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nyheder2019januar15

Facebook's '10 Year Challenge' Is Just a Harmless Meme—Right?

Opinion: The 2009 vs. 2019 profile picture trend may or may not have been a data collection ruse to train its facial recognition algorithm. But we can't afford to blithely play along.

19h

Cellular protein a target for Zika control

A cellular protein that interacts with invading viruses appears to help enable the infection process of the Zika virus, according to an international team of researchers who suggest this protein could be a key target in developing new therapies to prevent or treat Zika virus infection.

4h

Regeringsplan: Kommuner overtager ansvaret for regional trafik

Regionerne skal med regeringens nye reform afhænde ansvaret for bus- og togtrafik såvel som ejerskabet af trafikselskaber som Aarhus Letbane. Ansvaret for trafikken i hovedstadsområdet er ikke afklaret i regeringens udspil.

8h

LATEST

Wildfires Spark Population Booms in Fungi and Bacteria

Understanding how microbial communities change after a fire can help researchers to predict how an ecosystem will recove — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3min

Photos From the 2019 Dakar Rally

With a ceremonial start in Lima, Peru, on January 7, a group of 334 competitors started the 41st annual Dakar Rally: a 10-day 3,000-mile (5,000 kilometer) off-roading adventure held exclusively in Peru this year. The vehicles—which include specialized cars, trucks, motorcycles, and quad bikes—are currently on stage 9 of 10 stages that travel south to Tacna, then back to Lima on January 17. Here i

7min

Manatees, whales and turtles are coming back from the brink in the US

The Trump administration has plans to weaken a key environmental law, but it has helped many marine animals avoid extinction

7min

Unscrambling the Hidden Secrets of Superpermutations

Four. Three. One. Five. Two. Nothing happens. The evil genius Derango is loading a cataclysmic computer virus that, when launched, will lock the entire world out of the internet. In five minutes, no one will be able to access their online bank accounts, networked video games or online TV shows ever again! Three. One. Five. Two. Four. The virus keeps loading. The code to stop the program is some s

8min

Dental study of juvenile archaic Homo< fossil gives clues about human development

Most aspects of dental development for a juvenile Homo specimen from the Pleistocene fall within the modern human range, according to research by a group of Chinese and international scientists. The results are useful in helping to identify when modern human-like growth and development first appeared.

10min

Feathers: better than Velcro?

The structures zipping together the barbs in bird feathers could provide a model for new adhesives and new aerospace materials, according to a study by an international team of researchers publishing in the Jan. 16 issue of Science Advances. Researchers 3D printed models of the structures to better understand their properties.

10min

Water, not temperature, limits global forest growth as climate warms

The growth of forest trees all over the world is becoming more water-limited as the climate warms. The effect is most evident in northern climates and at high altitudes where the primary limitation on tree growth had been cold temperatures. The research, to be published in Science Advances this week, is the first time that changes in tree growth in response to current climate changes have been map

10min

Higher risk of fracture in type 1 diabetes may be linked to poor blood sugar control

Patients with type 1 diabetes and poor blood sugar control face a higher risk of fragility fracture — any fall from standing height or less that results in a broken bone — than type 1 diabetes patients with good blood sugar control, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

10min

Gastric bypass surgery may benefit muscle strength more than previously thought

Gastric bypass surgery improves relative muscle strength and physical performance in people with obesity, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

10min

Cheering on a potential diabetes drug from bench to bedside

Scientists have developed a promising compound that targets a protein well-known to be implicated in type 2 diabetes, which — unlike different versions of its kind currently under investigation — proved to be safe and effective in a phase 2 clinical trial of 190 type 2 diabetes patients.

10min

Researchers set standards for models in biodiversity assessments

An international team of biodiversity modelers has developed, for the first time, a best-practice standards framework with detailed guidelines enabling scoring of studies based on species distribution models for use in biodiversity assessments.

10min

'Ambidextrous' robots could dramatically speed e-commerce

Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley present a novel, 'ambidextrous' approach to grasping a diverse range of object shapes without training.

10min

Full carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification in a tropical coral

Researchers from the Centre Scientifique de Monaco (CSM), the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and the University of Kiel have succeeded in directly measuring three key parameters necessary for skeleton formation in a live tropical coral. This way, they completely characterized the carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification. The study has now been published in Science A

10min

An ancient relative of humans shows a surprisingly modern trait

A relative of modern humans that lived at least 104,000 years ago in northern China showed evidence of dental growth and development very similar to that of people today, a new study found.

10min

NIH researchers rescue photoreceptors, prevent blindness in animal models of AMD

Using a novel patient-specific stem cell-based therapy, researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) prevented blindness in animal models of geographic atrophy, the advanced 'dry' form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is a leading cause of vision loss among people age 65 and older. The protocols established by the animal study set the stage for a first-in-human clinical trial te

10min

Publication of data for SYNB1020 a potential treatment for hyperammonemia

Synlogic, Inc., (Nasdaq: SYBX) a clinical stage company applying synthetic biology to beneficial microbes to develop novel, living medicines, today announced the publication in Science Translational Medicine of clinical data from its Phase 1 clinical study in healthy volunteers and supporting preclinical data from its investigational Synthetic Biotic candidate, SYNB1020. The data support the conti

10min

Experimental treatment approach shows potential against Staphylococcus aureus

A new class of engineered proteins may counter infection caused by Staph aureus.

10min

Wearable sensor can detect hidden anxiety, depression in young children

Anxiety and depression in young children are hard to detect and often go untreated, potentially leading to anxiety disorders and increased risk of suicide and drug abuse later. In a PLOS ONE study, researchers showed a wearable sensor detected these 'internalizing disorders' in children with 81 percent accuracy, reducing to 20 seconds what would take clinicians months to diagnose, opening the door

10min

Gut bacteria make key amino acids dispensable, expanding food options for invasive flies

Fruit flies fed antibiotics to supress their gut microbiome are forced to avoid the best food patches if they lack vital amino acids, according to a study by Boaz Yuval from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel and Chang-Ying Nui from Huazhong Agricultural University in China, publishing Jan. 16, 2019, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

10min

Ozaena ground beetles likely parasitize ants throughout their life cycle

Ozaena ground beetles likely have anatomical adaptations enabling them to parasitize ant nests throughout their life cycle, according to a study published Jan. 16, 2019, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Wendy Moore from the University of Arizona, USA, and colleagues.

10min

Marine mammals and sea turtles recovering after Endangered Species Act protection

More than three-quarters of marine mammal and sea turtle populations have significantly increased after listing of the US Endangered Species Act (ESA), according to a study published Jan. 16 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Abel Valdivia of the Center for Biological Diversity in California, and colleagues.

10min

Bacterial compounds may be as good as DEET at repelling mosquitoes

A bacterium’s metabolic by-products are as effective as DEET in deterring Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

10min

An ancient child from East Asia grew teeth like a modern human

An ancient child’s choppers indicate that hominids evolved a humanlike life span in East Asia by at least 100,000 years ago.

10min

Engineered bacteria could mop up toxic ammonia in the human gut

Toxic ammonia can build up in the guts of people with certain disorders – probiotics containing bacteria engineered to break down the toxin could help

19min

Robot dog taught itself to get back up when people kick it over

The ANYmal robot is about the size of a large dog. AI has taught it to stand up after being pushed over by researchers

19min

Cool Beans? Far From It: Global Warming Is Helping to Wipe Out Coffee in the Wild

Researchers found that more than half of all species could vanish from the wild, and the implications for coffee’s survival in the era of climate change are huge.

22min

How stem cells self-organize in the developing embryo

New study uses live imaging to understand a critical step in early embryonic development — how genes and molecules control forces to orchestrate the emergence of form in the developing embryo. The study findings could have important implications for how stem cells are used to create functional organs in the lab, and lead to a better understanding of the underlying causes of gastrointestinal birth

22min

Artificial intelligence applied to the genome identifies an unknown human ancestor

By combining deep learning algorithms and statistical methods, investigators have identified, in the genome of Asian individuals, the footprint of a new hominid who cross bred with its ancestors tens of thousands of years ago.

22min

Mechanism for leukaemia cell growth revealed, prompting new treatment hopes

A mechanism which drives leukaemia cell growth has been discovered by researchers, who believe their findings could help to inform new strategies when it comes to treating the cancer.

22min

Engineered light to improve health, food

intentionally controlled light can help regulate human health and productivity by eliciting various hormonal responses. Tailored LED wavelengths and intensities also can efficiently stimulate plant growth, alter their shapes and increase their nutritional value, opening a new world of scientific and technological possibilities for indoor farming.

22min

Nepal earthquake: Waiting for the complete rupture

Nepal was struck by an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8 in 2015, but the country may still face the threat of much stronger temblor. This is the conclusion reached by researchers based on a new model that simulates physical processes of earthquake rupture between the Eurasian and Indian Plates.

22min

Welding process for manufacturing industries

New research will optimize the welding, additive and manufacturing process.

22min

A map of London's most toxic breathing spots

Dirty air is an invisible killer, but an effective one. More than 9,000 people die prematurely in London each year due to air pollution, a recent study estimates. This map visualizes the worst places to breathe in Central London. The Great Smog of 1952 London used to be famous for its 'pea-soupers': combinations of smoke and fog caused by burning coal for power and heating. All that changed after

24min

Ozaena ground beetles likely parasitize ants throughout their life cycle

Ozaena ground beetles likely have anatomical adaptations enabling them to parasitize ant nests throughout their life cycle, according to a study published January 16, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Wendy Moore from the University of Arizona, USA, and colleagues.

28min

Marine mammals and sea turtles recovering after Endangered Species Act protection

More than three-quarters of marine mammal and sea turtle populations have significantly increased after listing of the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA), according to a study published January 16 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Abel Valdivia of the Center for Biological Diversity in California, and colleagues. The findings suggest that conservation measures such as tailored species manageme

28min

Full carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification in a tropical coral

Coral reefs are made up of massive calcium carbonate skeletons. A new study, published in Science Advances on January 16th 2019, reveals insights into the calcification process that leads to the formation of these skeletons. Elucidating coral calcification is key to a deeper understanding and better predictions of how and why coral reefs respond to environmental changes such as ocean acidification

28min

Water, not temperature, limits global forest growth as climate warms

The growth of forest trees all over the world is becoming more water-limited as the climate warms, according to new research from an international team that includes University of Arizona scientists.

28min

An ancient relative of humans shows a surprisingly modern trait

A relative of modern humans that lived at least 104,000 years ago in northern China showed evidence of dental growth and development very similar to that of people today, a new study found.

28min

Gut bacteria make key amino acids dispensable, expanding food options for invasive flies

Fruit flies fed antibiotics to supress their gut microbiome are forced to avoid the best food patches if they lack vital amino acids, according to a study by Boaz Yuval from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel and Chang-Ying Nui from Huazhong Agricultural University in China, publishing January 16, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

28min

Researchers set standards for models in biodiversity assessments

Over the past 20 years, more than 6000 studies have used one of the most common classes of biodiversity modeling, species distribution models (SDMs). Over half of the studies using SDMs sought to apply their results to at least one type of biodiversity assessment, including forecasting the effects of climate change on biodiversity, or selecting places for protected areas, habitat restoration, and/

28min

Bacteria In Worms Make A Mosquito Repellent That Might Beat DEET

An insect-killing bacteria that lives inside a parasitic worm might hold the key to developing a powerful new repellent. (Image credit: Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source)

30min

31mi

Creative citizen science illuminates complex ecological responses to climate change [Evolution]

Climate change is causing the timing of key behaviors (i.e., phenology) to shift differently across trophic levels and among some interacting organisms (e.g., plants and pollinators, predators and prey), suggesting that interactions among species are being disrupted (1, 2). Studying the phenology of interactions, however, is difficult, which has limited…

1d

Bioactive cell-like hybrids from dendrimersomes with a human cell membrane and its components [Chemistry]

Cell-like hybrids from natural and synthetic amphiphiles provide a platform to engineer functions of synthetic cells and protocells. Cell membranes and vesicles prepared from human cell membranes are relatively unstable in vitro and therefore are difficult to study. The thicknesses of biological membranes and vesicles self-assembled from amphiphilic Janus dendrimers,…

1d

Data-driven quantitative modeling of bacterial active nematics [Physics]

Active matter comprises individual units that convert energy into mechanical motion. In many examples, such as bacterial systems and biofilament assays, constituent units are elongated and can give rise to local nematic orientational order. Such “active nematics” systems have attracted much attention from both theorists and experimentalists. However, despite intense…

1d

DNA damage and genome instability by G-quadruplex ligands are mediated by R loops in human cancer cells [Biochemistry]

G quadruplexes (G4s) and R loops are noncanonical DNA structures that can regulate basic nuclear processes and trigger DNA damage, genome instability, and cell killing. By different technical approaches, we here establish that specific G4 ligands stabilize G4s and simultaneously increase R-loop levels within minutes in human cancer cells. Genome-wide…

1d

ParST is a widespread toxin-antitoxin module that targets nucleotide metabolism [Biochemistry]

Toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems interfere with essential cellular processes and are implicated in bacterial lifestyle adaptations such as persistence and the biofilm formation. Here, we present structural, biochemical, and functional data on an uncharacterized TA system, the COG5654–COG5642 pair. Bioinformatic analysis showed that this TA pair is found in 2,942 of…

1d

Biosynthesis of mycobacterial methylmannose polysaccharides requires a unique 1-O-methyltransferase specific for 3-O-methylated mannosides [Biochemistry]

Mycobacteria are a wide group of organisms that includes strict pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as well as environmental species known as nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), some of which—namely Mycobacterium avium—are important opportunistic pathogens. In addition to a distinctive cell envelope mediating critical interactions with the host immune system and largely…

1d

Two symmetric arginine residues play distinct roles in Thermus thermophilus Argonaute DNA guide strand-mediated DNA target cleavage [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Bacterium Thermus thermophilus Argonaute (Ago; TtAgo) is a prokaryotic Ago (pAgo) that acts as the host defense against the uptake and propagation of foreign DNA by catalyzing the DNA cleavage reaction. The TtAgo active site consists of a plugged-in glutamate finger with two arginine residues (R545 and R486) located symmetrically…

1d

Role of domain interactions in the aggregation of full-length immunoglobulin light chains [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Amyloid light-chain (LC) amyloidosis is a protein misfolding disease in which the aggregation of an overexpressed antibody LC from a clonal plasma cell leads to organ toxicity and patient death if left untreated. While the overall dimeric architecture of LC molecules is established, with each LC composed of variable (VL)…

1d

Photoswitching FRET to monitor protein-protein interactions [Cell Biology]

FRET is a powerful approach to study the interactions of fluorescent molecules, and numerous methods have been developed to measure FRET in cells. Here, we present a method based on a donor molecule’s photoswitching properties, which are slower in the presence vs. the absence of an acceptor. The technique, photoswitching…

1d

Single-molecule imaging of the transcription factor SRF reveals prolonged chromatin-binding kinetics upon cell stimulation [Cell Biology]

Serum response factor (SRF) mediates immediate early gene (IEG) and cytoskeletal gene expression programs in almost any cell type. So far, SRF transcriptional dynamics have not been investigated at single-molecule resolution. We provide a study of single Halo-tagged SRF molecules in fibroblasts and primary neurons. In both cell types, individual…

1d

Different roles of E proteins in t(8;21) leukemia: E2-2 compromises the function of AETFC and negatively regulates leukemogenesis [Cell Biology]

The AML1-ETO fusion protein, generated by the t(8;21) chromosomal translocation, is causally involved in nearly 20% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases. In leukemic cells, AML1-ETO resides in and functions through a stable protein complex, AML1-ETO–containing transcription factor complex (AETFC), that contains multiple transcription (co)factors. Among these AETFC components, HEB…

1d

Exploiting regulatory heterogeneity to systematically identify enhancers with high accuracy [Developmental Biology]

Identifying functional enhancer elements in metazoan systems is a major challenge. Large-scale validation of enhancers predicted by ENCODE reveal false-positive rates of at least 70%. We used the pregrastrula-patterning network of Drosophila melanogaster to demonstrate that loss in accuracy in held-out data results from heterogeneity of functional signatures in enhancer…

1d

Global-scale dispersal and connectivity in mangroves [Ecology]

Dispersal provides a key mechanism for geographical range shifts in response to changing environmental conditions. For mangroves, which are highly susceptible to climate change, the spatial scale of dispersal remains largely unknown. Here we use a high-resolution, eddy- and tide-resolving numerical ocean model to simulate mangrove propagule dispersal across the…

1d

Novel genetic code and record-setting AT-richness in the highly reduced plastid genome of the holoparasitic plant Balanophora [Evolution]

Plastid genomes (plastomes) vary enormously in size and gene content among the many lineages of nonphotosynthetic plants, but key lineages remain unexplored. We therefore investigated plastome sequence and expression in the holoparasitic and morphologically bizarre Balanophoraceae. The two Balanophora plastomes examined are remarkable, exhibiting features rarely if ever seen before…

1d

Blacklisting variants common in private cohorts but not in public databases optimizes human exome analysis [Genetics]

Computational analyses of human patient exomes aim to filter out as many nonpathogenic genetic variants (NPVs) as possible, without removing the true disease-causing mutations. This involves comparing the patient’s exome with public databases to remove reported variants inconsistent with disease prevalence, mode of inheritance, or clinical penetrance. However, variants frequent…

1d

Constitutive Dicer1 phosphorylation accelerates metabolism and aging in vivo [Genetics]

DICER1 gene alterations and decreased expression are associated with developmental disorders and diseases in humans. Oscillation of Dicer1 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation regulates its function during the oocyte-to-embryo transition in Caenorhabditis elegans. Dicer1 is also phosphorylated upon FGF stimulation at conserved serines in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and HEK293 cells. However, whet

1d

Nutrition, the visceral immune system, and the evolutionary origins of pathogenic obesity [Medical Sciences]

The global obesity epidemic is the subject of an immense, diversely specialized research effort. An evolutionary analysis reveals connections among disparate findings, starting with two well-documented facts: Obesity-associated illnesses (e.g., type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease), are especially common in: (i) adults with abdominal obesity, especially enlargement of visceral adipose tissue

1d

Linear variational principle for Riemann mappings and discrete conformality [Applied Mathematics]

We consider Riemann mappings from bounded Lipschitz domains in the plane to a triangle. We show that in this case the Riemann mapping has a linear variational principle: It is the minimizer of the Dirichlet energy over an appropriate affine space. By discretizing the variational principle in a natural way…

1d

Structural basis for prodrug recognition by the SLC15 family of proton-coupled peptide transporters [Biochemistry]

A major challenge in drug development is the optimization of intestinal absorption and cellular uptake. A successful strategy has been to develop prodrug molecules, which hijack solute carrier (SLC) transporters for active transport into the body. The proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2, have been successfully targeted using this approach….

1d

Arrestin-3 scaffolding of the JNK3 cascade suggests a mechanism for signal amplification [Biochemistry]

Scaffold proteins tether and orient components of a signaling cascade to facilitate signaling. Although much is known about how scaffolds colocalize signaling proteins, it is unclear whether scaffolds promote signal amplification. Here, we used arrestin-3, a scaffold of the ASK1-MKK4/7-JNK3 cascade, as a model to understand signal amplification by a…

1d

Patched1-ArhGAP36-PKA-Inversin axis determines the ciliary translocation of Smoothened for Sonic Hedgehog pathway activation [Cell Biology]

The Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway conducts primarily in the primary cilium and plays important roles in cell proliferation, individual development, and tumorigenesis. Shh ligand binding with its ciliary membrane-localized transmembrane receptor Patched1 results in the removal of Patched1 from and the translocation of the transmembrane oncoprotein Smoothened into the cilium,…

1d

Inner Workings: How bacteria could help recycle electronic waste [Chemistry]

The bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum is known for producing an antimicrobial agent called violacein. But C. violaceum offers more than medical applications. The bacterium might be capable of recovering precious metals from the massive quantities of electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) generated around the world. People tossed out 44.7 million metric…

1d

Mcm10 has potent strand-annealing activity and limits translocase-mediated fork regression [Chemistry]

The 11-subunit eukaryotic replicative helicase CMG (Cdc45, Mcm2-7, GINS) tightly binds Mcm10, an essential replication protein in all eukaryotes. Here we show that Mcm10 has a potent strand-annealing activity both alone and in complex with CMG. CMG-Mcm10 unwinds and then reanneals single strands soon after they have been unwound in…

1d

Nanoscale infrared imaging analysis of carbonaceous chondrites to understand organic-mineral interactions during aqueous alteration [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites is distributed in fine-grained matrix. To understand pre- and postaccretion history of organic matter and its association with surrounding minerals, microscopic techniques are mandatory. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a useful technique, but the spatial resolution of IR is limited to a few micrometers, due to…

1d

Global synthesis of conservation studies reveals the importance of small habitat patches for biodiversity [Ecology]

Island biogeography theory posits that species richness increases with island size and decreases with isolation. This logic underpins much conservation policy and regulation, with preference given to conserving large, highly connected areas, and relative ambivalence shown toward protecting small, isolated habitat patches. We undertook a global synthesis of the relationship…

1d

Designing combinatorial exchanges for the reallocation of resource rights [Economic Sciences]

We describe the design and implementation of a combinatorial exchange for trading catch shares in New South Wales, Australia. The exchange ended a decades-long political debate by providing a market-based response to a major policy problem faced by fisheries worldwide: the reallocation of catch shares in cap-and-trade programs designed to…

1d

Economic carbon cycle feedbacks may offset additional warming from natural feedbacks [Environmental Sciences]

As the Earth warms, carbon sinks on land and in the ocean will weaken, thereby increasing the rate of warming. Although natural mechanisms contributing to this positive climate–carbon feedback have been evaluated using Earth system models, analogous feedbacks involving human activities have not been systematically quantified. Here we conceptualize and…

1d

The genomic basis of Red Queen dynamics during rapid reciprocal host-pathogen coevolution [Evolution]

Red Queen dynamics, involving coevolutionary interactions between species, are ubiquitous, shaping the evolution of diverse biological systems. To date, information on the underlying selection dynamics and the involved genome regions is mainly available for bacteria–phage systems or only one of the antagonists of a eukaryotic host–pathogen interaction. We add to…

1d

Climate-induced phenological shifts in a Batesian mimicry complex [Evolution]

Climate-induced changes in spatial and temporal occurrence of species, as well as species traits such as body size, each have the potential to decouple symbiotic relationships. Past work has focused primarily on direct interactions, particularly those between predators and prey and between plants and pollinators, but studies have rarely demonstrated…

1d

HIV peptidome-wide association study reveals patient-specific epitope repertoires associated with HIV control [Genetics]

Genetic variation in the peptide-binding groove of the highly polymorphic HLA class I molecules has repeatedly been associated with HIV-1 control and progression to AIDS, accounting for up to 12% of the variation in HIV-1 set point viral load (spVL). This suggests a key role in disease control for HLA…

1d

Human RIPK1 deficiency causes combined immunodeficiency and inflammatory bowel diseases [Immunology and Inflammation]

Receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) is a critical regulator of cell death and inflammation, but its relevance for human disease pathogenesis remains elusive. Studies of monogenic disorders might provide critical insights into disease mechanisms and therapeutic targeting of RIPK1 for common diseases. Here, we report on eight patients from six…

1d

RNA-binding protein YTHDF3 suppresses interferon-dependent antiviral responses by promoting FOXO3 translation [Immunology and Inflammation]

IFN–stimulated genes (ISGs) are essential effectors of the IFN-dependent antiviral immune response. Dysregulation of ISG expression can cause dysfunctional antiviral responses and autoimmune disorders. Epitranscriptomic regulation, such as N6-methyladenosine (m6A) modification of mRNAs, plays key roles in diverse biological processes. Here, we found that the m6A “reader” YT521-B homology domain-co

1d

Interfacial fluid transport is a key to hydrogel bioadhesion [Medical Sciences]

Attaching hydrogels to soft internal tissues is a key to the development of a number of biomedical devices. Nevertheless, the wet nature of hydrogels and tissues renders this adhesion most difficult to achieve and control. Here, we show that the transport of fluids across hydrogel−tissue interfaces plays a central role…

1d

Direct electrochemical generation of supercooled sulfur microdroplets well below their melting temperature [Physics]

Supercooled liquid sulfur microdroplets were directly generated from polysulfide electrochemical oxidation on various metal-containing electrodes. The sulfur droplets remain liquid at 155 °C below sulfur’s melting point (Tm = 115 °C), with fractional supercooling change (Tm − Tsc)/Tm larger than 0.40. In operando light microscopy captured the rapid merging and…

1d

Thermal disequilibration of ions and electrons by collisionless plasma turbulence [Physics]

Does overall thermal equilibrium exist between ions and electrons in a weakly collisional, magnetized, turbulent plasma? And, if not, how is thermal energy partitioned between ions and electrons? This is a fundamental question in plasma physics, the answer to which is also crucial for predicting the properties of far-distant astronomical…

1d

Science and Culture: Searching for the science behind art therapy [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

John sat hunched over, ears red, cursing the paint under his breath. A war veteran not an artist, John (not his real name) hadn’t painted with water colors before. But he and seven other combat veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars weren’t trying to master a new artistic medium….

1d

Integration in emerging social networks explains academic failure and success [Social Sciences]

Academic success of students has been explained with a variety of individual and socioeconomic factors. Social networks that informally emerge within student communities can have an additional effect on their achievement. However, this effect of social ties is difficult to measure and quantify, because social networks are multidimensional and dynamically…

1d

Kineserne får planter til at vokse på Månens bagside

Frø spirer ombord på rumsonden Chang'e 4. Vi lægger fundamentet til en fremtidig månebase, siger forsker bag.

1d

Community-College Students Succeed at Elite Schools—When They’re Admitted

There’s a perception, flawed as it may be , that college admissions are a zero-sum game. One student gets in, another loses out. That perception is even more acute when it comes to selective institutions, where the seats are few and the applications from qualified students are plenty. Once students get into such selective schools—with all of the money, prestige, and support that comes with them—t

1d

Young Trans Children Know Who They Are

Since 2013, Kristina Olson , a psychologist at the University of Washington, has been running a large, long-term study to track the health and well-being of transgender children—those who identify as a different gender from the one they were assigned at birth. Since the study’s launch, Olson has also heard from the parents of gender-nonconforming kids, who consistently defy gender stereotypes but

1d

Cotton Seed Sprouts on the Moon's Far Side in Historic First by China's Chang'e 4

Before China finished packing up its Chang'e 4 lunar lander to be blasted off on a never-before-accomplished journey to the far side of the moon, scientists slipped in a small tank of plant seeds. And now, the team announced, a cotton seed has sprouted.

1d

Keeping roads in good shape reduces greenhouse gas emissions, study finds

Keeping road pavement in good shape saves money and energy and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, more than offsetting pollution generated during road construction, according to a Rutgers-led study.

1d

Scientists identify two new species of fungi in retreating Arctic glacier

Two new species of fungi have made an appearance in a rapidly melting glacier on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic, just west of Greenland.

1d

To save lives in the next flu pandemic, tweak vaccine supplies

Health experts should only replenish flu vaccines in areas that need them, researchers argue in a new paper. More than 50 million people died in the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918-19. Its 100th anniversary this flu season serves as a reminder to close flu vaccine supply gaps that may be costing hundred to thousands of lives now and could cost many more when the next “big one” strikes, researchers s

1d

Protein alteration controls cell's response to stress, immunity and lifespan

Scientists have revealed a key mechanism in worms that is involved in controlling the cell's response to stress, a study in eLife reports.

1d

Personality type could shape attitudes toward body weight of others, researchers say

Researchers found that personality traits have significant bearing on a person's attitudes toward obesity, their implicit theories of weight and their willingness to engage in derisive fat talk or weight discrimination.

1d

Physicists experimentally verify the multipartite generalized Hardy's paradox

In a recent article published in Science Bulletin, a joint team led by Professors Jian-Wei Pan, Chao-Yang Lu and Nai-Le Liu at the University of Science and Technology of China, and Jing-Ling Chen at Nankai University, has for the first time verified the multipartite Hardy's paradox in experiment.

1d

Using satellites to measure rates of ice mass loss in glaciers

Researchers from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have now investigated all glacial areas in South America in more detail than ever before, from the tropical areas to the subpolar regions. Their two major findings are that the highest rate of mass loss is in the Patagonian ice sheet, and that the glaciers in the tropics have lost considerably less mass than previously projected, a

1d

Genes reveal clues about people's potential life expectancy

Scientists say they can predict whether a person can expect to live longer or die sooner than average, by looking at their DNA. Experts at the University of Edinburgh have analysed the combined effect of genetic variations that influence lifespan to produce a scoring system. People who score in the top ten per cent of the population might expect to live up to five years longer than those who score

1d

RUDN pedologists found out a correct combination of nitrogen fertilizers and plastic mulch

RUDN pedologists studied the combined effect of nitrogen-containing fertilizers and plastic mulching. The efficiency of the procedure turned out to depend on the part of the bed (the furrow or the ridge) that was fertilized. The results of the study were published in the Soil & Tillage Research journal.

1d

Researchers discovered new immune response regulators

The research groups of Academy Professor Riitta Lahesmaa and Research Director Laura Elo from Turku Centre for Biotechnology have discovered new proteins that regulate T cells in the human immune system. Some of these proteins can provide possible new targets for drug development in treating immune-mediated diseases.

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Keeping roads in good shape reduces greenhouse gas emissions, Rutgers-led study finds

Keeping road pavement in good shape saves money and energy and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, more than offsetting pollution generated during road construction, according to a Rutgers-led study. The study appears in the International Journal of Sustainable Transportation.

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Big genome found in tiny forest defoliator

The European gypsy moth (EGM) is perhaps the country's most famous invasive insect—a nonnative species accidentally introduced to North America in the 1860s when a few escaped from a breeding experiment in suburban Boston. The caterpillars have been slowly eating their way across the continent ever since, causing widespread defoliation.

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Carbohydrates, fibre and a healthy diet | Letters

Low-carb does not mean no-carb, nor does it mean low-fibre, says Sue Morgan . Vegetables are stuffed full of fibre, points out Dr Nick Evans . The ketogenic diet should not be dismissed as a dangerous fad, says Anna McGuirk Low-carb does not mean no-carb, nor does it mean low-fibre ( Blow to the low-carb diet as WHO report says fibre cuts early deaths , 11 January). Your article appears to confuse

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New book tells story of secret Hollywood studio that shaped the nuclear age

Our images of mushroom clouds came from its cameras. So did many shots of missile tests, space missions and the Korean and Vietnam wars.

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Serious problems with forensic software

New research finds significant flaws in recently released forensic software designed to assess the age of individuals based on their skeletal remains. The researchers report that, on average, the software's age estimates are off by more than 14 years.

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Understanding physics could lead to big gains in shale oil recovery

Oil companies are missing out on vast sums of recoverable oil in unconventional reservoirs, according to Penn State experts.

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Researchers report breakthrough in ice-repelling materials

Icy weather is blamed for multibillion dollar losses every year in the United States, including delays and damage related to air travel, infrastructure and power generation and transmission facilities. Finding effective, durable and environmentally stable de-icing materials has been stymied by the stubborn tenacity with which ice adheres to the materials on which it forms.

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Genomic study finds Haida Gwaii's northern goshawks are highly distinct and at-risk

Haida Gwaii's small population of northern goshawks—already of great concern to conservationists—are the last remnant of a highly distinct genetic cluster of the birds, according to a new genomic analysis by University of British Columbia researchers.

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3,000-year-old eastern North American quinoa discovered in Ontario

A mass of charred seeds found while clearing a home construction site in Brantford, Ontario, has been identified as ancient, domesticated goosefoot (C. berlandieri spp. jonesianum), a form of quinoa native to Eastern North America. The seeds date back to 900 B.C., and have never previously been found north of Kentucky this early in history, says Professor Gary Crawford of the Department of Anthrop

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Purchase receipts with easily erasable ink contain cancer-infertility inducing substances

An international research led by the UGR shows that 90 percent of store and supermarket receipts are made of thermal paper containing bisphenol A (BPA).

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Mathematical model can improve our knowledge on cancer

Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have developed a new mathematical tool, which can improve our understanding of what happens when cells lose their polarity (direction) in diseases such as cancer. The result is advancing our understanding of how the fertilized egg cell develops into a complete organism. Biological shapes, like individual organs or an entire body, c

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Effects of linoleic acid on inflammatory response depend on genes

The effects of linoleic acid on the human body are largely dependent on genes, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid. People carrying different variants of the FADS1 gene had a different inflammatory response and different changes in their fasting glucose levels when supplementing their diet by linoleic acid rich sunflower oil. This was

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Enhanced research reporting method to improve patient care

Patients could benefit from improved care and outcomes thanks to new research guidance developed as part of a University of Stirling-led study.

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Poo transplant effective treatment for chronic bowel condition

Poo transplant or 'Faecal microbiota transplantation' (FMT) can successfully treat patients with ulcerative colitis, new research from the University of Adelaide shows.

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Anonymous yet trustworthy

Minority and dissident communities face a perplexing challenge in countries with authoritarian governments. They need to remain anonymous to avoid persecution, but also must establish a trustworthy identity in their communications. An interdisciplinary group of researchers at UC Santa Barbara has designed an application to meet both of these requirements.

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Big genome found in tiny forest defoliator

Drs. Don Gammon and Nick Grishin of UT Southwestern have sequenced the genomes of the European gypsy moth and its even more destructive cousin, the Asian gypsy moth.

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Vådområder skulle spare 2450 ton kvælstof: Landbruget har nået 12 pct.

Kun 12 procent af de indsatser, som landbruget skal nå inden 2021 for at mindste udledningen af kvælstof, er blevet til virkelighed, viser ny opgørelse.

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Health effects of metabolic 'magic bullet' protein

Researchers have developed a new system that lets them study in more detail than ever exactly how, where and when the metabolic protein AMPK carries out its molecular and therapeutic functions.

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Fever alters immune cells so they can better reach infections

Fever is known to help power up our immune cells, and scientists have new evidence explaining how. They found in mice that fever alters surface proteins on immune cells like lymphocytes to make them better able to travel via blood vessels to reach the site of infection.

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Animals may get used to drones

A new study shows that over time, bears get used to drones. Previous work indicated that animals behave fearfully or show a stress response near drone flights. Using heart monitors to gauge stress, however, researchers here found that bears habituated to drones over a 3 to 4-week period and remained habituated.

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How fasting can improve overall health

Researchers found evidence that fasting affects circadian clocks in the liver and skeletal muscle, causing them to rewire their metabolism, which can ultimately lead to improved health and protection against aging-associated diseases.

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Mojave rattlesnakes' life-threatening venom is more widespread than expected

The Mojave rattlesnake, living in the deserts of the southwestern United States and central Mexico, is characterized by its lethal venom that can either shut down your body or tenderize your insides. Clemson University researchers say which one depends on where you're located.

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Pore size influences nature of complex nanostructures

Building at the nanoscale is not like building a house. Scientists often start with two-dimensional molecular layers and combine them to form complex three-dimensional architectures. And instead of nails and screws, these structures are joined together by the attractive van der Waals forces that exist between objects at the nanoscale.

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New study shows animals may get used to drones

A new study in Conservation Physiology shows that over time, bears get used to drones. Previous work indicated that animals behave fearfully or show a stress response near drone flights. Using heart monitors to gauge stress, however, researchers here found that bears habituated to drones over a 3 to 4-week period and remained habituated.

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Steven Pinker's 13 rules for writing better

Steven Pinker is many things: linguist, psychologist, optimist, Harvard professor, and author. When it comes to writing, he's a student and a teacher. Here's are his 13 rules for writing better, more simply, and more clearly. 1. Reverse-engineer what you read. 2. Prose is a window onto the world. 3. Don’t go meta. 4. Let verbs be verbs. 5. Beware of the Curse of Knowledge. 6. Omit needless words.

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Steven Pinker's 13 rules for writing better

Steven Pinker is many things: linguist, psychologist, optimist, Harvard professor, and author. When it comes to writing, he's a student and a teacher. Here's are his 13 rules for writing better, more simply, and more clearly. 1. Reverse-engineer what you read. 2. Prose is a window onto the world. 3. Don’t go meta. 4. Let verbs be verbs. Interlude for Steven Pinker's view of human nature. Is it ev

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POLAR experiment reveals orderly chaos of black holes

An international consortium of scientists studying gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as part of the POLAR (GRB polarimeter) experiment has revealed that high-energy photon emissions from black holes are neither completely chaotic nor completely organized, but a mixture. The results were published in Nature Astronomy.

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Multimaterial 3D printing used to develop fast response stiffness-tunable soft actuator

Researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design and Shanghai Jiao Tong University have designed and fabricated a fast-response, stiffness tunable (FRST) soft actuator which is able to complete a softening-stiffening cycle within 32 seconds.

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Light up logic: Engineers from UTokyo and RIKEN perform computational logic with light

For the first time, researchers performed logic operations — the basis of computation — with a chemical device using electric fields and ultraviolet light. The device and the pioneering methods used open up research possibilities including low-power, high-performance computer chips.

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MANF identified as a rejuvenating factor in parabiosis

Older mice who are surgically joined with young mice in order to share a common bloodstream get stronger and healthier, making parabiosis one of the hottest topics in age research. Publishing in Nature Metabolism, researchers report that MANF (mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor) is one of the factors responsible for rejuvenating the transfused older mice. Researchers also show the

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B-group vitamins can improve concentration among people with first episode psychosis

The study, led by Dr Colin O'Donnell, now at Letterkenny University Hospital, and Dr Kelly Allott from Orygen, explored the impact of increasing a person's intake of vitamins B12, B6, and folic acid [vitamin B9] after studies in people with schizophrenia revealed that increased intake of these vitamins could decrease patients' levels of an amino acid called homocysteine and improve their symptoms.

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Bike share programs show infrequent helmet use, little disparity among neighborhoods

People riding free-floating bike share rentals in Seattle are wearing helmets infrequently, according to a new analysis conducted by University of Washington researchers. Only 20 percent of bike share riders wore helmets in the study, while more than 90 percent of cyclists wore helmets while riding their own bikes.Different research on the free-floating bike share systems showed that bikes were us

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The Scourge of Sepsis

It’s the leading cause of preventable death worldwide; migrant children are especially vulnerable; and time is of the essence in treating it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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US charges eight in securities hacking scheme

US authorities on Tuesday charged eight people in a scheme to trade on and profit from stolen corporate information hacked from a government database, court papers showed.

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Netflix raising prices for 58M US subscribers as costs riseNetflix Prices US Hulu

Netflix is raising its U.S. prices by 13 percent to 18 percent, its biggest increase since the company launched its video streaming service 12 years ago.

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Genomic study finds Haida Gwaii's northern goshawks are highly distinct and at-risk

Haida Gwaii's small population of northern goshawks — already of great concern to conservationists — are the last remnant of a highly distinct genetic cluster of the birds, according to a new genomic analysis.

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The 17 different ways your face conveys happiness

Human beings can configure their faces in thousands and thousands of ways to convey emotion, but only 35 expressions actually get the job done across cultures, a new study has found.

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3,000-year-old eastern North American quinoa discovered in Ontario

A mass of charred seeds found while clearing a home construction site in Brantford, Ontario, has been identified as ancient, domesticated goosefoot (C. berlandieri spp. jonesianum), a form of quinoa native to Eastern North America. The seeds date back to 900 B.C., and have never previously been found north of Kentucky this early in history.

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Hindering melanoma metastasis with an FDA-approved drug

A drug approved by the FDA 65 years ago for blood pressure control may aid in preventing cancer from spreading to distant organs. New research revealed that this drug disrupted formation of a fertile environment for metastasis in an animal model by protecting healthy cells from harmful vesicles released by tumors.

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Sugary stent eases suturing of blood vessels

A team has concocted a sugar-heavy stent to reduce the margin of error in a delicate surgical procedure.

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Understanding physics could lead to big gains in shale oil recovery

Oil companies are missing out on vast sums of recoverable oil in unconventional reservoirs, according to experts.

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Experiments detect entropy production in mesoscopic quantum systems

One of the most important aims of contemporary scientific research is finding out what makes the production of entropy predominate. This aim explains the current interest in studying mesoscopic systems, which are not as small as individual atoms but nevertheless display well-defined quantum behavior.

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Romeo the Water Frog Has Finally Found His Juliet — and Their Love Just Might Save His Species

For 10 long years he searched for his Juliet — and now he's found her.

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Scientists identify two new species of fungi in retreating Arctic glacier

Two new species of fungi have made an appearance in a rapidly melting glacier on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic, just west of Greenland. A collaborative team of researchers from Japan's National Institute of Polar Research, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies in Tokyo, Japan, and Laval University in Québec, Canada made the discovery.

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Defective glial cells can push neurons toward Parkinson's disease

A team of scientists from IDIBELL, the University of Barcelona and CMR[B] have discovered that astrocytes are linked to the buildup of a toxic protein that is one the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The work, which appeared January 10 in the journal Stem Cell Reports, suggests an important role for glial cells in Parkinson's disease and offers potential new targets for developing therapies.

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Muscle stem cells can drive cancer that arises in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have demonstrated that muscle stem cells may give rise to rhabdomyosarcoma that occurs during DMD–and identified two genes linked to the tumor's growth. The research, performed using a mouse model of severe DMD, helps scientists better understand how rhabdomyosarcoma develops in DMD–and indicates that ongoing efforts to dev

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A microbial hot spring in your basement

Microbes that thrive in some of the most extreme places on Earth have discovered another cozy place to live — inside homes across the United States.

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New research from Barnard president Sian Beilock helps students excel on science exams

A new study released today reveals that helping lower-income high school freshman to regulate their test-taking anxiety can cut their biology course failure rates in half. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and conducted by Barnard College President Sian Leah Beilock and her research team found that brief pre-exam de-stressing strategies could reduce the perfor

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A new twist on a mesmerizing story

The Einstein-de Haas effect, first demonstrated more than a century ago, provides an intriguing link between magnetization and rotation in ferromagnetic materials. An international team led by ETH physicist Steven Johnson now established that the effect has also a central role in ultrafast processes that happen at the sub-picosecond timescale — and thus deliver fresh insight into materials that m

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CU researchers review vaccine-preventable infections in pediatric transplant patients

Children who receive solid organ transplants are hospitalized due to vaccine-preventable infections at rates that are significantly higher than the general population, according to a newly published study by University of Colorado School of Medicine researchers.

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Researchers report breakthrough in ice-repelling materials

Icy weather is blamed for multibillion dollar losses every year in the United States, including delays and damage related to air travel, infrastructure and power generation and transmission facilities. Now researchers have reported creating a durable silicone polymer coating capable of repelling ice from any surface.

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Pore size influences nature of complex nanostructures

In new research that could help inform development of new materials, Cornell chemists have found that the empty space ("pores") present in two-dimensional molecular building blocks fundamentally changes the strength of these van der Waals forces, and can potentially alter the assembly of sophisticated nanostructures.

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Educational videos in clinics increased adolescent HPV vaccinations

Showing parents and children an educational video while they wait during a routine medical visit could lead to more people choosing HPV vaccination according to Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University School of Medicine, and IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI researchers. They used electronic health records and the state's immunization registry system to identify patients e

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NYSCF scientists make strides in creation of clinical-grade bone

A team of scientists from the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute reported Friday in Stem Cell Research and Therapy that they have made valuable progress toward creating clinical-grade cells for treatment of bone disease and injury. In their study, the team identified two types of growth media that could support effective expansion of mesenchymal progenitor (MP) cells from ste

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Researchers discover new evidence of superconductivity at near room temperature

Researchers at the George Washington University have taken a major step toward reaching one of the most sought-after goals in physics: room temperature superconductivity.

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Microneedle patch could offer long-term birth control

A new long-acting contraceptive patch that women administer themselves could eventually provide a new family planning option, particularly in developing nations with limited access to health care. The patch uses microneedle technology originally developed to painlessly administer vaccines. Long-acting contraceptives now available offer the highest level of effectiveness, but usually require a hea

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What Kissinger Knew That Pompeo Does Not

In November 1973, at the end of the Yom Kippur War, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger made his first visit to Cairo, to meet Anwar Sadat, Egypt’s president. America was in the process of withdrawing from Vietnam and Richard Nixon was in the throes of the Watergate crisis that would soon drive him from office. The new secretary of state wanted to conceal the appearance of American weakness with e

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New study shows animals may get used to drones

A new study in Conservation Physiology shows that over time, bears get used to drones. Previous work indicated that animals behave fearfully or show a stress response near drone flights. Using heart monitors to gauge stress, however, researchers here found that bears habituated to drones over a 3 to 4-week period and remained habituated.

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JAMA report outlines recommendations for evaluation and management of penicillin allergy

A review article in the Jan. 15, 2019, issue of JAMA recommends best practices for evaluation of reported penicillin allergies and provides clinicians with guidance and tools to help determine appropriate procedures based on the severity of previously reported reactions.

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Fever alters immune cells so they can better reach infections

Fever is known to help power up our immune cells, and scientists in Shanghai have new evidence explaining how. They found in mice that fever alters surface proteins on immune cells like lymphocytes to make them better able to travel via blood vessels to reach the site of infection. Their work appears on Jan. 15 in the journal Immunity.

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Mojave rattlesnakes' life-threatening venom is more widespread than expected

It was thought that Mojave rattlesnakes with hemorrhagic venom only lived in Arizona, but new research from Clemson University scientists documents hemorrhagic and neurotoxic venom types throughout the US and Mexico, and even hybrid venom in which one snake exhibits both types.

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Experiments detect entropy production in mesoscopic quantum systems

One of the most important aims of contemporary scientific research is finding out what makes the production of entropy predominate. This aim explains the current interest in studying mesoscopic systems, which are not as small as individual atoms but nevertheless display well-defined quantum behavior.

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Tap or bottled? Water composition impacts health benefits of tea

Here's to sipping a cupful of health: Green tea steeped in bottled water has a more bitter taste, but it has more antioxidants than tea brewed using tap water, according to new Cornell University food science research published in Nutrients.

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Understanding physics could lead to big gains in shale oil recovery

Oil companies are missing out on vast sums of recoverable oil in unconventional reservoirs, according to Penn State experts.

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Sugary stent eases suturing of blood vessels

A team led by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Harvard Medical School has concocted a sugar-heavy stent to reduce the margin of error in a delicate surgical procedure.

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The 17 different ways your face conveys happiness

Human beings can configure their faces in thousands and thousands of ways to convey emotion, but only 35 expressions actually get the job done across cultures, a new study has found.

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Salk scientists uncover the health effects of metabolic 'magic bullet' protein

Salk researchers have developed a new system that lets them study in more detail than ever exactly how, where and when the metabolic protein AMPK carries out its molecular and therapeutic functions.

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Genomic study finds Haida Gwaii's northern goshawks are highly distinct and at-risk

Haida Gwaii's small population of northern goshawks — already of great concern to conservationists — are the last remnant of a highly distinct genetic cluster of the birds, according to a new genomic analysis by University of British Columbia researchers.

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Nebraska leads $11 million study to develop radiation exposure drugs

Academic and medical researchers at the University of Nebraska are partnering with the Department of Defense to develop drug compounds that protect against and treat radiation exposure.

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Early child deprivation and neglect impair memory and executive functioning at age 16

Young children experiencing deprivation and neglect in institutional settings have impaired memory and executive functioning at ages 8 and 16 compared with peers placed early in quality foster homes, report investigators at Boston Children's Hospital. The study, interpreting the latest findings from the randomized controlled trial, the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (BEIP), was published tod

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3,000-year-old eastern North American quinoa discovered in Ontario

A mass of charred seeds found while clearing a home construction site in Brantford, Ontario, has been identified as ancient, domesticated goosefoot (C. berlandieri spp. jonesianum), a form of quinoa native to Eastern North America. The seeds date back to 900 B.C., and have never previously been found north of Kentucky this early in history.

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Surge protector: A novel approach to suppressing therapy-induced tumor growth and recurrence

Following up on a groundbreaking 2018 study in which BIDMC's Dipak Panigrahy, MD, demonstrated that dead and dying cancer cells killed by conventional cancer treatments paradoxically trigger inflammation that promotes tumor growth and metastasis, a new study led by Allison Gartung, PhD, describes a novel approach to suppressing chemotherapy-induced tumor growth in an ovarian cancer model. Gartung

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TGF-beta pathway protects against uterine cancer

Two new mouse models of uterine cancer reveal that the TGF-beta signaling pathway in uterine cells protects against the disease by suppressing the overgrowth and oncogenesis of the endometrium, the membrane lining the inside of the uterus.

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Bear necessities: New study highlights importance of water resources for Andean bears

A new study highlights the importance of water for Andean bears living in the mountain forests of Peru. The study found that bears exhibit tree-rubbing behavior on shrubs and trees that are located on trails near water holes. The discovery that this behavior occurs near water holes could have implications for future conservation programs.

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Honey bee parasites, varroa mites, feed on fatty organs, not blood

Among the many threats to honey bee colonies around the world, one stands alone: the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor. For decades, researchers assumed that varroa mites feed on blood, like many of their mite and tick cousins. But new research suggests that varroa mites have a voracious appetite for a honey bee organ called the fat body, which serves many of the same vital functions carried out b

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Central Texas salamanders, including newly identified species, at risk of extinction

Biologists have discovered three new species of groundwater salamander in Central Texas, including one living west of Austin that they say is critically endangered. They also determined that an already known salamander species near Georgetown is much more endangered than previously thought. They warn that more severe droughts caused by climate change and increasing water use in Central Texas have

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Americans now more likely to die from opioids than car crashes

Each American has about a 1 in 7,569 chance of dying from an opioid overdose, according to a National Safety Council report. The probability of dying in a motor vehicle accident is 1 in 8,096. The death rate for opioids is now six times higher than it was in 1999, with about 130 Americans dying every day from the drugs. Narcan is a life-saving drug that can stop opioid overdoses in their tracks,

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Immediate fossil fuel phaseout could arrest climate change – study

Scientists say it may still technically be possible to limit warming to 1.5C if drastic action is taken now Climate change could be kept in check if a phaseout of all fossil fuel infrastructure were to begin immediately, according to research. It shows that meeting the internationally agreed aspiration of keeping global warming to less than 1.5C above pre-industrial levels is still possible. The

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How you see these shapes may depend on your culture

Science Why your eyes perceive the world differently from everyone else. When we look at something, the brain uses visual cues –sensory signals that convey information – to help work out what that thing is. This means that our perception of…

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Letters: ‘We Need to Read Lincoln’s Words, Heed Their Meaning, Weep That We Have Fallen Astray’

The Suicide of a Great Democracy Last week, George Packer described what it was like to visit the Lincoln Memorial during the government shutdown. “It shamed me to read” Abraham Lincoln’s second inaugural, Packer wrote. “Lincoln’s eloquence touched levels of morality and high resolve that were preposterously out of reach in the first days of 2019, in the third year of the Trump presidency.” I fou

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How Nearby Stellar Explosions Could Have Killed Off Large Animals

Even though Earth is floating in the void, it does not exist in a vacuum. The planet is constantly bombarded by stuff from space, including a daily deluge of micrometeorites and a shower of radiation from the sun and more-distant stars. Sometimes, things from space can maim or kill us, like the gargantuan asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs. More often, stellar smithereens make their way to Ear

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Hindering melanoma metastasis with an FDA-approved drug

A drug approved by the FDA 65 years ago for blood pressure control may aid in preventing cancer from spreading to distant organs. New research led by the University of Pennsylvania's Serge Fuchs revealed that this drug disupted formation of a fertile environment for metastasis in an animal model by protecting healthy cells from harmful vesicles released by tumors.

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Study of mutation order may change understanding of how tumors develop

Cancers most commonly arise because of a series of two to five mutations in different genes that combine to cause a tumor. Evidence from a growing number of experiments focused on truncal mutations — the first mutations in a given sequence — suggests a new direction in understanding the origins of cancer.

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UCI-led study reveals how fasting can improve overall health

In a University of California, Irvine-led study, researchers found evidence that fasting affects circadian clocks in the liver and skeletal muscle, causing them to rewire their metabolism, which can ultimately lead to improved health and protection against aging-associated diseases. The study was published recently in Cell Reports.

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Research finds serious problems with forensic software

New research finds significant flaws in recently released forensic software designed to assess the age of individuals based on their skeletal remains. The researchers report that, on average, the software's age estimates are off by more than 14 years.

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World's loneliest frog finds a possible mate

The world's loneliest frog, known as Romeo, finds friends (and a possible date) after water frogs found in the wild.

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Why black girls are targeted for punishment at school — and how to change that | Monique W. Morris

Around the world, black girls are being pushed out of schools because of policies that target them for punishment, says author and social justice scholar Monique W. Morris. The result: countless girls are forced into unsafe futures with restricted opportunities. How can we put an end to this crisis? In an impassioned talk, Morris uncovers the causes of "pushout" and shows how we can work to turn a

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In areas without enough doctors, nurse practitioners step in

A growing number of nurse practitioners provide primary care in low-income and rural areas where physician supply is low, according to a new study. Researchers looked at data trends in 50 states and Washington, DC from 2010 to 2016 and charted a narrowing gap between the supply of primary care nurse practitioners and physicians, particularly in low-income and rural communities. “The growing NP su

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Ny plan: S-togenes nye signalsystem bliver forsinket til 2022

Banedanmark har præsenteret politikerne for en ny plan, der bekræfter flere måneders frygt for, at det nye system ikke bliver færdiginstalleret i 2021. Den første strækning med CBTC-systemet er stadig ramt af problemer.

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Bear necessities: New study highlights importance of water resources for Andean bears

A new study highlights the importance of water for Andean bears living in the mountain forests of Peru. The study found that bears exhibit tree-rubbing behavior on shrubs and trees that are located on trails near water holes. The discovery that this behavior occurs near water holes could have implications for future conservation programs.

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Bear necessities: New study highlights importance of water resources for Andean bears

A new study is shedding light on the importance of one critical resource for Andean bears living in the dry mountain forests of Peru: water. The study—a collaboration between the Norwegian University of Life Sciences and San Diego Zoo Global, with assistance from the Spectacled Bear Conservation Society-Peru—found that Andean bears focus much of their tree-rubbing behavior on shrubs and trees that

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Stroke drug may also prevent Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have discovered that a drug currently being developed to treat stroke patients could also prevent Alzheimer's disease. The study shows that the genetically engineered protein 3K3A-APC protects the brains of mice with Alzheimer's-like symptoms, reducing the buildup of toxic peptides and preventing memory loss.

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Epigenetic change causes fruit fly babies to inherit diet-induced heart disease

Scientists have identified an epigenetic marker and two genes that caused heart failure in the children and grandchildren of fruit flies with high-fat-diet-induced heart dysfunction. Reversing the epigenetic modification or over-expressing the two genes protected subsequent generations from the negative heart effects of their parents' diet.

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Medie: Regioner nedlægges

Regeringen vil nedlægge regionerne, skriver Jyllands-Posten forud for offentliggørelsen af den samlede sundhedsreform onsdag.

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Observing clouds in four dimensions

While easily seen by people, the cotton-ball clouds (called shallow cumulus clouds) that drift overhead on partly cloudy days are hard for radars and many other instruments to observe and, therefore, hard to model and predict. Scientists situated six digital cameras in pairs at a distance of 6 kilometers (nearly 4 miles) from the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement user facili

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The Stubborn Culture of Harassment in America’s Medical Schools

When Yale University announced in summer 2018 that the renowned cardiologist Michael Simons had received a prestigious endowed professorship, his colleagues at the university’s medical school did not rush to congratulate him. On the contrary, they were outraged. “I was appalled,” says Nancy Ruddle, an epidemiology professor. Nina Stachenfeld, another researcher at the medical school, got the news

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Engineered T cells promote long-term organ transplant acceptance

Organ transplant rejection is a major problem in transplantation medicine. Suppressing the immune system to prevent organ rejection, however, opens the door to life-threatening infections. Researchers have now discovered a molecular approach preventing rejection of the transplanted graft while simultaneously maintaining the ability to fight against infections.

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Child abuse cases quadruple when report cards are sent home on Fridays

Researchers discovered a four-fold increase in verified cases of child abuse when report cards were sent home on Friday as compared to other days. Corporal punishment is legal throughout America, including in many public and most private schools. A child is hit, on average, every 30 seconds in American public schools. None I certainly remember that feeling when I was young: The dreaded Friday tha

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Our Language Affects What We See

A new look at “the Russian Blues” demonstrates the power of words to shape perception — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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States with fewer melanoma diagnoses have higher death rates

Researchers at University of Utah Health conducted a state-by-state analysis to understand the geographic disparities for patients diagnosed with melanoma. The results of their study suggest that lower survival is associated with more practicing physicians in a region and higher population of Caucasians.

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Personalized treatment benefits kidney cancer patients

Personalized treatment plans may extend life expectancy for early-stage kidney cancer patients who have risk factors for worsening kidney disease, according to a new study.

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New historical emissions trends estimated with the community emissions data system

To better understand how aerosols affect the atmosphere and Earth system processes, historical emissions data are a key input for modeling and analyses. A research team produced a new, robust data set covering the years 1750–2014 for carbonaceous aerosols, and chemically reactive gases—which are precursors to ozone, aerosols such as sulfate and nitrate, and carbon dioxide. To organize, analyze, an

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Road repairs cut greenhouse gas emissions

Keeping road pavement in good shape saves money and energy and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, more than offsetting pollution generated during road construction, according to a new study. Extending the life of pavement through preventive maintenance can reduce greenhouse gases by up to 2 percent; transportation agencies can cut spending by 10 percent to 30 percent; and drivers can save about 2

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Quality of life in adolescents recovering from sports-related concussion or fracture

Researchers studied health-related quality of life in adolescents with sports-related concussion or extremity fracture during their recovery periods.

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Apps let everyone help track health of insect populations

More challenging than birdwatching and not nearly as popular, insect-watching—noting and sharing exactly what one sees and where—is nevertheless on the rise.

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Two charged with hacking SEC computers in trading scheme

Two Ukrainian men hacked into the Securities and Exchange Commission's computers to steal thousands of quarterly and annual reports of public companies and worked with traders to use the information to make more than $4 million in illegal profits, U.S. Attorney Craig Carpenito said Tuesday.

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Kikkertmetode ved bypassoperation skåner patienten

På Rigshospitalet bruger hjertekirurgisk afdeling kikkertteknik ved 60 pct. af alle bypassoperationer. Det giver færre komplikationer og kortere indlæggelsestid, fortæller overlæge.

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Herlev og Gentofte styrker patientplejen med nyt professorat

Hanne Konradsen tiltræder 1. februar som professor i klinisk sygepleje på Herlev og Gentofte Hospital.

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Sygehuse skal være bedre til at sende patienter videre til anden behandling

Sundhedsreformen vil byde på tiltag som, at sygehuse skal guide patienter bedre til at bruge det udvidede frie sygehusvalg, og førstegangsfødende skal have en garanti for at vælge en indlæggelse i to døgn efter fødsel.

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VR gets reality check with significant decline in investment

A few years ago, virtual reality was all the rage in Hollywood, helping to fuel the rise of Silicon Beach with the promise of reinventing the entertainment business.

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Why Master Photographer Ralph Gibson Went Digital After Decades

Ralph Gibson, who’s been shooting analog since 1956, highlights the qualities inherent to digital photography in this new show, 'Digital Color.'

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So You Want to Harness Evaporation From a Manmade Lake

There are much better ways to generate electricity than this proposed scheme in Egypt, but here's how it would theoretically work.

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Bringing medieval literature into the digital age

William Langland likely wouldn't know what to make of the latest way people are reading his poetry. In part, that's because Langland died in 1386. But it's also because his most famous work, Piers Plowman, is the subject of an expansive digital humanities project – allowing scholars to work with multiple versions of the poem using modern tools.

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The legal implications of digital privacy

A June 2018 decision rendered by the Supreme Court of the United States established an interesting principle on digital privacy in a case related to a criminal proceeding.

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Why Did the Border Patrol Union Switch Its Position on the Wall?

In advocating for border security, President Donald Trump has repeatedly sought to enlist Border Patrol agents and their union, the Washington Post reports , even bringing union leaders for Border Patrol and Immigration and Customs Enforcement to the White House “to tout the wall.” That isn’t surprising in one sense: Lots of politicians use uniformed law-enforcement officers as political props. B

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Habitable planets around red dwarf stars might not get enough photons to support plant life

In recent years, the number of extra-solar planets discovered around nearby M-type (red dwarf stars) has grown considerably. In many cases, these confirmed planets have been "Earth-like," meaning that they are terrestrial (aka. rocky) and comparable in size to Earth. These finds have been especially exciting since red dwarf stars are the most common in the universe – accounting for 85 percent of s

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Will talking to AI voice assistants re-engineer our human conversations?

When you're lost, Siri can be your best friend. But if she can't retrieve the right address from your contacts, she can drive you crazy.

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Kæmpekranernes rige: Her løfter de borerigge og skibe

PLUS. Singapore er et globalt centrum for shipping. Vi besøger den gigantiske servicestation for tusinder af skibe.

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Marine bacterium sheds light on control of toxic metals

An ocean-dwelling bacterium has provided fresh insights into how cells protect themselves from the toxic effects of metal ions such as iron and copper. Although essential to life, metal ions can also generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) — highly reactive molecules that damage cells as they try to form bonds with other molecules. In humans, reactive oxygen species are linked to aging and also to

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History of North African date palm

Genome analysis reveals that North African date palms are a hybrid between cultivated date palms from the Middle East and a different, wild species of palm that grows on the island of Crete and in small areas of Southern Turkey. These findings shed new light on the evolutionary history of one of the crop.

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Sleeping less than six hours a night may increase cardiovascular risk

People who sleep less than six hours a night may be at increased risk of cardiovascular disease compared with those who sleep between seven and eight hours, suggests a new study. Poor quality sleep increases the risk of atherosclerosis — plaque buildup in the arteries throughout the body — according to the study.

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Teen brain volume changes with small amount of cannabis use, study finds

At a time when several states are moving to legalize recreational use of marijuana, new research shows that concerns about the drug's impact on teens may be warranted. The study shows that even a small amount of cannabis use by teenagers is linked to differences in their brains.

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Memory of last meal influences when, how much rats eat next

Researchers have identified cells in the brains of male rats that appear to control future food intake by preserving memories of past meals. The study lends support to the idea of boosting meal memories as a strategy for managing overeating.

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Diving deeper into developmental dyslexia

Men with dyslexia have altered structural connections between the thalamus and auditory cortex on the left side of the brain, new research reveals. The study extends similar observations of the dyslexic visual system and highlights the importance of early sensory processing for reading proficiency.

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How we turned guns and opioids into epidemics

Health America’s latest public health contagions by the numbers. "Not all contagions are caused by something you can catch with a cough. Gun violence and opioid overdoses are public health crises on the rise."…

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Facebook follows Google with funds to support journalismFacebook US Local News

Facebook announced Tuesday that it will invest $300 million over three years to support journalism, with an emphasis on promoting hard-hit local news organizations.

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Romantic-era music linked to real-life romantic entanglement

There's a juicy psychological, even romantic, angle underlying his mathematical analysis of an important Johannes Brahms composition in the new book co-written and edited by Scott Murphy, University of Kansas professor of music theory.

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Gut bacteria in fruit flies do not have a major influence on behavior

Microbial communities residing within the gut have been implicated in several aspects of health and disease. The mammalian gut microbiome, for example, not only influences metabolic functions and immune responses, but has also been found to affect mood, cognition, pain and anxiety. However, a recent study by Singaporean scientists has shown this is not the case for flies.

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Store craft beer in a cool place and consume it as fresh as possible

A new study by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (Leibniz-LSB@TUM) shows that craft beer should be kept cool and consumed as fresh as possible. After three months, cold stored beer loses more than one third of an important hop odorant that characterizes the typical aroma of many craft beers. Storage at room temperature causes the concentration of

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It's not just the isolation. Working from home has surprising downsides

What if you never had to return to work? Never had to return to work at the office, that is.

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Fossil deposit is much richer than expected

It has long been known that a quarry near the Dutch town of Winterswijk is an Eldorado for fossil lovers. But even connoisseurs will be surprised just how outstanding the site actually is. A student at the University of Bonn, himself a Dutchman and passionate fossil collector, has now analyzed pieces from museums and private collections for his master's thesis. He found an amazing amount of almost

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VW, Ford announce alliance to build commercial vans, pickups

Volkswagen and Ford announced a new alliance on Tuesday to jointly develop commercial vans and pickups starting in 2022, in a bid to reduce costs in the increasingly competitive auto market.

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Bright colors produced by laser heating

Most of the colors on today's paper and fabric are made using dyes or pigments. But colors can also be produced by modifying a material's surface at the nanoscale, causing the surface to reflect or scatter different frequencies of light and giving these materials "structural color." Butterfly wings and bird feathers are examples of materials that naturally exhibit structural color.

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Three-dimensional femtosecond laser nanolithography of crystals

Optical properties of materials are based on their chemistry and the inherent subwavelength architecture, although the latter remains to be characterized in depth. Photonic crystals and metamaterials have proven this by providing access through surface alterations to a new level of light manipulation beyond the known natural optical properties of materials. Yet, in the past three decades of resear

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More than one-third of American kids have lived in extended family households

About 35 percent of children in the United States have lived with a relative other than their parent or sibling at some point by age 18, says a University of Michigan researcher.

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Algorithm gives robots an instinctive understanding of how to use tools

A*STAR researchers working with colleagues in Japan have developed a method by which robots can automatically recognize an object as a potential tool and use it, despite never having seen it before.

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School biology teaching given a helping hand with molecular game and software

Two free interactive platforms that teachers could use to help students learn about molecular biology have been developed by researchers.

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Stroke drug may also prevent Alzheimer's disease, say USC researchers

Researchers from the University of Southern California have discovered that a drug currently being developed to treat stroke patients could also prevent Alzheimer's disease. The study, which will be published Jan. 15 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that the genetically engineered protein 3K3A-APC protects the brains of mice with Alzheimer's-like symptoms, reducing the buildup of tox

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Nike's Self-Lacing Adapt BB Basketball Shoe Is Actually SmartNike Adapt BB Self

The Adapt BB isn't just an impressive riff on a sci-fi dream—it's a lightweight, NBA-ready kick that's ushering in a new age of smart footwear.

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Researchers discover new evidence of superconductivity at near room temperature

Researchers at the George Washington University have taken a major step toward reaching one of the most sought-after goals in physics: room temperature superconductivity.

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Extremophile microbes found in residential water heaters

Microbes that thrive in some of the most extreme places on Earth have discovered another cozy place to live—inside homes across the United States.

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Einstein–de Haas effect offers new insight into a puzzling magnetic phenomenon

More than 100 years ago, Albert Einstein and Wander Johannes de Haas discovered that when they used a magnetic field to flip the magnetic state of an iron bar dangling from a thread, the bar began to rotate.

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Archaeologists find Rome-era tombs in Egypt's Western Desert

Egypt says archaeologists have uncovered two ancient tombs dating back to the Roman period in the country's Western Desert.

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Suicide risk spikes for people with cancer

People with cancer are more than four times more likely to commit suicide than people without it, according to a new study. In the study, which used data on more than 8 million cancer patients in the United States, the researchers also found that among people with cancer, white males; patients received a diagnosis at a younger age; and patients with lung, head and neck, testicular cancer, and lym

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French court axes market approval of Bayer's Roundup weed-killer

A French court on Tuesday struck down market approval for the controversial weed-killer Roundup, saying regulators had failed to take safety concerns into account when clearing the widely used herbicide.

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Free tools empower public in bid for online privacy

Protecting personal information while surfing the web or using apps is a concern for many of us and successfully shielding such data can be a struggle.

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Human hazards hamper vampire bat venom research

Vampire bats could hold the key to new treatments for a range of serious medical problems, but researchers have hit a snag accessing the specimens needed to advance their work.

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Study confirms micro-algae's cleaning ability in wastewater treatment

Environmental engineers have discovered that Chlorella vulgaris, a single-celled fresh water algae species, effectively removes pollutants from wastewater even at fluctuating levels, making it an effective tool for wastewater treatment.

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Biology of our ancient ancestor takes shape

The recent discovery of a new lineage of microbes has overturned biologists' understanding of the evolution of complex life on Earth. Genomic studies of Asgard archaea revealed that they carry many genes previously thought to be found only in nucleus-bearing eukaryotes, suggesting they may be closely related to more complex life forms such as humans.

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Is ’Oumuamua an Alien Spaceship? Sure! Except, No

People love ‘Oumuamua because it's an antidote to our cosmic loneliness. And that's OK!

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'Onimusha: Warlords' Reminds Us of the Power of Small Stories

Games like the now-remastered 2001 title may have disappeared, but their plainness is an appealing antidote to today's excesses.

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World's 'loneliest' frog gets a date

Scientists find a Juliet for water frog, Romeo, once thought to be the last of his kind in the world.

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Cern plans even larger hadron collider for physics search

The Future Circular Collider could be Europe's £20bn successor to the existing Large Hadron Collider.

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Ultra ultrasound to revolutionise technology

A new and extremely sensitive method of measuring ultrasound could revolutionise everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles.

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A new 3-D printed ‘sponge’ sops up excess chemo drugs

Researchers have created “sponges” that would absorb excess cancer drugs before they spread through the body and cause negative side effects.

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New method contributes to better transport services

How the user perceives accessibility is an important factor in the development and evaluation of attractive and sustainable transport services. Despite this, the user perspective is generally left out in traditional accessibility evaluations, in favor of a focus on objective measures. In her dissertation, Katrin Lättman at CTF, Service Research Center at Karlstad University, has developed a new me

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Comprehensive model captures entire life cycle of solar flares

A team of scientists has, for the first time, used a single, cohesive computer model to simulate the entire life cycle of a solar flare: from the buildup of energy thousands of kilometers below the solar surface, to the emergence of tangled magnetic field lines, to the explosive release of energy in a brilliant flash.

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Hit the slopes with bio-based skis and snowboards

With the onset of winter, Europe's ski season is in full swing. To help you perfect your turns and hold your line down the slope, ski and snowboards are surprisingly complex pieces of equipment, but they are also increasingly bio-based

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Time to step inside your DNA

Researchers at the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine (MRC WIMM) have developed technology that allows scientists to explore the complex 3-D structure of DNA in Virtual Reality. In a newly published pre-print, the team describes their tool, which is now freely available to all.

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Physicists measure ‘weak force’ inside atoms for first time

Researchers have reported the first measurements of the weak interaction between protons and neutrons inside an atom. The detection of the elusive force verifies a prediction of the Standard Model, the most widely accepted model explaining the behavior of three of the four known fundamental forces in the universe. “This observation determines the most important component of the weak interaction b

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How harvesting natural products can help rural people beat poverty

Every day, people around the world harvest natural products like fungi, plants, bark, flowers, honey and nuts. These non-timber forest products, as they are known, can play an important role – particularly for people living in rural areas.

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Heating buildings leaves a huge carbon footprint, but there's a fix for it

As winter weather sets in, the heat kicks on in New York City's approximately one million buildings. Most of these buildings' furnaces or boilers run on fossil fuels such as natural gas and oil; as a result, heating and hot water account for about 42 percent of the city's total greenhouse gas emissions.

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Tiny silicon particles could power lithium ion batteries with 10 times more capacity

University of Alberta chemists have taken a critical step toward creating a new generation of silicon-based lithium ion batteries with 10 times the charge capacity of current cells.

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Phylogenomic analyses shows group of winged insects developed from terrestrial ancestor

An international team of researchers has found evidence that shows that many modern winged insects developed from a terrestrial ancestor, not from one that lived in the sea. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describe their large-scale phylogenomic analyses of both Polyneoptera and Pterygota and what they found.

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Research helps students excel on science exams

A new study released today reveals that helping lower-income high school freshman to regulate their test-taking anxiety can cut their biology course failure rates in half. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and conducted by Barnard College President Sian Leah Beilock and her research team found that brief pre-exam de-stressing strategies could reduce the perfor

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Scientist anticipated "snowman" asteroid appearance

On Jan. 2, the New Horizons spacecraft made the most distant flyby ever attempted, successfully returning images of the Kuiper Belt object Ultima Thule. While the world is agog at the so-called "snowman" shape of this icy asteroid, the concept is nothing new to PSI scientist and artist, Bill Hartmann. The figure shows paintings that Hartmann made from 1978 to 1996, to illustrate the possible outco

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Repairing 'broken ladders' to help people climb out of social mobility

Research projects don't always lead to the formation of national federations. One researcher's project on poverty did, and he's hoping it starts a movement.

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The science of steak

Before you throw a hunk of meat on the barbie this summer, read our guide to the perfect steak.

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Getting Ready for Brain Awareness Week 2019!

Brain Awareness Week (March 11-17) is only a few months away, so it’s time for our partners to start planning in earnest for their 2019 activities! Partners can take advantage of the many Dana Foundation resources available to support their outreach efforts on the campaign website . What is Brain Awareness Week , you might ask? It’s the global campaign to increase public awareness about the progr

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Watching Venezuela’s Last Glacier Disappear

I n 1976, Alejandra Melfo and her family joined the tens of thousands of Uruguayans fleeing their country’s military dictatorship. Melfo, who was 11 when her family arrived in Venezuela, remembers delighting in the lighthearted Venezuelan national anthem, and realizing that her blond hair and pale skin were unremarkable in a country where generations of Portuguese, Spanish, and Italian immigrants

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Photos: Drilling into Antarctic Subglacial Lake Mercer

Scientists drilled through some 3,500 feet of ice to study this hidden Antarctic lake. They found it is teeming with life.

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Hidden Beneath a Half Mile of Ice, Antarctic Lake Teems with Life

It's one of the most extreme environments on Earth.

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It’s the 10th anniversary of the ‘Miracle on the Hudson.’ Here’s what we’ve learned since.

Environment “Why did the bird cross the runway?” and other real concerns at the Airport Wildlife Hazards Program. A new documentary from the Smithsonian Channel will show how wildlife biologists pieced together the events leading up to the “Miracle on the Hudson,” and work to…

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Sydpolen smelter seks gange hurtigere end for 40 år siden: Gemmer på enorm vandstandsstigning

Afsmeltningen af Antarktis går meget hurtigt, og det er mere bekymrende end afsmeltningen af Grønland, siger forsker.

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China's Moon mission sees first seeds sprout

The seeds, inside a sealed container, are the first plants ever grown on the Moon's surface.

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How Individual Actions Affect Economic Inequality

Writing last year , the New York University sociologist Guillermina Jasso used two words to describe economic inequality in America: “high” and “increasing.” The most common proposals for turning those descriptors around are big-picture government policies—things like hiking the minimum wage or raising tax rates for the highest earners. But in a paper last year , Jasso, who has been publishing ac

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With a Cadillac SUV, GM Shows a New Way to an Electric World

The concept teased at the Detroit Auto Show is the first step in a new way of winning drivers over to batteries and motors.

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Image of the Day: Evolution Underground

The lay of the land shapes the diversity of groundwater-dependent salamanders.

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Proper Breathing Brings Better Health

Stress reduction, insomnia prevention, emotion control, improved attention—certain breathing techniques can make life better. But where do you start? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Are We Living Through Climate Change’s Worst-Case Scenario?

The year 2018 was not an easy one for planet Earth. Sure, wind and solar energy kept getting cheaper , and an electric car became America’s best-selling luxury vehicle . But the most important metric of climatic health—the amount of heat-trapping gas entering the atmosphere—got suddenly and shockingly worse. In the United States, carbon emissions leapt back up , making their largest year-over-yea

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Cancer Cells Transformed into Harmless Fat in Mouse Study

Scientists in Switzerland say they have turn aggressive cancer cells into harmless fat in a mouse model.

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Reflections from Donna Strickland, 3rd Woman Ever to Win Nobel in Physics

The winner of the 2018 Nobel Prize in physics says scientists shouldn't feel pressured to do research that has economic or commercial ramifications. Science for the sake of science is more important.

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Dommer i USA: Politiet må ikke tvinge folk til at låse smartphonen op

Det er ikke lovligt, når amerikansk politi tvinger folk til at bruge deres fingre og ansigt til at låse smartphones med gemte fingeraftryk og ansigtsgenkendelse op, vurderer en californisk dommer.

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Ny dom: Du hænger på lån underskrevet med et stjålet NemID

To personer, som har fået misbrugt deres NemID til at optage lån i Basisbank i deres navne, hænger nu på gælden, selv om de ikke selv tilføjede underskrifterne. Det har Højesteret fastslået.

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Så kom beviset: Den omstridte landbrugspakke er slået fejl

En længe ventet opgørelse viser, at kvælstofudledningen til vandmiljøet fra de danske marker ikke er faldet som forudsat, men tværtimod steget en smule. Miljøminister klar med nye indgreb.

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Kammeradvokaten afviser ekstra betaling til hovedstadslæger

PLO-forslag om at give praksislæger i hovedstaden et økonomisk incitament til at tage flere end 1.600 patienter afvises af Kammeradvokaten. Der er hverken hjemmel i sundhedsloven eller i overenskomsten, lyder den juridiske vurdering.

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The 2009 vs. 2019 Meme Is a Gift From Our Smartphones

Nearly everyone now has a decade of photos in their pockets.

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Cities Are Tucking Climate Change Fixes Into New Laws

Across the country, cities are implementing new housing and transit laws that, oh by the way, lower their emissions of greenhouse gasses.

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As Tech Invades Cycling, Are Bike Activists Selling Out?

Now in the cycling business, Uber, Lyft, and others are co-opting the experience of longtime safe streets advocates.

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So Many Ticks Were Feasting on This Unlucky Python, They Looked Like Living Scales

Some 511 bloodsucking ticks were removed from this snake.

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The first suspected exomoon may remain hidden for another decade

The discoverers of the first evidence for a moon orbiting a planet around a distant star are still trying to confirm the object’s existence.

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Spare a Thought for the Distant Future

The actions we take today could have consequences for millions or even billions of years to come — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We all love Marie Kondo. So why is tidying up so hard?

The Japanese neatness consultant has inspired millions to declutter. So why is getting your home Instagrammably neat so difficult, asks David H. Freedman

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Research finds serious problems with forensic software

New research from North Carolina State University and the University of South Florida finds significant flaws in recently released forensic software designed to assess the age of individuals based on their skeletal remains. The researchers report that, on average, the software's age estimates are off by more than 14 years.

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Scientists uncover the health effects of metabolic 'magic bullet' protein

The metabolic protein AMPK has been described as a kind of magic bullet for health. Studies in animal models have shown that compounds that activate the protein have health-promoting effects to reverse diabetes, improve cardiovascular health, treat mitochondrial disease—even extend life span. However, how much of the effects of these compounds can be fully attributed to AMPK versus other potential

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EU: Lovligt at eksportere lavradioaktivt affald fra midlertidige lagre

Nu kan Esbjerg komme af med sine 600 ton normaffald til andre EU-lande.

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Call for more transparency over ‘add-on’ fertility treatments

The UK’s fertility regulator has said that clinics offering fertility treatments must be more transparent about the effectiveness and costs of “optional extras”

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Astronauts travelling to the moon and Mars risk dying from superbugs

Just trace amounts of antibiotics in a spacecraft could be enough to let bacteria evolve deadly resistance on long space journeys

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DNA origami: A precise measuring tool for optimal antibody effectiveness

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, in collaboration with researchers at University of Oslo, Norway, have demonstrated the most accurate distance between densely packed antigens in order to get the strongest bond to antibodies in the immune system. The study, which is published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, may be of significance to the development of vaccines and immunotherapy us

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Scientists develop promising new type of polymer

Organic polymers are used in solar cells, sensors, LEDs and in many other devices. One specific type of polymer, S-PPV, was previously regarded as promising in theory, but almost impossible to produce from a technical perspective. After many years of work, a team from TU Wien has now identified a new chemical synthesis process for the production of S-PPVs. This production process has now been pate

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The secret to Rembrandt's impasto unveiled

Impasto is thick paint laid on the canvas in an amount that makes it stand from the surface. The relief of impasto increases the perceptibility of the paint by increasing its light-reflecting textural properties. Scientists know that Rembrandt, epitome of the Dutch Golden Age, achieved the impasto effect by using materials traditionally available on the 17th century Dutch colour market, namely lea

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The Kids (Who Use Tech) Seem to Be All Right

A rigorous new paper uses a new scientific approach that shows the panic over teen screen time is likely overstated — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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WWI German Sub Spotted Off French Coast, 100 Years After Its Crew Surrendered

Shifting sands are slowly revealing a WWI submarine, officially known as UC-61, and turning it into a tourist attraction in France.

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Researchers pioneer microfluidics-enabled manufacturing of macroscopic graphene fibers

A team of researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has developed a new microfluidics-assisted technique for developing high-performance macroscopic graphene fibers. Graphene fiber, a recently discovered member of the carbon fiber family, has potential applications in diverse technological areas, from energy storage, electronics and optics, electro-magnetics, thermal conductor and thermal ma

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First moon plants sprout in China's Chang'e 4 biosphere experimentChina Moon Chang e 4

China's space agency has released images of cotton plants sprouting inside the Chang'e 4 moon lander's mini biosphere, the first plant to germinate on another world

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No-deal Brexit could lead to drug shortages and delayed operations

Amid huge Brexit uncertainty, a range of emergency measures are being put in place to protect medical supplies – but no one knows if these will be enough

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Barr Will Be Grilled About ‘Unusual’ Memo on Mueller’s Obstruction Probe

On the eve of his confirmation hearings, the attorney-general nominee William Barr released prepared remarks vowing to allow Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation to run its natural course. “I believe it is in the best interest of everyone—the President, Congress, and, most importantly, the American people—that this matter be resolved by allowing the special counsel to complete his work,

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Sharon Van Etten’s Synth-Pop Celebration of Vulnerability

Piano chords descend at ritual pace, reverberating as if in a cathedral. A woman sings, her each word a weary quaver. “Sitting at the bar, I told you everything,” she begins. Then: “You said, ‘Holy shit.’” This is how Sharon Van Etten kicks off her fifth album, with a moment that marks the sole time I’ve LOLed—so much so that it required hitting pause—while listening to her. The Brooklyn songwrit

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The Clemency Process Is Broken. Trump Can Fix It.

Matthew Charles had served more than two decades in prison for dealing crack cocaine when a judge ordered his release in 2016, believing that a change in federal sentencing guidelines applied to him retroactively. Charles had been a free man for two years, leading a law-abiding and productive life, when he was ordered back to prison to serve yet another decade because federal prosecutors successf

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Is This the Year for a Redistricting Revolution?

LOS ANGELES—Barack Obama and Arnold Schwarzenegger agree: Neither thinks Donald Trump has any business being anywhere near the White House, but the main political issue they’re going to focus on for the next two years is redistricting reform. The clock is ticking. The 2020 census, and the nationwide 2021 redistricting right after, are around the corner. Deadlines for ballot initiatives and legisl

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Student debt: An American horror story

College went from being a beneficial step in a young person's life to a huge financial burden for decades into their life. Since the 1970s, the cost of education has gone up between 400–1200%, depending on the kind of school you go to. Can we turn it around? Only societal change — and a good hard look in the mirror — can really make college a better move for young Americans.

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One Couple’s Tireless Crusade to Stop a Genetic Killer

When Sonia Vallabh lost her mother to a rare disease, she and her husband, Eric Minikel, set out to find a cure.

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Virtual Reality’s Latest Use? Diagnosing Mental Illness

Researchers are turning to VR because it can create realistic scenarios in a controlled setting, potentially making diagnoses more objective.

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Cottoning on: Chinese seed sprouts on moonChina Moon Chang e 4

A small green shoot is growing on the moon in an out-of-this-world first after a cotton seed germinated on board a Chinese lunar lander, scientists said Tuesday.

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Opel helps France's PSA buck China, Iran auto downturn

French auto giant Groupe PSA, which makes the Citroen and Peugeot brands, reported record vehicle sales Tuesday as the acquisition of General Motors' Opel unit helped offset a sharp downturn in key markets China and Iran.

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Australian state to pump oxygen into rivers as fish die

An Australian state government on Tuesday announced plans to mechanically pump oxygen into lakes and rivers after hundreds of thousands of fish have died in heatwave conditions.

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Huawei founder says company would not share user secrets

The founder of Huawei, in a new effort to allay Western security concerns, said Tuesday that the Chinese tech giant would not comply with Chinese government requests to disclose confidential information about its foreign customers and their communication networks.

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Uforudsigeligt magnetfelt forstyrrer livsvigtig navigation

Pludselige forandringer i Jordens magnetfelt har forældet den nuværende model over magnetfeltet, som bruges til alt fra navigation til boring af oliebrønde.

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Kaos i kroppen tuner dit immunsystem

Kaos i kroppens genregulering kan optimere vores immunsystem. Det har forskere fra Niels Bohr Institutet…

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Giant leaf for mankind? China germinates first seed on moon

A small cotton shoot is growing onboard Chang’e 4 lunar lander, scientists confirm A small green shoot is growing on the moon after a cotton seed germinated onboard a Chinese lunar lander, scientists said. The sprout has emerged from a lattice-like structure inside a canister after the Chang’e 4 lander touched down earlier this month, according to a series of photos released by the Advanced Techn

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We must give more thought to how algorithms affect us

It is impossible to stop the march of algorithms into our daily lives, so it is essential we all understand what they can do

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Lægerne til Løkke: Her er vores input til sundhedsreformen

Det er på ingen måde givet, at der er behov for en reform, og direkte bekymrende, at regeringen vil stille en diagnose og udskrive en ‘reformrecept’ til sundhedsvæsenet, uden at der har været en læge til stede.

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Engineered T cells promote long-term organ transplant acceptance

Organ transplant rejection is a major problem in transplantation medicine. Suppressing the immune system to prevent organ rejection, however, opens the door to life-threatening infections. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now discovered a molecular approach preventing rejection of the transplanted graft while simultaneously maintaining the ability to fight against infection

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Critical Thinking in Medicine

Cognitive Errors and Diagnostic Mistakes is a superb new guide to critical thinking in medicine written by Jonathan Howard. It explains how our psychological foibles regularly bias and betray us, leading to diagnostic mistakes. Learning critical thinking skills is essential but difficult. Every known cognitive error is illustrated with memorable patient stories.

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Hundreds of flights axed as fresh strike hits German airports

Hundreds of flights were cancelled at eight German airports Tuesday, including at the nation's busiest travel hub Frankfurt, as security staff walked off the job in a deepening row over pay.

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Iran satellite in US row fails to reach orbit

Iran launched a satellite criticised by the United States as a breach of a UN resolution on Tuesday but it failed to reach orbit, the telecommunications minister said.

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Tokyo court denies ex-Nissan chief Ghosn's bail request

A Tokyo court on Tuesday rejected a request by former Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn for bail following fresh charges, dashing his hopes for an early release from his Japanese jail cell.

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Feds to ease rules on drone flights over crowds and at night

Federal officials plan to ease restrictions on flying small drones over crowds and at night, which would give a boost to the commercial use of unmanned aircraft.

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Alliance talks continue as Ford, VW call off joint Detroit appearance

The Detroit auto show was abuzz over what Ford and Volkswagen would announce Tuesday, after the car giants called off a joint appearance during which they were widely expected to announce an alliance.

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Relying on karma: Research explains why outrage doesn't usually result in revolution

If you're angry about the political feud that drove the federal government to partially shut down, or about a golden parachute for a CEO who ran a business into the ground, you aren't alone—but you probably won't do much about it, according to new research by Carnegie Mellon University's Tepper School of Business.

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North Korea’s Less-Known Military Threat: Biological Weapons

Military analysts are increasingly concerned about the nation’s “advanced, underestimated and highly lethal” bioweapons program.

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To save the rainforest, we need to work with the palm oil industry | Jennifer Lucey

As a tropical field ecologist in Borneo, I learned why science must work with industry to protect the planet Lots of academics worry that focusing too much on the real-world impact of research threatens pure, curiosity-driven science. But really the two go hand in hand, especially when it comes to solving the complex question of how we achieve sustainability despite increasing human pressures on

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Forsker: Lovforslag stiller borgere ringere i algoritmestyrede offentlige afgørelser

Danmark drejer ind på et uønskeligt sidespor i forhold til Sverige og Norge, når det gælder digital forvaltning, mener forsker og jurist.

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Many in UK lose virginity before they are ready – study

Contraceptive use and peer pressure can affect whether first sexual experience is positive, says research More than half of women and two in five men are losing their virginity before they are ready, potentially affecting their wellbeing and health, researchers say. The team add that focusing only on age is misguided, noting the research showed issues around willingness, peer pressure and contrac

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Hungary’s Workers Are the Victims of a Policy That Limits Migration

BUDAPEST —Viktor Orbán has found himself in something of a bind: Hungary’s growing economy has given him cover to dismiss his detractors, who rail against his moves to weaken the country’s institutions and his anti-immigrant rhetoric. But that same economic boom, paired with a dearth of workers—both homegrown and from abroad—is counterintuitively uniting a political opposition against him. Orbán

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GPs could use breast cancer 'calculator' to predict risk to women

Scientists devise method using genetic data and lifestyle to work out who should be screened Women may be able to go to their GP to find out their risk of getting breast cancer and choose whether or not to be screened, if a new online calculator devised by scientists is successful. Related: Women with BRCA gene mutations given clearer picture of breast and ovarian cancer risk Continue reading…

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Vovehals eller bangebuks? Det ligger i dine gener

Dine gener har en stor betydning for de beslutninger, du tager. Nu har forskere fundet gener, som gør, at du tør løbe store risici.

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Country diary: stirring calls give vent to the beautiful unity of geese in flight

Claxton, Norfolk: Geese follow each other closely to reduce the energy they expend, but here the practical is tied up with the emotional They came out of a backlit umber sky produced by the cloudbank that had just given us a double rainbow. Now it brought on dusk prematurely. They were pink-footed geese in three silhouetted echelons, and when the first turned westwards the sounds of them poured d

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Staying fit can cut your risk of heart attack by half

Raise your pulse, break a sweat and do it several times a week. Then you'll reduce your statistical risk of running into serious heart problems later, new research confirms.

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Protective effects of ADM-RAMP2 system make it a new therapeutic target for retinal vein occlusion

A clot in the retinal vein can lead to severe and irreversible loss of vision. In a report in The American Journal of Pathology investigators utilize a newly developed model of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) in mice that mimics many of the clinical features of CRVO in humans to study the pathologic effects of retinal occlusion and demonstrate the retinoprotective effects of the peptide adre

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Physical activity reduces mortality in patients with diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes should be prescribed physical activity to control blood sugar and improve heart health.

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Quality of life in adolescents recovering from sports-related concussion or fracture

Researchers studied health-related quality of life in adolescents with sports-related concussion or extremity fracture during their recovery periods.

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Food ads targeting black and Hispanic youth almost exclusively promote unhealthy products

Restaurant, food, and beverage companies target Hispanic and Black children and teens with ads almost exclusively for fast food, candy, sugary drinks, and unhealthy snacks, according to a new report from the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut, the Council on Black Health at Drexel University, and Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio.

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DSB-tog kørte forbi stoplys efter ombygning til nye signaler

DSB har taget de tog, som kører på strækningen mellem Roskilde og Køge, ud af drift.

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Epigenetic change causes fruit fly babies to inherit diet-induced heart disease

Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified an epigenetic marker and two genes that caused heart failure in the children and grandchildren of fruit flies with high-fat-diet-induced heart dysfunction. Reversing the epigenetic modification or over-expressing the two genes protected subsequent generations from the negative heart effects of their parents' d

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Relying on karma: Research explains why outrage doesn't usually result in revolution

New research from Professors Rosalind Chow and Jeffrey Galak examines how people respond to two types of injustices: when bad things happen to good people, and when good things happen to bad people.

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F.D.A. Says It Will Resume Inspections of Some High-Risk Foods

Despite the federal shutdown, some agency inspectors are returning to work and will begin performing food safety visits without pay this week, the F.D.A. commissioner said.

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Fears over life-saving drug unfounded, finds review

Fears over a drug that can be used to treat alcohol addiction are unfounded, according to its first ever systematic review, led by academics at The University of Manchester.

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The Atlantic Daily: 30,000 Teachers Strike in America’s Second-Largest School District

What We’re Following More than 30,000 teachers in Los Angeles are heading to the picket line. Over the past year, teachers in states around the country—from West Virginia to Oklahoma —have staged walkouts calling for higher pay and better working conditions. Today, educators in the Los Angeles Unified School District joined them, driven by concerns that current school conditions aren’t adequately

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Men React to Repeated Painful Experiences Differently than Women Do

Men's pain tolerance decreases when exposed to a setting where they've previously had a painful experience.

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