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nyheder2019januar14

 

Elias M. Stein, Mathematician of Fluctuations, Is Dead at 87

Arriving from Europe with diamonds in his shoes (hidden there), he found renown in his field with real-world applications, like charting a stock market.

39min

Ford's Shelby GT500 Is the Most Powerful Mustang Ever

The latest take on the muscled up Mustang has more than 700 horsepower and might actually corner as well as it sprints.

3min

Physical activity, any type or amount, cuts health risk from sitting

A new study offers compelling evidence that replacing 30 minutes of sitting with physical activity, of any intensity or amount, reduces the risk of early death.

55min

Researchers develop comprehensive new way to predict breast cancer risk

Scientists have created the most comprehensive method yet to predict a woman's risk of breast cancer, according to a study by Cancer Research UK published in Genetics in Medicine.

20min

You’re now more likely to die from opioids than in a car crash

Health Let's put your risk of depth into perspective. The opioid crisis has evolved so rapidly in recent years that it can be hard to wrap your head around just how deadly they've become.

25min

Anne Churchland (CSHL) 2: Connecting movements & neural activity during decision-making

www.iBiology.org Anne Churchland shares her research on what happens in the brain when it makes decisions. How do brains make decisions? In this seminar, Dr. Anne Churchland tells us why understanding decision-making is important, and outlines common approaches to study decision-making in the lab using a variety of mammals. She describes findings that suggest accurate decision-making results from

28min

Anne Churchland (CSHL) 1: How do brains decide?

www.iBiology.org Anne Churchland shares her research on what happens in the brain when it makes decisions. How do brains make decisions? In this seminar, Dr. Anne Churchland tells us why understanding decision-making is important, and outlines common approaches to study decision-making in the lab using a variety of mammals. She describes findings that suggest accurate decision-making results from

28min

Ruth Lehmann (NYU / HHMI) 2: Establishing Soma-Germline Dichotomy

www.iBiology.org Germ cells, which give rise to egg and sperm, are critical to the survival of a species. Lehmann describes how germ cells are specified in the early embryo and how they develop. Very early in embryogenesis, germ cells, the cells that give rise to egg and sperm, are set aside from the somatic cells which give rise to the rest of the cells in our bodies. While germ cells are not ne

28min

Ruth Lehmann (NYU / HHMI) 1: Germ Cell Development

www.iBiology.org Germ cells, which give rise to egg and sperm, are critical to the survival of a species. Lehmann describes how germ cells are specified in the early embryo and how they develop. Very early in embryogenesis, germ cells, the cells that give rise to egg and sperm, are set aside from the somatic cells which give rise to the rest of the cells in our bodies. While germ cells are not ne

28min

Julie Huber (WHOI) 3: Combining Stable Isotopes and Sequencing to Understand Subseafloor Life

www.iBiology.org Julie Huber describes her research to better understand the microbes that dominate deep sea life in the rocky crust below the ocean floor. A mile or more below the surface of the ocean, microbes dominate the deep sea life. In this seminar, Dr. Julie Huber describes her research to better understand the microbial ecosystem in the rocky crust below the ocean floor. She begins the s

28min

Julie Huber (WHOI) 2: Subseafloor Life at Axial Seamount

www.iBiology.org Julie Huber describes her research to better understand the microbes that dominate deep sea life in the rocky crust below the ocean floor. A mile or more below the surface of the ocean, microbes dominate the deep sea life. In this seminar, Dr. Julie Huber describes her research to better understand the microbial ecosystem in the rocky crust below the ocean floor. She begins the s

28min

Julie Huber (WHOI) 1: Microbes, Fluids, and Rocks

www.iBiology.org Julie Huber describes her research to better understand the microbes that dominate deep sea life in the rocky crust below the ocean floor. A mile or more below the surface of the ocean, microbes dominate the deep sea life. In this seminar, Dr. Julie Huber describes her research to better understand the microbial ecosystem in the rocky crust below the ocean floor. She begins the s

28min

Kevin Esvelt (MIT) 2: Gene Drive and Local Drive

www.iBiology.org Dr. Kevin Esvelt explains how CRISPR-based gene drives can be used to spread genetic alterations through wild populations. He discusses strategies to maximize benefit and minimize risk. Evolution has selected wild organisms to be extremely well adapted to their environment. Because most genetic changes introduced by humans divert the resources of the organism to benefit humans, s

28min

Kevin Esvelt (MIT) 1: Gene Drive

www.iBiology.org Dr. Kevin Esvelt explains how CRISPR-based gene drives can be used to spread genetic alterations through wild populations. He discusses strategies to maximize benefit and minimize risk. Evolution has selected wild organisms to be extremely well adapted to their environment. Because most genetic changes introduced by humans divert the resources of the organism to benefit humans, s

28min

Medically assisted reproduction does not raise risk of preterm birth and low birth weight

Study shows that couples can decide about using medically assisted reproduction free from concerns about increasing the health risks to their baby.

1h

Levels of inflammatory marker (CRP) linked to housing type and tenure

Levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a chemical associated with inflammation and stress, may be linked to housing type and tenure in the UK, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

1h

Readiness for first sex is about more than age for many young Britons

A substantial proportion of young Britons are not ready for their first sexual activity — whatever their age — and lose their virginity 'under circumstances that are incompatible with positive sexual health,' reveals research published online in BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health.

1h

The most interesting fitness and workout tech from CES 2019

Technology The Consumer Electronics Show just dropped a whole bunch of new fitness gadgets on us. All the best fitness and workout gear from the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show.

1h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The NeverEnding Shutdown

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, January 14. On the 24th day of the longest government shutdown in U.S. history, midway through his first term in office, President Donald Trump took the stage at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 100th anniversary convention and reiterated his case for building a wall on the United States’ southern border. Meanwhile, The Washington Post reports that a b

1h

Earth’s magnetic pole is moving faster than expected

Space But we won't know where it's going until the government shutdown ends. Feeling a little off-kilter in the early weeks of 2019? Well, so’s the Earth’s magnetic pole—and it’s been feeling like that for a while.

1h

Calculator: Opioids, Car Crashes and Falling: The Odds of Dying in the U.S.

A new report found that, for the first time, Americans are more likely to die of an opioid overdose than in a vehicle crash. But the likeliest causes of death are still heart disease and cancer.

1h

Antarctica losing six times more ice mass annually now than 40 years agoAntarctic Losing Ice

Antarctica experienced a sixfold increase in yearly ice mass loss between 1979 and 2017, according to a new study. Glaciologists additionally found that the accelerated melting caused global sea levels to rise more than half an inch during that time.

2h

Physical activity, any type or amount, cuts health risk from sitting

Replacing 30 minutes of sitting with physical activity cut the risk of early death by as much as 35 percent, finds a new study.

2h

Young-onset diabetes linked to higher risk of hospitalization for mental illness before age 40

Young-onset diabetes, which is defined as onset before age 40, is associated with a higher risk of being hospitalized for mental illness compared with those who develop diabetes later in life. Those with young-onset diabetes also faced increased hospitalizations for any reason across their lifetime. Findings from a population-based cohort study are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

2h

American College of Physicians releases new edition of Ethics Manual

The American College of Physicians (ACP) today released the seventh edition of its Ethics Manual. New or significantly expanded sections of the ACP Ethics Manual include precision medicine and genetic testing, research and protection of human subjects, telemedicine, electronic communications, social media and online professionalism, electronic health records, and physician volunteerism.

2h

DNA of Red Wolves, Once Gone from the Wild, Discovered in Texas Pack

The wild population of the species was declared extinct almost 40 years ago, but now researchers have found their genes in a pack of canines near the Gulf coast.

2h

What Caused This Man's Sudden, Monthly Sweating Episodes?

There's nothing strange about breaking out into a heavy sweat on a sweltering day, or, after some serious physical activity.

2h

Sit less and move more to reduce risk of early death, study says

Short spells of movement help, but research finds overall time spent seated must be cut Are you sitting comfortably? Then get up and move about – even if it is just a walk about the office. That is the advice from experts who say periods of sitting must be replaced with exercise in order to ward off an early death. Previous research from the same team found people should move at least every 30 mi

2h

Psychology’s five revelations for finding your true calling

Look. You can't plan out your life. What you have to do is first discover your passion – what you really care about . Barack Obama If, like many, you are searching for your calling in life – perhaps you are still unsure which profession aligns with what you most care about – here are five recent research findings worth taking into consideration. First, there's a difference between having a harmon

2h

Letters: Is the Senate Representative Enough?

The Path to Give California 12 Senators, and Vermont Just One Earlier this month, Eric W. Orts argued that the time has come to reevaluate the apportionment of the Senate. “Today the voting power of a citizen in Wyoming, the smallest state in terms of population, is about 67 times that of a citizen in the largest state of California,” Orts wrote, “and the disparities among the states are only inc

2h

Greece aims to modernize its islands with Tesla Powerpacks, microgridsElon Musk Tesla Pwn2Own

The Greek government is considering collaborating with Tesla to modernize the electric grids on its many islands. The project(s) would involve microgrids connected to Tesla's energy storage systems. Tesla has helped to make energy storage technology better and more affordable in recent years. None The Greek government is considering collaborating with Tesla to modernize the electric grids on its

3h

Al Sharpton’s Bid to Be a 2020 Kingmaker

With a Democratic presidential field that’s bigger and more diverse than ever, and with a Democratic Party struggling with racial issues more than ever—both in grappling with its own history and in response to President Donald Trump—the Reverend Al Sharpton wants to be both kingmaker and validator. The New York–based civil-rights leader and president of the National Action Network has already bee

3h

The Unique Racial Dynamics of the L.A. Teachers' Strike

In a highly anticipated move that for key organizers has been years in the making, more than 30,000 educators on Monday kicked off a strike that’s put regular K–12 classes on hiatus in the country’s second-largest public-school district. A whopping 98 percent of L.A. teachers, who because of stalled negotiations with the district have been working without a contract for more than a year, voted to

3h

Former Head of NIMH, Lewis Judd, Dies

The UCSD psychiatry researcher championed the concept of mental illness as a neurobiological condition and helped form the US government's Decade of the Brain initiative.

3h

Discovery of single atom structure leads to more efficient catalyst

The discovery shows an efficiency rate that is up to 25 times higher than traditional catalysts made from larger iridium structures or nanoparticles.

3h

Virtual video visits may improve patient convenience without sacrificing quality of care

A team of researchers reports that virtual video visits, one form of telehealth visit used at the hospital, can successfully replace office visits for many patients without compromising the quality of care and communication.

3h

China will overtake the U.S. as world’s top economy in 2020, says Standard Chartered Bank

The Standard Chartered Bank, a British multinational banking and financial services company, recently issued a report to clients outlining projections about the world economy up until 2030. The report predicts Asian economies will grow significantly in the next decade, taking seven of the top 10 spots on the list of the world's biggest economies by 2030. However, the researchers formed their pred

3h

Dementia: New culprit and potential treatment target

A study shows people with the worst memory problems also had the most leakage in their brain's blood vessels — regardless of whether abnormal proteins amyloid and tau were present.

3h

Genetically modified food opponents know less than they think, research finds

People most opposed to genetically modified foods think they know the most about them, but actually know the least, new report finds.

3h

Long-acting contraceptive designed to be self-administered via microneedle patch

A new long-acting contraceptive designed to be self-administered by women may provide a new family planning option, particularly in developing nations where access to healthcare can be limited, a recent study suggests. The contraceptive would be delivered using microneedle skin patch technology originally developed for the painless administration of vaccines.

3h

When the body's in overdrive, this liver hormone puts the brakes on metabolism

Researchers have identified a hormone produced by the liver that tells the body to downshift its metabolism when it's expending a lot of energy.

3h

Government Shutdown Halts Some Research on New Invasive Tick Species

It's critical to learn more about this tick, health officials say, but the shutdown has halted at least some of this research.

3h

The Strange Marketplace for Diabetes Test Strips

It is legal to resell unused test strips for blood glucose, and many patients do, driving an unusual trade online and on the streets.

3h

Fixing the environment: when solutions become problems

In a world where climate change, air and water pollution, biodiversity loss, water scarcity, ozone depletion, and other environmental problems overlap, a fix in one arena can cause trouble in another.

3h

NBCUniversal jumps into the streaming fray

NBCUniversal will launch an ad-supported streaming service in 2020, free for anyone who pays for a cable service.

3h

Russia loses control of only space telescope

Russia has lost control of its only space radio telescope but officials are working to re-establish communication, the country's beleaguered space agency said Monday.

3h

3 ways to build a happy marriage and avoid divorce | George Blair-West

Choosing to marry and share your life with someone is one of the most important decisions you can make in life. But with divorce rates approaching fifty percent in some parts of the world, it's clear we could use some help picking a partner. In an actionable, eye-opening talk, psychiatrist George Blair-West shares three keys to preventing divorce — and spotting potential problems while you're sti

3h

Putting cells under pressure

As cells divide to form tissues and organs in multicell organisms, they move to where they belong, informed by a series of cues that scientists have yet to observe or fully understand.

4h

Researchers identify long-sought activator of sigma receptors in human cells

Cells communicate through complex mechanisms that typically involve receptors and ligands that bind to them. Endogenous ligands have been identified for the vast majority of cellular receptors, helping explain receptor existence and function. But in the case of sigma-1 receptors, which interact with a diverse array of psychoactive drugs, an endogenous ligand has remained elusive. Now, researchers

4h

Gut microbes from healthy infants block milk allergy development in mice

New research suggests that the gut microbiome may help prevent the development of cow's milk allergy. Scientists found that gut microbes from healthy human infant donors transplanted into mice protected animals exposed to milk from experiencing allergic reactions, while gut microbes transplanted from infants allergic to milk did not.

4h

Herpes viruses and tumors evolved to learn how to manipulate the same ancient RNA

Herpes viral infections use the ancient genetic material found in the human genome to proliferate, mimicking the same process tumors have been found to manipulate, Mount Sinai researchers have shown for the first time. These observations provide further insight about how herpes viruses can manipulate the immune system in ways that may drive neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, according to

4h

Step forward in understanding human feet

Scientists have made a step forward in understanding the evolution of human feet.

4h

Researchers gain control over soft-molecule synthesis

By gaining control over shape, size and composition during synthetic molecule assembly, researchers can begin to probe how these factors influence the function of soft materials. Finding these answers could help advance virology, drug delivery development and the creation of new materials.

4h

UCI/JPL study: Antarctica losing six times more ice mass annually now than 40 years ago

Antarctica experienced a sixfold increase in yearly ice mass loss between 1979 and 2017, according to a study published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Glaciologists from the University of California, Irvine, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Netherlands' Utrecht University additionally found that the accelerated melting caused global sea levels to rise more than h

4h

Honey bee parasites feed on fatty organs, not blood

Among the many threats to honey bee colonies around the world, one stands alone: the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor. For decades, researchers assumed that varroa mites feed on blood, like many of their mite and tick cousins. But new University of Maryland-led research suggests that varroa mites have a voracious appetite for a honey bee organ called the fat body, which serves many of the same vi

4h

Study: 'Post-normal' science requires unorthodox communication strategies

'Our aim,' the authors write, 'is therefore to use our collective experiences and knowledge to highlight how the current debate about gene drives could benefit from lessons learned from other contexts and sound communication approaches involving multiple actors.'

4h

Cilia beat to an unexpected rhythm in male reproductive tract, study in mice reveals

Waves of undulating cilia drive several processes essential to life. They clear debris and mucus from the respiratory tract, move spinal fluid through the brain and transport embryos from the ovaries to the uterus for implantation. According to a new study in mice, however, cilia perform somewhat differently in the male reproductive tract.

4h

Marine bacterium sheds light on control of toxic metals

An ocean-dwelling bacterium has provided fresh insights into how cells protect themselves from the toxic effects of metal ions such as iron and copper.Although essential to life, metal ions can also generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) — highly reactive molecules that damage cells as they try to form bonds with other molecules. In humans, reactive oxygen species are linked to ageing and also to

4h

Central Texas salamanders, including newly identified species, at risk of extinction

Biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered three new species of groundwater salamander in Central Texas, including one living west of Austin that they say is critically endangered. They also determined that an already known salamander species near Georgetown is much more endangered than previously thought. They warn that more severe droughts caused by climate change and increa

4h

Using genomic data, NYU Abu Dhabi researchers unlock history of North African date palm

Genome analysis reveals that North African date palms are a hybrid between cultivated date palms from the Middle East and a different, wild species of palm that grows on the island of Crete and in small areas of Southern Turkey. These findings, the result of research at NYU Abu Dhabi's Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (NYUAD CGSB), shed new light on the evolutionary history of one of the cr

4h

Ancient 'Tomb' Unearthed in Guatemala Turns Out to Be Maya Steam Bath

Archaeologists have discovered an ancient steam bath that the Maya likely used for religious rituals — and possibly relaxation — more than 2,500 years ago.

4h

New way supermassive black holes are 'fed'

A new study finds that some supermassive black holes are 'triggered' to grow, suddenly devouring a large amount of gas in their surroundings.

4h

Smart home tests first elder care robot

Researchers believe the robot, nicknamed RAS, could eventually help those with dementia and other limitations continue to live independently in their own homes.

4h

UK must stay vigilant for bluetongue after 2007 'lucky escape'

Scientists have used mathematical modelling to identify why the 2007 UK outbreak of bluetongue — a viral disease spread by midge bites that affects sheep and cattle — was smaller than it could have been and to predict the future impact of the disease in northern Europe as the climate warms.

4h

Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation

Given the pressures that pollinators face in agricultural land, cities could play an important role in conserving pollinators, according to a new study. The research has revealed that gardens and allotments are good for pollinators, and lavender and borage are important garden plants that pollinators use as food sources.

4h

Researchers catalog defects that give 2D materials amazing properties

A new theoretical framework predicts the kinds of holes that can form in two-dimensional materials like graphene. The work could help in the design of new filtration and desalination devices or new quantum computing and communications systems.

4h

More accurate leukemia diagnosis expected as researchers refine leukemia classification

New research means more than 90 percent of the most common cases of childhood cancer can now be classified by subtype, an advance likely to fuel precision medicine.

4h

A Northwestern Student Took Her Own Life. Is a Sorority to Blame?

On January 9, 2017, a Northwestern University sophomore named Jordan Hankins died by suicide in her dorm room in Evanston, Illinois. This week, two years after her death, her mother—Felicia Hankins—filed a complaint in federal court against Alpha Kappa Alpha, the sorority her daughter was pledging at the time of her death. The complaint alleges that Jordan Hankins, also a member of the university

4h

Researchers gain control over soft-molecule synthesis

By gaining control over shape, size and composition during synthetic molecule assembly, researchers can begin to probe how these factors influence the function of soft materials. Finding these answers could help advance virology, drug delivery development and the creation of new materials.

4h

Step forward in understanding human feet

Scientists have made a step forward in understanding the evolution of human feet.

4h

Antarctica losing six times more ice mass annually now than 40 years agoAntarctic Losing Ice

Antarctica experienced a sixfold increase in yearly ice mass loss between 1979 and 2017, according to a study published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Glaciologists from the University of California, Irvine, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Netherlands' Utrecht University additionally found that the accelerated melting caused global sea levels to rise more than h

4h

'Post-normal' science requires unorthodox communication strategies, study says

Proposals to fight malaria by "driving" genes that slow its spread through mosquitoes is a high-risk, high-reward technology that presents a challenge to science journalists, according to a new report aimed at stimulating a fruitful, realistic public discussion of "post-normal" science and technology.

4h

Central Texas salamanders, including newly identified species, at risk of extinction

Biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered three new species of groundwater salamander in Central Texas, including one living west of Austin that they say is critically endangered. They also determined that an already known salamander species near Georgetown is much more endangered than previously thought.

4h

Using genomic data, researchers unlock history of North African date palm

Genome analysis reveals that North African date palms are a hybrid between cultivated date palms from the Middle East and a different, wild species of palm that grows on the island of Crete and in small areas of Southern Turkey. These findings, the result of research at NYU Abu Dhabi's Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (NYUAD CGSB), shed new light on the evolutionary history of one of the ea

4h

Marine bacterium sheds light on control of toxic metals

An ocean-dwelling bacterium has provided fresh insights into how cells protect themselves from the toxic effects of metal ions such as iron and copper, in research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA).

4h

Honey bee parasites feed on fatty organs, not blood

Honey bee colonies around the world are at risk from a variety of threats, including pesticides, diseases, poor nutrition and habitat loss. Recent research suggests that one threat stands well above the others: a parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, which specializes in attacking honey bees.

4h

Cilia beat to an unexpected rhythm in male reproductive tract, study in mice reveals

Waves of undulating cilia drive several processes essential to life. They clear debris and mucus from the respiratory tract, move spinal fluid through the brain and transport embryos from the ovaries to the uterus for implantation. According to a new study in mice, however, cilia perform somewhat differently in the male reproductive tract.

4h

Easing test anxiety boosts low-income students’ biology grades

Wealthier students outperform their less advantaged peers in math and science. Decreasing test anxiety may help even the playing field.

4h

To find new cancer drug targets, reorganize kinases

Grouping protein kinases by their reaction to drugs could reveal new cancer drug targets. Protein kinases—a class of signaling molecules—regulate most cellular processes. When protein kinases malfunction, diseases such as cancer can result. This is why certain types of protein kinases implicated in disease are desirable drug targets. A new study, however, takes a fresh approach to grouping kinase

4h

Take a Number: You’re Not Getting Much Taller, America. But You Are Getting Bigger.

New government data charts some interesting changes in average bodies over recent decades.

4h

Rise of the Golden Jackal

A species that was barely known in Europe now vastly outnumbers wolves there, and is rapidly spreading north and west.

4h

Newborn Orca Spotted Off Seattle Coast. Will the Baby Survive Its 1st Year?

A beleaguered orca population finally has something to celebrate.

4h

How the finance industry can save the world

For millennia, the finance industry has been a primary culprit in global warming. Now it's time for finance to right its wrongs and provide the solution. It's easy to read about the current and future state of our climate and have a fit of despair. For years, the scientific consensus was that we'd be fine if temperatures increased from pre-industrial levels by less than 2°C. But the UN's recent g

5h

Ocean Moons, Promising Targets in Search for Alien Life, Could Be Dead Inside

The interiors of Europa and other watery moons in the outer solar system might be too geologically inactive to support life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The duration and quality of sleep is of vital importance in cardiovascular health

Researchers at the National Center for Cardiovascular Research (CNIC) have seen that sleeping less than six hours a day or have a poor quality of sleep increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. The results of the PESA CNIC-Santander study show the duration and quality of sleep are of vital importance for our cardiovascular health.

5h

Sleeping less than six hours a night may increase cardiovascular risk

People who sleep less than six hours a night may be at increased risk of cardiovascular disease compared with those who sleep between seven and eight hours, suggests a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Poor quality sleep increases the risk of atherosclerosis — plaque buildup in the arteries throughout the body — according to the study.

5h

5 types of climate change deniers, and how to change their minds

Climate change is easily one of humanity's greatest threats, and a mountain of data and evidence support this assertion. Despite the evidence, only 71% of Americans believe that climate change is real and primarily driven by human activities. People can and do change their minds about climate change. Trying to convince people to change their minds is often more about picking the right target than

5h

Disaster Response Projects Could Lose Funding to Border Wall

The White House has been looking at reallocating money earmarked to address flood risks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

5h

Are seniors more responsible with other people’s money?

When making financial decisions, older adults think of other people’s financial outcomes as they think of their own and make choices they would have made for themselves, according to a new study. In the study, researchers compared how adults in older and younger age groups make financial decisions both for themselves and for others. “Citizens in approximately one third of the countries around the

5h

Amazon’s Informer Deftly Mines the War on Terror

You know how the saying goes: You wait years for a gripping British counterterrorism drama and then two come along at once. First the BBC’s Bodyguard arrived on Netflix in October, all clenched teeth and joylessness and impossibly frequent explosions, riveting viewers and somehow scoring a Golden Globe for its star, Richard Madden. Arriving amid more muted fanfare on Amazon last week was Informer

5h

Fish farms in the Caribbean would make tons of food

Fish farming—or aquaculture—in the Caribbean could produce more than 34 million metric tons of seafood per year—more than two orders of magnitude larger than the region’s current seafood production, a new study shows. There are only so many fish in the sea and our appetite for seafood has already stressed many wild fisheries to the breaking point. Meanwhile, the planet’s growing population will f

5h

James Watson, Co-Discoverer of DNA Structure, Stripped of Honors Over Racist Statements

The co-discoverer of DNA's double helix is being stripped of his honorary titles because of his recent racist remarks.

5h

Exosomes Linked to Cancer Spread from Chemoresistant Tumors in Mice

The vesicles promote metastasis after chemotherapy, but the authors say the results shouldn’t alarm patients and may point to ways to improve treatments.

5h

Making Salty Water Drinkable Also Makes Brine

Making Salty Water Drinkable Also Makes Brine Desalinization's leftovers may negatively affect oceans and ecosystems. Desalination.jpg Image credits: Stanislav71/ Shutterstock.com Earth Monday, January 14, 2019 – 11:15 James Gaines, Contributor (Inside Science) — About 700 million people worldwide lack reliable access to fresh water , a number which might grow due to population growth and climat

5h

Fake Whiskeys and Octo-Ecstasy

Scientific American assistant news editor Tanya Lewis and collections editor Andrea Gawrylewski take an deeper look at two short articles from the Advances news section of the December issue, on… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

When should we stop trying to save the patient and focus on saving the organs?

The latest Hastings Center Report is dedicated to the question of defining death. Definitions of death are not only biological, but cultural, leading to important questions about organ donation. The brain can continue to be electrically active for five minutes after cardiac death—valuable time for patients in need of transplants. None One of the most disturbing movies I've ever watched is The Div

5h

A Theatrical Moscow Trial Draws the Ire of Russia's Cultural Elite

MOSCOW—Outside a courtroom here in the Russian capital, dozens of people crowded along a narrow corridor, some wearing T-shirts calling for those on trial to be freed, others clad in hipster and designer outfits. In many ways, the scene at the Meshansky District Court of Moscow was much the same as when human-rights activists or opposition politicians have gone before a judge, facing an almost ce

5h

Global Health: A Silver Bullet Against the Brain-Eating Amoeba?

Minuscule particles coated with anti-seizure drugs seem to halt microbes that feed on brain tissue.

5h

Teachers are scanning students' brains to check they are concentrating

Thousands of school children in China have trialled a brain-scanning headband that lets teachers see if they stop paying attention in class

6h

Teen brain volume changes with small amount of cannabis use, study finds

At a time when several states are moving to legalize recreational use of marijuana, new research shows that concerns about the drug's impact on teens may be warranted. The study shows that even a small amount of cannabis use by teenagers is linked to differences in their brains.

6h

A little weed may change the teenage brain

Teenagers who report using recreational marijuana just once or twice display increased volume of numerous brain regions, according to a study of 14-year-olds from Ireland, England, France, and Germany. The research, published in JNeurosci, warrants further study of low-level cannabis use among adolescents amid changing societal attitudes toward the drug.

6h

Memory of last meal influences when, how much rats eat next

Researchers have identified cells in the brains of male rats that appear to control future food intake by preserving memories of past meals. The study, published in eNeuro, lends support to the idea of boosting meal memories as a strategy for managing overeating.

6h

Diving deeper into developmental dyslexia

Men with dyslexia have altered structural connections between the thalamus and auditory cortex on the left side of the brain, new research published in JNeurosci reveals. The study extends similar observations of the dyslexic visual system and highlights the importance of early sensory processing for reading proficiency.

6h

A Surgeon Reflects On Death, Life And The 'Incredible Gift' Of Organ Transplant

Joshua Mezrich has performed hundreds of kidney, liver and pancreas transplants. He shares stories from the operating room in his book, When Death Becomes Life. (Image credit: shapecharge/shapecharge/Getty Images)

6h

Psychological processes at work in Trump and the Brexiters | Letters

The pattern is clinically well known and exemplifies one response to attachment insecurity seen first when children are younger than two, writes Dr John Richer . Plus Mary Montaut on the cult of Nigel Farage Gary Younge’s excellent piece on the similarities of Trump and the Brexiters ( Trump and the Brexiters must own the mess they lied us into , 11 January) is a reminder of the similar underlying

6h

Virtual video visits may improve patient convenience without sacrificing quality of care

A team of researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital reports that virtual video visits, one form of telehealth visit used at the hospital, can successfully replace office visits for many patients without compromising the quality of care and communication.

6h

L-proline catalyzed synthesis

Here, we report a simple and efficient method for the synthesis of different unsymmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea and N-substituted urea derivatives using L-Proline as a green catalyst. The methodology is applicable for synthesizing various derivatives of phenylurea, diphenyl urea with excellent yield at mild condition

6h

BIODS in search of better non-steroidal, non-acid antiinflammatory agents

Inflammation is defined as the response of immune system cells to damaged or injured tissues. The major symptoms of inflammation include increased blood flow, cellular influx, edema, elevated cellular metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS) nitric oxide (NO) and vasodilation.

6h

New chromenone derivatives as cholinesterase inhibitors and molecular docking studies

Inactivation of AChE and BChE by inhibitors can increase the acetylcholine level and hence may be an encouraging strategy for the treatment of AD and related neurological problems.

6h

Breakthrough in organic electronics

Researchers have discovered a simple new tweak that could double the efficiency of organic electronics. OLED-displays, plastic-based solar cells and bioelectronics are just some of the technologies that could benefit from their new discovery, which deals with 'double-doped' polymers.

6h

Rich people's gardens are better for bees and other pollinators

Gardens in wealthier areas have more pollinating insects, such as bees. This could be because gardens in richer areas tend to have a wider range of flowers

6h

Team discovers new way supermassive black holes are 'fed'

Supermassive black holes weigh millions to billions times more than our sun and lie at the center of most galaxies. A supermassive black hole several million times the mass of the sun is situated in the heart of our very own Milky Way.

6h

Anticancer drug candidate inhibits lethal aggregation of mutant tumor suppressor protein

Brazilian researchers are the first to demonstrate the action of the synthetic compound PRIMA-1 (p53 reactivation with induction of massive apoptosis-1) against amyloid aggregates of mutant p53 protein, structure found in more than half of malignant tumors.

6h

Tel Aviv University-led team discovers new way supermassive black holes are 'fed'

A new Tel Aviv University-led study published today in Nature Astronomy finds that some supermassive black holes are 'triggered' to grow, suddenly devouring a large amount of gas in their surroundings.

6h

Wild insects 'get old' before they die

Short-lived wild insects "get old—losing some of their physical abilities—before they die, new research shows.

6h

Herpes viruses and tumors evolved to learn how to manipulate the same ancient RNA

Herpes viral infections use the ancient genetic material found in the human genome to proliferate, mimicking the same process tumors have been found to manipulate, Mount Sinai researchers have shown for the first time. These observations provide further insight about how herpes viruses can manipulate the immune system in ways that may drive neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, according to

6h

Halvblinde Hubble: Kamera på historisk rumteleskop er i stykker

– Det er den bedste udsigt til universet, som mennesket har, siger forsker om det ødelagt kamera.

6h

UK must stay vigilant for bluetongue after 2007 'lucky escape'

A set of fortunate circumstances may have prevented the UK from being harder hit by bluetongue in the past but the threat of future outbreaks is only set to increase, new research reveals.

7h

Researchers catalog defects that give 2-D materials amazing properties

Amid the frenzy of worldwide research on atomically thin materials like graphene, there is one area that has eluded any systematic analysis—even though this information could be crucial to a host of potential applications, including desalination, DNA sequencing, and devices for quantum communications and computation systems.

7h

Putting cells under pressure

As cells divide to form tissues and organs in multicell organisms, they move to where they belong, informed by a series of cues that scientists have yet to observe or fully understand.

7h

Mixed ancestry might affect our mitochondria

Differences in the geographic origin of genes may affect the function of human mitochondria—energy-generating organelles inside of cells—according to a new study. Mitochondria have their own genome, separate from the nuclear genome contained in the nucleus of the cell, and both genomes harbor genes integral to energy production by mitochondria. The study explores whether these “mito-nuclear” inte

7h

The Final Season of 'Game of Thrones' Has a Launch Date

Winter is coming this spring—April 14, to be exact. There's a trailer too.

7h

Physicists Built a Machine That Breaks the Normal Rules of Light

Physicists have built a ring in which pulses of light whip circles around each other and the normal rules that govern light's behavior stop applying.

7h

What restless mice tell us about insomnia

Mice that sleep fitfully could help unravel the mystery of insomnia, researchers report. Researchers studied mice genetically modified to mimic the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), which is associated with sleep problems. They found that the animals, like some people with NF1, slept in short, irregular spurts. Studying these mice could help identify the molecular and cellular mecha

7h

Wellness gurus' health tips: which to adopt and which to ignore

The daily routines of four wellness obsessives profiled in The Times included some habits backed up by evidence – and some that definitely aren't

7h

WSU smart home tests first elder care robot

Researchers believe the robot, nicknamed RAS, could eventually help those with dementia and other limitations continue to live independently in their own homes.

7h

The orderly chaos of black holes

During the formation of a black hole a bright burst of very energetic light in the form of gamma-rays is produced, these events are called gamma-ray bursts. Researchers have built the POLAR instrument to analyze gamma-ray bursts. The first results of POLAR reveal that the high energy photons coming from gamma-ray bursts are neither completely chaotic, nor completely organized, but a mixture of the

7h

It's time to redefine 'masculinity'

APA Guidelines for the Psychological Practice of Boys and Men represents the first time the association has published rules specifically for treating white, Western males. Though the guidelines are data-driven and therapeutically sound, a corner of the American Right (and some on the Left) has taken offense. Men still dominate statistics in a number of categories, including suicide rates, substan

7h

Did you solve it? Catriona's colourful conundrums

The solutions to today’s puzzles Earlier today I set you the following five geometrical puzzles by Catriona Shearer. I hope you discovered the clever way of solving them, without recourse to pages of algebra. 1. Orange segments Continue reading…

7h

Double star system flips planet-forming disk into pole position

Astronomers have found the first confirmed example of a double star system that has flipped its surrounding disc to a position that leaps over the orbital plane of those stars.

7h

DNA origami: A precise measuring tool for optimal antibody effectiveness

Using DNA origami — DNA-based design of precise nanostructures — scientists have been able to demonstrate the most accurate distance between densely packed antigens in order to get the strongest bond to antibodies in the immune system. The study may be of significance to the development of vaccines and immunotherapy used in cancer.

7h

Wild insects 'get old' before they die

Short-lived wild insects 'get old' — losing some of their physical abilities — before they die, new research shows.

7h

What Netflix Is Learning From the Massive Success of Bird Box

Bird Box is one of those movies that don’t stand up to the barest amount of scrutiny. If you were to pause the film on Netflix, where it is streaming now, and ask a basic plot question—such as “How does every character guess that a nondescript home exists as a safe zone from the movie’s ongoing apocalypse?” — you might struggle to come up with a good answer. How do the titular birds stay in their

7h

Discovery of single atom structure leads to more efficient catalyst

The discovery shows an efficiency rate that is up to 25 times higher than traditional catalysts made from larger iridium structures or nanoparticles.

7h

UK must stay vigilant for bluetongue after 2007 'lucky escape'

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have used mathematical modelling to identify why the 2007 UK outbreak of bluetongue — a viral disease spread by midge bites that affects sheep and cattle — was smaller than it could have been and to predict the future impact of the disease in northern Europe as the climate warms.

7h

GPs prescribe more opioid drugs for pain in poorer areas of England

Study finds nine areas in the north among top 10 highest prescribers in the country People living in deprived areas of England are more likely to be prescribed opioid drugs for pain relief than those in wealthier parts of the country, according to research. A study found GPs in parts of Blackpool and St Helens prescribe the highest levels of opioids in England. Five areas in north-east England an

7h

Microbes Might Be the Key to a Mars Mission

Engineered yeast could turn waste into food, plastics and other essentials — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Military spouses face higher perinatal depression risk

Women whose partners are away on military deployment are at greater risk of developing mental illness during the perinatal period, according to a review article.

7h

Scientists develop promising new type of polymers

Organic polymers can nowadays be found in solar cells, sensors, LEDs and in many other technical applications. One specific type of polymers – known as S-PPVs – were previously regarded as promising in theory but were almost impossible to produce from a technical perspective. After many years of work, a team has now managed to identify a new chemical synthesis process for the production of S-PPVs.

7h

What’s the Difference Between Steve King and Donald Trump?

The Republican Party is doing a little soul searching. Last week, Representative Steve King of Iowa drew harsh rebukes from some members of his party for his defenses of white nationalism and white supremacy. “White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization—how did that language become offensive?” King told the New York Times . “Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of

7h

Researchers catalog defects that give 2D materials amazing properties

A new theoretical framework developed by MIT researchers predicts the kinds of holes that can form in two-dimensional materials like graphene. The work could help in the design of new filtration and desalination devices or new quantum computing and communications systems.

8h

Wild insects 'get old' before they die

Short-lived wild insects 'get old' — losing some of their physical abilities — before they die, new research shows.

8h

More accurate leukemia diagnosis expected as researchers refine leukemia classification

Research led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital means more than 90 percent of the most common cases of childhood cancer can now be classified by subtype, an advance likely to fuel precision medicine.

8h

Herpes viruses and tumors evolved to learn how to manipulate the same ancient RNA

Herpes viral infections use the ancient genetic material found in the human genome to proliferate, mimicking the same process tumors have been found to manipulate, Mount Sinai researchers have shown for the first time. These observations provide further insight about how herpes viruses can manipulate the immune system in ways that may drive neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, according to

8h

DNA origami: A precise measuring tool for optimal antibody effectiveness

Using DNA origami — DNA-based design of precise nanostructures — scientists at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, in collaboration with researchers at University of Oslo, Norway, have been able to demonstrate the most accurate distance between densely packed antigens in order to get the strongest bond to antibodies in the immune system. The study, which is published in the journal Nature Nanotechnol

8h

The YouTube app now lets you swipe through videos so you can watch forever

Technology The design team tells us how they made swipe happen. On Monday, YouTube launched a new way to move through videos on mobile: swiping.

8h

Weird star system has double binary stars and wonky planetary nursery

A planet-forming disc of dust and gas is orbiting a pair of binary stars at an odd angle, and a second set of binary stars circle the whole system to keep it in line

8h

A child's mix of gut bacteria may determine if they get allergies

Faecal transplants from healthy children prevent mice from developing allergies, and drugs could mimic this effect in humans

8h

Store craft beer in a cool place and consume it as fresh as possible

A new study by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (Leibniz-LSB@TUM) shows that craft beer should be kept cool and consumed as fresh as possible. After three months, cold stored beer already loses more than one third of an important hop odorant which characterizes the typical aroma of many craft beers. Storage at room temperature causes the concentr

8h

Gut microbes from healthy infants block milk allergy development in mice

New research suggests that the gut microbiome may help prevent the development of cow's milk allergy. Scientists at the University of Chicago found that gut microbes from healthy human infant donors transplanted into mice protected animals exposed to milk from experiencing allergic reactions, while gut microbes transplanted from infants allergic to milk did not. The work, described online today in

8h

Sexual minorities more likely to suffer severe substance use disorders

Researchers know that lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals are more likely than heterosexuals to use alcohol, tobacco or other drugs, but until now they didn't know to what degree.

8h

Putting cells under pressure

As cells divide to form tissues and organs in multicell organisms, they move to where they belong, informed by a series of cues that scientists have yet to observe or fully understand.

8h

Technology use explains at most 0.4 percent of adolescent wellbeing, new study finds

Study finds only 0.4 percent of wellbeing in adolescents is associated with technology use.Most definitive study to date, using data from 300,000 adolescents and parents in the UK and USAComparatively, eating potatoes has nearly as negative effect and wearing glasses has a more negative effect on adolescent mental health then screen use. Novel methodology to remove bias from data analysis revealed

8h

Demi Lovato's overdose causes surge in media, but few mentions of lifesaving hotline

Demi Lovato's drug overdose and Anthony Bourdain's suicide resulted in unequal news coverage of national help hotlines, finds a new study published Jan. 14 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

8h

Research reveals strategies for combating science misinformation

Nowhere has the impact of scientific misinformation been more profound than on the issue of climate change in the US, where a well-funded network has coalesced around the goal of undercutting the legitimacy of climate science. But as a new paper illustrates, an emerging field of research is providing new insights into this critical dynamic.

8h

Life-threatening lung disease averted in experimental models

Combining cutting-edge single-cell sequencing with novel computational techniques, UC San Francisco researchers identified a new type of immune cell that infiltrates lung tissue and initiates fibrosis. Furthermore, they were able to prevent fibrosis in mouse models of the disease by targeting these cells for destruction, a discovery that may lead to new treatments for this terminal illness.

8h

Differences in genes' geographic origin influence mitochondrial function

A new study explores whether interactions between genomes found in the nucleus and in the mitochondria of a cell could be altered when genes of different geographic origins are brought together.

8h

Researchers discover common markers of tumor hypoxia across 19 cancer types

Unlike healthy tissues, tumors thrive in low-oxygen environments, often acquiring the ability to resist treatment and spread to other sites in the body. Despite being a well-known cause of therapy resistance and metastasis, the impact of low oxygen, known as hypoxia, on tumor cells is poorly understood. As reported today in Nature Genetics, researchers have discovered molecular hallmarks of hypoxi

8h

Breakthrough in organic electronics

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a simple new tweak that could double the efficiency of organic electronics. OLED-displays, plastic-based solar cells and bioelectronics are just some of the technologies that could benefit from their new discovery, which deals with 'double-doped' polymers.

8h

How cancer becomes transmissible in Tasmanian devils: Molecular mechanisms elucidated

Facial tumors of Tasmanian devils belong to the extremely rare cases of transmissible cancers. Nevertheless, they are highly interesting for biomedical research, as they allow the study of fundamental properties of cancer cells and their interaction with the host´s immune system. Scientists at the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Ve

8h

Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation

Given the pressures that pollinators face in agricultural land, cities could play an important role in conserving pollinators, according to a new study. The research, carried out by scientists at the Universities of Bristol, Edinburgh, Leeds and Reading in collaboration with Cardiff University and the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), has revealed that gardens and allotments

8h

Genetically modified food opponents know less than they think, research finds

People most opposed to genetically modified foods think they know the most about them, but actually know the least, new report finds.

8h

3D printed implant promotes nerve cell growth to treat spinal cord injury

For the first time, researchers at University of California San Diego have used rapid 3D printing technologies to create a spinal cord, then successfully implanted that scaffolding, loaded with neural stem cells, into sites of severe spinal cord injury in rats.

8h

Long-acting contraceptive designed to be self-administered via microneedle patch

A new long-acting contraceptive designed to be self-administered by women may provide a new family planning option, particularly in developing nations where access to healthcare can be limited, a recent study suggests. The contraceptive would be delivered using microneedle skin patch technology originally developed for the painless administration of vaccines.

8h

When the body's in overdrive, this liver hormone puts the brakes on metabolism

Researchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute have identified a hormone produced by the liver that tells the body to downshift its metabolism when it's expending a lot of energy.

8h

Large study identifies numerous genes associated with risk tolerance and risky behaviors

Scientists have identified 124 genetic variants associated with someone's willingness to take risks. They found evidence of shared genetic influences across a general measure of risk tolerance and many specific risky behaviors, such as speeding, drinking alcohol, tobacco and cannabis consumption, and sexual behavior. No variant on its own meaningfully affects risk tolerance or making risky decisio

8h

Antarctic ice sheet could suffer a one-two climate punch

Variations in the axial tilt of the Earth have significant implications for the rise and fall of the Antarctic Ice Sheet, the miles-deep blanket of ice that locks up huge volumes of water that, if melted, would dramatically elevate sea level and alter the world's coastlines. New research matches the geologic record of Antarctica's ice with the periodic astronomical motions of the Earth.

8h

Scientists coax proteins to form synthetic structures with method that mimics nature

Scientists have invented a simple new way to build synthetic nanostructures from proteins, perhaps allowing for development of molecular cages that precisely deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumors or photosynthetic systems for harvesting energy from light.

8h

Complication rates and costs of invasive lung cancer diagnostic tests may be higher than anticipated

Complication rates following invasive diagnostic procedures for lung abnormalities were twice as high in the community setting compared to those reported in lung cancer screening trials, and associated downstream costs ranged from $6,320 to $56,845 on average, according to a new study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

8h

ZIP code or genetic code?

Analysis of insurance records of more than 56,000 twin pairs assesses the influence of genes and environment in 560 diseases.Going beyond the usual one-disease-at-a-time approach, the new method analyzes heritable and environmental factors across hundreds of common conditions.Insights can propel genetic and epidemiological research for a range of diseases, inform clinical decisions, health policy.

8h

Intestinal bacteria from healthy infants prevent food allergy

New research from the University of Chicago shows that healthy infants have intestinal bacteria that prevent the development of food allergies.

8h

Recalling happy memories during adolescence can reduce risk of depression

Recalling positive events and experiences can help young people build resilience against depression in later life, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge.

8h

Team finds how error and reward signals are organized within the cerebral cortex

With the team having verified generators of the error signal, further research is needed to determine what each generator contributes.

8h

Blood-brain barrier breakdown an early driver of dementia, USC study says

USC study shows people with the worst memory problems also had the most leakage in their brain's blood vessels — regardless of whether abnormal proteins amyloid and tau were present.

8h

New immune system understanding may lead to safer nanomedicines

Eliminating immunoglobulins from blood reduced ability of C3 to find and mark nanoparticles by 70-95 percent.

8h

Drug hobbles deadly liver cancer by stifling protein production

In laboratory experiments, UC San Francisco researchers successfully beat back the growth of aggressive liver cancers using a surprising new approach. Traditionally, targeted cancer therapies aim to disable proteins borne of cancer-driving genes. Instead, the UCSF scientists prevented these proteins, including those that shield tumors from the immune system, from being built in the first place.

8h

The orderly chaos of black holes

During the formation of a black hole a bright burst of very energetic light in the form of gamma-rays is produced, these events are called gamma-ray bursts. Researchers from UNIGE, in collaboration with an international team, have built the POLAR instrument to analyze gamma-ray bursts. The first results of POLAR reveal that the high energy photons coming from gamma-ray bursts are neither completel

8h

Where is George? Ask this software to look at the crowd

Idtracker.ai is a mix of conventional algorithms and artificial intelligence developed at the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown. From the video footage of a moving crowd composed of dozens of individuals, it learns to identify each and every individual in that crowd.

8h

Study finds the circuits that may help you keep your cool

For optimal performance the brain can strike a balance of being alert, but not overly excited, using a circuit mechanism newly teased out by scientists at MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory.

8h

Double star system flips planet-forming disk into pole position

New research led by an astronomer at the University of Warwick has found the first confirmed example of a double star system that has flipped its surrounding disc to a position that leaps over the orbital plane of those stars.

8h

Let's prepare now so farming insects as food is environmentally friendly, say scientists

As whole-roasted crickets gain traction as a protein-rich snack and restaurants experiment with mealworms on the menu, there's still 'an overwhelming lack of knowledge' concerning the ecological sustainability of the emerging, multi-million-dollar insects-as-food industry, say researchers at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. In an opinion article published Jan. 14 in the journal Tre

8h

Conversion of breast cancer cells into fat cells impedes the formation of metastases

An innovative combination therapy can force malignant breast cancer cells to turn into fat cells. This can be used to prevent the formation of metastases in mice, as researchers at the University of Basel's Department of Biomedicine recently reported in the journal Cancer Cell.

8h

Breast cancer cells in mice tricked into turning into fat cells

As cancer cells respond to cues in their microenvironment, they can enter a highly plastic state in which they are susceptible to transdifferentiation into a different type of cell. Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland exploited this critical phase, known as an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), to coax breast cancer cells in mice to turn into harmless fat cells. The proof-o

8h

A cosmic flare called the ‘Cow’ may reveal a new way that stars die

A burst of light from far away may have been an odd type of exploding star or a white dwarf being eaten by a black hole.

8h

Strongest opponents of GM foods know the least but think they know the most

Analysis of surveys from US, France and Germany could also have implications for science communication in other fields The most extreme opponents of genetically modified foods know the least about science but believe they know the most, researchers have found. The findings from public surveys in the US, France and Germany suggest that rather than being a barrier to the possession of strongly held

8h

Remembering good times 'could reduce teenage depression'

Recalling happy events appears to build resilience to mental illness, say scientists Remembering the good times may help adolescents stave off depression, according to research on teenagers who were at risk of mental illness because of childhood hardships. Scientists at the University of Cambridge found recalling happy events appeared to build their resilience to mental illness, suggesting this c

8h

Flere reparationsmanualer og reservedele på vej til køleskabe, skærme og vaskemaskiner

Nye EU-regler skal tvinge elektronikproducenter til at fremlægge flere manualer, fremstille originale reservedele og droppe lim til fordel for skruer. Det skal gøre det nemmere at reparere elektronikprodukter og forlænge deres levetid. Frivillige reparationscafeer og maker-spaces får dog ikke hel…

8h

5000 times faster than a computer

The absorption of light in semiconductor crystals without inversion symmetry can generate electric currents. Researchers have now generated directed currents at terahertz (THz) frequencies, much higher than the clock rates of current electronics. They show that electronic charge transfer between neighboring atoms in the crystal lattice represents the underlying mechanism.

8h

Fossil deposit is much richer than expected

Near the Dutch town of Winterswijk is an Eldorado for fossil lovers. A student has now analyzed pieces from museums and private collections for his master's thesis. He found an amazing amount of almost completely preserved skeletons, between 242 and 247 million years old. The good condition is presumably due to particularly favorable development conditions. These make Winterswijk a cornucopia for

8h

Wildfire: Fort McMurray homes have normal levels of indoor toxins

Researchers have examined dust from homes in Fort McMurray, Alta., for evidence of harmful toxins left in the aftermath of the devastating 2016 wildfire. Their study reveals normal levels of contaminants that are comparable to homes across Canada, and so far, no evidence of long-term health risks from fire-ash exposure in residents' homes.

8h

Chance of depression in new doctors depends on where they train

Nearly 20,000 future doctors will graduate from US medical school this spring, and embark on the residency training. But a new study suggests that their mental health in the crucial first year of training — called internship — may depend a lot on the nature of the program they enter. The year-long study of 1,276 medical interns in 54 programs finds they were more likely to suffer from depression

8h

What Are Corticosteroids?

Corticosteroids are synthetic drugs that are similar to cortisol, a hormone the body naturally produces. They're used to treat a wide variety of disorders, including asthma, arthritis, skin conditions and autoimmune diseases.

8h

Ekspert: Der er ikke en jordisk chance for en røgfri generation i 2030

Flere danske unge har de senere år kastet sig over cigaretterne, viser ny rapport. Flere partier er klar til at sætte prisen på cigaretterne op, men regeringen er skeptisk. Ifølge ekspert får vi ikke bragt antallet af unge rygere ned, uden prisen kommer op.

8h

A mother and son's photographic journey through dementia | Tony Luciani

Artist Tony Luciani was testing out a new camera when his 93-year-old mother, Elia, snuck into the background of his photos. The spontaneous images that resulted sparked a years-long collaboration, with Luciani documenting his mom's life and spirit as she lived with dementia. In this touching talk, he shares the stories behind some of their favorite shots, capturing the joy and grief of caring for

8h

Desalination produces more toxic waste than clean water

More than 16,000 desalination plants scattered across the globe produce far more toxic sludge than fresh water, according to a first global assessment of the sector's industrial waste, published Monday.

8h

Topological quantities flow

Topology is an emerging field within many scientific disciplines, even leading to a Nobel Physics Prize in 2016. Leiden physicist Marcello Caio and his colleagues have now discovered the existence of topological currents in analogy to electric currents. Their research is published in Nature Physics.

8h

Scientists coax proteins to form synthetic structures with method that mimics nature

Scientists have long dreamed of creating synthetic structures out of the same raw material that nature uses in living systems—proteins—believing such an advance would allow for the development of transformative nanomachines, for example, molecular cages that precisely deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumors or photosynthetic systems for harvesting energy from light. Now a team of biologists from The

8h

Genetically modified food opponents know less than they think, research finds

The people who hold the most extreme views opposing genetically modified (GM) foods think they know most about GM food science, but actually know the least, according to new research.

8h

Double star system flips planet-forming disk into pole position

New research led by an astronomer at the University of Warwick has found the first confirmed example of a double star system that has flipped its surrounding disc to a position that leaps over the orbital plane of those stars. The international team of astronomers used the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) to obtain high-resolution images of the Asteroid belt-sized disc.

8h

Differences in genes' geographic origin influence mitochondrial function

Differences in the geographic origin of genes may affect the function of human mitochondria—energy-generating organelles inside of cells—according to a new study. Mitochondria have their own genome, separate from the nuclear genome contained in the nucleus of the cell, and both genomes harbor genes integral to energy production by mitochondria. The study explores whether these "mito-nuclear" inter

8h

Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation

Given the pressures that pollinators face in agricultural land, cities could play an important role in conserving pollinators, according to a new study. The research, carried out by scientists at the Universities of Bristol, Edinburgh, Leeds and Reading in collaboration with Cardiff University and the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), has revealed that gardens and allotments

8h

Research reveals strategies for combating science misinformation

Just as the scientific community was reaching a consensus on the dangerous reality of climate change, the partisan divide on climate change began to widen.

8h

Antarctic ice sheet could suffer a one-two climate punchAntarctic Losing Ice

Scientists have long speculated that our planet's climate system is intimately linked to the Earth's celestial motions.

8h

The orderly chaos of black holes

During the formation of a black hole, a bright burst of very energetic light in the form of gamma rays is produced, these events are called gamma ray bursts. The physics behind this phenomenon includes many of the least understood fields within physics today: general gravity, extreme temperatures and acceleration of particles far beyond the energy of the most powerful particle accelerators on Eart

8h

Doubling the efficiency of organic electronics

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a simple new tweak that could double the efficiency of organic electronics. OLED-displays, plastic-based solar cells and bioelectronics are just some of the technologies that could benefit from their new discovery, which deals with "double-doped" polymers.

8h

New immune system understanding may lead to safer nanomedicines

Doctors would like to use all sorts of nanoparticles in the body, for example to construct detailed images of anatomy and disease, and to deliver cancer-fighting drugs deep within tumor tissue. However, millions of years of evolution have equipped the body to identify and reject foreign particles, even nanoparticles. And so one major challenge in the use of nanomedicine has been the immune system'

8h

Let's prepare now so farming insects as food is environmentally friendly, say scientists

As whole-roasted crickets gain traction as a protein-rich snack and restaurants experiment with mealworms on the menu, there's still "an overwhelming lack of knowledge" concerning the ecological sustainability of the emerging, multi-million-dollar insects-as-food industry, say researchers at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. In an opinion article published January 14 in the journal

8h

Screens Might Be as Bad for Mental Health as … Potatoes

The science of how technology affects happiness needs a huge statistical upgrade. A new paper charts a path toward better research.

8h

Bio-Printers Are Churning out Living Fixes to Broken Spines

A new study shows that 3D-printing a section of spinal cord, living cells and all, restored movement in injured rats.

8h

The Space Oracle by Ken Hollings review – why humans are star-struck

From astrology’s houses of the zodiac to the ‘lost cosmonauts’, this beautifully written book appraises humanity’s relationship with the stars At the start of this succinct survey of our undying love affair with the cosmos, Ken Hollings notes that we are all, even in this scientific age, “secretly familiar with our star sign”. His book’s 12 chapters echo the 12 houses of the zodiac. It is not a d

8h

The Brain Maps Out Ideas and Memories Like Spaces

We humans have always experienced an odd — and oddly deep — connection between the mental worlds and physical worlds we inhabit, especially when it comes to memory. We’re good at remembering landmarks and settings, and if we give our memories a location for context, hanging on to them becomes easier. To remember long speeches, ancient Greek and Roman orators imagined wandering through “memory pal

8h

Crowdsourcing lower back pain offers ‘tricks’

Crowdsourcing information on lower back pain may offer people with the condition support, new research finds. Here, Jorge Goncalves of the University of Melbourne and Simo Hosio of the University of Oulu explain their work: Globally, low back pain (LBP) is one of the main reasons why many people take sick leave from work or can’t get out and exercise. It has a massive impact on the quality of cou

8h

Procrastination at the top level

A study by psychologists from the Higher School of Economics has proven that top managers use their time more effectively than middle managers. They have lower procrastination levels and focus more on the future.

8h

Mesenchymal stems cells: Vital role in repair of damaged organs

In adults, mesenchymal stems cells (MSCs) are primarily found in bone marrow and they play a vital role in repair of damaged organs. The transformation of a single MSC into complex tissue like cartilage and bone starts with its association with other MSCs in order to form microscopic clusters via a process termed as condensation.

8h

Discovery casts doubt on cell surface organization models

Like planets, the body's cell surfaces look smooth from a distance but hilly closer up. A new article describes implications, unknown to date, of the way data from cell surfaces are normally interpreted; i.e. as if they lacked topographic features.

8h

Total lunar eclipse on Jan 20-21 will be last until 2022

People in North and South America, a large part of Europe and Africa may get a glimpse of a total lunar eclipse overnight from January 20 to 21, the last such event until 2022.

8h

Volkswagen to build electric vehicles at Tennessee plant

German automaker Volkswagen says its factory in Tennessee will be the focus of an $800 million investment in its manufacturing of electric vehicles in North America.

8h

Researchers identify long-sought activator of sigma receptors in human cells, marking important advance in cell biology

Cells communicate through complex mechanisms that typically involve receptors and ligands that bind to them. Endogenous ligands, produced by the body, have been identified for the vast majority of cellular receptors, helping explain receptor existence and function. But in the case of sigma-1 receptors, which interact with a diverse array of psychoactive drugs, an endogenous ligand has remained elu

8h

A new study shows that wine experts differ by geographic region

When it comes to wine experts, some are more alike than others.

8h

Introducing PROSPERA: A new sweet basil hybrid resistant to Downy Mildew

In recent years an epidemic of Downy Mildew (DM) has caused severe damage to sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) crops all over the world. The cause of the epidemic is a leaf fungus called Peronospora belbahrii. Symptoms of infected plants include deformed leaves, chlorotic lesions on leaves and dark spores on the lower leaf surface.

8h

Fort McMurray homes have normal levels of indoor toxins, study reveals

University of Toronto Engineering researchers have examined dust from homes in Fort McMurray, Alta., for evidence of harmful toxins left in the aftermath of the devastating 2016 wildfire. Their study reveals normal levels of contaminants that are comparable to homes across Canada, and so far, no evidence of long-term health risks from fire-ash exposure in residents' homes.

8h

Temple researchers identify long-sought activator of sigma receptors in human cells

Cells communicate through complex mechanisms that typically involve receptors and ligands that bind to them. Endogenous ligands have been identified for the vast majority of cellular receptors, helping explain receptor existence and function. But in the case of sigma-1 receptors, which interact with a diverse array of psychoactive drugs, an endogenous ligand has remained elusive. Now, Temple resea

8h

A new study shows that wine experts differ by geographic region

Canadian vintners, sommeliers, journalists and other wine experts judge and rate wines differently depending on where in the country they are located. The two regions studied, British Columbia and Quebec, both come from different wine-tasting traditions and this is reflected in how they appraise wine.

8h

Nasa-sonde på lynvisit i solsystemets fjerne afkrog

PLUS. Kuiperbæltet blev opdaget for mindre end 30 år siden – nu giver observationer af Ultima Thule ny viden.

9h

Concerns over increase in toxic brine from desalination plants

Operations to extract fresh water from the sea are now producing 50% more of this salty effluent than expected.

9h

An old drug shows promise for preeclampsia

New research with mice points the way to the first possible drug treatment for preeclampsia. One in 20 women around the world suffers from preeclampsia during pregnancy. It causes a rise in blood pressure and kidney failure. It is one of the most common causes of death during pregnancy—for both the mother and the fetus. There is currently no treatment and the only method doctors have to prevent i

9h

Vitamin D supplements are of no benefit to the over 70s

There is little benefit for those over 70 taking higher dose vitamin D supplements to improve their bone strength and reduce the risk of falls, new research has revealed.

9h

The secret to Rembrandt's impasto unveiled

Rembrandt van Rijn revolutionized painting with a 3D effect using his impasto technique, where thick paint makes a masterpiece protrude from the surface. Scientists have now found out how he did it.

9h

Pain and substance abuse interact in a vicious cycle

Pain and substance use interact in a vicious cycle that can ultimately worsen and maintain both chronic pain and addiction, according to new research.

9h

Next generation photonic memory devices are light-written, ultrafast and energy efficient

Researchers have developed a 'hybrid technology' which shows the advantages of both light and magnetic hard drives. Ultra-short (femtosecond) light pulses allows data to be directly written in a magnetic memory in a fast and highly energy-efficient way. This research promises to revolutionize the process of data storage in future photonic integrated circuits.

9h

Scientists identify how plants sense temperature

A UC Riverside researcher is leading a team exploring how plants respond to temperature.

9h

Viennese scientists develop promising new type of polymers

Organic polymers can nowadays be found in solar cells, sensors, LEDs and in many other technical applications. One specific type of polymers – known as S-PPVs – were previously regarded as promising in theory but were almost impossible to produce from a technical perspective. After many years of work, a team from TU Wien has now managed to identify a new chemical synthesis process for the producti

9h

Military spouses face higher perinatal depression risk

Women whose partners are away on military deployment are at greater risk of developing mental illness during the perinatal period, according to a review paper published in the Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps.

9h

Chance of depression in new doctors depends on where they train

Nearly 20,000 future doctors will graduate from US medical school this spring, and embark on the residency training. But a new study suggests that their mental health in the crucial first year of training — called internship — may depend a lot on the nature of the program they enter. The year-long study of 1,276 medical interns in 54 programs finds they were more likely to suffer from depression

9h

Fort McMurray homes have normal levels of indoor toxins, U of T Engineering study reveals

U of T Engineering researchers have examined dust from homes in Fort McMurray, Alta., for evidence of harmful toxins left in the aftermath of the devastating 2016 wildfire. Their study reveals normal levels of contaminants that are comparable to homes across Canada, and so far, no evidence of long-term health risks from fire-ash exposure in residents' homes.

9h

Fossil deposit is much richer than expected

Near the Dutch town of Winterswijk is an Eldorado for fossil lovers. A student at the University of Bonn has now analyzed pieces from museums and private collections for his master's thesis. He found an amazing amount of almost completely preserved skeletons, between 242 and 247 million years old. The good condition is presumably due to particularly favorable development conditions. These make Win

9h

5,000 times faster than a computer

The absorption of light in semiconductor crystals without inversion symmetry can generate electric currents. Researchers at the Max-Born-Institute have now generated directed currents at terahertz (THz) frequencies, much higher than the clock rates of current electronics. They show that electronic charge transfer between neighboring atoms in the crystal lattice represents the underlying mechanism.

9h

Genetic risk for atypical heart attack in women identified

New research published by teams from Leicester, UK and Paris, France in collaboration with international partners from the US and Australia, has found a common genetic factor that confers a significant risk of atypical heart attacks in women.

9h

UN warns of rising levels of toxic brine as desalination plants meet growing water needs

A fast-rising number of desalination plants (~16,000, with capacity concentrated in the Middle East / North Africa) quench a growing thirst for freshwater but also create a salty dilemma: how to deal with the chemical-laden leftover brine.In a new analysis, UN experts say that for every litre of freshwater, desalination plants produce on average 1.5 litres of brine (though values vary dramatically

9h

Desalination pours more toxic brine into the ocean than previously thought

Desalination plants help offset the world’s growing water needs, but they also produce much more supersalty water than scientists realized.

9h

Trafikstyrelsen: Virksomheder skal selv bestemme deres sikkerhedsprocedurer

Det er op til de enkelte togoperatører, hvordan de kontrollerer sættevogne på godstog. DB Cargo ønsker ikke at fortælle om deres sikkerhedsprocedure.

9h

Desalination Is Booming. But What About All That Toxic Brine?

Desalination plants turn seawater into drinking water, but also pump hypersaline water back into the environment. That's especially troubling because desal has become extremely popular.

9h

UN warns of rising levels of toxic brine as desalination plants meet growing water needs

The fast-rising number of desalination plants worldwide—now almost 16,000, with capacity concentrated in the Middle East and North Africa—quench a growing thirst for freshwater but create a salty dilemma as well: how to deal with all the chemical-laden leftover brine.

9h

The Atlantic Bears Witness to Trump’s Destructive Presidency

In a November 2016 editorial, The Atlantic warned that Donald Trump would be a threat to the republic—and a danger to democracy itself. In the course of making our case that he was unfit to command, we called him “a demagogue, a xenophobe, a sexist, a know-nothing, and a liar.” That was an understatement, argues editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg. In a new Atlantic Argument, Goldberg elucidates The

9h

Region Hovedstaden har ansat to nye professorer i børne- og ungdomspsykiatri

Anne Katrine Pagsberg og Anne Thorup er nye kliniske professorer i forskningsenheden på børne- og ungdomspsykiatrisk center i Region Hovedstadens Psykiatri.

9h

Next generation photonic memory devices are light-written, ultrafast and energy efficient

Researchers of the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have developed a 'hybrid technology' which shows the advantages of both light and magnetic hard drives. Ultra-short (femtosecond) light pulses allows data to be directly written in a magnetic memory in a fast and highly energy-efficient way. This research, published in Nature Communications, promises to revolutionize the process of data

9h

Pain and substance abuse interact in a vicious cycle

Pain and substance use interact in a vicious cycle that can ultimately worsen and maintain both chronic pain and addiction, according to a research team including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

9h

Discovery casts doubt on cell surface organization models

Like planets, the body's cell surfaces look smooth from a distance but hilly closer up. An article published in Communications Biology describes implications, unknown to date, of the way data from cell surfaces are normally interpreted; i.e., as if they lacked topographic features.

9h

The secret to Rembrandt's impasto unveiled

Rembrandt van Rijn revolutionized painting with a 3D effect using his impasto technique, where thick paint makes a masterpiece protrude from the surface. Thanks to the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, Grenoble, France, three centuries later an international team of scientists led by the Materials Science and Engineering Department of the Delft University of Technology and the Rijksmuseum have found

9h

Doing more with less

In adults, mesenchymal stems cells (MSCs) are primarily found in bone marrow and they play a vital role in repair of damaged organs. The transformation of a single MSC into complex tissue like cartilage and bone starts with its association with other MSCs in order to form microscopic clusters via a process termed as condensation.

9h

To fight drug resistance, block how bacteria share it?

Researchers have figured out a key step in the transmission of antibiotic resistance from one Acinetobacter bacterium to another. The work sheds light on how antibiotic resistance spreads through a hospital or community. Spotless surfaces in hospitals can hide bacteria that rarely cause problems for healthy people but pose a serious threat to people with weakened immune systems. Acinetobacter bau

9h

How to prepare your digital life for your inevitable death

DIY What will happen to your photos and passwords? You probably know where you want your money and physical assets to go when you die. But how do you protect the future of your digital photos, accounts, and passwords?

9h

Predicting enhancers from multiple cell lines and tissues based on SVM method

Enhancers are short DNA regions that improve transcription efficiency by recruiting transcription factors. Identifying enhancer regions is important to understand the process of gene expression. As enhancers are independent of their distances and orientations to the target genes, it is difficult to locate enhancers accurately.

10h

Study shows vitamin D supplements are of no benefit to the over 70s

There is little benefit for those over 70 taking higher dose vitamin D supplements to improve their bone strength and reduce the risk of falls, new research has revealed.

10h

Molecular aspects of the dengue virus infection process: A review

At the present time, dengue is one of the most important arboviruses affecting man, becoming a serious global public health problem, especially in subtropical and tropical countries, where environmental conditions favor the development and proliferation of the mosquito Aedes aegypti. Dengue is caused by a type of flavivírus, which is an enveloped virus of spherical geometry.

10h

Fused bis-lactams to spirolactams: New member of the family of ring- contraction reaction

A new ring contraction of fused bis-lactams into spirolactams is presented here. In the presence of a triflate catalyst in various solvents under microwave irradiation, this rearrangement allows a clean conversion of some fused bicycles into spirocycles with good yields.

10h

Change your phone settings so Apple, Google can't track your movements

Technology companies have been pummeled by revelations about how poorly they protect their customers' personal information, including an in-depth New York Times report detailing the ability of smartphone apps to track users' locations. Some companies, most notably Apple, have begun promoting the fact that they sell products and services that safeguard consumer privacy.

10h

Nobody predicted this galaxy would be so lonely

When astronomers examined a galaxy called Messier 94, they discovered far fewer satellite galaxies than expected. In fact, they detected just two galaxies near M94, with very few stars each. M94 is a similar size as our Milky Way. Researchers have long known the Milky Way has about 10 smaller, satellite galaxies surrounding it, each with at least a million stars, and up to more than a billion, su

10h

Nanostructures get better at harvesting sunlight for solar steam generation

One way to produce clean water is to heat dirty water until it turns into steam. As the steam rises, it leaves behind the heavier contaminants and can be collected and cooled, providing clean water. There are many ways to heat water, one of which is to use light-absorbing materials at the air/water interface to harvest sunlight and convert the light into heat. This method is very energy-efficient

10h

Human trafficking research shows problem looks the same, whether in U.S. or Middle East

Despite toiling up to 18 hours a day, Rhoda, a Filipina migrant domestic worker in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), was given food only once every 24 hours by her employers, who insisted she must finish all her daily chores before eating.

10h

AI-controlled checks to boost security and speed up traffic at EU borders

Traffic across the EU's external borders is on the rise, as is the threat posed by illegal immigration. As over 700 million people enter the EU each year, this puts considerable pressure on border agencies that must adhere to strict security protocols while at the same time ensuring the smooth flow of traffic into the EU. Increased international trade and more sophisticated criminal activity make

10h

Dolphins unintentionally poisoning offspring with banned chemicals

Toxins called PCBs were banned in the 1980s, but they persist in the environment where they collect and concentrate in dolphin blubber – and in dolphin milk

10h

Stem cells regulate their fate by altering their stiffness

In adults, mesenchymal stems cells (MSCs) are primarily found in bone marrow and they play a vital role in repair of damaged organs. The transformation of a single MSC into complex tissue like cartilage and bone starts with its association with other MSCs in order to form microscopic clusters via a process termed as condensation. While it is known that this condensation step is important for skele

10h

Here's how origami could be used to shape the future of engineering

Folding a paper crane is a slow, methodical process. So is unfolding an array of solar panels in space.

10h

Reflections from a Nobel winner: Scientists need time to make discoveries

Since the announcement that I won the Nobel Prize in physics for chirped pulse amplification, or CPA, there has been a lot of attention on its practical applications.

10h

Space subjects that will get the world's attention in 2019 and beyond

The first few days of 2019 brought remarkable news from outer space. On January 1 NASA's New Horizons space probe made the most distant planetary flyby ever, and captured images of a small object 4 billion miles away from earth. The following day, China landed its Chang'e 4 rover, named Jade Rabbit 2, on the far side of the moon – another first.

10h

Seeing Titan with infrared eyes

Saturn's moon Titan is enveloped in a thick atmosphere, but through the infrared eyes of the international Cassini mission, the moon's myriad surface features are revealed in this exquisite global mosaic.

10h

USA Today publisher targeted for buyout

The publisher of USA Today has received a $1.36 billion buyout bid from a media group with a history of taking over struggling newspapers and slashing jobs.

10h

Big Bang query: Mapping how a mysterious liquid became all matter

The leading theory about how the universe began is the Big Bang, which says that 14 billion years ago the universe existed as a singularity, a one-dimensional point, with a vast array of fundamental particles contained within it. Extremely high heat and energy caused it to inflate and then expand into the cosmos as we know it—and, the expansion continues to this day.

10h

GPs prescribe more opioids for pain in poor Northern areas, study reveals

English patients living in poorer areas are likely to be prescribed more opioids by their GPs, according to a study led by University of Manchester and University of Nottingham researchers.

10h

Scientists identify how plants sense temperature

A UC Riverside researcher is leading a team exploring how plants respond to temperature.

10h

Scientists identify how plants sense temperature

When it gets hot outside, humans and animals have the luxury of seeking shelter in the shade or cool, air-conditioned buildings. But plants are stuck.

10h

Unraveling the genetic causes of skin cancer

Medical researchers are helping to identify the genetic factors that lead to squamous cell carcinoma. In a new article, they show how the interaction between a cell signaling pathway called MET and a gene, Tpl2, contributes to skin cancer progression.

10h

The course of back pain over time

Back pain is among the most frequently reported health problems in the world. New research examines patterns in back pain over time and identifies the patient characteristics and the extent of healthcare and medication use (including opioids) associated with different patterns.

10h

DNA tool allows you to trace your ancient ancestry

Scientists at the University of Sheffield studying ancient DNA have created a tool allowing them to more accurately identify ancient Eurasian populations, which can be used to test an individual's similarity to ancient people who once roamed the earth.

10h

5000 times faster than a computer—interatomic light rectifier generates directed electric currents

The absorption of light in semiconductor crystals without inversion symmetry can generate electric currents. Researchers at the Max Born Institute have now generated directed currents at terahertz (THz) frequencies, much higher than the clock rates of current electronics. They show that electronic charge transfer between neighboring atoms in the crystal lattice represents the underlying mechanism.

10h

What happens after you take injured wildlife to the vet?

Australia's wildlife is unique and endearing, with many species found nowhere else in the world. Unfortunately, it isn't rare to encounter sick or injured wildlife around your home or by the side of the road. My research, recently published in the Australian Veterinary Journal, estimates between 177,580 and 355,160 injured wild animals are brought into NSW veterinary clinics alone every year.

10h

Supernova SN 2018byg triggered by a helium-shell double detonation, study finds

Astronomers have recently conducted photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 2018byg, a peculiar Type Ia supernova. Results of these observations, presented in a paper published January 3 on the arXiv pre-print server, suggest that this cosmic explosion was caused by double detonation of a massive helium shell.

10h

AI can help retailers understand the consumer

Consumer brands and retailers often struggle to fully understand ever-changing customer needs. That is why you mostly find XL sizes in your favorite fashion store and no M sizes. That is why you have to spend hours looking for the style you saw on Instagram and still not find it. That is why the cost of dead inventory to fashion retailers in the US alone is an estimated to be a whopping USD 50 bil

10h

Sådan helbredes et sygt sundhedsvæsen

Her er en række anbefalinger til oprydning i sundhedssektoren.

10h

Subpoena the Interpreter

Now Congress faces a very hard question: Subpoena President Donald Trump’s translator, or not? On Saturday, The Washington Post ’s Greg Miller reported new details of the extreme things done by Trump to conceal his talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin from even the senior-most members of Trump’s own administration. Trump even reportedly seized the interpreter’s notes after one of his meeti

10h

Tech Workers Unite to Fight Forced Arbitration

A social media campaign against forced arbitration clauses in employment contracts is a rare example of employees from different companies joining together.

10h

How is oxygen 'sucked out' of our waterways?

A million fish have died in the Murray Darling basin, as oxygen levels plummet due to major algal blooms. Experts have warned we could see more mass deaths this week.

10h

Unraveling the genetic causes of skin cancer

American University Associate Professor of Biology Katie DeCicco-Skinner and her colleagues are helping to identify the genetic factors that lead to squamous cell carcinoma. In a new paper, they show how the interaction between a cell signaling pathway called MET and a gene, Tpl2, contributes to skin cancer progression.

10h

Upper-ocean warming is changing the global wave climate, making waves stronger

Sea level rise puts coastal areas at the forefront of the impacts of climate change, but new research shows they face other climate-related threats as well. Scientists found that the energy of ocean waves has been growing globally, and they found a direct association between ocean warming and the increase in wave energy.

10h

The human brain works backwards to retrieve memories

When we remember a past event, the human brain reconstructs that experience in reverse order, according to a new study.

10h

How governments use Big Data to violate human rights

The right to privacy has become a pressing human rights issue. And rightly so. Big data —combined with artificial intelligence and facial recognition software —has the capacity to intrude on people's lives in unprecedented ways, in some cases on a massive scale.

10h

Sugar daddy capitalism: Even the world's oldest profession is being uberised

The sleazy "sugar baby" scandal involving Australian politician Andrew Broad, exposed for his reported cringy attempts to hook up with a woman almost half his age, might look like just another case of a politician caught in flagrante delicto.

10h

Barrier island sand dunes recover at different rates after hurricanes

Sand dunes on coastal barrier islands buffer the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts from oncoming hurricanes. Every year, millions of public and private dollars fund the restoration of these barrier islands, but managers often focus on the recovery of smaller sand dunes and aim at making them bigger, for better storm protection.

10h

One day our sun will solidify into a giant crystal orb

Our sun and billions of stars just like it are headed for a strange, cold destiny.

10h

New mathematical model to save endangered species

What does the blue whale have in common with the Bengal tiger and the green turtle? They share the risk of extinction and are classified as endangered species. There are multiple reasons for species to die out, and climate change is among the main reasons.

10h

New orca calf seen among Puget Sound's critically endangered killer whales

A new calf has been born to the critically endangered southern resident killer whales, researchers confirmed.

10h

Mutations in key protein that oversees cellular functions crucial to health and survival

A new research project uses the Canadian Light Source to help researchers understand the protein responsible for regulating heartbeats. Errors in this crucial protein's structure can lead to potentially deadly arrhythmias, and understanding its structure should help researchers develop treatments.

10h

Caring for the hills protects us from flooding, says new research

A restoration scheme on the hills of the Peak District has the potential to reduce the level of flood risk to the towns and villages below, according to researchers.

11h

Scientists develop novel method to monitor molecular aggregation

Chiral molecules are defined as molecules that are non-superimposable on their mirror images, much like that of left and right human hand bone structure. There are many examples of chiral molecules in nature, including proteins and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The dynamic processes of these chiral molecules are highly significant to understanding their biological activity. Indeed, protein aggregat

11h

Plant phytolith and water content influence rate of tooth enamel abrasion in vertebrates

Plant phytolith and water content cause differing degrees of tooth enamel abrasion in vertebrates. This is the conclusion reached by an international research team headed by scientists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Their study, featured online before print in the journal PNAS, has implications for how tooth wear in extinct animals is interpreted and how this information can be em

11h

Sundhedsreform skal sikre 40.000 færre indlæggelser

Statsministeren lægger op til, at kronisk syge patienter i langt højere grad skal behandles hos læger i lokale sundhedshuse. Sundhedsprofessor kalder målsætning for ønsketænkning.

11h

China envisions moon base after far-side success

China will seek to establish an international lunar base one day, possibly using 3D printing technology to build facilities, the Chinese space agency said Monday, weeks after landing a rover on the moon's far side.

11h

Watch how air pollution moves across Europe

See an animation showing the concentration and movement of nitrogen dioxide through the atmosphere.

11h

Tomato plant aroma to protect crops

Tomato plants emit an aroma in order to ward off bacterial attacks. This volatile compound is hexenyl butyrate (HB), and according to testing by researchers at the Institute for Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology, it has great potential for protecting crops from infections, drought, etc. The finding has been published in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science.

11h

How 3D technology is revolutionizing face transplants

Health From modeling to printing, it's all about seeing inside someone's head Face transplants are an ideal setting to fuse medicine with the growing world of 3D printing and imaging. During Cameron Underwood’s recent surgery at NYU Langone…

11h

Investigating why oak trees are dying is helping scientists understand how infectious diseases work

British oak trees are under threat from a disease known as Acute Oak Decline. Mainly affecting mature trees, it can kill them within four to five years of symptoms appearing. However, while researchers like myself have been looking into what causes it, and trying to find a way to prevent it, our work has been hindered in part by the fact that we have to follow a set of scientific rules known as Ko

11h

Big Bang query: Mapping how a mysterious liquid became all matter

Lehigh University's Rosi Reed presents findings from new Beam Energy Scan at Brookhaven National Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider that tests the limits of quark-gluon plasma (QGP), the mysterious liquid thought to have existed in the micro-seconds after the Big Bang

11h

11h

Integrated pathways for meeting climate targets and ensuring access to safe water

IIASA researchers have led work to develop new pathways to developing water and energy infrastructure consistent with both the Paris Agreement and U.N. Sustainable Development Goal 6 (SDG6)—to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all.

11h

Discovery casts doubt on cell surface organization models

Like planets, the body's cell surfaces look smooth from a distance, but contoured closer up. An article published in Communications Biology describes previously unknown implications of the way data from cell surfaces are normally interpreted; i.e. as if they lacked topographic features.

11h

Flock party for rare bird

Hundreds of hard-core birders from across the nation have been flocking to South Los Angeles this week, hoping to catch a glimpse of a rare avian that wandered in from Siberia and inexplicably chose to hunker down within a hedge just south of the 10 Freeway.

11h

If Legal Marijuana Leads to Murder, What’s Up in the Netherlands?

In 1971’s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, a mescaline-infused Hunter S. Thompson and his Benzedrine-addicted attorney infiltrate a police conference, where they are amused and appalled by the naïveté of the people charged with enforcing drug laws. Thompson captures the tone with a fictionalized bulletin, “Know Your Dope Fiend,” that warns officers: The Dope Fiend fears nothing. He will attack, fo

11h

The Dueling Narratives on Trump and Russia

It’s nearly two years into President Donald Trump’s first term in office, and almost as long for federal investigations into his campaign’s connections to Russia. After two bombshell news reports Friday and Saturday, lawmakers from both sides of the aisle took to the airwaves Sunday morning and talked at length about those probes. Their reactions highlight the divergent—and perhaps irreconcilable

11h

Image of the Day: Breathe In

Inhalable particles carrying mRNA make mouse lungs glow.

11h

Scientists Are Legit Building a Steam-Powered Spaceship, And It Sounds Awesome

Half a century after the first manned space flight, space travel may be about to enter the age of steam.

11h

Fast serves don't make sense – unless you factor in physics

The serve is arguably the most important component of the modern tennis game – and the faster, the better.

12h

A black hole the size of Jupiter is just wandering around the galaxy

Black holes are usually the mass of one star or the mass of millions, but we may have found one wandering through our galaxy that’s right in the middle

12h

How Wrong Should You Be?

If you always get 100 percent on your tests, they aren’t hard enough. If you never get above 50 percent, you’re probably in the wrong major — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

U.S. science gets shut down right along with the federal government

When the U.S. government shuts down, much of the science that it supports is not spared. And there is no magic light switch that can be flipped to reverse the impact.

12h

Roll-up screens and 8K resolution: What the future of television looks like

The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) wrapped-up in Las Vegas last week. The annual event gives enthusiasts a taste of the latest gadgets and devices on the horizon of consumer technology.

12h

New findings bring physicists closer to understanding the formation of planets and stars

Down a hallway in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), scientists study the workings of a machine in a room stuffed with wires and metal components. The researchers seek to explain the behavior of vast clouds of dust and other material that encircle stars and black holes and collapse to form planets and other celestial bodies.

12h

WhatsApp wants researchers to tackle its fake news problem – here's our idea

Last February, Cadbury Chocolate fell victim to a hoax. The image below went viral in an Indonesian WhatsApp group called "Viral Media Johor", and later in a Nigerian group.

12h

Why do some people believe the Earth is flat?

If you type 'flat Earth' into Google, you'd be joining a group of people that have helped to triple the search term over the last couple of years. In fact, a recent YouGov poll found that only around two-thirds of Americans aged between 18 and 24 believe that the Earth is round.

12h

Scientists discover new ways to twist and shift light

The results from the National Physical Laboratory's (NPL) latest research in photonics could open doors to new quantum technologies and telecoms systems

12h

New method knocks out yeast genes with single-point precision

How do you make yeast work harder? Not to make bread, but in processes that yield chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Industries currently use a yeast called Saccharomyces cerevisiae. They'd like it to work better. The answer is in manipulating the yeast's genetic code. To get at that code, researchers developed a method that turns off targeted genes in the yeast, introducing mutations. The team's appr

12h

A new mechanism helps explain differences between eukaryotic and bacterial proteomes

Why do distinct species have different proteins? Is there a key that allows eukaryotic cells to produce proteins involved in multicellularity that are mostly absent in prokaryotes? These are some of the questions addressed by the team of ICREA researcher Lluís Ribas, group leader of the Gene Translation lab at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona). Their work has led to the dis

12h

USA’s ‘shutdown’ giver forældede webcertifikater og utilgængelige hjemmesider

De offentlige hjemmesider, det drejer sig om, burde måske have valgt Let's Encrypt.

12h

Amazon-ansatte kunne se optagelser fra kunders hjemmesikkerhedssystem

Ansatte i Amazon, inklusive et forskningshold i Ukraine, kunne se al video optaget af alle kameraer fra Amazons hjemmesikkerhedssystem Ring. Videoerne lå ukrypteret på Amazons servere og kunne kobles sammen med ejernes e-mail

12h

Første gang i årevis: Forskel på virkelige og officielle brændstoftal mindskes

Forskellen på bilers officielle brændstofforbrug og det, de rent faktisk udleder, er 39 procent, lyder det i ny rapport. På trods af et lille fald siden sidste år er afvigelsen siden 2001 firedoblet.

12h

Dear Therapist: My Sister Is a Mess and I Don’t Know How to Help Her

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My younger sister and I are very close. We had a rough childhood, we’re only 13 months apart, and she’s always been my favorite person to be around—when things are going well. But she also has some anxiety iss

12h

Ny hjemmeside skal få læger til at henvise til kommunale tilbud

Som den første kommune har Aalborg målrettet en hjemmeside til praktiserende læger for at sikre, at flere borgere bliver henvist til kommunale tilbud.

12h

As Self-Driving Cars Stall, Players Revive an Old Approach

With true autonomy proving harder than we hoped, some companies are refocusing on systems that split the work between human and machine.

12h

Raise boys who end the #MeToo crisis

Former FOX News host Gretchen Carlson says that, as a culture, we didn't know how to speak openly about sexual harassment until very, very recently. And there's still a lot of work to be done. Her docuseries on the subject, Breaking the Silence airs January 14 at 8 PM on Lifetime . Her own experiences of sexual harassment played out on air in real time … and were wrongly condoned by a major new

12h

Wine on Mars? The World's Oldest Wine-Making Country Wants to Make It Happen

Fancy some white wine on the Red Planet? Scientists in the Republic of Georgia are determined to grow grapes on Mars.

12h

Dark Matter Behaves Differently in Dying Galaxies

Astronomers barely know anything about dark matter, but now they know this: It behaves differently in old, dying galaxies than in new, star-forming ones.

12h

Earth's Magnetic Pole Is Wandering, Lurching Toward Siberia

Earth's north magnetic pole is on the move, unpredictably lurching away from the Canadian Arctic and toward Siberia.

12h

New method facilitates study of the effects of chemicals on DNA

University of Arkansas physics researchers have developed a simple, cost-effective method to study the effects of chemicals on DNA which has potential to improve the development and testing of life-saving treatments.

12h

Research on metamaterials transforms satellite communications

Groundbreaking innovations on antenna technology, based on a collaboration between Lockheed Martin Space and Penn State, are now under consideration for use in the next generation of GPS satellite payloads.

12h

Lindsey Graham’s Shifting Sands on the Shutdown

Senator Lindsey Graham, a former critic of President Donald Trump who famously called him a “jackass,” has grown close with the president, becoming a golfing buddy and a lunch guest as well as a top defender in Trump’s favorite forum, cable news. Last week he became a vocal supporter of the president’s threat to declare a national emergency and use special powers to divert funding to build more m

12h

Solar Farms Shine a Ray of Hope on Bees and Butterflies

A trend of planting wildflowers on solar sites could maintain habitat for disappearing bees and butterflies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Panda celebrates first birthday in Malaysian zoo with ice cake

A giant panda born in a Malaysian zoo celebrated her first birthday Monday with a cake made of ice in front of adoring visitors.

13h

Iran to launch two satellites in 'coming days'

Iran's president said Monday the Islamic republic plans to launch two domestically made satellites into orbit in the "coming days" to gather information on the country's environment, state TV reported.

13h

China says it exchanged data with NASA on far side of moon

China's space agency says it worked with NASA to collect data from the far side of the moon.

13h

Heavy smog, worsened by weather, raises alarm across Asia

Unusually high levels of smog worsened by weather patterns are raising alarm across Asia, with authorities in Thailand's hazy capital Bangkok handing out face masks and preparing to seed clouds for rain to clear the air.

13h

Detroit show has SUVs, horsepower, but electric cars are few

Automakers have promised to start selling hordes of electric cars in the next few years, but only two will be unveiled at the big Detroit auto show that kicks off this week—and those aren't even ready for production.

13h

Techtopia #87: Danmark pivåben for hackere

Danske virksomheder og borgere står helt alene efter et hackerangreb, fordi der ikke findes et civilsamfund, som kan beskytte eller samle dem op i cyberspace.

13h

Bill de Blasio and Gavin Newsom May Give Restrictionism New Life

To President Donald Trump, unauthorized immigration is a grave threat that must be deterred and repelled, with force if need be. Gavin Newsom , the governor of California, the most populous state in the union, and Bill de Blasio , the mayor of New York, the nation’s most populous city, see things rather differently. Both have announced new initiatives to provide unauthorized immigrants residing i

13h

The Truth About the Gig Economy

The workforce is getting Uberized. The gig economy is taking over the world. Independent-contractor jobs are the new normal. In the postrecession years, this became conventional wisdom, as more and more Americans took jobs—well, “jobs”—with companies such as Postmates, Fiverr, TaskRabbit, and Lyft. But the gig economy was then and is now a more marginal phenomenon than it might have seemed. Last

13h

Your phone could reveal your radiation exposure after a nuclear disaster

Examining personal electronics may help gauge people’s radiation exposure in the event of a nuclear accident or attack.

13h

The New Health Care: The Reasonable Way to View Marijuana’s Risks

Cannabis has downsides, but speculation and fear should be replaced with the best evidence available.

13h

Stop nu, hjerne! 5 tidspunkter hvor din hjerne modarbejder dig

Søvnløshed, dårlige vaner og kvalme på køreturen. Din hjerne er ret genial, men nogle gange driller den lidt.

14h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan orienterer selvkørende biler sig i snevejr?

En læser undrer sig over, at selvkørende biler kan orientere sig i dårligt vejr. Dansk operatør af selvkørende busser forklarer, hvad de gør.

14h

Upper-ocean warming is changing the global wave climate, making waves stronger

Sea level rise puts coastal areas at the forefront of the impacts of climate change, but new research shows they face other climate-related threats as well. Scientists found that the energy of ocean waves has been growing globally, and they found a direct association between ocean warming and the increase in wave energy.

14h

Suicide risk more than quadruples for people with cancer

People with cancer are more than four times more likely to commit suicide than people without cancer, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

14h

The human brain works backwards to retrieve memories

When we remember a past event, the human brain reconstructs that experience in reverse order, according to a new study at the University of Birmingham.

14h

Here's how we can make work work for all of us

Having a meaningful job makes us happier and healthier – but governments and employers should eschew the logic that workers who work less are less productive

14h

Upper-ocean warming is changing the global wave climate, making waves stronger

Sea level rise puts coastal areas at the forefront of the impacts of climate change, but new research shows they face other climate-related threats as well. In a study published January 14 in Nature Communications, researchers report that the energy of ocean waves has been growing globally, and they found a direct association between ocean warming and the increase in wave energy.

14h

Voyager-1 dømmer små sorte huller ude som forklaring på mørkt stof

De allermindst tænkelige sorte huller kan ikke være universets mørke stof, viser ny analyse af Voyager-1’s målinger.

15h

Two integrative oncologists delude themselves that their specialty is science-based

Integrative oncology "integrates" quackery with oncology. Its practitioners, however, frequently delude themselves that their specialty is science-based. A recent review article by two integrative oncologists from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center expresses that delusion perfectly.

15h

Thailand to make it rain as pollution chokes Bangkok

Thailand is set to deploy rainmaking planes to seed clouds in an effort to tackle the pall of pollution that has shrouded the capital in recent weeks.

16h

Seeking true happiness? Harness the power of negative thinking | André Spicer

There are limits to being relentlessly upbeat. Embrace pessimism – accepting it will all end in ruin releases us to live Early on New Year’s Day, I began scrolling through the messages people had left on social media. Usually you find a note of hope among popping corks and exploding fireworks. Not this year. All I found were posts like “2018 was a terrible year. Don’t expect more from 2019” or “I

16h

Detroit auto show, and industry, prepare for transition

The auto industry gathered Sunday in Detroit, on the eve of the last winter edition of North America's premiere auto show, as carmakers grapple with a contracting market and uncertainty in the year ahead.

17h

Million dead fish cause environmental stink in Australia

As many as a million fish are believed to have died along the banks of a major river system in drought-battered eastern Australia, and the authorities warned Monday of more deaths to come.

17h

Algeria's ancient pyramid tombs still shrouded in mystery

Dating back centuries, Algeria's pyramid tombs are unique relics of an ancient era but a dearth of research has left the Jeddars shrouded in mystery.

17h

Chilean Patagonia: an open-air lab to study climate change

In one of the most inhospitable places on Earth, the southernmost part of Chile's Patagonia region, scientists are studying whales, dolphins and algae in order to help predict how climate change will affect the world's oceans.

17h

DNA tool allows you to trace your ancient ancestry

Scientists at the University of Sheffield studying ancient DNA have created a tool allowing them to more accurately identify ancient Eurasian populations, which can be used to test an individual's similarity to ancient people who once roamed the earth.

17h

Can you solve it? Catriona's colourful conundrums

Five beautiful geometrical puzzles UPDATE: To read the solutions click here Today’s puzzles come from Catriona Shearer , a maths teacher at a school in north Essex, whose colourful geometry puzzles have recently gained a following on social media. These brainteasers are certainly pretty, and some are pretty tricky too! Here are five of her best. Continue reading…

17h

Togspecialist til myndigheder efter dødsulykke: Installer nødbremseløsning

En selvudløsende, analog bremse vil med det samme fortælle lokomotivføreren i lange godstog, om noget er galt.

18h

Datatilsynet i Norge: Det er muligt at sikre bilisters persondata ved roadpricing

Norske politikere og organisationer er positivt instillede overfor GPS-baseret roadpricing. Lokalt lagrede kørselsdata i bilen er blandt de løsninger, der kan sikre beskyttelse af bilisters data, lyder det fra Datatilsynet i Norge.

18h

Nutritionists launch portion size guide to tackle overeating

Recommendations focus on how much people should eat during the day to stay healthy Ministers and public health experts have long been telling us we eat too much sugar, saturated fat and salt but less attention has been paid to the size of the portions on the plate. Now a new guide to portion sizes warning that people are eating too much without realising has been launched by nutritionists, to sug

18h

Sprængte trommehinder og smadrede organer: Kan lyd bruges som våben?

Du kan få høreskader af lyd, men de mere alvorlige skader skyldes andre kræfter, forklarer dansk ekspert.

19h

Numenta publishes breakthrough theory for intelligence and cortical computation

Numenta researchers propose a broad framework for understanding what the neocortex does and how it works. 'The Thousand Brains Theory of Intelligence' proposes that every part of the neocortex learns complete models of objects and concepts, rather than learning one model of the world.

19h

In breast-cancer prevention, race matters

African-American women at high risk of breast cancer are less likely than white women to pursue potentially life-saving preventive care, and racial disparities in health care and elsewhere are to blame, new research suggests.

19h

Scientists connect dots between colitis and colon cancer

Lingering inflammation in the colon is a known risk factor for colorectal cancer and now scientists report one way it resets the stage to enable this common and often deadly cancer.

19h

DNA tool allows you to trace your ancient ancestry

Scientists at the University of Sheffield studying ancient DNA have created a tool allowing them to more accurately identify ancient Eurasian populations, which can be used to test an individual's similarity to ancient people who once roamed the earth.

19h

Study examines the course of back pain over time

Back pain is among the most frequently reported health problems in the world. New research published in Arthritis Care & Research, an official journal of the American College of Rheumatology and the Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals, examines patterns in back pain over time and identifies the patient characteristics and the extent of healthcare and medication use (including opioids)

19h

Invest in a single national electronic health record for primary care to benefit Canadians

Canada should invest in a single national electronic health record for primary care to improve the health of Canadians, argues an editorial in CMAJ.

19h

Report: Americans Are Now More Likely To Die Of An Opioid Overdose Than On The Road

Americans now have a 1 in 96 chance of dying from an opioid overdose, according to new analysis from the National Safety Council. (Image credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

19h

‘God Is Not Done With Us Yet’: The Move Toward Local Renewal

The prospect for governance at the national level is dark. If you were in doubt, here is some recent grist . This makes it all the more important to notice, to connect, and to learn from the dispersed examples of local-level renewal, progress, and reinvention around the country. That is the intended theme of this ongoing thread. With minimal elaboration, here are a few recent installments and bit

21h

The Moral Failure of Family Separation

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. The fact of what was happening dawned before the scope of it did: In the summer of 2017, immigration lawyers and judges began reporting that parents were arriving at immigrant detention centers without their children, who had been placed in custody elsewhere, sometimes thousands of miles away. Not unt

21h

The President’s Pursuit of White Power

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. Armed white terrorists, many of them Confederate veterans, stormed the July 1866 constitutional convention in New Orleans and slaughtered nearly 50 people, many of them black Union veterans. The attendees at the convention had committed a crime of dire proportions: They had sought to enfranchise the b

21h

It’s Been Two Years. The President Still Hasn’t Released His Tax Returns

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. The president owns a business. The president owns a business entity composed of roughly 500 other business entities. The president owns a business entity that he no longer controls, but his sons do. The president owns a business entity set up to allow him to withdraw funds “ at his request .” The pres

21h

The Collusion With Russia Is in Plain Sight

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. Perhaps even President Donald Trump is susceptible to the emotionalism of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony . He listened to the piece surrounded by his fellow G20 summiteers, the leaders of the world who had gathered in Germany in the summer of 2017. Sitting in a balcony, he leaned forward and seemed to lis

21h

The Chain Reaction That Began When Trump Fired James Comey Is Speeding Up

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. The firing of FBI Director James Comey, widely thought to be the result of Comey’s handling of L’Affaire Russe , would have been scandalous on its own. What we now know is that it was more than an isolated abuse; it was a window into how President Donald Trump understands the role of federal law enfor

21h

The War on Black Athletes

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. The exact date I knew that Colin Kaepernick would never play in the NFL again was March 20, 2017. That day, Donald Trump held a rally in Louisville, Kentucky, and publicly eviscerated Kaepernick—who had been taking a knee during the national anthem to protest the treatment of people of color by police

21h

The Faulty Logic in Trump’s Travel Ban

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. Exactly one week after he was inaugurated, President Donald Trump signed an executive order barring nationals from seven Muslim-majority nations—Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen—from entering the United States for at least 90 days. Mass protests , wall-to-wall news coverage, and a s

21h

Imagine the Stormy Daniels Scandal in Any Other Presidency

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. Certain phrases, uttered in a moment, become part and parcel of a presidency, particularly when they reveal glimpses of the person occupying the office. “The better angels of our nature,” for instance, helped shape Abraham Lincoln’s legacy as much as “I did not have sexual relations with that woman” d

21h

Six Hours and Three Minutes of Internet Chaos

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. It is possible to view the history of presidential politics in McLuhanian terms, via the changing technologies that leaders have used to communicate. William Jennings Bryan stood at the edge of a train car and bellowed orations to his devoted followers as he traveled across the country. Franklin D. Ro

21h

The Self-Pardoning President

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. Andrew Johnson solemnly assured a campaign rally that he was not Judas Iscariot. Lyndon B. Johnson lifted his shirt to show reporters his gallbladder-surgery scar. Jimmy Carter told Playboy that he had lusted in his heart. Bill Clinton shared with federal prosecutors his unusual definition of sexual r

21h

That Time Trump Threw Paper Towels at Puerto Ricans

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. It is impossible to blame a single individual for the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, which brought thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in destruction to Puerto Rico. To attempt to do so would be not only faulty, but hubristic. Nature will do as it wishes. But in the history of Puerto Rico, Pres

21h

The Day ‘Shithole’ Entered the Presidential Lexicon

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. On January 11, 2018, during an Oval Office talk with several U.S. senators about protecting immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador, and African countries in a new immigration package, President Donald Trump unleashed a word that Americans aren't accustomed to hearing from their president. “Why are we havi

21h

Trump Cares About Only One Audience

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. President Donald Trump took the stage in Southaven, Mississippi, for a campaign rally on October 2, 2018, at a fraught moment in American politics. Brett Kavanaugh, Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, had been accused of committing sexual assault as a teenager, and his nomination now appeared to be in peri

21h

You Know You're in a Constitutional Crisis When …

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. Unlike pornography, a constitutional crisis is not always obvious when you see it. The question of whether the nation is in the grip of such a crisis first surfaced within weeks of President Donald Trump’s inauguration, and it has never really gone away. After the first travel ban was issued, in Janua

21h

How Not to Smooth Things Over With the CIA

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. On President Donald Trump’s first full day in office, he crossed the Potomac to visit CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia, where he attempted to assure the intelligence professionals gathered there that nobody—nobody—cared about the agency more than he did. Of course, the people who work at the CIA

21h

Mattis’s Departure Was a Turning Point

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. The operating thesis regarding democracy in the age of Trump is that America continues to operate because sane people still work in the government. General James Mattis, the former secretary of defense, was a prime example of this civic commitment: an institutionalist discipline amid executive malfeas

21h

Donald Trump Stars in a North Korean Reality Show

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. When historians in the 22nd century search for the moment when reality television was at its most influential, they may well pinpoint June 12, 2018. That was the day entertainment converged with existential danger, low-budget cinematography with high-stakes diplomacy. Less than a year after threatenin

21h

Why Trump Is the Most Fact-Checked President

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. It’s astounding even now, two years into Donald Trump’s presidency, how many things he says on a daily basis that just aren’t true. Here are some of the president’s most frequent falsehoods: U.S. Steel is opening six plants (it’s not); Barack Obama’s administration had the same policy as Trump’s of se

21h

The President Humiliates His Own Department of Justice

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. On March 16, 2018, just days before he was eligible to receive a federal pension for his 21 years at the bureau, former Deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabe was fired by then–Attorney General Jeff Sessions. The president took to Twitter to celebrate. “Andrew McCabe FIRED, a great day for the hard working

21h

The President Learns About Separation of Powers

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. It took all of two weeks for President Donald Trump to mount his first verbal assault on the federal judiciary. In early February 2017, a federal judge in Seattle, James Robart, halted the travel ban the Trump administration had hastily implemented a week earlier based on an executive order from the p

21h

What It Means When Trump Doesn’t Show Up

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. Sometimes our character is marked by what we do not do, what we do not say, and where we do not go. For President Donald Trump, who delights in arousing and infuriating his opponents and inflaming his supporters, the attention invariably turns to his insults, his scowls, and his rants. But it was the

21h

The World Isn’t Laughing at Just Trump

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. Before The Laugh, there was The Handshake. In May 2017, ahead of a Nato summit in Belgium, President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron shook hands—and neither would let go. For six seconds, an eternity in handshaking, the two men gripped hands, each wanting to assert his manual superio

21h

What Is Ivanka Trump’s Role in the White House?

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. We’re halfway through, and Ivanka Trump remains as much of a mystery as ever. Like Hillary Clinton, she has a West Wing office, and like Nancy Reagan, she has a wondering, matchless fealty to the president. She would never snatch her hand away from his, like Melania did; she would never even roll her

21h

The President Can’t Stop Talking About Carnage

Editor’s Note: This article is one of 50 in a series about Trump's first two years as president. Right from the start, the Trump presidency was different. Donald Trump said as much in his inaugural address, casting his swearing-in as the start of a new era, one in which power over government would be returned to “the people.” Of course, that sort of rhetoric is normal new-administration bluster.

21h

Wood burners and open fires face restrictions in new clean air plan

Ministers hail the UK's "world leading" pollution plan, but green groups call it a missed opportunity.

1d

Many medical marijuana users say they’ve driven high

More than half of people who take medical cannabis for chronic pain say they’ve driven under the influence within two hours of using it at least once in the last six months. One in five of them said they’d driven while “very high” in the past six months, researchers report. The results of the survey of 790 Michigan medical cannabis users are troubling, says Erin E. Bonar, assistant professor of p

1d

10 science photos that made history and changed minds

Science has given humanity an incalculable boost over the recent centuries, changing our lives in ways both awe-inspiring and humbling. Fortunately, photography, a scientific feat in and of itself, has recorded some of the most important events, people and discoveries in science, allowing us unprecedented insight and expanding our view of the world. Here are some of the most important scientific

1d

The Ripple Effects of the Shutdown Reach the GPS System (and Beyond)

As you read the accounts below, remember the point that Jon Tester, recently reelected Democratic senator from Montana, made this past week on the Senate floor: If one man, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, would let a “clean” budget resolution come up for a vote, it would certainly pass with both Democratic and Republican support. Extra reminder: As of December 18 , the Senate had unanimou

1d

Starwatch: total eclipse of a supermoon

The first supermoon of the year will be on show later this week, with a total eclipse thrown in for good measure A total lunar eclipse greets skywatchers at the end of this week. Don’t miss it, as the next one will not be until 26 May 2021. The Moon will begin to enter Earth’s shadow at 03:34 GMT on 21 January and reach mid-eclipse at 05:12 GMT. Skywatchers in the Americas will see things at earl

1d

DNA scientist James Watson stripped of honors over views on race

New York laboratory cuts ties with 90-year-old scientist who helped discover the structure of DNA, revoking all titles and honors A New York laboratory has cut its ties with James Watson , the Nobel Prize-winning scientist who helped discover the structure of DNA, over “reprehensible” comments in which he said race and intelligence are connected. Related: Interview: James Watson Continue reading.

1d

Iceland's Northern Lights: Beautiful sight, risky drives

Police in Iceland have a warning for visitors: Beware our roads in the winter.

1d

Russian attempt to control orbiting radio telescope fails

Russia's space agency says another attempt by its specialists to establish contact with an orbiting radio telescope has failed.

1d

DNA of wolf declared extinct in wild lives on in Texas pack

Researchers say a pack of wild canines found frolicking near the beaches of the Texas Gulf Coast carries a substantial amount of red wolf genes, a surprising discovery because the animal was declared extinct in the wild nearly 40 years ago.

1d

The Guardian view on the periodic table: better living through chemistry | Editorial

The creation of modern chemistry in the 19th century was a forgotten intellectual revolution that made today’s world possible This year marks the 150th anniversary of the discovery, or invention, of the periodic table of the elements, one of the most important, if least dramatic, of all scientific breakthroughs. Chemistry has a bad reputation among non-chemists, perhaps because it is the first pla

1d

Craving insight into addiction | Letters

Dr David Marjot on the anti-boredom effect, and Dr Ian Flintoff on the damage done by a materialist society I am a retired consultant psychiatrist who specialised in the field of addiction ( Constant craving: is addiction on the rise? , G2, 9 January). My conclusion was that most, perhaps all, drugs of addiction were very effective ways of passing time with minimum distress – the anti-boredom eff

1d

Mistimed Migration Means Bird Death Battles

Climate change is shifting population numbers and nest building by resident and migratory birds in Europe–sometimes leading to deadly conflict. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

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