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nyheder2019januar16

New gauge of well-being adjusts for men’s challenges

Researchers have developed a new way of measuring gender inequality, one that is fairer to both men and women. The new measurement also presents a simplified but more accurate picture of peoples’ well-being than previous calculations. The new Basic Index of Gender Inequality (BIGI) focuses on three factors—educational opportunities, healthy life expectancy, and overall life satisfaction. The stud

31min

‘Living medicine’ helps make toxic ammonia breakthrough

Using genetically modified bugs to prolong life was ‘fanciful’ until recently, says scientist A “living medicine” made from genetically modified bugs has prolonged the lives of animals with severe metabolic disease in a landmark test of the treatment. Researchers created the medicine by making a common strain of bacteria mop up excess ammonia in the body. High levels can be fatal for people with

31min

Six in 10 wild coffee species endangered by habitat loss

Kew scientists’ analysis of 124 wild species shows 60% facing possible extinction, risking viability of commercial stock Wild coffee species are under threat, with 60% of them facing possible extinction, including Arabica, the original of the world’s most popular form of coffee , researchers say. Most coffee species are found in the forests of Africa and Madagascar. They are threatened by climate

31min

Observations of a rare hypernova complete the picture of the death of the massive stars

The end of a star's life can occur in a tranquil manner in the case of low mass stars. This is not the case for very massive stars, which suffer such extreme explosive events that they can outshine the brightness of the whole galaxy. A group of astronomers has published a study of the death of a high-mass star that produced a gamma-ray burst (GRB) and a hypernova, in which they have detected a new

31min

These robots can follow how-to diagrams

Robots capable of reading diagrams could work in more varied environments and be easier to communicate with.

32min

To remember something, draw it

Drawing something that you want to remember is more effective than using other memory techniques For older people with dementia or Alzheimer's, drawing stores memories in still-intact regions of the brain Even if you're terrible at drawing, it's the neurological underpinnings that make it worth a try It seems everyone wishes they had a better memory than they do. From simple herbs like ginkgo bil

35min

When activated, 'social' brain circuits inhibit feeding behavior in mice

Feeding behavior and social stimulation activate intermingled but distinct brain circuits, and activating one circuit can inhibit the other, according to a new study.

36min

Scientists discover novel process to convert visible light into infrared light

Scientists have developed a novel chemical process to convert infrared energy into visible light, allowing innocuous radiation to penetrate living tissue and other materials without the damage caused by high-intensity light exposure. The discovery could advance numerous fields, including clinical applications for photodynamic therapy and drug development.

36min

Fiery sighting: A new physics of eruptions that damage fusion experiments

Sudden bursts of heat that can damage the inner walls of tokamak fusion experiments are a hurdle that operators of the facilities must overcome. Such bursts, called 'edge localized modes (ELMs),' occur in doughnut-shaped tokamak devices that house the hot, charged plasma that is used to replicate on Earth the power that drives the sun and other stars. Now researchers have directly observed a possi

36min

Acupressure relieves long-term symptoms of breast cancer treatment, study finds

A new study finds acupressure could be a low-cost, at-home solution to a suite of persistent side effects that linger after breast cancer treatment ends.

45min

Scientists grow perfect human blood vessels in a petri dish

Scientists have managed to grow perfect human blood vessels as organoids in a petri dish for the first time. The breakthrough engineering technology dramatically advances research of vascular diseases like diabetes, identifying a key pathway to potentially prevent changes to blood vessels — a major cause of death and morbidity among those with diabetes.

58min

A four-legged robot hints at how ancient tetrapods walked

Using fossils, computer simulations and a life-size walking robot, researchers re-created how an early tetrapod may have made tracks.

1h

How to Deal With People Who Talk Too Much

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen offers 5 tips for when Jeff from accounting stops by to give you the play-by-play of his morning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Facebook Users Still Don’t Know How Facebook Works

After all the scandals and hubbub and congressional testimony and mea culpas in Facebook’s nearly 15 years of existence, one would think that its users would have a pretty firm grasp on how the business works. Surely, users know that Facebook uses information about their behaviors and friendships to deduce a constantly updating list of their interests. This detailed information about people const

1h

Why Would Bill Barr Even Want to Be Attorney General?

When nominees for Cabinet jobs come before the Senate, the burning question is often how they would handle a particular policy matter. But in the case of Bill Barr, President Donald Trump’s nominee for attorney general, that question was answered before the hearings began, when Barr said in prepared remarks that he believes Special Counsel Robert Mueller should be allowed to complete his work. Th

1h

How bad will my postpartum depression be in 12 months?

A new Northwestern Medicine study was able to successfully predict — with 72.8 percent accuracy — if a new mother would experience worsening depressive symptoms over the first year after giving birth. The scientists predicted this depression trajectory using four maternal characteristics that put the mother at risk. Identifying these factors early in the postpartum period will allow mothers to s

1h

Less than half of US youth discuss sensitive topics with their doctors

Fewer than half of young people in the United States are having discussions of sensitive topics with their regular healthcare providers, according to a new study published in Pediatrics. This new research led by researchers at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health suggests that modifying healthcare delivery practices may improve discussions between youth and their healthcare providers. Yout

1h

Breast cancer up to five times more likely to metastasize even 10 years after childbirth

Breast cancers diagnosed in young women within 10 years of giving birth are more likely to metastasize, and thus more likely to cause death, than breast cancers in young women who gave birth less recently or not at all.

1h

High-speed supernova reveals earliest moments of a dying star

An international team of researchers, including the University of Leicester, found evidence for the much theorized 'hot cocoon'.

1h

Scientists grow perfect human blood vessels in a petri dish

Scientists have managed to grow perfect human blood vessels as organoids in a petri dish for the first time. The breakthrough engineering technology, outlined in a new study published today in Nature, dramatically advances research of vascular diseases like diabetes, identifying a key pathway to potentially prevent changes to blood vessels–a major cause of death and morbidity among those with dia

1h

How stem cells self-organize in the developing embryo

New study uses live imaging to understand a critical step in early embryonic development–how genes and molecules control forces to orchestrate the emergence of form in the developing embryo. The study findings could have important implications for how stem cells are used to create functional organs in the lab, and lead to a better understanding of the underlying causes of gastrointestinal birth d

1h

When activated, 'social' brain circuits inhibit feeding behavior in mice

Feeding behavior and social stimulation activate intermingled but distinct brain circuits, and activating one circuit can inhibit the other, according to a new study by researchers at Stanford University.

1h

Scientists discover novel process to convert visible light into infrared light

Columbia and Harvard scientists have developed a novel chemical process to convert infrared energy into visible light, allowing innocuous radiation to penetrate living tissue and other materials without the damage caused by high-intensity light exposure. The discovery could advance numerous fields, including clinical applications for photodynamic therapy and drug development.

1h

Sinclair debuts streaming service for its local TV stations

Sinclair Broadcast wants to "Stirr" up streaming.

1h

Proteins use a lock and key system to bind to DNA

You can think of DNA as a string of letters—As, Cs, Ts, and Gs—that together spell out the information needed for the construction and function of cells. Each cell in your body shares the same DNA. So, for cells to take on their differing roles, they must be able to turn on and off specific genes with precise control. The genes active in a brain cell, for instance, are different than those active

1h

Growth of desalination plants is a serious problem for marine life

The super salty waste water dumped into the oceans by the world’s 16,000 desalination plants can push marine species beyond what they can tolerate

1h

Type 2 diabetes may not be a lifelong condition

New evidence shows that weight loss can push the condition into remission, offering hope for patients, says Elizabeth Robertson

1h

Robot version of our distant ancestor hints at how we learned to walk

A robotic version of a four-legged animal that lived 290 million years ago suggests it had an efficient walking style despite spending some of its life in water

1h

Robot Helps Scientists Study How Prehistoric Animals Moved

Robot Helps Scientists Study How Prehistoric Animals Moved New research suggests the ancestors of reptiles, birds and mammals might have walked more efficiently on land than previously thought. ORObot_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Tomislav Horvat (EPFL Lausanne), Kamilo Melo (EPFL Lausanne) Creature Wednesday, January 16, 2019 – 13:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A robot mimic

1h

Anti-Trump Activists Defend Fake-*Washington Post* Stunt

Protesters have created satirical newspapers before, but the tactic comes with more baggage in the era of fake news.

1h

A Crocodile-Like Robot Helps Solve a 300-Million-Year Mystery

Researchers use a fossil, fancy computer work, and a complex robot to tease apart how an early land-walking animal moved.

1h

Letters: More Unthinkable Moments

Unthinkable: 50 Moments That Define an Improbable Presidency This week marks the halfway point of Donald Trump’s presidency . “Like many Americans, we sometimes find the velocity of chaos unmanageable,” Jeffrey Goldberg, the editor in chief of The Atlantic , wrote in his introduction to a special project taking stock of Trump’s first two years as president . “So we decided to pause for a moment a

1h

Proteins use a lock and key system to bind to DNA

Scientists have traditionally thought that DNA binding proteins use patterns in the genome's code of As, Cs, Ts, and Gs to guide them to the right location, with a given protein only binding to a specific sequence of letters. In a new study, published in Cell Systems, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes discovered that proteins must rely on another clue to know where to bind: the DNA's three-di

1h

Scientists discover novel process to convert visible light into infrared light

Columbia University scientists, in collaboration with researchers from Harvard, have succeeded in developing a chemical process to convert infrared energy into visible light, allowing innocuous radiation to penetrate living tissue and other materials without the damage caused by high-intensity light exposure.

1h

High-speed supernova reveals earliest moments of a dying star

An international team of scientists, including astronomers from the Universities of Leicester, Bath and Warwick, have found evidence for the existence of a 'hot cocoon' of material enveloping a relativistic jet escaping a dying star. This research is been published online today and in print in Nature tomorrow.

1h

How stem cells self-organize in the developing embryo

Embryonic development is a process of profound physical transformation, one that has challenged researchers for centuries. How do genes and molecules control forces and tissue stiffness to orchestrate the emergence of form in the developing embryo? How are the precise mechanics underlying emergence of the complexity of our organs and tissues encoded in our DNA?

1h

Ready for the Galaxy S10? Samsung to host 'Unpacked' press event on Feb. 20

Ten years ago, Samsung unveiled its very first Galaxy smartphone. On Feb. 20 at San Francisco's Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, Samsung hopes to celebrate the milestone with the expected launch of the S10 flagship handset.

1h

Clean Power Plan Replacement Could Lead to Increased Emissions

The EPA’s proposed new rule could be worse than having no climate rule at all — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

New AI can detect urinary tract infections

New AI could identify and help reduce one of the top causes of hospitalization for people living with dementia: urinary tract infections (UTI).

1h

Final winter Detroit auto show a shadow of its former self

As row upon row of automakers' latest models gleam in the bright lights of the Detroit auto show, the exhibitors ready to greet industry insiders and journalists are looking down—into their smartphones.

1h

House Republicans question telecoms on location tracking

Several House Republicans asked T-Mobile, AT&T, Verizon and Sprint how they share their users' cellphone location data, citing a recent report that telecoms are selling that information to shadowy companies without customer knowledge.

1h

Bones suggest Neolithic dogs hunted with people

New research indicates that humans valued the tracking and hunting abilities of early dogs more than previously known. Humans domesticated dogs as early as 14,000 years ago in the Near East, but whether this was accidental or on purpose is so far not clear. The new study of animal bones from the 11,500-year-old settlement Shubayqa 6 in northeast Jordan not only suggests that dogs were present in

1h

Poor sense of smell may result from pesticide ‘events’

A study is the first to show an association between unusually high pesticide exposure and poor sense of smell among aging farmers. The research examined more than 11,200 farmers over a 20-year period. At the start of the study, about 16 percent of participants reported having experienced a high pesticide exposure event, or HPEE, such as a large amount of pesticide spilling on their body. Two deca

1h

Can stronger necks prevent concussions?

Neck-strengthening exercises in the preseason can help protect the heads of athletes at higher risk of concussion, new research suggests. For a new study, which appears in the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy , researchers looked at previous studies on the role that the neck’s strength, size, and posture play in reducing concussion risk. They also looked into the greater risk of

1h

Teach kids about climate change? This state might require it

A legislative proposal in Connecticut would mandate instruction on climate change in public schools statewide, beginning in elementary school.

1h

Drones shown to make traffic crash site assessments safer, faster and more accurate

Idling in a long highway line of slowed or stopped traffic on a busy highway can be more than an inconvenience for drivers and highway safety officers.

1h

Jean Bourgain, Problem-Conquering Mathematician, Is Dead at 64

Dr. Bourgain, a recipient of some of his field’s most prestigious awards, was undaunted by even the most intractable of challenges.

1h

Urbanization may hold key to tiger survival

A new study says the future of tigers in Asia is linked the path of demographic transition — for humans.

1h

A 'vampire' fungus has killed millions of bats since 2006. Here's why it matters.

White-nose syndrome has killed at least 6.7 million bats, though this estimate was made in 2012, and the current figure is almost certainly much higher. Bats serve a crucial role in our ecosystem and economy, and white-nose syndrome is already pushing many species to the brink of extinction. Researchers and scientists are working hard to develop novel methods to cure white-nose syndrome; a few me

1h

William Barr’s Unnerving Testimony

The confirmation hearing for William Barr went a lot better than the one for Jeff Sessions. In fairness, that’s not a very high standard. The former Alabama senator made false statements to the Senate about his contacts with Russia, was forced to admit he had misled the public about his civil-rights record , and insisted he had “done no research” into whether the Russian government had interfered

2h

A Massive, Moving Ice Disk Takes Center Stage, Mesmerizing Maine

Whether reminiscent of the moon's surface or "a big duck-go-round," a circle of ice entrances as it bobs and spins on a river in Maine. (Image credit: Tina Radel/AP)

2h

Hold your breath at Marble Arch!

Dirty air is an invisible killer, but an effective one. A recent study estimates that more than 9,000 people die prematurely in London each year due to air pollution. This map visualises the worst places to breathe in Central London. The Great Smog of 1952 London used to be famous for its 'pea-soupers': combinations of smoke and fog caused by burning coal for power and heating. All that changed a

2h

New study finds evidence of changing seasons, rain on Titan's north pole

An image from the international Cassini spacecraft provides evidence of rainfall on the north pole of Titan, the largest of Saturn's moons. The rainfall would be the first indication of the start of a summer season in the moon's northern hemisphere.

2h

New AI can detect urinary tract infections

New AI developed at the University of Surrey could identify and help reduce one of the top causes of hospitalisation for people living with dementia: urinary tract infections (UTI).

2h

Researchers explore benefits of immersive technology for soldiers

The emergence of next generation virtual and augmented reality devices like the Oculus Rift and Microsoft HoloLens has increased interest in using mixed reality to simulate training, enhance command and control, and improve the effectiveness of warfighters on the battlefield.

2h

Urbanization may hold key to tiger survival

A new WCS-led study published in the journal Biological Conservation says the future of tigers in Asia is linked the path of demographic transition—for humans. The study marks the first-of-its-kind analysis that overlays human population scenarios with the fate of these endangered big cats.

2h

Fiery sighting: A new physics of eruptions that damage fusion experiments

Sudden bursts of heat that can damage the inner walls of tokamak fusion experiments are a hurdle that operators of the facilities must overcome. Such bursts, called "edge localized modes (ELMs)," occur in doughnut-shaped tokamak devices that house the hot, charged plasma that is used to replicate on Earth the power that drives the sun and other stars. Now researchers at the U.S. Department of Ener

2h

Preparing For “The Big One”

A devastating earthquake is allegedly overdue. (Image credit: Archive.gov)

2h

Research reveals mechanism for leukaemia cell growth, prompting new treatment hopes

A mechanism which drives leukaemia cell growth has been discovered by researchers at the University of Sussex, who believe their findings could help to inform new strategies when it comes to treating the cancer.

2h

Drones shown to make traffic crash site assessments safer, faster and more accurate

Research shows that drones can be more effective and safer in crash mapping of vehicular highway accidents than conventional methods. Drones using new imaging technology developed at Purdue University allows highway safety officers to capture and print 3D composites of crash sites and reduce mapping time and improve traffic flow following a crash by 60 percent.

2h

Artificial intelligence applied to the genome identifies an unknown human ancestor

By combining deep learning algorithms and statistical methods, investigators from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE), the Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG-CRG) of the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and the Genomics Institute at the University of Tartu have identified, in the genome of Asiatic individuals, the footprint of a new hominid who cross bred with its ancestors tens

2h

From emergence to eruption: Comprehensive model captures life of a solar flare

A team of scientists has, for the first time, used a single, cohesive computer model to simulate the entire life cycle of a solar flare: from the buildup of energy thousands of kilometers below the solar surface, to the emergence of tangled magnetic field lines, to the explosive release of energy in a brilliant flash.

2h

Giant, Spinning Disk of Ice Looks Like Alien Creation. Here's How It Formed.

Its appearance has been likened to a moon, an alien creation, a crop circle and a giant Lazy Susan.

2h

Most parents say hands-on, intensive parenting is best

Most parents say a child-centered, time-intensive approach to parenting is the best way to raise their kids, regardless of education, income or race.

2h

Faulty ‘reading network’ in brain is behind dyslexic language trouble

The reading difficulty associated with dyslexia stems from a lack of coordinated processing in the four brain areas known as “the reading network,” according to new research. The new study could help researchers develop tests for early identification of dyslexia, which affects 80 percent of people who struggle with reading, writing, and spelling. Tasks which require audiovisual processing are esp

2h

Evidence of changing seasons, rain on Saturn's moon Titan's north pole

An image from the international Cassini spacecraft provides evidence of rainfall on the north pole of Titan, the largest of Saturn's moons. The rainfall would be the first indication of the start of a summer season in the moon's northern hemisphere.

2h

Bizarre Superfluid Could Explain the Existence of the Modern Universe

Back in the first moment of the universe, everything was hot and dense and in perfect balance. A new quantum experiment aims to show how that changed.

2h

‘Intensive’ Parenting Is Now the Norm in America

Supervised, enriching playtime. Frequent conversations about thoughts and feelings. Patient, well-reasoned explanations of household rules. And extracurriculars. Lots and lots of extracurriculars. These are the oft-stereotyped hallmarks of a parenting style that has been common in upper-middle-class households for at least a generation. But according to a recent survey , this child-rearing philos

2h

Huge spinning ice disc in river provides a carousel for ducks

Residents of Westbrook in Maine discovered an enormous circle of ice slowly spinning in the Presumpscot river running through their town

2h

The war against antibiotic resistance is finally turning in our favour

We are finally seeing progress in the battle against antibiotic resistance, but now we must make it profitable to develop new drugs

2h

New yeast model of metabolic disorders may lead to life-saving therapies

A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that the role of yeast, the world's most basic eukaryotic unicellular organism, may pave the way for the development of novel, more effective therapies for congenital diseases.

2h

First international consensus on fibromuscular dysplasia

The "First international consensus on the diagnosis and management of fibromuscular dysplasia" (FMD) has been published online first today in Vascular Medicine and the Journal of Hypertension.

2h

Research to improve welding process for manufacturing industries

New research, led by the University of Leicester, will optimise the welding and additive and manufacturing process

2h

Waiting for the complete rupture

Nepal was struck by an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8 in 2015, but the country may still face the threat of much stronger temblor. This is the conclusion reached by ETH researchers based on a new model that simulates physical processes of earthquake rupture between the Eurasian and Indian Plates.

2h

Fiery sighting: A new physics of eruptions that damage fusion experiments

Sudden bursts of heat that can damage the inner walls of tokamak fusion experiments are a hurdle that operators of the facilities must overcome. Such bursts, called 'edge localized modes (ELMs),' occur in doughnut-shaped tokamak devices that house the hot, charged plasma that is used to replicate on Earth the power that drives the sun and other stars. Now researchers at the US Department of Energy

2h

The Rise of Homo Verticalis

In an age of proliferating super-skyscrapers, especially in Asia, we know surprisingly little about vertical human mobility — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Neurofeedback helps to control learning success

Those who regulate their brain rhythm themselves can release capacities to learn new things.

2h

Athletes should build neck strength to reduce concussion risk, researchers recommend

Researchers have proposed a way to mitigate risk for football and soccer players and others at risk of concussion: Protect your head with neck-strengthening exercises in the pre-season. New research examines previous studies on the role that the neck's strength, size and posture play in reducing concussion risk.

2h

Ketone body utilization decreases when blood flow to the heart is reduced

Researchers have measured the ketone body utilization rate in the heart and confirmed that it decreases when the heart is in a state of reduced blood flow (myocardial ischemia).

2h

Dry-cured ham bones — a source of heart-healthy peptides?

Drinking bone broth is a recent diet fad that proponents claim fights inflammation, eases joint pain and promotes gut health. Simmering animal bones in water releases collagen and other proteins into the broth that may have health benefits, although more research is needed to validate these claims. Now, a new study has shown that ham bones contain peptides that could have cardioprotective effects.

2h

New study finds evidence of changing seasons, rain on Titan's north pole

An image from the international Cassini spacecraft provides evidence of rainfall on the north pole of Titan, the largest of Saturn's moons. The rainfall would be the first indication of the start of a summer season in the moon's northern hemisphere.

2h

New AI can detect urinary tract infections

New AI developed at the University of Surrey could identify and help reduce one of the top causes of hospitalisation for people living with dementia: urinary tract infections (UTI).

2h

Urbanization may hold key to tiger survival

A new WCS-led study published in the journal Biological Conservation says the future of tigers in Asia is linked the path of demographic transition — for humans.

2h

Damage to Ancient Carving of Egyptian Couple Was Meant to Hurt Them in the Afterlife

The act was meant to obliterate them in the afterlife.

2h

Steven Pinker's 13 rules for writing better

Steven Pinker is many things: linguist, psychologist, optimist, Harvard professor, and author. When it comes to writing, he's a student and a teacher. Here's are his 13 rules for writing better, more simply, and more clearly. 1. Reverse-engineer what you read. 2. Prose is a window onto the world. 3. Don’t go meta. 4. Let verbs be verbs. 5. Beware of the Curse of Knowledge. Interlude: Steven Pinke

2h

Mosquito known to transmit malaria has been detected in Ethiopia for the first time

A type of mosquito that transmits malaria has been detected in Ethiopia for the first time, and the discovery has implications for putting more people at risk for malaria in new regions.

2h

High pesticide exposure among farmers linked to poor sense of smell later

A new study has shown an association between unusually high pesticide exposure and poor sense of smell among aging farmers.

2h

New Scientist launches internship scheme for aspiring BAME journalists

To boost diversity in science journalism, we’re launching a training internship for aspiring journalists from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic backgrounds

2h

Mystery Mummy May Have Been Pharaoh's Personal Eye Doctor

This ancient Egyptian eye doctor certainly made a spectacle of himself.

2h

Army researchers explore benefits of immersive technology for soldiers

Army researchers are exploring the benefits of immersive technology for warfighters. They have developed a platform to assess this technology called AURORA-MR.

3h

Engineered light to improve health, food, suggests Sandia researcher in Nature

intentionally controlled light can help regulate human health and productivity by eliciting various hormonal responses. Tailored LED wavelengths and intensities also can efficiently stimulate plant growth, alter their shapes and increase their nutritional value, opening a new world of scientific and technological possibilities for indoor farming.

3h

Most parents say hands-on, intensive parenting is best

Most parents say a child-centered, time-intensive approach to parenting is the best way to raise their kids, regardless of education, income or race.

3h

Trends over time in antibiotic prescribing by dermatologists

This study looked at trends over time in oral antibiotic prescribing by dermatologists using commercial insurance claims data for almost 986,000 courses of oral antibiotics prescribed by nearly 12,000 dermatologists.

3h

Did quality of care, outcomes improve for hospitalized heart attack patients in states that expanded Medicaid?

Lack of insurance is associated with worse care and outcomes among adults hospitalized for a heart attack. It is unclear whether states that expanded Medicaid eligibility under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2014 had an associated improvement in quality of care and outcomes among low-income patients hospitalized with a heart attack.

3h

Schizophrenia linked to genetic structural abnormality in adolescent brain

Schizophrenia could be caused by a genetic mutation that causes a structural abnormality in the brain during adolescence. Therefore testing for the gene SLC39A8, and brain scans for schizophrenia could predict whether or not someone will develop it — researchers at the University of Warwick have found.

3h

The Joyce Carol Oates Story That Shares DNA With 'Cat Person’

By Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Jonathan Franzen, Amy Tan, Khaled Hosseini, and more. Doug McLean In December 2017, The New Yorker published “Cat Person,” an enigmatically titled story that went viral as almost no other work of short fiction has managed to do. The tale of a flirtation lived mostly through tex

3h

The weirdest things we learned this week: killer surgeons and mysterious floating feet

Science Our editors are back with more bizarre facts for season two. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s hit podcast.

3h

'Statistics anxiety' is real, and new research suggests targeted ways to handle it

Have you ever been stressed out by the idea of doing math or statistics problems? You're not alone.

3h

Simple rules predict and explain biological mutualism

Scientists have long employed relatively simple guidelines to help explain the physical world, from Newton's second law of motion to the laws of thermodynamics.

3h

Senators Grill Andrew Wheeler, Former Coal Lobbyist and Trump’s Choice to Lead the E.P.A.

The former coal lobbyist took the stand before a Senate panel to make his case for leading the E.P.A. and steering President Trump’s agenda of rolling back environmental rules.

3h

Cuttlefish embryos can see and recognise predators before they hatch

The transparent eggs of pharaoh cuttlefish let them see predators long before they hatch and they can even learn to spot new threats

3h

Ocean giant gets a health check: Combination blood, tissue test reveals whale shark diets

Whale sharks, the world's largest fish, likely endure periods of starvation and may eat more plants than previously thought, according to the first results of a new health check. Ocean scientists now have a powerful, simple tool to discover the diets, migrations, and conservation needs of this endangered species.

3h

Larger Hermit Crab Penises May Prevent Shell Theft

Members of species with shells they must hold onto for survival have larger sexual tubes than those with less precious private property.

3h

New research confirms US Fed right to hold news conferences after every meeting

A policy intended to increase transparency at the US Federal Reserve may have done the opposite, setting markets up for unnecessary surprises, says a new study from the University of Toronto.

3h

'Statistics anxiety' is real, and new research suggests targeted ways to handle it

A new study uses an analytical technique called 'network science' to determine factors contributing to statistics anxiety among psychology majors.

3h

Combatting brain infections in special issue of Viral Immunology

A special issue of Viral Immunology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, contains a rich collection of the latest research and reviews focusing on Viral Neuroimmunology and the intricacies of viral brain infection.

3h

Fighting perinatal mood and anxiety disorders on multiple levels

An award-winning poster that Lenore Jarvis, M.D., MEd, and colleagues presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Convention and Exhibit in Orlando, Florida, details Children's integrated approach to help women with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders which includes actions at individual, interpersonal, organizational, community and policy levels.

3h

Major earthquakes could still devastate Nepal

An earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8 struck Nepal in 2015, and the country may still face the threat of much stronger quake, according to new research. In April 2015, a powerful tremor struck Nepal—and especially the region around the capital city, Kathmandu. An earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8 destroyed entire villages, traffic routes, and cultural monuments, with a death toll of some 9,000.

3h

First green leaf on moon dies as temperatures plummet

Cotton plant perishes on lunar far side after sprouting on board China’s Chang’e 4 lander The appearance of a single green leaf hinted at a future in which astronauts would grow their own food in space , potentially setting up residence at outposts on the moon or other planets. Now, barely after it had sprouted, the cotton plant onboard China’s lunar rover has died. The plant relied on sunlight a

3h

Born to run: Just not on cocaine

A study finds a surprising response to cocaine in a novel strain of mutant mice — they failed to show hyperactivity seen in normal mice when given cocaine and didn't run around. In other tests, they still found cocaine appealing, but displayed an inability to shake the memory of cocaine's actions when the drug was no longer administered. The key change that blocks cocaine's stimulant effects in t

3h

Var det virkelig alt?

I regeringens nye oplæg skubbes der ekstra rockwool-lag ind sundhedsvæsenet, og det bliver ualmindeligt svært at gennemskue, hvem der skal bestemme hvad.

3h

Fællesskaber, forvaltninger og en national bestyrelse: Her er det nye sundheds­væsen

Det politiske lag bliver rykket op ved rode, men få medarbejdere bliver direkte berørt af den nye reform, hvis regeringen får held til at gennemføre den. Det er endnu uklart, hvem der får det sidste ord i de 21 sundhedsfællesskaber.

3h

Lose frygter for borgernes indflydelse på sundhedsvæsenet

Regionernes formand Stephanie Lose mener, at man bør fastholde det folkevalgte niveau med regionsråd, fordi en bestyrelse ikke vil skele til borgernes hensyn.

3h

The Lessons, and the Costs, of Terrorism in Kenya

NAIROBI—On a warm Tuesday afternoon here in Kenya’s capital, a suicide bomber blew himself up outside the Secret Garden Café, a restaurant within an upscale hotel and office complex. The blast shredded the bodies of customers sitting at tables on the restaurant’s ground-floor veranda, threw debris across the grassy courtyard, and shattered windows six floors up. Minutes after the bombing, gunmen

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How empowering women and girls can help stop global warming | Katharine Wilkinson

If we really want to address climate change, we need to make gender equity a reality, says writer and environmentalist Katharine Wilkinson. As part of Project Drawdown, Wilkinson has helped scour humanity's wisdom for solutions to draw down heat-trapping, climate-changing emissions: obvious things like renewable energy and sustainable diets and not so obvious ones, like the education and empowerme

3h

Most Users Still Don't Know How Facebook Advertising Works

A new Pew survey also finds that more than 50 percent of Facebook users are uncomfortable with how the company collects their information for ads.

3h

Sudden aging

Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. At least this was the established view of palaeontologists all over the world until now. However, this classification will now have to be revised after fossils discovered by researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg in conjunction with researchers at

3h

Athletes should build neck strength to avoid concussions, Rutgers researchers recommend

Rutgers researchers have proposed a solution for athletes at higher risk for sports-related concussions, such as football and soccer: Protect your head with neck-strengthening exercises in the pre-season.A paper by researchers at the Rutgers School of Health Professions, published in the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, examines previous studies on the role that the neck's stren

3h

Neurofeedback helps to control learning success

Those who regulate their brain rhythm themselves can release capacities to learn new things.

3h

Simple rules predict and explain biological mutualism

Scientists have long employed relatively simple guidelines to help explain the physical world, from Newton's second law of motion to the laws of thermodynamics. Biomedical engineers at Duke University have used dynamic modeling and machine learning to construct similarly simple rules for complex biology. They have devised a framework to accurately interpret and predict the behavior of mutually ben

3h

Ultra ultrasound to transform new tech

Scientists at University of Queensland and Swansea University department of Physics have developed a new, more sensitive method to measure ultrasound waves.

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What is clean breathing water?

Researchers from Arizona State University and Drexel University have developed a more detailed framework for understanding and managing the risk of transmitting a bacterial disease via water spray from sinks, showers and toilets. As continuous testing of indoor water is not always feasible, the guidelines can help to identify water use situations that could increase the risk of exposure.

3h

Fighting the crave for fattening food? Just surround yourself in its scent

A new study proves one sense can compensate another.

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Climate change: How could artificial photosynthesis contribute to limiting global warming?

If CO2 emissions do not fall fast enough, then CO2 will have to be removed from the atmosphere to limit global warming. Not only could planting new forests and biomass contribute to this, but new technologies for artificial photosynthesis as well. Physicists have estimated how much surface area such solutions would require. Although artificial photosynthesis could bind CO2 more efficiently than th

3h

Mechanism helps explain the ear's exquisite sensitivity

Researchers at MIT decode the way structures in the inner ear give our hearing its remarkable sensitivity and selectivity.

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Chaos in our cells keeps immune system running

Chaos in bodily regulation can optimize the immune system, research suggests. Researchers investigated how a particular protein produced within cells, NF-kB, stimulates genes. Among other things, this particular protein is vital for maintaining the body’s immune defense system and thereby the body’s ability to combat disease. The concentration of NF-kB fluctuates over time, and these swings affec

3h

Researchers discover black hole in our galaxy spinning rapidly around itself

A University of Southampton-led project has shown a black hole spinning near its maximum possible rate around its axis.

3h

Differences among brain neurons that coincide with psychiatric conditions

It's no surprise to scientists that variety is the very essence of biology, not just the seasoning, but most previous studies of key brain cells have found little variability in a common cell process that involves how genetic information is read and acted on.

3h

New insights into what Neolithic people ate in Southeastern Europe

New research has shed new light on the eating habits of Neolithic people living in southeastern Europe using food residues from pottery extracts dating back more than 8,000 years.

3h

Edward C. Baig: Have a great idea for 5G? Verizon may give you a million dollars to make it happen

Think you've come up with a killer idea for exploiting the emerging next-generation wireless networks known as 5G?

4h

Nudging does not necessarily improve decisions

Nudging, the concept of influencing people's behavior without imposing rules, bans or coercion, is an idea that government officials and marketing specialists alike are keen to harness, and itis often viewed as a one-size-fits-all solution. Now, a study by researchers from the University of Zurich puts things into perspective: Whether a nudge really does improve decisions depends on a person's und

4h

Researchers establish principles for transmitting light-delivered data via nonreciprocal circuits

The development of fiber optics technology has been indispensable to increasing the speed at which information is delivered over large distances by relying on light to carry information rather than electricity. Currently, incoming light signals are converted into electrical signals, after which the information they carry is processed. Digital communications and sharing of information would be even

4h

Bygningssagkyndige: »Absurd« at sætte grænse for afhængighed af forsikringsselskaber

PLUS. Erhvervsministeren overvejer at indføre en grænse for, hvor stor en del af en bygningssagkyndigs indtægt, der må komme fra en enkelt kunde. Absurd, mener brancheforeninger

4h

What future for Renault after Ghosn scandal?

Behind bars in Japan, Carlos Ghosn has already been stripped of his leadership roles at Nissan and Mitsubishi—leaving questions for Renault, the third carmaker in their alliance, over who should steer the French company now.

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European assessment of Glyphosate is quality-assured and independent

The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) already prepared the first draft of its health assessment of glyphosate (RAR) in 2013. Since then the BfR has received repeated inquires foremost regarding the independence of the European institutions and the assessment procedure.

4h

Jellyfish map could be the future to protecting UK waters and fish

A University of Southampton research team has developed a map of chemicals found in Jellyfish caught across 1 million square-kilometres of UK waters. The same chemicals are found in other marine animals such as birds and fish.These findings can support conservation efforts by helping track an animals movements and also be used as a tool to detect food fraud by identifying where seafood products we

4h

Health risks through fumigated containers

Products transported by sea in containers are often fumigated with biocides as protection against pests. In addition to this, they often contain volatile organic solvents, such as the potentially carcinogenic 1,2-dichloroethane, which can originate from cleaning or manufacturing processes.In a meeting held at the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) on 16 November 2018, 36 experts fr

4h

Nudging does not necessarily improve decisions

Nudging, the concept of influencing people's behavior without imposing rules, bans or coercion, is an idea that government officials and marketing specialists alike are keen to harness, and itis often viewed as a one-size-fits-all solution. Now, a study by researchers from the University of Zurich puts things into perspective: Whether a nudge really does improve decisions depends on a person's und

4h

Chaos in the body tunes up your immune system

Chaos in bodily regulation can optimize our immune system according to a recent discovery made by researchers at the University of Copenhagen's Niels Bohr Institute. The discovery may prove to be of great significance for avoiding serious diseases such as cancer and diabetes.

4h

Researchers establish principles for transmitting light-delivered data via nonreciprocal circuits

In a new paper published in the journal Optica, the flagship journal of the Optical Society, researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (CUNY) lay out a rigorous theoretical framework that clarifies the fundamental principles governing resonant nonreciprocal circuits and resolves some outstanding questions on their potential

4h

Sundhedsreform ændrer ikke meget for hospitalslæger

Regeringens sundhedsreform vil ikke have indflydelse på hospitalsansatte læger, siger sundhedsministeren. Anderledes ser det dog ud for almen praksis.

4h

Amazon, Facebook and Google don't need to spy on your conversations to know what you're talking about

If you've ever wondered if your phone is spying on you, you're not alone. One of the most hotly debated topics in technology today is the amount of data that firms surreptitiously gather about us online. You may well have shared the increasingly common experience of feeling creeped out by ads for something you recently discussed in a real life conversation or an online interaction.

4h

The Dutch Science Park Unlocking the Secrets of the Universe

For his book Universe, photographer Jos Jansen documented a neutrino-detecting orb, data visualizations, and other ambitious projects in the Netherlands.

4h

Best Skiing and Snowboarding Gear (2019): Jackets, Boots, and More

From custom skis to the ultimate in-bounds backpack, everything you need to make the most of powder days.

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What It’s Like Making Your First Film After 18 Years in ‘Movie Jail’

In the 1990s, Mimi Leder was a formidable name in television. As a producer and director on the military drama China Beach and the smash hit ER , she helped invent a more robust, cinematic form for a medium that had long existed in the shadow of feature films. Landmark ER episodes like “Love’s Labor Lost” and “The Healers” proved that TV could tell compelling stories on a scale that felt dynamic

4h

Fiserv buys First Data for $22B, creating fintech giant

Fiserv is buying First Data in a $22 billion all-stock deal, creating a giant player in the payments and financial technology sector.

4h

Key West moves to ban sunscreens that could damage reefs

Officials in Key West took the initial steps toward banning the sale of sunscreens containing two ingredients that could be harmful to coral reefs.

4h

Ford forecasts $112 mn Q4 loss amid restructuring costs

Ford said Wednesday it expected to post a $112 million loss in the fourth quarter of 2018 as the automaker implements a massive restructuring in the United States and Europe.

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Global carbon tax may be more feasible than previously thought

A recent large survey conducted in five countries, published today in Nature, shows a consistently high level of support for a global carbon tax among the general public, given that the tax policy is carefully designed.

4h

Ammonia synthesis through electroreduction of nitrogen on black phosphorus nanosheets

More than 100 years after the introduction of the Haber–Bosch process, scientists continue to search for alternative ammonia production routes that are less energy demanding. Chinese scientists have now discovered that black phosphorus is an excellent catalyst for the electroreduction of nitrogen to ammonia. According to their study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, layered black phospho

4h

Leuven experts push the boundaries of 3D microscopy

Two newly developed methods will help researchers to study the 3D structure of complex surfaces and of individual neurons better than ever before. Sebastian Munck and Natalia Gunko, two expert technologists at VIB-KU Leuven, report new imaging protocols that will advance neuroscience and (bio)imaging in general.

4h

Identifying 'friends' in an objective manner

Dr. Teruyoshi Kobayashi of Kobe University and his team developed a new method for identifying individuals that have essential connections between them — what they call 'significant ties'. Dr. Kobayashi says: "The point is that we need to distinguish between the contact events that could happen by chance and the events that would not happen without a significant relationship between two individua

4h

First example of copper catalyzed/mediated direct b-h alkenylation/alkynylation in carboranes

Base metal catalyzed regioselective cage B-H functionalization has been achieved. Under the assistance of a bidentate directing group, Cu-catalyzed [4+2] annulation of carboranyl amides with internal alkynes affords unprecedented C,B-substituted carborane-fused-pyridone derivatives, whereas the use of terminal alkynes leads to B-H/C(sp)-H dehydrocoupling products. The isolation and structural iden

4h

Advances and challenges in precise nanomedicine for intelligent therapy of cancer

The authors demonstrate the recent advances of intelligent cancer nanomedicine, and discuss the comprehensive understanding of their structure-function relationship for smart and efficient cancer nanomedicine including various imaging and therapeutic applications, as well as nanotoxicity. In particular, a few emerging strategies that have advanced cancer nanomedicine are also highlighted such as t

4h

Ammonia by phosphorus catalysis

More than 100 years after the introduction of the Haber-Bosch process, scientists continue to search for alternative ammonia production routes that are less energy demanding. Chinese scientists have now discovered that black phosphorus is an excellent catalyst for the electroreduction of nitrogen to ammonia. According to their study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, layered black phospho

4h

How manganese produces a parkinsonian syndrome

Using X-ray fluorescence at synchrotrons DESY and ESRF, researchers in the Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CNRS/Université de Bordeaux) have demonstrated the consequences of a mutation responsible for a hereditary parkinsonian syndrome: accumulated manganese in the cells appears to disturb protein transport. This work, carried out with colleagues at the University of Texas at Aus

4h

Preparation, characterization and in vitro biological activity of Soyasapogenol B

Using Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a drug delivery system, can avoid the need for solvents and preventing drug precipitation in aqueous solution. Soyasapogenol B (SSB) acts as an important therapeutic agent owing to its numerous reported biological activities.

4h

AGA releases guide to care for women with IBD throughout family planning

The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) announced 'Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in Pregnancy Clinical Care Pathway – A Report from the American Gastroenterological Association IBD Parenthood Project Working Group' published online today ahead of print. The new pathway creates a standardized work flow among health care providers (HCPs) who treat women with IBD throughout all stages o

4h

Two Ancient Tombs from the Roman Era Discovered in Egypt

Archeologists recently found two ancient tombs in Egypt’s Western Desert that date back to Roman times

4h

Electricity Basics: Resistance, Inductance and Capacitance

Resistors, inductors and capacitors are basic electrical components that make modern electronics possible.

4h

Here's a look at Harley-Davidson's LiveWire electric motorcycle

Technology The moto giant showed off a pair of lightweight electric prototypes at CES in Las Vegas. The 2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycle plus a pair of lightweight electrics are shown at CES.

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4h

Millionbevilling sikrer uddeling af mikrocomputere til 100.000 skoleelever

Fond giver 12,6 mio. kroner til uddeling af mikrocomputere på størrelse med en tændstikæske, under projektet ultra:bit.

4h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan kan man udnytte solceller bedre?

En læser vil gerne vide, om man ikke kunne udnytte solceller bedre, hvis man for eksempel absorberede solens blå lys i stedet for at reflektere det. Det svarer European Energy på.

4h

Right green for crop, environment, wallet

Researchers found an efficient approach to managing nitrogen in agriculture and reducing its environmental impact. It's all about being green.

4h

Toward a circular economy: Tackling the plastics recycling problem

Why has the world continued to increase consumption of plastic materials when at the same time, environmental and human health concerns over their use have grown?

4h

Waiting for the complete rupture

Nepal was struck by an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8 in 2015, but the country may still face the threat of much stronger temblor. This is the conclusion reached by ETH researchers based on a new model that simulates physical processes of earthquake rupture between the Eurasian and Indian Plates.

4h

Map of chemicals in jellyfish could be the future to protecting UK waters and marine life

Scientists at the University of Southampton have developed maps of chemicals found in jellyfish which could offer a new tool for conservation in British waters and fisheries. The maps will also be able to detect fraudulently labelled food in retail outlets by helping to trace the origins of seafood.

4h

Himalayan winds play role in cloud and moisture transport, water redistribution

Around 1 billion people depend on water resources originating from the Hindu-Kush Karakoram Himalayan region, attributable to both rainfall and melting of snow and ice.

4h

Understanding insulators with conducting edges

Insulators that are conducting at their edges hold promise for interesting technological applications. However, until now their characteristics have not been fully understood. Physicists at Goethe University have now modelled what are known as topological insulators with the help of ultracold quantum gases. In the current issue of Physical Review Letters, they demonstrate how the edge states could

4h

It Used to Be Okay for Parents to Play Favorites

The fight might be over the last fruit strip or the TV or the best chair in front of the TV; it doesn’t really matter. My children’s conflict has many causes but only one true one: They are siblings, and that’s what siblings do. The war between brothers and sisters is eternal, each generation renewing the hostilities that have defined sibling relations since humanity began. Although it seems as i

4h

Ultra ultrasound to transform new tech

A new, more sensitive method to measure ultrasound may revolutionize everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles.Researchers at The University of Queensland have combined modern nanofabrication and nanophotonics techniques to build the ultra precise ultrasound sensors on a silicon chip.

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New integrative stratigraphy and timescale for China released

A special issue, edited by professor SHEN Shuzhong and professor RONG Jiayu of the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, summarizes the latest advances in stratigraphy and timescale as well as discusses the correlation among different blocks in China and with international timescales.

4h

Vampire bat venom could hold key to new medical treatments

Vampire bats could hold the key to new treatments for a range of serious medical problems, but researchers have hit a snag accessing the specimens needed to advance their work.An international team led by The University of Queensland has found a new class of blood pressure-regulating peptides in the venom of the common vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata).

4h

Image: Parachute for planetfall

Testing a candidate design for a subsonic parachute to slow a future mission to Mars inside Canada's National Research Council wind tunnel, in Ottawa.

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Offices are too hot or too cold – is there a better way to control room temperature?

In any office, home or other shared space, there's almost always someone who's too cold, someone who's too hot – and someone who doesn't know what the fuss around the thermostat is all about.

4h

Following heart health guidelines also reduces diabetes risk

You've probably heard that things like staying active, eating healthy and keeping your blood pressure in check can help your heart, and a new study finds that following a set of seven lifestyle factors can also drastically reduce your risk of developing diabetes.

4h

New quantum structures in super-chilled helium may mirror early days of universe

Experimental proof of a decades-old prediction opens a pathway to recreate possible conditions of the early universe here on earth.

4h

The pace at which the world's permafrost soils are warming

Global warming is leaving more and more apparent scars in the world's permafrost regions. As the new global comparative study conducted by the international permafrost network GTN-P shows, in all regions with permafrost soils the temperature of the frozen ground at a depth of more than 10 meters rose by an average of 0.3 degrees Celsius between 2007 and 2016 — in the Arctic and Antarctic, as well

4h

Extracting functional mitochondria using microfluidics devices

Mitochondria are dynamic, bioenergetic intracellular organelles, responsible for energy production via ATP production during respiration. They are involved in key cellular metabolic tasks that regulate vital physiological responses of cells, including cell signaling, cell differentiation and cell death. Defective mitochondria are linked to several critical human genetic diseases, including neurode

4h

Some Samsung phone owners can't delete Facebook app, report says

Dropping Facebook may be tougher than it appears for Samsung smartphone owners.

4h

What are the costs of the government shutdown?

The current government shutdown is now the longest on record, sidelining roughly 800,000 non-essential workers in nine agencies out of about two million full-time federal employees in all (excluding postal workers and soldiers). Paul C. Light, a professor of public service at New York University’s Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, is a leading expert on the federal service and the author

5h

Study defines differences among brain neurons that coincide with psychiatric conditions

It's no surprise to scientists that variety is the very essence of biology, not just the seasoning, but most previous studies of key brain cells have found little variability in a common cell process that involves how genetic information is read and acted on.

5h

Born to run: just not on cocaine

A study finds a surprising response to cocaine in a novel strain of mutant mice — they failed to show hyperactivity seen in normal mice when given cocaine and didn't run around. In other tests, they still found cocaine appealing, but displayed an inability to shake the memory of cocaine's actions when the drug was no longer administered. The key change that blocks cocaine's stimulant effects in t

5h

High pesticide exposure among farmers linked to poor sense of smell later

A Michigan State University study is the first to show an association between unusually high pesticide exposure and poor sense of smell among aging farmers.

5h

Ocean giant gets a health check: Combination blood, tissue test reveals whale shark diets

Whale sharks, the world's largest fish, likely endure periods of starvation and may eat more plants than previously thought, according to the first results of a new health check developed at the University of Tokyo. Ocean scientists now have a powerful, simple tool to discover the diets, migrations, and conservation needs of this endangered species.

5h

Alterations in hippocampal structural connections differentiate between responders of ECT

A new study in people with major depression reports that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) induces changes in the fibers connecting the hippocampus to brain regions involved in mood and emotion.

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A comprehensive metabolic map for production of bio-based chemicals

A KAIST research team completed a metabolic map that charts all available strategies and pathways of chemical reactions that lead to the production of various industrial bio-based chemicals.

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Record-breaking ocean temperatures point to trends of global warming

An international team released 2018 ocean heat content observations in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences on January 16, 2019. The newly available observations show that the year 2018 is the hottest year ever recorded for the global ocean, as evident in its highest ocean heat content since 1950s in the upper 2000m. Compared to the average value measured from 1981 to 2010, the 2018 ocean heat anomaly

5h

Apple is selling a new battery case for its latest iPhones… for $129

Apple has just started selling silicone "Smart Battery Cases" for the iPhone XS, XS Max and XR models, promising talk time for the phones that in some instances could exceed a day and a half. But if you think Apple's iPhones are expensive, consider that each of these optional cases fetches $129.

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What's in a species? Biologist helps determine wolf taxonomy

It's right there in the name: The Endangered Species Act is meant to protect endangered species of animals.

5h

Drilling deep for clues on earthquakes

Lingering motion sickness is one of the occupational hazards of working at sea off the coast of Japan for three weeks. Hiroki Sone can attest to that, having spent part of the fall 2018 semester on the deepest scientific oceanic drilling project ever.

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Warning to Davos: world 'sleep-walking' into climate disaster

The risks of catastrophic weather and flooding from climate change top the list of concerns for business leaders heading into next week's World Economic Forum meeting in Davos.

5h

Mathematical model can improve our knowledge on cancer

Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have developed a new mathematical tool to characterize what happens when cells lose their polarity (direction) in diseases such as cancer. The result is advancing the understanding of how the fertilized egg cell develops into a complete organism.

5h

For Nervous Californians, Fire-Proofing Is a New Obsession

In wildfire-prone cities and towns, increasingly worried residents are banding together to prevent future disasters.

5h

A 'Fortnite' Vulnerability Exposed Accounts to Takeover

Epic Games has since patched the attack, which would have allowed attackers to view account info, listen in on in-game conversations, and more.

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8 Best Travel Coffee Mugs (2019): Insulated, Steel, Thermal

From classics like Zojirushii, Yeti, and Stanley to new mugs from OtterBox and Snow Peak, I tried a ton of travel tumblers this winter. These are the best.

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Ocean giant gets a health check: Combination blood, tissue test reveals whale shark diets

Whale sharks, the world's largest fish, likely endure periods of starvation and may eat more plants than previously thought, according to the first results of a new health check developed at the University of Tokyo. Ocean scientists now have a powerful, simple tool to discover the diets, migrations, and conservation needs of this endangered species.

5h

Sprint adds new rewards program in latest bid to rival AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile

T-Mobile has its T-Mobile Tuesdays, Verizon has its VerizonUp and AT&T has its AT&T Thanks. After long being the only carrier without one, Sprint on Tuesday is finally getting into the rewards game.

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Fast, very high-energy gamma-ray flare detected from the blazar BL Lacertae

Using Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes, an international group of astronomers has detected a fast, very high-energy (VHE) flare from the blazar BL Lacertae. The finding is detailed in a paper published January 7 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

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Ketone body utilization decreases when blood flow to the heart is reduced

Researchers from Kumamoto University in Japan measured the ketone body utilization rate in the heart and confirmed that it decreases when the heart is in a state of reduced blood flow (myocardial ischemia).

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Stereotypes are no joke for STEM students of color

A new report documents the negative effects labels and stereotypes have on high-achieving Asian and black college students. “The interviews we conducted show that high-achieving black students are working to defy stereotypes of intellectual inferiority, while Asian students are trying to uphold the ‘model minority’ stereotype about their intellectual superiority,” says Ebony O. McGee, an associat

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Dana Foundation Launches Neuroscience Outreach Video Series

To support and encourage people interested in building an organization or communicating brain science through events, teaching, or writing, the Dana Foundation today launches the first of five “Community Neuroscience” videos. The videos, between 5 and 12 minutes in length, will air weekly on the Dana Foundation YouTube channel starting January 16, leading up to Brain Awareness Week (March 11-17),

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Study: Doubts about ISO 9001 quality certificates of Chinese companies

A qualitative study carried out by a research group led by the UPV/EHU Professor Iñaki Heras-Saizarbitoria, in collaboration with the Université Laval of Quebec, concludes that fake ISO 9001 quality certificates are widespread across Chinese companies, and that the certification processes of the auditing companies lack credibility. Suggestions have also been offered for people in charge of compani

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‘Messy’ star pushed its companion to go supernova

Astronomers have identified a type of companion star that made its partner in a binary system, a carbon-oxygen white dwarf star, explode. Through repeated observations of SN 2015cp, a supernova 545 million light years away, researchers detected hydrogen-rich debris that the companion star shed prior to the explosion. Many stars explode as luminous supernovae when, swollen with age, they run out o

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Video: Se Kinas landing på bagsiden af Månen

Det kinesiske rumagentur har frigivet en video fra landingen af måne-fartøjet Chang’e 4, og det forlyder også, at plantefrøene om bord er begyndt at spire.

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Frede Olesen: Sundhedsreform har både potentiale og trusler

Professor i almen medicin Frede Olesen finder det overordnet positivt, at regeringen med den nye sundhedsreform tager fat i de egentlig problemer i sundhedsvæsenet. Men dem kunne regionerne også have løst, mener professoren, der også har en frygt for et »statsligt embedsmandsstyre«.

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PLO om sundhedsreformen: »Det er en spand kul til vores del af sundhedsvæsenet«

Regeringens sundhedsreform byder på nye ydernumre og flere uddannelsespladser til almen medicinere. Når det kommer til de praktiserende læger, er reformen et decideret pletskud fra regeringen, mener PLO-formand.

5h

Using satellites to measure rates of ice mass loss in glaciers

If you compare historical photos of glaciers with those taken more recently, you can see that where there was formerly ice, there is now very often nothing but rock. Geographers, however, are less interested in the area covered by a glacier, and more interested in its mass. Researchers from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now investigated all glacial areas in South Ame

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Sharing the lessons learned during the 2013 Colorado flood

Hurricanes and tropical storms on the coasts tend to get countrywide airtime for their intensity and impact, but floods in the central part of the U.S. also cause significant damage and disruption. That is certainly true for the Front Range of Colorado. In 1864, a massive flood from the Poudre River destroyed the Camp Collins military post in LaPorte. In 1997, the Spring Creek flood caused $200M i

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Unemployment and unhappiness

A new research paper in the International Journal of Economics and Business Research uses log-linear models to study the correlation between happiness, employment and various demographic factors.

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Study shows no long-term removal of Neandertal DNA from Europeans

A team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has found evidence that suggests there has been no long-term removal of Neandertal DNA from modern Europeans. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes using whole-genome simulations to trace the history of Neandertal DNA in the human genome and what they found.

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The global race for groundwater speeds up to feed agriculture's growing needs

Water is becoming a scarce resource in many parts of the world. Water tables have been falling in many regions for decades, particularly in areas with intensive agriculture. Wells are going dry and there are few long-term solutions available —a common stopgap has been to drill deeper wells.

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Transparency and privacy: Empowering people through blockchain

Blockchain has already proven its huge influence on the financial world with its first application in the form of cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin. It might not be long before its impact is felt everywhere.

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Scientists identify two new species of fungi in retreating Arctic glacier

Two new species of fungi have made an appearance in a rapidly melting glacier on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic, just west of Greenland. A collaborative team of researchers from Japan's National Institute of Polar Research, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies in Tokyo, Japan, and Laval University in Québec, Canada made the discovery.

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New research shows significant decline of glaciers in Western North America

Alpine glaciers have existed in North America for thousands of years. They represent important, frozen reservoirs for rivers – providing cool, plentiful water during hot, dry summers or during times of prolonged drought.

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Scorecarding the dictators: How rating countries' behavior can change it

Using data to rate countries doesn't just help us understand their behavior, it actually changes it.

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The Darling River is simply not supposed to dry out, even in drought

The deaths of a million of fish in the lower Darling River system over the past few weeks should come as no surprise. Quite apart from specific warnings given to the NSW government by their own specialists in 2013, scientists have been warning of devastation since the 1990s.

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Government Shutdown Keeps Young Scientists in Limbo

With the lapse in government funding in its fourth week, early-career researchers tell The Scientist how their businesses, jobs, and research have been affected.

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Dry-cured ham bones — a source of heart-healthy peptides?

Drinking bone broth is a recent diet fad that proponents claim fights inflammation, eases joint pain and promotes gut health. Simmering animal bones in water releases collagen and other proteins into the broth that may have health benefits, although more research is needed to validate these claims. Now, a new study in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry has shown that ham bones contain

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We're in the era of overtourism but there is a more sustainable way forward

If you live in a tourist destination, you might dread the holiday invasion. Likewise, disgruntled tourists complain about crowded and polluted beaches, national parks or attractions.

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Frequency Specific Microcurrent

Frequency Specific Microcurrents is a dubious energy medicine treatment in the tradition of Albert Abrams.

6h

Thirty five degree days make blackouts more likely, but new power stations won't help

Summer is here with a vengeance. On hot days it's very likely something in the power system will break and cause someone to lose power. And the weather bureau expects this summer to be hotter and drier than average – so your chances of losing power will be higher than normal.

6h

Giant ice disc appears in Presumpscot River, Westbrook

The approximately 91m (298ft) wide frozen slab formed naturally and has been slowly spinning.

6h

A Poker-Playing Robot Goes to Work for the Pentagon

A bot trained to beat poker stars could offer strategic lessons to generals simulating a future war.

6h

A Floating Glass Bead Could Help Physicists Probe the Unknown

New tabletop sensors could be sensitive enough to glimpse gravitational waves and even dark matter particles.

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How to build muscle on a vegan diet

Muscle Month Everything you ever wanted to know about protein, supplements, meal timing, and more. Even without recent or replicated peer-reviews papers, we have proof enough that getting buff with plants is, in fact, possible.

6h

New quantum structures in super-chilled helium may mirror early days of universe

For the first time, researchers have documented the long-predicted occurrence of 'walls bound by strings' in superfluid helium-3. The existence of such an object, originally foreseen by cosmology theorists, may help explaining how the universe cooled down after the Big Bang. With the newfound ability to recreate these structures in the lab, earth-based scientists finally have a way to study some o

6h

Dry-cured ham bones—a source of heart-healthy peptides?

Drinking bone broth is a recent diet fad that proponents claim fights inflammation, eases joint pain and promotes gut health. Simmering animal bones in water releases collagen and other proteins into the broth that may have health benefits, although more research is needed to validate these claims. Now, a new study in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry has shown that ham bones contain

6h

How to Tell an Open Secret

They were young, still in college, when one night he lashed out and choked her—backed her against the wall, his hands on her neck, so she thought she was going to die. She crept home and hardly spoke of it, told one trusted friend years later, while he rose in the ranks of the country’s powerful, a political wunderkind. Then she learned of his young female protégée’s death, thought of what he mig

6h

What Might Animals Look Like Thousands of Years From Now?

It’s early May of the year 4847, and Willek Muriday, a chief scientist and regional director of a far-reaching biological survey, has just submitted a report on the Cagoan District, the ruins of an ancient urban center. These ruins, southwest of Lake Mishkin, were long thought to be lifeless, but year-round tropical temperatures and high levels of background radiation have led to the rapid evolut

6h

Image of the Day: Sentinel Cells

Researchers hacked the genetic machinery of E. coli to make them glow and identify proteins linked to cancer.

6h

Weird Star System's Planet-Forming Disk Goes Vertical Like a Ferris Wheel

Worlds with off-kilter orbits may be much more common than previously believed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Facebook to tighten political ad rules for 2019 electionsFacebook US Local News

Facebook said Tuesday it will tighten rules for political ads in countries with elections scheduled in the first half of the year, building on transparency efforts already underway in the United States, Britain and Brazil after a series of scandals.

6h

Tanzania forest to be protected as a result of major scientific discoveries

The United Republic of Tanzania has announced it will protect a globally unique forest ecosystem in East Africa, following research that demonstrated it is under threat from illegal activities including tree-cutting for charcoal and the poaching of elephants and other animals.

6h

How we're designing musical instruments with the help of disabled musicians and VR

Most new digital technologies tend to be designed with an able-bodied user in mind. The first desktop computers required fine motor skills to navigate software menus using a mouse, and mobile phones need users to press buttons, swipe screens, and so on. To use such technology a person needs to be fairly dexterous.

6h

New environmental sensing and monitoring system tested and evaluated

On the edge of Virginia Tech's campus, on a stretch of farmland that few students ever visit, small boxes are whirling through the season's change to winter, collecting and transmitting data that will make it easier for scientists to monitor and collect data across landscapes.

6h

Affordable Clean Energy rule may lead to more air pollution and carbon emissions, study says

A new study published in Environmental Research Letters and co-authored by Charles T. Driscoll, University Professor of Environmental Systems and Distinguished Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering and Computer Science, predicts that the Trump administration's Affordable Clean Energy (ACE) rule, which aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions at coal-fired po

6h

On the road to liveable cities

By the end of November, the city of Trento, one of the Lighthouse Cities of the EU-funded project STARDUST, had its first Stakeholder Workshop at the Palazzo Thun. Main actors of the city in the field of Logistics discussed with other local key figures on the different scenarios they need to consider for developing the last-mile logistics and goods delivery in the city centre. The goal is to prolo

6h

Bioconstruction: Beyond hempcrete

One of the common beliefs about bio-construction is that it is only for rich people. According to Mike Lawrence, Professor at the BRE CICM (Centre for Innovative Construction Materials), University of Bath, UK, this is a myth: "If you compare like with like, so if you compare a building made out of conventional materials with the same thermal performance as a building made out of biobased material

6h

Identifying 'friends' in an objective manner: A new method for extracting the backbone of networked social interactions

In recent years, behavioral patterns of social creatures, such as humans, cattle, ants, etc., have been discovered by using wearable sensors called Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) devices (Figs. 1).

6h

Novel viral identification method developed

Currently, influenza typing in clinical practice is performed using an immunochromatography method based on antigen-antibody interaction. This method enables simple diagnosis of infectious diseases. However, it also has a problem in that a single molecular recognition element (MRE) only recognizes a specific single target analyte.

6h

A comprehensive metabolic map for production of bio-based chemicals

A KAIST research team completed a metabolic map that charts all available strategies and pathways of chemical reactions that lead to the production of various industrial bio-based chemicals.

6h

China's moon garden is dead as the craft is plunged into lunar nightChina Moon Chang e 4

Cotton seeds growing on China's Chang'e 4 probe on the far side of the moon have been plunged into darkness, marking the end of the first lunar biosphere experiment

6h

Research advancing biological control of invasive plant species

Academics from Royal Holloway, University of London in collaboration with The Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience (CABI) and the University of Reading are the first in Europe to study the ecological effects of a rust fungus on the invasive plant species, Himalayan Balsam, in the field.

6h

The pace at which the world's permafrost soils are warming

Global warming is causing increasing damage in the world's permafrost regions. As the new global comparative study conducted by the international permafrost network GTN-P shows, in all regions with permafrost soils the temperature of the frozen ground at a depth of more than 10 metres rose by an average of 0.3 degrees Celsius between 2007 and 2016—in the Arctic and Antarctic, as well as the high m

6h

11,500-year-old animal bones in Jordan suggest early dogs helped humans hunt

Around 11,500 years ago, in what is now northeast Jordan, people began to live with dogs and may also have used them for hunting, according to a new study by archaeologists from the University of Copenhagen and University College London. They suggest that the introduction of dogs as hunting aids may explain the dramatic increase of hares and other small prey in the archaeological remains at the si

6h

How Candida albicans exploits lack of oxygen to cause disease

Scientists from Umeå university have shown that the yeast Candida albicans can modulate and adapt to low oxygen levels in different body niches to cause infection and to harm the host. Studying adaption to hypoxic or anoxic niches is particularly fruitful for characterizing the pathogenicity of C. albicans toward the development of better therapeutic approaches. Details about the study are publish

6h

Physicists discover new effect in the interaction of plasmas with solids

Plasmas—hot gases consisting of chaotically-moving electrons, ions, atoms and molecules—comprise the interiors of stars, but scientists can create them artificially using special equipment in the laboratory. If a plasma comes in contact with a solid, such as the wall of the lab equipment, under certain circumstances, the wall is changed fundamentally and permanently: Atoms and molecules from the p

6h

Power stations driven by light

Green plants, algae and some bacteria use sunlight to convert energy. The pigments in chlorophyll absorb electromagnetic radiation, which induces chemical reactions in electrons. These reactions take place in the nucleus of complex protein structures, referred to by experts as photosystems I and II. The processes that take place in these photosystems are induced by catalysts in a certain order. In

6h

Light up logic: Engineers perform computational logic with light

For the first time, researchers have performed logic operations with a chemical device using electric fields and ultraviolet light. The device and the pioneering methods open up research possibilities, including low-power, high-performance computer chips.

6h

Machine learning could reduce testing, improve treatment for intensive care patients

Doctors in intensive care units face a continual dilemma: Every blood test they order could yield critical information, but also adds costs and risks for patients. To address this challenge, researchers from Princeton University are developing a computational approach to help clinicians more effectively monitor patients' conditions and make decisions about the best opportunities to order lab tests

6h

A current affair: the movement of ocean waters around Australia

Many people in Australia will head to the beach this summer and that'll most likely include a dip or a plunge into the sea. But have you ever wondered where those ocean waters come from, and what influence they may have?

6h

Velcro for human cells

The ability of cells to adhere to each other and to their environment is the basis for multicellular life. Adhesion occurs via diverse receptors at the surface of cells that bind to specific ligands in their surroundings. Despite the importance of these adhesion receptors, there is a paucity of tools available for precisely controlling their interactions with the environment. To address this limit

6h

Experiments detect entropy production in mesoscopic quantum systems

The production of entropy, which means increasing the degree of disorder in a system, is an inexorable tendency in the macroscopic world owing to the second law of thermodynamics. This makes the processes described by classical physics irreversible and, by extension, imposes a direction on the flow of time. However, the tendency does not necessarily apply in the microscopic world, which is governe

6h

Mechanism helps explain the ear's exquisite sensitivity

The human ear, like those of other mammals, is so extraordinarily sensitive that it can detect sound-wave-induced vibrations of the eardrum that move by less than the width of an atom. Now, researchers at MIT have discovered important new details of how the ear achieves this amazing ability to pick up faint sounds.

6h

Don’t Blame the Government Shutdown for SpaceX Delays

NASA astronauts haven’t launched to space from the United States in nearly eight years. They’ve gone to space, of course. An American astronaut is up there right now . But they launch from Kazakhstan, at a hulking facility in the middle of the desert, in a Russian capsule, snuggled close to Russian cosmonauts, on a Russian rocket. When the U.S. government retired its iconic but expensive space-sh

7h

Western-led team may unlock rocky secrets of Mars

Humankind may be able to reach further back into the history of its nearest planetary neighbour, unlocking the secrets to the evolution, climate, and habitability of Mars, thanks to the efforts of a Western-led team tapped to improve NASA's rover technology.

7h

Sewers could help clean the atmosphere

Sewage treatment—an unglamorous backbone of urban living—could offer a cost-effective way to combat climate change by flushing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

7h

Avoiding fossil fuel 'lock-in' could limit global temperature rise

Research suggests there would be a 64 percent chance of limiting the increase in global average temperatures to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, if fossil fuel infrastructure was phased out immediately.

7h

Cybersecurity system evolves as it watches and learns from would-be hackers

For hackers, the United States energy grid is a treasure trove of classified information with vast potential for profit and mayhem. To be effective, the power grid's protection system has to be a bit like a hacker: highly intelligent, agile and able to learn rapidly.

7h

Study finds students learning Cherokee writing developed previously unknown, 'idiosyncratic' style

Cherokee is spoken as a first language by fewer than 5,000 people, yet in recent years it has experienced a remarkable revival as a second language. But what happens when entire generations may have learned to speak the language but not read or write it? Research from the University of Kansas shows children learning to write Cherokee in an Oklahoma immersion school internalized both English and Ch

7h

The Millions Silicon Valley Spends on Security for Execs

Facebook told investors it expects to spend $10 million annually on security for CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

7h

As the Government Shutdown Drags on, Security Risks Intensify

From potential nation state hacks to a brain drain, the shutdown has done nothing good for cybersecurity.

7h

Porny Presidential Fanfic Isn't Just Kinky—It's Political

You probably won’t enjoy reading about President Trump getting it on with Mike Pence (or Putin, or Shrek), but you’re not really supposed to.

7h

There’s a Way for Democrats to Sue Trump—Thanks to the Republicans

As the partial shutdown of the federal government has stretched to 25 days, Democrats are mulling a possible lawsuit: If Donald Trump declares a national emergency and reappropriates funding for his proposed border wall from other departments, as he has suggested he might do , they would almost certainly challenge that action in court. “Look, an emergency cannot be whatever a president says an em

7h

What People Actually Say Before They Die

Mort Felix liked to say that his name, when read as two Latin words, meant “happy death.” When he was sick with the flu, he used to jokingly remind his wife, Susan, that he wanted Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” played at his deathbed. But when his life’s end arrived at the age of 77, he lay in his study in his Berkeley, California, home, his body besieged by cancer and his consciousness cradled in morp

7h

How a Stroke Turned a 63-Year-Old Into a Rap Legend

D r. Sherman Hershfield woke up one morning and was surprised to find himself behind the wheel of his car. Somewhere between his Beverly Hills apartment and his practice in the San Fernando Valley, the silver-haired physician had blacked out. Somehow, he’d avoided a crash, but this wasn’t the first time. “I didn’t know what was going on,” he admitted. Apart from his frequent blackouts, Hershfield

7h

Human Gene Editing: Great Power, Great Responsibility

Modifying the human germline has profound implications and must be approached with extraordinary care — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Løkke: Danmark skal have ét landsdækkende EPJ-system

På sigt skal Danmark have ét nationalt elektronisk patientjournal-system, siger statsminister Lars Løkke Rasmussen. Han kalder det »ikke klogt«, at der er valgt forskellige systemer i Øst- og Vestdanmark.

7h

Nancy Pelosi’s Winning Strategy

Democrats sometimes portray themselves as high-minded and naive—unwilling to play as rough as the GOP. Speaker Nancy Pelosi is, once again, proving that self-image wrong. She’s not only refusing Donald Trump’s demand for a border wall. She’s trying to cripple his presidency. And she may well succeed. Pelosi’s strategy resembles the one she employed to debilitate another Republican president: Geor

7h

Fukushima Residents Return Despite Radiation

Eight years after the nuclear meltdown, wary citizens are moving back to contaminated homesteads—some not by choice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Smoking Pot Just Once May Increase Teen Brain Volume: Why That Could Be Bad

Smoking pot just once might be linked to changes in young brains

7h

Earth's Tilt May Exacerbate a Melting Antarctic

As sea ice melts, Antarctica may get more sensitive to astronomical cycles.

7h

Regeringen: Jordforurening skal være statens ansvar

Regeringen foreslår samtidig at bruge en halv milliard til oprydning efter Grindstedværket og Cheminova. Pengene skal komme fra besparelser ved at staten overtager jordforureningsopgaven.

8h

Revisor-undersøgelse: Byggesagkyndige er dybt afhængige af forsikringsselskaber

PLUS. Ny revisorrapport bekræfter mistanken om, at mange byggesagkyndige ikke er uafhængige af forsikringsselskaberne. Der er dog ikke fundet beviser på, at det påvirker indholdet af tilstandsrapporterne til forsikringsselskabernes fordel. Erhvervsminister overvejer stramninger

8h

Record-breaking ocean temperatures point to trends of global warming

The newly available observations show that the year 2018 is the hottest year ever recorded for the global ocean, as evident in its highest ocean heat content since 1950s in the upper 2,000 meters.

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Our oceans broke heat records in 2018 and the consequences are catastrophic

Rising temperatures can be charted back to the late 1950s, and the last five years were the five hottest on record Last year was the hottest ever measured, continuing an upward trend that is a direct result of manmade greenhouse gas emissions. The key to the measurements is the oceans. Oceans absorb more than 90% of the heat that results from greenhouse gases, so if you want to measure global war

8h

The dos and don’ts of helping a drug-addicted person recover

Addiction is a learning disorder; it's not a sign that someone is a bad person. Tough love doesn't help drug-addicted people. Research shows that the best way to get people help is through compassion, empathy and support. Approach them as an equal human being deserving of respect. As a first step to recovery, Maia Szalavitz recommends the family or friends of people with addiction get them a comp

8h

Trump’s Democratic Critics Are in Danger of Following His Lead

President Donald Trump is a unilateralist. He often seems more comfortable condemning allies than adversaries. He prefers to go his own way, walking away from multinational agreements or understandings with relish—witness the Paris Climate accord and the Iran nuclear deal. He makes it clear that he wants out of the Middle East—a region that, he believes, has consumed far too much American blood a

8h

The Shutdown Is Doing Lasting Damage to National Security

As the longest government shutdown in American history drags on, it’s not just hurting the morale of America’s federal workforce and the broader American economy . It’s hurting our national security. Some of the damage is already plainly apparent—but in four crucial ways, its harms will persist long after the government reopens. We’re beginning to see indicators of short-term national- and homela

8h

The Attention Economy Is a Malthusian Trap

On September 28, 2018, tech died. That’s according to a widely circulated eulogy prepared by Vincent Deluard, a strategist at INTL FCStone, a financial-services company. “If technology is everywhere, the tech sector no longer exists,” he wrote . “If the tech sector no longer exists, its premium is no longer justified.” When the Financial Times got its hands on the document, it leaned into the dea

8h

The Perils of a Psychological Approach to Anti-racism

In a recent essay , my colleague John McWhorter posited that the current social-justice paradigm is a dead end—that fighting racism and sexism are still necessary, but that the left went astray when it stopped focusing on the sociological project of changing laws and social structures that abolitionists, suffragists, and civil-rights activists had earlier pursued. Today’s left is too focused on p

8h

DI: Ny CFCS-overvågning kan betyde dansk statstapning af patentdata og børsdata fra udenlandske selskaber

Hvad sker der med udenlandske selskabers data, når de kommer til Danmark, spørger DI efter nyt lovforslag, der giver CFCS mulighed for at tvangsinstallere overvågningssoftware i erhvervslivet.

8h

The pace at which the world's permafrost soils are warming

Global warming is leaving more and more apparent scars in the world's permafrost regions. As the new global comparative study conducted by the international permafrost network GTN-P shows, in all regions with permafrost soils the temperature of the frozen ground at a depth of more than 10 meters rose by an average of 0.3 degrees Celsius between 2007 and 2016 — in the Arctic and Antarctic, as well

9h

New quantum structures in super-chilled helium may mirror early days of universe

Experimental proof of a decades-old prediction opens a pathway to recreate possible conditions of the early universe here on earth.

9h

Britisk rapport: Forbyd sløvtladende plugin-hybrider fra offentlige ladestandere

Langsomtladende plugin-hybrider risikerer at blokere for elbilerne ved de hurtige ladestandere. Elbilerne bør have forrang, konkluderer britisk rapport.

9h

Løkkes sundhedsreform lukker regionerne og styrker almen praksis

Regeringen vil med sit udspil til en omfattende sundhedsreform sige farvel til regionsrådene og erstatte dem med bestyrelser. Samtidig skal 21 sundhedsfællesskaber sikre tættere samarbejde mellem kommunerne og sygehussektoren.

9h

Her er sundhedsreformen

Regeringen præsenterer en sundhedsreform uden regioner, med 21 sundhedsfællesskaber, fem sundhedsforvaltninger og en national sundhedsmyndighed med egen bestyrelse.

9h

The Real Significance of the FBI’s Probe Into Trump

The arresting New York Times headline last Friday—“ F.B.I. Opened Inquiry Into Whether Trump Was Secretly Working on Behalf of Russia ”—sparked a strangely bifurcated reaction. A bombshell to some, a dud to others, the story has had lots of people scratching their heads: What does it even mean? The confusion is understandable, as is the debate over the significance of this deceptively complex and

9h

The Racial Wealth Gap Could Become a 2020 Litmus Test

When Senator Elizabeth Warren announced that she’d formed a presidential exploratory committee, she hit all the populist notes that have become standard in her career, addressing a besieged middle class that’s constantly undermined by powerful corporate and political elites. “In our country, if you work hard and play by the rules, you ought to be able to take care of yourself and the people you l

9h

Cambodian Deportees Return to a 'Home' They've Never Known

PHNOM PENH—Thuch Sek’s skin is an ink-filled canvas, his Cambodian heritage and American life woven across his back and down his limbs. Thug life marks his right forearm; a misspelled tattoo extolling Khemer pride blankets his muscled shoulder blades. The 39-year-old was born in a Thai refugee camp to parents fleeing the Khmer Rouge, the brutal regime that in the late 1970s killed nearly a quarte

9h

Polen efterspørger et fælles standpunkt i EU og Nato i forhold til Huawei

Sidste uges anholdelse af en Huawei-ansat i Polen har fået landets indenrigsminister til at kalde EU og Nato op.

10h

Pakkerobot med dansk islæt testes i København

PLUS. En selvkørende leverancerobot fra selskabet Starship Technologies har været en tur forbi København i december. Selskabet har nemlig planer om at lancere en tjeneste i København.

10h

The apps that can tell you if you're buying sustainably

What does sustainable shopping look like? From environmental impact to workers' rights, the term can cover so many aspects that buying sustainably can be a daunting task. But a new app that helps people select supermarket products by ethical preferences and an online database that brings transparency to supply chains aim to change that.

11h

'Zebra' tribal bodypaint cuts fly bites 10-fold: study

Traditional white-striped bodypainting practiced by indigenous communities mimics zebra stripes to reduce the number of potentially harmful horsefly bites a person receives by up to 10-fold, according to new research published Wednesday.

11h

Australian towns among hottest spots on Earth as heatwave sizzles

Australian towns were among the hottest places on Earth this week as a severe heatwave hit the continent's southeast, with forecasters warning of more record-breaking temperatures before the weekend.

11h

Aussie businesses complain Google sending outback tourists off the map

Tourism operators in Australia's vast outback say wild inaccuracies in Google Maps are making remote hot spots appear out of reach, deterring people from visiting the region.

11h

New retail tools aim to solve e-commerce profit dilemma

Conventional wisdom in the Amazon era holds that the lowest price wins the battle of the retailers, leading many to just about give away items to make a sale.

11h

Intel vet takes wheel of self-driving car startup Zoox

Intel vet Aicha Evans will lead self-driving car startup Zoox from next month, becoming a rare high-profile black chief executive in a Silicon Valley.

11h

Vietnam's newest airline Bamboo takes first flight

Vietnam's newest commercial carrier Bamboo Airways took flight Wednesday, officially entering Southeast Asia's crowded aviation sector where it will face stiff competition from established players.

11h

At Detroit auto show, the future of cars is… in the future

The Detroit auto show kicked off this week with glitzy, high-production value debuts of mostly sports cars, giant trucks and SUVs—new versions of age-old themes.

11h

YouTube clarifies rules on pranks as risky memes rageYouTube Dangerous Bird Box

YouTube on Tuesday clarified rules against posting videos of dangerous pranks, as risky "challenges" prompt people to video themselves doing things like biting into laundry soap or driving blindfolded.

11h

'Junk' science? For some crabs at least, size does matter

Size does matter, at least when it comes to some hermit crabs, who appear to have evolved longer penises so they can stay in their shells to protect their homes during sex.

11h

US gambling operators have 90 days to comply with new rules

The Department of Justice will wait 90 days to implement a legal opinion that will affect online gambling.

11h

No-shows for auto shows? Detroit and others aim to retool

At first glance, this year's edition of the North American International Auto Show might look like any other from the past: gleaming vehicles, bright lights and flashy displays trying to lure spectators to their offerings.

11h

Northridge earthquake shattered Los Angeles 25 years ago

Twenty-five years ago this week, a violent, pre-dawn earthquake shook Los Angeles from its sleep, and sunrise revealed widespread devastation, with dozens killed and $25 billion in damage.

11h

Cop voice: Jay-Z, Public Enemy songs highlight police tactic to frighten people of color

What do songs by artists like Jay-Z and Public Enemy have in common? They feature representations of 'cop voice,' a racialized way of speaking that police use to weaponize their voices around people of color, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

11h

Researchers develop new zoning tool that provides global topographic datasets in minutes

Fluvial landscapes and the availability of water are of paramount importance for human safety and socioeconomic growth. Hydrologists know that identifying the boundaries of floodplains is often the first crucial step for any urban development or environmental protection plan.

11h

Right green for crop, environment, wallet

Too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. That's certainly true for nitrogen fertilizers.

11h

Video games can turn university graduates into better employees | Matthew Barr

Video games improve communication, adaptibility and critical thinking – just the attributes that employers are looking for In recent years, Boris Johnson has excelled at making ignorant pronouncements and illiterate blunders. From offensive remarks on burqas to reciting Kipling in Myanmar and his ludicrous statements on Brexit , Johnson has perfected the art of getting it wrong. It feels like he’

12h

Robotten ruller!

Så blev det tid til en opdatering af projektet med min selvkørende robot. Se første del HER. Først og fremmest har jeg valgt at herligheden skal drives af to børsteløse (BLDC) motorer, én per bælte. Jeg har valgt en forholdsvis beefy model på 270kv hvilket i nominelle termer vil sige, at øges f…

12h

Forskere er bekymrede: Rensning af saltvand skader havene

I flere lande er afsaltningsanlæg nødvendige for at skaffe drikkevand. Men processen efterlader et skadeligt restprodukt, som i store mængder pumpes ud i havet.

13h

Mosquito known to transmit malaria has been detected in Ethiopia for the first time

A type of mosquito that transmits malaria has been detected in Ethiopia for the first time, and the discovery has implications for putting more people at risk for malaria in new regions, according to a study led by a Baylor University researcher.

14h

Right green for crop, environment, wallet

Researchers found an efficient approach to managing nitrogen in agriculture and reducing its environmental impact. It's all about being green.

14h

Study finds following heart health guidelines also reduces diabetes risk

Lifestyle and health factors that are good for your heart can also prevent diabetes, according to a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine that published today in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

14h

Ohio State study finds following heart health guidelines also reduces diabetes risk

You've probably heard that things like staying active, eating healthy and keeping your blood pressure in check can help your heart, and a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds that following a set of seven lifestyle factors can also drastically reduce your risk of developing diabetes.

14h

Genes reveal clues about people's potential life expectancy

Scientists say they can predict whether a person can expect to live longer or die sooner than average, by looking at their DNA. Experts have analyzed the combined effect of genetic variations that influence lifespan to produce a scoring system. People who score in the top ten per cent of the population might expect to live up to five years longer than those who score in the lowest ten per cent, th

14h

Using satellites to measure rates of ice mass loss in glaciers

Researchers have investigated all glacial areas in South America in more detail than ever before, from the tropical areas to the subpolar regions. Their two major findings are that the highest rate of mass loss is in the Patagonian ice sheet, and that the glaciers in the tropics have lost considerably less mass than previously projected, although this is not the good news which it might appear at

14h

Personality type could shape attitudes toward body weight of others, researchers say

Researchers found that personality traits have significant bearing on a person's attitudes toward obesity, their implicit theories of weight and their willingness to engage in derisive fat talk or weight discrimination.

14h

Informationsdisplay på Køge Nords nye vartegn spares væk

Det store informationsdisplay på Køge Nords monumentale station spares væk. Det fremgår af et svar, som transportministeren har sendt til Køge Kommunes borgmester, selvom det var en del af begrundelsen for, at projektet oprindeligt blev valgt.

15h

4 anti-scientific beliefs and their damaging consequences

Fifty years later after one of the greatest achievements of mankind, there's a growing number of moon landing deniers. They are part of a larger trend of anti-scientific thinking. Climate change, anti-vaccination and other assorted conspiratorial mindsets are a detriment and show a tangible impediment to fostering real progress or societal change. All of these separate anti-scientific beliefs sha

16h

Pioneering surgery restores movement to children paralyzed by acute flaccid myelitis

An innovative and complex surgery involving nerve transfers is restoring movement to young patients with paralysis caused by acute flaccid myelitis.

17h

Gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9 shown to limit impact of certain parasitic diseases

Researchers have successfully used CRISPR/Cas9 to limit the impact of schistosomiasis and liver fluke infection, which affects more than a quarter of a billion people in Southeast Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America.

17h

New effect in the interaction of plasmas with solids discovered

If a plasma comes in contact with a solid, under certain circumstances the surface is changed fundamentally and permanently. Researchers have now discovered a surprising effect, in which the electronic properties of the solid material, such as its electrical conductivity, can be changed in a controlled, extremely fast and reversible manner, by ion impact.

17h

Sacklers Directed Efforts to Mislead Public About OxyContin, New Documents Indicate

A filing in a Massachusetts lawsuit contains dozens of internal Purdue Pharma documents suggesting the family was far more involved than the company has long contended.

17h

Unraveling threads of bizarre hagfish's explosive slime

Biologists have modeled the hagfish's gag-inducing defense mechanism mathematically.

17h

Poisons or medicines? Cyanobacteria toxins protect tiny lake dwellers from parasites

The cyanobacteria blooms that plague western Lake Erie each summer are both an unsightly nuisance and a potential public health hazard, producing liver toxins that can be harmful to humans and their pets.

17h

Assessing the performance of multiple influenza forecasting models

In what the authors believe is the first documented comparison of several real-time infectious disease forecasting models by different teams across many seasons, five research groups report this week that a majority of models consistently showed higher accuracy than historical baseline models.

17h

A new way by which the human brain marks time

With a little help from HBO's 'Curb Your Enthusiasm,' neurobiologists have uncovered a key component of how the human brain marks time.

17h

Genome doubling, cell size and novelty

Scientists have examined the effects of genome doubling on cell biology and the generation of novelty in plants.

17h

18h

Bracing for a Hazy Robo-Future, Ford and VW Join Forces

By joining forces, the major automakers have each diversified their self-driving portfolios.

18h

Scientists make strides in creation of clinical-grade bone

A team of scientists has made valuable progress toward creating clinical-grade cells for treatment of bone disease and injury. In their study, the team identified two types of growth media that could support effective expansion of mesenchymal progenitor (MP) cells from stem cells in a clinically compatible, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) setting.

18h

Einstein-de Haas effect has a central role in ultrafast demagnetization processes

The Einstein-de Haas effect, first demonstrated more than a century ago, provides an intriguing link between magnetization and rotation in ferromagnetic materials. Researchers have now found that the effect has also a central role in ultrafast processes that happen at the sub-picosecond timescale — and thus deliver fresh insight into materials that might form the basis for novel devices.

18h

New conservation practice could reduce nitrogen pollution in agricultural drainage water

In a new study, scientists have estimated that a new conservation practice known as saturated buffers could reduce nitrogen from agricultural drainage by 5 to 10 percent.

18h

Idled farmland presents habitat restoration opportunities in San Joaquin Desert

Most of the native habitat in California's San Joaquin Desert has been converted to row crops and orchards, leaving 35 threatened or endangered species confined to isolated patches of habitat. A new study looked at the conservation potential of marginal farmland in the San Joaquin Desert and found that restoration of fallowed farmland could play a crucial role in habitat protection and restoration

18h

Power stations driven by light

The smallest building blocks within the power stations of organisms which get their energy directly from the sun are basically miniature reactors surrounded by collectors which capture photons and forward them to the center. The close correlation between structure and interaction of the components boosts productivity, a strategy which researchers are using for increasing the efficiency of solar te

18h

Mathematical model can improve our knowledge on cancer

Researchers have developed a new mathematical tool, which can improve our understanding of what happens when cells lose their polarity (direction) in diseases such as cancer. The result is advancing our understanding of how the fertilized egg cell develops into a complete organism. Biological shapes, like individual organs or an entire body, can be reproduced or maintained with great accuracy, jus

18h

Helping anxious students excel on science exams

A new study released today reveals that helping lower-income high school freshman to regulate their test-taking anxiety can cut their biology course failure rates in half. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and conducted by Barnard College President Sian Leah Beilock and her research team found that brief pre-exam de-stressing strategies could reduce the perfor

18h

Big genome found in tiny forest defoliator

Scientists have sequenced the genomes of the European gypsy moth and its even more destructive cousin, the Asian gypsy moth.

18h

Surge protector: A novel approach to suppressing therapy-induced tumor growth and recurrence

Dead and dying cancer cells killed by conventional cancer treatments paradoxically trigger inflammation that promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Researchers now describe a novel approach to suppressing chemotherapy-induced tumor growth in an ovarian cancer model.

18h

10 Years Later, Retrace the 'Miracle on the Hudson' Flight

On the anniversary of the remarkable crash landing, remember just how quickly it all happened.

18h

A microbial hot spring in your basement

Microbes that thrive in some of the most extreme places on Earth have discovered another cozy place to live — inside homes across the United States.

18h

Scientists have identified a bone marrow backup system

New research has identified a backup for an important biological system — the hematopoietic system, whose adult stem cells constantly replenish the body's blood supply.

18h

How Candida albicans exploits lack of oxygen to cause disease

Scientists have shown how the yeast Candida albicans can modulate and adapt to low oxygen levels in different body niches to cause infection and to harm the host. Studying adaption to hypoxic or anoxic niches is particularly fruitful, since it helps us to understand the pathogenicity of C. albicans and promotes the development of better therapy approaches.

18h

Researchers raise bar for successful management of severe atopic dermatitis

A team of investigators has identified comprehensive guidelines for managing severe atopic dermatitis (AD), the most common form of eczema.

18h

Defective glial cells can push neurons toward Parkinson's disease

A team of scientists have discovered that astrocytes are linked to the buildup of a toxic protein that is one the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The work suggests an important role for glial cells in Parkinson's disease and offers potential new targets for developing therapies.

18h

Effects of linoleic acid on inflammatory response depend on genes

The effects of linoleic acid on the human body are largely dependent on genes, a new study shows. Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid. People carrying different variants of the FADS1 gene had a different inflammatory response and different changes in their fasting glucose levels when supplementing their diet by linoleic acid rich sunflower oil. This was the first time these associations were

18h

Keeping roads in good shape reduces greenhouse gas emissions

Keeping road pavement in good shape saves money and energy and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, more than offsetting pollution generated during road construction, according to a new study.

18h

Long penises help hermit crabs avoid being robbed during sex

Some male hermit crabs have unusually long penises. This could be so that they can protect their homes whilst having sex

19h

How hagfish can make enough slime to clog a shark's jaws in seconds

Hagfish use slime to clog up sharks’ jaws in milliseconds, and it’s the water drag generated when the shark inhales that helps the slime form so quickly

19h

Nerve cells made from skin cells are a valid lab model for studying disease

Researchers have shown that cells from mice that have been induced to grow into nerve cells using a previously published method have molecular signatures matching neurons that developed naturally in the brain.

19h

New immune response regulators

Researchers have discovered new proteins that regulate T cells in the human immune system. Some of these proteins can provide possible new targets for drug development in treating immune-mediated diseases.

19h

MANF identified as a rejuvenating factor in parabiosis

Older mice who are surgically joined with young mice in order to share a common bloodstream get stronger and healthier, making parabiosis one of the hottest topics in age research. Researchers now report that MANF (mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor) is one of the factors responsible for rejuvenating the transfused older mice. Researchers also show the naturally occurring, evoluti

19h

Unraveling threads of bizarre hagfish's explosive slime

Jean-Luc Thiffeault, a University of Wisconsin-Madison math professor, and collaborators Randy Ewoldt and Gaurav Chaudhary of the University of Illinois have modeled the hagfish's gag-inducing defense mechanism mathematically, publishing their work today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface.

19h

New insights into what Neolithic people ate in southeastern Europe

New research, led by the University of Bristol, has shed new light on the eating habits of Neolithic people living in southeastern Europe using food residues from pottery extracts dating back more than 8,000 years.

19h

Poisons or medicines? Cyanobacteria toxins protect tiny lake dwellers from parasites

The cyanobacteria blooms that plague western Lake Erie each summer are both an unsightly nuisance and a potential public health hazard, producing liver toxins that can be harmful to humans and their pets.

19h

Poisons or medicines? Cyanobacteria toxins protect tiny lake dwellers from parasites

The cyanobacteria blooms that plague western Lake Erie each summer are both an unsightly nuisance and a potential public health hazard, producing liver toxins that can be harmful to humans and their pets.

19h

New insights into what Neolithic people ate in southeastern Europe

New research, led by the University of Bristol, has shed new light on the eating habits of Neolithic people living in southeastern Europe using food residues from pottery extracts dating back more than 8,000 years.

19h

Unraveling threads of bizarre hagfish's explosive slime

Hundreds of meters deep in the dark of the ocean, a shark glides toward what seems like a meal. It's kind of ugly, eel-like and not particularly meaty, but still probably food. So the shark strikes.

19h

The Atlantic Daily: Mayday

What We’re Following The political impasse over the U.S. government shutdown continues, matched now by the tumult across the Atlantic. More than two years after citizens in the United Kingdom voted in favor of Brexit, the strategy on how to actually leave the European Union is more muddled than ever. On Tuesday, the British Parliament voted down Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit plan, just 10 w

19h

There’s a Huge Ice Disk in a Maine River. No, the Aliens Aren’t Coming.

Despite all the speculation, it’s not a landing zone for aliens. Scientists say the ice disks are an unusual but entirely natural phenomenon.

19h

Trilobites: When Fungi Fight Back

A mushroom species was found to sense predators and sent warning signals to other parts of its body, but how it does that remains a mystery.

19h

Giant Ice Disk Spins in Maine River

The sudden appearance of a giant ice disk in Maine has raised many questions. Watch it rotate in this stunning drone video.

19h

Junk food ads disproportionally target black and Hispanic kids over white kids

Health Teens and younger children are also seeing ads in far more places, like YouTube and social media outlets, than in previous years. Over the past few years, major food companies, like Coca-Cola, General Mills, and Hershey, signaled an interest in combating their images as junk-food giants—they’ve…

20h

In a first for humankind, China successfully sprouts a seed on the Moon

China's Chang'e 4 lunar lander touched down on the far side of the moon on January 3. In addition to a lunar rover, the lander carried a biosphere experiment that contains five sets of plants and some insects. The experiment is designed to test how astronauts might someday grow plants in space to sustain long-term settlements. None A plant has sprouted on the moon in a Chinese probe, marking the

20h

Difficulties with audiovisual processing contributes to dyslexia in children

A neuroimaging study could help develop tests for early identification of dyslexia.

20h

Tool for nonstatisticians automatically generates models that glean insights from complex datasets

Researchers are hoping to advance the democratization of data science with a new tool for nonstatisticians that automatically generates models for analyzing raw data.

20h

New zoning tool provides global topographic datasets in minutes

With the increased availability of remote sensing technologies, scientists now have access to high-resolution datasets on Earth's surface properties at the global scale. As a result, an international team of scientists, has created the first comprehensive high resolution map of Earth's floodplains.

20h

Medical detection dogs help diabetes patients regulate insulin levels

New research has found that the best trained alert dogs have the potential to vastly improve the quality of life of people living with Type 1 diabetes.

20h

Back to the future with CD4 testing: Improving HIV care in low- and middle-income countries

A practical resource-based public health approach for the rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected individuals living in low- and middle-income countries could save thousands of lives.

20h

Part-time working mothers with flexible schedules end up doing more work without pay

Flexible schedules cause part-time working mothers to work longer without pay.

20h

Bill Barr Breaks With Trump on the Mueller Probe

Senate Democrats were undoubtedly heartened to hear from President Donald Trump’s attorney-general nominee, Bill Barr, that he does not believe Special Counsel Robert Mueller is on “a witch hunt” and that he would allow Mueller to complete the Russia probe unimpeded. But they also appeared considerably unnerved as Barr defended a lengthy memo he wrote attacking Mueller’s obstruction inquiry as “f

20h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: No Holds Barred

What We’re Following Today It’s Tuesday, January 15. A bipartisan meeting of senators on Monday led to no consensus, and a group of Democrats rejected the president’s invitation for lunchtime talks today, as the federal government shutdown stretches into its 25 th day. Barr None: On the first day of confirmation hearings for President Donald Trump’s nominee for attorney general, Senate Judiciary

20h

Here’s How the Shutdown Is Delaying Climate Data and Undercutting Scientists

A key global temperature report isn’t coming out this week because of missing data, and some long-term research projects are at risk.

20h

Love in a time of migrants: on rethinking arranged marriages

In his book In Praise of Love (2009), the French communist philosopher Alain Badiou attacks the notion of 'risk-free love', which he sees written in the commercial language of dating services that promise their customers 'love, without falling in love '. For Badiou, the search for 'perfect love without suffering' signifies a ‘modern’ variant of ‘traditional’ arranged-marriage practices – a risk-a

20h

Are screens really destroying young people’s brains?

Leading pediatricians say the assumption that screen time is behind problems is not really supported by research. The danger has more to do with a screen being a gateway for unwanted intrusions into a child's life. While recommendations are difficult based on the limited amount of research that has been done, the report offers a few. None It's impossible to be a perfect parent, however hard you t

20h

Antarctica's Largest Ice Shelf Could Be at Risk of Melting

Earth The Ross Ice Shelf appears to be melting in previously unknown ways. The same mechanisms could be melting other giant ice shelves, too. 01/11/2019 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer To read more…

20h

Extreme opponents of GM foods know the least science, but think they know the most

A recent study compared the public's scientific literacy with their attitudes on GM foods. The results showed that "as the extremity of opposition increased, objective knowledge went down, but self-assessed knowledge went up." The results also suggest that, in terms of policy efforts to boost scientific literacy, education about a given topic alone isn't going to be enough. None In 1999, the soci

20h

Why haven't cancer cells undergone genetic meltdowns?

Cancer first develops as a single cell going rogue, with mutations that trigger aggressive growth at all costs to the health of the organism. But if cancer cells were accumulating harmful mutations faster than they could be purged, wouldn't the population eventually die out? To get at the heart of the matter, a team of scientists from Beijing and Taipei wanted to get a new hint at cancer vulnerabi

21h

Apple finally makes battery cases for the iPhone XS and XR, but you have optionsApple iPhone XS Max

Gadgets But there are already plenty of options out there. Apple finally makes battery cases for the iPhone XS and XR, but there are already plenty of options out there.

21h

Black mangroves' impact on the salt marsh food web

Warmer temperatures are causing more tropical species to move northward. Among these are black mangroves, whose abundance is steadily increasing in the northern Gulf of Mexico. A new article examines how this tropical species is impacting the salt marsh food web.

21h

Protein alteration controls cell's response to stress, immunity and lifespan

Scientists have revealed a key mechanism in worms that is involved in controlling the cell's response to stress, a study reports.

21h

Researchers develop new zoning tool that provides global topographic datasets in minutes

With the increased availability of remote sensing technologies, scientists now have access to high-resolution datasets on Earth's surface properties at the global scale. As a result, an international team of scientists, including ASU professor and hydrologist Enrique Vivoni of the School of Earth and Space Exploration, has published the first comprehensive high resolution map of Earth's floodplain

21h

Cop voice: Jay-Z, Public Enemy songs highlight police tactic to frighten people of color

What do songs by artists like Jay-Z and Public Enemy have in common? They feature representations of 'cop voice,' a racialized way of speaking that police use to weaponize their voices around people of color, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

21h

Why haven't cancer cells undergone genetic meltdowns?

Cancer first develops as a single cell going rogue, with mutations that trigger aggressive growth at all costs to the health of the organism. But if cancer cells were accumulating harmful mutations faster than they could be purged, wouldn't the population eventually die out?

21h

21h

The 'Spider-Man: Far From Home' Trailer Raises Some Questions

Think Peter Parker got dusted for good in 'Infinity War'? Think again.

21h

Why Republicans Finally Moved Against Steve King

There are but a few guarantees about what each new session of Congress will bring: One is that Republicans and Democrats will bicker over government spending, and another is that Representative Steve King will say something deeply offensive about race, religion, or immigration. So when House Republicans moved aggressively on Monday evening to kick the Iowa conservative off his two prized congress

21h

The President’s Big-Mac Feast Was Politically Savvy

How does that line go? All fast food served warm is happy, but every fast-foodstuff consumed after it gets cold is unhappy in its own way? Regardless: Taste was not, by all appearances, a top concern when it came to the culinary offerings that the White House presented to visiting members of the Clemson Tigers football team on Monday evening. It was the visuals, instead—items from McDonald’s, fro

21h

Mojave rattlesnakes' life-threatening venom is more widespread than expected

It was thought that Mojave rattlesnakes with hemorrhagic venom only lived in Arizona, but new research documents hemorrhagic and neurotoxic venom types throughout the US and Mexico, and even hybrid venom in which one snake exhibits both types.

21h

Breakthrough in ice-repelling materials

Icy weather is blamed for multibillion dollar losses every year in the United States, including delays and damage related to air travel, infrastructure and power generation and transmission facilities. Now researchers have reported creating a durable silicone polymer coating capable of repelling ice from any surface.

21h

Vaccine-preventable infections in pediatric transplant patients

Children who receive solid organ transplants are hospitalized due to vaccine-preventable infections at rates that are significantly higher than the general population.

21h

Pore size influences nature of complex nanostructures

In new research that could help inform development of new materials, chemists have found that the empty space ('pores') present in two-dimensional molecular building blocks fundamentally changes the strength of these van der Waals forces, and can potentially alter the assembly of sophisticated nanostructures.

21h

New evidence of superconductivity at near room temperature

Researchers have taken a major step toward reaching one of the most sought-after goals in physics: room temperature superconductivity.

21h

Potential therapeutic target for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

New research has revealed that the protein TDP-43 regulates a gene called Stathmin2 (STMN2). STMN2 shows promise as a therapeutic target and could be the first biomarker ALS, which is extremely difficult to diagnose and treat.

21h

Gene expression study sheds new light on African Salmonella

Scientists have completed one of the largest bacterial comparative gene expression studies to date and taken another step forward in understanding the African Salmonella strain that is currently killing around 400,000 people each year in sub-Saharan Africa.

21h

Third Cat in Wyoming Diagnosed with Plague: Here's Why You Shouldn't Panic

Two other cats are known to have contracted plague in the past six months.

21h

Democratizing data science

MIT researchers are hoping to advance the democratization of data science with a new tool for nonstatisticians that automatically generates models for analyzing raw data.

21h

Difficulties with audiovisual processing contributes to dyslexia in children

A University at Buffalo psychologist has published a neuroimaging study that could help develop tests for early identification of dyslexia.

21h

Study: Despite progress, gay fathers and their children still structurally stigmatized

A study published in the February 2019 'Pediatrics' journal suggests the majority of gay fathers and their children continue to experience stigma with potentially harmful physical and psychological effects, despite legal, media and social advances. Study participants specifically cited structural stigma, such as state laws and beliefs of religious communities, as affecting their experiences in mul

21h

1/3 of kids live in extended family homes before 18

About 35 percent of children in the United States have lived with a relative other than a parent or sibling by the time they turn 18, a new study shows. Overall, about 17 percent of kids, or about 12 million, currently live in an extended family household, according to the most recent data from 2014. “It’s important to understand it because research shows strong associations between children’s li

21h

Why did Easter Islanders build statues where they did?

The ancient people of Rapa Nui, Chile, better known as Easter Island, built their famous ahu monuments near coastal freshwater sources, according to new research. The island of Rapa Nui is well-known for its elaborate ritual architecture, particularly its numerous statues, or moai, and ahu, the monumental platforms that supported them. Researchers have long wondered why ancient people built these

22h

Genome doubling, cell size and novelty

In the 2019 Coulter Review, "Polyploidy, the Nucleotype, and Novelty: The Impact of Genome Doubling on the Biology of the Cell," published in the International Journal of Plant Sciences (180:1-52), Jeff J. Doyle and Jeremy E. Coate examine the effects of genome doubling on cell biology and the generation of novelty in plants.

22h

Physicists Lay Out Plans for a New Supercollider

The proposed facility would become the most powerful—and most expensive—collider ever built — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

The Subversive, Delectable Fun of Troye Sivan's "Lucky Strike"

Not to make this about politics or walls or borders or displacement, but the Australian pop singer's new song is all about politics and walls and borders and displacement.

22h

Pioneering surgery restores movement to children paralyzed by acute flaccid myelitis

An innovative and complex surgery involving nerve transfers at Hospital for Special Surgery is restoring movement to young patients with paralysis caused by acute flaccid myelitis.

22h

Genome doubling, cell size and novelty

In the 2019 Coulter Review, 'Polyploidy, the Nucleotype, and Novelty: The Impact of Genome Doubling on the Biology of the Cell,' published in the International Journal of Plant Sciences (180:1-52), Jeff J. Doyle and Jeremy E. Coate examine the effects of genome doubling on cell biology and the generation of novelty in plants.

22h

UCI study identifies a new way by which the human brain marks time

With a little help from HBO's 'Curb Your Enthusiasm,' University of California, Irvine neurobiologists have uncovered a key component of how the human brain marks time.

22h

Assessing the performance of multiple influenza forecasting models

In what the authors believe is the first documented comparison of several real-time infectious disease forecasting models by different teams across many seasons, five research groups report this week that a majority of models consistently showed higher accuracy than historical baseline models.

22h

Idled farmland presents habitat restoration opportunities in San Joaquin Desert

Most of the native habitat in California's San Joaquin Desert has been converted to row crops and orchards, leaving 35 threatened or endangered species confined to isolated patches of habitat. A new study looked at the conservation potential of marginal farmland in the San Joaquin Desert and found that restoration of fallowed farmland could play a crucial role in habitat protection and restoration

22h

Harvard research reveals potential therapeutic target for ALS

Harvard-led ALS research revealed that the protein TDP-43 regulates a gene called Stathmin2 (STMN2).Human pluripotent stem cell models of ALS successfully predicted the relationship between TDP-43 and STMN2. Findings were validated by independent work carried out at the University of California, San Diego.STMN2 shows promise as a therapeutic target and could be the first biomarker ALS, which is ex

22h

Megapixels: Behold this giant spinning ice disk

Science The city of Westbrook has a beautiful physics lesson for us all. This swirling disk might seem like it's rotating from the river's current, but some clever physicists figured out the scientific reason that these ice formations…

22h

Idled farmland presents habitat restoration opportunities in San Joaquin Desert

Most of the native habitat in California's San Joaquin Desert has been converted to row crops and orchards, leaving 35 threatened or endangered species confined to isolated patches of habitat. A significant portion of that farmland, however, is likely to be retired in the coming decades due to groundwater overdraft, soil salinity, and climate change.

22h

The Instagram Egg’s Delightful Appeal

The egg feels absurd, but it’s part of a viral playbook we’ve seen before.

22h

Built to Separate: Border Barriers Around the World

The current debate in the United States about building up and reinforcing the border wall with Mexico may have distinctly American roots, but the problems, and the controversial solutions, are global. Growing numbers of immigrants, terrorist activity, continued drug trafficking, and protracted wars have sparked the construction of temporary and permanent border barriers in many regions worldwide.

22h

The Skeletons in Abusers’ Closets

“I got in a fight with my wife and I slapped her,” says an unidentified male. After a pause, he adds: “I held her and punched the wall.” The man, whose face is blurred to protect his identity, is speaking to a dozen convicted abusers seated around a table. They’re participating in a group therapy session, part of a state-mandated program for men convicted of domestic violence in California. Over

22h

The Brexit Deal's Historic Defeat

LONDON—The likelihood of Britain leaving the European Union without a deal just got a whole lot higher—and Prime Minister Theresa May is largely to blame. On Tuesday, British lawmakers overwhelmingly voted against May’s negotiated agreement with the EU, delivering a damaging (albeit foreseeable ) blow to her Brexit strategy. The deal, which outlines the terms of Britain’s withdrawal from the EU a

22h

New conservation practice could reduce nitrogen pollution in agricultural drainage water

Every summer, a "dead zone" forms in the Gulf of Mexico. Plumes of oxygen-robbing algae, fed by excess nitrogen coming in from the Mississippi River, kill off marine life and threaten the livelihoods of those who fish the Gulf. States bordering the Mississippi River are putting strategies in place to limit nitrogen from wastewater treatment plants, surface runoff, and agricultural fields. In a new

23h

Gene expression study sheds new light on African Salmonella

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have taken another step forward in understanding the bacteria that are causing a devastating Salmonella epidemic currently killing around 400,000 people each year in sub-Saharan Africa.

23h

Cotton Seed Sprouts In China's Lunar Lander

A mini biosphere was sent up in China's Chang'e-4, which landed on the far side of the moon in early January. Photos show the small, green shoot of a cotton plant in a container aboard the spacecraft. (Image credit: China National Space Administration/Xinhua News Agency/AP)

23h

'Outdated' management plan increases risks to Alaska's large carnivores

Alaskan wildlife management that prioritizes reducing bear and wolf populations so hunters can kill more moose, caribou and deer is both backward and lacks scientific monitoring.

23h

Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors comes from ornate quantum physics

A new wave of semiconductors that can be painted on is on the horizon. It bears the promise of revolutionizing lighting all over again and of transforming solar energy. Ornate quantum particle action, revealed here, that drives the new material's properties defies the workings of established semiconductors.

23h

Engineers 3D print smart objects with 'embodied logic'

Using stimuli-responsive materials and geometric principles, engineers have designed structures that have 'embodied logic.' Through their physical and chemical makeup alone, they are able to determine which of multiple possible responses to make in response to their environment.

23h

More Cancer Mutations, Better Immunotherapy Outcomes

Immune checkpoint inhibitors are generally most effective against tumors with more genetic mutations, according to a new study, although the relationship isn't true for all cancers.

23h

New conservation practice could reduce nitrogen pollution in agricultural drainage water

In a new study, University of Illinois scientists have estimated that a new conservation practice known as saturated buffers could reduce nitrogen from agricultural drainage by 5 to 10 percent.

23h

Hollywood's Portrayals of Science and Scientists Are Ridiculous

And Twitter is taking note — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

How to watch the super blood wolf moon this weekend

Space Okay, it's really just an eclipse. Sunday’s eclipse will be visible throughout North America, South America, Europe, and Africa.

23h

How GPS Tracking Technology Can Curb Domestic Violence

Opinion: GPS-monitored violent offenders are 95 percent less likely to commit a new crime. We need to implement an integrated, nationwide domestic violence program that tracks domestic abusers.

23h

Donald Trump’s Pattern of Deference to the Kremlin Is Clear

When Donald Trump gives interviews, it’s usually to Fox News. When he gives interviews to Fox, it’s usually to the channel’s opinion side, not to tougher questioners such as Chris Wallace or Bret Baier. But there he was Saturday night, talking to the normally friendly Jeanine Pirro and receiving what he called the most insulting question in his life. “Are you now or have you ever worked for Russi

23h

Where Did the North Pole Go?

As the humans go about their affairs, living atop a thin crust floating on molten rock, the liquid iron in the Earth’s core is churning in strange, erratic ways. This is a problem because those humans, clever in some ways, have figured out that the movement of the liquid iron creates a magnetic field. For centuries, their compasses have pointed “north.” But where that is, exactly, is changing. Af

23h

11,500-year-old animal bones in Jordan suggest early dogs helped humans hunt

11,500 years ago in what is now northeast Jordan, people began to live alongside dogs and may also have used them for hunting, a new study shows. The archaeologists suggest that the introduction of dogs as hunting aids may explain the dramatic increase of hares and other small prey in the archaeological remains at the site.

23h

Nonfiction: Hacker for Hire

In “Breaking and Entering,” Jeremy Smith tells the story of a brilliant, larger-than-life computer scientist who runs her own boutique cybersecurity firm.

23h

Two daring spacecraft aim to bring asteroid dust back to Earth

A pair of daredevil spacecraft that aim to bring asteroid dust back to Earth have reached their targets and are scouting for the best sampling spots.

23h

This Ikea kitchen might teach industrial robots to be less dumb and more helpful

Nvidia’s new robotics lab will see if robots can learn to fetch the ketchup, load the dishwasher, and—eventually—make a cake.

23h

We could still prevent 1.5 ˚C of warming—but we almost certainly won’t

New research finds we’d need to immediately stop building fossil-fuel-burning vehicles, planes, and factories.

23h

U.S. government can do more to promote biochar

A new study shows how well-designed government policy can address the problem of high startup costs making it hard for some farmers to implement best environmental practices—especially with regard to biochar. Biochar is a porous, charcoal-like material produced via pyrolysis, the high-temperature decomposition of biomass. It improves soil water properties and enhances agricultural production an a

1d

Reports of Demi Lovato overdose failed to highlight drug hotline

The suicide of chef Anthony Bourdain contrasts sharply to singer Demi Lovato’s reported drug overdose in the exposure that toll-free helplines received in news coverage and social media postings, according to new research. “Exactly when people need free, lifesaving resources like 1-800-662-HELP, people don’t know they exist.” The difference may stem, at least in part, from the existence of formal

1d

Goo and light make 3D-printing 100 times faster

Rather than building up plastic filaments layer by layer, a new approach to 3D printing lifts complex shapes from a vat of liquid at up to 100 times faster than conventional 3D printing processes. 3D printing could change the game for relatively small manufacturing jobs, producing fewer than 10,000 identical items. That’s because manufacturers could make the objects without the need for a mold co

1d

Gene expression study sheds new light on African Salmonella

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have completed one of the largest bacterial comparative gene expression studies to date and taken another step forward in understanding the African Salmonella strain that is currently killing around 400,000 people each year in sub-Saharan Africa.

1d

'Outdated' management plan increases risks to Alaska's large carnivores

Alaskan wildlife management that prioritizes reducing bear and wolf populations so hunters can kill more moose, caribou and deer is both backward and lacks scientific monitoring.

1d

Medical detection dogs help diabetes patients regulate insulin levels

New research by the University of Bristol in collaboration with Medical Detection Dogs has found that the best trained alert dogs have the potential to vastly improve the quality of life of people living with Type 1 diabetes.

1d

Conserving large carnivores in Alaska requires overhauling state policy

Large carnivore management in Alaska should be based on rigorous science and monitoring of the status and trends of carnivore populations, according to a Perspective article published Jan. 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by William Ripple of Oregon State University, and colleagues.

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Back to the future with CD4 testing: improving HIV care in low- and middle-income countries

A practical resource-based public health approach for the rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected individuals living in low- and middle-income countries could save thousands of lives, according to an Essay published Jan. 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Mark Tenforde of the University of Washington School of Medicine, and colleagues.

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Hvad vil regionerne med diabetesbehandlingen?

Hvorfor lader Region Hovedstaden det gå ud over diabetesbehandlingen i almen praksis at regionen har ødslet penge væk andre steder i systemet?

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These automated drones know when the supermarket is out of beer

Technology This Pensa Systems UAV can check stock at the local grocery store These automated flying machines could keep tabs on popular products.

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CERN lays out vision for next-generation particle collider

Scientists behind the world's largest atom smasher have laid out their multibillion-euro vision to build an even bigger one, in hopes of unlocking even more secrets of matter and the universe in the coming decades.

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France takes Roundup weed-killer off market after court ruling

French authorities on Tuesday banned the sale of a form of controversial weed-killer Roundup following a court ruling that regulators failed to take safety concerns into account when clearing the widely used herbicide.

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Antarctica Is Dumping Hundreds of Gigatons of Ice into the Ocean Right Now

Antarctica is losing ice six times faster than it was four decades ago. That’s not good for our oceans.

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Part-time working mothers with flexible schedules end up doing more work without pay

Part-time working mothers who have the ability to control their own schedule often end up working an increased amount of unpaid overtime, new research from the University of Kent has found.

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Conserving large carnivores in Alaska requires overhauling state policy

Large carnivore management in Alaska should be based on rigorous science and monitoring of the status and trends of carnivore populations, according to a Perspective article published January 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by William Ripple of Oregon State University, and colleagues.

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UM professor co-authors report on the use of biotechnology in forests

University of Montana Professor Diana Six is one of 12 authors of a new report that addresses the potential for biotechnology to provide solutions for protecting forest trees from insect and pathogen outbreaks, which are increasing because of climate change and expanded global trade.

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Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors comes from ornate quantum physics

A new wave of semiconductors that can be painted on is on the horizon. It bears the promise of revolutionizing lighting all over again and of transforming solar energy. Ornate quantum particle action, revealed here, that drives the new material's properties defies the workings of established semiconductors.

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Velcro for human cells

Freiburg researchers engineer cellular adhesion receptors that can be controlled with light.

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Protein alteration controls cell's response to stress, immunity and lifespan

Scientists have revealed a key mechanism in worms that is involved in controlling the cell's response to stress, a study in eLife reports.

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Differentiating summer and winter rainfall in South Asia around 4.2 ka climatic 'event'

Climate change has the potential to have affected ancient civilizations by spurring migrations and changes in cropping strategies, and the¬se questions are increasingly relevant as we look at how modern civilization is coping with climate change today.

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Here's the 1 Way We Can Avoid Climate Catastrophe, Scary Report Says

How can humans limit catastrophic climate change? We can phase out fossil-fuel emitters — such as coal-burning power plants, jet-fuel-slurping planes and gas-thirsty automobiles — once they reach their retirement age, a new study finds.

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Study examines black mangroves impact on the salt marsh food web

Warmer temperatures are causing more tropical species to move northward. Among these are black mangroves, whose abundance is steadily increasing in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Black mangroves grow as short trees in a dwarf forest and displace many plants common to Gulf salt marshes.

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China Is Growing Cotton on the Moon

Images from the country’s Chang’e-4 lunar lander show the first sprouting plants.

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Scientists identify gene contributing to prostate cancer drug resistance

Researchers have discovered how a gene involved in regulating hormone receptors may contribute to drug resistance in some prostate cancer patients.

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Cern draws up plans for collider four times the size of Large Hadron

The Future Circular Collider would smash particles together in a tunnel 100km long Plans for a machine that would dwarf the Large Hadron Collider have been drawn up by researchers at Cern to take over the baton in the search for new physics in the latter half of the century. The €20bn (£17.8bn) machine, named the Future Circular Collider, would smash particles together inside a 100km (62 mile) tu

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The Sad News About CBD Cupcakes

As I stood at the window of a Weed World Candies truck on Manhattan’s Sixth Avenue last week, a gray-haired man I didn’t know tapped me on my shoulder. “It doesn’t work,” he said, motioning at the truck, which sells candies laced with a cannabis- or hemp-derived compound called cannabidiol. “I didn’t ask you,” I responded, turning back to the window. “It doesn’t work ,” he reiterated, louder, as

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Researchers raise bar for successful management of severe atopic dermatitis

A team of investigators from the University of Colorado College of Nursing at CU Anschutz Medical Campus and National Jewish Health has identified comprehensive guidelines for managing severe atopic dermatitis (AD), the most common form of eczema.

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Penn engineers 3D print smart objects with 'embodied logic'

Using stimuli-responsive materials and geometric principles, Penn Engineers have designed structures that have 'embodied logic.' Through their physical and chemical makeup alone, they are able to determine which of multiple possible responses to make in response to their environment.

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How Candida albicans exploits lack of oxygen to cause disease

Scientists from Umeå university have shown how the yeast Candida albicans can modulate and adapt to low oxygen levels in different body niches to cause infection and to harm the host. Studying adaption to hypoxic or anoxic niches is particularly fruitful, since it helps us to understand the pathogenicity of C. albicans and promotes the development of better therapy approaches. Details about the st

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Scientists have identified a bone marrow backup system

New research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research has identified a backup for an important biological system — the hematopoietic system, whose adult stem cells constantly replenish the body's blood supply.

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Research confirms nerve cells made from skin cells are a valid lab model for studying disease

Researchers from the Salk Institute, along with collaborators at Stanford University and Baylor College of Medicine, have shown that cells from mice that have been induced to grow into nerve cells using a previously published method have molecular signatures matching neurons that developed naturally in the brain.

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Study examines black mangroves impact on the salt marsh food web

Warmer temperatures are causing more tropical species to move northward. Among these are black mangroves, whose abundance is steadily increasing in the northern Gulf of Mexico. An article published this month, Tropicalization of the barrier islands of the northern Gulf of Mexico: A comparison of herbivory and decomposition rates between smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) and black mangrove (

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Power stations driven by light

The smallest building blocks within the power stations of organisms which get their energy directly from the sun are basically miniature reactors surrounded by collectors which capture photons and forward them to the center. The close correlation between structure and interaction of the components boosts productivity, a strategy which an international team of researchers, including scientists at F

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Fraction of US outpatient treatment centers offer medication for opioid addiction

Despite the mounting death toll of America's opioid crisis, only a minority of facilities that treat substance use disorders offer patients buprenorphine, naltrexone or methadone — the three FDA-approved medications for the long-term management of opioid use disorder, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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29-årige Lotte fik inkontinens efter fødsel: Det er invaliderende

Lotte Frank var fyldt med skam og isolerede sig hjemme, fordi hun i en ung alder ikke kunne holde på vandet.

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Light up logic: Engineers perform computational logic with light

For the first time, researchers performed logic operations — the basis of computation — with a chemical device using electric fields and ultraviolet light. The device and the pioneering methods used open up research possibilities including low-power, high-performance computer chips.

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Multimaterial 3D printing used to develop fast response stiffness-tunable soft actuator

Researchers have designed and fabricated a fast-response, stiffness tunable (FRST) soft actuator which is able to complete a softening-stiffening cycle within 32 seconds.

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Bike share programs show infrequent helmet use, little disparity among neighborhoods

People riding free-floating bike share rentals in Seattle are wearing helmets infrequently, according to a new analysis. Only 20 percent of bike share riders wore helmets in the study, while more than 90 percent of cyclists wore helmets while riding their own bikes. Different research on the free-floating bike share systems showed that bikes were usually available in all Seattle neighborhoods acro

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B-group vitamins can improve concentration among people with first episode psychosis

A new study explored the impact of increasing a person's intake of vitamins B12, B6, and folic acid [vitamin B9] after studies in people with schizophrenia revealed that increased intake of these vitamins could decrease patients' levels of an amino acid called homocysteine and improve their symptoms.

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Dissidents under authoritarian rule: Staying anonymous yet trustworthy

Minority and dissident communities face a perplexing challenge in countries with authoritarian governments. They need to remain anonymous to avoid persecution, but also must establish a trustworthy identity in their communications. An interdisciplinary group of researchers has designed an application to meet both of these requirements.

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Climate Concerns Are Pushing Oil Majors to Look beyond Fossil Fuels

Several companies are diversifying their businesses, from biofuels to electric vehicles — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Spyware That Brought Down El Chapo’s Drug Empire

A pivotal moment in the trial of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, the two-time prison escapee and alleged kingpin of Mexico’s infamous Sinaloa cartel, came when prosecutors played for the jury a phone call between Guzmán and a cartel operative nicknamed Gato. Guzmán, federal prosecutors allege, is overheard in the call directing a cartel member to bribe a commander in the Mexican Federal Police. “Is he

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Doubts about ISO 9001 quality certificates of Chinese companies

A qualitative study carried out by a research group led by the UPV/EHU professor Iñaki Heras-Saizarbitoria, in collaboration with the Université Laval of Quebec, concludes that fake ISO 9001 quality certificates are very widespread across Chinese companies and that the certification processes of the auditing companies lack credibility. Suggestions have also been offered for people in charge of com

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Antihypertension drug losartan may improve treatment of ovarian cancer

A new study from a Massachusetts General Hospital research team has found that the hypertension drug losartan, which targets the angiotensin signaling pathway, may improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy agents used to treat ovarian cancer.

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Differentiating summer and winter rainfall in South Asia around 4.2 ka climatic 'event'

New results point to a 200-year period of abnormally strong winter precipitation between c.4.5-4.3 thousand years ago

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Part-time working mothers with flexible schedules end up doing more work without pay

Flexible schedules cause part-time working mothers to work longer without pay.

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Advances in the study of drugs to combat cognitive impairment in schizophrenia

A study by the UPV/EHU has assessed the effectiveness of various drugs, which are used to delay cognitive deterioration in patients with Alzheimer's, in improving cognitive impairment displayed by patients with schizophrenia. Through an analysis of nine clinical trials carried out worldwide, the researchers have specified a series of methodological improvements in the study of drugs that ensure th

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Pregnancy: Weight gain difficult to influence through lifestyle counseling

If a pregnant woman gains excessive weight, it can pose a problem for both the mother and child. As a solution, regular counseling appointments have been proposed. Based on results with 2286 women, a team of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) in cooperation with the Competence Center for Nutrition (KErn) has now shown that although counseling appointments as part of routine prenatal care can

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Gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9 shown to limit impact of certain parasitic diseases

For the first time, researchers at the George Washington University have successfully used the gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9 to limit the impact of parasitic worms responsible for schistosomiasis and for liver fluke infection, which can cause a diverse spectrum of human disease including bile duct cancer.

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For-profit nursing schools associated with lower performance on nurse licensure test

A new study published today by researchers at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health finds that for-profit ownership of nursing school programs is significantly associated with lower performance on a national nursing licensure exam than public and nonprofit programs.

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11,500-year-old animal bones in Jordan suggest early dogs helped humans hunt

11,500 years ago in what is now northeast Jordan, people began to live alongside dogs and may also have used them for hunting, a new study from the University of Copenhagen shows. The archaeologists suggest that the introduction of dogs as hunting aids may explain the dramatic increase of hares and other small prey in the archaeological remains at the site.

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Kiel physicists discover new effect in the interaction of plasmas with solids

If a plasma comes in contact with a solid, under certain circumstances the surface is changed fundamentally and permanently. A team from Kiel University has now discovered a surprising effect, in which the electronic properties of the solid material, such as its electrical conductivity, can be changed in a controlled, extremely fast and reversible manner, by ion impact. Their results were publishe

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Regulation and potential drug targets of tumor-associated Tregs

Multiple studies indicate that tumour-associated regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a detrimental role in the antitumour immune responses. Decreasing the numbers of Tregs or inhibiting the Treg function will contribute to the antitumour effects. However, it is unclear which molecules of Tregs are suitable targets for tumour immunotherapy with minimal toxic side effects. Here researchers review the re

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Netflix Raises Prices to Stockpile for the Streaming WarsNetflix Prices US Hulu

The company needs more cash for content and global expansion—and it's still cheaper than a lot of streaming services.

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Kanye West donates $10m for James Turrell art installation

Rapper contributes funds to complete long-gestating land art piece in Arizona, having described the work as ‘life-changing’ Kanye West has donated $10m (£7.77m) to the creation of a major work of land art by James Turrell . The money will fund the ongoing construction of Roden Crater in Arizona, which is described on the project’s website as “a controlled environment for the experiencing and cont

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Binding mode of the side-by-side two-IgV molecule CD226/DNAM-1 to its ligand CD155/Necl-5 [Immunology and Inflammation]

Natural killer (NK) cells are important component of innate immunity and also contribute to activating and reshaping the adaptive immune responses. The functions of NK cells are modulated by multiple inhibitory and stimulatory receptors. Among these receptors, the activating receptor CD226 (DNAM-1) mediates NK cell activation via binding to its…

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Microglia are effector cells of CD47-SIRP{alpha} antiphagocytic axis disruption against glioblastoma [Immunology and Inflammation]

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive malignant brain tumor with fatal outcome. Tumor-associated macrophages and microglia (TAMs) have been found to be major tumor-promoting immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. Hence, modulation and reeducation of tumor-associated macrophages and microglia in GBM is considered a promising antitumor strategy. Resident microglia…

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Unregulated antigen-presenting cell activation by T cells breaks self tolerance [Immunology and Inflammation]

T cells proliferate vigorously following acute depletion of CD4+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cells [natural Tregs (nTregs)] and also when naive T cells are transferred to syngeneic, nTreg-deficient Rag1−/− hosts. Here, using mice raised in an antigen-free (AF) environment, we show that proliferation in these two situations is directed to self…

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Rigidification of the Escherichia coli cytoplasm by the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 revealed by superresolution fluorescence microscopy [Microbiology]

Superresolution, single-particle tracking reveals effects of the cationic antimicrobial peptide LL-37 on the Escherichia coli cytoplasm. Seconds after LL-37 penetrates the cytoplasmic membrane, the chromosomal DNA becomes rigidified on a length scale of ∼30 nm, evidenced by the loss of jiggling motion of specific DNA markers. The diffusive motion of…

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Herpes simplex virus 1 ICP8 mutant lacking annealing activity is deficient for viral DNA replication [Microbiology]

Most DNA viruses that use recombination-dependent mechanisms to replicate their DNA encode a single-strand annealing protein (SSAP). The herpes simplex virus (HSV) single-strand DNA binding protein (SSB), ICP8, is the central player in all stages of DNA replication. ICP8 is a classical replicative SSB and interacts physically and/or functionally with…

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Regulation of acetate metabolism and coordination with the TCA cycle via a processed small RNA [Microbiology]

Bacterial regulatory small RNAs act as crucial regulators in central carbon metabolism by modulating translation initiation and degradation of target mRNAs in metabolic pathways. Here, we demonstrate that a noncoding small RNA, SdhX, is produced by RNase E-dependent processing from the 3′UTR of the sdhCDAB-sucABCD operon, encoding enzymes of the…

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Ca2+-activated Cl- current ensures robust and reliable signal amplification in vertebrate olfactory receptor neurons [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Activation of most primary sensory neurons results in transduction currents that are carried by cations. One notable exception is the vertebrate olfactory receptor neuron (ORN), where the transduction current is carried largely by the anion Cl−. However, it remains unclear why ORNs use an anionic current for signal amplification. We…

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Phosphatase PP2A is essential for TH17 differentiation [Immunology and Inflammation]

Phosphatase PP2A expression levels are positively correlated to the clinical severity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and IL17A cytokine overproduction, indicating a potential role of PP2A in controlling TH17 differentiation and inflammation. By generating a mouse strain with ablation of the catalytic subunit α of PP2A in peripheral mature T…

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Dual inhibition of MDM2 and MDM4 in virus-positive Merkel cell carcinoma enhances the p53 response [Microbiology]

Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) contributes to approximately 80% of all Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. MCV-positive MCC expresses small T antigen (ST) and a truncated form of large T antigen (LT) and usually contains wild-type p53 (TP53) and RB (RB1). In contrast, virus-negative…

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Conotoxin {kappa}M-RIIIJ, a tool targeting asymmetric heteromeric Kv1 channels [Neuroscience]

The vast complexity of native heteromeric K+ channels is largely unexplored. Defining the composition and subunit arrangement of individual subunits in native heteromeric K+ channels and establishing their physiological roles is experimentally challenging. Here we systematically explored this “zone of ignorance” in molecular neuroscience. Venom components, such as peptide toxins,…

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Correction for Li et al., Pressure-induced phase transitions and superconductivity in a black phosphorus single crystal [Correction]

PHYSICS Correction for “Pressure-induced phase transitions and superconductivity in a black phosphorus single crystal,” by Xiang Li, Jianping Sun, Prashant Shahi, Miao Gao, Allan H. MacDonald, Yoshiya Uwatoko, Tao Xiang, John B. Goodenough, Jinguang Cheng, and Jianshi Zhou, which was first published September 14, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1810726115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci…

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Correction for Paluck et al., Changing climates of conflict: A social network experiment in 56 schools [Correction]

PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for “Changing climates of conflict: A social network experiment in 56 schools,” by Elizabeth Levy Paluck, Hana Shepherd, and Peter M. Aronow, which was first published January 4, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1514483113 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 113:566–571). The authors note that the following statement should be…

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Correction for Terui et al., Metapopulation stability in branching river networks [Correction]

ECOLOGY Correction for “Metapopulation stability in branching river networks,” by Akira Terui, Nobuo Ishiyama, Hirokazu Urabe, Satoru Ono, Jacques C. Finlay, and Futoshi Nakamura, which was first published June 12, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1800060115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E5963–E5969). The authors wish to note the following: “While extending a theoretical framework…

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Correction for Zella et al., Mycoplasma promotes malignant transformation in vivo, and its DnaK, a bacterial chaperon protein, has broad oncogenic properties [Correction]

MICROBIOLOGY Correction for “Mycoplasma promotes malignant transformation in vivo, and its DnaK, a bacterial chaperon protein, has broad oncogenic properties,” by Davide Zella, Sabrina Curreli, Francesca Benedetti, Selvi Krishnan, Fiorenza Cocchi, Olga S. Latinovic, Frank Denaro, Fabio Romerio, Muhammad Djavani, Man E. Charurat, Joseph L. Bryant, Hervé Tettelin, and Robert…

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Climate change and animal mimicry Hymenopteran insect (Vespula vulgaris) and Syrphidae mimic (Chrysotoxum festivum). Images courtesy of Steven Falk (photographer). Batesian mimics are organisms with traits that imitate poisonous or otherwise dangerous prey, allowing the mimics to evade predators. Christopher Hassall et al. (pp. 929–933) report that climate change-associated seasonal…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences—Its evolution and adaptation [Editorials]

With more than 8,500 journals publishing content deemed worthy of inclusion in Science Citation Index Expanded, the launch of a new journal is not necessarily noteworthy. In fact, the proliferation of open access journals has become problematic, if in no other way than by filling email inboxes of scientists with…

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Reduced emissions through climate damage to the economy [Environmental Sciences]

Today, most global economic production depends on energy produced from burning fossil fuels, which emit carbon dioxide as a byproduct. Although the costs of carbon-free energy such as wind and solar have come down dramatically over recent decades, there are substantial challenges to completely decarbonizing our electricity system, and even…

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Small patches make critical contributions to biodiversity conservation [Ecology]

Vast areas of the earth’s land surface have been altered by human activities such as clearing native vegetation for agriculture and livestock grazing, logging of natural forests, and land conversion for urban settlements (1). These activities have had profound impacts on biodiversity and on key ecosystem processes (e.g., pollination and…

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