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nyheder2019januar17

Human diet causing 'catastrophic' damage to planet: study

The way humanity produces and eats food must radically change to avoid millions of deaths and "catastrophic" damage to the planet, according to a landmark study published Thursday.

8h

Ny rapport: Her er diæten, der redder både krop og klima

Mindre kød og sukker – meget mere grønt: Alle i verden må rette ind, hvis vi både skal redde klima og folkesundhed, konkluderer ny rapport, som 37 forskere har været tre år om at udforme.

6h

Fra depression til angst: En psykisk lidelse fører ofte til flere diagnoser

Halvdelen af dem, der udvikler en depression, før de fylder 20 år, udvikler også angst senere i livet, viser undersøgelse.

11h

Is Cannabis Good or Bad for Mental Health?

The evidence says it can go either way. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4min

How the human brain works during simultaneous interpretation

Researchers at the Centre for Bioelectric Interfaces and the Centre for Cognition & Decision Making of the Higher School of Economics utilized electroencephalogram (EEG) and the event-related potential (ERP) technique to study neural activity during simultaneous interpretation of continuous prose. Using event-related potentials as an index of depth of attention to the sounding fragment, the resear

4min

Researchers race against extinction to uncover tree's cancer-fighting properties

As the population of a fir tree in China dwindles, researchers are racing to replicate its cancer-fighting molecules.

4min

Blister fluid could help diagnose burn severity

Severe burns can leave physical and psychological scars, especially in children. When a burn patient enters the clinic, doctors use factors such as the depth and size of the burn, as well as the time required for skin healing—or re-epithelialization—to determine the best course of treatment. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research have found another, possibly more accurate

4min

Coming soon: A blood test for Alzheimer's disease?

People with symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), such as cognitive difficulties, behavior changes and mood swings, may wait months or even years to get a definitive diagnosis. That's because doctors lack a simple, accurate and inexpensive test for it. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are gettin

4min

Sloths aren't the picky eaters we thought they were

Animals When their favorite food isn't available, they will try something else. The authors of the paper looked at how the availability of different tree species, including those of the genus Cecropia, affected the survival and reproduction rates of…

6min

What are habits?

Have you ever been driving and been so lost in thought that you aren’t even consciously aware of what you are doing? For a well-practiced skill like driving (and especially for a well-practiced commute) you might even find yourself arriving at your destination with little recollection of all the steps you took to make it … Continue reading "What are habits?"

6min

Head and neck cancers spike in 9/11 responders

Researchers have found a significant increase in head and neck cancers among workers and volunteers who responded to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. The study, the first to report on head and neck cancers in WTC first responders, finds a 40 percent increase in diagnosis of these diseases between 2009 and 2012. The study points to newly emerging risks that require ongoing mon

15min

Population study finds striking disparities in health behaviors and screening in Indiana

A population health study from IUPUI and Regenstrief Institute has identified striking socioeconomic and racial disparities in health behavior and in the receipt of cancer screening in the 34 Indiana counties with cancer death rates higher than the state's average.

18min

Reinforcement learning expedites 'tuning' of robotic prosthetics

Researchers have developed an intelligent system for 'tuning' powered prosthetic knees, allowing patients to walk comfortably with the prosthetic device in minutes, rather than the hours necessary if the device is tuned by a trained clinical practitioner. The system is the first to rely solely on reinforcement learning to tune the robotic prosthesis.

18min

Scientists confirm pair of skeletons are from same early hominin species

Separate skeletons suggested to be from different early hominin species are, in fact, from the same species, a team of anthropologists has concluded in a comprehensive analysis of remains first discovered a decade ago.

20min

Eating Red Meat Is Wreaking Havoc on Earth. So, Stop It!

There's a new diet in town, and it offers a two-for-one special: People can help the planet and even live longer … so long as they stop devouring so many burgers, a new report by an international commission finds.

27min

Swimming with sharks

The shark, believed to be one known as Deep Blue, weighs 2.5 tonnes and is nearly 20ft long.

28min

A Second President Falls at Michigan State

John Engler was supposed to be a safe choice. He was a former Michigan governor, an alum of Michigan State University, and in January he was brought in to replace Lou Anna K. Simon who had resigned following the Larry Nassar scandal. He was a Republican, and his board-appointed senior advisor was a Democrat; the board thought that would quell fears of overt partisanship. On Wednesday, Engler, not

32min

Right on target: Light hybrid molecule stop tumor growth in mice

A team of scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS', the Moscow Technological University (MIREA) and the Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University has experimentally proved the effectiveness of the formerly suggested 'light' method in oncotherapy. In a series of laboratory preclinical tests, the tumor growth stopped in 70 percent of mice, treated accordin

40min

Blister fluid could help diagnose burn severity

Severe burns can leave physical and psychological scars, especially in children. When a burn patient enters the clinic, doctors use factors such as the depth and size of the burn, as well as the time required for skin healing–or re-epithelialization–to determine the best course of treatment. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research have found another, possibly more accurat

40min

Scientists from TU Dresden search for new methods to cure neurodegenerative diseases

Behavioural experiments confirm: Additional neurons improve brain function.

40min

How molecules teeter in a laser field

When molecules interact with the oscillating field of a laser, an instantaneous, time-dependent dipole is induced. This very general effect underlies diverse physical phenomena. Now scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) report on an experiment in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, where the dependence of the driven-dipole response on

40min

Global change could also affect hake fisheries in Tierra del Fuego

A new scientific study suggests snoek (Thyrsites atun) can recolonize the marine area of the Beagle Channel and South-Western Atlantic waters, an area in the American continent where this species competed with the hake (Merluccius sp.) to hunt preys in warmer periods. The conclusions open a new scene of potential changes that can affect trophic networks in this marine region due the effect of the

40min

Whole genome sequencing method may speed personalized treatment of drug-resistant infections

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have added to evidence that rapid resistance gene sequencing technology can accurately speed the identification of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria strains that sicken and kill some patients. A report on a proof of concept study, published in the January 2019 issue of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, suggests the technology has the potenti

40min

Russian scientists creating new tools for diagnosing cancer

A group of scientists from Russia's Ural Federal University, headed by Professor Grigory Zyryanov, synthesized a group of multi-purpose fluorophores. The scientists told about the content and results of their research on the unique technology in a respected international scientific journal "Dyes and Pigments".

40min

A new way to transfer energy between cells

Researchers have described a new method for the transmission of electrons between proteins that refutes the evidence from experiments until now. This process, involved in the generation of energy in both animal and plant cells, will permit better understanding of the behavior of proteins in the cells, as well as giving a deeper understanding of the energy dysfunctions that cause diseases.

40min

Scientists confirm pair of skeletons are from same early hominin species

Separate skeletons suggested to be from different early hominin species are, in fact, from the same species, a team of anthropologists has concluded in a comprehensive analysis of remains first discovered a decade ago.

40min

Study highlights lack of fair access to urban green spaces

People with higher incomes and more education tend to have greater access to urban green spaces than their less privileged neighbors, a new University of British Columbia study of parks and greenery in 10 major North American cities has found.

40min

Many hepatitis infections go undiagnosed in cancer patients

Results from the largest study of hepatitis B and C and HIV infection prevalence in cancer patients show an alarmingly high rate of undiagnosed acute and chronic hepatitis B and C. Hepatitis B and C are serious but treatable viral infections that cancer patients should know they have – because these viruses can cause life-threatening complications when certain cancer treatments are used.

40min

New hope for stem cell approach to treating diabetes

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have tweaked the recipe for coaxing human stem cells into insulin-secreting beta cells and shown that the resulting cells are more responsive to fluctuating glucose levels in the blood

40min

Investigation evaluates effects of environmental exposures on neurologic disorders

New systematic approach keys in on environmental mechanisms that contribute to central nervous system inflammation, identifies herbicide linuron as inflammation activator

40min

Scientists generate high-quality human vascular cells through genome editing technology

Scientists from the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Peking University and the Institute of Zoology of CAS have generated the world's first genetically enhanced human vascular cells by targeting a single longevity gene, FOXO3. The findings prove the feasibility of using gene-editing strategies to obtain high-quality, safe human vascular cell grafts and make it poss

40min

Molecular machinery that makes potent antibiotic revealed after decades of research

Scientists at Rutgers and universities in Russia, Poland and England have solved a nearly 30-year mystery — how the molecular machinery works in an enzyme that makes a potent antibiotic. The findings, which appear in the journal Molecular Cell, provide the tools to design new antibiotics, anticancer drugs and other therapeutics.

40min

Individual lichens can have up to three fungi, study shows

Individual lichens may contain up to three different fungi, according to new research from an international team of researchers. This evidence provides new insight into another recent discovery that showed lichen are made up of more than a single fungus and alga, overturning the prevailing theory of more than 150 years.

40min

Scientists accidentally engineer mice with unusually short and long tails

Researchers from two groups studying mouse development have accidentally created mice with unusually long and unusually short tails. Their findings, publishing Jan. 17 in the journal Developmental Cell, offer new insight into some of the key aspects controlling the development of tails in mice and have implications for understanding what happens when developmental pathways go awry.

40min

This computer program makes pharma patents airtight

Routes to making life-saving medications and other pharmaceutical compounds are among the most carefully protected trade secrets in global industry. Building on recent work programming computers to identify synthetic pathways leading to pharmaceutically complex molecules, researchers in Poland and South Korea have unveiled computerized methods to suggest only synthetic strategies that bypass paten

40min

Findings on eye-signal blending re-examines Nobel-winning research

Knowing precisely where the signals meet and the brain processes them is vital to treating amblyopia, or reduced vision in one eye because the brain and eye aren't working together properly.

40min

AI chemist figures out how to legally clone expensive patented drugs

Pharma firms protect their drugs with hundreds of complex patents but an AI called Chematica can find workarounds, which could potentially make drugs cheaper

40min

Emperor penguins' first journey to sea

New research reveals the previously unknown behaviors of juvenile Emperor penguins in their critical early months when they leave their birth colony and first learn how to swim, dive, and find food.

42min

TESS telescope has found eight new planets, six supernovae

The Kepler program closed down in August, 2018, after nine and a half years of observing the universe. Picking up where it left off, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has already found eight planets, three of which scientists are very excited about, and six supernovae. In many ways, TESS is already outperforming Kepler, and researchers expect it to find more than 20,000 exoplanets

48min

How Lichens Explain (And Re-explain) the World

Science is sometimes caricatured as a wholly objective pursuit that allows us to understand the world through the lens of neutral empiricism. But the conclusions that scientists draw from their data, and the very questions they choose to ask, depend on their assumptions about the world, the culture in which they work, and the vocabulary they use. The scientist Toby Spribille once said to me, “We

54min

Local focus could help tackle global problems

People's love for their local areas could be harnessed to tackle global environmental problems, researchers say.

58min

Epigenetics contribute to male and female differences in fear memory

In a mouse model of traumatic memory, male mice recall fear-related memories better than female mice, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry.

1h

The cytoskeleton of neurons has been found to be involved in Alzheimer's disease

A researcher at the UPV/EHU has participated in a study describing what it is during the early stages of Alzheimer's that triggers the loss of dynamics and subsequent impairment of the dendritic spines, the compartments of the neurons responsible for receiving nerve impulses from other neurons. The role played by the actin cytoskeleton of these compartments and how it responds in the presence of b

1h

Local focus could help tackle global problems

People's love for their local areas could be harnessed to tackle global environmental problems, researchers say.

1h

Brain vital signs capture undetected impairments in ice hockey players with concussions

A team of brain researchers have published results from a multi-year hockey concussion study, which tracked young Junior A male ice hockey players using a new brainwave monitoring method called 'brain vital signs.' The study showed that 'brain vital signs' — a breakthrough for analyzing complex brainwave data to provide a simple and objective physiological evaluation of brain function — is more

1h

Molecular machinery that makes potent antibiotic revealed after decades of research

Scientists at Rutgers and universities in Russia, Poland and England have solved a nearly 30-year mystery—how the molecular machinery works in an enzyme that makes a potent antibiotic.

1h

Scientists accidentally engineer mice with unusually short and long tails

Researchers from two groups studying mouse development have accidentally created mice with unusually long and unusually short tails. Their findings, publishing January 17 in the journal Developmental Cell, offer new insight into some of the key aspects controlling the development of tails in mice and have implications for understanding what happens when developmental pathways go awry.

1h

Individual lichens can have up to three fungi, study shows

Individual lichens may contain up to three different fungi, according to new research from an international team of researchers. This evidence provides new insight into another recent discovery that showed lichen are made up of more than a single fungus and alga, overturning the prevailing theory of more than 150 years.

1h

This computer program makes pharma patents airtight

Routes to making life-saving medications and other pharmaceutical compounds are among the most carefully protected trade secrets in global industry. Building on recent work programming computers to identify synthetic pathways leading to pharmaceutically complex molecules, researchers in Poland and South Korea have unveiled computerized methods to suggest only synthetic strategies that bypass paten

1h

DTU-forsker har knækket koden til at fjerne støj fra genopladelige høreapparater

PLUS. Dennis Øland Larsen fra DTU Elektro har fundet en løsning til at anvende genopladelige batterier i høreapparater uden at øge størrelsen eller skabe uønsket støj. Den nye metode til mikrochipdesign kan også bruges til at gøre strømforsyninger mindre uden energitab.

1h

Business this week

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1h

KAL’s cartoon

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1h

Politics this week

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1h

Nanoparticle breakthrough in the fight against cancer

A recent study has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer.

1h

Managerialism in UK schools erodes teachers' mental health and well-being

Performance targets, increased workload, curriculum changes and other bureaucratic changes are eroding teachers' professional identity and harming their mental health, a new study finds.

1h

Penguins, starfish, whales: Which animals will win and lose in a warming Antarctic?

Using risk assessments, like those used for setting occupational safety limits in the workplace, researchers determined the winners and losers of climate change in the Antarctic. They show that marine animals associated with sea ice for food or breeding, such as some whales and penguins, are most at risk from the effects of climate change, while seafloor predators and open-water feeding animals li

1h

More animal species under threat of extinction, new method shows

Currently approximately 600 species might be inaccurately assessed as non-threatened on the Red List of Threatened Species. More than a hundred others that couldn't be assessed before, also appear to be threatened. A new more efficient, systematic and comprehensive approach to assess the extinction risk of animals has shown this.

1h

Mindfulness may ease menopausal symptoms

Mindfulness may be associated with fewer menopausal symptoms for women, according to a new study. Researchers discovered that being mindful may be especially helpful for menopausal women struggling with irritability, anxiety and depression.

1h

Cultivating 4-D tissues—the self-curving cornea

Scientists at Newcastle University have developed a biological system which lets cells form a desired shape by moulding their surrounding material—in the first instance creating a self-curving cornea.

1h

Hjertelæger savner data fra kommunerne

Kommunerne sidder med store mængder information, der vil kunne hjælpe danske hjertepatienter, men data bliver ikke indrapporteret. Kommunerne fik opgaven, men mangler fortsat infrastrukturen, mener formand for hjerteregister.

1h

Svært at få svar på: Vil regionsbosser sætte sig i spidsen for Løkkes prestigeprojekt?

Mindst en regionsformand er klar til at takke ja til jobbet som bestyrelsesformand for en sundhedsforvaltning, som er det organ regeringen ønsker skal erstatte regionerne. De øvrige regionsformænd forekommer mere lunkne.

1h

Trump Isn’t Even Trying to Convince Voters on the Shutdown

A government shutdown that most Americans oppose, on behalf of a border wall that most Americans oppose, may be the logical end point for a president and a political party that appears more and more unconcerned about attracting support from a majority of the public. Trump’s decision to precipitate a government shutdown over his demands for money to build a border wall, and the virtual absence of

1h

Liver hormone quells an overactive metabolism

The liver produces a hormone that tells the body to downshift its metabolism when it is using up too much energy, according to a new study. The finding reveals a potential target for treating metabolic disorders. Our bodies use several systems to maintain precise control of energy homeostasis—balancing the amount of energy we use and the calories we consume. The hormone leptin, for example, signa

1h

Embrace the strange magic of your true self | Casey Gerald

The way we're taught to live has got to change, says author Casey Gerald. Too often, we hide parts of ourselves in order to fit in, win praise, be accepted. But at what cost? In this inspiring talk, Gerald shares the personal sacrifices he made to attain success in the upper echelons of American society — and shows why it's time for us to have the courage to live in the raw, strange magic of ours

1h

Cultivating 4D tissues — the self-curving cornea

Scientists at Newcastle University have developed a biological system which lets cells form a desired shape by molding their surrounding material — in the first instance creating a self-curving cornea. The astonishing video shows the cornea molding itself into a bowl-like structure over the course of 5 days.

1h

Molecules of GM food can accumulate in human digestive tract and enter cells of body

An international group of toxicologists, which includes scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), continues to study the potential risks of genetically modified (GM) products. Scientists have published a review of research papers on the fate of the DNA derived from GM food and feed entering the human body and animals. The article published in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology.

1h

Additive manufacturing reflects fundamental metallurgical principles to create materials

University of Sheffield has been taking a novel approach to the development of engineering components produced using additive manufacturing.

1h

Queen's University researchers develop new test to detect disease and infection

Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have developed a highly innovative new enzyme biomarker test that has the potential to indicate diseases and bacterial contamination saving time, money and possibly lives.

1h

Complex molecules emerge without evolution or design

In biology, folded proteins are responsible for most advanced functions. These complex proteins are the result of evolution or design by scientists. Now, a team of scientists led by University of Groningen Professor of Systems Chemistry, Sijbren Otto, have discovered a new class of complex folding molecules that emerge spontaneously from simple building blocks. The results were published in the Jo

1h

Erucic acid

Erucic acid occurs in vegetable oils and fats. It is a natural component of plant seeds of the Brassicaceae family (crucifers such as rape and mustard). Chemically, it is a long-chain, simple, unsaturated omega-9 fatty acid.

1h

Critic’s Pick: Ansel Adams in a New Light

The National Parks are in partial shutdown. But America’s wilderness shines in a show at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston that reveals how human intervention has changed purple mountains’ majesty.

1h

Proposed engineering method could help make buildings and bridges safer

Researchers discovered that the distance between dislocations in nanolayer interfaces of pearlite can determine how much the material can stretch or contract without breaking (ductility). The dislocations are disruptions in the regular arrangements of atoms in nanolayers. This discovery opens the possibility of engineering materials with higher ductility by simply manipulating the spacing between

1h

Researchers develop new test to detect disease and infection

Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have developed a highly innovative new enzyme biomarker test that has the potential to indicate diseases and bacterial contamination saving time, money and possibly lives.

1h

Ekstreme hedebølger rammer Australien hårdt: Flagermus falder ned fra træerne, og fisk dør i hobetal

Australiens premierminister kalder den seneste hedebølge for en 'ødelæggende naturbegivenhed'.

1h

New survey identifies the social influences in people attending A&E

A survey of 20 disadvantaged neighborhoods across the North West (UK) has revealed the social influences on why people attend their local Accident & Emergency department.

1h

New risk score far more effective for diabetes diagnosis

Researchers at the University of Exeter and the Pacific Northwest Research Institute in Seattle have developed a new risk score which takes into account detailed genetic information known to increase the chances of type 1 diabetes. This could be used to help identity babies at highest risk of developing the condition in the future. The score may also be used at the time of diabetes diagnosis to he

1h

Engineered immune cells target broad range of pediatric solid tumors in mice

Immune cells engineered to attack childhood cancers were able to eradicate different types of pediatric tumors in mice, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine.

1h

Joshua Learn

Contributor Joshua Rapp Learn ( @JoshuaLearn1 ) is an expat Albertan based in Washington, D.C. He reports on science for publications like National Geographic, New Scientist, Smithsonian, Scientific American, Washington Post, The Atlantic, Science and Hakai. Author social media Twitter

1h

Lack of Privacy Could Be Affecting When and Where Japan's Imperial Raccoon Dogs Relieve Themselves

Lack of Privacy Could Be Affecting When and Where Japan's Imperial Raccoon Dogs Relieve Themselves Social behavior of beloved "trickster" dogs may be changing due to human activity. Tanuki_in_field.jpg This tanuki, or raccoon dog, is pictured at Yokota Air Base in Japan Image credits: Credit: U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Michael Dillon Creature Thursday, January 17, 2019 – 09:30 Joshua L

1h

It’s Time to Impeach Trump

Impeachment is a powerful tool. The time to wield it is now, argues the Atlantic senior editor Yoni Appelbaum. In the latest Atlantic Argument , Appelbaum invokes Andrew Johnson’s impeachment in 1868 to make the case for democratically removing President Donald Trump from office. Appelbaum underscores that this measure is not meant to resolve a policy dispute; rather, it is an attempt to rectify

1h

4 factors predict risk of postpartum depression

Four characteristics may offer a way to predict if a woman will experience postpartum depression—and if her symptoms will worsen over the first year after giving birth. Identifying the factors early on could allow earlier treatment and improve chances of a full recovery, say researchers. The four characteristics are: Number of children Ability to function in general life, at work, and in relation

1h

1h

In This Brutal 'Titan Games' Event, Friction Is The Real Winner

Sure, you need big muscles to win the Lunar Impact event in Dwayne Johnson's new reality show. But you won't get anywhere without friction.

1h

Facebook closes hundreds of 'inauthentic' Russia-linked pagesFacebook Russia Sputnik

Facebook announced Thursday that it has removed more than 500 pages, groups and accounts originating in Russia for engaging in what the social network called "coordinated inauthentic behavior."

2h

Apple's Tim Cook calls for privacy bill with right to delete dataApple Tim Cook FTC

Apple chief executive Tim Cook called on US lawmakers Thursday to pass privacy legislation enabling consumers to see and delete their harvested online personal data from a central clearinghouse.

2h

Proposed engineering method could help make buildings and bridges safer

Kanazawa University researchers discovered that the distance between dislocations in nanolayer interfaces of pearlite can determine how much the material can stretch or contract without breaking (ductility). The dislocations are disruptions in the regular arrangements of atoms in nanolayers. This discovery opens the possibility of engineering materials with higher ductility by simply manipulating

2h

A study shows an increase of permafrost temperature at a global scale

Permafrost, is an element of the cryosphere which has not been as much studied as other soils like glaciers or marine ice. Now, for the first time, a review of the state of permafrost on Earth has been carried out thanks to the data analysis of more than 120 drillings distributed around the Arctic and the Antarctica, as well as in mountains and high plains worldwide.

2h

Pressure induced lifshitz transition in the type II Dirac semimetal PtTe2

A recent high pressure study on the type II Dirac Semimetal (DSM) PtTe2 reveals a pressure induced Lifshitz transition in the trivial band structure, while the crystal structure keeps robust under pressure.

2h

Zika and Chikungunya viruses: Diagnostic pitfalls

Millions of people have contracted Zika and chikungunya virus infections since the outbreaks that have been striking Latin America since 2013. Particularly Zika-related malformations in newborns warrant reliable diagnostics. DZIF scientists from the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin demonstrate the problems with the currently available diagnostics, particularly for Zika virus detection, and dev

2h

Two tiny beetle fossils offer evolution and biogeography clues

Recently, an international team led by Dr. CAI Chenyang, from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, reported two new and rare species of the extant family Clambidae from Burmese amber: Acalyptomerus thayerae Cai and Lawrence, 2019, and Sphaerothorax uenoi Cai and Lawrence, 2019. They are important for understanding the early evolution and biogeograp

2h

Forsinket signalprogram forhindrer ekstra togafgange fra Køge Nord

Når Køge Nord station åbner i maj 2019, bliver det med kun to afgange i timen frem mod 2021. Årsagen er både forsinkelsen af Ringsted station og implementeringen af ERTMS-signalprogrammet.

2h

How to digitally secure your smart home

DIY Protect your internet-connected devices. If you've filled your house with internet-connected gadgets, you need to make sure nobody can access them. Here's how to secure your smart home.

2h

New light shed on intensely studied material

The organic polymer PEDOT is probably one of the world's most intensely studied materials. Despite this, researchers have now demonstrated that the material functions in a completely different manner than previously believed. The result has huge significance in many fields of application.

2h

Surgeons find opioids often overprescribed for elbow fractures in children

Opioid drugs prescribed to children for pain relief after a typical pediatric orthopaedic procedure may be significantly overprescribed, according to a new study. The patients used less than 25 percent of the drugs, suggesting a potential risk of opioid diversion.

2h

Sea slug study illuminates how mitochondria move

Your cells have an amazing ability—they can build their own energy factories, called mitochondria. Once built, mitochondria must move where needed in the cell. Defects in mitochondrial transport are a suspected cause of diseases including Alzheimer's, ALS, Huntington's and Parkinson's.

2h

Sundhedsreform giver ingen svar om øget sammenhæng

Ifølge projektchef i Vive Sidsel Vinge, er der flere spørgsmål end svar i regeringens udspil til en ny sundhedsreform. Centralt står spørgsmålet om, hvad der konkret skal skabe sammenhængen i et nyt sundhedsvæsen, mener hun.

2h

Fever boots immune cell trafficking through a thermal sensory Hsp90-α4 integrin pathway

Recently, researchers at the Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with colleagues, demonstrated that fever promotes T lymphocyte trafficking through heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-induced α4 integrin activation and signaling in T cells.

2h

Resist! TAK1 enables endothelial cells to avoid apoptosis

TNFα-induced cell death is tightly regulated and resisted in endothelial cells. Here, an Osaka University-led research team used a unique type of mouse, in which TAK1 could be deleted in specific tissues, to show that TAK1 is an essential component in ensuring survival of endothelial cells during inflammation and injury, and that TAK1 could be a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapy in cancer t

2h

Addressing expected challenges after resumption of HPV vaccination

Researchers at Osaka University present measures for reducing a risk of uterine cervical cancer that increased by the suspension of the Japanese government recommendation for the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and for promoting HPV vaccination after its resumption

2h

Antibiotics still routinely prescribed in the ER for infants with viral lung infections

Despite recommendations first issued more than a decade ago, antibiotics are still routinely prescribed in US emergency rooms for infants with bronchiolitis, a common viral lung infection. The findings highlight a concerning lag in translating evidence-based guidelines into clinical practice and underscore the need to continue educating health care providers and the public about appropriate antibi

2h

Another piece of Ebola virus puzzle: Host and virus protein interaction

A team of researchers have discovered the interaction between an Ebola virus protein and a protein in human cells that may be an important key to unlocking the pathway of replication of the killer disease in human hosts.

2h

Army researchers explore benefits of immersive technology for soldiers

Army researchers are exploring the benefits of immersive technology for warfighters. They have developed a platform to assess this technology called AURORA-MR.

2h

First international consensus on fibromuscular dysplasia

The 'First international consensus on the diagnosis and management of fibromuscular dysplasia' (FMD) has been published online first today in Vascular Medicine and the Journal of Hypertension.

2h

Schizophrenia can be caused by structural abnormality in adolescent brain associated with genetic risk

Schizophrenia could be caused by a genetic mutation that causes a structural abnormality in the brain during adolescence. Therefore testing for the gene SLC39A8, and brain scans for schizophrenia could predict whether or not someone will develop it, researchers have found.

2h

Most parents say hands-on, intensive parenting is best

Most parents say a child-centered, time-intensive approach to parenting is the best way to raise their kids, regardless of education, income or race.

2h

Cellular protein a target for Zika control

A cellular protein that interacts with invading viruses appears to help enable the infection process of the Zika virus, according to researchers who suggest this protein could be a key target in developing new therapies to prevent or treat Zika virus infection.

2h

How to feed a growing population healthy food without ruining the planet

If we're serious about feeding the world's growing population healthy food, and not ruining the planet, we need to get used to a new style of eating. This includes cutting our Western meat and sugar intakes by around 50%, and doubling the amount of nuts, fruits, vegetables and legumes we consume.

2h

In Photos: The Lions of Kenya's Masai Mara

Take a closer look at one of Kenya's most treasured pride of lions.

2h

St Andrews find may be oldest surviving wall chart of periodic table

Chart appears to date from 1885, and was found under lecture hall during clean-out A crumbling roll of canvas-backed paper discovered underneath a lecture theatre in Scotland may be the world’s oldest surviving periodic table chart, experts have said. The chart was found during a clean-out at the University of St Andrews in 2014 and appears to date from 1885 – 16 years after the Russian chemist D

2h

3-D culturing hepatocytes on a liver-on-a-chip device

Liver-on-a-chip cell culture devices are attractive biomimetic models in drug discovery, toxicology and tissue engineering research. To maintain specific liver cell functions on a chip in the lab, adequate cell types and culture conditions must be met, which includes 3D cell orientation and a consistent supply of nutrients and oxygen. Compared with conventional 2D cell culture techniques, organ-on

2h

Afromontane forests and climate change

In the world of paleoecology, little has been known about the historical record of ecosystems in the West African highlands, especially with regard to glacial cycles amidst a shifting climate and their effects on species diversity. It has long been a subject of debate whether stability or instability of tropical forests is responsible for the high levels of species richness found there.

2h

Gut bacteria make key amino acids dispensable, expanding food options for invasive flies

Fruit flies fed antibiotics to suppress their gut microbiome are forced to avoid the best food patches if they lack vital amino acids, according to a new study.

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Molecules 'spin flip' from magnetic to non-magnetic forms dynamically

Solar cells, quantum computing and photodynamic cancer therapy. These all involve molecules switching between magnetic and nonmagnetic forms. Previously this process, called a "spin flip," was thought to occur slowly in most cases. Now, researchers have discovered spin flips happen in one half of one trillionth of a second, or half a picosecond in the course of a chemical reaction. To understand h

2h

Pushing the boundaries of 3D microscopy

Two newly developed methods will help researchers to study the 3D structure of complex surfaces and of individual neurons better than ever before. Technologists report new imaging protocols that will advance neuroscience and (bio)imaging in general.

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Nanoparticle breakthrough in the fight against cancer

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer.

2h

Researchers map out the relationship between mental disorders

Based on register data from 5.9 million people living in Denmark from 2000 to 2016, the study is the most detailed study of comorbidity ever conducted in the field of mental health.

2h

New blood tests for TB could accelerate diagnosis and save the NHS money

Rapid blood tests used by the NHS are unable to rule out tuberculosis (TB) and should be replaced with a new, more accurate test, a study has found.

2h

New light shed on intensely studied material

The organic polymer PEDOT is probably one of the world's most intensely studied materials. Despite this, researchers at Linköping University have now demonstrated that the material functions in a completely different manner than previously believed. The result has huge significance in many fields of application.

2h

Understanding insulators with conducting edges

Insulators that are conducting at their edges hold promise for interesting technological applications. However, until now their characteristics have not been fully understood. Physicists at Goethe University have now modelled what are known as topological insulators with the help of ultracold quantum gases. In the current issue of Physical Review Letters, they demonstrate how the edge states could

2h

HPV vaccination rates remain critically low among younger adolescents in the US

Only about 16 percent of US adolescents have been fully vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) by the time they turn 13, despite national recommendations that call for vaccination at 11 to 12 years of age. Published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, the new findings highlight the need for stronger efforts to encourage HPV vaccination and to improve immunization rates in this key age gr

2h

Multiple sclerosis treatments delay progression of the disease

An international study finds multiple sclerosis treatments have long-term benefits, and that early treatment is important. The Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne-led study is the first to provide evidence that the currently available therapies can delay progression of disability in Multiple Sclerosis. It showed that early treatment — particularly within five years of onset — de

2h

Sea slug study illuminates how mitochondria move

Defects in the transport of cells' energy organelles are a suspected cause of diseases including Alzheimer's, ALS, Huntington's and Parkinson's. A new study reveals the genetics behind mitochondrial shifts.

2h

New PET probe could improve detection of primary and metastatic melanoma

A new nuclear medicine method for detecting malignant melanoma, one of the most aggressive skin cancers, has been successfully tested for the first time in humans and could improve detection of both primary and metastatic melanoma. The research is featured in the January 2019 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

2h

Danske Regioner om reform-regnestykke: Er det et tal, regeringen har trukket i en automat?

Danske Regioner kan slet ikke få regeringens forventning om en gevinst på 1,5 mia. kr. ved at nedlægge regionerne til at hænge sammen. »Jeg kan simpelthen ikke få det tal til at gå op,« siger næstformand Ulla Astman (S).

2h

Morten Ladekarl er ny professor i onkologi

Overlæge Morten Ladekarl er tiltrådt som klinisk professor i onkologi ved Aalborg Universitetshospital.

2h

More animal species under threat of extinction, new method shows

Currently approximately 600 species might be inaccurately assessed as non-threatened on the Red List of Threatened Species. More than a hundred others that couldn't be assessed before, also appear to be threatened. A new more efficient, systematic and comprehensive approach to assess the extinction risk of animals has shown this. The method, designed by Radboud University ecologist Luca Santini an

2h

Why Antarctica's sea ice cover is so low (and no, it's not just about climate change)

Sea ice cover in Antarctica shrank rapidly to a record low in late 2016 and has remained well below average. But what's behind this dramatic melting and low ice cover since?

2h

When good stuff happens to bad people, we care but don’t act

If you’re angry about good things happening to bad people, you aren’t alone—but you probably won’t do much about it, according to new research. The study outlines how people respond to two types of injustices: when bad things happen to good people, and when good things happen to bad people. “When a hurricane happens, we want to help, but we give them 10 bucks. We don’t try to build them a new hou

2h

Soft drinks + hard work + hot weather = possible kidney disease risk

New research suggests that drinking sugary, caffeinated soft drinks while exercising in hot weather may increase the risk of kidney disease. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology–Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

3h

A new hope in treating neurodegenerative disease

Korean researchers have identified the inhibition of autophagy in microglia, brain immune cells. It is expected to help develop treatments for Alzheimer's diseases which occur due to the inhibition of autophagy.

3h

Risk for developing more than one mental health disorder revealed

A new study has revealed the risks behind developing a seconds mental health disorder after an initial diagnosis in the largest and most comprehensive study of comorbidity to date.

3h

Anti-inflammatory compound protects against cancer growth and recurrence

A new anti-inflammatory compound developed at UC Davis acts as a 'surge protector' to suppress inflammation and reduce cancer growth, at least in mouse models of cancer.

3h

Recycling is not enough. Zero-packaging stores show we can kick our plastic addiction

Wrapped, sealed, boxed, cling-filmed and vacuum packed. We have become used to consumables being packaged in every way imaginable.

3h

Artificial intelligence applied to the genome identifies an unknown human ancestor

By combining deep learning algorithms and statistical methods, investigators from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE), the Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG-CRG) of the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and the Institute of Genomics at the University of Tartu have identified, in the genome of Asiatic individuals, the footprint of a new hominid who cross bred with its ancestors t

3h

The Detroit Auto Show Proves Americans Sure Love SUVs

The people want their cars big and gas-powered. The automakers are happy to provide.

3h

Efter millioner af lastbiler: 65 gange er køretøjer væltet på Storebæltsbroen

Siden åbningen af Storebæltsbroen har der i gennemsnit været 3 hændelser årligt, hvor køretøjer er væltet på grund af blæst. Over 1 million lastbiler krydser broen hvert år.

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Coralline red algae have existed for 300 million years longer than previously presumed

Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years—in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. At least this was the established view of palaeontologists all over the world until now. However, this classification will now have to be revised after fossils discovered by researchers at GeoZentrum Nordbayern at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) in c

3h

Ice Age climate caused sediment sourcing in Gulf of Mexico to switch dramatically

The onset of the most recent ice age about 2.6 million years ago changed where the western Gulf of Mexico gets its supply of sediments. The finding adds new insight into how extreme climate change can directly impact fundamental geological processes and how those impacts play out across different environments.

3h

Fleksible rammer for blodsukkeranalyser

Region Hovedstaden ønsker, at nødvendige blodprøver både kan foretages i almen praksis eller på hospitalslaboratorierne – afhængig af den enkelte patients ønske.

3h

Stor bevilling til forskning i genstridig blodkræft hos børn

Overlevelsesraten skal øges og risiko for tilbagefald skal mindskes inden for særligt svær leukæmiform hos børn. Derfor modtager forskningsprojekt støtte på fire mio. kr.

3h

People most against GM food know the least about it

The people who hold the most extreme views against genetically modified foods think they know the most about GMO food science, but actually know the least, according to new research. Researchers asked more than 2,000 US and European adults for their opinions about GM foods. The surveys asked respondents how well they thought they understood genetically modified foods, then tested how much they ac

3h

Soil bacteria found to produce mosquito repelling chemical stronger than DEET

A trio of researchers at the University of Wisconsin has discovered that a common soil bacterium produces a chemical that is more effective in repelling mosquitoes than DEET. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Mayur Kajla, Gregory Barrett-Wilt and Susan Paskewitz describe their search for the chemical made by the bacteria and their hopes for its future.

3h

Researchers led By Georgia State economist find a global tax on carbon may be feasible

There is a consistently high level of public support across nations for a global carbon tax if the tax policy is carefully designed, according to a survey of people in the United States, India, the United Kingdom, South Africa and Australia.

3h

Climate change: How could artificial photosynthesis contribute to limiting global warming?

If CO2 emissions do not fall fast enough, then CO2 will have to be removed from the atmosphere to limit global warming. Not only could planting new forests and biomass contribute to this, but new technologies for artificial photosynthesis as well. Physicists have estimated how much surface area such solutions would require. Although artificial photosynthesis could bind CO2 more efficiently than th

3h

What actually works for muscle recovery—and what doesn’t

Health Knowing which methods don’t help at all is just as important as knowing which ones work. The most painful part of a workout often comes after the exercise itself. The day after a hard run or an intense lifting session, almost everyone feels the pain…

3h

Wasps, cockroaches and crickets are pollinators too

Wasps, cockroaches and crickets are widely disliked, but for a certain species of plant on the Japanese island of Yakushima they play a vital role. While studying the non-photosynthetic Mitrastemon yamamotoi plant, Associate Professor Kenji Suetsugu revealed that these insects were responsible for its pollination. Suetsugu is a member of the Kobe University Graduate School of Science, and these fi

3h

Emperor penguins' first journey to sea

New research by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and colleagues reveals the previously unknown behaviors of juvenile Emperor penguins in their critical early months when they leave their birth colony and first learn how to swim, dive, and find food.

3h

Ny overenskomst sikrer sygeplejersker og bioanalytikere lønstigning i almen praksis

De Praktiserende Lægers Arbejdsgiverforening har indgået aftale om en ny overenskomst for sygeplejersker og bioanalytikere ansat i en lægepraksis, der sikrer lønstigninger de næste år.

3h

It's time for a new way to regulate social media platforms

When it came to our online lives, 2018 was revealing in its dysfunction.

3h

Small Terrapin Outsmarts Young Lion in Wild Video

Who will win this lopsided battle?

3h

Brexit Is Chaos. The Movie About It Is Anything But.

LONDON —Early on in Brexit , Channel 4 and HBO’s almost inappropriately entertaining movie about Britain’s 2016 vote to leave the European Union, we flash back in time to 1975, when ordinary citizens are being interviewed about another historic referendum on Europe. “I don’t really know what I’m voting for,” one voter sheepishly confesses. “I don’t really see what good it’s going to do us,” anoth

3h

Geological fingerprinting of volcanic ash

Volcanic ash consists of tiny particles containing minerals and glass. LMU researchers have now used a new analytical technique based on quantitative chemical analysis under a scanning electron microscope to link their surface composition to activity during volcanic eruptions.

3h

A Rare Kind of Black Hole May Be Wandering Around Our Milky Way

Scientists think that they've spotted a rare, Jupiter-size black hole casually strolling through the Milky Way galaxy.

3h

Did the Vikings Think the Gods Were Watching Them?

The Norse gods weren't babysitting humanity.

3h

Overdose deaths tied to antianxiety drugs like Xanax continue to rise

Benzodiazepines, widely used but addictive drugs to treat anxiety and insomnia, are contributing to a growing number of overdose deaths.

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Image of the Day: Broken Needles

A long-acting contraceptive patch with microscopic needles releases a drug slowly over time.

4h

Emperor penguins' first journey to sea

Emperor penguin chicks hatch into one of Earth's most inhospitable places—the frozen world of Antarctica. Childhood in this environment is harsh and lasts only about five months, when their formerly doting parents leave the fledglings to fend for themselves.

4h

Be Careful Using Bots on Telegram

Introducing a bot to a secure Telegram conversation downgrades the level of encryption—without providing any visual cues.

4h

2 Food Processors Tested: Breville, Cuisinart

Even if your knife skills are solid, a food processor is still faster and more convenient for bigger projects.

4h

Heat Waves Are Causing Mass Fish Deaths in Australia

Drought conditions and poor water management have contributed to the events — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Preparing for extreme weather

From high winds and heavy rainfall to droughts and plummeting temperatures, people in Europe have already begun to feel the effects of extreme weather. As we get used to this new reality, scientists are investigating how it will affect how we get around and whether our infrastructure can cope.

4h

TIC-TOC technology moves Tactile Internet a step closer to reality

Researchers in South Korea have developed extremely fast information processing technologies that can help usher in the next generation of the Internet. Researchers at the Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) in South Korea have developed technology capable of sending packets of digital information at 25 Gb/s (gigabits per second) – 10 times faster than currently available

4h

Cotton and rice have an important place in the Murray Darling Basin

The widespread deaths of fish in the Darling River – with more predicted to come – has raised serious questions about the allocation of water between agriculture and the environment. Water-hungry crops like cotton and rice are also raising eyebrows: are they worth growing in the Murray Darling Basin?

4h

DNA analyses show a dynamic coevolutionary relationship between birds and their feather mites

A genetic study uncovers that birds maintain a dynamic coevolutionary relationship with their feather mites. The study has involved the participation of the Estación Biológica de Doñana from the CSIC, and its results have just been published in the journal Molecular Ecology.

4h

Opal-Filled Fossils Reveal Timid, Dog-Size Dinosaur That Lived Down Under

When Mike Poben, an opal buyer and and fossil fanatic, bought a bucket of opal from an Australian mine, he was surprised to find to find what looked like an ancient tooth in the pile.

4h

Anti-Vaccine Movement Joins Ebola, Drug Resistance on List of Top Global Threats

The World Health Organization has listed the anti-vaccine movement as a top global health threat in 2019.

4h

The Day Edwin Hubble Realized Our Universe Was Expanding

It's the 90th anniversary of Edwin Hubble's discovery.

4h

New scale for electronegativity rewrites the chemistry textbook

Electronegativity is one of the most well-known models for explaining why chemical reactions occur. Now, Martin Rahm from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has redefined the concept with a new, more comprehensive scale. His work, undertaken with colleagues including a Nobel Prize-winner, has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

4h

Global leaders warn of ecological collapse and technological meltdown

The top five global threats are all now either environmental or technological, according to a World Economic Forum survey of business and political leaders

4h

We've seen methane rain gleaming on the icy plains of Titan

Images from the Cassini spacecraft have revealed the rainy season near the north pole of Saturn's moon Titan – and it's pretty weird

4h

What It’s Like to Visit an Existential Therapist

If you ever find yourself sinking into the plush blue couch of Dr. Jane Prelinger, you should know that she doesn’t want you to call her Dr. Prelinger. In her office, even when you’re on the couch and she’s facing you from her chair, looking at you through heavy eyeliner and the frame of her white-blond bangs, she insists: You’re just two humans. “It’s Faith and Jane,” she told me when I was in t

4h

Huawei's Many Troubles: Bans, Alleged Spies, and Backdoors

Its execs have been arrested. Its gear is banned in places. And countries are reconsidering relationships with the company. How much trouble is Huawei really in?

4h

Pingvinerne dør, mens ormene trives: Klimaforandringer truer Sydpolens dyreliv

Når isen på Antarktis svinder, ændres fødekæden.

5h

Forsker-kolleger med hård kritik: Aarhus-forskere hvidvaskede regeringens landsbrugspakke

PLUS. Forskere fra Aarhus Universitet svigtede videnskaben, lyder kritikken fra kolleger på Københavns Universitet.

5h

Why CERN's plans for a €20 billion supersized collider are a bad idea

The research potential of a proposed massive particle smasher that would dwarf the Large Hadron Collider doesn’t justify its huge price tag, says Sabine Hossenfelder

5h

Bitter Reality: Most Wild Coffee Species Risk Extinction Worldwide

Researchers surveyed the world’s 124 coffee species and found more than half are threatened — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

World's oldest periodic table chart found in St Andrews

A periodic table chart discovered at the University of St Andrews is thought to be the oldest in the world.

5h

New study quantifies deep reaction behind 'superdeep' diamonds

Whether they are found in an engagement ring or an antique necklace, diamonds usually generate quick reactions from their recipients. Now, new research shows deep inside the Earth, fast reactions between subducted tectonic plates and the mantle at specific depths may be responsible for generating the most valuable diamonds.

5h

Japan's Hitachi freezes British nuclear project

Hitachi said Thursday it would freeze construction of its stalled nuclear power station in Wales due to financing problems, a blow to Britain's nuclear strategy and a costly decision for the Japanese firm.

5h

Mindfulness may ease menopausal symptoms

Mindfulness may be associated with fewer menopausal symptoms for women, according to a Mayo Clinic study recently published in Climacteric: The Journal of the International Menopause Society. Researchers discovered that being mindful may be especially helpful for menopausal women struggling with irritability, anxiety and depression.

5h

India gives Volkswagen 24 hours to pay Dieselgate fine

India's environmental court Thursday threatened Volkswagen executives with arrest and gave the German automaker a day to pay $14 million for violating pollution norms by fudging emission tests.

5h

Siemens, Alstom raise doubts about mega merger

Confidence that the politically sensitive merger of their rail businesses would be waved through by the European Commission was ebbing at both Siemens and Alstom Thursday.

5h

Robots can go all the way to Mars but they can't pick up the groceriesJeff Bezos Amazon MARS

Cambridge researchers are studying the interaction between robots and humans – and teaching them how to do the very difficult things that we find easy.

5h

China's moon cotton experiment ends in freezing lunar night

A cotton seedling that sprouted on the moon has been left to die as China's historic lunar lander continues a freezing night-time nap that will last as long as two earth weeks, scientists said.

5h

Biochar can be tailor-made for range of environmental benefits, research shows

A low-cost, versatile type of charcoal known as biochar can be tailored for specific uses including treating water, removing contaminants from soil and even storing carbon, according to new research by University of Alberta scientists.

5h

Found: A precise method for determining how waves and particles affect fusion reactions

Like surfers catching ocean waves, particles within the hot, electrically charged state of matter known as plasma can ride waves that oscillate through the plasma during experiments to investigate the production of fusion energy. The oscillations can displace the particles so far that they escape from the doughnut-shaped tokamak that houses the experiments, cooling the plasma and making fusion rea

5h

New paper indicates potential for primitive life on icy Barnard b super-earth planet if geothermal activity exists

Barnard b (or GJ 699 b) is a recently discovered Super-Earth planet orbiting Barnard's Star, making it the second nearest star system to the Earth. Although likely cold (-170 degrees centigrade), it could still have the potential to harbor primitive life if it has a large, hot iron/nickel core and enhanced geothermal activity. That was a conclusion announced by Villanova University Astrophysicists

5h

Is Ancient DNA Research Revealing New Truths — or Falling Into Old Traps?

Geneticists have begun using old bones to make sweeping claims about the distant past. But their revisions to the human story are making some scholars of prehistory uneasy.

5h

How to Think About the Costs of Climate Change

Many of the big economic questions in coming decades will come down to just how extreme the weather will be, and how to value the future versus the present.

5h

Democratic Operatives Are Building Beto O’Rourke’s Campaign Without Him

He’s running—or they hope he is, and for now at least, they’ll settle for a shot of him running in a new web video they’re putting out Thursday to try to drum up support and convince Beto O’Rourke that the movement is really there, waiting for him. Out of a shared office space in Brooklyn and through a network of phone calls and emails, political operatives behind a group called Draft Beto have r

5h

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Has the Better Tax Argument

When Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez suggested this month that the United States should tax income over $10 million by 70 percent, it galvanized something unusual: a broad and substantive national conversation about the design and purpose of federal tax policy. No, I’m just kidding. It kicked off a lot of screaming about socialism , especially on cable news . From the cacophony of communist callouts, ho

5h

James Blake’s Ether Becomes Mush

“My brother and my sister don’t speak to me, but I don’t blame them,” James Blake sang on loop for 2011’s “I Never Learnt to Share, ” a defining moment in one of the 21st century’s most improbably important music careers. It was an evocative bit of poetry (what did you do at playtime, James Blake?) that, he said , was mostly selected for how it sounded rather than what it said. As keyboards wiggl

5h

Wealth inequality is literally killing us. The economy should work for everyone.

Economic hardship is linked to physical and psychological illness, resulting in added healthcare expenses people can't afford. The gig economy – think Uber, Lyft, TaskRabbit, Handy – is marketed as a 'be your own boss' revolution, but it can be dehumanizing and dangerous; every worker is disposable. The cooperative business model can help reverse wealth inequality. Squeezed: Why Our Families Can'

5h

How Trump Could Wind up Making Globalism Great Again

OK, so it was never great in the first place. But the rise of rank nationalists could finally—perversely—spark an era of progress and cooperation for all humanity.

5h

To Prevent Wildfires, Treat Utilities Like Railroad Barons

PG&E’s electrical equipment likely caused California’s massive Camp Fire. That’s particularly maddening because science knows full well how to stop that.

5h

Tidying Up When We Have No Control over Our Digital Lives

Never-ending notifications. Pull-to-refresh rewards. There's no escape from surveillance capitalism.

5h

This rediscovered Bolivian frog species survived deadly chytrid fungus

Scientists recently rediscovered a frog species in Bolivia that hasn’t been seen in 10 years — and it could be used to better understand a frog-killing fungus.

6h

Physicists show quantum materials can be tuned for superconductivity

Some iron-based superconductors could benefit from a tuneup, according to two studies by Rice University physicists and collaborators.

6h

How realistic are China's plans to build a research station on the Moon?

The world is still celebrating the historic landing of China's Chang'e-4 on the dark side of the moon on January 3. This week, China announced its plans to follow up with three more lunar missions, laying the groundwork for a lunar base.

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Rational thinking is saving antibiotics – it could work on Brexit too

The turning of the tide in the fight against bacterial resistance to antibiotics shows the benefits of clear thinking and leadership, and it could work for Brexit too

6h

Kommuner og skoler skal ikke længere have adgang til elevers trivselsmålinger

Undervisningsministeriet: Bred enighed om at sikre elevers oplysninger bedre i trivselsmålinger.

6h

Applying physics to energy-efficient building design

Developing a perfectly energy-efficient building is relatively easy to do—if you don't give the building's occupants any control over their environment. Since nobody wants that kind of building, Professor Christoph Reinhart has focused his career on finding ways to make buildings more energy-efficient while keeping user needs in mind.

6h

Study finds simple explanation for endurance of religion

Childcare can be expensive, stressful, and annoying to organise, but a University of Otago-led study has found it may also be behind religion's resilience.

6h

Why do egg whites turn white when you cook them?

When you crack open a raw egg, the egg white isn't white at all—it's more like a clear jelly. So why does it turn white when you cook it? Does that make it safe to eat? And what about egg yolks?

6h

Researchers find 2-D transition metal carbides react with water, opening a door to their unknown chemistry

Researchers at Missouri S&T have discovered that two-dimensional (2-D) titanium carbide materials, or MXenes, can react with water with no other oxidizers involved. Their finding may lead to new insights into the unusual chemistry of MXenes and consequently have impacts on MXenes' storage and device manufacturing.

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Study: Social media sways exercise motivation

It's January – a time when students are looking for that extra bit of oomph. For some, time spent on social media might provide the necessary inspiration to get up and exercising – but that time can come with consequences, according to a recent Western-led study.

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Wake up and smell the coffee: Research shows freezing beans can preserve aroma

Andrew Cotter's day does not begin until he's had his "cup of Joe," a ritual he takes seriously as one of a growing group of coffee consumers who grind and brew specialty coffee beans at home for a more flavorful and fragrant experience.

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We’d have more quantum computers if it weren’t so hard to find the damn cables

Quantum machines will deliver the next great leap forward in computing, but researchers building them can’t easily get some of the exotic components they need.

6h

Bee-killing mite isn't a vampire after all

Varroa mites may be mighty small – about the size of the head of a pin – but the parasites are a primary cause of colony collapse disorder, a large problem for honey bee populations worldwide. A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences today debunks the long-held belief that the mites feed on "bee blood" – AKA hemolymph.

6h

Researchers using data-driven approach to make earthquakes less damaging

The 1994 Northridge earthquake was one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history. Fifty-seven people died, more than 8,700 were injured, and property damages amounted to billions of dollars. In the 25 years since the 6.7 quake shook Southern California at 4:30 a.m. on Jan.17—collapsing buildings, bridges and freeways—what have we learned?

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Himalaya er plaget af to former for jordskælv – og et nyt kan være undervejs

Ny model viser, at området i Himalaya, hvor der i 2015 blev udløst et stort jordskælv, er i højrisikozonen for et enormt jordskælv med styrke over 8.

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Researchers uncover a group of introns in yeast that possess surprising stability and function

A research team from Whitehead Institute has uncovered a surprising and previously unrecognized role for introns, the parts of genes that lack the instructions for making proteins and are typically cut away and rapidly destroyed. Through studies of baker's yeast, the researchers identified a highly unusual group of introns that linger and accumulate, in their fully intact form, long after they hav

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Fruit fly promiscuity alters the evolutionary forces on males

Researchers in the Department of Zoology at Oxford University have demonstrated for the first time what effect female fruit flies having multiple partners has on sexual selection — before and after mating. Sexual selection is the branch of natural selection concerned with obtaining mates and fertility, rather than survival.

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Study finds dangerous increases in patients mixing opioids, benzodiazepines or Z-drugs

The number of Americans taking a dangerous combination of both opioids and benzodiazepines — a group of drugs commonly prescribed for pain, insomnia and anxiety — increased by 250 percent over a 15-year period, while there was an 850 percent increase in patients taking benzodiazepines and so-called Z-drugs, according to a new study published in the journal Sleep.

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Penguins, starfish, whales: Which animals will win and lose in a warming Antarctic?

Using risk assessments, like those used for setting occupational safety limits in the workplace, researchers determined the winners and losers of climate change in the Antarctic. They show that marine animals associated with sea ice for food or breeding, such as some whales and penguins, are most at risk from the effects of climate change, while seafloor predators and open-water feeding animals li

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Songwriter AI emulates the Beatles with a little help from its friends

Many songwriters have honed their skills listening to the Beatles. Now AI has done the same by learning to write pop songs that mimic their style

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Penguins, starfish, whales: Which animals will win and lose in a warming Antarctic?

Marine Antarctic animals closely associated with sea ice for food or breeding, such the humpback whale and emperor penguin, are most at risk from the predicted effects of climate change, finds a new study published in Frontiers in Marine Science. Using risk assessments like those used for setting occupational safety limits in the workplace, scientists from the British Antarctic Survey determined t

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Fruit fly promiscuity alters the evolutionary forces on males

Results, published in Nature Communications, have shown that the nature of the evolutionary forces which act on male fruit flies depend on how many mates a females has.

7h

Zirconium isotope a master at neutron capture

The probability that a nucleus will absorb a neutron is important to many areas of nuclear science, including the production of elements in the cosmos, reactor performance, nuclear medicine and defense applications.

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VIDEO: Skal Svanemølleværket være museum? Kom med indenfor

Det ikoniske fjernvarmeværk i Københavns Nordhavn skal måske omdannes til teknisk museum. Vi kiggede indenfor og fik driftskoordinator Jens Philip Møller til at vise rundt og fortælle, hvordan værket arbejder i dag.

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#55 Pumpet fuld af bas

Neurolog Peter Michael Lausten Nielsen har opfundet en behandling, der kan dulme smerter ved at pumpe kroppen fuld af bas.

8h

More animal species under threat of extinction, new method shows

Currently approximately 600 species might be inaccurately assessed as non-threatened on the Red List of Threatened Species. More than a hundred others that couldn't be assessed before, also appear to be threatened. A new more efficient, systematic and comprehensive approach to assess the extinction risk of animals has shown this. The method, designed by Radboud University ecologist Luca Santini an

8h

Mathematician’s record-beating formula can generate 50 prime numbers

Figuring out the pattern of the primes is one of the long-standing mysteries of maths, and now there is a way to spit some out on demand

8h

Airbus boosts US footprint with new A220 plant in Alabama

European aircraft manufacturer Airbus on Wednesday broke ground on its second assembly line in the southern US state of Alabama, where it plans to build its small A220 jets, as it seeks to swipe market share from rival Boeing.

8h

Frøæg hjælper forskere til at forstå reparation af DNA-skader

Når DNA bliver kopieret, hvilket sker hver gang en celle bliver delt, udløser det samtidig…

8h

Battle lines forming ahead of a looming US privacy law fight

Consumer advocates and the data-hungry technology industry are drawing early battle lines in advance of an expected fight this year over what kind of federal privacy law the U.S. should have.

8h

Volcano in southern Japan erupts; no injuries or damage

A small island volcano in southern Japan erupted Thursday, blasting rocks and ashes into the air but causing no damage or injuries.

8h

Government shutdown taking toll on wildfire preparations

Just two months after a wildfire wiped out Paradise, California, officials are gearing up for this year's fire season and fear the government shutdown could make it even more difficult than one of the worst in history.

8h

Managerialism in UK schools erodes teachers' mental health and well-being

Performance targets, increased workload, curriculum changes and other bureaucratic changes are eroding teachers' professional identity and harming their mental health, a new study in Educational Review finds.

8h

Ice Age climate caused sediment sourcing 180 in Gulf of Mexico

The onset of the most recent ice age about 2.6 million years ago changed where the western Gulf of Mexico gets its supply of sediments. The finding adds new insight into how extreme climate change can directly impact fundamental geological processes and how those impacts play out across different environments.

8h

DNA analyses show a dynamic coevolutionary relationship between birds and their feather mites

A genetic study uncovers that birds maintain a dynamic coevolutionary relationship with their feather mites. The study has involved the participation of the Estación Biológica de Doñana from the CSIC, and its results have just been published in the journal Molecular Ecology.

9h

Patient groups assessing NHS drugs receive undeclared industry funds

Study calls for rules to be tightened over disclosure of money received from drug makers Most patient groups involved in the appraisal of drugs or medical devices for use in the NHS have received money from the manufacturers that they have not declared, research has found. Patient groups are asked to give their views when the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) is deciding wh

9h

It-konsulent: Ofte sniger cloud sig ind i virksomheder ad bagvejen

Det er svært at skabe en strategi for sky-produkter, for udbuddet ændrer sig hele tiden. Men når det handler om sikkerhed er det vigtigt at have fat i tøjlerne.

10h

Sikkerhedsfirma: Hackere står i kø for at angribe forbundne biler

En honeypot udformet som en forbundet bil har modtaget op mod 300.000 angreb på en måned. Sikkerhedsvirksomheden bag advarer om kreative og vedholdende hackere der fokuserer på nye softwaresystemer i biler

10h

“Right to try” laws create tremendous legal uncertainties; FDA expanded access preferable

The Goldwater Institute and the Kochs pushed "right to try" laws in an attempt to get rid of FDA oversight of access to investigational drugs. Instead, they created tremendous legal uncertainties, making the FDA's expanded access program preferable for all.

11h

Measuring AI's ability to learn is difficult

Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.

11h

World Trade Center responders at increased risk for head and neck cancers

A Rutgers study has found a significant increase in head and neck cancers among workers and volunteers who responded to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC), pointing to newly emerging risks that require ongoing monitoring and treatment of those who were exposed during the initial response.

11h

Rutgers scientist identifies gene responsible for spread of prostate cancer

A recent study has found that a specific gene in cancerous prostate tumors indicates when patients are at high-risk for the cancer to spread, suggesting that targeting this gene can help patients live longer.

11h

New scale for electronegativity rewrites the chemistry textbook

Electronegativity is one of the most well-known models for explaining why chemical reactions occur. Now, Martin Rahm from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has redefined the concept with a new, more comprehensive scale. His work, undertaken with colleagues including a Nobel Prize-winner, has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

11h

Another piece of Ebola virus puzzle identified

A team of researchers have discovered the interaction between an Ebola virus protein and a protein in human cells that may be an important key to unlocking the pathway of replication of the killer disease in human hosts. Scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute were part of a nationwide collaborative with scientists at Gladstone Institutes, UC San Francisco and Georgia State University fo

11h

Higher suicide rates evident among youth certain groups of Medicaid enrollees

According to a new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, nearly four in ten of all youth who died by suicide in 16 states between 2009 and 2013 were Medicaid enrollees.

11h

Financial stress linked to heart disease risk among African Americans

African Americans who experienced moderate to high financial stress had an increased risk of developing heart disease compared to those who did not report such stress, according to a longitudinal study performed by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital.

11h

BU: US youth suicides more prevalent in states with higher gun ownership

A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds that states with higher levels of household gun ownership also have higher overall youth suicide rates, with every 10 percentage-point increase in household gun ownership associated with a 26.9 percent increase in the youth suicide rate.

11h

Antibiotics still routinely prescribed in the ER for infants with viral lung infections

Despite recommendations first issued more than a decade ago, antibiotics are still routinely prescribed in US emergency rooms for infants with bronchiolitis, a common viral lung infection. Published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, the findings highlight a concerning lag in translating evidence-based guidelines into clinical practice and underscore the need to continue

11h

Tre gange så dyrt: Flytning af Lynetten koster mere end øerne, den skal flyttes til

Flytningen af Lynetten blev præsenteret som en mindre del af Holmene-projektet ud for Avedøre, men økonomisk set kan den blive en kæmpepost.

12h

Impeach Donald Trump

O n January 20, 2017, Donald Trump stood on the steps of the Capitol, raised his right hand, and solemnly swore to faithfully execute the office of president of the United States and, to the best of his ability, to preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States. He has not kept that promise. [ Impeachment: An argument ] Instead, he has mounted a concerted challenge to the sep

12h

Impeachment: An Argument

I n the March 1976 issue of The Atlantic , Elliot Richardson, the former attorney general, made a silver-lining argument about the then-recent constitutional crisis: Beyond its own sordid confines, Watergate has been redemptive—a disguised stroke of good fortune … The good fortune may yet turn to ashes, but I am one of those whom H. L. Mencken called the “optimists and chronic hopers of the world

12h

US plans new space sensors for missile defence against 'rogue states'

Trump likely to present Pentagon findings about changing threat as justification for his planned ‘space force’ Donald Trump will unveil a plan on Thursday for a major expansion in US missile defence that will rely on a new generation of space-based sensors. The administration’s long-delayed missile defence review , which the president will present at the Pentagon, will call for the expansion of t

14h

Study investigates socioeconomic disparities in nitrate levels in US drinking water

The first nationwide investigation of potential socioeconomic disparities in nitrate concentrations in US drinking water is reported in the open access journal Environmental Health. The authors, from Silent Spring Institute, USA, note that understanding the extent of current exposures — particularly among vulnerable communities — is critical for developing effective strategies to reduce exposure

15h

An Astonishing 773 Million Records Exposed in Monster Breach

Collection #1 appears to be the biggest public breach yet, with millions of unique passwords sitting out in the open.

15h

World's coffee under threat, say experts

Of 124 coffees in the world, we only drink two, but we need to protect all of them, say scientists.

16h

New Diet Guidelines to Benefit People and the Planet: More Greens for All, Less Meat for Some

A report in the medical journal The Lancet recommends cutting food waste and consumption of red meat, especially among people who eat a lot of it.

16h

The Atlantic Daily: The 2020 Census Citizenship Question Isn’t Dead Yet

What We’re Following A federal judge threw a wrench in the Trump administration’s plans to add a citizenship question to the 2020 U.S. census , declaring that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross violated federal law by providing the public with false rationales on its inclusion. Groups suspicious of the question have long fretted that it could lead undocumented immigrants to forgo filling out the cens

16h

Immune cell clues offer hope to hypertension patients, study suggests

Scientists have pinpointed cells in the immune system that could be key to tackling high blood pressure. The findings also shed light on current medications that could increase risk of the disorder, which affects more than 12 million people in the UK.

16h

Parents' break-up more likely to harm mental health of children aged seven to 14

Research shows a 16% rise in emotional problems and 8% rise in conduct disorders Parental separation is more likely to harm the mental health of children if they are aged at least seven when the split occurs, but appears to have no effect on the risks of them getting ill if they are younger, research has found. The research, involving 6,245 children and young people in the UK, is the first Britis

16h

A New Role for Yeast Introns: Helping Cells Cope Under Stress

Two studies contest the idea that the noncoding sequences are just "junk DNA," demonstrating that they play important roles in the regulation of cell growth.

17h

Only 13 percent of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions considered appropriate

Only 13 percent of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions are considered appropriate and 36 percent considered potentially appropriate, according to a new study from Northwestern Medicine, the University of Michigan and Harvard University's Brigham and Women's Hospital.The study provides the most extensive assessment of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions to date and demonstrates the scale of inappro

17h

Nearly a quarter of antibiotic prescriptions for children and adults may be unnecessary

One in 10 children and about one in six adults with private insurance received antibiotics they didn't need at least once in 2016, a new Michigan Medicine study suggests.

17h

Common genetic disorder linked to more disease than previously thought

The most common genetic disorder in people from northern Europe is associated with substantially higher levels of disease than previously thought, despite being easy to detect and treat, finds a study published in The BMJ today.

17h

The Lancet: Diet and food production must radically change to improve health and avoid potentially catastrophic damage to the planet

Transformation of the global food system is urgently needed as more than 3 billion people are malnourished (including people who are undernourished and overnourished), and food production is exceeding planetary boundaries — driving climate change, biodiversity loss, pollution due to over-application of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers, and unsustainable changes in water and land use

17h

Almost a quarter of antibiotic prescriptions in the US are inappropriate

Almost of quarter of antibiotic prescriptions claimed by privately insured outpatients in the US are inappropriate, reveals a study of over 19 million patients published in The BMJ today.

17h

Study reveals financial interests of patient organizations assessing NHS treatments

More than two thirds of patient organizations involved in assessing treatments for NHS use received funding from the maker(s) or a competitor of that treatment, yet decision makers were aware of less than a quarter of these interests, finds a review in The BMJ today.

17h

Common gene disorder causes serious 'stealth' disease, but could be easily treated

The western world's most common genetic disorder is a 'stealth condition' that causes far higher levels of serious disease and disability than previously thought, despite being easy to detect and treat.

17h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Date of the Union

What We’re Following Today It’s Wednesday, January 16. The partial government shutdown is now in its 26th day. Speaker Nancy Pelosi has asked that President Donald Trump postpone—or deliver in writing—his State of the Union address, which is scheduled for January 29, saying that because of security concerns, it would be better to wait until after the government is reopened. The White House has no

17h

Ants Stick to Cliques to Dodge Disease

Ants infected with fungal pathogens steer clear of other cliques within the colony—avoiding wider infection, and allowing for a sort of immunity. Lucy Huang reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Protecting oligodendrocytes may reduce the impact of multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating inflammatory disorder in which autoreactive T cells migrate into the central nervous tissue and damage oligodendrocytes and myelin, which protect nerve cells. Sephin1 prolongs a cytoprotective response in oligodendrocytes, protecting those cells and myelin from this inflammatory attack. It dampens central nervous system inflammation, limits myelin damage and r

17h

Ocean warming is making waves stronger—and that's a problem

Environment The first systematic analysis of world wave energy spelled trouble for coastal communities. Ocean waves are growing stronger, which could pose a problem for coastal communities already threatened by climate change.

17h

Trilobites: Watch These Stink Bugs Hatch in Unison

In terrifying synchrony, baby stink bugs all but explode to life.

17h

New yeast model of metabolic disorders may lead to life-saving therapies

A new study suggests that the role of yeast, the world's most basic eukaryotic unicellular organism, may pave the way for the development of novel, more effective therapies for congenital diseases.

18h

From emergence to eruption: Comprehensive model captures life of a solar flare

A team of scientists has, for the first time, used a single, cohesive computer model to simulate the entire life cycle of a solar flare: from the buildup of energy thousands of kilometers below the solar surface, to the emergence of tangled magnetic field lines, to the explosive release of energy in a brilliant flash.

18h

Vampire bat venom could hold key to new medical treatments

Vampire bats could hold the key to new treatments for a range of serious medical problems, but researchers have hit a snag accessing the specimens needed to advance their work. Now scientists have found a new class of blood pressure-regulating peptides in the venom of the common vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata).

18h

Those Tiny Cotton Sprouts China Grew on the Moon? They’re Dead Now

China managed to grow some tiny cotton sprouts on the moon, but it killed them. Here's how.

18h

Gillette's Ad Proves the Definition of a Good Man Has Changed

Despite the backlash, the fact that the Gillette ad exists at all is an undeniable sign of progress.

18h

Artificial intelligence made this robot dog a very good boy

Technology The robot's "brain" actually learned in a simulator. ANYmal is a four-legged robot that researchers trained using AI.

18h

Experimental treatment approach shows potential against Staphylococcus aureus

A new class of engineered proteins may counter infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus — a bacterial species considered one of the largest global health threats, a new study suggests.

18h

Ice Age climate caused sediment sourcing 180 in Gulf of Mexico

The onset of the most recent ice age about 2.6 million years ago changed where the western Gulf of Mexico gets its supply of sediments. The finding adds new insight into how extreme climate change can directly impact fundamental geological processes and how those impacts play out across different environments.

18h

Millennials Stare Into the Void, and Gillette Stares Back

On Monday, the men’s shaving brand Gillette released a new commercial and social-responsibility initiative, and the internet had some feedback. The ad, which shifts Gillette’s longtime tagline from “The Best a Man Can Get” to “The Best Men Can Be,” is intended to mark the brand’s 30th anniversary and reflect on the masculine ideals the razor purveyor has endorsed in the past and will demonstrate

18h

Yandex's Self-Driving CES Demo Comes Without a Human Backup

The "Google of Russia" showed up in Vegas with a bold and daring demonstration of what a Moscow-trained robot Moscow can do.

18h

Wearable sensor can detect hidden anxiety, depression in young children

Anxiety and depression in young children are hard to detect and often go untreated, potentially leading to anxiety disorders and increased risk of suicide and drug abuse later. In a new study, researchers showed a wearable sensor detected these 'internalizing disorders' in children with 81 percent accuracy, reducing to 20 seconds what would take clinicians months to diagnose, opening the door to i

18h

Marine mammals and sea turtles recovering after Endangered Species Act protection

More than three-quarters of marine mammal and sea turtle populations have significantly increased after listing of the US Endangered Species Act (ESA), according to a new study.

18h

Researchers rescue photoreceptors, prevent blindness in animal models of age-related macular degeneration

Using a novel patient-specific stem cell-based therapy, researchers prevented blindness in animal models of geographic atrophy, the advanced 'dry' form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is a leading cause of vision loss among people age 65 and older. The protocols established by the animal study set the stage for a first-in-human clinical trial testing the therapy in people with geo

18h

People who engage in fat-shaming tend to score high in this personality trait

The study compared personality traits and obesity views among more than 3,000 mothers. The results showed that the personality traits neuroticism and extraversion are linked to more negative views and behaviors related to obesity. People who scored high in conscientiousness are more likely to experience "fat phobia. None A new study explores the relationship between personality traits and attitud

18h

Smoke from Wildfires May Increase Violent Crime and Asthma Attacks

Smoke from Wildfires May Increase Violent Crime and Asthma Attacks Researchers saw spikes in hospital visits, inhaler refills and violent crime in areas inundated by wildfire smoke. wildfire-smoke_cropped.jpg Rights information: StacieStauffSmith Photos/ Shutterstock Earth Wednesday, January 16, 2019 – 16:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Exposure to wildfire smoke can send people

18h

An ancient relative of humans shows a surprisingly modern trait

A relative of modern humans that lived at least 104,000 years ago in northern China showed evidence of dental growth and development very similar to that of people today, a new study found.

18h

The Deadliest Day for the U.S. in Syria

Mere weeks after President Donald Trump declared on Twitter that the Islamic State was defeated in Syria and it was time to leave, the militants claimed credit for an attack that, in one stroke, doubled the overall death toll the U.S. has suffered in the counter- ISIS campaign. An explosion in the Kurdish-held town of Manbij killed two U.S. soldiers, along with a Defense Department civilian and a

19h

Nancy Pelosi’s Power Move on the State of the Union

The latest casualty of the partial government shutdown might be President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, in a letter to the president on Wednesday, suggested that the annual speech before Congress be postponed or scrapped altogether in light of the legislative impasse that has led to the ongoing shutdown, the longest in U.S. history . “Sadly, given the secu

19h

Pioneering infrared imager gives sharpest-ever view of stars and planet-forming discs

A pioneering new instrument that produces the sharpest images of young stars could give astronomers a fascinating glimpse into how the solar system may have looked more than 4.5 billion years ago.

19h

New leash on life? Staying slim keeps pooches happy, healthy

Carrying extra pounds isn't just bad for humans: New research indicates dogs' lives may be significantly shorter if they're overweight.

19h

Court orders Italian govt to publicize cellphone risks

A consumers' group says an Italian tribunal has ordered a public information campaign about the possible health risks of cellular and cordless phones.

19h

One Man’s Trash Is Another Man’s Cyborg

There’s nothing, it would seem, that Peter Kokis can’t turn into a robot. The Brooklyn performance artist makes cyborgs out of 100 percent recycled materials—oftentimes salvaged from the trash. He builds the 170-pound costumes on his kitchen table. When he’s done, Kokis parades through the streets, a veritable Transformer among mortals. “I look for complexity in everyday objects,” Kokis says in A

19h

Poll: Majority of millennials do not like Trump, Twitter

President Donald Trump, his Twitter habit and Twitter in general are not popular with millennials, according to the results of a new national poll released today.

19h

Researchers create 'shortcut' to terpene biosynthesis in E. coli

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed an artificial enzymatic pathway for synthesizing isoprenoids, or terpenes, in E. coli. This shorter, more efficient, cost-effective and customizable pathway transforms E. coli into a factory that can produce terpenes for use in everything from cancer drugs to biofuels.

19h

Researchers discover molecules 'spin flip' from magnetic to non-magnetic forms dynamically

An unexpected discovery in Professor Arthur Suits' chemistry lab could have implications for manufacturing more efficient solar cells and improving photodynamic therapies for treating cancer, and it may contribute to research into quantum computing. At the heart of the discovery is the spin of electrons. Molecules are either nonmagnetic or magnetic depending on whether two electrons are paired wit

19h

19h

Antibiotics Are Failing Us. Crispr Is Our Glimmer of Hope

Antibiotics are still massively overprescribed, a new study shows. With no new drugs in sight, some scientists are turning to Crispr for a reboot.

19h

MEGAPIXELS: A fiery end for the old Tappan Zee Bridge

Technology Come see a bridge getting blown up. A portion of the old Tappan Zee Bridge was demolished with explosives on Tuesday.

19h

Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly

Whether it's exercise or housework, older Americans who move their bodies regularly may preserve more of their memory and thinking skills, even if they have brain lesions and other signs of dementia. (Image credit: BSIP/UIG/Getty Images)

19h

Democratic governors have bold ideas to transform health care: Harvard researchers

Republican and Democratic governors have strikingly different visions for the future of health care, according to a new analysis published in the American Journal of Public Health. While Republican leaders favor maintaining or shrinking public health insurance programs, Democratic leaders are advancing several new proposals to expand public coverage, including 'public option' and single-payer heal

19h

Moffitt leads the nation in addressing LGBTQ health care disparities and education

Moffitt launched the first nationwide survey to identify potential gaps in attitudes, knowledge and institutional practices for LGBTQ patients. The results were published today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

19h

Survey questions cancer doctors' awareness of LGBTQ issues

Most oncologists say they don't know enough about how to treat patients with differences in sexual orientation or identity, but most are also interested in learning more, a new study finds.

19h

Moving more in old age may protect brain from dementia

lder adults who move more than average, either in the form of daily exercise or just routine physical activity such as housework, may maintain more of their memory and thinking skills than people who are less active than average, even if they have brain lesions or biomarkers linked to dementia, according to a study by Rush University Medical Center published in the January 16, 2019, online issue o

19h

Moving more in old age may be linked to sharper memory

Older adults who move more, either with daily exercise or even simple routine physical activity like housework, may preserve more of their memory and thinking skills, even if they have brain lesions or biomarkers linked to dementia, according to a study published in the Jan. 16, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

19h

Here’s how hagfish slime gets 10,000 times bigger in 0.4 seconds

Animals Sharks versus rapidly expanding snot. Biologists are still trying to work out exactly how hagfish slime works—it’s something of an engineering marvel.

19h

Study Suggests Hermit Crabs Evolved Long Penises to Defend Against Shell Thieves

Study Suggests Hermit Crabs Evolved Long Penises to Defend Against Shell Thieves Long penises may allow hermit crabs to stay in their shells during sex, reducing the risk of shells being stolen. hermit-crab-reaching_cropped.jpg Image credits: JetKat via Shutterstock Creature Tuesday, January 15, 2019 – 19:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Hermit crabs may have evolved longer penise

19h

Majority of Wild Coffee Species at Risk of Extinction, Study Finds

Threats to the plants include climate change and habitat loss.

19h

ACLU urges Amazon, Microsoft & Google not to sell face recognition tech to government

The coalition argues that government agencies might abuse facial recognition technology. Google and Microsoft have expressed concern about the potential problems of facial recognition technology. Meanwhile, Amazon has been actively marketing the technology to law enforcement agencies in the U.S. None A coalition comprised of more than 85 of civil, immigrants' and human rights groups, including th

19h

Gamblers predicted Brexit before traders or experts

A new study finds that gamblers reacted more quickly to news on Brexit than currency traders. On the night of the referendum, gamblers and odds makers figured out what would happen hours before traders, experts, and the BBC. The results are bad news for the idea that markets are perfectly efficient. Sometimes experts are wrong. This statement will shock some people and strike others as obvious. I

19h

Stunning Animation of a Solar Flare Captures Its Life from Birth to Death

For the first time, an animated model visualized a realistic solar flare.

19h

Poll: Majority of millennials do not like Trump, Twitter

A new national poll of millennials looks at opinions on President Trump, social media, key issues and potential 2020 presidential candidates.

20h

Activity sharpens even dementia-affected brains, report suggests

Moving more and strong motor skills seem to help cognitive prowess, results show Moving more might help to keep people’s brains sharp as they age – even in the face of dementia, researchers have said. Scientists have found older adults fared better when it came to cognitive tasks if they clocked up higher levels of daily activity on a wrist-based tracker – something the researchers said picked up

20h

Physicists Want to Build an Even More Powerful Atom Smasher at CERN

The search for the universe's hidden particles continues

20h

French govt seeks new Renault boss, ditches Ghosn

The French government on Wednesday called for former Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn, who has spent the last two months in Japanese custody, to be replaced as chief executive of carmaker Renault.

20h

Gastric bypass surgery may benefit muscle strength more than previously thought

Gastric bypass surgery improves relative muscle strength and physical performance in people with obesity, according to a new study.

20h

Full carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification in a tropical coral

Researchers have succeeded in directly measuring three key parameters necessary for skeleton formation in a live tropical coral. This way, they completely characterized the carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification.

20h

Ozaena ground beetles likely parasitize ants throughout their life cycle

Ozaena ground beetles likely have anatomical adaptations enabling them to parasitize ant nests throughout their life cycle, according to a new study.

20h

Just like flipping a switch — in only half a picosecond

Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered spin flips happen in one half of one trillionth of a second, or half a picosecond in the course of a chemical reaction. To understand how fast it is — watches count in seconds, sporting games are timed in 10ths of a second, and light travels just under 12 inches in one-billionth of a second. Spin flips are faster.

20h

Researchers create 'shortcut' to terpene biosynthesis in E. coli

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed an artificial enzymatic pathway for synthesizing isoprenoids, or terpenes, in E.coli. This shorter, more efficient, cost-effective and customizable pathway transforms E. coli into a factory that can produce terpenes for use in everything from cancer drugs to biofuels.

20h

Unintended side effects: antibiotic disruption of the gut microbiome dysregulates skeletal health

Diet and exercise regulate the accrual of bone mass, but some evidence suggests the microbiome may also play a role. Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina examined how the gut microbiome impacts skeletal health and what happens when the system is perturbed. They showed that antibiotic disruption of the gut microbiota induced a pro-inflammatory response that led to increased osteo

20h

CHOP surgeons find opioids often overprescribed for elbow fractures in children

Opioid drugs prescribed to children for pain relief after a typical pediatric orthopaedic procedure may be significantly overprescribed, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The patients used less than 25 percent of the drugs, suggesting a potential risk of opioid diversion.

20h

What is the Green New Deal?

Recent protests by the Sunrise Movement have taken the Green New Deal from forgotten policy to trending hashtag. The Green New Deal aims to move the U.S. to 100% renewable energy within a decade. Proponents also hope to catalyze a top-down restructuring of the U.S. economy and advance social justice issues. None In October of last year, the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Chang

20h

Romeo and Juliet: the last hopes to save Bolivian aquatic frog

Almost a year after conservationists sent out a plea to help save a species of Bolivian aquatic frog by finding a mate for the last remaining member, Romeo, his very own Juliet has been tracked down deep inside a cloud forest.

20h

60 percent of coffee varieties face 'extinction risk'

Three in five species of wild coffee are at risk of extinction as a deadly mix of climate change, disease and deforestation puts the future of the world's favourite beverage in jeopardy, new research warned Wednesday.

20h

Mobile app spend soars with China a top market: report

Mobile app downloads are surging around the world with growth in smartphone use, with nearly half coming from China, a market tracker said Wednesday.

20h

Robot recreates the walk of a 290-million-year-old creature

How did the earliest land animals move? Scientists have used a nearly 300-million-year old fossil skeleton and preserved ancient footprints to create a moving robot model of prehistoric life.

20h

The Citizenship Question Isn’t Quite Dead Yet

On Tuesday, a federal judge struck down the infamous citizenship question. Judge Jesse M. Furman, in the Southern District of New York, decided to block the Commerce Department from “adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census questionnaire,” a decision informed by what Furman found was clear evidence that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross violated federal law in providing conflicting and untru

20h

Go Ahead, Post the Stupid Photo of Yourself From 10 Years Ago

Do you want the good news or the bad news first? Okay, bad news. Everything you do on the internet is tracked. Your information streams into massive databases that are then linked to one another. At least several companies have good models of your social networks, purchasing behavior, and, yes, your face. Your face 10 years ago and your face today. Ten years ago, Facebook already had 15 billion p

20h

Snap to lose chief financial officer, its 2nd in a year

The company behind Snapchat is losing its second financial chief in less than a year as the social media service confronts a declining user base and stiff competition from bigger rivals.

20h

Hyundai, Kia recall vehicles due to increased fire risk

Despite a government shutdown, Hyundai and Kia are moving ahead with a recall of about 168,000 vehicles to fix a fuel pipe problem that can cause engine fires. The problem stems from improper repairs during previous recalls for engine failures.

20h

Water, not temperature, limits global forest growth as climate warms

The growth of forest trees all over the world is becoming more water-limited as the climate warms. The effect is most evident in northern climates and at high altitudes where the primary limitation on tree growth had been cold temperatures. The research details the first time that changes in tree growth in response to current climate changes have been mapped at a near-global scale.

20h

Feathers: Better than Velcro?

The structures zipping together the barbs in bird feathers could provide a model for new adhesives and new aerospace materials, according to a new study. Researchers 3D printed models of the structures to better understand their properties.

20h

'Statistics anxiety' is real, and new research suggests targeted ways to handle it

A new study uses an analytical technique called 'network science' to determine factors contributing to statistics anxiety among psychology majors.

20h

Alterations in hippocampal structural connections differentiate between responders of ECT

A new study in people with major depression reports that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) induces changes in the fibers connecting the hippocampus to brain regions involved in mood and emotion.

20h

Theresa May Lives to Fight Another Day. But for What?

LONDON —Less than 24 hours after suffering a historic defeat against her Brexit deal, British Prime Minister Theresa May survived another vote of no confidence on Wednesday, ensuring that she’ll survive to fight another day. But there is little cause for celebration: More than two years after Britain voted to leave the European Union, its lawmakers are still hopelessly divided. Questions remain o

20h

Trump's Chief Shutdown Negotiator Is Unknown to Most Americans

The ongoing government shutdown, the longest in U.S. history, has crystallized for many Americans that Washington skews more “day-care center” than “center of the free world.” And as Republicans and Democrats alike address the furlough with all the sophistication of a playground brawl— dropping f-bombs , throwing “temper tantrums,” and snubbing lunch invites —there is Shahira Knight, the adult en

20h

Opvarmningen af verdenshavene bliver mere og mere ekstrem

Verdenshavene opsuger over 90 procent af varmen fra den globale opvarmning. Svarende til flere atombomber i sekundet.

20h

Catch the Rainbow: Multicolor Flow Cytometry

Download this eBook from The Scientist and Beckman Coulter Life Sciences to learn about the essential components of flow cytometers, setting up a high-parameter multicolor flow cytometry experiment, preventing common multicolor flow cytometry pitfalls, and high-sensitivity flow cytometry for nanoscale science!

20h

Fighting the crave for fattening food? Just surround yourself in its scent

A new study proves one sense can compensate another.

20h

Climate change: How could artificial photosynthesis contribute to limiting global warming?

If CO2 emissions do not fall fast enough, then CO2 will have to be removed from the atmosphere to limit global warming. Not only could planting new forests and biomass contribute to this, but new technologies for artificial photosynthesis as well. Physicists have estimated how much surface area such solutions would require. Although artificial photosynthesis could bind CO2 more efficiently than th

20h

Coralline red algae have existed for 300 million years longer than presumed

Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. At least this was the established view of palaeontologists all over the world until now. However, this classification will now have to be revised after fossils prove that coralline red algae existed as far back as 430 million years ago.

20h

Identifying 'friends' in an objective manner

Scientists have developed a new method for identifying individuals that have essential connections between them — what they call 'significant ties'.

20h

Ultra ultrasound to transform new tech

A new, more sensitive method to measure ultrasound may revolutionize everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles. Researchers have combined modern nanofabrication and nanophotonics techniques to build the ultra precise ultrasound sensors on a silicon chip.

20h

Simple rules predict and explain biological mutualism

Scientists have long employed relatively simple guidelines to help explain the physical world, from Newton's second law of motion to the laws of thermodynamics. Biomedical engineers have used dynamic modeling and machine learning to construct similarly simple rules for complex biology. They have devised a framework to accurately interpret and predict the behavior of mutually beneficial biological

20h

Trump Must Be a Russian Agent; the Alternative Is Too Awful

We know a lot about the “what” of the Mueller probe’s findings. The crucial questions now focus on the “why.”

20h

German Institutions and Wiley Reach Open-Access Publishing Deal

The three-year contract, in which all articles will be published as open access in exchange for an annual fee for journal subscriptions, is a triumph for Project DEAL.

21h

Steve Carell to star in Netflix comedy based on Trump's space force

The actor will take the lead in a series he has co-created, following those tasked by the president to develop the space-based initiative Steve Carell is set to head up a new comedy series for Netflix based on Donald Trump’s space force initiative. Related: Schitt's Creek: the funniest sitcom you're (probably) not watching Continue reading…

21h

Reigning in brutality – how one man's outrage led to the Red Cross and the Geneva Conventions

Henry Dunant's work led to the Red Cross and conventions on treating prisoners humanely. Four Geneva Conventions defined the rules for prisoners of war, torture, naval and medical personnel and more. Amendments to the agreements reflect the modern world but have not been ratified by all countries. None Is history just a collection of barely-connected events that recur because humans can't really

21h

The world's oldest, deepest lake is full of life. Humans are changing that.

Nexus Media News Siberia’s Lake Baikal, a UNESCO world heritage site, is imperiled by rising temperatures and pollution. Lake Baikal is the world's oldest and deepest lake. It's now suffering the devastating effects of climate change.

21h

How bad will my postpartum depression be in 12 months?

A new study was able to successfully predict — with 72.8 percent accuracy — if a new mother would experience worsening depressive symptoms over the first year after giving birth. The scientists predicted this depression trajectory using four maternal characteristics that put the mother at risk. Identifying these factors early in the postpartum period will allow mothers to seek treatment earlier

21h

Acupressure relieves long-term symptoms of breast cancer treatment, study finds

A new study finds acupressure could be a low-cost, at-home solution to a suite of persistent side effects that linger after breast cancer treatment ends.

21h

Drones shown to make traffic crash site assessments safer, faster and more accurate

Research shows that drones can be more effective and safer in crash mapping of vehicular highway accidents than conventional methods. Drones using new imaging technology allows highway safety officers to capture and print 3D composites of crash sites and reduce mapping time and improve traffic flow following a crash by 60 percent.

21h

Fighting perinatal mood and anxiety disorders on multiple levels

Over the past several decades, it's become increasingly recognized that perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs), including postpartum depression, are more than just "baby blues." They're the most common complication of childbirth in the U.S., affecting about 14 percent of women in their lifetimes and up to 50 percent in some specific populations. PMADs can lead to a variety of adverse outcome

21h

Jellyfish map could be the future to protecting UK waters and fish

Researchers have developed a map of chemicals found in jellyfish caught across 1 million square kilometers of UK waters. The same chemicals are found in other marine animals such as birds and fish. These findings can support conservation efforts by helping track an animals movements and also be used as a tool to detect food fraud by identifying where seafood products were sourced from.

21h

Chaos in the body tunes up your immune system

Chaos in bodily regulation can optimize our immune system, according to researchers. The discovery may prove to be of great significance for avoiding serious diseases such as cancer and diabetes.

21h

How manganese produces a parkinsonian syndrome

Using X-ray fluorescence at synchrotrons DESY and ESRF, researchers have demonstrated the consequences of a mutation responsible for a hereditary parkinsonian syndrome: accumulated manganese in the cells appears to disturb protein transport.

21h

Nudging does not necessarily improve decisions

Nudging, the concept of influencing people's behavior without imposing rules, bans or coercion, is an idea that government officials and marketing specialists alike are keen to harness, and it is often viewed as a one-size-fits-all solution. Now, a new study puts things into perspective: Whether a nudge really does improve decisions depends on a person's underlying decision-making process.

21h

Mechanism helps explain the ear's exquisite sensitivity

Researchers have decoded the way structures in the inner ear give our hearing its remarkable sensitivity and selectivity.

21h

New study shows smoking accelerates aging

Smoking has long been proven to negatively affect people's overall health in multiple ways. The study shows that the smokers demonstrated a higher aging ratio, and both male and female smokers were predicted to be twice as old as their chronological age as compared to nonsmokers.

21h

High-speed supernova reveals earliest moments of a dying star

An international team of researchers found evidence for the much theorized 'hot cocoon'.

21h

'Ambidextrous' robots could dramatically speed e-commerce

Engineers present a novel, 'ambidextrous' approach to grasping a diverse range of object shapes without training.

21h

Ammonia by phosphorus catalysis

More than 100 years after the introduction of the Haber-Bosch process, scientists continue to search for alternative ammonia production routes that are less energy demanding. Scientists have now discovered that black phosphorus is an excellent catalyst for the electroreduction of nitrogen to ammonia. Layered black phosphorus nanosheets are a highly selective and efficient catalyst in this process.

21h

Risk of infection from water in the air at home

Researchers have developed a more detailed framework for understanding and managing the risk of transmitting a bacterial disease via water spray from sinks, showers and toilets. As continuous testing of indoor water is not always feasible, the guidelines can help to identify water use situations that could increase the risk of exposure.

21h

 

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