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nyheder2019januar19

Kritiske tal for vandmiljø gemt af vejen med nøje orkestrerede krumspring

I månedsvis hemmeligholdt myndigheder og Aarhus Universitet den opgørelse over stigende udledning af kvælstof til vandmiljøet, som viser, at regeringens Landbrugspakke ikke virker.

7h

Are Psychopaths Attractive to Other Psychopaths?

Psychopathic birds of a feather flock together — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Scientists turn carbon emissions into usable energy

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a system that turn carbon emissions into usable energy.

12h

New class of solar cells, using lead-free perovskite materials

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has presented a new class of solar cells, using lead-free perovskite materials.

4min

What to Expect from the Super Blood Wolf Moon Eclipse

This weekend's long lunar eclipse has an unwieldy name.

36min

A new low-latency congestion control for cellular networks

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has proposed a novel technique that can reduce the congestion issues in the network environment.

1h

What’s behind our appetite for self-destruction?

Each new year, people vow to put an end to self-destructive habits like smoking, overeating or overspending. And how many times have we learned of someone – a celebrity, a friend or a loved one – who committed some self-destructive act that seemed to defy explanation? Think of the criminal who leaves a trail of evidence , perhaps with the hope of getting caught, or the politician who wins an elec

1h

Your sustainable diet for the year 2050: More nuts, less sugar and red meat

Good news, Earthlings! An international team of scientists reports that it is indeed possible to feed everyone on the planet a healthy and environmentally sustainable diet by the year 2050.

1h

Kunstig intelligens kan se forskel på bananfluer: Genkender én blandt 72

Forskere vil bruge den kunstige intelligens til at nærstudere dyr i grupper.

2h

What It’s Like for Secular, Liberal Pro-Lifers at the March for Life

WASHINGTON, D.C.—On Friday morning, a few hours before the start of the March for Life —the 46th annual event held to commemorate the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision and call for its repeal—banners waved above the heads of some 60 people gathered on the wet, slushy grounds of the National Mall. “Consistent Life Network: … End Abortion, End Poverty, End Racism, End War,” read one. “Secular Pr

2h

Pesticides on Our Plates: Is Our Food Safe to Eat?

A new report looks at the amount of pesticides that are making their way to our plates — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Brennan Saves the Day | Gold Rush

With pressure mounting from Parker, Brennan manages to stop a faulty water pump from exploding. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Di

3h

How a German City Developed — And Then Lost — Generations of Math Geniuses

Anti-Semitism brought down one of the world's greatest centers for mathematical research.

3h

What Jazz in 2019 Will Sound Like

The best improvised music destabilizes expectations. That could happen when a taut groove suddenly dissolves into a free-jazz breakdown, a trick the band Science Fair pulled in a set Saturday night at Winter Jazzfest in New York City. It could happen via the surfeit of groups at the festival, such as Science Fair, that are led by women in a genre that has long been male-dominated. Or it could hap

4h

Isolde har tjek på de dobbelt magiske atomkerner

PLUS. Fysikerne har fået et nyt værktøj til studier af kort­livede isotoper efter opgradering af Cern-anlæg med ny post-accelerator.

4h

DNC Accuses Russia, ACLU Sues ICE, and More Security News This Week

Trump dominated security headlines this week, but there's plenty of other news to catch up on.

4h

Being a Hollywood Science Consultant Isn't Exactly Glamorous

It's not all fact-checking physics and rubbing elbows with celebs, it turns out.

4h

More Babies Are Being Born with Intestines Outside the Body. Is the Condition Linked to Mom's Opioid Use?

A serious birth defect is on the rise in the United States, and a new report suggests it may be linked to opioid use.

4h

Is The Power Of The Flour Really The Secret To Baking The Perfect Biscuit?

While some bakers believe that soft wheat flour, found primarily in the American South, is the best for making light, flaky biscuits, others say the key to better biscuits comes down to technique. (Image credit: Brett Flashnick/The Washington Post/Getty Images)

5h

Douglas Rushkoff – It’s not the technology’s fault

It's an all-hands-on-deck moment in the arc of civilization. Everyone has a choice: Do you want to try to earn enough money to insulate yourself from the world you're creating— or do you want to make the world a place you don't have to insulate yourself from? None For me, the very best Onion article of 2018 was this one about Jeff Bezos revealing Amazon's new headquarters to be the entire Earth,

5h

A Really, Really Bright Mystery in Space

Scientists don’t know why a spot in space exploded. They still haven’t figured out black holes, either.

5h

Lunar Craters Show Spike in Earth-Pummeling Space Rocks

A new analysis suggests the last few hundred million years of life on Earth has seen above-average asteroid impact rates — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending January 19, 2019)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

5h

The Tricky Ethics of Transplants for Addicts

“How many of you think we should do liver transplants for alcoholics?” About half the hands were slowly raised, while the other members of the class looked around nervously. These were third-year medical students, and I was giving my monthly lecture on organ transplantation. “How many of you think the potential recipient should have six months of absolute sobriety before being offered a transplan

5h

Chigozie Obioma’s Homerian Epic

Moments before setting the novel’s central journey into motion, the protagonist of An Orchestra of Minorities makes a simple declaration about the woman he loves. “I’m ready to do anything to marry her,” the beleaguered Nigerian poultry farmer Chinonso Solomon Olisa tells Jamike, an erstwhile childhood friend. It is an earnest mission statement, at once brave and straightforward. But the lovesick

6h

The Best of Breastfeeding Tech in 2019: Medela, Willow, Lilu

From new breast shields to hands-free pumps, breast pumping technology just keeps getting better and better.

6h

16 of the Best Winter Sales for 2019: Outdoors, Tech, Games

There are some exciting sales this cold weekend from REI, Apple, Samsung, and more.

6h

Do You Take This Robot …

Today we fall in love through our phones. Maybe your phone itself could be just as satisfying?

6h

Republicans Used to Care About Obstruction of Justice

It’s not clear if the story is really true. The previous sentence applies to so many things these days, but in this case refers to BuzzFeed News ’s Thursday night report that President Donald Trump allegedly directed his attorney Michael Cohen to lie to Congress about the Trump Tower project in Moscow. BuzzFeed News had just two sources, both anonymous law-enforcement officials. Nobody, including

7h

The ‘Bright Spot’ for Trump in the Government Shutdown

In a world in which the U.S. government is functioning somewhat normally, the president right now would be preparing for his delegation’s trip to the World Economic Forum, in Davos, Switzerland, next week. Once there, he would mingle with foreign leaders. He would likely endure a series of speeches on the promises of globalization and the perils of climate change. As he did last year, he might de

7h

Women Are Not a Monolith

This weekend, women will take to the streets. The third annual Women’s March will bring thousands of women to Washington, D.C., and other cities across the country to mark “two years of resistance to the Trump presidency, two years of training new activists, and two years of building power.” From its first year, the march has highlighted the significant divisions among women’s political movements

7h

The Shutdown Is Great News for Russia

The longest government shutdown in American history is making headlines around the world. It will also have global effects, none of them good. U.S. political leaders, so unable to compromise, should understand how their decisions chip away at national security. First and most obvious are the practical consequences: the State Department employees who have spent weeks on furlough, unable to advocat

7h

Forsøg overrasker forskere: Mænd reagerer stærkere på smerte end kvinder

Et minde om smerte forstærker smerterne hos mænd og ikke hos kvinder, viser ny undersøgelse.

7h

Why 'upgrading' humanity is a transhumanist myth

Though computer engineers claim to know what human consciousness is, many neuroscientists say that we're nowhere close to understanding what it is, or its source. Scientists are currently trying to upload human minds to silicon chips, or re-create consciousness with algorithms, but this may be hubristic because we still know so little about what it means to be human. Is transhumanism a journey fo

7h

They said I'd go blind. Now gene therapy has changed that

Matthew Bishop was told there was no treatment that could save his vision. But now scientific breakthroughs in gene therapy have given him, and others, hope In his office in Oxford’s John Radcliffe hospital, Prof Robert MacLaren sits upright, his back as straight as a soldier’s, and tells me about the lowest point in his 20-year career. It was the rejection, many years ago, of his grant applicati

7h

Report: Snap fires 2 execs after alleged sexual misconduct

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Snap recently fired two executives after one allegedly had an inappropriate relationship with a contract worker.

8h

Scientists ID another possible threat to orcas: pink salmon

Over the years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon.

8h

Report: Facebook's privacy lapses may result in record fine

Facebook may be facing the biggest fine ever imposed by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission for privacy violations involving the personal information of its 2.2 billion users.

8h

New technologies enable better-than-ever details on genetically modified plants

Salk researchers have mapped the genomes and epigenomes of genetically modified plant lines with the highest resolution ever to reveal exactly what happens at a molecular level when a piece of foreign DNA is inserted. Their findings, published in the journal PLOS Genetics on January 15, 2019, elucidate the routine methods used to modify plants, and offer new ways to more effectively minimize poten

8h

Herpetologists describe new species of snake found in stomach of predator snake

Herpetologists at The University of Texas at Arlington have described a previously unknown species of snake that was discovered inside the stomach of another snake more than four decades ago.

8h

Targeting 'hidden pocket' for treatment of stroke and seizure

The ideal drug is one that only affects the exact cells and neurons it is designed to treat, without unwanted side effects. This concept is especially important when treating the delicate and complex human brain. Now, scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory have revealed a mechanism that could lead to this kind of long-sought specificity for treatments of strokes and seizures.

8h

Every bottle of prosecco may erode 4.4 kilograms of Italian hillside

In Italy's traditional prosecco-growing region, estimates suggest that 400,000 tonnes of soil is eroded from the vineyards each year

8h

Svanemølleværket udvides med flere kedler

Tre år efter indvielsen af Østerbros nye kraftvarmeværk i 1953 aflagde Elektroteknisk Gruppe under Ingeniørforeningen værket et besøg og blev vist rundt af overingeniør T. Egebjerg. Her er deres rapport i Ingeniøren.

9h

3 superb arguments for why we live in a matrix – and 3 arguments that refute them

The simulation argument was first put forth in a paper published in 2003 by philosopher Nick Bostrom. Bostrom assigns less than a 50 percent probability that we're living in a simulated universe. Some physicists believe that we can test this scientifically. Are we living in a simulation? This idea has been explored on a number of levels. While there has been a fair share of sophomoric musings and

10h

How to break a Brexit deadlock: 'keep going, be flexible … and listen'

Whether it be a hijack, kidnap or siege situation, negotiation is an art. Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn take note Westminster is in deadlock. The progress of Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement has stalled in parliament, where a majority of MPs are opposed to it. Jeremy Corbyn has refused to enter talks with the prime minister until she rules out a no-deal Brexit, a demand she describes as “an imp

11h

Swimming with huge female pregnant great white sharks

Footage emerges of divers getting up close and personal with massive great white shark.

12h

Ni ud af ti danskere mangler D-vitamin: Virker tilskud?

86 procent af os lider i perioder af D-vitaminmangel. Tilskud hjælper, men er ikke nødvendigvis den rigtige løsning.

12h

Could flexitarianism save the planet?

Scientists say a drastic cut in meat consumption is needed, but this requires political will It has been known for a while that the amount of animal products being eaten is bad for both the welfare of animals and the environment. People cannot consume 12.9bn eggs in the UK each year without breaking a few. But the extent of the damage, and the amount by which people need to cut back, is now becom

12h

North American glaciers melting much faster than 10 years ago – study

Satellite images show glaciers in US and Canada, excluding Alaska, are shrinking four times faster then in previous decade Glaciers in western North America, excluding Alaska, are melting four times faster than in the previous decade, with changes in the jet stream exacerbating the longer-term effects of climate change, according to a new study. The retreat hasn’t been equal in the US and Canada

12h

New study reveals local drivers of amplified Arctic warming

An international team of researchers, including Professor Sarah Kang and DoYeon Kim in the School of Urban and Environmental Engineering at South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), has unveiled local drivers of amplified arctic warming.

12h

Here's Why This Winter Storm Is So Darn Big

A major snowstorm has begun its trek across the United States. Here's why it's going to impact so many people.

12h

Viewing This Weekend's Lunar Eclipse

A total lunar eclipse will grace the skies this Sunday, January 20—and it may or may not be red. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

Scientists learn how common virus reactivates after transplantation

A new study challenges long-held theories of why a common virus — cytomegalovirus, or CMV — can reactivate and become a life-threatening infection in people with a compromised immune system, including blood cancer patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation.

16h

Tesla Investors Suing Musk Can Subpoena Azealia Banks and Grimes

Shareholders are suing Elon Musk over that "taking Tesla private" tweet, and just got the right to subpoena Banks and Grimes.

16h

The Atlantic Daily: The Next Few Decades of Climate Policy

What We’re Following Newly empowered progressive legislators and activists have set their sights on a Green New Deal to fight climate change and decarbonize the economy. But the devil is in the details , and a plan released late last week by some 600 environmental groups includes opposition to nuclear power and carbon capture—two tools without which it will be virtually impossible to meet any of

18h

Gadget Lab Podcast: A Deep Dive Into Nike’s Adapt BB Smart Sneakers

WIRED’s Peter Rubin joins the Gadget Lab podcast to talk about his experience wearing Nike’s newest self-adjusting sneakers. Plus: Nitasha Tiku weighs in on mandatory arbitration at tech companies.

18h

What to Expect From Trump-Kim Take Two

For roughly 40 minutes on Friday, a sleepy boutique hotel in Washington, D.C., burst to life as the epicenter of nuclear talks with North Korea. As reporters and camera crews crowded into the lobby of the Dupont Circle Hotel and spilled outside to the street, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo briefly met with his North Korean negotiating partner, Kim Yong Chol, before emerging from an elevator, smil

18h

Brace for the Polar Vortex: It May Be Visiting More Often

A researcher says that as the climate changes, “winter is shortening, but you’re getting these more intensive periods in that shorter winter.”

18h

Q&A: These Species Were Said to Be Extinct. Really, They Were Just Hard to Find.

A surprising number of plants and animals have been discovered alive and well after scientists had declared them long gone.

18h

The Elderly and Driving: When Is It Time to Hit the Brakes?

Prince Philip, 97, was involved in a car accident outside London. For families everywhere, the incident raises all-too-familiar questions.

18h

Here's a planet-friendly diet that's not vegan

Health How to eat better for the Earth. You don’t have to go vegan to ease your diet’s environmental impact. A new study offers insights into a new kind of planet-friendly diet.

19h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: How’s It Cohen?

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, January 18 . President Donald Trump will reportedly meet with the North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in February. How It All Could End: As the government shutdown bleeds into its 28th day, some congressional staffers have privately come to a consensus: A resolution to the dysfunction may require a dramatic government failure , such as an airplane crash or a ma

19h

Tesla Lays Off 3,000 Workers in Cost-Cutting Effort

CEO Elon Musk says the layoffs will help the electric car maker as it leans into the tough job of building mass-market cars.

19h

Microsoft Wants Cortana to Play Nicely With Amazon and Google

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says the company's Cortana digital assistant should be available on smart speakers made by rivals like Amazon and Google.

19h

Oracle Paid Women $13,000 Less Than Men, Analysis Finds

An economist studying pay records as part of an ongoing lawsuit found the software company paid women 14 percent less annually than men doing similar jobs.

19h

Dead – yes, dead – tardigrade found beneath Antarctica

Scientists find remains of a tardigrade and crustaceans in a deep, frozen Antarctic lake. The creatures' origin is unknown, and further study is ongoing. Biology speaks up about Antarctica's history. None So it turns out our favorite real-world superheroes, tardigrades , aren't completely indestructible. But even in death, they continue to amaze. Scientists boring a hole one kilometer beneath the

19h

7 best Alan Watts books on philosophy and life

Alan Watts wrote more than 25 books on the subject of philosophy and religion. He was among the first to bring Zen Buddhist thought to the west. Subjects ranged from dualism in philosophy to the troubles of modern man. Alan Watts was a gifted philosopher who tasked himself with the near impossible, putting that which transcended the knowable into words. A counterculture mystic and a spiritual ent

19h

Cryptic remains of tiny animals have turned up in an Antarctic lake

Researchers were surprised to find vestiges of what appear to be tiny animals in mud from Antarctica’s ice-covered Lake Mercer.

19h

Proposed carbon tax plan would return proceeds to people once goals are met

A bipartisan group of renowned economists has proposed the U.S. implement a carbon tax. The tax would increase until climate goals are met, and all proceeds would be given back to the people in equal lump-sums. Recent research suggests that a majority of people would support a carbon tax policy that redistributes proceeds back to citizens. None A bipartisan group of renowned economists has a plan

20h

UTA herpetologists describe new species of snake found in stomach of predator snake

Herpetologists at The University of Texas at Arlington have described a previously unknown species of snake that was discovered inside the stomach of another snake more than four decades ago.

20h

The Family Weekly: What People Actually Say Before They Die

This Week in Family People’s last words are often nonsensical and borderline bizarre , yet they’ve gotten conspicuously little attention from researchers, since it’s difficult to study people’s final moments without being overly intrusive. Michael Erard writes about the deeper meaning behind people’s last words, and why understanding them is important to ensuring good end-of-life care. Relationsh

20h

Targeting 'hidden pocket' for treatment of stroke and seizure

By closely examining a special neuron receptor that is involved in memory, learning, and much more, researchers have identified a hidden molecular 'pocket.' By creating chemical compounds that affect this pocket only in very specific circumstances, they are one step closer to creating ideal treatments for stroke and seizures.

20h

New technologies enable better-than-ever details on genetically modified plants

Salk researchers have mapped the genomes and epigenomes of genetically modified plant lines with the highest resolution ever to reveal exactly what happens at a molecular level when a piece of foreign DNA is inserted. Their findings, published in the journal PLOS Genetics on January 15, 2019, elucidate the routine methods used to modify plants, and offer new ways to more effectively minimize poten

20h

Why are women more religious than men? Because men are more willing to take risks.

Sociologists have long observed a gap between the religiosity of men and women. A recent study used data from several national surveys to compare religiosity, risk-taking preferences and demographic information among more than 20,000 American adolescents. The results suggest that risk-taking preferences might partly explain the gender differences in religiosity. None In virtually all countries in

20h

New Technique Captures Entire Fly Brain in 3D

The method combines two approaches to reveal a high-resolution map of all 40 million synapses.

20h

No substantial benefit from transplantation reported for a high-risk leukemia subtype

Study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital found treatment guided by measuring minimal residual disease was associated with better outcomes for hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

20h

Coming soon: A blood test for Alzheimer's disease?

People with symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), such as cognitive difficulties, behavior changes and mood swings, may wait months or even years to get a definitive diagnosis. That's because doctors lack a simple, accurate and inexpensive test for it. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are gettin

20h

Tony's Attempt to Uncover a Pearson Box | Gold Rush

Tony wants to use an old-school "Pearson Box" to sluice gold. But he'll have to get it out of the ground first. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https:

21h

Firsthand accounts indicate fentanyl test strips are effective in reducing overdose risk

Young adults who use drugs find fentanyl test strips useful, residue testing more convenient and testing at home more private, a Brown study found.

21h

The anti-vax movement is among this year’s top 10 global health threats

Health Also making the list: air pollution, dengue fever, and antibiotic resistance. Every year, the World Health Organization puts out a list of the most pressing issues that face global health.

21h

America Scrambles to Catch Up With Chinese and Russian Weapons

“We have some very bad players out there,” President Donald Trump warned from a Pentagon podium on Thursday. Advanced missile technologies are spreading among great powers and rogue actors alike, and with them new threats to the United States. So Trump threatened back. “We’re a good player, but we can be far worse than anybody, if need be.” The blueprint he unveiled for doing that, the Pentagon’s

21h

Classic double-slit experiment in a new light

An international research group has developed a new X-ray spectroscopy method based on the classical double-slit experiment to gain new insights into the physical properties of solids.

21h

Specific cognitive deficits in individuals with spinal cord injury

A multidisciplinary team of researchers has identified specific cognitive deficits in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Their findings support the theory of accelerated aging after SCI, and have important implications for further research.

21h

The New Old Age: Hospitals Stopped Readmitting So Many Medicare Patients. Did That Cost Lives?

A new government program was supposed to prevent certain Medicare recipients from cycling in and out of hospitals. Now experts worry some older patients are being denied necessary care.

21h

Your Sweat Will See You Now

A new device — wearable, wireless and battery free — improves the ability to monitor and diagnose health problems by analyzing the sweat on your skin.

21h

Using bacteria to create a water filter that kills bacteria

Engineers have created a bacteria-filtering membrane using graphene oxide and bacterial nanocellulose. It's highly efficient, long-lasting and environmentally friendly — and could provide clean water for those in need.

22h

Enhanced NMR reveals chemical structures in a fraction of the time

Researchers have developed a way to dramatically enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), a technique used to study the structure and composition of many kinds of molecules, including proteins linked to Alzheimer's and other diseases.

22h

Smart microrobots that can adapt to their surroundings

Scientists have developed tiny elastic robots that can change shape depending on their surroundings. Modeled after bacteria and fully biocompatible, these robots optimize their movements so as to get to hard-to-reach areas of the human body. They stand to revolutionize targeted drug delivery.

22h

Bioethicists call for oversight of consumer 'neurotechnologies' with unproven benefits

The marketing of consumer 'neurotechnologies' can be enticing: apps that diagnose a mental state, and brain devices that improve cognition or 'read' one's emotional state. However, many of these increasingly popular products aren't fully supported by science and have little to no regulatory oversight, which poses potential health risks to the public. Two bioethicists suggest the creation of a work

22h

Women Who Win Science Prizes Earn Less Money, Prestige than Men

Biomedical awards from the past 50 years reveal a gender imbalance, but it appears to be improving.

22h

Hand-knitted molecules

Molecules are usually formed in reaction vessels or laboratory flasks. An Empa research team has now succeeded in producing molecules between two microscopically small, movable gold tips — in a sense as a 'hand-knitted' unique specimen. The properties of the molecules can be monitored in real time while they are being produced. The research results have just been published in Nature Communication

22h

New therapeutic avenue in the fight against chronic liver disease

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer.

22h

Mediterranean freshwater fish species susceptible to climate change

Climate change will strongly affect many European freshwater fish species. This is particularly the case for species in the Mediterranean region.

22h

Potential biotech and health applications with new knowledge on bacteria and viruses

New research to better understand how bacteria and their viruses interact and evolve will enable future studies to exploit the use of bacteria and their viruses for potential biotechnology and health applications.

22h

Plant peptide helps roots to branch out in the right places

How do plants space out their roots? A research team has identified a peptide and its receptor that help lateral roots to grow with the right spacing.

22h

Salad, soda and socioeconomic status: Mapping a social determinant of health in Seattle

Seattle residents who live in waterfront neighborhoods tend to have healthier diets compared to those who live along Interstate-5 and Aurora Avenue, according to new research on social disparities. The study used local data to model food consumption patterns by city block. Weekly servings of salad and soda served as proxies for diet quality.

22h

Bee surveys in newest US national park could aid pollinator studies elsewhere

Declines in native bee populations are widely reported, but can existing data really analyze these trends? Entomologists report findings about pollinator biodiversity in California's Pinnacle National Park derived from three separate surveys spanning 17 years and say similar studies in other areas are needed.

22h

Back-To-Back Storms And No Pay For Federal Weather Forecasters

Despite the shutdown, the National Weather Service is putting out forecasts and helping local officials prepare for dangerous weather, even as employees worry about making ends meet at home. (Image credit: Jae C. Hong/AP)

22h

22h

World’s Oldest Periodic Table Poster Turns Up in Scottish Storeroom

The world's oldest classroom poster of the periodic table of elements, dating to 1885, has turned up in Scotland.

22h

A World-Famous Artist With Four Legs and a Bite

Stories of people and animals bringing comfort to one another are a dime a dozen on the internet. But every once in a while, an interspecies communion rises above the din. Ron Krajewski and his horse, Metro Meteor, are one such pair. The short documentary My Paintbrush Bites , directed by Joel Pincosy and Joe Egender and premiering today on The Atlantic , tells their remarkable story—one of a rec

22h

The Invisible Children of the Trump Administration

Here is the finding listed as the “key takeaway” in a report compiled by the inspector general for the Department of Health and Human Services and released to the American public on Thursday: The total number of children separated from a parent or guardian by immigration authorities is unknown. Pursuant to a June 2018 Federal District Court order, HHS [the U.S. Department of Health and Human Serv

22h

Killer blows? Knockout study of pair of mouse MicroRNA provides cancer insight

Researchers used knockout mouse models created by gene editing to reveal that the miRNA miR-146b, like miR-146a, is involved in the development of cancers, with them having similar but not identical effects. The knockout mice should help in the fight against cancers involving miRNA dysregulation.

22h

How musicians communicate non-verbally during performance

Scientists have discovered a new technique to examine how musicians intuitively coordinate with one another during a performance, silently predicting how each will express the music.

22h

Mangrove patches deserve greater recognition no matter the size

Governments must provide stronger protection for crucial small mangrove patches, experts say.

22h

Short bouts of stairclimbing throughout the day can boost health

It just got harder to avoid exercise. A few minutes of stair climbing, at short intervals throughout the day, can improve cardiovascular health, according to new research.

22h

Exposure to chemicals during pregnancy is not associated with an increase in blood pressure

Exposure to certain chemicals such as phthalates, parabens or Bisphenol A could be associated with a decrease in blood pressure during pregnancy.

22h

New ways to harness wasted methane

The primary component of natural gas, methane, is itself a potent greenhouse gas. A recent study has unveiled a high performance catalyst for methane conversion to formaldehyde.

22h

Do wild animals hate being cold in winter?

Animals And why are so many dogs wearing snow boots? While the weather outside may indeed get frightful this winter, a parka, knit hat, wool socks, insulated boots and maybe a roaring fire make things bearable for people…

22h

Enhanced NMR reveals chemical structures in a fraction of the time

MIT researchers have developed a way to dramatically enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), a technique used to study the structure and composition of many kinds of molecules, including proteins linked to Alzheimer's and other diseases.

22h

Smart microrobots that can adapt to their surroundings

Scientists at EPFL and ETH Zurich have developed tiny elastic robots that can change shape depending on their surroundings. Modeled after bacteria and fully biocompatible, these robots optimize their movements so as to get to hard-to-reach areas of the human body. They stand to revolutionize targeted drug delivery.

22h

Classic double-slit experiment in a new light

An international research group has developed a new X-ray spectroscopy method based on the classical double-slit experiment to gain new insights into the physical properties of solids.

22h

Synaptic logic for connections between two brain hemispheres

Researchers have developed a new combination of technologies that allows them to identify the functional properties of individual synapses that link the two hemispheres and determine how they are arranged within a neuron's dendritic field.

23h

Fighting deadly drug resistant bacteria in intestines with new antibiotic

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a potentially deadly infection in the large intestine most common in people who need to take antibiotics for a long period of time, particularly in Australia's ageing population. But when doses of a new antibiotic called Ramizol were given to hamsters infected with a lethal dose of the bacteria, a significant proportion of hamsters survived the infection.

23h

Poor sleep and heart-related death

Elderly men who experience extended episodes of interrupted breathing while asleep have a high risk of heart problems. Research shows for the first time that poor blood oxygenation is a good indicator of the chance of heart-related death, which cannot be attributed to sleep apnoea alone.

23h

A New Satellite Will (Safely) Drop 'Meteors' Over Hiroshima

There's a new satellite in space, and it was put there to drop "meteors" over the city of Hiroshima.

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Let’s keep the Green New Deal grounded in science

Advocates hope the proposal will inspire voters, but that’s no reason it has to ignore the latest research.

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Using bacteria to create a water filter that kills bacteria

Engineers have created a bacteria-filtering membrane using graphene oxide and bacterial nanocellulose. It's highly efficient, long-lasting and environmentally friendly — and could provide clean water for those in need.

23h

Researchers develop smart micro-robots that can adapt to their surroundings

One day, hospital patients might be able to ingest tiny robots that deliver drugs directly to diseased tissue, thanks to research being carried out at EPFL and ETH Zurich.

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Classic double-slit experiment in a new light

An international research team led by physicists from the University of Cologne has implemented a new variant of the basic double-slit experiment using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the European Synchrotron ESRF in Grenoble. This new variant offers a deeper understanding of the electronic structure of solids. Writing in Science Advances, the research group have now presented their results

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Enhanced NMR reveals chemical structures in a fraction of the time

MIT researchers have developed a way to dramatically enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), a technique used to study the structure and composition of many kinds of molecules, including proteins linked to Alzheimer's and other diseases.

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Resurrecting the Genes of Extinct Plants

Scientists at Gingko Bioworks have resurrected the smell of an extinct flower by putting together the pieces of its DNA. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Building a barbell for 1,000 pound deadlifts takes careful engineering and lots of testing

Technology The Rogue Fitness Elephant Bar is built to bend. The Rogue Elephant Bar can handle deadlifts well over a half-ton.

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Blood Vessels Grown in a Petri Dish Closely Resemble Human Ones

The lab-made organoids are fully functional, the team reports, and could aid the study of vascular-related diseases such as diabetes.

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WIN a VIAFLO 96/384 to supercharge your microplate pipetting!

INTEGRA Biosciences is offering labs the chance to win a VIAFLO 96/384 pipette. Designed to simplify plate replication, plate reformatting or reservoir-to-plate transfers, the VIAFLO 96/384 allows labs without the space or budget for an expensive pipetting robot to increase the speed and throughput of routine tasks.

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68,000 Pounds of Frozen Chicken Nuggets Recalled Because They May Contain Wood Pieces

Thousands of bags of frozen chicken nuggets are being recalled because they may contain a not-so-tasty ingredient: wood pieces.

23h

A Former Regulator Rethinks Nuclear Energy

Greg Jaczko used to lead the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. But in his new book, he says nuclear power is too hazardous. (Image credit: Jeff Fusco/Getty Images)

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Scientists discover natural fitness watch in fishes that records their activity levels

Scientists have shown for the first time that the energetic cost of living (the metabolic rate) of fish can be measured in structures that grow in their ears. This new tool can be used to show how fish are influenced by and adapt to changes in their environment, including climate change.

23h

Waves in Saturn's rings give precise measurement of planet's rotation rate

Saturn's distinctive rings were observed in unprecedented detail by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, and scientists have now used those observations to probe the interior of the giant planet and obtain the first precise determination of its rotation rate. The length of a day on Saturn, according to their calculations, is 10 hours 33 minutes and 38 seconds.

23h

Does being bilingual make children more focused? Study says no

Bilingual children do not have more advantages than monolingual children when it comes to executive function, which includes remembering instructions, controlling responses, and shifting swiftly between tasks.

23h

Air pollution increases ER visits for breathing problems

As levels of ozone and fine particulate pollution (PM2.5) rise, more patients end up in the ER with breathing problems, according to the largest US study of air pollution and respiratory emergency room visits of patients of all ages.

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Placentas adapt when mothers have poor diets or low oxygen during pregnancy

Researchers have discovered the placenta regulates how much oxygen and nutrients it transports to babies during challenging pregnancies in the first study of its kind. The placenta is one of the least understood human organs and it is notoriously difficult to study. This new research focused on analyzing the placental mitochondria and it is hoped the new findings could lead to tests to determine w

23h

'Happiness' exercises can boost mood in those recovering from substance use disorder

Brief, text-based, self-administered exercises can significantly increase in-the-moment happiness for adults recovering from substance use disorders, report researchers.

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NASA and China collaborate on Moon exploration

The space agencies of the United States and China are coordinating efforts on Moon exploration, NASA said Friday, as it navigates a strict legal framework aimed at protecting national security and preventing technology transfer to China.

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Barcelona taxis go on strike, block major street

Dozens of taxis in Barcelona went on indefinite strike on Friday, blocking a major thoroughfare in protest against online ride-hailing services like Uber.

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Overcoming the Challenges of Farming on Mars

Overcoming the Challenges of Farming on Mars Scientists are trying to perfect a technique for growing crops in space so that astronauts have enough food to get to Mars and back. Lettuce-in-Space.jpg The study was conducted in a climate-regulated growth chamber in the Netherlands. Image credits: Silje Wolff, NTNU Social Research (CIRiS) Rights information: Please credit the photographer and use th

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Liver cancer patients can be treated for Hep C infection

A large, multi-center study refutes earlier suggestions that antiviral drugs for treating hepatitis C may lead to a higher recurrence of liver cancer.

23h

Prosecco production takes a toll on northeast Italy’s environment

The soil in Northern Italy’s prosecco vineyards is washing away.

23h

These brain cells make pain feel so bad

Researchers have identified a bundle of brain cells in mice responsible for the negative emotions that come with physical pain. If you step on a tack, neurons in your brain will register two things: that there’s a piercing physical sensation in your foot, and that it’s not pleasant. Pain research has traditionally focused on the neurons and molecules at the frontline of pain perception—the cells

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This honeybee parasite may be more of a fat stealer than a bloodsucker

Inventing decoy bee larvae prompts a back-to-basics rethink of a mite ominously named Varroa destructor.

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25,000 Years Later, Javelin Is Still Embedded in Mammoth's Rib

About 25,000 years ago, ice age hunters in what is now Poland threw a light spear known as a javelin at a mammoth. Now, the discovery of that javelin has revealed a major surprise.

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Green turtle: The success of the reintroduction program in Cayman Islands

The reintroduction program for the green turtle in the Cayman Islands has been crucial in order to recover this species, which are threatened by the effects of human overexploitation, according to the first genetic study of the green turtle's reintroduction program in this area of the Atlantic ocean.

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9 in 10 people can’t tell sponsored stuff from real news online

Most people can’t tell native advertising apart from actual news articles, according to new research. There are all kinds of ways to avoid advertising, such as using ad-blocker software, fast-forwarding through commercials, or choosing ad-free media streaming services like Netflix. This has forced advertisers to get creative to put their messages in front of digital consumers. Also known as spons

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Trump’s Entire Shutdown Approach, Encapsulated in One Tweet

Imagine you were charged with choosing an artifact to put in a time capsule so that future Americans could understand the current government shutdown. This is an unrealistic scenario, of course. No single item can explain the current moment, and moreover, there’s no reason to believe that the shutdown is actually going to end . But playing along with the game, your best bet would be this Donald T

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Parenting Looks Nothing Like What the Experts Say

Harvey Karp makes soothing babies look like a cinch. In the video that accompanies his best-selling book The Happiest Baby on the Block , he holds one screaming infant after another, deftly rolls them on their side, and bam! —the crying stops. “Side position” is just one of the techniques to calm a baby in Karp’s repertoire. He also uses swaddling, shushing, swinging, and sucking. Bleary-eyed par

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Researchers identify specific cognitive deficits in individuals with spinal cord injury

'People often focus on mobility impairments associated with SCI; however, addressing cognitive deficits in this population is also critically important,' said co-author Dr. Dyson-Hudson, director of SCI Research, and director of the Northern New Jersey SCI Model System. 'Future research needs to be based on broader measures of neuropsychological function. Identifying modifiable risk factors and de

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Fra dårlige tænder til diabetes: Din mund er forbundet med dit helbred

Diabetes giver dårlige tænder, viser forskning. Og også hjertesygdomme og psoriasis kan hænge sammen med tandsundhed.

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Here's How to Watch the Super Blood Moon Lunar Eclipse This Weekend

On Sunday, the moon will snuggle up as close as it ever does to Earth, passing through our planet's shadow and putting on a show for millions across North and South America.

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Free public transport is great news for the environment but it's no silver bullet

When Luxembourg announced recently that all public transport in the country will be free from next year, this radical move was received with astonishment. After all, most nations would surely shy away from putting such strain on public finances and from antagonising those taxpayers who don't use public transport.

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Glaciers in the Americas Are Melting Faster

Mountain glaciers are an important source of freshwater for wildlife and human communities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study Links Drug Maker Gifts for Doctors to More Overdose Deaths

Counties where doctors got more meals, trips and consulting fees from opioid makers had higher overdose deaths involving prescription opioids.

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Dr. John Mendelsohn, 82, Researcher Who Led Top Cancer Center, Dies

After pioneering a targeted cancer therapy, he oversaw MD Anderson in Houston as it gained a reputation as the nation’s top cancer hospital.

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We've dug up tiny animals from beneath a frozen Antarctic lake

The discovery of preserved carcasses of tiny crustaceans and tardigrades beneath Lake Mercer suggests biologically complex life may survive deep beneath the ice

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As shutdown drags on, scientists scramble to keep insects, plants and microbes alive

Three days a week, Don Weber shows up to work at the U.S. Department of Agriculture campus in Beltsville, Md. The parking lot is empty and the hallways are dark. Like other federal facilities across the country, the lab is closed because of the partial government shutdown.

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Man-made chemicals in our environment cause 'worrying' changes in sheep livers

Exposure to man-made chemicals found all around us has caused 'worrying' changes in sheep livers, according to the researchers behind a new study.

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'Happiness' exercises can boost mood in those recovering from substance use disorder

Brief, text-based, self-administered exercises can significantly increase in-the-moment happiness for adults recovering from substance use disorders, report researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Recovery Research Institute

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Fighting deadly drug resistant bacteria in intestines with new antibiotic

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a potentially deadly infection in the large intestine most common in people who need to take antibiotics for a long period of time, particularly in Australia's ageing population. But when doses of a new antibiotic called Ramizol were given to hamsters infected with a lethal dose of the bacteria, a significant proportion of hamsters survived the infection.

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Data breaches are inevitable – here's how to protect yourself anyway

It's tempting to give up on data security altogether, with all the billions of pieces of personal data – Social Security numbers, credit cards, home addresses, phone numbers, passwords and much more – breached and stolen in recent years. But that's not realistic – nor is the idea of going offline entirely. In any case, huge data-collection corporations vacuum up data about almost every American wi

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Government can't force people to unlock phones using facial recognition, fingerprints: Federal judge

A federal judge in Oakland ruled that law enforcement agencies cannot force people to use biometric features such as facial-recognition to unlock their phones and other devices in a case that highlights the fight between Big Tech and law enforcement over users' privacy.

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A New Way to Help Manage Parkinson's

A broader range of treatments for this disorder offers patients a more personalized approach — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Trump’s Prayer-Rug Paranoia

The president is tweeting again. Three weeks into a government shutdown triggered when the president reneged on a deal to fund the government, insisting instead that any deal had to include money for a wall on the southern border, Donald Trump tweeted about a story from the Washington Examiner that cited an anonymous rancher who claimed that Muslim “prayer rugs” were found at the U.S. border. Alt

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Blame Sacramento

Undeterred by an afternoon rainstorm, a band of students, teachers, and parents crowded the streets outside Hollywood High School the other day to chant, whistle, and brandish protest signs in support of United Teachers Los Angeles, the city’s striking teachers’ union. Stop Cheaping out on the Children read one sign that pretty much summed up the union’s bargaining stance. Similar scenes are play

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Why Democrats Have Suddenly Started Talking About Impeachment

Updated at 9:16 p.m. ET. Late Thursday night, BuzzFeed News published a report that, if true, could prove historic: President Donald Trump allegedly directed his then–personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, to lie to Congress about a real-estate deal he was pursuing in Moscow during the 2016 election. Trump immediately denied the story, but for many Democrats, including those who had previously cautioned

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Molecular ‘machine’ makes strong natural antibiotic

Researchers have solved a nearly 30-year mystery: how the molecular machinery works in an enzyme that makes a potent antibiotic. The findings provide the tools to design new antibiotics, anticancer drugs, and other therapeutics. The potent natural antibiotic, microcin B17, kills harmful E. coli bacteria. Microbial resistance to antibiotics—due to their overuse and misuse—is one of the biggest thr

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Two skeletons aren’t different hominin species after all

Two skeletons, thought to be from different early hominin species, are actually from the same species, report anthropologists. The fossil site of Malapa in the Cradle of Humankind, South Africa yielded two partial skeletons: a juvenile male individual—Malapa Hominin 1 (MH1)—and an adult female (MH2); each is more complete than the famous “Lucy” specimen from Ethiopia. Lee Berger, a professor in t

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Can genetic engineering save disappearing forests?

Compared to gene-edited babies in China and ambitious projects to rescue woolly mammoths from extinction, biotech trees might sound pretty tame.

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Two thirds of people in their 20s now live with their parents – here's how it affects their lives

Gone are the days when living at home in your 20s was seen as an embarrassing sign of arrested development. Today, 63% of single adults between the ages of 20 and 29 live with their parents, as do just over half of 25- to 29-year-olds. This inevitably raises issues about how families share costs, and what sort of living standards both older and younger generations can maintain in this arrangement.

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Stoking conflict between farming and conservation hurts everyone

Canada's future prosperity will depend on effective environmental conservation and sustainable —and profitable —agriculture. Unfortunately, recent comments from former Saskatchewan premier Brad Wall pit the two concerns against each other unnecessarily.

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If Trump Told Cohen to Lie, Impeachment Is ComingMichael Cohen D. Trump

An explosive new report from Buzzfeed News makes the impeachment of Donald Trump not just possible, but likely.

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'Make love, not CO2': Swiss students march for climate action

Thousands of school children and university students across Switzerland skipped class on Friday to march in the streets and demand climate action, telling politicians "There is no planet B".

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Bad math: Software error tweaks grades in N Carolina schools

A software error caused public school students around North Carolina to receive incorrect end-of-term grades this school year, state education officials said.

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Technology near for real-time TV political fact checks

A Duke University team expects to have a product available for election year that will allow television networks to offer real-time fact checks onscreen when a politician makes a questionable claim during a speech or debate.

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Nanoparticle breakthrough in the fight against cancer

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer.

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New research finds that when it comes to crowdsourcing, less is more

New research from Cass Business School has found a solution that deals with one of the primary challenges businesses face when they crowdsource innovation.

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Researchers come face to face with huge great white shark

Two shark researchers who came face to face with what could be one of the largest great whites ever recorded are using their encounter as an opportunity to push for legislation that would protect sharks in Hawaii.

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Researchers discover synaptic logic for connections between two brain hemispheres

Researchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience have developed a new combination of technologies that allows them to identify the functional properties of individual synapses that link the two hemispheres and determine how they are arranged within a neuron's dendritic field.

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Placentas adapt when mothers have poor diets or low oxygen during pregnancy

Cambridge researchers have discovered the placenta regulates how much oxygen and nutrients it transports to babies during challenging pregnancies in the first study of its kind. The placenta is one of the least understood human organs and it is notoriously difficult to study. This new research focused on analysing the placental mitochondria and it is hoped the new findings could lead to tests to d

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Bioengineering & Translational Medicine honors biotech pioneers Langer and Peppas

Bioengineering & Translational Medicine (BioTM), published by Wiley on behalf of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) and its Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), has released a tribute issue dedicated to research inspired by Robert Langer and Nicholas Peppas — two biotechnology luminaries whose game-changing contributions to drug delivery and biomaterials have made those fie

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Does being bilingual make children more focused? Study says no

Bilingual children do not have more advantages than monolingual children when it comes to executive function, which includes remembering instructions, controlling responses, and shifting swiftly between tasks, according to a new study published in PLOS ONE.

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Waves in Saturn's rings give precise measurement of planet's rotation rate

Saturn's distinctive rings were observed in unprecedented detail by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, and scientists have now used those observations to probe the interior of the giant planet and obtain the first precise determination of its rotation rate. The length of a day on Saturn, according to their calculations, is 10 hours 33 minutes and 38 seconds.

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Researchers examine how musicians communicate non-verbally during performance

A team of researchers from McMaster University has discovered a new technique to examine how musicians intuitively coordinate with one another during a performance, silently predicting how each will express the music.

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How investment in irrigation is paying off for Ethiopia's economy

After rapid economic growth averaging 10% every year between 2004 and 2014, Ethiopia has emerged as an engine of development in Africa.

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Bison are back, and that benefits many other species on the Great Plains

Driving north of Pawhuska, Oklahoma, an extraordinary landscape comes into view. Trees disappear and an immense landscape of grass emerges, undulating in the wind like a great, green ocean.

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Mangrove patches deserve greater recognition no matter the size

Governments must provide stronger protection for crucial small mangrove patches, is the call led by scientists at international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London), which hosts the IUCN SSC Mangrove Specialist Group, in a letter published in Science today.

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Natural History Museum dinosaur Dippy lands in Glasgow

Specialists put 21.3-metre skeleton back together in Kelvingrove Museum Experts have been piecing together Dippy the dinosaur before he goes on public display on the only Scottish stop of his UK tour. The Natural History Museum London’s 21.3-metre replica diplodocus skeleton arrived at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow this month after sailing across the Irish Sea. Continue reading…

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Potential biotech and health applications with new knowledge on bacteria and viruses

University of Otago research to better understand how bacteria and their viruses interact and evolve will enable future studies to exploit the use of bacteria and their viruses for potential biotechnology and health applications.

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A Lot on the Mind: Autism

In the second event hosted by Caveat NYC of a three-part series dedicated to explaining the most misunderstood neurological disorders, the focus was on autism, or autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Of the many neurological disorders that affect the world, autism is one of the most familiar. Affecting 1 out of every 59 people , there are characteristics associated with the disorder that seem to be fa

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Scientists discover natural fitness watch in fishes that records their activity levels

An international research team including scientists from the University of Southampton have shown for the first time that the energetic cost of living (the metabolic rate) of fish can be measured in structures that grow in their ears. This new tool can be used to show how fish are influenced by and adapt to changes in their environment, including climate change.

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Waves in Saturn's rings give precise measurement of planet's rotation rate

Saturn's distinctive rings were observed in unprecedented detail by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, and scientists have now used those observations to probe the interior of the giant planet and obtain the first precise determination of its rotation rate. The length of a day on Saturn, according to their calculations, is 10 hours 33 minutes and 38 seconds.

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Green turtle: The success of the reintroduction program in Cayman Islands

The reintroduction program for the green turtle in the Cayman Islands has been crucial in order to recover this species, which are threatened by the effects of human overexploitation, according to the first genetic study of the green turtle's reintroduction program in this area of the Atlantic ocean.

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New study shows physician-targeted marketing is associated with increase in opioid overdose deaths

New research from NYU School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center published online Jan. 18 in JAMA Network Open shows that increased marketing of opioid products to physicians — from consulting fees to free meals — is associated with higher opioid prescribing rates and elevated overdose deaths in the US.

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Have new appointment wait times improved at VA health care system?

This study compared new appointment wait times in the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system with wait times in the private sector. Wait time data were for primary care, dermatology, cardiology or orthopedics at VA medical centers in 15 major metropolitan areas and private sector comparison data came from a published survey.

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Is marketing of opioids to physicians associated with overdose deaths?

This study examined the association between pharmaceutical company marketing of opioids to physicians and subsequent death from prescription opioid overdoses across US counties. The study, which analyzed industry marketing information data and national data on opioid prescribing and overdose deaths, reports almost $40 million in opioid marketing was targeted to more than 67,500 physicians across m

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Antarctic expedition yields remains of tiny, ancient 'water bears'

Scientists surprised by haul of crustaceans and tardigrades in undisturbed subglacial lake Scientists have found the remains of tiny, ancient animals in an Antarctic lake that has lain undisturbed for thousands of years beneath a kilometre-thick slab of ice. The surprise haul of dead crustaceans and tardigrades, also known as “water bears” or “moss piglets”, was made by US researchers on a rare m

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Tech to protect children from school shooting? Medical school dropout's Manayunk startup is on it.

Matias Klein is a medical school dropout who is still out to save lives. Orlando "Jahlil Beats" Tucker is a hip-hop producer and songwriter trying to help breathe new life into his beleaguered Delaware County hometown of Chester.

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Shift to planetary health diet would impact UK land use and global water resources

The EAT-Lancet Commission on Food, Planet, Health has today released a 'planetary health diet', that advocates a radical shift in dietary habits.

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Lab-on-a-chip helps search for human DNA at crime scenes

Thanks to the work carried out by University of Twente Ph.D. candidate Brigitte Bruijns, crime scenes can now be inspected on the spot for the presence of human DNA. In her Ph.D. thesis, she describes a lab-on-a-chip that rapidly indicates whether a trace discovered at a crime scene contains human DNA and, thus, whether it should be examined in the laboratory.

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Sloths are far more adaptable than we realised

Unless you live in the tropical rainforests of South or Central America, most of the sloths you'll encounter will be two-toed sloths. This is because they are able to eat quite a varied diet and are therefore relatively easy to keep in captivity. Their relatives, the three-toed sloths, on the other hand, have a very restricted diet, subsisting solely on Cecropia: a group of fast-growing tree speci

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Biologists discover deep-sea fish living where there is virtually no oxygen

Oxygen—it's a basic necessity for animal life. But marine biologists recently discovered large schools of fishes living in the dark depths of the Gulf of California where there is virtually no oxygen. Using an underwater robot, the scientists observed these fishes thriving in low-oxygen conditions that would be deadly to most other fish. This discovery could help scientists understand how other ma

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Using bacteria to create a water filter that kills bacteria

More than one in 10 people in the world lack basic drinking water access, and by 2025, half of the world's population will be living in water-stressed areas, which is why access to clean water is one of the National Academy of Engineering's Grand Challenges. Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis have designed a novel membrane technology that purifies water while preventing biofouling, or

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Top Science Stories of 2018

Top Science Stories of 2018 The end-of-the-year cool science stories summed up. Top Science Stories of 2018 Video of Top Science Stories of 2018 Physics Friday, January 18, 2019 – 10:45 Alistair Jennings, Contributor (Inside Science) — Alistair Jennings sums up some of the most interesting science stories for the 2018 year. References: http://www.hayabusa2.jaxa.jp/en/ https://www.nature.com/arti

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Global change could also affect hake fisheries in Tierra del Fuego

A scientific study published in the journal Global Change Biology suggests snoek (Thyrsites atun) can recolonize the marine area of the Beagle Channel and South-Western Atlantic waters, an area in the American continent where this species competed with the hake (Merluccius sp.) to hunt preys in warmer periods.

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Pesticides found in more than 80% of tested European soils

The industrialisation of agriculture has radically transformed the way most of our food is produced. By making large-scale production possible, it has led to more food being available at lower prices throughout the world. However, we are increasingly seeing the negative side of this chemically intensive system of food production. Today, 2,000 pesticides with 500 chemical substances are being used

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Viewpoints: should teaching students who fail a literacy and numeracy test be barred from teaching?

Starting this month, teaching students who fail or haven't yet taken the Literacy and Numeracy Test for Initial Teacher Education (LANTITE) will not be able to teach in Victorian schools. Previously, around one in 20 teachers who had failed the test or hadn't taken it yet received provisional registration. Prospective students who took the test late in 2018 received their results on January 11.

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Climate change is making construction, fishing and other dangerous industries even riskier

Climate change is already affecting many aspects of our everyday lives, including what we eat, where we live and the buildings we inhabit. And dangerous industries that make our way of life possible, such as agriculture, construction and fishing, are becoming riskier than ever as a result of changing weather. As extreme natural events become more common, it is increasingly important these industri

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Researchers find cooling effect of aerosols in cumulus and MSC clouds twice as high as thought

An international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests the cooling effect of aerosols in cumulus and MSC clouds is twice as high as thought. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their analyses of data from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) database and what they found.

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Indonesia’s Rights Struggle: Deciding Which Candidate Is the ‘Lesser Evil’

JAKARTA —Standing on a stage in the Hotel Bidakara’s ballroom in downtown Jakarta during a presidential debate, Indonesia’s incumbent leader, Joko Widodo, meekly defended what has been, at best, a checkered record on human rights. Widodo, popularly known simply as Jokowi, denied having overseen any rights violations; he pledged, as he did four years ago when he first ran for the presidency, to re

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Some national parks won’t recover from the government shutdown for decades

Environment Joshua Tree and other deserts house sensitive soil crust communities. Photos of felled Joshua trees went viral last week, a casualty of the government shutdown and the related lack of oversight in the eponymous national park. Other arid…

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The political progress women have made — and what's next | Cecile Richards

Women have made enormous progress over the last century — challenging the status quo, busting old taboos and changing business from the inside out. But when it comes to political representation, there's still a long way to go, says activist Cecile Richards. In this visionary talk, Richards calls for a global political revolution for women's equality and offers her ideas for how we can build it.

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Is winter miserable for wildlife?

While the weather outside may indeed get frightful this winter, a parka, knit hat, wool socks, insulated boots and maybe a roaring fire make things bearable for people who live in cold climates. But what about all the wildlife out there? Won't they be freezing?

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Mediterranean freshwater fish species susceptible to climate change

Climate change will strongly affect many European freshwater fish species. This is particularly the case for species in the Mediterranean region, according to the latest findings of an international team of researchers from institutions including IGB, the University of Girona in Spain, the Norwegian Research Centre (NORCE) and the Czech Academy of Sciences.

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Pharma Spending on Doctors Is Correlated With Opioid Deaths

A new study shows that doctors wrote more prescriptions, and more people overdosed on opioids, in counties where drug companies spent more money.

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Helium kan måske forklare mystisk signal i detektor for mørkt stof

Et sæsonmæssigt varierende signal i en italiensk detektor skyldes måske ikke mørkt stof, som forskerne formoder, men ioniserede heliumatomer.

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Hand-knitted molecules

Molecules are usually formed in reaction vessels or laboratory flasks. An Empa research team has now succeeded in producing molecules between two microscopically small, movable gold tips – in a sense as a "hand-knitted" unique specimen. The properties of the molecules can be monitored in real time while they are being produced. The research results have just been published in Nature Communications

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Large Hadron Collider replacement plans unveiled – here's what it could discover

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. During its ten years of operations it has led to remarkable discoveries, including the long sought-after Higgs boson. On January 15, an international team of physicists unveiled the concept design for a new particle accelerator that would dwarf the LHC.

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How molecules interact with a laser field

When molecules interact with the oscillating field of a laser, an instantaneous, time-dependent dipole is induced. This very general effect underlies diverse physical phenomena such as optical tweezers, for which Arthur Ashkin received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2018, as well as the spatial alignment of molecules by a laser field. Now scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics

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Scientists discover natural fitness watch in fishes that records their activity levels

An international research team including scientists from the University of Southampton have shown for the first time that the energetic cost of living (the metabolic rate) of fish can be measured in structures that grow in their ears. This new tool can be used to show how fish are influenced by and adapt to changes in their environment, including climate change.

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Making stars when the universe was half its age

The universe is about 13.8 billion years old, and its stars are arguably its most momentous handiwork. Astronomers studying the intricacies of star formation across cosmic time are trying to understand whether stars and the processes that produce them were the same when the universe was younger, about half its current age. They already know that from three to six billion years after the big bang s

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In search of Weyl semimetals

Imagine how much you could accomplish if the circuits in your laptop and cell phone worked 10 times faster, and your battery lasted 10 times longer, than they do now.

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The Mixed Reception of the Hamilton Premiere in Puerto Rico

Heading into the opening night of Hamilton in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on January 11, I wasn’t sure what to expect. The musical was supposed to begin previews three days earlier at the theater of the University of Puerto Rico, the alma mater of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s father, Luis, under a new million-dollar roof financed by the show’s fundraising campaign to repair hurricane damage. Some students and

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Letters: Even More Unthinkable Moments

Unthinkable: 50 Moments That Define an Improbable Presidency This week marks the halfway point of Donald Trump’s presidency . “Like many Americans, we sometimes find the velocity of chaos unmanageable,” Jeffrey Goldberg, the editor in chief of The Atlantic , wrote in his introduction to a special project taking stock of Trump’s first two years as president . “So we decided to pause for a moment a

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Researchers find short bouts of stairclimbing throughout the day can boost health

It just got harder to avoid exercise. A few minutes of stair climbing, at short intervals throughout the day, can improve cardiovascular health, according to new research from kinesiologists at McMaster University and UBC Okanagan.

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Mangrove patches deserve greater recognition no matter the size

Governments must provide stronger protection for crucial small mangrove patches, is the call led by scientists at international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London), which hosts the IUCN SSC Mangrove Specialist Group, in a letter published in Science today.

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10 year challenge: How science and the world have changed

The last 10 years have seen amazing advances in science and technology – and stark damage to the world we live in. Like a lot of people on social media we thought we'd take a look back at the last ten years in science and New Scientist

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Vital Signs: The power of not being too clear

Incentives, in one form or other, are central to our lives.

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Light connects two worlds on a single chip

For the first time, researchers of the University of Twente succeeded in connecting two parts of an electronics chip using an on-chip optical link. A light connection could be a safe way of connecting a high-power component and digital control circuitry on one chip without a direct electrical link. Until now, however, an optical link was not possible using standard silicon chip technology. Vishal

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A new way to transfer energy between cells

Researchers from the Catalonian Institute of Bioengineering (Instituto de Bioingeniería de Cataluña) and the Seville Chemical Research Institute (Instituto de Investigaciones Químicas de Sevilla) have described a new method for the transmission of electrons between proteins that refutes the evidence from experiments until now. This process, involved in the generation of energy in both animal and p

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Experts push the boundaries of 3-D microscopy

Two newly developed methods will help researchers to study the 3-D structure of complex surfaces and of individual neurons better than ever before. Sebastian Munck and Natalia Gunko, two expert technologists at VIB-KU Leuven, report new imaging protocols that will advance neuroscience and (bio)imaging in general.

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New light shed on intensely studied material

The organic polymer PEDOT is one of the world's most intensely studied materials. Despite this, researchers at Linköping University have now demonstrated that the material functions in a completely different manner than previously believed. The result has huge significance in many fields of application.

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Florida pulls Keys' ospreys from endangered animals list as numbers climb statewide

The Florida Keys' ospreys, the fierce fish hawks whose massive nests dot utility poles, channel markers and nesting platforms up and down the ribbon of islands, will no longer be listed as an imperiled species by the state.

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Proposed engineering method could help make buildings and bridges safer

Pearlitic steel, or pearlite, is one of the strongest materials in the world, and can be made into long, thin wires. The strength of pearlite allows it to support very heavy weight, and it has the unique ability to stretch and contract without breaking (ductility). Ductility is important for building bridges, because even very strong materials can break when subjected to stretching if they are not

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A 'decathlon' for antibiotics puts them through more realistic testing

The environments where bacteria thrive in our bodies are very different from those in which they're tested in the lab, and that can be a problem. Sriram Chandrasekaran, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Michigan, is using advanced computer simulations to study how different environments affect antibiotic performance.

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Tweak advances stem cells approach to treat diabetes

Researchers have come up with a solution to problems with turning stem cells into insulin-producing cells. Stem cells can transform into cells that produce insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar. But the amount of insulin they produce is difficult to control. Tweaking the recipe for coaxing human stem cells into insulin-secreting beta cells, however, makes the resulting cells more respons

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Researchers examine how musicians communicate non-verbally during performance

A team of researchers from McMaster University has discovered a new technique to examine how musicians intuitively coordinate with one another during a performance, silently predicting how each will express the music.

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Exposure to chemicals during pregnancy is not associated with an increase in blood pressure

New study analyses the health impact of exposure to 21 non-persistent chemicals among pregnant women.

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Antibodies to a retina protein to be used as a kidney cancer marker

Sechenov University together with their German colleagues suggest a new highly sensitive, quick, and pain-free method for diagnosing kidney cancer. This method is based on measuring of the immune response to arrestin-1, a retina protein that is synthesized in the cancerous cells of kidneys.

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Tinkering with public debt we doom innovation and growth

New research by Bocconi University's Mariano Max Croce and colleagues finds that public debt is bad for growth also because it hinders innovative firms' investment. 'By affecting their cost of capital, movements in government debt impact firms' investment and, critically, innovation decisions,' Professor Croce says. The net result is a GDP growth drop in four to five years, when the lack of innova

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Your body’s full of stuff you no longer need. Here's a list.

An evolutionary biologist got people swapping ideas about our lingering vestigia. Basically, this is the stuff that served some evolutionary purpose at some point, but now is kind of, well, extra. Here are the six traits that inaugurated the fun. Evolutionary anthropologist and Boston College post-doc , Dorsa Amir , started the whole thing with a series of eight tweets , and boy did she start som

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The Books Briefing: These Books Are Alive With the Sound of Music

I’ll acknowledge that reading about music seems counterintuitive. But it’s one thing to just listen to a piece or song, and another thing entirely to do so while understanding what a particular melody might represent, or what inspired a composer, or what impact a certain work may have had on musical history. The esteemed pianist Alfred Brendel gives readers a peek inside his mind with Music, Sens

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Photos of the Week: Ice Disk, Pet Blessings, Presidential Burgers

Teachers on strike in Los Angeles, “Kiss a Ginger Day” in Ireland, icy purification in Japan, a terror attack in Nairobi, the Australian Open in Melbourne, heavy snow in Austria, fashion shows in Berlin and Paris, the “No Pants Subway Ride” in New York, and much more

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How gut bacteria affect the treatment of Parkinson's disease

Patients with Parkinson's disease are treated with levodopa, which is converted into dopamine, a neurotransmitter in the brain. In a study published on Jan. 18, in the journal Nature Communications, scientists from the University of Groningen show that gut bacteria can metabolize levodopa into dopamine. As dopamine cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, this makes the medication less effective — e

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Researchers find new ways to harness wasted methane

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) presented new ways to harness wasted methane.

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Hand-knitted molecules

Molecules are usually formed in reaction vessels or laboratory flasks. An Empa research team has now succeeded in producing molecules between two microscopically small, movable gold tips — in a sense as a 'hand-knitted' unique specimen. The properties of the molecules can be monitored in real time while they are being produced. The research results have just been published in Nature Communication

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New therapeutic avenue in the fight against chronic liver disease

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer.

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Mediterranean freshwater fish species susceptible to climate change

Climate change will strongly affect many European freshwater fish species. This is particularly the case for species in the Mediterranean region, according to the latest findings of an international team of researchers from institutions including IGB, the University of Girona in Spain, the Norwegian Research Centre (NORCE) and the Czech Academy of Sciences.

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Killer blows? Knockout study of pair of mouse MicroRNA provides cancer insight

Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers used knockout mouse models created by gene editing to reveal that the miRNA miR-146b, like miR-146a, is involved in the development of cancers, with them having similar but not identical effects. The knockout mice showed high rates of B-cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia, which was associated with the absence of miRNA causing NF-κB overa

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Copenhagen residents are torn over Denmark's proposed 'Silicon Valley'

The Danish government is building nine artificial islands known as Holmene off the coast of Hvidovre. The 33 million square feet of new land will house 380 businesses and 170 acres of parkland, creating 30,000 new jobs. Local residents fear this project will alienate the middle class while disrupting traffic and public transportation systems in nearby Copenhagen. None In 1997, I lived in San Brun

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Sexist? Bigoted? Aren’t we all? | Oliver Burkeman

Before we point the finger at others, maybe it’s time to take a closer look at our own behaviour You’ll recall, I assume, the ancient riddle about the father and son rushed to casualty after a car crash, where the surgeon, taking one look at the boy, declares, “I can’t operate on him, he’s my son!” As a way of making a point about sexism, this doesn’t really work any more: the twist or “solution”

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Check Out These Amazing Super-Detailed Images of Fruit Fly Brains

A team of neuroscientists have produced a series of amazing, detailed images of fruit fly brains using a brand-new combination of imaging techniques.

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Photo Gallery: Meet the Workers Who Build an Entire City of Ice Every Year

Photographer Kevin Frayer goes behind the scenes at the massive Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in China’s Heilongjiang Province.

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Care about Science? Demand a Better Democracy

We won’t get science-based policies unless our political system permits them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Has LIGO Seen Galaxy-Warped Gravitational Waves?

Nobel laureate George Smoot claims LIGO has observed amplified signals of black hole mergers from the very distant universe, but LIGO scientists disagree — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Plant peptide helps roots to branch out in the right places

How do plants space out their roots? A Japanese research team has identified a peptide and its receptor that help lateral roots to grow with the right spacing. The findings were published on Dec. 20, 2018 in the online edition of Developmental Cell.

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Poor sleep and heart-related death

Elderly men who experience extended episodes of interrupted breathing while asleep have a high risk of heart problems. Research shows for the first time that poor blood oxygenation is a good indicator of the chance of heart-related death, which cannot be attributed to sleep apnoea alone.

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Potential biotech and health applications with new knowledge on bacteria and viruses

University of Otago research to better understand how bacteria and their viruses interact and evolve will enable future studies to exploit the use of bacteria and their viruses for potential biotechnology and health applications.

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Regionerne forstår stadig ikke regeringens regnestykke

Danske Regioner og regeringsmedlemmer har holdt møde om regeringens sundhedsreform. Fin dialog, men fortsat skepsis, lyder det fra regionernes formand.

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We’re getting closer to being able to track stolen bitcoins

Cybersecurity experts have never been able to trace individual bitcoins, which is why it is so easy for cryptocurrency criminals to cover their tracks. A new algorithm could change that by revealing hidden patterns of Bitcoin money-laundering.

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Yes, cabin fever is real—here's how to prevent it

DIY Don't let winter isolation ruin your mood. As the weather becomes more intense, we huddle indoors. This habit can lead to so-called cabin fever. Here's how to prevent it from setting in.

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Gene therapy promotes nerve regeneration

Researchers have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to a faster recovery after nerve damage. By combining a surgical repair procedure with gene therapy, the survival of nerve cells and regeneration of nerve fibers over a long distance was stimulated. The discovery is an important step towards the development of a new treatment for people with nerve damage.

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Why do Hydra end up with just a single head?

Hydra is able to regenerate any part of its body to rebuild an entire individual. The head organizer performs two opposite activities, one activating, which causes the head to differentiate, and the other inhibiting, which prevents the formation of supernumerary heads. Researchers have discovered the identity of the inhibitor, called Sp5, and deciphered the dialogue between these two antagonistic

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Frailty could make people more susceptible to dementia

New research suggests that frailty makes older adults more susceptible to Alzheimer's dementia, and moderates the effects of dementia-related brain changes on dementia symptoms. The findings suggest that frailty should be considered in clinical care and management of Alzheimer's dementia.

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Windshield wipers collect rain data to fight floods

Tracking windshield wiper activity can provide faster, more accurate rainfall data than radar and rain gauge systems we currently have in place, according to new research. With a test fleet in the city of Ann Arbor, Michigan, engineers tracked when wipers were in use and matched that information with video from onboard cameras to document rainfall. Researchers collected data from a set of 70 cars

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Feds failed to protect habitat of endangered bee found in Illinois, lawsuit says

Federal agencies failed to follow the law in protecting the habitat of an endangered bumblebee that continues to be found in Illinois despite major population loss nationwide, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday in Washington, D.C., by an environmentalist group.

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Første exoskeletter på vej ud i danske industrivirksomheder

PLUS. Trættende gentagne arbejdsbevægelser kan få et løft med passive exoskeletter. Det første bliver nu introduceret på det danske marked, og Aalborg-professor forventer, at vi kun lige er kommet i gang.

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Praktiserende læger roser markant uddannelsesløft

PLO-formand Christian Freitag roser regerings ambition om at løfte lægeuddannelsen, der i sidste ende vil kunne løfte en presset almen praksis.

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Sådan vil regeringen sikre flere praktiserende læger

Regeringen vil sikre lægedækningen ved at frigøre flere hænder og mere arbejdsglæde. Ifølge sundhedsministeren skal der alternative initiativer til.

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Gene indicates whose prostate cancer will spread

Scientists have discovered a gene in cancerous prostate tumors that indicates when someone is at high risk of their cancer spreading. “Currently, when a patient is diagnosed with prostate cancer, physicians can determine how advanced a tumor is but not whether the patients’ cancer will spread,” says Antonina Mitrofanova, an assistant professor at Rutgers School of Health Professions and a researc

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Violence in PG-13 rated movies not linked to violence in US society

New research suggests that policy makers should remain focused on issues that have been demonstrated to impact criminal behavior, such as family environment, mental health, poverty and education.

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The Cerebellum Is Your "Little Brain"–and It Does Some Pretty Big Things

A newly identified circuit connecting the cerebellum to the brain’s reward centers in mice could help scientists understand autism and addiction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Breville Smart Oven Pizzaiolo Review: Love at First Slice

Breville's smart oven makes a foolproof, restaurant-quality Neapolitan-style pizza, and sits on your countertop.

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An 'Assassin's Creed' DLC Controversy Leads the Week's Game News

Also: hey, why do Star Wars games keep getting canceled?

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Untargeted metabolomics for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Four out of five CVD deaths are due to myocardial infarction or stroke. Despite many initiatives that have been established for CVD prevention and risk management, and new therapies to treat existing CVD, patients continue to die from cardiac events.

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Nerve growth factor: Early studies and recent clinical trials

NGF is the first discovered member of a family of neurotrophic factors, collectively indicated as neurotrophins, (which include brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3 and neurotrophin 4/5). NGF was discovered for its action on the survival and differentiation of selected populations of peripheral neurons.

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Musculoskeletal and rheumatic diseases induced by immune checkpoint inhibitors

Immune checkpoint inhibitors are a new promising class of antitumor drugs that have been associated with a number of immune-related Adverse Events (AEs), including musculoskeletal and rheumatic disease.

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Fidarestat prevents high-fat diet-induced intestinal polyps in ApcMin/+ mice

Recent epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that obesity is a major risk factor for Colorectal Cancer (CRC). Regular intake of high fat-containing diet can promote obesity and metabolic syndrome by increasing the insulin resistance and inflammatory response which contribute to carcinogenesis.

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Home-based hypertension program produces 'striking' results

Pilot study finds that an innovative care-delivery program helped 81 percent of participants achieve blood pressure control in seven weeks.

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Unraveling of 58-year-old corn gene mystery may have plant-breeding implications

In discovering a mutant gene that 'turns on' another gene responsible for the red pigments sometimes seen in corn, researchers solved an almost six-decades-old mystery with a finding that may have implications for plant breeding in the future.

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Intensive (often impossible) parenting is all the rage

Regardless of their education, income, or race, most parents say a child-centered, time-intensive approach to parenting is the best way to raise their kids, researchers report. The findings suggest intensive parenting has become the dominant model for how parents across the socioeconomic spectrum feel they should raise their children—regardless of whether the parent has the resources to actually

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How music crosses cultures and empowers communities | LADAMA

Singing in Spanish, Portuguese and English, LADAMA brings a vibrant, energizing and utterly danceable musical set to the TED stage. In between performances of their songs "Night Traveler" and "Porro Maracatu," they discuss how cross-cultural musical collaboration can empower communities.

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Otoliths — the fish's black box — also keeps an eye on the metabolism

For the first time ever, an international research team has shown that fish otoliths record information on fish metabolism. Analyses of old and new otoliths can therefore provide new knowledge about how different species of fish adapt to new conditions, including climate change.

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What Life Is Like When Corn Is Off the Table

When Christine Robinson was first diagnosed with a corn allergy 17 years ago, she remembers thinking, “No more popcorn, no more tacos. I can do this.” Then she tried to put salt on her tomatoes. (Table salt has dextrose, a sugar derived from corn.) She tried drinking bottled iced tea. (It contains citric acid, which often comes from mold grown in corn-derived sugar.) She tried bottled water. (Add

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Mobil-antenner bliver bedre – men kvaliteten svinger enormt

Aalborg Universitet har testet antennekvaliteten i 16 udvalgte mobiltelefoner. Konklusion: Telefonerne i dag kan opfange et signal, der er under halvt så kraftigt som i 2016, men der er fortsat enorm forskel telefonerne i mellem.

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1st Interstellar Visitor 'Oumuamua Is Actually Not That Special

A cigar-shaped space rock named 'Oumuamua caused quite a stir when it became the first interstellar visitor discovered in our solar system. Is it an asteroid, a comet or an alien spacecraft? Whatever it is, it's probably not unique.

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Here's How a Huge Exoplanet Very Close to Earth Could Hide Strange Forms of Life

There's a rocky planet in our stellar neighborhood that's very big and cold. However, scientists argue, it might still hold life.

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Mini-Monsters with Multiple Heads Created in the Lab

A single genetic tweak can mess up the process of regeneration in hydras, causing them to sprout multiple heads.

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Home-based hypertension program produces 'striking' results

Pilot study by Brigham investigators finds that an innovative care-delivery program helped 81 percent of participants achieve blood pressure control in seven weeks.

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This Charge Is Different

It’s not just the collusion. It’s the conspiracy. Thursday evening, BuzzFeed News dropped a bombshell , reporting that President Donald Trump told Michael Cohen, his former personal attorney, to lie to Congress about the Trump Organization’s pursuit of a real-estate project in Moscow during the 2016 election, during a period in which the Russian government was seeking to aid Trump’s presidential

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When It’s Time to Sell the Family Home

The house in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, that Denise Portner and her husband raised their two children in was the site of dozens of celebrations—from birthday parties to Passover seders and Rosh Hashanah dinners. It was where she beat cancer. It was where her children were potty trained and where they returned to during their breaks from college. But after 15 years, it was time to go. “It was a bi

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High Maintenance Goes Naked

How’s this for an opening hook of a TV season? An elderly, unkempt, and out-of-shape male character that viewers have never before seen, stark naked, picks up an ungainly pot of boiling water from a stove. Slowly, awkwardly, with great straining, he carries it up some stairs. Will he drop the pot and scald his genitals? is the main suspense on offer. Not easy viewing. But fans of the still-brilli

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Algorithm predicts which rappers will work together

A new algorithm can predict which groups, such as rappers, are likely to work together in the future based on their past partnerships. In 2013, for example, rap artists Gucci Mane and Young Thug collaborated on the song “Anything” on a Mane mixtape, and both later appeared on Waka Flocka Flame’s track “Fell.” In 2014, Young Thug twice featured on Travis Scott’s mixtape, Days Before Rodeo , and bo

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'Glass' Review: It's not Perfect, But It Says a Lot About Heroism

There's one big question at the core of writer-director M. Night Shyamalan's new movie: Who gets to be a hero?

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Space Billboards Are Just the Latest Orbital Stunt

A company that wants to slap logos on the night sky is raising tricky questions about what belongs in space.

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7 iconic movie training montages ranked by professional trainers

Muscle Month Would Rocky’s regimen really work? We asked the experts. We asked professional trainers to rate the realness of these seven iconic movie training montages. Here’s what they had to say about every regimen from Rocky to Mulan.

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Why a Scientist Is Running for Seattle City Council

When it comes to our biggest challenges, we need scientifically informed policies to make lasting, sustainable change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Elephants, Herpes, and Protests: A Zoo Tragedy Distorted

There has been a recent kerfuffle over the death of a young elephant from elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus hemorrhagic disease. Was it the zoo's fault? Probably not .

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Image of the Day: Sweet Lure

Thought to be a nectar con artist, the candy spider-orchid actually does feed its pollinators, a select group of bees.

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Australia swelters in record temperatures with warmest ever night

Noona in New South Wales recorded Australia's warmest ever night with temperatures remaining above 35.9°C on 17 January

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Moon craters reveal surprise rise in asteroid shrapnel pelting Earth

Craters on the moon show that it and Earth faced a massive increase in large meteorite strikes about 290 million years ago, which could have endangered life on the planet

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More data, lower cost – DIY electronics tackle global change

Scientific research can be a costly undertaking, oftentimes so much so that projects become cost-prohibitive. So what happens when the research is too expensive, but the data is too important to leave uncollected?

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Quakes a reminder of the reach of partial government shutdown

If the partial shutdown of the U.S. government, doesn't have you quaking, maybe it should.

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With fire, warming and drought, Yellowstone forests could be grassland by mid-century

The fires in Yellowstone National Park began to burn in June 1988. A natural feature of the landscape, park managers expected the fires to fizzle out by July, when rains historically drenched the forests and valleys of the world's first national park.

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Q&A: Designing a better local tsunami warning system

On a Friday afternoon in the spring of 2011, the Tōhoku-Oki earthquake shook northeastern Japan for six minutes and shifted the country's main island by 8 feet. Minutes later, residents began receiving tsunami warnings through broadcast media, mobile phones and sirens.

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Lunar De-Light! How to View 2019's Sole Total Eclipse of the Moon

On January 20, stargazers across the Americas will have stunning views of a historic celestial event — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Gene therapy promotes nerve regeneration

Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and the Leiden University Medical Center have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to a faster recovery after nerve damage. By combining a surgical repair procedure with gene therapy, the survival of nerve cells and regeneration of nerve fibers over a long distance was stimulated. The discovery, published in Brain, is an importan

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Image: Jupiter-family comet 46P Wirtanen

The ghostly green glow at the very top of this image reveals the presence of 46P Wirtanen – a relatively small comet with an estimated diameter of 1.2 kilometers. Had the path of history taken a different course, we would have much more than estimates about this Jupiter-family comet.

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Byretten giver Københavns Universitet medhold i sag om doktorgrad

Københavns Universitet har fået rettens ord for, at fratagelsen af Milena Penkowas doktorgrad…

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Artificially produced cells communicate with each other

Friedrich Simmel and Aurore Dupin, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), have for the first time created artificial cell assemblies that can communicate with each other. The cells, separated by fatty membranes, exchange small chemical signaling molecules to trigger more complex reactions, such as the production of RNA and other proteins.

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Two tiny beetle fossils offer evolution and biogeography clues

It is well-known that living fossils exhibit stasis over geologically long time scales. Examples are the panda and ginkgo. Now, two tiny beetles trapped in 99-million-year-old amber may join this group.

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Austria privacy activists file suit against streaming sites

An Austrian privacy campaign group lodged complaints against eight online streaming services Friday, accusing them of "structural violations" of EU data regulations that came into effect last year.

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Renault posts record sales as Ghosn successor sought

French carmaker Renault unveiled record sales Friday of nearly 3.9 million vehicles last year, even as it prepares to turn the page on the era of chief executive Carlos Ghosn who remains behind bars in Tokyo on fraud charges.

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The Green New Deal Hits Its First Major Snag

Not long ago, I found myself in the south of Greenland, in a tidy cottage at the edge of a fjord, in the company of four scientists. We were talking about sea-level rise when one of the younger scientists asked whether I could settle a debate: Should we keep developing nuclear power? He thought we should. I said that I didn’t have a strong opinion, but it seemed like a good way to produce electri

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Trump's Missile Defense Plan Creates More Problems Than It Solves

The Trump administration has presented its Missile Defense Review, and yes, there are lasers.

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India’s Plan to Curb Hate Speech Could Mean More Censorship

India's government has proposed rules that would require encrypted messaging services like WhatsApp to decrypt data, threatening the security of users globally.

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If Edible Insects Are the Future, We Should Talk About Poop

Insects are touted as a major new source of protein, but scaling up Big Cricket could mean new problems—such as what to do with all their "frass."

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Volkswagen says it will pay Indian fine even as it appeals

Volkswagen Group said Friday that it will pay a fine of 1 billion rupees ($14.2 million) imposed by India for installing software on vehicles that allegedly cheated pollution testing devices, though it is still appealing the order.

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A new gravitational wave detector is almost ready to join the search

Buried deep underground, Japan’s KAGRA detector relies on components cooled to just 20 degrees above absolute zero.

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Trods Løkkes sundhedsudspil: Politikerne kan ikke boykotte Sundhedsplatformen som landsdækkende EPJ

Statsminister Lars Løkke Rasmussen lægger med et nyt sundhedsudspil op til, at Danmark i fremtiden skal samle sig om ét fælles EPJ-system. Det har fået Epic-kritikere til at øjne muligheden for at skille sig af med Sundhedsplatformen – men så let er det ikke.

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Giving algorithms a sense of uncertainty could make them more ethical

Algorithms are best at pursuing a single mathematical objective—but humans often want multiple incompatible things.

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Save the Sharks!

We harm and kill vastly more of them than they do of us—but a research/educational project in the Bahamas aims to help change that — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Waiting for a Shutdown to End in Disaster

As the longest government shutdown in American history lurches toward its fifth week, a grim but growing consensus has begun to emerge on Capitol Hill: There may be no way out of this mess until something disastrous happens. This is, of course, not a sentiment lawmakers are eager to share on the record. But in interviews this week with congressional staffers on both sides of the aisle (whom I gra

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U.S. Astronomers Ponder Science Priorities for the 2020s and Beyond

The Astro 2020 Decadal Survey kicks off amid turmoil and uncertainty — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Smart fabrics made possible by new metal deposition technique

Imperial researchers have devised a way to deposit metals onto fabrics and used it to insert sensors and batteries into these materials.

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Why do Hydra end up with just a single head?

Often considered immortal, the freshwater Hydra can regenerate any part of its body, a trait discovered by the Geneva naturalist Abraham Trembley nearly 300 years ago. Any fragment of its body containing a few thousands cells can regenerate the entire animal The one-centimeter polyp has a developmental organizer center located at the head level, and another located in the foot. The head organizer

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Hør ugens podcast: Telenettet er made in China

Ingeniøren har kortlagt omfanget af kinesisk udstyr i det danske mobilnet. Det findes mange steder, men er det et problem? Kvælstofudledningen til vandmiljøet er steget i stedet for at falde.

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Energinet: Nej til Brexit-aftale ændrer ikke Viking Link-projekt

PLUS. Ifølge Energinet er business casen for Viking Link så stærk, at den ikke er truet – heller ikke af en no deal, siger han i lyset af forkastelsen af Theresa Mays Brexit-aftale. Dansk Energi mener, at situationen skaber usikkerhed om fremtiden.

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Cairns catastrophe

Two months ago, a record-breaking heatwave devastated Australia's population of spectacled flying foxes.

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We won’t use CRISPR to make super-smart babies—but only because we can’t

Gene experts speculate that our worst gene-editing fears won’t come true because they are too complex for us to pull them off.

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Tesla plans 7 pct staff cut, says road ahead very difficult

Saying the road ahead was "very difficult," Tesla's CEO Elon Musk said Friday that the company would be cutting its staff by about 7 percent.

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How the Showtime Saints Became Championship Favorites

Last Sunday evening, after the top-seeded New Orleans Saints dispatched the Philadelphia Eagles to earn a berth in the NFC Championship game, Drew Brees stood at a podium to give reporters his thoughts. The Saints quarterback, who turned 40 on Tuesday, brings no small amount of polish to the discrete elements of his job—fitting passes into tight windows during a game, deflecting praise afterward—

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How Rush Limbaugh Learned to Love Character Flaws

Conservatives who spent their career decrying moral relativism are now openly embracing it. That’s the argument Jonathan Chait recently made, flagging articles by Roger Kimball and Henry Olsen as examples. Days later, Rush Limbaugh offered a more naked illustration of the trend. In the erstwhile conservative’s telling, Mitt Romney, who criticized President Donald Trump’s character in The Washingt

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Space toilets: How astronauts boldly go where few have gone before

When nature calls in micro-gravity, astronauts must answer. Space agencies have developed suction-based toilets – with a camera built in to ensure all the waste is contained before "flushing". Yes, there have been floaters in space. The early days of space exploration were a learning curve! Amazingly, you don't need gravity to digest food. Peristalsis, the process by which your throat and intesti

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Hver fjerde liter vand i rensningsanlæggene er 'uvedkommende'

Tidligere i år konkluderede en rapport, at der ikke var økonomi i at nedbringe mængden af såkaldt uvedkommende vand i rensningsanlæggene. Envidan, som udarbejdede rapporten for styrelsen, mener, at man bør nuancere budskabet; Danva og Herning Vand er på samme linje.

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Blog: Peter Naurs advarsel om datamagt er blevet uhyggeligt aktuel

»Faren lurer, ikke hos de maskiner som muligvis kan tænke, men hos de mennesker, som ikke kan,« sagde datalogiprofessor Peter Naur.

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Mere rumkunst: I nat opsendte Japan en satellit med kunstige stjerneskud

Japansk virksomhed har udviklet en kunstig meteorregn, og første ladning af partikler blev opsendt i nat.

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Why do Hydra end up with just a single head?

Hydra is able to regenerate any part of its body to rebuild an entire individual. The head organizer performs two opposite activities, one activating, which causes the head to differentiate, and the other inhibiting, which prevents the formation of supernumerary heads. Researchers at UNIGE have discovered the identity of the inhibitor, called Sp5, and deciphered the dialogue between these two anta

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Ryanair blames lower fares for fresh profit warning

Ryanair on Friday cut its annual profit forecast for a second time, blaming lower air fares caused by overcapacity in the European short-haul sector.

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Tarmbakterier fra raske børn kan forebygge mælkeallergi

Forsøg viser, at tarmbakterier fra raske børn beskytter mus mod deres allergi over for komælk.

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Nyt kabel forsinket: Kulfyret Amagerværk tvinges til at køre en måned mere

En problematisk underboring har udskudt færdiggørelse af nyt 132 kV-kabel mellem Avedøreværket og Amager Koblingsstation indtil marts måned.

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Climate change: Is nuclear power the answer?

How green is nuclear power and what are the other options?

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11.500 år gamle dyreknogler tyder på, at hunde hjalp mennesker med at jage

For 11.500 år siden i det nuværende Jordan begyndte mennesker at leve sammen med hunde og…

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Long periods of undisturbed sleep during pregnancy may be associated with stillbirth

Sleeping more than nine hours per night during pregnancy may be associated with late stillbirth, a new Michigan Medicine-led international study suggests.

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Mediernes historier om medicin gør patienter utrygge

De seneste 15 år er antallet af artikler om kolesterolsænkende medicin tidoblet i de danske…

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Peacocks might use their showy tails for covert communication

Tigers, leopards and dogs all hunt peacocks, but their colour vision is poor, suggesting they might not actually notice a peacock's colourful tail

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Ghosn received 8m euro in 'improper' payments: Nissan

Former Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn received nearly eight million euros in "improper payments" from a Netherlands-based joint venture, the Japanese car giant alleged Friday, threatening to sue to recover the funds.

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Netflix shares slip as spending weighs on profits

Netflix shares swung lower Thursday as spending on original shows at the leading streaming television service weighed on quarterly revenue and competition heated up.

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Google acquires Fossil smartwatch tech for $40 mn

Google agreed to pay $40 million for the smartwatch technology of the fashion and accessory group Fossil, the companies said Thursday, enabling the California tech giant to expand in the growing wearable tech market.

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Japan satellite blasts into space to deliver artificial meteors

A rocket carrying a satellite on a mission to deliver the world's first artificial meteor shower blasted into space on Friday, Japanese scientists said.

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Tesla recalls 14,000 cars in China over Takata airbags

Electric-vehicle maker Tesla will recall over 14,000 Model S cars in China as part of the global automotive sector's effort to replace potentially dangerous airbags made by Takata, China's market regulator announced on Friday.

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Grand jury charges four Audi managers in emissions case

A federal grand jury in Detroit has indicted four Audi engineering managers from Germany in a widening diesel emissions cheating scandal.

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Oxford says no to additional Huawei funding

Oxford University has decided to forgo further funding from Chinese tech giant Huawei as scrutiny grows in Europe over the telecom company's relationship with the Beijing government.

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2017 Women's March solidarity events drew 100 times national protest average, study shows

As the next Women's March approaches, a new study of the 2017 Women's March solidarity events led by University of Notre Dame Associate Professor of Sociology Kraig Beyerlein is likely a good predictor of what to expect. Based on a survey of sister marches across the United States, key characteristics of the events were massive turnout, majority female leadership, low rate of counterdemonstrators,

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Bee surveys in newest national park could aid pollinator studies elsewhere

Declines in native bee populations are widely reported, but can existing data really analyze these trends? In the Jan. 17, 2019, online edition of PLOS One, Utah State University and USDA researchers report findings about pollinator biodiversity in California's Pinnacles National Park derived from data collected from three separate surveys spanning 17 years. Their results documented 450 species of

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Unraveling of 58-year-old corn gene mystery may have plant-breeding implications

In discovering a mutant gene that "turns on" another gene responsible for the red pigments sometimes seen in corn, researchers solved an almost six-decades-old mystery with a finding that may have implications for plant breeding in the future.

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770 millioner brugernavne og passwords er lækket i ny database

En ny database, som cirkulerer på hackerfora, indeholder passwords i klartekst for 773 millioner e-mailadresser. Databasen fylder 87 gigabytes og indeholder 2,7 milliarder rækker, og går under navnet Collection #1

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Lægeflugt dræner afdeling på AUH

Massiv afvandring af speciallæger inden for gynækologisk onkologi på afdelingen for kvindesygdomme og fødsler på Aarhus Universitetshospital rammer avancerede behandlinger af kvinder med kræft i æggestokkene og livmoderhalskræft. Situationen på afdelingen får nu Sundhedsstyrelsen til at bede Region Midtjylland om en redegørelse.

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Horsens bedst til behandlingen af skizofreni for ­andet år i træk

Et stærkt fokus på vidensbaseret ledelse og nære relationer til patienter kendetegner Regionspsykiatrien Horsens, som atter kan kalde sig Danmarks bedste til behandlingen af skizofreni ifølge Dagens Medicins årlige analyse af behandlingsdata.

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Studie finder nye ­kandidater til behandling af depression

Velkendte lægemidler til behandling af bl.a. forhøjet blodtryk og kolesterol reducerer ifølge stort registerstudie også risikoen for depression. Fundet kan muligvis være første skridt i jagten på nye måder at behandle sygdommen, siger professor i psykiatri Lars Vedel Kessing.

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Netværksmøder kan holde ­psykisk syge unge fra skadestuen

Hvis man tidligt samler de unges familie og netværk til møder og samtaler om deres situation, kan det medføre færre kontakter med psykiatrien og egen læge efter 10 år, viser nyt studie.

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How do we define creativity? – Science Weekly podcast

In our latest collaboration, Ian Sample teams up with Jordan Erica Webber of Chips with Everything to look at why artwork produced using artificial intelligence is forcing us to look at how we define creativity In October 2018 the British auction house Christie’s became the first to sell a work of art created by an algorithm. The painting, Portrait of Edmond Belamy , was sold for $432,500, which

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How do we define creativity? – Science Weekly podcast

In our latest collaboration, Ian Sample teams up with Jordan Erica Webber of Chips with Everything to look at why artwork produced using artificial intelligence is forcing us to look at how we define creativity

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Sproget er et våben i kampen om de syge

Diabetiker eller en person med diabetes? Sproget afslører en verserende skyttegravskrig om fortolkningsretten over syge danskere, siger en specialist, Louise Jane Phillips fra RUC. Vi har talt med fagfolk fra begge sider af skyttegraven – og samlet en fyordsliste, hvor psykiatrien er hårdest plaget.

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Improved maternity care practices decrease racial gaps in breastfeeding in the US South

A new paper published in Pediatrics links successful implementation of Baby-Friendly™ practices in the southern US with increases in breastfeeding rates and improved, evidence-based care. The changes were especially positive for African-American women.

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Kortlægning af Huaweis rolle i det danske telenet: Er der en kinesisk nål i høstakken?

PLUS. TDC har været i skudlinjen i debatten om kinesisk udstyr i det danske telenet. Kinesiske Huawei leverer imidlertid til alle fire teleoperatører – men at påvise et problem ved det er som at finde en nål i en høstak.

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Regionerne må føle sig som i baronens seng

Hastværk er også i sundhedsvæsnet lastværk. Vi skal fremtidssikre vores sundhedsvæsen, men det gøres ikke på kort tid. Det kræver omtanke.

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Monica Beets' Impressive Gold Haul | Gold Rush

Monica gets Tony back on track with an impressive 2-week gold haul weighing in over 480 oz. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discov

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Scientists accidentally engineer mice with unusually short and long tails

Researchers from two groups studying mouse development have accidentally created mice with unusually long and unusually short tails. Their findings offer new insight into some of the key aspects controlling the development of tails in mice and have implications for understanding what happens when developmental pathways go awry.

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Puzzling phenomenon in a quantum gas: Insulators with conducting edges

Insulators that are conducting at their edges hold promise for interesting technological applications. However, until now their characteristics have not been fully understood. Physicists have now modeled what are known as topological insulators with the help of ultracold quantum gases. They now demonstrate how the edge states could be experimentally detected.

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New risk score far more effective for diabetes diagnosis

Researchers have developed a new risk score which takes into account detailed genetic information known to increase the chances of type 1 diabetes. This could be used to help identity babies at highest risk of developing the condition in the future. The score may also be used at the time of diabetes diagnosis to help decide if someone has type 1 or type 2 diabetes, which need very different treatm

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HPV vaccination rates remain critically low among younger adolescents in the U.S.

Only about 16 percent of U.S. adolescents have been fully vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) by the time they turn 13, despite national recommendations that call for vaccination at 11 to 12 years of age. The new findings highlight the need for stronger efforts to encourage HPV vaccination and to improve immunization rates in this key age group.

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Dangerous increases in patients mixing opioids, benzodiazepines or Z-drugs

The number of Americans taking a dangerous combination of both opioids and benzodiazepines — a group of drugs commonly prescribed for pain, insomnia and anxiety — increased by 250 percent over a 15-year period, while there was an 850 percent increase in patients taking benzodiazepines and so-called Z-drugs, according to a new study.

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Individual lichens can have up to three fungi

Individual lichens may contain up to three different fungi, according to new research from an international team of researchers. This evidence provides new insight into another recent discovery that showed lichen are made up of more than a single fungus and alga, overturning the prevailing theory of more than 150 years.

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Stress fracture? Your foot hitting pavement wasn't the main problem

It starts as a persistent and irritating pain in the foot or lower leg, then it gets more intense, maybe with swelling, and soon a runner knows she's being sidelined by one of the most common running injuries: a stress fracture. These tiny cracks in the bone can halt training for months or even end a sports season. A segment of the multibillion-dollar wearables industry aims to save potential vict

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New hope for stem cell approach to treating diabetes

Researchers have tweaked the recipe for coaxing human stem cells into insulin-secreting beta cells and shown that the resulting cells are more responsive to fluctuating glucose levels in the blood.

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Reinforcement learning expedites 'tuning' of robotic prosthetics

Researchers have developed an intelligent system for 'tuning' powered prosthetic knees, allowing patients to walk comfortably with the prosthetic device in minutes, rather than the hours necessary if the device is tuned by a trained clinical practitioner. The system is the first to rely solely on reinforcement learning to tune the robotic prosthesis.

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Body-painting protects against bloodsucking insects

A study by researchers from Sweden and Hungary shows that white, painted stripes on the body protect skin from insect bites. It is the first time researchers have successfully shown that body-painting has this effect. Among indigenous peoples who wear body-paint, the markings thus provide a certain protection against insect-borne diseases.

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Economist find a global tax on carbon may be feasible

There is a consistently high level of public support across nations for a global carbon tax if the tax policy is carefully designed, according to a recent survey.

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Sea slug study illuminates how mitochondria move

Defects in the transport of cells' energy organelles are a suspected cause of diseases including Alzheimer's, ALS, Huntington's and Parkinson's. A new study reveals the genetics behind mitochondrial shifts.

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Soft drinks + hard work + hot weather = possible kidney disease risk

New research suggests that drinking sugary, caffeinated soft drinks while exercising in hot weather may increase the risk of kidney disease.

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"Mona Lisa Effect" Not True for Mona Lisa

The Mona Lisa effect is the illusion that the subject of a painting follows you with her gaze, despite where you stand. But da Vinci's famous painting doesn't have that quality. Christopher… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Combination therapy treats leishmaniasis, HIV patients

Coinfection with visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been observed in at least 35 countries on four continents and requires special case management. Currently, the World Health Organization recommends AmBisome monotherapy for treatment. Now, researchers have showed that a combination therapy of AmBisome and miltefosine is more effective.

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Blocking hormone uptake burns more fat

A newly discovered regulatory mechanism helps the body control the rate of fat metabolism, according to a new study. The finding may lead to new drugs to help burn stored fat and reduce weight.

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Engineered immune cells target broad range of pediatric solid tumors in mice

Immune cells engineered to attack childhood cancers were able to eradicate different types of pediatric tumors in mice, according to a new study.

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Measuring ability of artificial intelligence to learn is difficult

Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study has found.

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Multiple sclerosis treatments delay progression of the disease

A new study finds multiple sclerosis treatments have long-term benefits, and that early treatment is important. The study is the first to provide evidence that the currently available therapies can delay progression of disability in Multiple Sclerosis. It showed that early treatment — particularly within five years of onset — delayed the secondary progressive stage of MS, which is characterised

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Risk for developing more than one mental health disorder revealed

A new study has revealed the risks behind developing a seconds mental health disorder after an initial diagnosis in the largest and most comprehensive study of comorbidity to date.

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U.S. youth suicides more prevalent in states with higher gun ownership, study finds

A new study finds that states with higher levels of household gun ownership also have higher overall youth suicide rates, with every 10 percentage-point increase in household gun ownership associated with a 26.9 percent increase in the youth suicide rate.

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Fruit fly promiscuity alters the evolutionary forces on males

Researchers have demonstrated for the first time what effect female fruit flies having multiple partners has on sexual selection — before and after mating. Sexual selection is the branch of natural selection concerned with obtaining mates and fertility, rather than survival.

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World Trade Center responders at increased risk for head and neck cancers

A new study has found a significant increase in head and neck cancers among workers and volunteers who responded to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC), pointing to newly emerging risks that require ongoing monitoring and treatment of those who were exposed during the initial response.

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Artificially produced cells communicate with each other

Researchers have for the first time created artificial cell assemblies that can communicate with each other. The cells, separated by fatty membranes, exchange small chemical signaling molecules to trigger more complex reactions, such as the production of RNA and other proteins.

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Size matters: To livebearer fish, big fins are a big deal

Biologists studied the evolution of 40 molly and Limia species, and concluded dorsal fin displays arose first for males to compete with other males, only later being used in courtship displays to females. These changes in fin function went hand in hand with enlargement of the male dorsal fin. The fins reached extreme sizes in a few species and appear to be associated with rapid evolution, especial

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Wired for obesity

Researchers have discovered a set of genes that help to establish brain connections governing body weight.

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Diet and food production must radically change to save planet

Transformation of the global food system is urgently needed as more than 3 billion people are malnourished (including people who are undernourished and overnourished), and food production is exceeding planetary boundaries — driving climate change, biodiversity loss, pollution due to over-application of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers, and unsustainable changes in water and land use.

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Bagsiden: Julegaven til ingeniøren, der har alt

CO2-besparelse: Et meget lille bidrag, men alligevel …

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Tænkeboks: Munken møder sig selv

Her kommer løsningen på uge 2's tænkeboks.

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Genetic variants implicated in development of schizophrenia

Genetic variants damaging neurotransmitter receptor implicated in development of schizophrenia.Genetic variants which prevent a neurotransmitter receptor from working properly have been implicated in the development of schizophrenia, according to research by the UCL Genetics Institute.

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New thermoelectric material delivers record performance

Taking advantage of recent advances in using theoretical calculations to predict the properties of new materials, researchers have discovered a new class of half-Heusler thermoelectric compounds, including one with a record high figure of merit — a metric used to determine how efficiently a thermoelectric material can convert heat to electricity.

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Gene therapy blocks peripheral nerve damage in mice

Scientists have developed a gene therapy that blocks axonal degeneration, preventing axon destruction in mice and suggesting a therapeutic strategy that could help prevent the loss of peripheral nerves in multiple conditions.

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Trilobites: Romeo the Frog Finds His Juliet. Their Courtship May Save a Species.

The lonely male in a Bolivian museum was thought to be the last Sehuencas water frog, but an expedition has found him a potential mate.

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Nearly a quarter of antibiotic prescriptions for children and adults may be unnecessary

One in 10 children and about one in six adults with private insurance received antibiotics they didn't need at least once in 2016, a new Michigan Medicine study suggests.

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The Atlantic Daily: Removing a President

What We’re Following More than two years after the Larry Nassar scandal rocked Michigan State University, the fallout continues to grow. On Wednesday, President John Engler, appointed a year ago after the scandal first hit, resigned after implying that some of the women whom Nassar assaulted are “enjoying” the “spotlight.” It’s the latest example of how the incident has turned into a full-on cata

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Common gene disorder causes serious 'stealth' disease, but could be easily treated

The western world's most common genetic disorder is a 'stealth condition' that causes far higher levels of serious disease and disability than previously thought, despite being easy to detect and treat.

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Unintended side effects: Antibiotic disruption of the gut microbiome dysregulates skeletal health

Diet and exercise regulate the accrual of bone mass, but some evidence suggests the microbiome may also play a role. Researchers examined how the gut microbiome impacts skeletal health and what happens when the system is perturbed. They showed that antibiotic disruption of the gut microbiota induced a pro-inflammatory response that led to increased osteoclast activity and suppressed bone mass accr

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Researchers create 'shortcut' to terpene biosynthesis in E. coli

Researchers have developed an artificial enzymatic pathway for synthesizing isoprenoids, or terpenes, in E.coli. This shorter, more efficient, cost-effective and customizable pathway transforms E. coli into a factory that can produce terpenes for use in everything from cancer drugs to biofuels.

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Can the keto diet help treat depression? Here’s what the science says so far

The keto diet is known to be an effective tool for weight loss, however its effects on mental health remain largely unclear. Recent studies suggests that the keto diet might be an effective tool for treating depression, and clearing up so-called "brain fog," though scientists caution more research is necessary before it can be recommended as a treatment. Any experiments with the keto diet are bes

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Trump Flirts With Leaving NATO, and ‘Zero’ Republicans in Congress Are Impressed

It’s a familiar pattern: President Donald Trump’s Republican allies disagree with him on a major issue. They send statements and tweets, and repeat talking points on cable news. But will those in positions of power actually stand up to the president when they are at odds with him? For Jim Risch, the incoming chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, a big test could come if Trump decide

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