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nyheder2019januar22

11h

A meteorite hit the moon during yesterday's total lunar eclipse

People watching the total lunar eclipse in the early hours of Monday morning noticed a brief flash of light, which has now been confirmed as a meteorite impact

12h

Bornholm vil være verdens første industrialiserede samfund uden affald

Når øens forbrændingsanlæg er udtjent i 2032, skal al affald genbruges eller genanvendes.

12h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: In the Cross-Harris

What We’re Following Today It’s Tuesday, January 22. This is the 32nd day of the partial government shutdown. The Donald Trump administration said it is exploring ways to keep providing assistance to the nearly 40 million Americans receiving SNAP benefits if the current stalemate continues into March. In 2020 News: California Senator Kamala Harris announced on Martin Luther King Jr. Day that she’

17min

22min

Apple fixes a host of bugs for iOS, Apple Watch and HomePod

Don't look now, but you'll have a lot of updating to do if you live deep in the Apple ecosystem. Apple has released updates that tackle a host of issues for iOS, macOS, tvOS, …

24min

Kvinna biten i ansiktet av hund

En kvinna har blivit biten i ansiktet av en hund i Kinna, skriver Borås Tidning. Polisen uppger att kvinnan matade hunden när den anföll.

25min

Accessing health records on your iPhone is a dream and a nightmare

Health Owning your personal health data can come at a cost. NYU Langone started allowing its patients to access their medical records through Apple’s Health Records app in a wave of health care organizations integrating the Apple…

25min

Scientist Behind "CRISPR Babies" Fired by University

An investigation by Chinese authorities found He Jiankui broke national regulations in his controversial gene editing work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

27min

How Flat-Earthers Explain Total Lunar Eclipses

The blood-red color of the moon during a total lunar eclipse may be difficult to explain without a basic understanding of orbital mechanics, but flat-Earthers have come up with a way to circumvent scientific facts and construct a creative explanation.

33min

No Planet Nine? Weird Orbits of Distant Objects May Have Different Explanation

The weirdly clustered orbits of some far-flung bodies in our solar system can be explained without invoking a big, undiscovered "Planet Nine," a new study suggests.

33min

34min

Inget bud på Millicom efter förhandlingar

Telekombolaget Liberty Latin America uppgavs enligt Bloomberg ha lagt ett bud på 7,6 miljarder dollar, motsvarande 68,5 miljarder kronor, på den luxemburgska teleoperatören Millicom.

39min

Biologists Test Promising Treatments For Bats Threatened By Fungal Disease

A fungal disease called white-nose syndrome has killed millions of North American cave-dwelling bats over the past decade. Now, scientists are field testing some promising treatments.

40min

Are car headlights getting brighter?

Technology Headlight technology could be changing in exciting ways. Big changes to headlight technology could be coming down the turnpike.

54min

55min

Smällar i Kista – bombgruppen på plats

En hög smäll har hörts vid ett flerfamiljshus i sydöstra delen av Kista. Nationella bombgruppen är på plats och polisen utreder allmänfarlig ödeläggelse. – Mycket talar för att det varit någon typ av explosion snarare än en sten som krossat rutorna, säger Anna Westberg presstalesperson vid polisregion Stockholm.

1h

Massive fish die-off sparks outcry in Australia

“Historic” plan to save the Murray-Darling River Basin failed to prevent ecological disaster

1h

What Time is it on Saturn? We Finally Know

The Time on Saturn For years, the length of a day on Saturn has remained an unsolved puzzle to frustrated astronomers. But now, a graduate student from the University of California Santa Cruz believes that he has finally solved the mystery. Christopher Mankovich used the planet’s rings to determine that a day on Saturn lasts for 10 hours, 33 minutes, and 38 seconds. Being a gas giant, Saturn has n

1h

Does 'Planet Nine' Exist? Astronomers Say An Unseen Disk of Icy Space Rocks May Explain Things

For years, some astronomers have suspected that a planet lies beyond Neptune’s orbit in the far reaches of our solar system — a mysterious, giant planet dubbed “Planet Nine.” That theory is based on the strange orbital motions of small, distant worlds that behave like some unseen object is influencing their movements. But now a group of researchers has come up with another way to explain these orb

1h

Researchers Find New Insights Into Role of Little-Understood Placenta

More than 15 percent of women in developed countries suffer from pregnancy complications associated with the placenta, the disk-shaped organ that sustains a growing fetus. Now researchers find the placenta adapts when nutrients are scarce. The discovery identifies possible targets for intervention, the researchers say. “Pregnancy complications are [often] linked to poor placental growth and functi

1h

Compressed Air in Underground Rocks Could Be the Next Batteries

With reports about climate change becoming increasingly dire, it’s increasingly important to find an eco-friendly way to not only generate energy, but also store it. After all, wind turbines and solar power and the like don’t run steadily. So we can’t just stick that extra energy in a bottle to use when the wind dies down and the sun sets. Only no, that’s almost exactly what a group of Scottish sc

1h

Courage to aim for less cleanliness?

Current hygiene measures against aggressive germs could sometimes be counterproductive, according to a group of researchers. They propose to examine the role diversity of microorganisms plays in our domestic environment more intensively. The findings could challenge existing strategies for fighting infectious diseases and resistant germs.

1h

Vibrating Astronauts’ Legs Could Keep Their Bones Strong

In Your Bones When astronauts are in space, the reduced gravity means their bones don’t have to carry as heavy of a load as they do on Earth. This can lead to a loss of bone density that can affect the astronaut throughout their lifetime , increasing their risk of breaking bones as they grow older. Now, researchers in the United Kingdom think they’ve found a way to prevent this loss of density —

1h

Annals of Family Medicine media tip sheet

Annals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines.

1h

Funktionsnedsatt flicka körd till fel bostad

En skoltaxi i Malmö lämnade av en nioårig funktionsnedsatt flicka som inte kan prata hemma hos fel föräldrar. Hennes föräldrar var utom sig av oro och först efter en timme kom flickan hem, skriver Sydsvenskan.

1h

26 ultra-rich people own as much as the world's 3.8 billion poorest

A new report by Oxfam argues that wealth inequality is causing poverty and misery around the world. In the last year, the world's billionaires saw their wealth increase by 12%, while the poorest 3.8 billion people on the planet lost 11% of their wealth. The report prompted Anand Giridharadas to tweet: "Don't be Pinkered into everything's-getting-better complacency." We explain what Steven Pinker'

1h

Fecal Transplants More Successful from "Super-Donors"

A review finds that for several conditions, poop from certain healthy people is more likely to provide relief for recipients.

1h

This Scientist Is Hunting for Planets That Orbit Dead Stars

Dead Star Sometimes when a star dies, the planets that orbited it survive, either freely floating through the galaxy or orbiting whatever’s left of their former star. Normally, the giant cloud of dust given off as the star dies obscures these lonely planets. But Jason Nordhaus, a NASA-funded astrophysicist at the Rochester Institute of Technology, wants to solve the mystery of what happens to pla

1h

Prince William interviews Sir David Attenborough in Davos

Prince William interviews Sir David Attenborough at the World Economic Forum in Davos.

1h

Ring ripples reveal how long a day lasts on Saturn

Clues in Saturn’s rings divulge the planet’s rotation rate: 10 hours, 33 minutes, 38 seconds.

1h

Tiny, Previously Undiscovered Capillaries May Exist Inside People's Bones

These tiny tunnels were spotted in lab mice and traces of it in one inquisitive researcher

1h

1h

Feeling groovy: Neurons integrate better with muscle grown on grooved platforms

Growing muscle tissue on grooved platforms helps neurons more effectively integrate with the muscle, a requirement for engineering muscle in the lab that responds and functions like muscle in the body, University of Illinois researchers found in a new study. Such engineered muscle with integrated nerves has applications in reconstructive and rehabilitative medicine, as well as for engineered biolo

1h

Forest soils need many decades to recover from fires and logging

A landmark study from The Australian National University has found that forest soils need several decades to recover from bushfires and logging — much longer than previously thought.

1h

Good neighbors

In the animal kingdom, food access is among the biggest drivers of habitat preference. It influences, among other things, how animals interact, where they roam and the amount of energy they expend to maintain their access to food. But how do different members of ecologically similar species manage to live close to each other?

1h

Not only do Gulf of Aqaba corals survive climate change but their offspring may too

Parent corals from the Gulf of Aqaba that experience increased temperatures and ocean acidification stress during the peak reproductive period are not only able to maintain normal physiological function, but also have the same reproductive output and produce offspring that function and survive as well as those which were produced under today's ambient water conditions.

1h

Feds Also Say That Oracle Underpaid Women and Minorities

In a new filing, the US Department of Labor says Oracle underpaid women and minorities at its headquarters complex by $400 million over four years.

1h

Astronomers use split images of quasars to produce a new estimate of the Hubble constant

The question of how quickly the universe is expanding has been bugging astronomers for almost a century. Different studies keep coming up with different answers—which has some researchers wondering if they've overlooked a key mechanism in the machinery that drives the cosmos.

1h

Without habitat management, small land parcels do not protect birds

Designating relatively small parcels of land as protected areas for wildlife with no habitat management—which has frequently been done in urban-suburban locales around the world—likely does not benefit declining songbird species, according to a team of researchers who studied a long-protected northeastern virgin forest plot.

1h

Do endangered woods make better guitars?

Researchers have tested the sounds made by six different acoustic guitars in a study addressing the effects of the type of wood used in their construction. Some of the woods used for guitar backs are revered by guitar players for their acoustic qualities, and are claimed to be tonally superior to other woods. Unfortunately many of these woods are expensive, rare, and from unsustainable sources.

1h

Exercise before surgery can protect both muscle and nerves, study suggests

Exercise can protect both muscle and nerves from damage caused by the restoration of blood flow after injury or surgery, new research shows.

1h

Cause of bone loss in joint implant patients uncovered in new study

Researchers have discovered the long-sought reason that many people with joint replacements experience harmful inflammation and bone loss. Their finding may pave the way for new therapies to reduce pain and prevent the need for follow-up surgery.

1h

Without habitat management, small land parcels do not protect birds

Designating relatively small parcels of land as protected areas for wildlife with no habitat management—which has frequently been done in urban-suburban locales around the world—likely does not benefit declining songbird species, according to a team of researchers who studied a long-protected northeastern virgin forest plot.

1h

Viralt ”hån” i USA omvärderas efter nya klipp

Hånade gymnasiepojkar en man ur den amerikanska ursprungsbefolkningen – eller försökte de lugna en spänd situation under ett besök i Washington DC? Händelsen som har skapat stora rubriker i USA har nu omvärderats.

1h

A Mysterious Disease Is Killing Beech Trees

Scientists suspect the rapidly spreading beech leaf disease is due to an unidentified microbe.

1h

1h

Without habitat management, small land parcels do not protect birds

Designating relatively small parcels of land as protected areas for wildlife with no habitat management — which has frequently been done in urban-suburban locales around the world — likely does not benefit declining songbird species, according to a team of researchers who studied a long-protected northeastern virgin forest plot.

1h

Smällar i Kista – bombgruppen på väg

Någon form av hög smäll har hörts i sydöstra delen av Kista. Polisens bombgrupp är på väg. – Vi har konstaterat en krossad ruta på ett flerfamiljshus, säger Mikael Pettersson, RLC-befäl hos polisen.

1h

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2h

China's AI scientists teach a neural net to train itself

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

2h

Outbreak of paralyzing disease linked to non-polio enterovirus

Using multiple genomic sequencing tests, TGen identified a specific non-polio enterovirus — EV-D68 — among at least four children, according to a new study. The finding is significant because AFM cases are continuing to increase and there has been no official recognition that this disease is being caused by EV-D68, which limits the research community's ability to develop preventative measures, s

2h

Urbanization changes shape of mosquitoes' wings

Research shows that rapid urbanization in São Paulo City, Brazil, is influencing wing morphology in the mosquitoes that transmit dengue and malaria.

2h

Machine learning could reduce testing, improve treatment for intensive care patients

Doctors in intensive care units face a continual dilemma: Every blood test they order could yield critical information, but also adds costs and risks for patients. To address this challenge, researchers are developing a computational approach to help clinicians more effectively monitor patients' conditions and make decisions about the best opportunities to order lab tests for specific patients.

2h

Trout, salamander populations quickly bounce back from severe drought conditions

Populations of coastal cutthroat trout and coastal giant salamanders in the Pacific Northwest show the ability to rebound quickly from drought conditions, buying some time against climate change.

2h

Negative experiences on social media tied to higher odds of feeling lonely

Positive interactions on social media are not making young adults feel more connected, whereas negative experiences increase the likelihood of them reporting loneliness.

2h

2h

Should Reality Make Us Glad or Sad?

Some sages say seeing things as they truly are should make us feel fantastic, but others demur. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Google Gives Wikimedia Millions—Plus Machine Learning Tools

When the tech giant helps Wikipedia, it’s also helping itself.

2h

Seeing double could help resolve dispute about how fast the universe is expanding

How fast the universe is expanding has been puzzling astronomers for almost a century. Different studies keep coming up with different answers — which has some researchers wondering if they've overlooked a key mechanism in the machinery that drives the cosmos. Now, by pioneering a new way to measure how quickly the cosmos is expanding, a team led by UCLA astronomers has taken a step toward resolv

2h

Infectious disease researchers unveil the secret life of flesh-eating bacteria

Using a tool first used for strep throat in horses, Houston Methodist researchers unveiled the secret life of flesh-eating bacteria, learning how it causes severe disease while living deep within muscle. The team focused on necrotizing myositis. The study appears Jan. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Corresponding author James M. Musser says his team now has an in-depth understanding o

2h

Community Neuroscience: How to Organize a Brain Fair

The second episode of our new “Community Neuroscience” series is now up on the Dana Foundation YouTube channel ! In this video, Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives member Michael Burman , Ph.D., offers tips on how to organize a successful brain fair for the public. Burman is an associate professor at the University of New England (UNE), as well as Neuroscience K-12 Outreach Coordinator at its Cen

2h

2h

Are YOU too smart to fall for an online scam? Google quiz tests if users can spot phishing emails

Google created an eight-question, interactive quiz that takes users through a number of phishing scenarios and tests whether they can tell when a hypothetical attack is real or not.

2h

Concern About Global Warming Among Americans Spikes, Report Says

The proportion of those polled who say global warming is "personally important" to them jumped from 63 to 72 percent last year. (Image credit: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)

2h

Scientists Kept Rats Sober by Deleting Memories of Cocaine

Drug Rats Once a drug addiction takes hold, staying clean can be just as hard as getting clean in the first place — as many as 70 percent of cocaine users relapse within 90 days. Now, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh think they’ve found a way to prevent relapse that sounds like a side plot in “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.” By erasing memories linked to cocaine use, they dec

2h

General Electric to cut up to 468 jobs in France: unions

US energy giant General Electric plans to slash up to 468 jobs across France, union sources said Tuesday.

2h

The future of China’s AI industry is in the hands of just three companies

More than half of the country’s major AI players have funding ties that lead back to Baidu, Alibaba, and Tencent.

2h

How sex pheromones diversify: Lessons from yeast

What happens to sex pheromones as new species emerge? New research studies sex pheromones in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, revealing an 'asymmetric' pheromone recognition system in which one pheromone operates extremely stringently whereas the other pheromone is free to undergo a certain degree of diversification, perhaps leading to a first step towards speciation.

2h

Aspirin may lower stroke risk in women with history of preeclampsia

A new study suggests aspirin may lower stroke risk among middle-aged women with a history of preeclampsia.

2h

Noninvasive light-sensitive recombinase for deep brain genetic manipulation

A research team presents a noninvasive light-sensitive photoactivatable recombinase suitable for genetic manipulation in vivo. The highly light-sensitive property of photoactivatable Flp recombinase will be ideal for controlling genetic manipulation in deep mouse brain regions by illumination with a noninvasive light-emitting diode. This easy-to-use optogenetic module will provide a side-effect fr

2h

Terroråtalad från Malmö nekar till brott

KÖPENHAMN. Han friades från bombdådet mot en shiamuslimsk moské i Malmö. Nu står den misstänkte 31-årige IS-anhängaren Moyed al-Zoebi åter inför rätta. Den här gången i Köpenhamn där han misstänks ha planerat ett terrorattentat.

2h

Scrubbing Carbon from the Sky

The first direct air capture and storage plant in the world is powered by geothermal heat in Iceland. Is it enough to reach negative carbon emissions? To learn more, read the story here. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Nya problem fördröjer arbetet för att nå pojken i brunnen

Borrningsarbetet för att nå fram till den tvåårige pojke som föll ner i en djup brunn i Spanien gick under tisdagen in i ett avgörande skede, men stötte återigen på problem som nu fördröjer processen ytterligare.

2h

New remains discovered at site of famous Neanderthal ‘flower burial’

Archaeologist Chris Hunt describes rare find at Shanidar Cave

2h

Multiple sclerosis: Helping cells to help themselves

Diseases such as multiple sclerosis are characterized by damage to the 'myelin sheath', a protective covering wrapped around nerve cells akin to insulation around an electrical wire. Researchers have discovered how the body initiates repair mechanisms which will limit the extent of any damage to this sheath. Their findings may provide a basis for the development of new drugs to treat multiple scle

2h

Graphene and related materials safety: Human health and the environment

Researchers reviewed the current research into the safety of graphene and related materials looking at both human health and environmental impact.

2h

Blocking toxic-protein production in ALS

An approved drug that blocks an integrated stress response shows promise in preliminary tests against ALS and frontotemporal dementia.

2h

Chinese Scientist Who Created Gene-Edited Babies Lied and Skirted Regulations, Officials Say

Research to create genetically modified babies was conducted dishonestly, authorities in China said.

2h

The Climate Scientists are Alright

Guest commentary from Eric Guilyardi (IPSL) and Valérie Masson-Delmotte (IPSL/IPCC) [This is a translation of an article in Le Monde (Jan 11).] In recent weeks in France, there has been a profusion of articles about the “climate scientist blues” (Le Monde 21/Dec, JDD 9/Dec , France Info 26/Sep) , which has apparently affecting them “scientifically”. This follows a spate of similar articles in the

2h

Three common cold myths you should stop spreading

Health Replace these “folklore strategies” with facts. A recent poll found that seven in 10 parents rely on “folklore strategies” to help their children avoid the worst of cold and flu season.

2h

Congress to vote on previous spending deals that could presage final 2019 budgets

House of Representatives measure reflects agreement with Senate before President Donald Trump demanded more for a wall

2h

Early detection of prediabetes can reduce risk of developing cardiovascular disease

A diagnosis of prediabetes should be a warning for people to make lifestyle changes to prevent both full-blown diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine.

3h

Kulturkommissionen: Tror Henrik Bromander på elallergi?

Spoilervarning! I 2019 års första avsnitt av DN Kulturs podcast Kulturkommissionen avhandlas Henrik Bromanders nya roman ”Högspänning”.

3h

Olofsson firade med mål i Malmöseger

Värmlänningen Johan Olofsson trivs i Skåne och har skrivit på ett nytt kontrakt med Malmö. Det firade 24-åringen med ett mål och en framspelning när skåningarna slog Djurgården med 3–1 hemma.

3h

The Climate Change Solution That Could Spark Global War

submitted by /u/boksysocks [link] [comments]

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Emerging significance of gammaherpesvirus and morbillivirus infections in cats

Emerging infectious diseases comprise a substantial fraction of important human infections, with potentially devastating global health and economic impacts. A 2008 paper in Nature described the emergence of no fewer than 335 infectious diseases in the global human population between 1940 and 2004. In the veterinary field, just as in the medical field, advanced molecular techniques and sophisticate

3h

Surveillance in our schools, through commercial apps

ClassDojo is one of the most popular education apps in the world. Its company estimates it is used by millions of teachers and children across 180 countries. Beneath its friendly exterior lie disturbing implications.

3h

Inability to integrate reward info contributes to undervalued rewards in schizophrenia

People with schizophrenia have a hard time integrating information about a reward — the size of the reward and the probability of receiving it — when assessing its value, according to a new study.

3h

Brazil’s new president has scientists worried. Here’s why

Jair Bolsonaro nixes agencies working on climate change and appoints a minister who flirted with creationism

3h

Nikolaj Sonne til gigantisk gadget-mekka: Fremtidens skærm gør mobiltelefon, TV og computer overflødig

Skærmen har den størrelse og form, du har råd til. Og så kan den foldes – eller tages på hovedet.

3h

Sharon Van Etten lägger till lite för mycket

Det verkar som att Sharon Van Etten har ägnat hela tiden sen förra albumet åt att hitta nya saker att lägga till sin musik, ändå var den mer storslagen och dramatisk då.

3h

”Här hånflinar han åt urinvånaren (eller inte)”

Erik Helmerson: Två filmer från Kista och Washington har lett till flammande debatt om rasism och propaganda.

3h

Decades after Reagan’s ‘Star Wars,’ Trump calls for missile defenses that would blast warheads from the sky

Scientists worry about cost and feasibility of “boost-phase” technologies

3h

New Study Casts Doubt on Planet Nine Hypothesis

Science doesn't consider Pluto a planet anymore, but some believe there's a still-undiscovered ninth planet out there tweaking the orbit of small planetoids. A new study calls into question that idea. The post New Study Casts Doubt on Planet Nine Hypothesis appeared first on ExtremeTech .

3h

New mutations causing inherited deaf-blindness have been discovered

A team of scientists from Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (MSMU) together with their colleagues from leading scientific centers of Moscow and India described a number of genetic mutations causing Usher syndrome (inherited deaf-blindness). They found previously unstudied unique mutations in investigated DNA regions. The results of the study were published in the Ophthalmic Genetics j

3h

How psychological science is benefiting the world

Technological advances have allowed psychological scientists to measure everything from cognitive impairments to everyday decision-making. Now, the scientists are using their research to inform tools, programs, and interventions that are helping to cultivate a healthier, happier, and more sustainable world. More than 25 psychological researchers address this question in a special issue of Perspect

3h

Sorry, Global Warming Won't Save You from Snow Days

Donald Trump's tweets notwithstanding, climate change could lead to a worst-case scenario of extreme snow storms against a backdrop of less snowpack overall.

3h

Materials chemists tap body heat to power 'smart garments'

Many wearable biosensors, data transmitters and similar tech advances for personalized health monitoring have now been "creatively miniaturized," says materials chemist Trisha Andrew at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, but they require a lot of energy, and power sources can be bulky and heavy. Now she and her Ph.D. student Linden Allison report that they have developed a fabric that can ha

3h

Risk för fallande bostadspriser vid slopat ränteavdrag

Sänkta eller slopade ränteavdrag för bostäder har under de senaste åren regelbundet föreslagits för att komma till bukt med hushållens bolåneskulder. Men de goda argumenten är få och konsekvenserna kan bli stora, skriver Robert Boije, chefsekonom på SBAB på DN Debatt, och varnar för kraftigt fallande bostadspriser.

3h

New Carbon Capture System Generates Electricity by Sucking up CO2

Carbon Capture When vehicles and power plants burn fossil fuels, they release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere — trapping energy from the S un and warming the planet . Some researchers have suggested that the world could fight climate change by investing in machines that capture carbon from the air. A practical solution remains years away, but researchers in South Korea and Georgia now say they

3h

Protecting Monarch Butterflies Could Mean Moving Hundreds of Trees

Researchers are trying to shift Mexico’s oyamel firs to higher elevations to help them weather warming temperatures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Is malaria research leaving out the human factor?

Malaria research should focus not just on mosquitoes, but also on the behavior of humans they infect, a new study suggests. What people do at night, when the risk of infected mosquito bites is highest, is especially critical, the authors say. There is substantial research into when malaria mosquitoes bite, when they are most active, and which species are most likely to spread disease, says April

3h

Inga genombrott mellan Ryssland och Japan

Ryssland och Japan är fortfarande inte närheten av något fredsavtal. Men Vladimir Putin och Shinzo Abe säger att dialogen fortsätter.

3h

Ronnie Hellströms guldbollar värderade under ”Antikrundan”

Vad är en Guldboll värd? Ronnie Hellström tog med sina två dyrgripar till SVT:s ”Antikrundan” för att få svar. Men han skulle aldrig sälja dem. – Absolut inte, säger målvaktslegendaren.

3h

These Cold-Prevention Myths Won't Keep Your Kids Healthy This Winter (But Here's What Will)

Many parents have tried "folklore strategies" to prevent their children from catching colds, like telling them not to go outside with wet hair.

3h

How hot are atoms in the shock wave of an exploding star?

A new method to measure the temperature of atoms during the explosive death of a star will help scientists understand the shock wave that occurs as a result of this supernova explosion.

3h

Long-read DNA analysis can give rise to errors

Advanced technologies that read long strings of DNA can produce flawed data that could affect genetic studies, research suggests.

3h

Human mutation rate has slowed recently

Researchers have discovered that the human mutation rate is significantly slower than for our closest primate relatives. The new knowledge may be important for estimates of when the common ancestor for humans and chimpanzees lived — and for conservation of large primates in the wild.

3h

Photos: The World’s Largest Airport-Terminal Building

Beijing Daxing International Airport is a massive complex built on the outskirts of Beijing, China, from more than 220,000 tons of steel, with a price tag nearing 14 billion U.S. dollars, and is set for completion in September 2019. The new facility—billed as the world’s largest single-terminal airport—will be Beijing’s second international airport, and developers hope it will relieve pressure on

3h

Greece removes ancient sites, museums, from development list

Greece's government has removed hundreds of archaeological museums, ancient sites and castles inadvertently put on a provisional list of properties up for private development under the country's bailout terms.

3h

Trout, salamander populations quickly bounce back from severe drought conditions

Populations of coastal cutthroat trout and coastal giant salamanders in the Pacific Northwest show the ability to rebound quickly from drought conditions, new research by Oregon State University suggests.

3h

Shots ‘rescue’ cognition in Alzheimer’s mouse model

A new approach to treating Alzheimer’s disease may make it possible to eventually reverse memory loss, a new study shows. When researchers focused on gene changes that epigenetics—rather than DNA sequences—cause, it was possible to reverse memory decline in mice. “In this paper, we have not only identified the epigenetic factors that contribute to the memory loss, we also found ways to temporaril

3h

Outbreak of paralyzing disease linked to non-polio enterovirus through TGen-led study

Using multiple genomic sequencing tests, TGen identified a specific non-polio enterovirus — EV-D68 — among at least four children, according to a study published today in the scientific journal mBio. The finding is significant because AFM cases are continuing to increase and there has been no official recognition that this disease is being caused by EV-D68, which limits the research community's

3h

UMass Amherst materials chemists tap body heat to power 'smart garments'

Many wearable biosensors, data transmitters and similar tech advances for personalized health monitoring have now been 'creatively miniaturized,' says materials chemist Trisha Andrew at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, but they require a lot of energy, and power sources can be bulky and heavy. Now she and her Ph.D. student Linden Allison report that they have developed a fabric that can ha

3h

Trout, salamander populations quickly bounce back from severe drought conditions

Populations of coastal cutthroat trout and coastal giant salamanders in the Pacific Northwest show the ability to rebound quickly from drought conditions, new research by Oregon State University suggests.

3h

En belåten Bolsonaro klev upp på scenen i Davos

DAVOS. Donald Trump deltar inte på årets Världsekonomiska forum, vilket har gett Brasiliens nyvalde högerpopulistiska president en plats i rampljuset. I sitt tal i Davos valde Jair Bolsonaro samma tema som Trump gjorde förra året; att hans land ska bli mer näringslivsvänligt och öppnare för investeringar.

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Rekordmånga privatjet till Davos

Trots att klimatfrågan tar större plats än någonsin under årets ekonomiska toppmöte i Davos väljer många deltagare att flyga privatjet till den schweiziska orten, skriver The Guardian. Enligt experter handlar det om uppemot 1.500 plan.

3h

Patienter borde inte få avgöra sitt eget vårdbehov

Nätläkartjänster lämnar de medicinska bedömningarna till sina kunder.

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For zombie microbes, deep-sea buffet is just out of reach

A new study is beginning to pick apart how bizarre zombie-like microbes survive by examining their source of 'food' — nearby molecules of organic carbon. The study helps further our understanding of the limitations of life on Earth and could help inform how life might exist on other planets.

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New insights into magnetic quantum effects in solids

Using a new computational method, an international collaboration has succeeded for the first time in systematically investigating magnetic quantum effects in the well-known 3D pyrochlore Heisenberg model. The surprising finding: physical quantum phases are formed only for small spin values.

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Corals light the way to a healthy partnership

Corals know how to attract good company. New research finds that corals emit an enticing fluorescent green light that attracts the mobile microalgae, known as Symbiodinium, that are critical to the establishment of a healthy partnership.

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Frog eggs help researchers understand repair of DNA damages

The DNA replication process, which takes place every time a cell divides, also triggers repair of DNA damage, researchers have described in a new study. Scientists have studied extracts from frog eggs, whose proteins are very similar to those of human cells. The researchers hope the new research results can be used to develop more effective treatments for cancer in the long run.

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To combat smog, Thailand made it rain

Environment Cloud seeding could reduce particulate matter over Bangkok. Cloud seeding is an unproven practice. But Bangkok’s air quality is bad enough, the Thai government has decided to try it.

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Newly Discovered Ancient Shark Found Alongside Bones of T. Rex

Galagadon's tiny teeth look like the spaceships in its namesake video game from the early 1980s.

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Urbanization changes shape of mosquitoes' wings

Research shows that rapid urbanization in São Paulo City, Brazil, is influencing wing morphology in the mosquitoes that transmit dengue and malaria.

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Stressed? Having a partner present — even in your mind — may keep blood pressure down

Visualizing your significant other may be just as effective as having them in the room with you when it comes to managing the body's cardiovascular response to stressful situations, according to a University of Arizona study.

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Price disclosure legislation unlikely to lower drug costs

The Trump administration's proposal to require pharmaceutical companies to publish drug prices in TV ads is unlikely to help control drug prices, according to a study publishing Jan. 22, 2019, in JAMA Internal Medicine. The research found that consumer demand for high-priced drugs declined unless the drug ads included language explaining that the medication would be low-cost or no-cost because of

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Dengue immunity may be protective against symptomatic Zika, study finds

Children with a history of prior dengue virus infection had a significantly lower risk of being symptomatic when infected by Zika virus, according to a study in Nicaragua of more than 3,000 children aged 2 to 14 years. Experts have worried that prior dengue virus infection could exacerbate severe Zika disease. However, the new findings, published in PLOS Medicine, indicate that prior dengue immuni

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Trout, salamander populations quickly bounce back from severe drought conditions

Populations of coastal cutthroat trout and coastal giant salamanders in the Pacific Northwest show the ability to rebound quickly from drought conditions, buying some time against climate change.

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France to seek tougher oversight of 5G network gear

France will require telecommunications companies to allow more government oversight and control of the equipment required for next-generation 5G wireless networks due to security concerns, a government official said Tuesday.

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When bad financial advisers happen to good people

Over 650,000 registered financial advisers in the United States help manage over $30 trillion of investible assets and represent approximately 10% of total employment of the finance and insurance sector. However, despite their prevalence and importance, financial advisers are often perceived as dishonest and consistently rank among the least trustworthy professionals, a perception shaped by highly

4h

Farm manure boosts greenhouse gas emissions—even in winter

Decisions farmers make over the spring and summer can dramatically increase greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions later in the winter.

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CRISPR-baby scientist fired by university

CRISPR-baby scientist fired by university CRISPR-baby scientist fired by university, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00246-2 Investigation by Chinese authorities finds He Jiankui broke national regulations in his controversial work on gene-edited babies.

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India’s LIGO gravitational-wave observatory gets green light

India’s LIGO gravitational-wave observatory gets green light India’s LIGO gravitational-wave observatory gets green light, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00184-z The US$177-million observatory will join a global network or sensors and should improve sensitivity.

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Ipsos: De är vinnare efter stökiga maktkampen

Den mest turbulenta perioden i svensk politik på mycket länge är till ända. Löften har svikits, gamla allianser spruckit och nya uppstått. Ändå ligger partiernas väljarstöd relativt stabilt. – Sedan valet är det S som är vinnaren och M förloraren, säger Nicklas Källebring på Ipsos.

4h

Intimate Love Letters, Read Aloud

“Dear Noortje: Why, I sometimes wonder, do so many love letters start with ‘I meant to write sooner,’ or ‘I should write to you more often,’ or a more fanciful variation of the same?” reads a young man in Tara Fallaux ’s short film. “Maybe because people are lazy and, in their daily lives, easily find an excuse for that laziness,” the man ventures, “while it’s harder to justify on paper. Maybe th

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America’s Teachers Are Furious

In Los Angeles, more than 30,000 teachers remain on strike; it took union and city officials more than a week to eke out a tentative agreement that, they announced Tuesday morning, will likely bring them back to their classrooms this week. Last Friday, teachers from a handful of public schools in Oakland, California, staged a one-day walkout, too, and they’re planning for another demonstration th

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Waymo Gets Approval to Open Driverless Car Factory in Michigan

Driverless in Michigan Alphabet-owned driverless car company Waymo has received approval from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation to build an autonomous vehicle factory in the state. In a Medium post , Waymo claims its factory will be the first in the world that’s entirely dedicated to the mass production of driverless vehicles. The company has yet to identify an exact location for its

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When bad financial advisers happen to good people

Over 650,000 registered financial advisers in the United States help manage over $30 trillion of investible assets and represent approximately 10 percent of total employment of the finance and insurance sector. However, despite their prevalence and importance, financial advisers are often perceived as dishonest and consistently rank among the least trustworthy professionals, a perception shaped by

4h

Farm manure boosts greenhouse gas emissions — even in winter

Researchers have shown, for the first time, that manure used to fertilize croplands in spring and summer can dramatically increase greenhouse gas emissions in winter. While it's known that farmers' decisions to add nutrients to their fields affects greenhouse gas emissions during the growing season, the study is the first to show that these choices have long-lasting effects, especially as winters

4h

Aspirin may lower stroke risk in women with history of preeclampsia

A new study by Columbia researchers suggests aspirin may lower stroke risk among middle-aged women with a history of preeclampsia.

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Machine learning could reduce testing, improve treatment for intensive care patients

Doctors in intensive care units face a continual dilemma: Every blood test they order could yield critical information, but also adds costs and risks for patients. To address this challenge, researchers from Princeton University are developing a computational approach to help clinicians more effectively monitor patients' conditions and make decisions about the best opportunities to order lab tests

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Children who had a dengue infection could be protected from symptomatic Zika

A prior dengue virus infection could protect children from symptomatic Zika virus infection, according to a study by an international group of researchers including those from the University of Michigan and the University of California, Berkeley.

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Dengue virus immunity may protect children from Zika symptoms

Previous infection with dengue virus may protect children from symptomatic Zika, according to a study published Jan. 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Eva Harris of the University of California, Berkeley, and colleagues.

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Opioid marketing drives prescription and overdose rates

There is an undeniable link among opioid marketing, opioid prescription rates, and deaths related to opioid overdoses in the United States, according to a new study. Compiling data county by county across the nation, the study paints a stark picture of the connection between the number of drug marketing interactions per county and the number of people in that county who eventually die from opioid

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Originally, Poe envisioned a parrot, not a raven

Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1949) is considered one of America's great writers. Poe penned his most famous poem, The Raven , in his 30s. Originally, the poem's feathered subject was a bit flamboyant. None By his mid-30s, Edgar Allan Poe was not only weary by the hardships of poverty, but also regularly intoxicated — by more than just macabre visions. Despite this, the Gothic writer lucidly insisted tha

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Trilobites: Where Sloths Find These Branches, Their Family Trees Expand

A study showed that when some animals find a crucial resource, they can survive in changing environments and even thrive.

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How sex pheromones diversify: Lessons from yeast

Many organisms including insects, amphibians and yeasts use sex pheromones for attracting individuals of the opposite sex, but what happens to sex pheromones as new species emerge? New research publishing January 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology from Taisuke Seike and Hironori Niki at the National Institute of Genetics, Japan and Chikashi Shimoda at Osaka City University, Japan studies s

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Sverige mållöst i årets första landskamp

Det var årets första landskamp. Det märktes. Sverige fick bara med sig 0–0 från bortamötet med Sydafrika i förberedelserna inför sommarens fotbolls-VM. – Det var inte så värst bra spel, sade landslagsstjärnan Olivia Schough.

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New Research Could Reverse Memory Loss in Alzheimer’s Patients

Epigenetic Factors Your DNA sequence never changes. But the expression of your genes changes throughout your life, and the elements affecting these changes are known as epigenetic factors . Now, scientists believe they have identified an epigenetic factor that causes memory loss in people with Alzheimer’s disease. Their other claim is explosive: that they’ve found a way to reverse memory loss in

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Unique camera enables researchers to see the world the way birds do

Using a specially designed camera, researchers have succeeded for the first time in recreating how birds see colors in their surroundings. The study reveals that birds see a very different reality compared to what we see.

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How sex pheromones diversify: Lessons from yeast

Many organisms including insects, amphibians and yeasts use sex pheromones for attracting individuals of the opposite sex, but what happens to sex pheromones as new species emerge? New research publishing January 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology from Taisuke Seike and Hironori Niki at the National Institute of Genetics, Japan and Chikashi Shimoda at Osaka City University, Japan studies s

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

DNA methylation and orange fruit ripening Sweet orange fruits at 90–210 days after bloom (Left to Right). Tomatoes ripen according to a complex developmental process regulated by active DNA demethylation and an associated genome-wide loss of DNA methylation. Whether global DNA demethylation contributes to ripening in other fruits remains unclear….

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Profile of Hao Wu [Profiles]

Researchers’ understanding of cellular physiology has evolved over time with the identification of internal cell structures. Organelles, large and small, are key to cellular function and response to external stimuli. Harvard Medical School professor of structural biology Hao Wu, elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2015, uses protein…

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Molecular origins and outcomes of status and stress in primates [Anthropology]

Social dominance hierarchies are common in human and nonhuman animals and profoundly affect the behavior, health, and well-being of every member of a community. Research on diverse species has expanded our understanding of how ecological and social forces shape interactions influencing social status, behavior, and the underlying biology (1, 2)….

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Dowsing for nodal lines in a topological semimetal [Physics]

In PNAS, Shao et al. (1) report a spectroscopic search for line degeneracies in the electronic bands of NbAs2, a topological semimetal (TSM). TSMs have attracted great interest recently as exemplars of the emergent physics that can arise in quantum condensed matter (2). They host quasiparticle excitations that cannot occur…

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Innate and adaptive immunity combined for cancer treatment [Immunology and Inflammation]

In PNAS, Kaplanov et al. (1) report on how IL-1β orchestrates recruitment of immunosuppressive monocytes and their polarization in IL-10–producing macrophages during tumor development. This mechanism consequently inhibits and limits CD8+ T cell-driven immune responses and enables tumor outgrowth. Therapeutic blockade of IL-1β and inhibition of monocyte recruitment synergized and…

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Native mass spectrometry reveals the conformational diversity of the UVR8 photoreceptor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

UVR8 is a plant photoreceptor protein that regulates photomorphogenic and protective responses to UV light. The inactive, homodimeric state absorbs UV-B light, resulting in dissociation into monomers, which are considered to be the active state and comprise a β-propeller core domain and intrinsically disordered N- and C-terminal tails. The C…

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Neoproterozoic glacial origin of the Great Unconformity [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The Great Unconformity, a profound gap in Earth’s stratigraphic record often evident below the base of the Cambrian system, has remained among the most enigmatic field observations in Earth science for over a century. While long associated directly or indirectly with the occurrence of the earliest complex animal fossils, a…

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Computer simulations suggest that prostate enlargement due to benign prostatic hyperplasia mechanically impedes prostate cancer growth [Engineering]

Prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are common genitourinary diseases in aging men. Both pathologies may coexist and share numerous similarities, which have suggested several connections or some interplay between them. However, solid evidence confirming their existence is lacking. Recent studies on extensive series of prostatectomy specimens have shown that…

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Fluidization of collisionless plasma turbulence [Physics]

In a collisionless, magnetized plasma, particles may stream freely along magnetic field lines, leading to “phase mixing” of their distribution function and consequently, to smoothing out of any “compressive” fluctuations (of density, pressure, etc.). This rapid mixing underlies Landau damping of these fluctuations in a quiescent plasma—one of the most…

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Social status alters chromatin accessibility and the gene regulatory response to glucocorticoid stimulation in rhesus macaques [Anthropology]

Low social status is an important predictor of disease susceptibility and mortality risk in humans and other social mammals. These effects are thought to stem in part from dysregulation of the glucocorticoid (GC)-mediated stress response. However, the molecular mechanisms that connect low social status and GC dysregulation to downstream health…

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Failure to eliminate a phosphorylated glucose analog leads to neutropenia in patients with G6PT and G6PC3 deficiency [Biochemistry]

Neutropenia represents an important problem in patients with genetic deficiency in either the glucose-6-phosphate transporter of the endoplasmic reticulum (G6PT/SLC37A4) or G6PC3, an endoplasmic reticulum phosphatase homologous to glucose-6-phosphatase. While affected granulocytes show reduced glucose utilization, the underlying mechanism is unknown and causal therapies are lacking. Using a combin

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Near-continuously synthesized leading strands in Escherichia coli are broken by ribonucleotide excision [Biochemistry]

In vitro, purified replisomes drive model replication forks to synthesize continuous leading strands, even without ligase, supporting the semidiscontinuous model of DNA replication. However, nascent replication intermediates isolated from ligase-deficient Escherichia coli comprise only short (on average 1.2-kb) Okazaki fragments. It was long suspected that cells replicate their chromosomal DNA…

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Anthrax toxin requires ZDHHC5-mediated palmitoylation of its surface-processing host enzymes [Cell Biology]

The protein acyl transferase ZDHHC5 was recently proposed to regulate trafficking in the endocytic pathway. Therefore, we explored the function of this enzyme in controlling the action of bacterial toxins. We found that ZDHHC5 activity is required for two very different toxins: the anthrax lethal toxin and the pore-forming toxin…

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IQGAP-related protein IqgC suppresses Ras signaling during large-scale endocytosis [Cell Biology]

Macropinocytosis and phagocytosis are evolutionarily conserved forms of bulk endocytosis used by cells to ingest large volumes of fluid and solid particles, respectively. Both processes are regulated by Ras signaling, which is precisely controlled by mechanisms involving Ras GTPase activating proteins (RasGAPs) responsible for terminating Ras activity on early endosomes….

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Ribosomal protein RPL26 is the principal target of UFMylation [Cell Biology]

Ubiquitin fold modifier 1 (UFM1) is a small, metazoan-specific, ubiquitin-like protein modifier that is essential for embryonic development. Although loss-of-function mutations in UFM1 conjugation are linked to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neither the biological function nor the relevant cellular targets of this protein modifier are known. Here, we show that…

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Chemically induced vesiculation as a platform for studying TMEM16F activity [Cell Biology]

Calcium-activated phospholipid scramblase mediates the energy-independent bidirectional translocation of lipids across the bilayer, leading to transient or, in the case of apoptotic scrambling, sustained collapse of membrane asymmetry. Cells lacking TMEM16F-dependent lipid scrambling activity are deficient in generation of extracellular vesicles (EVs) that shed from the plasma membrane in a…

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Gorillas have been infected with the HERV-K (HML-2) endogenous retrovirus much more recently than humans and chimpanzees [Evolution]

Human endogenous retrovirus-K (HERV-K) human mouse mammary tumor virus-like 2 (HML-2) is the most recently active endogenous retrovirus group in humans, and the only group with human-specific proviruses. HML-2 expression is associated with cancer and other diseases, but extensive searches have failed to reveal any replication-competent proviruses in humans. However,…

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Disruption of RPGR protein interaction network is the common feature of RPGR missense variations that cause XLRP [Genetics]

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease with severe vision impairment leading to blindness. About 10–15% of RP cases are caused by mutations in the RPGR gene, with RPGR mutations accounting for 70% of X-linked RP cases. The mechanism by which RPGR mutations cause photoreceptor cell dysfunction is…

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Blocking IL-1{beta} reverses the immunosuppression in mouse breast cancer and synergizes with anti-PD-1 for tumor abrogation [Immunology and Inflammation]

Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is abundant in the tumor microenvironment, where this cytokine can promote tumor growth, but also antitumor activities. We studied IL-1β during early tumor progression using a model of orthotopically introduced 4T1 breast cancer cells. Whereas there is tumor progression and spontaneous metastasis in wild-type (WT) mice, in IL-1β–deficient…

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Inhibition of chemotherapy resistant breast cancer stem cells by a ROR1 specific antibody [Medical Sciences]

Breast cancers enduring treatment with chemotherapy may be enriched for cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells, which have an enhanced capacity for self-renewal, tumor initiation, and/or metastasis. Breast cancer cells that express the type I tyrosine kinaselike orphan receptor ROR1 also may have such features. Here we find that the…

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Type I interferon response impairs differentiation potential of pluripotent stem cells [Microbiology]

Upon virus infection, pluripotent stem cells neither induce nor respond to canonical type I interferons (IFN-I). To better understand this biology, we characterized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as well as their differentiated parental or rederived counterparts. We confirmed that only iPSCs failed to respond to viral RNA, IFN-I, or…

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The RNA degradosome promotes tRNA quality control through clearance of hypomodified tRNA [Microbiology]

The factors and mechanisms that govern tRNA stability in bacteria are not well understood. Here, we investigated the influence of posttranscriptional modification of bacterial tRNAs (tRNA modification) on tRNA stability. We focused on ThiI-generated 4-thiouridine (s4U), a modification found in bacterial and archaeal tRNAs. Comprehensive quantification of Vibrio cholerae tRNAs…

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Risk-taking bias in human decision-making is encoded via a right-left brain push-pull system [Neuroscience]

A person’s decisions vary even when options stay the same, like when a gambler changes bets despite constant odds of winning. Internal bias (e.g., emotion) contributes to this variability and is shaped by past outcomes, yet its neurobiology during decision-making is not well understood. To map neural circuits encoding bias,…

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Ionic stress enhances ER-PM connectivity via phosphoinositide-associated SYT1 contact site expansion in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

The interorganelle communication mediated by membrane contact sites (MCSs) is an evolutionary hallmark of eukaryotic cells. MCS connections enable the nonvesicular exchange of information between organelles and allow them to coordinate responses to changing cellular environments. In plants, the importance of MCS components in the responses to environmental stress has…

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Global increase in DNA methylation during orange fruit development and ripening [Plant Biology]

DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark involved in many biological processes. The genome of the climacteric tomato fruit undergoes a global loss of DNA methylation due to active DNA demethylation during the ripening process. It is unclear whether the ripening of other fruits is also associated with global DNA…

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Human social motor solutions for human-machine interaction in dynamical task contexts [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Multiagent activity is commonplace in everyday life and can improve the behavioral efficiency of task performance and learning. Thus, augmenting social contexts with the use of interactive virtual and robotic agents is of great interest across health, sport, and industry domains. However, the effectiveness of human–machine interaction (HMI) to effectively…

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Clonal-level lineage commitment pathways of hematopoietic stem cells in vivo [Systems Biology]

While the aggregate differentiation of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) population has been extensively studied, little is known about the lineage commitment process of individual HSC clones. Here, we provide lineage commitment maps of HSC clones under homeostasis and after perturbations of the endogenous hematopoietic system. Under homeostasis, all donor-derived…

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Mission-driven research for stratospheric aerosol geoengineering [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The last decade has seen broad exploratory research into stratospheric aerosol (SA) geoengineering, motivated by concern that reducing greenhouse gas emissions may be insufficient to avoid significant impacts from climate change. Based on this research, it is plausible that a limited deployment of SA geoengineering, provided it is used in…

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Chronic and acute stress monitoring by electrophysiological signals from adrenal gland [Applied Biological Sciences]

We present electrophysiological (EP) signals correlated with cellular cell activities in the adrenal cortex and medulla using an adrenal gland implantable flexible EP probe. With such a probe, we could observe the EP signals from the adrenal cortex and medulla in response to various stress stimuli, such as enhanced hormone…

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Role of the extra Fe in K2-xFe4+ySe5 superconductors [Applied Physical Sciences]

The exact superconducting phase of K2−xFe4+ySe5 has so far not been conclusively decided since its discovery due to its intrinsic multiphase in early material. In an attempt to resolve this mystery, we have carried out systematic structural studies on a set of well-controlled samples with exact chemical stoichiometry K2−xFe4+xSe5 (x…

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Ab initio thermodynamics of liquid and solid water [Applied Physical Sciences]

Thermodynamic properties of liquid water as well as hexagonal (Ih) and cubic (Ic) ice are predicted based on density functional theory at the hybrid-functional level, rigorously taking into account quantum nuclear motion, anharmonic fluctuations, and proton disorder. This is made possible by combining advanced free-energy methods and state-of-the-art machine-learning techniques….

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Mesyl phosphoramidate antisense oligonucleotides as an alternative to phosphorothioates with improved biochemical and biological properties [Biochemistry]

Here we describe a DNA analog in which the mesyl (methanesulfonyl) phosphoramidate group is substituted for the natural phosphodiester group at each internucleotidic position. The oligomers show significant advantages over the often-used DNA phosphorothioates in RNA-binding affinity, nuclease stability, and specificity of their antisense action, which involves activation of cellular…

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The methyltransferase SETD6 regulates Mitotic progression through PLK1 methylation [Biochemistry]

Lysine methylation, catalyzed by protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs), is a key player in regulating intracellular signaling pathways. However, the role of PKMTs and the methylation of nonhistone proteins during the cell cycle are largely unexplored. In a recent proteomic screen, we identified that the PKMT SETD6 methylates PLK1—a key regulator…

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Signatures of selection in the human antibody repertoire: Selective sweeps, competing subclones, and neutral drift [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Antibodies are created and refined by somatic evolution in B cell populations, which endows the human immune system with the ability to recognize and eliminate diverse pathogens. However, the evolutionary processes that sculpt antibody repertoires remain poorly understood. Here, using an unbiased repertoire-scale approach, we show that the population genetic…

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High Rac1 activity is functionally translated into cytosolic structures with unique nanoscale cytoskeletal architecture [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Rac1 activation is at the core of signaling pathways regulating polarized cell migration. So far, it has not been possible to directly explore the structural changes triggered by Rac1 activation at the molecular level. Here, through a multiscale imaging workflow that combines biosensor imaging of Rac1 dynamics with electron cryotomography,…

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Structural mechanism of transcription inhibition by lasso peptides microcin J25 and capistruin [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

We report crystal structures of the antibacterial lasso peptides microcin J25 (MccJ25) and capistruin (Cap) bound to their natural enzymatic target, the bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). Both peptides bind within the RNAP secondary channel, through which NTP substrates enter the RNAP active site, and sterically block trigger-loop folding, which is…

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News Feature: What are the limits of deep learning? [Computer Sciences]

The much-ballyhooed artificial intelligence approach boasts impressive feats but still falls short of human brainpower. Researchers are determined to figure out what’s missing. There’s no mistaking the image: It’s a banana—a big, ripe, bright-yellow banana. Yet the artificial intelligence (AI) identifies it as a toaster, even though it was trained…

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Fat-regulated adaptor protein Dlish binds the growth suppressor Expanded and controls its stability and ubiquitination [Developmental Biology]

The Drosophila protocadherin Fat controls organ size through the Hippo pathway, but the biochemical links to the Hippo pathway components are still poorly defined. We previously identified Dlish, an SH3 domain protein that physically interacts with Fat and the type XX myosin Dachs, and showed that Fat’s regulation of Dlish…

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Global reconstruction of historical ocean heat storage and transport [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Most of the excess energy stored in the climate system due to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions has been taken up by the oceans, leading to thermal expansion and sea-level rise. The oceans thus have an important role in the Earth’s energy imbalance. Observational constraints on future anthropogenic warming critically depend…

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Titanium isotopes as a tracer for the plume or island arc affinity of felsic rocks [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Indirect evidence for the presence of a felsic continental crust, such as the elevated 49Ti/47Ti ratios in Archean shales, has been used to argue for ongoing subduction at that time and therefore plate tectonics. However, rocks of intermediate to felsic compositions can be produced in both plume and island arc…

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Forage silica and water content control dental surface texture in guinea pigs and provide implications for dietary reconstruction [Ecology]

Recent studies have shown that phytoliths are softer than dental enamel but still act as abrasive agents. Thus, phytolith content should be reflected in dental wear. Because native phytoliths show lower indentation hardness than phytoliths extracted by dry ashing, we propose that the hydration state of plant tissue will also…

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Four decades of Antarctic Ice Sheet mass balance from 1979-2017 [Environmental Sciences]

We use updated drainage inventory, ice thickness, and ice velocity data to calculate the grounding line ice discharge of 176 basins draining the Antarctic Ice Sheet from 1979 to 2017. We compare the results with a surface mass balance model to deduce the ice sheet mass balance. The total mass…

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Conserved transcriptomic profiles underpin monogamy across vertebrates [Evolution]

Social monogamy, typically characterized by the formation of a pair bond, increased territorial defense, and often biparental care, has independently evolved multiple times in animals. Despite the independent evolutionary origins of monogamous mating systems, several homologous brain regions and neuropeptides and their receptors have been shown to play a conserved…

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The harmonic mean p-value for combining dependent tests [Genetics]

Analysis of “big data” frequently involves statistical comparison of millions of competing hypotheses to discover hidden processes underlying observed patterns of data, for example, in the search for genetic determinants of disease in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Controlling the familywise error rate (FWER) is considered the strongest protection against false…

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Dysfunction of GRAP, encoding the GRB2-related adaptor protein, is linked to sensorineural hearing loss [Genetics]

We have identified a GRAP variant (c.311A>T; p.Gln104Leu) cosegregating with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic deafness in two unrelated families. GRAP encodes a member of the highly conserved growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2)/Sem-5/drk family of proteins, which are involved in Ras signaling; however, the function of the growth factor receptor-bound protein…

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Multidrug-resistant plasmids repress chromosomally encoded T6SS to enable their dissemination [Microbiology]

Acinetobacter baumannii (Ab) is a nosocomial pathogen with one of the highest rates of multidrug resistance (MDR). This is partially due to transmissible plasmids. Many Ab strains harbor a constitutively active type VI secretion system (T6SS) that is employed to kill nonkin bacteria. T6SS and plasmid conjugation both involve cell-to-cell…

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AWZ1066S, a highly specific anti-Wolbachia drug candidate for a short-course treatment of filariasis [Pharmacology]

Onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis are two neglected tropical diseases that together affect ∼157 million people and inflict severe disability. Both diseases are caused by parasitic filarial nematodes with elimination efforts constrained by the lack of a safe drug that can kill the adult filaria (macrofilaricide). Previous proof-of-concept human trials have…

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Optical signatures of Dirac nodal lines in NbAs2 [Physics]

Using polarized optical and magneto-optical spectroscopy, we have demonstrated universal aspects of electrodynamics associated with Dirac nodal lines that are found in several classes of unconventional intermetallic compounds. We investigated anisotropic electrodynamics of NbAs2 where the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) triggers energy gaps along the nodal lines. These gaps manifest as…

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Self-propulsion of inverse Leidenfrost drops on a cryogenic bath [Physics]

When deposited on a hot bath, volatile drops are observed to stay in levitation: the so-called Leidenfrost effect. Here, we discuss drop dynamics in an inverse Leidenfrost situation where room-temperature drops are deposited on a liquid-nitrogen pool and levitate on a vapor film generated by evaporation of the bath. In…

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Direct observation of crystallization and melting with colloids [Physics]

We study the kinetics of crystal growth and melting of two types of colloidal crystals: body-centered cubic (BCC) crystals and face-centered cubic (FCC) crystals. A dielectrophoretic “electric bottle” confines colloids, enabling precise control of the motion of the interface. We track the particle motion, and by introducing a structural order…

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Body camera footage leads to lower judgments of intent than dash camera footage [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Police departments use body-worn cameras (body cams) and dashboard cameras (dash cams) to monitor the activity of police officers in the field. Video from these cameras informs review of police conduct in disputed circumstances, often with the goal of determining an officer’s intent. Eight experiments (N = 2,119) reveal that…

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Leading a meaningful life at older ages and its relationship with social engagement, prosperity, health, biology, and time use [Social Sciences]

The sense that one is living a worthwhile and meaningful life is fundamental to human flourishing and subjective well-being. Here, we investigate the wider implications of feeling that the things one does in life are worthwhile with a sample of 7,304 men and women aged 50 and older (mean 67.2…

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The bright side of PV production in snow-covered mountains [Sustainability Science]

Our work explores the prospect of bringing the temporal production profile of solar photovoltaics (PV) into better correlation with typical electricity consumption patterns in the midlatitudes. To do so, we quantify the potential of three choices for PV installations that increase production during the winter months when electricity is most…

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Socioecologically informed use of remote sensing data to predict rural household poverty [Sustainability Science]

Tracking the progress of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and targeting interventions requires frequent, up-to-date data on social, economic, and ecosystem conditions. Monitoring socioeconomic targets using household survey data would require census enumeration combined with annual sample surveys on consumption and socioeconomic trends. Such surveys could cost up to $253…

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Correction for Miloȷević et al., Changing demographics of scientific careers: The rise of the temporary workforce [Correction]

COLLOQUIUM Correction for “Changing demographics of scientific careers: The rise of the temporary workforce,” by Staša Milojević, Filippo Radicchi, and John P. Walsh, which was first published December 11, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1800478115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:12616–12623). The authors note that a reference was omitted from the article. The complete…

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Correction for Lee et al., ZFAND5/ZNF216 is an activator of the 26S proteasome that stimulates overall protein degradation [Correction]

BIOCHEMISTRY Correction for “ZFAND5/ZNF216 is an activator of the 26S proteasome that stimulates overall protein degradation,” by Donghoon Lee, Shinichi Takayama, and Alfred L. Goldberg, which was first published September 25, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1809934115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E9550–E9559). The authors note that the following statement should be added as…

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Correction for Kim and Goldberg, UBL domain of Usp14 and other proteins stimulates proteasome activities and protein degradation in cells [Correction]

BIOCHEMISTRY Correction for “UBL domain of Usp14 and other proteins stimulates proteasome activities and protein degradation in cells,” by Hyoung Tae Kim and Alfred L. Goldberg, which was first published November 28, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1808731115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E11642–E11650). The authors note that the following statement should be added…

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Correction for Liu et al., The genome landscape of ER{alpha}- and ER{beta}-binding DNA regions [Correction]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “The genome landscape of ERα- and ERβ-binding DNA regions,” by Yawen Liu, Hui Gao, Troels Torben Marstrand, Anders Ström, Eivind Valen, Albin Sandelin, Jan-Åke Gustafsson, and Karin Dahlman-Wright, which was first published February 19, 2008; 10.1073/pnas.0712085105 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105:2604–2609). The authors wish to…

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Hibernating Squirrels and the Government Shutdown

In my lab and many others, time-sensitive research is in peril — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Invisible labor can negatively impact well-being in mothers

Keeping track of who wears which costume, the location of soccer cleats and what is in the pantry are all examples invisible labor, or the mental and emotional effort required of mothers as they raise children and manage households. Researchers quantified the prevalence and impact of invisible labor. Feeling solely responsible for the household and children strained mothers' well-being and decreas

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Hibernating Squirrels and the Government Shutdown

In my lab and many others, time-sensitive research is in peril — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Alzheimer's blood test detects brain damage years before symptoms

Testing blood levels of a protein that brain cells leak when faulty or dying detected people with Alzheimer's disease years before their symptoms emerged.

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Hibernating Squirrels and the Government Shutdown

In my lab and many others, time-sensitive research is in peril — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Skandalsimmaren tränar för OS i ”Big Brother”-poolen

Det finns olika sätt att förbereda sig inför ett OS. Den amerikanske skandalsimmaren Ryan Lochte har valt ett mer udda sådant. Ryan Lochte är en av deltagarna i tv-programmet ”Big Brother”, men det finns en pool i huset som gör det möjligt för honom att fortsätta att träna.

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Women, your inner circle may be key to gaining leadership roles

According to a new study, women who communicate regularly with a female-dominated inner circle are more likely to attain high-ranking leadership positions.

4h

Breastmilk sugars differ in pregnant women on probiotics

The complex sugars found in human breastmilk, long believed to be fixed in their composition, may change in women who are taking probiotics, according to new research.

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Migratory schedule of swallows uncovered

The study is the first to track the timing of 12 geographically distinct breeding populations of tree swallows across the continent. Researchers measured how long birds spent at breeding grounds to raise their young, when they began migration and stopped to refuel, and when they arrived at wintering grounds. Understanding when birds move between breeding and wintering sites, and how different popu

4h

New method uses ultraviolet light to control fluid flow and organize particles

A new, simple, and inexpensive method that uses ultraviolet light to control particle motion and assembly within liquids could improve drug delivery, chemical sensors, and fluid pumps.

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Orthodontics no guarantee of long-term oral health

A commonly held belief among the general public is orthodontic treatment will prevent future tooth decay. Research has found that this is not the case.

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Faulty molecular master switch may contribute to AMD

A signaling pathway controlled by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) could be involved in the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

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Last Week in Tech: Jetsuit obstacle courses, digital license plates, and tacos

Technology We need that rocket suit ASAP. Catch up on all the latest tech news you missed.

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Hard foot falls aren’t the biggest stress fracture risk

New research confirms that the vast majority of force on the bone is actually from muscles contracting, not from the foot’s impact on the ground, a finding both the wearables industry and many scientific studies have overlooked. It starts as a persistent and irritating pain in the foot or lower leg, then it gets more intense, maybe with swelling, and soon a runner knows she’s facing one of the mo

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Thousands turn out to support science in Italy’s stricken olive region

Thousands turn out to support science in Italy’s stricken olive region Thousands turn out to support science in Italy’s stricken olive region, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00224-8 Anti-science sentiment has hampered efforts to contain the spread of a devastating olive-tree disease.

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Greps felaktigt för snatteri – blev erbjuden personal shopper

Väktare grep tag i Jöns Hellsing på väg ut från Åhléns, ”halvsläpade” honom genom varuhuset och anklagade honom för snatteri – trots att han precis betalat för varorna. Åhléns erbjudande som plåster på såren: Köpa varor för 3.000 kronor med en ”personal shopper”. – Sorry. Min stolthet tillåter inte det, säger Jöns Hellsing om erbjudandet.

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Unraveling the mysteries of hagfish's slimy defense

The hagfish dates back at least 300 million years. The secret of survival for these eel-like sea creatures can be found in the rate and volume of slime it produces to fend off predators.

5h

Effective strategies for safeguarding CRISPR gene-drive experiments

Researchers have demonstrated for the first time how two molecular strategies can safeguard CRISPR gene-drive experiments in the lab, according to a new study.

5h

Famous freak wave recreated in laboratory mirrors Hokusai's 'Great Wave'

Researchers have recreated for the first time the famous Draupner freak wave measured in the North Sea in 1995.

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Ranger motivation in dangerous African park

A new study looks at the job satisfaction of front line conservation rangers working in challenging conditions at a national park in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and identifies ways to improve motivation to make them more effective at enforcing the law.

5h

Air pollutants from US forest soils will increase with climate change

Scientists predict that certain regions of the United States will experience higher levels of pollutants that cause smog, acid rain and respiratory problems due changes in forest soils from climate change.

5h

New skin test detects prion infection before symptoms appear

Prions can infect both humans and animals, causing Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, mad cow disease in cattle, and chronic wasting disease in elk and deer. The infectious, misfolded protein particles often go undetected as they destroy brain tissue, causing memory loss, mobility issues, and ultimately death. Preclinical detection of prions has proven difficult, but new research suggests

5h

To halt malaria transmission, more research focused on human behavior needed

Wherever possible, researchers should not just focus on mosquito behavior when working to eliminate malaria, but must also consider how humans behave at night when the risk of being bitten by an infected mosquito is highest.

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Unique camera enables researchers to see the world the way birds do

Using a specially designed camera, researchers have succeeded for the first time in recreating how birds see colors in their surroundings. The study reveals that birds see a very different reality compared to what we see.

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The ocean is full of drifting DNA. The United States needs to collect it, researchers say

Environmental DNA could help save species, manage fish stocks

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Lind vill inte ta ställning till OS – än

Sveriges nya idrottsminister vill ge barn och unga större chans att idrotta. Huruvida hon också vill ge OS-idrottare chansen på svensk mark återstår dock ännu att se. – Vi kommer behöva ett gediget beslutsunderlag innan vi landar i ett ställningstagande, säger Amanda Lind (MP) om den svenska OS-ansökan.

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Making Evidence Affordable: Get Ready For The Citizen Science Revolution

When it comes to health and wellness products, there are countless options available to consumers: health bars, juices, supplements, and nutritional shakes – just to name a few. The real challenge isn’t finding the products, but rather figuring out which products are or aren’t a waste of money. But there’s something most consumers don’t realize; it’s even more of a challenge for the wellness comp

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A new blood test could detect Alzheimer’s before symptoms emerge

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Originally Poe envisioned a parrot, not a raven

By his mid-30s, Edgar Allan Poe was not only weary by the hardships of poverty, but also regularly intoxicated — by more than just macabre visions. Despite this, the Gothic writer lucidly insisted that there was still a method to his madness when it came to devising poems. In an essay titled "The Philosophy of Composition," published in 1846 in Graham's Magazine , Poe divulged how his creative pr

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New book revives ‘Western Front’ author’s lost WWI stories

A new book brings readers lesser known short stories by famed German writer and World War I veteran Erich Maria Remarque. Among the books that the Nazis banned and burned was All Quiet on the Western Front , a novel Remarque published in 1929. All Quiet follows Paul Bäumer, a German soldier fighting in the first World War, and describes in brutal detail the war’s bloody horrors. In the book’s epi

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Publisher Correction: Magnetic and magnetic inverse spin Hall effects in a non-collinear antiferromagnet

Publisher Correction: Magnetic and magnetic inverse spin Hall effects in a non-collinear antiferromagnet Publisher Correction: Magnetic and magnetic inverse spin Hall effects in a non-collinear antiferromagnet, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0907-y Publisher Correction: Magnetic and magnetic inverse spin Hall effects in a non-collinear antiferromagnet

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Author Correction: Direct observation of incommensurate magnetism in Hubbard chains

Author Correction: Direct observation of incommensurate magnetism in Hubbard chains Author Correction: Direct observation of incommensurate magnetism in Hubbard chains, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0906-z Author Correction: Direct observation of incommensurate magnetism in Hubbard chains

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Usain Bolt lägger ned fotbollskarriären

Förre sprinterstjärnan Usain Bolt sadlade om till fotboll efter att ha ställt löparskorna på hyllan 2017.

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Brain biomarkers may explain severe PTSD

Researchers have discovered biomarkers that may explain why symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder can be so severe for some people and not for others. The study of combat veterans who have experienced intense events shows that those with severe symptoms of PTSD have distinct patterns of neurological and physiological responses affecting associative learning—the ability to distinguish between

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What bioRxiv’s first 30,000 preprints reveal about biologists

What bioRxiv’s first 30,000 preprints reveal about biologists What bioRxiv’s first 30,000 preprints reveal about biologists, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00199-6 More than 1 million studies are now downloaded from the site every month, mostly in neuroscience, bioinformatics and genomics.

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Study predicts how air pollutants from US forest soils will increase with climate change

A study from Indiana University has found that trees influence whether soil can remove or emit gases that cause smog, acid rain and respiratory problems.

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Astrophysicists develop technique to locate undiscovered planets, celestial bodies

A revolutionary technique developed by an astrophysicist at Rochester Institute of Technology could allow for a better understanding of the fates of solar systems when their stars cease to shine.

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”En signal som visar att vår verksamhet är viktig”

Damkronorna har haft en tuff ekonomisk verklighet. Inför vårens VM i Finland gör dock Svenska ishockeyförbundet en satsning på landslaget när de utökar ledartruppen med tre personer. – Genom det här beslutet skickar min arbetsgivare signalen att Damkronornas verksamhet är viktig, säger förbundskaptenen Ylva Martinsen.

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Youth with disabilities have increased risk for technology-involved peer harassment

New research from the University of New Hampshire finds that while youths with disabilities, mental health diagnoses and special education services experience peer harassment or bullying at similar rates as other youth, understanding differences in how they experience it may lead to solutions that minimize risk to all youth.

5h

Study looks at ranger motivation in dangerous African park

A new study by WCS looks at the job satisfaction of front line conservation rangers working in challenging conditions at a national park in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and identifies ways to improve motivation to make them more effective at enforcing the law.

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New method uses ultraviolet light to control fluid flow and organize particles

A new, simple, and inexpensive method that uses ultraviolet light to control particle motion and assembly within liquids could improve drug delivery, chemical sensors, and fluid pumps. The method encourages particles—from plastic microbeads, to bacterial spores, to pollutants—to gather and organize at a specific location within a liquid and, if desired, to move to new locations. A paper describing

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How ‘debris’ from joint replacements causes pain

Researchers have discovered why many people with joint replacements experience harmful inflammation and bone loss. The findings could lead to new therapies to prevent pain and the need for follow-up surgeries. As many as 15 percent of joint replacements will fail, which can require revision surgery to replace the implant. Prosthetic devices can release microparticles—known as “wear debris”—that p

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Women, your inner circle may be key to gaining leadership roles

According to a new Notre Dame study, women who communicate regularly with a female-dominated inner circle are more likely to attain high-ranking leadership positions.

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Older caregivers report worse well-being when providing minimal assistance

Providing less than an hour of help to an elderly person can take a surprising emotional toll on older caregivers, says a University of Michigan researcher.

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New skin test detects prion infection before symptoms appear

Prions can infect both humans and animals, causing Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, mad cow disease in cattle, and chronic wasting disease in elk and deer. The infectious, misfolded protein particles often go undetected as they destroy brain tissue, causing memory loss, mobility issues, and ultimately death. Preclinical detection of prions has proven difficult, but new research suggests

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Study predicts how air pollutants from US forest soils will increase with climate change

Scientists predict that certain regions of the United States will experience higher levels of pollutants that cause smog, acid rain and respiratory problems due changes in forest soils from climate change.

5h

How much rainforest do birds need?

Researchers have carried out research in Southwest Cameroon to assess which proportion of forest would be necessary in order to provide sufficient habitat for rainforest bird species.

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Bifacial stem cells produce wood and bast

So-called bifacial stem cells are responsible for one of the most critical growth processes on Earth — the formation of wood. By alternately developing into wood and bast cells, these stem cells are thus starting points for forming wood as well as generating plant bast fibers. A team of researchers were recently able to demonstrate this phenomenon using new experimental tools.

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Study looks at ranger motivation in dangerous African park

A new study by WCS looks at the job satisfaction of front line conservation rangers working in challenging conditions at a national park in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and identifies ways to improve motivation to make them more effective at enforcing the law.

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Millennial Burnout Is Being Televised

The fifth episode of Tidying Up With Marie Kondo , Netflix’s effervescent new reality series, deals with Frank and Matt, a couple living in West Hollywood, California. Both writers, they have a touching love story involving Tinder, a too-small apartment filled with detritus from past roommates, and a burning desire to prove their adulting bona fides. They are, in short, the archetypal Millennial

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Deckare återfinner tusenårig stulen konst

Konstvärldens Indiana Jones har gjort det igen. Den nederländska konstforskaren Arthur Brand har återfunnit två spanska stenreliefer – täckta med löv och lera i en trädgård i Storbritannien.

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Trump's Border Wall Highlights the Climate-Migration Connection

While the wall is aimed at stopping migrants, environmental rollbacks could encourage more migration — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Precision pest control: smartphone app is the farmer's newest weapon in crop protection

Scientists are creating a new smartphone app to help farmers tackle the pests destroying their crops, and it could soon have a major impact on the way information about the natural world is gathered, stored and accessed worldwide.

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Bird beaks did not adapt to food types as previously thought, study suggests

A study, led by the University of Bristol, has shed some new light on how the beaks of birds have adapted over time.

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Researchers uncover migratory schedule of swallows, new study

Each year, migratory birds journey from their breeding grounds to their wintering grounds, making pit stops along the way.

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How your immune system uses chaos to prevent disease

New research finds that chaotic swings in the concentration of a certain protein is key for regulating our immune response and preventing chronic disease.

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Bird beaks did not adapt to food types as previously thought, study suggests

A study, led by the University of Bristol, has shed some new light on how the beaks of birds have adapted over time.

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'Revealing Greater Cahokia' details research on ancient North American metropolis

With a population between 10,000 and 30,000 in its heyday (A.D. 1050-1200) and a sprawling assortment of homes, storage buildings, temples, cemeteries, mounds and other monuments in and around what is now St. Louis and East St. Louis, Illinois, the ancient Native American city known as Greater Cahokia was the first experiment in urban living in North America.

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Creating attraction between molecules deep in the periodic table

A McGill-led international research team provides the first experimental and theoretical proof that it is possible to form strong, stable attractions between some of the heavier elements in the periodic table—such as arsenic or even antimony. Because hydrogen is not involved in creating the bond between these elements, these new materials should be resistant to water and humidity.

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Milky Way's neighbors pick up the pace

After slowly forming stars for the first few billion years of their lives, the Magellanic Clouds, near neighbors of our own Milky Way galaxy, have upped their game and are now forming new stars at a fast clip. This new insight into the history of the Clouds comes from the first detailed chemical maps made of galaxies beyond the Milky Way.

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Oscar Hiljemark opereras – borta säsongen ut

Landslagsmittfältaren Oscar Hiljemark missar resten av säsongen. Hans klubb Genoa meddelar att 26-åringen ska opereras i Sverige.

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Jessica hittade försvunna bebisen: ”Hon var varm och glad”

Inkilad mellan ett par bilar på parkeringen stod den svarta barnvagn som polisen i Göteborg letat frenetiskt efter. Ovetandes om uppståndelsen gick Jessica Samuelsson och hennes kollega fram och såg den lilla flickan ligga där. – Hon var till synes helt oskadd. Hon var glad och varm och supermysig, säger hon.

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The Geologic Nature of Our Borders

The world's current political climate is one where we are very aware of borders. They divide what we humans decide is one country, one state, one region from another. They can be very clearly defined where everyone would notice the boundary and in other cases, they are merely defined by imaginary lines we've projected on our planet. Much of the time, these boundaries are geologic — that is, they

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Researchers uncover migratory schedule of swallows, new study

Each year, migratory birds journey from their breeding grounds to their wintering grounds, making pit stops along the way.

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Ancient climate change triggered warming that lasted thousands of years

A rapid rise in temperature on ancient Earth triggered a climate response that may have prolonged the warming for many thousands of years, according to scientists.

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Near-term climate prediction 'coming of age'

The quest for climate scientists to be able to bridge the gap between shorter-term seasonal forecasts and long-term climate projections is 'coming of age', a study shows.

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Study looks at ranger motivation in dangerous African park

A new study looks at the job satisfaction of front line conservation rangers working in challenging conditions at a national park in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and identifies ways to improve motivation to make them more effective at enforcing the law.

5h

Youth with disabilities have increased risk for technology-involved peer harassment

New research from the University of New Hampshire finds that while youths with disabilities, mental health diagnoses and special education services experience peer harassment or bullying at similar rates as other youth, understanding differences in how they experience it may lead to solutions that minimize risk to all youth.

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Famous freak wave recreated in laboratory mirrors Hokusai's 'Great Wave'

A team of researchers based at the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh have recreated for the first time the famous Draupner freak wave measured in the North Sea in 1995.

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Scientists demonstrate effective strategies for safeguarding CRISPR gene-drive experiments

Researchers have demonstrated for the first time how two molecular strategies can safeguard CRISPR gene-drive experiments in the lab, according to a study published today in eLife.

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Illinois team helping to unravel the mysteries of the hagfish's slimy defense

The hagfish dates back at least 300 million years. The secret of survival for these eel-like sea creatures can be found in the rate and volume of slime it produces to fend off predators. Interestingly, the oldest fossils of these eel-like sea creatures, were found in Illinois, and today researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are beginning to uncover the mystery of how the

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How much rainforest do birds need?

Researchers of the Department of Conservation Biology at the University of Göttingen have carried out research in Southwest Cameroon to assess which proportion of forest would be necessary in order to provide sufficient habitat for rainforest bird species. The results of the study were published in the journal Biological Conservation.

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Heating up cold tumors

A Ludwig Cancer Research study has uncovered a cellular mechanism by which melanomas that fail to respond to checkpoint blockade may be made susceptible to such immunotherapies.

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Study offers promise for preventing necrotizing enterocolitis in preemies

Researchers at Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, and colleagues, discovered a promising direction toward understanding the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a devastating intestinal disease commonly affecting premature infants, in order to treat it.

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New method uses ultraviolet light to control fluid flow and organize particles

A new, simple, and inexpensive method that uses ultraviolet light to control particle motion and assembly within liquids could improve drug delivery, chemical sensors, and fluid pumps.

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A fleeting moment in time: Last breath of a dying star

The faint, ephemeral glow emanating from the planetary nebula ESO 577-24 persists for only a short time — around 10,000 years, a blink of an eye in astronomical terms. ESO's Very Large Telescope captured this shell of glowing ionized gas — the last breath of the dying star whose simmering remains are visible at the heart of this image. As the gaseous shell of this planetary nebula expands and gr

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Experts call for review of quake limits on UK fracking

Researchers involved in monitoring fracking in the UK say the limits on seismic activity are "too conservative".

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Can Outrage Be a Good Thing?

A scientific look at an emotion that shapes our times — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Are cats jerks? Or are YOU the jerk?

Researchers discovered that the more attention you give a cat, the more likely they are to return it. Cats are territorial; being in their home environment greatly affects their attitude. The common wisdom that cats are aloof is provably false. None This weekend, my wife and I visited the San Diego Zoo. Having grown up nearby, she visited often as a child, though it was my first time. While I gen

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Can Outrage Be a Good Thing?

A scientific look at an emotion that shapes our times — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Elon Musk: Why I'm Building the Starship out of Stainless Steel

submitted by /u/wind_of_pain [link] [comments]

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Here's why NASA wants to 3D print human hearts in space

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Microsoft reveals 'Code Jumper,' a 'physical' programming language designed for blind children

Although the company has made a few controversial decisions in the past, one thing Microsoft can't be accused of is ignoring the needs of those with physical or mental disabilities.

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Dyson switches HQ from Britain to Singapore: company

British electric appliance pioneer Dyson will switch headquarters to Singapore this year due to booming Asian demand but not because of Brexit, the company said Tuesday.

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Negative experiences on social media tied to higher odds of feeling lonely

Positive interactions on social media are not making young adults feel more connected, whereas negative experiences increase the likelihood of them reporting loneliness.

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Bifacial stem cells produce wood and bast

So-called bifacial stem cells are responsible for one of the most critical growth processes on Earth — the formation of wood. By alternately developing into wood and bast cells, these stem cells are thus starting points for forming wood as well as generating plant bast fibres. A team of researchers under the direction of Dr Thomas Greb, a Heisenberg Professor at Heidelberg University, were recent

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Study shows low-sugar diet effective in boys with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that a diet low in free sugars (those added to foods and beverages and occurring naturally in fruit juices) resulted in significant improvement in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adolescent boys.

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Unique camera enables researchers to see the world the way birds do

Using a specially designed camera, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have succeeded for the first time in recreating how birds see colours in their surroundings. The study reveals that birds see a very different reality compared to what we see.

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Researchers uncover migratory schedule of swallows, new study

The study is the first to track the timing of 12 geographically distinct breeding populations of tree swallows across the continent. Researchers measured how long birds spent at breeding grounds to raise their young, when they began migration and stopped to refuel, and when they arrived at wintering grounds. Understanding when birds move between breeding and wintering sites, and how different popu

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Health literacy linked to blood pressure medication adherence among Hispanics

Good health literacy is associated with better adherence to blood pressure medications among Hispanic individuals with high blood pressure, finds a study by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and Columbia University School of Nursing. However, the majority of this population lacks health literary and has poor adherence to their medications.

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Breastmilk sugars differ in pregnant women on probiotics

The complex sugars found in human breastmilk, long believed to be fixed in their composition, may change in women who are taking probiotics, according to new research from the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC).

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Fewer medical tests — timely listing for transplantation

Younger patients would benefit greatly from kidney transplantation. Their expected remaining lifetime may even be doubled by having a transplant. 'We have to do all we can to get young patients listed for transplantation as soon as possible, preferably pre-emptively', says Professor Luuk Hilbrands, Chair of the DESCARTES working group of the ERA-EDTA. A proposal for the work-up of low-risk kidney

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Next Gene-Edited Baby Due in Six Months, Scientist Says

Round Two On Monday, the Chinese government finally confirmed to the world that disgraced scientist He Jiankui had been telling the truth: in an attempt to genetically alter people to be immune to HIV, He had allowed twin girls to be born with CRISPR-edited genomes. Now William Hurlbut, a Stanford bioethicist who says he was in regular contact with He, told the French wire service AFP that a seco

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Publisher Correction: Somatic APP gene recombination in Alzheimer’s disease and normal neurons

Publisher Correction: Somatic APP gene recombination in Alzheimer’s disease and normal neurons Publisher Correction: Somatic APP gene recombination in Alzheimer’s disease and normal neurons, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0905-0 Publisher Correction: Somatic APP gene recombination in Alzheimer’s disease and normal neurons

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The Advantages of an Addictive Personality

The fact that it persists suggests it could have conferred an evolutionary advantage on our remote ancestors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists discover new quantum spin liquid

A research team has made a significant breakthrough in the search for new states of matter. The scientists show that a perovskite-related metal oxide exhibits a quantum spin liquid state, a long-sought-after and unusual state of matter.

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New genes associated with the leading cause of blindness

A new study identifies genes associated with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) that could represent new targets for future drug development.

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Daily briefing: How to deal with not getting tenure

Daily briefing: How to deal with not getting tenure Daily briefing: How to deal with not getting tenure, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00248-0 “The best revenge is doing well.” Plus: fast, cheap, easy DNA testing in police stations and #ScienceShutdown stories.

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Do Animals Hate the Bitter Cold of Winter?

Animals can certainly feel the cold, and many species have developed unique ways of dealing with it

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Breaking Down the 2019 Oscar Nominations

Roma and The Favourite led the Oscar nominations with 10 apiece as the Academy Awards unfurled their shortlist Tuesday morning, with Best Picture recognition for A Star Is Born , BlacKkKlansman , Green Book , Black Panther , Vice , and Bohemian Rhapsody. Some surprising snubs abounded in a race that never quite settled on an obvious front-runner: Bradley Cooper ( A Star Is Born ) and Peter Farrel

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The Advantages of an Addictive Personality

The fact that it persists suggests it could have conferred an evolutionary advantage on our remote ancestors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Happy Sesquicentennial, Periodic Table!

The organizing scheme that revolutionized our understanding of the chemical elements turns 150 in 2019 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Being messy on the inside keeps metamaterials from folding under stress

Inspiration from disordered arrangements of atoms in crystalline metals may lead to longer-lasting, next-gen materials.

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To halt malaria transmission, more research focused on human behavior needed

Wherever possible, researchers should not just focus on mosquito behavior when working to eliminate malaria, but must also consider how humans behave at night when the risk of being bitten by an infected mosquito is highest, new findings from the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) suggest. CCP is based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Improved plastics recycling thanks to spectral imaging

Plastics recycling is complicated by the need to recycle similar plastics together. The presence of flame retardants in plastics also needs to be identified, and a NIR hyperspectral imaging method to do so is reported in this paper in the peer-reviewed, open-access journal, JSI — Journal of Spectral Imaging.

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White blood cells related to allergies may also be harnessed to destroy cancer cells

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that white blood cells which are responsible for chronic asthma and modern allergies may be used to eliminate malignant colon cancer cells.

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Milky Way's neighbors pick up the pace

After slowly forming stars for the first few billion years of their lives, the Magellanic Clouds, near neighbors of our own Milky Way galaxy, have upped their game and are now forming new stars at a fast clip. This new insight into the history of the Clouds comes from the first detailed chemical maps made of galaxies beyond the Milky Way.

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Parental PTSD affects health behavior and aging among offspring of Holocaust survivors

A new study on intergenerational transmission of trauma has found evidence that Holocaust survivors suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and their adult offspring exhibit more unhealthy behavior patterns and age less successfully in comparison to survivors with no signs of PTSD or parents who did not experience the Holocaust and their offspring.

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'Reprogramming' immune cells to attack cancer tumors

Macrophages, the immune cells that 'eat' pathogens and cell debris, are often ineffective against cancer cells. How can we co-opt them to attack tumors?

6h

The Advantages of an Addictive Personality

The fact that it persists suggests it could have conferred an evolutionary advantage on our remote ancestors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Happy Sesquicentennial, Periodic Table!

The organizing scheme that revolutionized our understanding of the chemical elements turns 150 in 2019 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Emerging significance of gammaherpesvirus and morbillivirus infections in cats

Emerging infectious diseases comprise a substantial fraction of important human infections, with potentially devastating global health and economic impacts. A 2008 paper in Nature described the emergence of no fewer than 335 infectious diseases in the global human population between 1940 and 2004. In the veterinary field, just as in the medical field, advanced molecular techniques and sophisticate

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Teen Diver Finds Huge Cache of Plastic Pollution — Thousands of Golf Balls Off California Coast

With a marine scientist, the teen reveals how much golf courses are polluting nearby waters.

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Emerging significance of gammaherpesvirus and morbillivirus infections in cats

Emerging infectious diseases comprise a substantial fraction of important human infections, with potentially devastating global health and economic impacts. A 2008 paper in Nature described the emergence of no fewer than 335 infectious diseases in the global human population between 1940 and 2004. In the veterinary field, just as in the medical field, advanced molecular techniques and sophisticate

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SpaceX Starship Will “Bleed Water” From Tiny Holes, Says Elon Musk

Steely Fan Stainless steel won’t just make the SpaceX Starship rocket look cool — it’ll help it stay cool, too. On Tuesday, Popular Mechanics published an interview with CEO Elon Musk focused on SpaceX’s decision to build its massive new rocket out of stainless steel instead of the previously planned carbon fiber. Not only is the material cheaper and tougher, according to Musk, but it also gives

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Ryssland får nytt klartecken av Wada

Rysslands antidopningsbyrå (Rusada) får på nytt klartecken från Wada, den internationella antidopningsbyrån. Wada anser sig ha fått tillfredsställande resultat från de datauppgifter man begärt in från dopningslaboratoriet i Moskva. Men ryska idrottare kan fortfarande komma att stängas av från OS i Tokyo nästa år.

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Dyson switches HQ from Britain to Singapore: company

British electric appliance pioneer Dyson will switch headquarters to Singapore this year due to booming Asian demand but not because of Brexit, the company said Tuesday.

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Resident Evil 2 review – genre-defining horror, loaded with dread

Capcom’s survival horror classic returns with improved visuals, new controls and a whole host of monstrous surprisesLet’s get this out of the way: Resident Evil 2 is the best game in Capcom’s …

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Google's self-driving unit Waymo to put factory in Michigan

Google's autonomous vehicle unit Waymo says it plans to bring a factory to Michigan.

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Freaked out ancestors boost lizard response to stress

Having ancestors with frequent exposure to stressors can improve a lizard’s immune response to stress, research shows. The findings suggest family history should be a consideration for predicting or understanding the health implications of stress. “Prolonged stress typically suppresses immune function within an individual,” says Tracy Langkilde, professor and head of biology at Penn State. “For e

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Bird beaks did not adapt to food types as previously thought

A study, led by the University of Bristol, has shed some new light on how the beaks of birds have adapted over time.

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Parents' mental health problems increase risk of reactive attachment disorder in children

Children's risk of being diagnosed with reactive attachment disorder (RAD) increases if parents are diagnosed with any type of mental health disorder, discovered researchers from the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry of the University of Turku, Finland. Particularly parents' alcohol and drug addiction and mother's depression were associated with reactive attachment disorder in children. The nat

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Creating attraction between molecules deep in the periodic table

A McGill-led international research team provides the first experimental and theoretical proof that it is possible to form strong, stable attractions between some of the heavier elements in the periodic table — such as arsenic or even antimony. Because hydrogen is not involved in creating the bond between these elements, these new materials should be resistant to water and humidity.

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Physicians: Treat eSport players as college athletes

ESport teams require preventive care, injury treatment protocols, according to a study in the British Journal of Medicine.

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Blocking toxic-protein production in ALS

An approved drug that blocks an integrated stress response shows promise in preliminary tests against ALS and frontotemporal dementia.

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Emerging significance of gammaherpesvirus and morbillivirus infections in cats

Emerging infectious diseases comprise a substantial fraction of important human infections, with potentially devastating global health and economic impacts. A 2008 paper in Nature described the emergence of no fewer than 335 infectious diseases in the global human population between 1940 and 2004. In the veterinary field, just as in the medical field, advanced molecular techniques and sophisticate

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Graphene and related materials safety: human health and the environment

Graphene Flagship researchers reviewed the current research into the safety of graphene and related materials looking at both human health and environmental impact.

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Fewer than half of adults and youth with type 1 diabetes in the US achieve treatment goals

A new study has shown that only a minority of patients in the US with type 1 diabetes (T1D) achieve target levels of hemoglobin A1c, a measure of blood glucose management over time.

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Why you should be concerned about Oprah Winfrey when introducing an innovation

New research by Bocconi University's Paola Cillo and Gaia Rubera with Texas A&M's David Griffith asserts that the reaction of large individual investors to innovation is an important component of stock returns, their reaction to innovation depends on their national culture, and there is a way to segment large individual investors and pitch innovation to them accordingly.

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Multiple sclerosis — Helping cells to help themselves

Diseases such as multiple sclerosis are characterized by damage to the 'myelin sheath', a protective covering wrapped around nerve cells akin to insulation around an electrical wire. Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered how the body initiates repair mechanisms which will limit the extent of any damage to this sheath. Their findings, which provide a basis for the de

6h

Increasing skepticism against robots

In Europe, people are more reserved regarding robots than they were five years ago.

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Human respiratory viruses continue to spread in wild chimpanzees

Less than two years after the first report of wild chimpanzees in Uganda dying as a result of a human 'common cold' virus, a new study has identified two other respiratory viruses of human origin in chimpanzee groups in the same forest.

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Multi-hop communication: Frog choruses inspire wireless sensor networks

Researchers looked to nature for inspiration in designing more effective wireless sensor networks. First, they recorded the vocal interplay of neighboring tree frog calls, which they found allowed trade-off time for individual communication, though this is interspersed with more random collective silence and choruses. They mathematically modeled these patterns and effectively applied their model t

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Concussions linked to epilepsy development

Experiments show a strong relationship between changes in astrocytes after mild traumatic brain injury and the eventual occurrence of a seizure.

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2D magnetism reaches a new milestone

Researchers have reported the first experimental observation of a XY-type antiferromagnetic material, whose magnetic order becomes unstable when it is reduced to one-atom thickness. These findings are consistent with theoretical predictions dating back to the 1970s.

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Could the US Government Shutdown fallout be a taste of what is to come when companies begin laying off employees in favor of automation?

As we see federal employees grappling with austerity, and for some a slide into poverty, for the first time, I wonder if this is how the apparently inevitable shift to automation may look as thousands of people are put out of work with no safety net. submitted by /u/hoodiemonster [link] [comments]

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Here’s Why NASA Wants to 3D Print Human Hearts in Space

Drastic Outsourcing To help cut down at the horrifically-long donor organ waitlist, some scientists are looking up to outer space. Several doctors have tried to 3D print organs in the lab, with mixed results — organs with complex internal structures, like hearts and lungs, tend to collapse under their own weight. Now, instead of supporting them with complex scaffolding systems, some scientists ar

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Long-read DNA analysis can give rise to errors, experts warn

Advanced technologies that read long strings of DNA can produce flawed data that could affect genetic studies, research suggests.

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Long-read DNA analysis can give rise to errors, experts warn

Advanced technologies that read long strings of DNA can produce flawed data that could affect genetic studies, research suggests.

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Batterivogn sikrer rullende strøm til elbiler

Amerikanske FreeWire vandt en konkurrence om venturekapital og får bl.a. kapital fra Volvo Cars Tech Fund.

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A surprisingly early replacement of Neanderthals by modern humans in southern Spain

A new study of Bajondillo Cave (Málaga, Spain) reveals that modern humans replaced Neanderthals at this site approximately 44,000 years ago. The research shows that the replacement of Neanderthals by modern humans in southern Iberia began early, rather than late, in comparison to the rest of Western Europe.

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Promising steps towards large scale production of graphene nanoribbons for electronics

Two-dimensional sheets of graphene in the form of ribbons a few tens of nanometers across have unique properties that are highly interesting for use in future electronics. Researchers have now for the first time fully characterized nanoribbons grown in both the two possible configurations on the same wafer with a clear route towards upscaling the production.

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Piece to the puzzle of baleen whales' evolution

A researcher has added another piece to the puzzle of the evolution of modern baleen whales with a new study examining the teeth and enamel of baleen whales' ancestors.

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Synthetic flaxseed derivative helps heart function in septic mice

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that develops in response to infection. One of its major complications is cardiovascular dysfunction. Now, scientists show that a novel synthetic compound derived from flaxseed can reverse this and improve heart function in mice with sepsis.

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Bröderna Ymer med i DC-laget mot Colombia

Både Elias och Mikael Ymer finns med i det svenska Davis Cup-lag som möter Colombia i kvalet på bortaplan i Bogota den 1–2 februari.

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Human mutation rate has slowed recently

Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, and Copenhagen Zoo have discovered that the human mutation rate is significantly slower than for our closest primate relatives. The new knowledge may be important for estimates of when the common ancestor for humans and chimpanzees lived — and for conservation of large primates in the wild.

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Racial discrimination increases activism in black young adults

A recent study finds that experiencing racial discrimination makes black teens and young adults more likely to engage in social and political activism on issues that are important to black communities.

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Inability to integrate reward info contributes to undervalued rewards in schizophrenia

People with schizophrenia have a hard time integrating information about a reward — the size of the reward and the probability of receiving it — when assessing its value, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.

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Long-read DNA analysis can give rise to errors, experts warn

Advanced technologies that read long strings of DNA can produce flawed data that could affect genetic studies, research from the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute suggests.

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Green fluorescence from reef-building corals attracts symbiotic algae

The researchers discovered a biological signal from corals that attracts potential symbionts.

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Test for esophageal cancer could save millions of lives

Cancer of the esophagus claims more than 400,000 lives around the world each year. With no efficient, reliable method of screening for the disease, by the time symptoms become apparent, it's often too late to save the patient.

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Significant disparities between educational groups in smoking during pregnancy

With the help of a multidisciplinary register and questionnaire study, Finnish researchers showed that both the educational level and its occupational orientation predict the mother's smoking during early pregnancy.

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Dry inland waters are underrated players in climate change

Climate change causes an increase in the number of freshwaters that run dry, at least temporarily. Around 90,000 square kilometres of water surface have already vanished in the last 30 years. This trend is not only a threat to drinking water reserves and major ecosystems – dried freshwaters also play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Two recently published studies reveal that the impor

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Mesoporous nickel could help to expand capacity of hydrogen engines and solar cells

Scientists of the Far Eastern Federal University, together with Russian and foreign colleagues, developed samples of nickel mesoporous film structures, which have useful surface area up to 400 times greater than their solid one. Brand new material can be used in energy saving, chemical industry and other practical areas. The research results are published in Applied Surface Science journal.

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A new method developed to produce precursors for high-strength carbon fibers processing

Carbon fiber is an important structural material of the 21st century. Due to its high strength, which is not inferior to metal alloys, in combination with low specific weight and high oxidative stability, it is an indispensable material for airspace and shipbuilding industry, construction, medicine, sports industry, and in other high-tech industry sectors.

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Study confirms 1-hour discharge rule for patients given naloxone after opiate overdose

Suspected opioid overdose patients treated with naloxone are safe for discharge from the emergency department after one hour.

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Frequent use of aspirin can lead to increased bleeding

A new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has found that taking aspirin on a regular basis to prevent heart attacks and strokes, can lead to an increase risk of almost 50 percent in major bleeding episodes.

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Possible link between rotavirus vaccine and decline in type 1 diabetes

A drop in the number of young children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes could be associated with the introduction of routine rotavirus vaccination of Australian infants, according to a new study by Melbourne researchers.

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Supplement makes (mouse) moms' milk better; pups benefit for life

Giving nursing mouse mothers a supplement called nicotinamide riboside (NR) promotes maternal weight loss, boosts milk production and quality, and leads to long-lasting physical, neurological, and behavioral benefits in the pups. The findings of the University of Iowa study were published Jan. 22 in Cell Reports.

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Erasing memories associated with cocaine use reduces drug seeking behavior

Researchers identified the brain circuits that form memories associating environmental cues with cocaine use. Targeting these memories may improve the success of exposure therapy to prevent relapse.

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Diet low in added sugars significantly improves fatty liver disease in children

A randomized clinical study of adolescent boys with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) found that a diet low in free sugars (those sugars added to foods and beverages and occurring naturally in fruit juices) resulted in significant improvement in NAFLD compared to a usual diet.

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Analyzing aspirin use in patients without cardiovascular disease

This study analyzed combined results from 13 randomized clinical trials with more than 164,000 participants to assess aspirin use with the prevention of cardiovascular events and bleeding in people without cardiovascular disease. Results suggest aspirin use was associated with lower risk (absolute risk reduction of 0.38 percent) for cardiovascular events (a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfa

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Liver transplant for alcohol-related liver disease in US

The proportion of liver transplants in the United States for alcohol-associated liver disease increased between 2002 and 2016, with much of the increase associated with a decrease in liver transplant for hepatitis C virus infection because of antiviral therapy. This observational study used data from the United Network for Organ Sharing for all liver transplants during the 15-year period and the n

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Study examines drug treatments for newborns exposed to opioids during pregnancy

Neonatal abstinence syndrome describes symptoms (including jitteriness, high-pitched crying, sweating and diarrhea) that primarily occur in newborns exposed to opioids during pregnancy. Finding an optimal drug therapy to treat newborns for neonatal abstinence syndrome may reduce the length of treatment and hospital stay.

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On its own, Trump admin's price disclosure policy unlikely to help curb drug prices

The Trump administration's proposal to require pharmaceutical companies to publish drug prices in TV ads is unlikely to help control drug prices, according to a new study in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Liver transplants double for alcohol-related liver disease

The proportion of US liver transplants for alcohol-associated liver disease (ALD) has doubled in the last 15 years, in part due to broader acceptance of waiving the mandated period of sobriety before transplants for this population, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco, which showed ongoing regional geographic variations in liver transplant rates for ALD patients, whose long-ter

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Target, Taco Bell and Jack in the Box to start accepting Apple Pay

Besides, Target, Apple Pay will now be accepted at Taco Bell, Speedway, Hy-Vee and Jack in the Box. Google Pay and Samsung Pay come to Target, too.

7h

The KonMari method sparks the most joy when you tweak it

Science Not everyone has Marie Kondo to watch over them. Can simply tidying up really be that life changing? I’ve been following the KonMari method as part of my “getting organised” new year’s resolution and, after two weeks,…

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Google's self-driving unit Waymo to put factory in MichiganWaymo Self Michigan

Google's autonomous vehicle unit Waymo says it plans to bring a factory to Michigan.

7h

Plants blink: Proceeding with caution in sunlight

Plants have control mechanisms that resemble those in human senses. According to a new Weizmann Institute of Science study, plants adjust photosynthesis to rapid light changes using a sophisticated sensing system, much in the way that the human eye responds to variations in light intensity. This sensory-like regulation operates at low light intensities, when the photosynthesis machinery is most ef

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TRENDING: Take a DNA Test, Then Buy an Airplane Ticket

For more and more people, learning about their genetic makeup is just the first step. The second is heading to the airport so they can explore their roots in person.

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Global Warming Concerns Rise Among Americans in New Poll

“I’ve never seen jumps in some of the key indicators like this,” the lead researcher said.

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Plants blink: Proceeding with caution in sunlight

Plants have control mechanisms that resemble those in human senses. According to a new Weizmann Institute of Science study, plants adjust photosynthesis to rapid light changes using a sophisticated sensing system, much in the way that the human eye responds to variations in light intensity. This sensory-like regulation operates at low light intensities, when the photosynthesis machinery is most ef

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New Animation Shows Off Blue Origin’s Redesigned Heavy Load Rocket

Heavy Load In a new animation, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ space agency Blue Origin showed off a new design for its heavy load “New Glenn” rocket. The animation shows the two stage rocket take off from a launch pad before separating a bullet-shaped payload fairing in space as the booster re-enters the atmosphere and lands on a ship. Yes, that last part is similar to how SpaceX reuses its Falcon 9 boos

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New Zealand academic offers new explanation for Alexander the Great's death

It may have happened more than 2300 years ago, but the mystery of Alexander the Great's death could finally be solved, thanks to a University of Otago, New Zealand, academic.

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Surveillance in our schools: Beneath the friendly exterior of ClassDojo

ClassDojo is one of the most popular education apps in the world. Its company estimates it is used by millions of teachers and children across 180 countries. Beneath its friendly exterior lie disturbing implications, say researchers.

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Toxic diet shields water fleas from parasites

Cyanobacteria produce liver toxins harmful to people and their pets, but they shield tiny shrimp-like crustaceans from fungal parasites. New research shows the toxins protect sand-grain-sized lake animals called Daphnia that eat them, the same way toxins in milkweed plants protect monarch butterflies from parasites. Commonly known as water fleas, Daphnia play a key role in freshwater food webs an

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Having stressed out ancestors improves immune response to stress

Having ancestors who were frequently exposed to stressors can improve one's own immune response to stressors, according to researchers. The results suggest that family history should be considered to predict or understand the health implications of stress.

7h

We need to rethink everything we know about global warming

New research shows that the degree to which aerosols cool the earth has been grossly underestimated, necessitating a recalculation of climate change models to more accurately predict the pace of global warming.

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Two- to three-fold increase in heatwave occurrence and severity seen directly in UK temperature

A two to three-fold increase in heatwave activity in the United Kingdom since the late 19th century has been identified in a new analysis of historical daily temperature data.

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Environmental 'time bomb' warning for world's groundwater reserves

Future generations could be faced with an environmental 'time bomb' if climate change is to have a significant effect on the world's essential groundwater reserves.

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Scientists find genes with large effects on head and brain size

The size of children's heads is not only related to the growth of their skull, but also their brain. A genome-wide analysis now reports the largest known genetic effects on head circumference and the related measure of intracranial volume.

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Chemists develop new synthesis method for producing fluorinated piperidines

A team of chemists at the University of Münster led by Professor Frank Glorius have developed a new, simple synthetic method for producing fluorinated piperidines — which had previously been very difficult. These compounds play a major role in the development of new active ingredients. The results have just been published in the online edition of the journal Nature Chemistry.

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How hot are atoms in the shock wave of an exploding star?

A new method to measure the temperature of atoms during the explosive death of a star will help scientists understand the shock wave that occurs as a result of this supernova explosion.

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Surveillance in our schools

ClassDojo is one of the most popular education apps in the world. Its company estimates it is used by millions of teachers and children across 180 countries. Beneath its friendly exterior lie disturbing implications.

7h

The feminization of men leads to a rise in homophobia

Before the feminist revolution, men built their masculinity on traits that opposed those assigned to women. Since then, men can no longer rely on this anti-feminine norm. What are the effects of this shift on masculinity affirmation? Researchers (UNIGE) have revealed that some men assert their manhood by stressing their heterosexuality, in order to compensate for this feminisation of men. This mov

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Noninvasive light-sensitive recombinase for deep brain genetic manipulation

A KAIST team presents a noninvasive light-sensitive photoactivatable recombinase suitable for genetic manipulation in vivo. The highly light-sensitive property of photoactivatable Flp recombinase will be ideal for controlling genetic manipulation in deep mouse brain regions by illumination with a noninvasive light-emitting diode. This easy-to-use optogenetic module made by Professor Won Do Heo and

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Scientists boost stability of low-cost, large-area solar modules

Modifications made to perovskite solar cells, or PSCs, render them more stable and scalable than ever before.

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All too human

Professor Rony Paz of the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests that our brains are like modern washing machines — evolved to have the latest sophisticated programming, but more vulnerable to breakdown and prone to develop costly disorders. He and a group of researchers recently conducted experiments comparing the efficiency of the neural code in non-human and human primates, and found that as t

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Plants blink: Proceeding with caution in sunlight

Plants have control mechanisms that resemble those in human senses. According to a new Weizmann Institute of Science study, plants adjust photosynthesis to rapid light changes using a sophisticated sensing system, much in the way that the human eye responds to variations in light intensity. This sensory-like regulation operates at low light intensities, when the photosynthesis machinery is most ef

7h

New Zealand academic offers new explanation for Alexander the Great's death

It may have happened more than 2300 years ago, but the mystery of Alexander the Great's death could finally be solved, thanks to a University of Otago, New Zealand, academic.

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Forsker bag CRISPR-babyer bedrog testpersoner og myndigheder

En kinesisk forsker forfalskede papirer og snød med falske blodprøver i bestræbelserne på at genredigere menneskefostre.

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Common vaccine may protect children from developing type 1 diabetes

Children who received a vaccine for a common virus that attacks insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have shown lower rates of type 1 diabetes

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Polisutredning om biljettrån nedlagd – brott kan inte styrkas

Polisen har lagt ned utredningen av det påstådda knivrånet mot en supporter som köpt fyra biljetter till matchen Chelsea-Malmö FF. Det går inte att styrka att något brott begåtts.

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UV light may help birds navigate forests

Amplifying contrast makes leaves stand out more clearly, research shows. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Red Plumber vs. Green Plumber

Once upon a time, in an unspecified yet magical land of mushroom monsters, terrorizing turtles, fire-breathing plants, and bricks bestowing money and mysterious gifts, a strange rivalry arose between two of the land’s residents: twin brothers, both plumbers, an important trade in a country that relied so much on underground pipes for public transit. One plumber was short, plump, and fond of red c

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Otago researcher contributes piece to the puzzle of baleen whales' evolution

An Otago researcher has added another piece to the puzzle of the evolution of modern baleen whales with a world-first study examining the teeth and enamel of baleen whales' ancestors.

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How to transform sinking cities into landscapes that fight floods | Kotchakorn Voraakhom

From London to Tokyo, climate change is causing cities to sink — and our modern concrete infrastructure is making us even more vulnerable to severe flooding, says landscape architect and TED Fellow Kotchakorn Voraakhom. But what if we could design cities to help fight floods? In this inspiring talk, Voraakhom shows how she developed a massive park in Bangkok that can hold a million gallons of rai

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10 powerful quotes to inspire your meditation practice

Meditation can have a profound impact in reducing anxiety and stress. While there are many ways to meditate, the ability to sustain your attention on one thing for a period of time is the foundation of them all. The more you practice, the more results you get, though quality of time is more important than quantity None Nothing is created in a vacuum. The emergence of meditation as a cultural stap

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Otago researcher contributes piece to the puzzle of baleen whales' evolution

An Otago researcher has added another piece to the puzzle of the evolution of modern baleen whales with a world-first study examining the teeth and enamel of baleen whales' ancestors.

7h

Elliott pushes for changes at eBay

An activist shareholder says eBay would be better off without StubHub or its classified ads businesses.

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Huawei warns of action against hostile markets

Chinese tech giant Huawei said Tuesday it could pull out of partnerships in hostile countries as it seeks to counter security concerns in the West over its 5G technology.

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Artificial intelligence can dramatically cut time needed to process abnormal chest X-rays

New research has found that a novel Artificial Intelligence (AI) system can dramatically reduce the time needed to ensure that abnormal chest X-rays with critical findings will receive an expert …

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Scientists take temp of atoms in supernova shock wave

There’s a new way to the temperature of atoms during the explosive death of a star. That information will help scientists understand the shock wave that occurs as a result of this supernova explosion. The research team analyzed long-term observations of the nearby supernova remnant SN1987A using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and created a model describing the supernova. The team confirmed that

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'Black Panther' and Netflix Just Got Historic Oscar NominationsBlack Panther Oscar Best

Unprecedented Oscar nods for Netflix and Hulu, 'American Gods' returns, and more of the week's top culture news

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Högupplöst karta över flodslätter kan avslöja översvämningsrisker

Verktyg för att följa hur floder formar landskapet är av stor vikt för socioekonomisk tillväxt. Att identifiera gränserna för flodslätter (områden som riskerar att svämma över) är ett viktigt steg för alla urbana och miljömässiga skydds- och utvecklingsplaner. Bedömningen av markområden i anslutning till en flodslätt utefter vilken risk området löper att översvämmas (floodplain zoning) görs vanli

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Europe Wants to Extract Rocket Fuel From Lunar Surface in 2025

Moon Mission The European Space Agency (ESA) says that it’s studying the prospects of a 2025 mission to the Moon that would use robotic mining equipment to extract rocket fuel from lunar regolith, the ancient ore that covers the Moon’s surface. “The use of space resources could be a key to sustainable lunar exploration and this study is part of ESA’s comprehensive plan to make Europe a partner in

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Huawei warns of action against hostile markets

Chinese tech giant Huawei said Tuesday it could pull out of partnerships in hostile countries as it seeks to counter security concerns in the West over its 5G technology.

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Elliott pushes for changes at eBay

An activist shareholder says eBay would be better off without StubHub or its classified ads businesses.

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New tool enables imaging of neural activity with near-infrared light

A new, groundbreaking tool for visualizing neural activity has implications for understanding brain functions and disorders, according to new research by University of Alberta scientists and a team of international collaborators.

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Temple researchers show synthetic flaxseed derivative helps heart function in septic mice

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that develops in response to infection. One of its major complications is cardiovascular dysfunction. Now, in a new study published online in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University are the first to show that a novel synthetic compound derived from flaxseed can reverse this and imp

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Increasing skepticism against robots

In Europe, people are more reserved regarding robots than they were five years ago. This is shown in a new study published by scientists from Linz and Würzburg.

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Having stressed out ancestors improves immune response to stress

Having ancestors who were frequently exposed to stressors can improve one's own immune response to stressors, according to Penn State researchers. The results suggest that family history should be considered to predict or understand the health implications of stress.

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New research proposes target omega-3 DHA level for pregnant women

A new scientific paper has, for the first time, proposed an omega-3 DHA target blood level of 5 percent or higher for pregnant women who want to reduce their risk of preterm birth. Published in the December edition of Nutrients, authors Kristina Harris Jackson, Ph.D., R.D., and William S. Harris, Ph.D., discuss the ramifications of low DHA levels among pregnant women and why they need to strive fo

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Rutgers study uncovers cause of bone loss in joint implant patients

Rutgers researchers have discovered the long-sought reason that many people with joint replacements experience harmful inflammation and bone loss. Their finding, published in Nature Materials, may pave the way for new therapies to reduce pain and prevent the need for follow-up surgery.

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Near-term climate prediction 'coming of age', study shows

The quest for climate scientists to be able to bridge the gap between shorter-term seasonal forecasts and long-term climate projections is 'coming of age', a study shows.

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Ancient climate change triggered warming that lasted thousands of years

A rapid rise in temperature on ancient Earth triggered a climate response that may have prolonged the warming for many thousands of years, according to scientists.

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Exercise before surgery can protect both muscle and nerves, study suggests

Exercise can protect both muscle and nerves from damage caused by the restoration of blood flow after injury or surgery, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows.

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Otago researcher contributes piece to the puzzle of baleen whales' evolution

An Otago researcher has added another piece to the puzzle of the evolution of modern baleen whales with a world-first study examining the teeth and enamel of baleen whales' ancestors.

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For zombie microbes, deep-sea buffet is just out of reach

A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is beginning to pick apart how bizarre zombie-like microbes survive by examining their source of 'food' — nearby molecules of organic carbon. The study helps further our understanding of the limitations of life on Earth and could help inform how life might exist on other planets.

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New tool enables imaging of neural activity with near-infrared light

A new, groundbreaking tool for visualizing neural activity has implications for understanding brain functions and disorders, according to new research by University of Alberta scientists and a team of international collaborators.

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Quinine’s Target

Every “history of pharmaceuticals” article ever written probably mentions quinine , and well they should. (I certainly reserved an entry for it while writing my own chemical history book ). It’s a classic example of a natural product drug, one that was not known to the classical Mediterranean world but was only appreciated by Europeans after they came into contact with the New World civilizations

8h

Engineers create decision-making tool for oil spill clean-up

A team of Southwest Research Institute engineers has created an interactive decision tree aimed at finding the best solution for specific oil spill scenarios. Numerous chemical dispersant technologies are available to address different types of oil spills and countless variables and external conditions can play into the effectiveness of any given dispersant. SwRI's decision-making tool helps bridg

8h

Brits and Germans have very different views on the future of state pensions

British and German citizens have very different views on whether or not their governments should continue to provide a state pension in the years ahead, according to new research by the University of Kent.

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'Silent slip' along fault line serves as prelude to big earthquakes, research suggests

Big earthquakes appear to follow a brief episode of "shallow mantle creep" and "seismic swarms," suggests new research at Oregon State University that offers an explanation for the foreshocks observed prior to large temblors.

8h

400 studentbostäder på Gärdet ser ut att bli verklighet

Mark- och miljööverdomstolen har beslutat att inte godkänna överklaganden om 400 planerade studentbostäder på Gärdet. Fastigheterna lär därmed med största sannolikhet byggas.

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Läkare åtalad för våldtäktsförsök tidigare utredd för våldtäkt

Den akutläkare som åtalats för våldtäktsförsök utreddes tidigare för en våldtäkt mot en sjuksköterska på hans arbetsplats. Trots att polisutredningen pågick fick mannen jobba kvar på sjukhuset.

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Do endangered woods make better guitars?

Researchers have tested the sounds made by six different acoustic guitars in a study addressing the effects of the type of wood used in their construction.

8h

A fleeting moment in time

The faint, ephemeral glow emanating from the planetary nebula ESO 577-24 persists for only a short time—around 10,000 years, a blink of an eye in astronomical terms. ESO's Very Large Telescope captured this shell of glowing ionized gas—the last breath of the dying star whose simmering remains are visible at the heart of this image. As the gaseous shell of this planetary nebula expands and grows di

8h

Facebook and Google got rich. Users paid the price.

Facebook and Google began as companies with supposedly noble purposes. Creating a more connected world and indexing the world's information: what could be better than that? But pressure to return value to shareholders came at the expense of their own users.

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Are cats jerks, or is it YOU who is the jerk?

Researchers discovered that the more attention you give a cat, the more likely they are to return it. Cats are territorial; being in their home environment greatly affects their attitude. The common wisdom that cats are aloof is provably false. None This weekend, my wife and I visited the San Diego Zoo. Having grown up nearby, she visited often as a child, though it was my first time. While I gen

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How Plastic Cleanup Threatens the Ocean’s Living Islands

Imagine you’re on a small boat in the middle of the open ocean, surrounded by what looks like a raft of plastic. Now flip the whole world upside down. You remain comfortably attached to your seat—the abyss towers above you, and all around, stretching up from the water’s surface, is an electric-blue meadow of life. What you thought was plastic is actually a living island. This meadow is made up of

8h

Ny menneskelignende art udvider vores stamtræ

Arten Australopithecus sediba gik oprejst som mennesker, men svingede sig i træerne som aber. Den kombination overrasker forskerne.

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Lind: ”Man ska inte tacka ja om man inte är beredd på debatt”

Sveriges nya kulturminister Amanda Lind (MP) hamnade i blåsväder ungefär samtidigt som hennes nya tjänst offentliggjordes. Bland annat för att hon försvarat sparkade ministern Mehmet Kaplan. – Man ska inte tacka ja till att bli kulturminister om man inte är beredd på debatt, säger hon i Studio Ett.

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Kvartssamtal slutade i knytnävsslagsmål

Föräldern blev upprörd på läraren under ett kvartssamtal på skolan. Till slut ska ett slagsmål ha utbrutit, enligt anmälan till Arbetsmiljöverket. När vaktmästaren kom till undsättning ska föräldern även ha gett sig på honom med knytnävarna och gjort ett försök till en ”knockning”.

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Study identifies new genes associated with the leading cause of blindness

A new study, published in Clinical Epigenetics, identifies genes associated with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) that could represent new targets for future drug development.

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New applications for encapsulated nanoparticles with promising properties

The Polymerisation Process research group of the POLYMAT institute of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has managed to efficiently encapsulate semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots of various sizes into polymer particles; great stability in terms of their optical properties and good fluorescence control when combining different quantum dots have been achieved. The possible applicab

8h

Evolution of national policy determines the degree of Spanish citizens' trust in the EU

Since 2008, political trust in European institutions has greatly deteriorated in many member states, including Spain, and has given rise to increasing research into its causes. This debate has focused on the economic and social evolution resulting from the austerity policies encouraged by the European institutions themselves and on their clear lack of response to citizens' growing demands.

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New insights into magnetic quantum effects in solids

Using a new computational method, an international collaboration has succeeded for the first time in systematically investigating magnetic quantum effects in the well-known 3D pyrochlore Heisenberg model. The surprising finding: physical quantum phases are formed only for small spin values.

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Artificial intelligence shows potential for triaging chest X-rays

An artificial intelligence (AI) system can interpret and prioritize abnormal chest X-rays with critical findings, potentially reducing the backlog of exams and bringing urgently needed care to patients more quickly, according to a new study.

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Promising steps towards large scale production of graphene nanoribbons for electronics

Two-dimensional sheets of graphene in the form of ribbons a few tens of nanometers across have unique properties that are highly interesting for use in future electronics. Researchers have now for the first time fully characterized nanoribbons grown in both the two possible configurations on the same wafer with a clear route towards upscaling the production.

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Environmental 'time bomb' warning for world's groundwater reserves

Future generations could be faced with an environmental 'time bomb' if climate change is to have a significant effect on the world's essential groundwater reserves.

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The first nucleophilic gold complex

A collaborative research effort between the departments of chemistry at the University of Oxford and University of Jyväskylä has resulted in the discovery of a gold compound exhibiting nucleophilic behavior hitherto unknown for molecular gold. The research enables new opportunities in applying gold compounds, for example, as catalysts in novel chemical reactions.

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Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease

Researchers from the Department of Biomedical Research of the University of Bern and the University Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine of the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland, have discovered that changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease affect the severity of the disease and the success of therapy. The advance provides an importan

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Corals light the way to a healthy partnership

Corals know how to attract good company. New research finds that corals emit an enticing fluorescent green light that attracts the mobile microalgae, known as Symbiodinium, that are critical to the establishment of a healthy partnership.

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Orsak funnen till extrem mängd mutationer i tumörer

– Förändringen i den här genen, som kodar för DNA-polymeras epsilon, ger en hävstångseffekt som skapar exceptionellt mycket mutationer hos tumörer. Nu kan vi förklara varför det sker, säger Erik Johansson, professor i medicinsk biokemi vid Umeå universitet Arvsmassan som vi bär med oss genom livet är uppbyggd av två DNA-strängar. Proteinet DNA-polymeras epsilon bygger i första hand den ena DNA-st

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Scientists demonstrate effective strategies for safeguarding CRISPR gene-drive experiments

Researchers have demonstrated for the first time how two molecular strategies can safeguard CRISPR gene-drive experiments in the lab, according to a study published today in eLife.

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Scientists demonstrate effective strategies for safeguarding CRISPR gene-drive experiments

Researchers have demonstrated for the first time how two molecular strategies can safeguard CRISPR gene-drive experiments in the lab, according to a study published today in eLife.

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Researchers identify gene essential for plants to survive

Phenylalanine amino acid must be included in the human diet, but it is also essential for plants, determining many of their characteristics, such as the colour and scent of flowers, healing powers and antioxidant properties, and the strength of wood. A team of researchers from the UMA has now demonstrated that ADT2 gene is essential for plants to produce phenylalanine, conditioning their survival.

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Erosion in wind turbine blades solved with the help of artificial intelligence

The erosion of materials used in wind turbine blades due to the effect of weather conditions is a problem that applies to the whole wind energy sector. VTT's antiAGE project found a functional solution to the material problem with the help of artificial intelligence and 3-D printing.

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Some robots walk. Others fly. He built one that can do both.

A bipedal robot walks on the surface of a distant planet. Its sensors scan the environment, sending data back to Earth. It comes to a crumbling hillside, flexes its knees and leaps, thrusters whirring, to land safely above the loose rock.

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Ulf Starks sista bok erövrar världen

Ulf Starks sista bok, ”Rymlingarna”, gavs i fjol ut postumt efter författarens bortgång i juni 2017. I Sverige har boken, med illustrationer av Kitty Crowther, sålt i 12 000 exemplar.

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Researchers identify gene essential for plants to survive

Phenylalanine amino acid must be included in the human diet, but it is also essential for plants, determining many of their characteristics, such as the colour and scent of flowers, healing powers and antioxidant properties, and the strength of wood. A team of researchers from the UMA has now demonstrated that ADT2 gene is essential for plants to produce phenylalanine, conditioning their survival.

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The Top Biotech and Medicine Advances to Expect in 2019

2018 was bonkers for science. From a woman who gave birth using a transplanted uterus, to the infamous CRISPR baby scandal, to forensics adopting consumer-based genealogy test kits to track down criminals , last year was a factory churning out scientific “whoa” stories with consequences for years to come. With CRISPR still in the headlines, Britain ready to bid Europe au revoir, and multiple scie

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Patented technology cloaks location on mobile devices to protect privacy

We agree to give up some degree of privacy anytime we search Google to find a nearby restaurant or use other location-based apps on our mobile devices.

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Racial discrimination increases activism in black young adults

A recent study by researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of Chicago finds that experiencing racial discrimination makes black teens and young adults more likely to engage in social and political activism on issues that are important to black communities.

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Social-Media Outrage Is Collapsing Our Worlds

Has the internet afforded humans more freedom, or less? That’s a question I’m pondering anew thanks to the University of Michigan philosophy professor Elizabeth Anderson, who provoked the thought while being interviewed by Nathan Heller for a recent profile in The New Yorker . After Europe’s religious wars, Anderson mused, as centuries of conflict s between Catholics and Protestants gave way to a

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DEBAT: Skal vi have ny karakterskala?

Nogen savner det exceptionelle 13-tal. Andre er kede af de lange spring mellem karaktererne. Men skal vi hellere fokusere på middelkarakteren?

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Can nanotechnology rewire an injured spinal cord?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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From nurses to conquerors: this single gene turns bees into social parasites

A small change in the genetic makeup of the South African Cape bee turns the socially organised animal into a fighting parasite. This change ensures that infertile worker bees begin to lay their own eggs and fight other colonies. In the current issue of the journal 'Molecular Biology and Evolution', an international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) outlines for

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Human respiratory viruses continue to spread in wild chimpanzees

Less than two years after the first report of wild chimpanzees in Uganda dying as a result of a human 'common cold' virus, a new study has identified two other respiratory viruses of human origin in chimpanzee groups in the same forest.

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A fleeting moment in time

The faint, ephemeral glow emanating from the planetary nebula ESO 577-24 persists for only a short time — around 10,000 years, a blink of an eye in astronomical terms. ESO's Very Large Telescope captured this shell of glowing ionized gas — the last breath of the dying star whose simmering remains are visible at the heart of this image. As the gaseous shell of this planetary nebula expands and gr

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Scientists achieve the first stable simulations of DNA crystals

The breakthrough made by researchers at IRB Barcelona allows the study of the role of each molecular component in the stability and conformation of DNA crystals.

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Courage to aim for less cleanliness?

Do laws of biodiversity also apply to our own bodies and homes? If so, current hygiene measures against aggressive germs could sometimes be counterproductive, writes an interdisciplinary research team from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) in Nature Ecology & Evolution. They propose to examine the role diversity of microorganisms plays in our domestic environment more

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Two- to three- fold increase in heatwave occurrence and severity seen directly in UK temperature

A two to three-fold increase in heatwave activity in the United Kingdom since the late 19th century has been identified in a new analysis of historical daily temperature data led by University of Warwick scientists.

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Scientists discover new quantum spin liquid

An international research team led by the University of Liverpool and McMaster University has made a significant breakthrough in the search for new states of matter. In a study published in the journal Nature Physics, researchers show that the perovskite-related metal oxide, TbInO3, exhibits a quantum spin liquid state, a long-sought-after and unusual state of matter.

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A surprisingly early replacement of Neanderthals by modern humans in southern Spain

A new study of Bajondillo Cave (Málaga, Spain) reveals that modern humans replaced Neanderthals at this site approximately 44,000 years ago. The research shows that the replacement of Neanderthals by modern humans in southern Iberia began early, rather than late, in comparison to the rest of Western Europe.

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New drug resistance process found in bacteria

Researchers at the UAB and the UMBC have described a new process capable of generating resistance to synthetic antibacterial drugs within bacterial populations long before their invention and without the existence of any similar substance in nature. The study has established that sulfonamide-resistant genes appeared million years ago thanks to a mutation in the drug's target gene.

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Genetic study reveals possible new routes to treating osteoarthritis

In the largest genetic study of osteoarthritis, an international team of scientists including researchers from the University of Sheffield, have uncovered 52 new genetic changes linked to the disease, which doubles the number of genetic regions associated with the disabling condition.

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Antarctic krill population contracts southward as polar oceans warm

The population of Antarctic krill, the favorite food of many whales, penguins, fish and seals, shifted southward during a recent period of warming in their key habitat, a paper published today in Nature Climate Change reports.

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A Movement to Close the Gender Gap in Mathematics

At the International Congress of Mathematicians in Rio de Janeiro this past August, the algebraic geometer Carolina Araujo was difficult to track down. As a member of the organizing committee, she was overseeing the women-in-mathematics file and working on several files behind the scenes, plus refining her own lecture — non-trivially, she was among the first Brazilian women to deliver an invited

8h

This Startup Is Growing Coral on Land and Transplanting It Into Damaged Reefs

Land of the Living Earth’s coral reefs are dying at an alarming rate, but Coral Vita thinks it knows how to save them. The startup is building the world’s first commercial, land-based coral farm — a place it can efficiently grow coral to later transplant into the world’s oceans. Once completed, the farm could be our best option for protecting one of Earth’s most precious natural resources. Farm F

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Postnords vd om kritiken från ombuden

Postnord har blivit av med flera ombud i början av året och Post- och telestyrelsen efterfrågar nya leveransvägar. Nu svarar Postnords Sverigechef på den senaste tidens kritik. – Jag tycker inte att vi har ett problem, säger Annemarie Gardshol.

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Transpersoner får stängas ute från USA:s militär

USA:s högsta domstol har hävt tidigare domar som hindrat Donad Trumps administration från att stoppa transpersoner från att tjänstgöra i militären, enligt Bloomberg News.

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From toilet to brickyard: Recycling biosolids to make sustainable bricks

Around 30 percent of the world's biosolids are stockpiled or sent to landfill each year, while over 3 billion cubic meters of clay soil is dug up for the global brickmaking industry. Using biosolids in bricks offers an innovative solution to these environmental challenges.

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Sverige är öppet för fler möten om Nordkorea

De samtal om Nordkorea som avslutades i måndags i Sverige var framgångsrika, enligt utrikesminister Margot Wallström (S). Fler möten i Sverige är sannolika. Men behovet av förtroendeskapande träffar är en signal om att relationerna mellan USA och Nordkorea präglas av misstro.

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Fleksible indlæggelser i Silkeborg vinder initiativprisen Den Gyldne Tråd

På blot to år har projektet ‘Fleksible indlæggelser’ i Silkeborg Kommune forhindret 41.000 indlæggelsestimer for 1.000 borgere ved at udviske barrierer mellem sektorer. Derfor modtager de Kommunal Sundheds pris, Den Gyldne Tråd.

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Lægeforeningen gik tomhændet fra ministermøde om sundhedsreformen

Møde med sundhedsministeren og innovationsministeren gav ikke Lægeforeningen afklaring på, hvordan regeringen vil finansiere det stigende antal patienter.

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Sådan vil Aarhus Universitetshospital sikre den gynækologiske onkologi

Region Midtjylland har sendt redegørelse for varetagelsen af AUH’s specialfunktioner inden for gynækologisk onkologi til Sundhedsstyrelsen. Regionen forventer, at bemandingen på området er på plads til april.

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Antiepileptic drugs linked to accumulation of hospital days in persons with Alzheimer's disease

People with Alzheimer's disease who used antiepileptic drugs had a higher number of accumulated hospital days than people with Alzheimer's disease who did not use antiepileptics, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. People with Alzheimer's disease who used antiepileptic drugs had a higher number of accumulated hospital days than people with Alzheimer's disease who did n

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2D magnetism reaches a new milestone

Researchers at the IBS Center for Correlated Electron Systems, in collaboration with Sogang University and Seoul National University, reported the first experimental observation of a XY-type antiferromagnetic material, whose magnetic order becomes unstable when it is reduced to one-atom thickness. Published in Nature Communications, these findings are consistent with theoretical predictions dating

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Fralin Biomedical Research Institute scientists link concussions to epilepsy development

Experiments by Fralin Biomedical Research Institute scientists show a strong relationship between changes in astrocytes after mild traumatic brain injury and the eventual occurrence of a seizure.

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Multi-hop communication: Frog choruses inspire wireless sensor networks

A team including researchers from Osaka University looked to nature for inspiration in designing more effective wireless sensor networks. First, they recorded the vocal interplay of neighboring tree frog calls, which they found allowed tradeoff time for individual communication, though this is interspersed with more random collective silence and choruses. They mathematically modeled these patterns

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Faulty molecular master switch may contribute to AMD

A signaling pathway controlled by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) could be involved in the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

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Teens keep active despite asthma or eczema, study finds

A fresh look by the University of Bristol at how teenagers are affected by their asthma, eczema or obesity has some reassuring findings published in BMJ Open today (Monday 21 January).

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Gene changes may predict breast cancer relapse, study suggests

Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have identified genetic changes that may predict the likelihood of breast cancer relapse in women taking a common type of hormone therapy.

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Do endangered woods make better guitars?

Researchers have tested the sounds made by six different acoustic guitars in a study addressing the effects of the type of wood used in their construction.Some of the woods used for guitar backs are revered by guitar players for their acoustic qualities, and are claimed to be tonally superior to other woods. Unfortunately many of these woods are expensive, rare, and from unsustainable sources.

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Orthopedic implants double the rate of bone lengthening in kids

Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University have developed implants which make mesenchymal stem cell to differentiate into bone tissue and accelerate limb lengthening in two times. The study outcomes were proved during preclinical trials at the Ilizarov Orthopedic Center (Kurgan, Russia).

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Properties of 'wonder material' graphene change in humid conditions

Graphene exhibits very different properties in humid conditions, according to researchers from Queen Mary University of London.

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The living wage may help us achieve social and environmental sustainability

Paying a living wage could be a step toward global economic and environmental sustainability, finds a first-of-its-kind study by the University of Surrey.

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Brits and Germans have very different views on the future of state pensions

Germans think the state always has some role to play in providing state pensions but UK citizens split over how to provide social welfare in the future, according to new research conducted at the University.

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'Silent slip' along fault line serves as prelude to big earthquakes, research suggests

Big earthquakes appear to follow a brief episode of 'shallow mantle creep' and 'seismic swarms,' suggests new research that offers an explanation for the foreshocks observed prior to large temblors.

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Social media privacy is in the hands of a few friends

New research has revealed that people's behavior is predictable from the social media data of as few as eight or nine of their friends.

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Novel technology reduces energy consumption of MRAM and AI hardware

Researchers from Osaka University, in collaboration with the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) and Grenoble Alpes University, succeeded in efficiently controlling the direction of a nano-sized magnet by heating at high speed. The researchers also discovered that nano-magnets amplify microwave signals. These achievements will contribute to reducing power consum

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Orthodontics no guarantee of long-term oral health

A commonly held belief among the general public is orthodontic treatment will prevent future tooth decay. Research undertaken at the University of Adelaide has found that this is not the case.

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Resisting the exploitation of black women's reproductive labor in the United States

In 'Milk Money: Race, Gender, and Breast Milk 'Donation," published in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, Laura Harrison demonstrates the exploitative, racially charged nature of Milk Money, a failed pilot program by the Mothers Milk Cooperative and Medolac Laboratories. The program targeted African American mothers in Detroit to sell their breast milk at one dollar per ounce to Medo

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Everything you’ve ever wanted to know about motorcycle exhaust

Technology Cycle World's Kevin Cameron breaks it down. How motorcycle exhaust shape helps make power.

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Scientists boost stability of low-cost, large-area solar modules

Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have resolved a fundamental weakness in a promising solar technology known as Perovskite Solar Cells, or PSCs. Their innovations appear to improve both the devices' stability and scalability in one fell swoop and could be key to moving PSCs to market.

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Advice for Trump’s adviser

Advice for Trump’s adviser Advice for Trump’s adviser, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00233-7 President Trump’s new science adviser has his work cut out. Here’s how meteorologist Kelvin Droegemeier can make a difference.

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National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week: Jan. 22-27

Today marks the beginning of 2019’s National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week , a health observance first launched by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) in 2010. In 2016, the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism became a partner, adding alcohol as a topic area for the week. Geared towards teens, the initiative helps educate people on what science has taught us about drug addicti

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Københavns politikere vil have mere letbane og metro

Ny letbane langs den trafikerede Frederikssundsvej og ny metrolinje til Amager står på ønskesedlen. Bare ikke på Christiansborg.

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Rising temperatures may safeguard crop nutrition as climate changes

Recent research has shown that rising carbon dioxide levels will likely boost yields, but at the cost of nutrition. A new studysuggests that this is an incomplete picture of the complex environmental interactions that will affect crops in the future — and rising temperatures may actually benefit nutrition but at the expense of lower yields.

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Blood test shows promise for early detection of severe lung-transplant rejection

Researchers have developed a simple blood test that can detect when a newly transplanted lung is being rejected by a patient, even when no outward signs of the rejection are evident. The test could make it possible for doctors to intervene faster to prevent or slow down so-called chronic rejection — which is severe, irreversible, and often deadly — in those first critical months after lung trans

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'Weather' and 'climate' are used interchangeably. They shouldn't be

As January 2019 entered its third week, huge swathes of the US are blanketed with snow, and winter storm warnings were in place across several states. US President Donald Trump, who has made it clear that he believes climate change is an overblown hoax, took to Twitter to suggest that "a little of that good old fashioned Global Warming" would be welcome.

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Rapid and continuous 3-D printing with light

Three-dimensional (3-D) printing, also known as additive manufacturing (AM), can transform a material layer by layer to build an object of interest. 3-D printing is not a new concept, since stereolithography printers have existed since the 1980s. The widespread availability and cost-effectiveness of the technology has allowed a variety of modern applications in biomedical engineering.

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Jesper Nielsen lämnar VM

Svenske mittsexan Jesper Nielsens ljumskskada gör att han tvingas lämna VM-truppen.

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Självkörande bilar ska testas i Australien

Den australiensiska delstaten Victoria har gett tillstånd till att självkörande bilar får användas på landsbygdsvägar. Det rapporterar The Guardian.

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Dangerous biofilms and drugs compete in ‘decathlon’

The environments in our bodies where bacteria thrive are very different from those in which lab tests take place, and that can be a problem. Sriram Chandrasekaran, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Michigan, is using advanced computer simulations to study how different environments affect antibiotic performance. Here, he discusses his recent study in PLOS Computat

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Invisible labor can negatively impact well-being in mothers

Keeping track of who wears which costume, the location of soccer cleats and what is in the pantry are all examples invisible labor, or the mental and emotional effort required of mothers as they raise children and manage households. Researchers from Arizona State University and Oklahoma State University quantified the prevalence and impact of invisible labor. Feeling solely responsible for the hou

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It may be possible to restore memory function in Alzheimer's, preclinical study finds

Research published today (Jan. 22) in the journal Brain reveals a new approach to Alzheimer's disease (AD) that may eventually make it possible to reverse memory loss, a hallmark of the disease in its late stages.

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Corals light the way to a healthy partnership

Corals know how to attract good company. New research finds that corals emit an enticing fluorescent green light that attracts the mobile microalgae, known as Symbiodinium, that are critical to the establishment of a healthy partnership.

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Soil fungi secrete an antibiotic with antitumor activity

A team of scientists from I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (MSMU) together with their colleagues isolated a peptide named emericellipsin A from soil fungi. The substance was proved to possess antitumor and antibacterial properties. The report of the scientists was published in the Molecules journal.

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BFU physicists developed a method of determining the composition of microplastic in water

Physicists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University (BFU) developed and applied a method of identifying microplastic collected in sea waters. The spectroscopy method allows to determine the chemical composition of contaminants regardless of their size. The article about the research was published in Marine Pollution Bulletin.

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Frog eggs help researchers understand repair of DNA damages

The DNA replication process, which takes place every time a cell divides, also triggers repair of DNA damage, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have described in a new study, where they have studied extracts from frog eggs, whose proteins are very similar to those of human cells. The researchers hope the new research results can be used to develop more effective treatments for cancer i

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Collision resonances between ultracold atom and molecules visualized for the first time

For the first time, a team led by Prof. Jian-Wei Pan and Prof. Bo Zhao at the University of Science and Technology of China, have successfully observed scattering resonances between atoms and molecules at ultralow temperatures, shedding light on the quantum nature of atom-molecule interactions that have so far only been discussed in theory.

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DNA study debunks Rudolf Hess impostor theory

Comparison of samples from inmate Spandau #7 and Hess relative finds a match A longstanding conspiracy theory that the Nazi war criminal Rudolf Hess was replaced by a doppelganger in prison has been debunked. For years, there were rumours that the prisoner known as Spandau #7 at the Berlin jail was an impostor substituted in to take the place of the deputy Führer of the Third Reich. Continue read

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Examining the link between neighborhoods and schools

You've probably heard the term gentrification thrown around many times to describe how neighborhoods are transforming in cities like Los Angeles, New York, Denver, Seattle, San Francisco and Portland. You probably think of gentrification and picture an influx of hip coffee shops and trendy restaurants. But, have you considered the impact on children and schools?

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Enhanced video quality despite poor network conditions

Professor Jinwoo Shin and Professor Dongsu Han from the School of Electrical Engineering developed neural adaptive content-aware internet video delivery. This technology is a novel method that combines adaptive streaming over HTTP, the video transmission system adopted by YouTube and Netflix, with a deep learning model.

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George Mason students have a new dining option: Food delivered by robots.

Thousands of students at George Mason University can order food from on-demand robots on wheels. The school has received a fleet of 25 delivery robots from Starship Technologies that can haul …

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UPS will expand its in-building delivery service to 10 more cities

Do you like the thought of UPS delivering packages to your apartment building when you're not home? UPS certainly does. The courier plans to bring its in-building delivery option …

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Aftale om industrisamarbejde på plads i Nordjylland

Region Nordjylland og Lægemiddelindustriforeningen har indgået aftale om at sikre klare rammer om samarbejdet mellem lægemiddelvirksomheder og sundhedspersonalet.

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Scientists’ salary data highlight US$18,000 gender pay gap

Scientists’ salary data highlight US$18,000 gender pay gap Scientists’ salary data highlight US$18,000 gender pay gap, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00220-y Female PhD recipients in the United States expect to earn less than male colleagues.

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From the archive

From the archive From the archive, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00217-7 How Nature reported an analysis of animal coloration in 1919, and Darwin’s letters in 1969.

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Barn i barnvagn försvunnet utanför förskola i Göteborg

Polisen har inlett en stor sökinsats efter att ett sex månader gammalt barn och en barnvagn har försvunnit utanför en förskola i Göteborg.

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Satellites saw rapid Greenland ice loss

Greenland went through an "unprecedented" period of ice loss in the last two decades.

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Dry inland waters are underrated players in climate change

2018: A year of drought – climate change causes an increase in the number of freshwaters that run dry, at least temporarily. Also, many lakes are shrinking permanently or have disappeared completely. Around 90,000 square kilometres of water surface have already vanished in the last 30 years. This trend is not only a threat to drinking water reserves and major ecosystems – dried freshwaters also pl

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Expanding the climate debate: The natural sciences can't solve the climate crisis alone

The latest major report from the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was issued in October. The message was dramatic, but unequivocal: The world's emissions must halve over the next 12 years if we are to avoid the worst consequences of global warming. Unfortunately, we are as yet poorly positioned to reach even the less ambitious two degree target set by the Paris Agreement.

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The hidden costs of online shopping – for customers and retailers

Internet shopping has grown massively, especially now that free delivery and returns, with multiple ways of making them, are the norm. You can order a number of variations of the same piece of clothing, for example, and then just send back the unwanted ones.

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New tsunami warnings could get more people to safety

A new method for local early tsunami warnings could give at-risk residents more accurate predictions about wave speed and height. On a Friday afternoon in the spring of 2011, the Tōhoku-Oki earthquake shook northeastern Japan for six minutes and shifted the country’s main island by eight feet. Minutes later, residents began receiving tsunami warnings through broadcast media, mobile phones, and si

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Fender American Acoustasonic Telecaster: Pricing, Specs, Release DateFender Acoustasonic

Fender's new American Acoustasonic Telecaster has a unique digital system on board that gives it a tremendously varied sonic palette.

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Micro-dispenser for long-term storage and controlled release of liquids

Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology could transform medicine in ways comparable with the microprocessor revolution—once it can be manufactured in a scalable, cost-effective way. Researchers in Sweden now report a development that could hasten this revolution.

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From toilet to brickyard: Recycling biosolids to make sustainable bricks

How can you recycle the world's stockpiles of treated sewage sludge and boost sustainability in the construction industry, all at the same time? Turn those biosolids into bricks.

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Coastal seas around New Zealand are heading into a marine heatwave, again

As New Zealanders are enjoying their days at the beach, unusually warm ocean temperatures look to be a harbinger of another marine heatwave.

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Is there any point in recycling?

To sort or not to sort, that is the question. Lots of people wonder whether it's really worth their time and effort to separate, wash and store recyclable materials – especially if it takes more energy to recycle, or if the plastics sent for recycling end up in overseas landfill. The truth is, the issue is complex, and even experts can't agree on the economic and environmental benefits of recyclin

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3-D-printed cube dials into energy harvesting

Ambient energy emitted by cellular phones and modems can be captured and converted into electricity using unusually shaped technology.

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Increasing skepticism against robots

In Europe, people are more reserved regarding robots than they were five years ago. This is shown in a new study published by scientists from Linz and Würzburg.

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Video games could teach spatial skills lost to a society dependent on devices

Video games have long been criticised for encouraging violence and antisocial behaviour. And parents often express concern that they could have detrimental effects on their child's learning abilities.

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Globally, Most Workers Think Robots Couldn’t Handle Their Jobs

Humans 1, Robots 0 Advances in artificial intelligence and automation cast such a long shadow over the workforce that a former Microsoft executive recently predicted that technology will displace 40 percent of workers within 15 years. But a new survey presented Monday to the World Economic Forum suggests that most workers remain surprisingly optimistic in the face of automation: worldwide, most w

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Migrationsverket går vidare med AFS-tröjor

När det högerextrema partiet Alternativ för Sverige (AFS) tryckte upp tröjor med Migrationsverkets logotyp och ordet ”återvandringsverket” intill i somras polisanmäldes det av myndigheten.

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Ny studie ska minska sjukskrivning vid endometrios

Långa sjukskrivningsperioder, ensamhet och svårt att ha råd med egen lägenhet. För kvinnor med endometrios kan behandlingar ofta pågå under långa perioder och vara förknippat med svårigheter att jobba. En ny studie vid Akademiska sjukhuset ska pröva mer aktiva rehabiliteringsinsatser för att möjliggöra för fler att komma tillbaka i arbete.

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Optimizing electric fields yields better catalysts

Industries rely on catalysts. These materials lessen the energy used in refining oil, manufacturing plastics, and much more. Catalysts can also mean less waste is produced. Better catalysts would benefit industries and the environment. In a perspective article in Nature Catalysis, a trio of researchers offer a unique view into catalyst design. They showed that optimizing electric fields in computa

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Why paper maps still matter in the digital age

Ted Florence is ready for his family trip to Botswana. He has looked up his hotel on Google Maps and downloaded a digital map of the country to his phone. He has also packed a large paper map. "I travel all over the world," says Florence, the president of the international board of the International Map Industry Association and Avenza, a digital map software company. "Everywhere I go, my routine i

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The first nucleophilic gold complex

A collaborative research effort between the Departments of Chemistry at the University of Oxford (United Kingdom) and University of Jyväskylä (Finland) has resulted in the discovery of a gold compound exhibiting nucleophilic behaviour hitherto unknown for molecular gold. The research enables new opportunities in applying gold compounds, for example, as catalysts in novel chemical reactions.

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Facial recognition tool tackles illegal chimp trade

Automated software is now scouring social media posts looking for evidence of ape trafficking.

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Ny studie kan väcka hoppet om att utrota malaria

Malariaforskaren Anders Björkman, professor vid Karolinska institutet, beskriver tiden kring år 2000 som ett katastrofläge vad gäller utbredningen av malaria i världen. Katastrofläget triggade en stor global insats som fick skjuts av nya former av läkemedel samt en bred utdelning av impregnerade myggnät och besprutning mot malariamyggor inomhus. Resultatet blev en halvering av malariautbredningen

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Blandskogar ger mer – men det gäller att blanda rätt!

Genom att analysera data från Riksskogstaxeringen kan forskare på Umeå universitet, SLU och Göteborgs universitet bidra till mer konkreta råd om hur blandskog kan ge bättre trädtillväxt. Deras resultat visar tydligt att det är viktigt att blanda rätt trädslag. Resultatet publiceras i Nature Plants och kan sägas vara en uppföljare på en tidigare studie 2013 i Nature Communications. – Då visade vi

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Med rätt belysning börjar stenarna berätta

– Det geologiska materialen spelar samma grundläggande roll i våra liv nu precis som de gjorde förr, då stenar kunde användas för att skapa jaktverktyg, bygga solida skydd eller magnifika monument, säger Claudia Sciuto. Claudia Sciuto menar att samspelet mellan samhällens utveckling och geologiska resurser blir tydligt när man börjar undersöka livsmiljöer. Till exempel så bor vi i hus av sten, fä

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Samspelet mellan tryckfärg och kartong

– En tryckt bild kan bestå av flera lager tryckfärg och fördelningen inom varje lager påverkar bildens kvalitet, säger Sofia Thorman, forskare inom tryckertteknik som undersökt hur ett kartongmaterials förmåga att ta upp vätska, i form av tryckfärg, påverkar flexotryck. Hur jämnt färgen överförs och fördelas påverkas bland annat av den kartong eller det papper den är tryckt på. För att säkerställ

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New moves for polymer chain dynamics

A technique that enables researchers to watch the motion of individual molecules within a polymer has been developed by KAUST: it challenges current thinking about polymer physics and could lead to new materials that can be tailored for specific tasks.

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New probe for the secrets of complex interfaces

In rechargeable batteries, ultra-thin material sheets are crucial. Reactions occur at the interfaces of these sheets. Scientists want to track these reactions. They need a way to probe buried interfaces with elemental specificity. In principle, soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques could be a powerful tool for probing such complex interfaces. However, these techniques haven't been available due to li

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Machine learning in action for the humanitarian sector

Governments across the world came together in Marrakesh this past December to ratify a pact to improve cooperation on international migration. Among other objectives, the Global Compact for Migration seeks to use "accurate and disaggregated data as a basis for evidence-based policies." How can machine learning technologies help with deeply polarizing societal issues like migration?

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Near-term climate prediction coming of age, study shows

The quest for climate scientists to be able to bridge the gap between shorter-term seasonal forecasts and long-term climate projections is coming of age, a study shows.

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The Doctors Who Invented a New Way to Help People Die

In 2016, a small group of doctors gathered in a Seattle conference room to find a better way to help people die. They included physicians at the forefront of medical aid in dying—the practice of providing terminal patients with a way to end their own life. And they were there because the aid-in-dying movement had recently run into a problem. The two lethal medications used by most patients for de

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Bråkig passagerare tvingade plan att nödlanda

Ett plan som var på väg från Moskva till den ryska staden Surgut tvingades att nödlanda. Detta efter att en bråkig passagerare krävt att planet skulle byta kurs och styra mot Afghanistan. Enligt uppgifter till den ryska statliga nyhetsbyrån Ria, ska passageraren ha varit berusad.

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Poll: Disasters influence thinking on climate change

When it comes to their views on climate change, Americans are looking at natural disasters and their local weather, according to a new poll.

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Small trees are among the oldest in Congolese rainforest

Forest giants have long been considered the oldest trees in tropical forests, but new research shows small trees can also be very old, and can even grow older than the big ones.

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Friad för våldtäkt får 320.000 i skadestånd

Den 29-årige mannen dömdes av Linköpings tingsrätt till fängelse i två år för våldtäkt. Göta hovrätt friade mannen. Nu får han 317.000 i skadestånd av Justitiekanslern, JK, för de dryga fyra månader han satt häktad förra året.

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Filippinerna pekas ut som ett av världens farligaste länder i ny rapport

Syrien är det land där ”vanliga” medborgare löper störst risk att dödas, följt av Nigeria och Jemen. Men civila lever farligt också i Filippinerna, visar en sammanställning från en grupp oberoende statistiker och konfliktforskare.

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EU delar ut miljardböter till Mastercard

Betalkortsjätten Mastercard tilldöms böter på 570,6 miljoner euro, motsvarande 5,6 miljarder svenska kronor, av EU-kommissionen för brott mot EU:s konkurrensregler.

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Small trees are among the oldest in Congolese rainforest

Forest giants have long been considered the oldest trees in tropical forests, but new research shows small trees can also be very old, and can even grow older than the big ones.

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Social networks that lead to leadership positions found to differ by gender for business students

A combined team of researchers from Northwestern University and the University of Notre Dame has found that when it comes to the usefulness of social networks in finding good positions after graduation, gender matters. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study involving analysis of student emails and what it revealed.

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Author Correction: Information-based autonomous reconfiguration in systems of interacting DNA nanostructures

Author Correction: Information-based autonomous reconfiguration in systems of interacting DNA nanostructures Author Correction: Information-based autonomous reconfiguration in systems of interacting DNA nanostructures, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08439-z Author Correction: Information-based autonomous reconfiguration in systems of interacting DNA nanostructures

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New synthesis method for producing fluorinated piperidines

Synthetic molecules are essential for many products, including medicines, crop protection agents and special materials such as Teflon. These molecules have several components, which can be combined in a variety of ways, resulting in different properties. Both so-called piperidines and fluorinated groups are particularly important.

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New technology for machine translation now available

A new methodology to improve machine translation has become available this month through the University of Amsterdam. The project DatAptor, funded by NWO/STW, increasingly advances translation machines by selecting data sets.

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For zombie microbes, deep-sea buffet is just out of reach

Far below the ocean floor, sediments are teeming with bizarre zombie-like microbes. Although they're technically alive, they grow in slow motion, and can take decades for a single cell to divide—something their cousins at the surface do in a matter of minutes. A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is beginning to pick apart how they survive by examining their source of "

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EU delar ut miljardböter till Mastercard

Betalkortsjätten Mastercard tilldöms böter på 570,6 miljoner euro, motsvarande 5,6 miljarder svenska kronor, av EU-kommissionen för brott mot EU:s konkurrensregler.

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Haak ryktas till världens bästa klubb – kan få mångmiljonkontrakt

Isabelle Haak blir allt hetare på den storinternationella marknaden och enligt uppgifter är volleybollspelaren redan klar för världens kanske allra bästa klubb.

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DxOMark Adds Selfie Benchmark to Its Phone Scores

DxOMark's Mobile scores are often used to compare the overall image quality of current-model phones. However, it only tests the main camera. With the growing popularity of selfies, DxOMark has …

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From toilet to brickyard: Recycling biosolids to make sustainable bricks

Around 30 percent of the world's biosolids are stockpiled or sent to landfill each year, while over 3 billion cubic meters of clay soil is dug up for the global brickmaking industry. Using biosolids in bricks offers an innovative solution to these environmental challenges.

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Kritik mot nedläggning av postombud i Huddinge

På kort tid har två Icabutiker i Huddinge slutat som postombud. Det har fått flera lokalinvånare att protestera. För en del äldre personer innebär nedläggningen att det blir svårare att ta sig till postombudet. – Jag kommer bli tvingad att sluta sända efter varor som kommer med posten, säger Bitten Folkesdotter, 67 år.

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Öresundsbron avstängd – risk för fallande is

Öresundsbron har stängts av i riktning mot Danmark. Anledningen är att det sitter is på vajrarna som skulle kunna falla ned på förbipasserande bilar.

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Kirsten Nørgaard hædres med prestigefyldt diabetespris

Overlæge Kirsten Nørgaard modtager Niels Schwartz Sørensens legat for sit utrættelige arbejde med at forfine behandlingen til personer med diabetes.

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New Technique to Map Brains

One of the “holy grails” of neuroscience is the ability to scan a brain and create a complete detailed map, including all networks and connections. Scientists use several techniques, all with their own drawbacks, and the process is very slow – it can take a year to completely scan a single fly brain. A collaboration of scientists, however, report in Science that they have developed a new techniqu

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the world's largest 3D printed concrete bridge is completed in shanghai

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Supermassive black holes sometimes go on feeding frenzies—here's how they know it's time for dinner

Space They’re called “supermassive” for a reason. About 10 percent of all supermassive black holes we can observe seem to be, at any given time, actively accreting matter—feeding on cosmic gas from their surroundings.

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How Estonia blazed a trail in science

How Estonia blazed a trail in science How Estonia blazed a trail in science, Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00209-7 A small nation found strength in research after joining the European Union.

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Riccardo Giacconi (1931-2018)

Riccardo Giacconi (1931-2018) Riccardo Giacconi (1931-2018), Published online: 22 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00216-8 Astronomer who opened the X-ray window onto the Universe.

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A fleeting moment in time

Observatory captures the last breath of a dying star.

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Forest soil needs decades or centuries to recover from fires and logging

The 2009 Black Saturday fires burned 437,000 hectares of Victoria, including tens of thousands of hectares of Mountain Ash forest.

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We could wreck natural world, David Attenborough tells Prince William

The naturalist tells Prince William people must look after the natural world, or it will be wrecked.

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Dippy the dinosaur arrives in Scotland

The famous replica skeleton, usually displayed at London's Natural History Museum, goes on show in Glasgow.

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Meet the Blind YouTubers Making the Internet More Accessible

Visually impaired creators are a lifeline for those who share their disability—and they’re educating and making allies of sighted people along the way.

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This artificial intelligence teaches robots to walk—by creating custom obstacle courses

Open-ended style of learning does better than traditional methods

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Image of the Day: Coral Fluorescence

Green fluorescent protein lures algal symbionts to corals.

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Fantasizing About Murdering Your Boss Will Only Hurt You

Have you ever thought about killing someone? Not plotted it out, necessarily, but fantasized about offing a bully or boss or boyfriend in a desperate search for catharsis? I wouldn’t encourage you to spend too much time dwelling on all the rejections and confrontations that might have led to such an angry moment, but I do need you to think about those things briefly. I also won’t ask you to name

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Kamala Harris Is Resisting Attempts to Pigeonhole Her

Kamala Harris is a half-Jamaican, half-Indian woman from Oakland, California, the daughter of two UC Berkeley grad students. She went to high school in Montreal. She married a wealthy, white, Jewish lawyer later in life, and didn’t have kids of her own. When she’s not in Washington, she splits her time between San Francisco and Los Angeles. Her first name is Sanskrit and gets mispronounced all th

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Changing the way to design sensors

US engineers have 3D-printed piezoelectric materials. Samantha Page reports.

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Men may need to workout harder to get older

But weight and height are a factor for women only, study finds. Nick Carne reports.

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Blood test may provide early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s

Detecting a protein leaking from dying neurons could reveal symptoms before they become obvious. Ben Lewis reports.

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Meet Galagadon, an ancient shark with funny teeth

Researchers report another important addition to the fossil record. Nick Carne reports.

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Tymosjenko siktar på att bli president

Julia Tymosjenko ställer upp i det ukrainska presidentvalet. Det meddelade den tidigare premiärministern vid en sittning med sitt nationalistiska parti Fosterlandet.

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How to identify, understand and teach gifted children

The beginning of the 2019 school year will be a time of planning and crystal-gazing. Teachers will plan their instructional agenda in a general way. Students will think about another year at school. Parents will reflect on how their children might progress this year.

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Why we don't know if Irukandji jellyfish are moving south

Reports that Irukandji jellyfish might be moving south may be panicking people unnecessarily. It's almost impossible to tell where the tiny jellyfish are along our coast, but that could change with new technology that can "sweep" the ocean for traces of DNA.

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‘Good to Go’ tackles the real science of sports recovery

In ‘Good to Go,’ science writer Christie Aschwanden puts science — and herself — to the test for the sake of sports recovery.

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Why we don't know if Irukandji jellyfish are moving south

Reports that Irukandji jellyfish might be moving south may be panicking people unnecessarily. It's almost impossible to tell where the tiny jellyfish are along our coast, but that could change with new technology that can "sweep" the ocean for traces of DNA.

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F-22 Raptor fitted with 3D printed titanium part – 3D Printing Industry

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Amerikansk superstjärna misstänkt för våldtäkt i Paris

En känd amerikansk r&b-sångare har gripits i Paris, misstänkt för våldtäkt. Hans framgångar har kantats av skandaler.

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Nya Zeelands premiärminister fick åter frågor om sitt privatliv

Sedan Nya Zeelands premiärminister Jacinda Ardern tillrädde i oktober 2017 har hon i intervjuer tvingats svara på flera frågor om sitt privatliv. I en intervju i BBC under måndagen fick hon frågan om hon kommer att fria till sin partner, rapporterar The Guardian.

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Amanda Lind mest omtalad av de nya ministrarna på sociala medier

Sveriges nya kulturminister Amanda Lind (MP) är den minister som det talats mest om på sociala medier sedan den nya regeringen tillträtt under måndagen. Fem av de tre mest delade artiklarna i svenska medier under det senaste dygnet handlar om Lind och hennes hyllning till den före detta ministern och partikamraten Mehmet Kaplan.

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Viktors val: Vad är egentligen en “liberal opposition”?

Om Centerpartiet tog över Rädda Barnen, då skulle organisationen omedelbart döpas om till “Liberal opposition mot barn”.

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Twitter suspends account that shared video of teens and Native American elder – CNET

The account claimed to be owned by a Californian schoolteacher but had a profile picture of a blogger based in Brazil.

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The robots being readied to enter nuclear no-go zones

Robust, intelligent robots that react to their surroundings are being developed to work in situations that are too dangerous for humans, such as cleaning up Europe's decades-old radioactive waste or helping during a nuclear emergency.

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Research Suggests We’re Not as Irrational as We Think

Decades of psychological research have emphasized the biases and errors in human judgment and decision-making. But a new approach that borrows an idea from the field of artificial intelligence is challenging this view, suggesting that people are much less irrational than they’ve been led to believe.

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New insight into cell membranes could improve drug testing and design

Research at the University of Arkansas on membrane proteins could lead to better development and testing of drugs. Chemistry researchers studied a type of membrane protein that expels drugs from a cell, contributing to drug resistance. They found that the lipid composition of the cell membrane has an effect on the behavior of these proteins, which should be taken into account when testing drugs th

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Researcher who created gene-edited babies has been fired

He Jiankui has been dismissed by the Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen after a preliminary investigation by provincial authorities

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Toward more energy-efficient cruise ships

An EPFL researcher has developed a system based on fuel cells to reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of cruise ships, which are increasingly popular among vacation goers around the world.

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Ingen reklam för Cannabis under Super Bowl

CBS, bolaget som sänder 2019 års Super Bowl, tar i snitt 5,2 miljoner dollar för att visa 30 sekunders reklam under matchen. Men några cannabispengar vill CBS inte ha, enligt USA Today.

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