reason . Stop me if you’ve heard this one before. But because this is such a common archetype, the precise form it took reveals the turbulence and structure of our current media moment. Yesterday

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