Search Posts

nyheder2019januar31

Solving the mystery of Serengeti's vanishing wild dogs

More than 25 years ago, African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) disappeared from Serengeti National Park. A firestorm of debate followed when one researcher claimed that handling by scientists was the cause. New research refutes that claim and offers another explanation.

14h

Engineers create a robot that can 'imagine' itself

Engineers have created a robot that learns what it is, with zero prior knowledge of physics, geometry, or motor dynamics. Initially the robot has no clue what its shape is. After a brief period of 'babbling,' and within about a day of intensive computing, the robot creates a self-simulation, which it can then use to contemplate and adapt to different situations, handling new tasks as well as detec

4h

Blødgjort vand i hanerne: Brøndby-forsøg bekræfter fordelene

Hofor ruller blødere vand ud i hovedstadsområdet, og en undersøgelse fra DTU Miljø har set nærmere på effekterne. F.eks. sparer man ikke strøm i elkedlen ved blødere vand.

14h

Do all chemotherapies have equal long-term heart risk?

Different chemotherapy drugs were associated with varying degrees of long-term risk of cardiomyopathy in survivors of childhood cancers, according to a new study that included a researcher from UT Health San Antonio.

5min

Warmer water, chemical exposure influence gene expression across generations in a coastal fish

Warmer water temperatures, combined with low-level exposure to chemicals already known to be harmful to aquatic life, influence the expression of genes in the offspring of an abundant North American fish species — and threaten organisms whose sex determination is sensitive to water temperature.

5min

Iguana-sized dinosaur cousin discovered in Antarctica

Scientists have just discovered a dinosaur relative that lived in Antarctica 250 million years ago. The iguana-sized reptile's genus name, Antarctanax, means 'Antarctic king.'

5min

Fight or flight: Serotonin neurons prompt brain to make the right call

Known for its role in relieving depression, the neurochemical serotonin may also help the brain execute instantaneous, appropriate behaviors in emergency situations, according to a new Cornell study published Feb. 1 in Science.

5min

Study reveals wildlife is abundant in Chernobyl

A scavenger study that used fish carcasses as bait provides additional evidence that wildlife is abundant in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

5min

Looking to choose a healthy post-workout snack? Decide early, study says

A post-exercise snack can threaten to undo the gains (or losses) of a workout. But the decision itself may depend on when you make it, according to a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Participants asked to choose between an apple and brownie were about one-third more likely to favor the fruit when deciding before vs. after their workouts.

5min

Immune master regulator orchestrates responses to parasite infection

A new study has identified the master regulator that maintains a healthy gut and limits damage by parasitic whipworms. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators revealed the interleukin 10 receptor (IL-10R) is critical to prevent uncontrolled whipworm infection in mice and a damaging immune response in the gut.The study, published today in PLOS Pathogens, helps understand th

5min

Study of brine discharge from desalination plant finds good news and bad news

Before the Carlsbad Desalination Plant in Southern California began operations in 2015, scientists at UC Santa Cruz recognized an important opportunity to study the effects of the high-salinity brine that would be discharged from the plant into coastal waters. Their study shows that brine discharged from the plant raises offshore salinity levels more than permitted, but researchers found no direct

5min

'Working rich' prevail among today's top earners

Many blame idle millionaires for the rise in income inequality, but today's top earners are actually the 'working rich,' according to a new working paper co-authored by Princeton University.

5min

Letters: How to Reduce the Wait Time for Women’s Bathrooms

The Long Lines for Women’s Bathrooms Could Be Eliminated. Why Haven’t They Been? Even after three decades of efforts to give men and women equal access to public toilets, Joe Pinsker reported last week , women still have to wait longer to use the restroom. Gender-neutral bathrooms present a possible solution. “One way to guarantee that men and women wait the same amount of time for a toilet,” Pin

10min

Space changes your brain in bigger ways than we thought

Space We've only scratched the surface. A new study published in JAMA Neurology this week provides more concerning details on how spaceflight changes the brain. The findings inadvertently underscore just how…

11min

Earth's largest extinction event likely took plants first

New evidence from the cliffsides of Australia suggests that Earth's largest extinction event — a volcanic cataclysm occurring roughly 252 million years ago — extinguished plant life long before many animal counterparts.

13min

FRA: Cyberhotet mot Sverige ökar

Statliga cyberattacker mot viktiga svenska system ökar – och blir även allt mer sofistikerade, enligt Försvarets radioanstalt (FRA). Konkreta exempel finns där främmande makt troligen lyckats stjäla information.

17min

Ny studie: Pappor i privat sektor har svårare att ta ut föräldraledighet

Färre pappor i den privata jämfört med den offentliga sektorn tar ut föräldraledighet. En av anledningarna är att de inte vill orsaka problem för de arbetskamrater som täcker upp, visar en ny studie vid Göteborgs Universitet. – Det är tyvärr ofta en del av företagskulturen, säger Philip Hwang som lett studien.

17min

Hon utforskar kvinnor som inte passar in i mallen

LONDON. Nicole Kidman gör sitt livs mest extrema make-over i rollen som försupen och plågad LA-detektiv i ”Destroyer”. Regissören Karyn Kusama berättar om varför hon är besatt av traumatiserade kvinnofigurer präglade av förluster och sorg.

24min

Persistent low body weight in young kids increases risk for anorexia nervosa later

A new study has found that a persistent low body mass index (BMI) in children, starting as young as age 2 for boys and 4 for girls, may be a risk factor for the development of anorexia nervosa in adolescence.

27min

Waters west of Europe drive ocean overturning circulation, key for regulating climate

A new international study finds that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC), a deep-ocean process that plays a key role in regulating Earth's climate, is primarily driven by cooling waters west of Europe.

27min

Evolution, illustrated

Led by Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Molecular and Cellular Biology Hopi Hoekstra, a team of international researchers conducted a years-long study that not only confirmed the intuition that light-colored mice survive better in light-colored habitats, and vice versa for dark-colored mice, but also allowed researchers to pinpoint a mutation related to survival, specifically t

27min

Mars rover Curiosity makes first gravity-measuring traverse on the Red Planet

A clever use of non-science engineering data from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has let a team of researchers, including an Arizona State University graduate student, measure the density of rock layers in Gale Crater.

27min

New 3D printer shapes objects with rays of light

A new 3D printer uses light to transform gooey liquids into complex solid objects in only a matter of minutes. The printer can create objects that are smoother, more flexible and more complex than what is possible with traditional 3D-printers. It can also encase an already existing object with new materials, which current printers struggle to do.

27min

Male birth control for the malaria parasite

Disrupting two genes involved in the preservation of RNA molecules inhibits the ability of the male form of the malaria parasite to mature and be transmitted from human blood into mosquitoes, interrupting a key stage in the parasite's life-cycle and cutting off an important step in the spread of the disease.

27min

Introducing nemuri, a protein that induces sleep and fights infection

Researchers have discovered a bacteria-fighting peptide in fruit flies that also promotes sleep after sleep deprivation or infection, according to a new study.

27min

First 'OSNAP' results alter understanding of Atlantic overturning circulation variability

Contradicting the prevailing view on what causes major changes to a climate-regulating ocean circulation pattern in the northern hemisphere, the first results from the 'OSNAP' project, an internationally collaborative effort designed to monitor large-scale ocean dynamics, report that deep water formation in the Labrador Sea does not drive Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) variabil

27min

Curiosity's first attempt at gravimetry advances martian geology

By cleverly repurposing a device onboard Curiosity normally used to detect the rover's movements on Mars to measure slight variations in gravitational fields instead, researchers have refined the understanding of how Gale crater and the mountain at its center formed.

27min

A new 'twist' on 3D printing renders 'The Thinker,' and other objects

Rotating photosensitive material while exposing it to an evolving light pattern allows for a new type of 3D printing in which printed components can encase other, pre-existing solid objects, researchers report.

27min

European waters drive ocean overturning, key for regulating climate

An international study reveals the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, which helps regulate Earth's climate, is highly variable and primarily driven by the conversion of warm, salty, shallow waters into colder, fresher, deep waters moving south through the Irminger and Iceland basins. This upends prevailing ideas and may help scientists better predict Arctic ice melt and future changes in

27min

To sleep, perchance to heal: Newly discovered gene governs need for slumber when sick

Humans spend nearly one-third of their lives in slumber, yet sleep is still one of biology's most enduring mysteries. Little is known about what genetic or molecular forces drive the need to sleep — until now. In a study of over 12,000 lines of fruit flies, researchers have found a single gene, called nemuri, that increases the need for sleep.

27min

Novel electron microscopy offers nanoscale, damage-free isotope tracking in amino acids

A new electron microscopy technique that detects the subtle changes in the weight of proteins at the nanoscale — while keeping the sample intact — could open a new pathway for deeper, more comprehensive studies of the basic building blocks of life. Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory described in the journal Science the first use of an electron microscope to directly identify isotopes in

27min

Self-growing materials that strengthen in response to force

A strategy inspired by the process responsible for muscle growth could lead to the development of stronger, longer-lasting materials.

27min

29min

Scenes From a Frozen World

As much of the United States remains in the clutches of the polar vortex, other parts of the Northern Hemisphere are also feeling the extremes of mid-winter. Collected below, images taken over the past week from countries across the North, where icy temperatures and snowfall have drastically changed the landscape.

30min

Åsa Beckman: Varför skyddar kvinnor män med för stor självbild?

Det finns många män med uppblåsta självbilder. Och det finns många kvinnor runt om kring dem som ser igenom dem. Varför säger vi ingenting? undrar Åsa Beckman.

31min

Sick And Tired? Scientists Find Protein That Puts Flies To Sleep And Fights Infection

In the search for what triggers sleep, researchers stumbled upon a link between sleep and the immune system. A single fly gene gets turned on in sick flies, inducing sleep and an immune response. (Image credit: Andrew Syred/Science Source )

33min

New Material Grows Like Muscles

New Material Grows Like Muscles Scientists have designed a new material that gets stronger after a "workout." Robot_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Sarah Holmlund via Shutterstock Technology Thursday, January 31, 2019 – 14:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Researchers from Japan have come up with a way to encourage materials to grow stronger over time, like the muscles in our body. The

34min

'The Batman' Will Hit Theaters in 2021—Minus Ben Affleck

Also, Zack Snyder is making a zombie movie for Netflix, and Oscar Isaac and Zendaya might be joining *Dune*.

36min

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover weighed the mountain it’s climbing

Curiosity measures gravity as it drives, allowing scientists to weigh Mount Sharp and determine that the rock is less dense than expected.

38min

Så vinner Qatars fotbollslandslag pr-kriget i Gulfkrisen

Asiatiska mästerskapen har blivit till ett pr-krig, mitt i Gulfkrisen. Det hårt kritiserade Qatar har skrällt sig till final – och blivit till underdogen som står upp mot sina mobbare. – Förutom att invadera landet finns det inget annat sätt kvar att straffa Qatar nu än att ta ifrån dem VM 2022, säger Mellanösternkännaren James Montague.

38min

Psychologically and physically, traffic is terrible for our health

Traffic has been implicated in measurable exhaustion, an increase in blood pressure, negative attitudinal shifts, and a constant release of stress hormones. In 2009, 3.9 billion gallons of fuel and 4.8 billion hours of time were wasted by Americans sitting in traffic. Traffic is costing the US economy $100 billion every year. None Shortly after moving to Santa Monica in 2011, I was scheduled to t

40min

Rhomboid distorts lipids to break the viscosity-imposed speed limit of membrane diffusion

Enzymes that cut proteins inside membranes regulate diverse cellular events, including cell signaling, homeostasis, and host-pathogen interactions. Adaptations that enable catalysis in this exceptional environment are poorly understood. We visualized single molecules of multiple rhomboid intramembrane proteases and unrelated proteins in living cells (human and Drosophila ) and planar lipid bilaye

41min

Democracy's plight

[no content]

41min

News at a glance

[no content]

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

In hot water

[no content]

41min

41min

Saving the steppes

[no content]

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

Setting the table

[no content]

41min

41min

Ordering the elements

[no content]

41min

Populating the periodic table: Nucleosynthesis of the elements

Elements heavier than helium are produced in the lives and deaths of stars. This Review discusses when and how the process of nucleosynthesis made elements. High-mass stars fuse elements much faster, fuse heavier nuclei, and die more catastrophically than low-mass stars. The explosions of high-mass stars as supernovae release elements into their surroundings. Supernovae can leave behind neutron s

41min

Frontiers in molecular p-block chemistry: From structure to reactivity

This year marks the 350th anniversary of the discovery of phosphorus by the alchemist Hennig Brand. However, this element was not included in the p-block of the periodic table until more recently. 2019 also marks the 150th anniversary of the preliminary tabular arrangement of the elements into the periodic system by Mendeleev. Of the 63 elements known in 1869, almost one-third of them belonged to

41min

Electronic structure in the transition metal block and its implications for light harvesting

Transition metal–based chromophores play a central role in a variety of light-enabled chemical processes ranging from artificial solar energy conversion to photoredox catalysis. The most commonly used compounds include elements from the second and third transition series (e.g., ruthenium and iridium), but their Earth-abundant first-row analogs fail to engage in photoinduced electron transfer chem

41min

Rare earth elements: Mendeleevs bane, modern marvels

The rare earths (REs) are a family of 17 elements that exhibit pronounced chemical similarities as a group, while individually expressing distinctive and varied electronic properties. These atomistic electronic properties are extraordinarily useful and motivate the application of REs in many technologies and devices. From their discovery to the present day, a major challenge faced by chemists has

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

Benefits of fat

[no content]

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

41min

Linking a mutation to survival in wild mice

Adaptive evolution in new or changing environments can be difficult to predict because the functional connections between genotype, phenotype, and fitness are complex. Here, we make these explicit connections by combining field and laboratory experiments in wild mice. We first directly estimate natural selection on pigmentation traits and an underlying pigment locus, Agouti , by using experimenta

41min

Mechanoresponsive self-growing hydrogels inspired by muscle training

Living tissues, such as muscle, autonomously grow and remodel themselves to adapt to their surrounding mechanical environment through metabolic processes. By contrast, typical synthetic materials cannot grow and reconstruct their structures once formed. We propose a strategy for developing "self-growing" polymeric materials that respond to repetitive mechanical stress through an effective mechano

41min

A sleep-inducing gene, nemuri, links sleep and immune function in Drosophila

Sleep remains a major mystery of biology. In particular, little is known about the mechanisms that account for the drive to sleep. In an unbiased screen of more than 12,000 Drosophila lines, we identified a single gene, nemuri , that induces sleep. The NEMURI protein is an antimicrobial peptide that can be secreted ectopically to drive prolonged sleep (with resistance to arousal) and to promote s

41min

A sea change in our view of overturning in the subpolar North Atlantic

To provide an observational basis for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projections of a slowing Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) in the 21st century, the Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program (OSNAP) observing system was launched in the summer of 2014. The first 21-month record reveals a highly variable overturning circulation responsible for the majorit

41min

Correlations in high-harmonic generation of matter-wave jets revealed by pattern recognition

Correlations in interacting many-body systems are key to the study of quantum matter. The complexity of the correlations typically grows quickly as the system evolves and thus presents a challenge for experimental characterization and intuitive understanding. In a strongly driven Bose-Einstein condensate, we observe the high-harmonic generation of matter-wave jets with complex correlations as a r

41min

Identification of site-specific isotopic labels by vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope

The identification of isotopic labels by conventional macroscopic techniques lacks spatial resolution and requires relatively large quantities of material for measurements. We recorded the vibrational spectra of an α amino acid, -alanine, with damage-free "aloof" electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to directly resolve carbon-site–specific isotopic labe

41min

Quantum reference beacon-guided superresolution optical focusing in complex media

Optical scattering is generally considered to be a nuisance of microscopy that limits imaging depth and spatial resolution. Wavefront shaping techniques enable optical imaging at unprecedented depth, but attaining superresolution within complex media remains a challenge. We used a quantum reference beacon (QRB), consisting of solid-state quantum emitters with spin-dependent fluorescence, to provi

41min

A loud quasi-periodic oscillation after a star is disrupted by a massive black hole

The tidal forces close to massive black holes can rip apart stars that come too close to them. As the resulting stellar debris spirals toward the black hole, the debris heats up and emits x-rays. We report observations of a stable 131-second x-ray quasi-periodic oscillation from the tidal disruption event ASASSN-14li. Assuming the black hole mass indicated by host galaxy scaling relations, these

41min

A surface gravity traverse on Mars indicates low bedrock density at Gale crater

Gravimetry, the precise measurement of gravitational fields, can be used to probe the internal structure of Earth and other planets. The Curiosity rover on Mars carries accelerometers normally used for navigation and attitude determination. We have recalibrated them to isolate the signature of the changing gravitational acceleration as the rover climbs through Gale crater. The subsurface rock den

41min

Intense threat switches dorsal raphe serotonin neurons to a paradoxical operational mode

Survival depends on the selection of behaviors adaptive for the current environment. For example, a mouse should run from a rapidly looming hawk but should freeze if the hawk is coasting across the sky. Although serotonin has been implicated in adaptive behavior, environmental regulation of its functional role remains poorly understood. In mice, we found that stimulation of dorsal raphe serotonin

41min

New Products

[no content]

41min

Crafting social ties

[no content]

41min

Opposing reactions in coenzyme A metabolism sensitize Mycobacterium tuberculosis to enzyme inhibition

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the leading infectious cause of death in humans. Synthesis of lipids critical for Mtb’s cell wall and virulence depends on phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PptT), an enzyme that transfers 4'-phosphopantetheine (Ppt) from coenzyme A (CoA) to diverse acyl carrier proteins. We identified a compound that kills Mtb by binding and partially inhibiting PptT. Killing o

41min

‘Cooking chemistry’ produces new, less toxic glue

A new soy-based adhesive made from food components is even stronger than Gorilla Glue on wood, researchers say. On aluminum, it’s about the same. Jonathan Wilker of Purdue University studies how marine animals, such as oysters and mussels, create natural adhesives. Unlike most glues you’d find in a hardware store, these adhesives are non-toxic, and many hold up underwater. While trying to re-crea

41min

Learning new vocabulary during deep sleep

Researchers showed that we can acquire the vocabulary of a new language during distinct phases of slow-wave sleep and that the sleep-learned vocabulary could be retrieved unconsciously following waking. Memory formation appeared to be mediated by the same brain structures that also mediate wake vocabulary learning.

42min

Carbon-capture technology scrubs CO2 from power plants like scuba-diving gear

Scientists have developed a process that removes CO2 from coal-burning power plant emissions in a way that is similar to how soda lime works in scuba diving rebreathers. Their research offers an alternative but simpler strategy for carbon capture and requires 24 percent less energy than industrial benchmark solutions.

42min

Effectively collecting tiny droplets for biomedical analysis and beyond

In a single sneeze or a cough, as many as 40,000 tiny droplets are forcibly propelled from our mouth and nose into the air. While we cannot control our sneezing, researchers have recently developed an original method to collect micro-droplets, such as these 'precious' human dewdrops, which may shed light on applications in detecting disease-causing bacteria and preventing the spread of disease.

42min

Pinpointing the cells that control the brain's memory flow

From the cab driver heading for Times Square to the commuter returning home on the freeway, we all carry maps in our head labeled with important locations. And a new study in mice shows that, by directing the delicate ebb-and-flow of brain activity, a small cluster of cells helps the brain's internal GPS remember which places matter most.

42min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

43min

This bacteria-fighting protein also induces sleep

A bacteria-fighting protein also lulls fruit flies to sleep, suggesting links between sleep and the immune system.

45min

Watch this super-speedy 3D printer make objects suddenly appear

Using light projected into resin, it creates solid objects all in one go, rather than in layers.

45min

Här skolas Kinas barn till mönstermedborgare

Personlig utveckling eller hjärntvätt? Möt barnen och personalen på Kinas 250:e Röda armé-skola.

46min

Star Trek–like replicator creates entire objects in minutes

Ghostly 3D printer sculpts The Thinker before your eyes

46min

Forget everything you know about 3D printing — the ‘replicator’ is here

Forget everything you know about 3D printing — the ‘replicator’ is here Forget everything you know about 3D printing — the ‘replicator’ is here, Published online: 31 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-018-07798-9 Rather than building objects layer by layer, the printer creates whole structures by projecting light into a resin that solidifies.

47min

We’ve hacked the Curiosity rover to learn how mountains form on Mars

Hacking the Curiosity rover let researchers measure the density of the rocks it was driving over, revealing that Martian mountains may not form how we thought

48min

Self-growing material could make muscles that become stronger with use

A self-growing hydrogel becomes stronger and larger with use and could one day help make robots with artificial muscles

48min

Novel electron microscopy offers nanoscale, damage-free isotope tracking in amino acids

A new electron microscopy technique that detects the subtle changes in the weight of proteins at the nanoscale—while keeping the sample intact—could open a new pathway for deeper, more comprehensive studies of the basic building blocks of life.

48min

Evolution, illustrated: Study captures one of the clearest pictures yet of evolution in vertebrates

What do you get when you put together several tons of steel plates, hundreds of mice, a few evolutionary and molecular biologists and a tiny Nebraska town near the South Dakota border?

48min

European waters drive ocean overturning, key for regulating climate

A new international study finds that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC), a deep-ocean process that plays a key role in regulating Earth's climate, is primarily driven by cooling waters west of Europe.

48min

Mars rover Curiosity makes first gravity-measuring traverse on the Red Planet

A clever use of non-science engineering data from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has let a team of researchers, including an Arizona State University graduate student, measure the density of rock layers in 96-mile-wide Gale Crater.

48min

Male birth control for the malaria parasite

Disrupting two genes involved in the preservation of RNA molecules inhibits the ability of the male form of the malaria parasite to mature and be transmitted from human blood into mosquitoes, interrupting a key stage in the parasite's life-cycle and cutting off an important step in the spread of the disease. Researchers at Penn State and the University of South Florida have identified a complex of

48min

Self-growing materials that strengthen in response to force

A strategy inspired by the process responsible for muscle growth could lead to the development of stronger, longer-lasting materials.

48min

How the 2011 riots spread: New evidence shows sense of identity was key

New analysis led by a Sussex psychologist has explained the way in which the 2011 riots spread — something which may be useful for policy makers in future.

48min

The development of brain stem cells into new nerve cells and why this can lead to cancer

Stem cells are true Jacks-of-all-trades of our bodies, as they can turn into the many different cell types of all organs. This allows the tissues to renew and to heal after injury. This amazing multipotency makes stem cells in the adult body key tools for regenerative medicine. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) now publish in the journal Nature how brain stem cells make the de

48min

Research identifies pathway connecting some ARV drugs with liver disease

Research out of the University of Kentucky has identified a potential pathway by which certain ARV drugs — commonly given to patients with HIV — give rise to liver disease.

48min

Vetenskapligt genombrott: ”sömnknappen” funnen

Sömnen är fortfarande ett av biologins stora mysterium. Man vet inte heller vad det är som gör att vi somnar. Men nu har forskare identifierat en sömngen och kanske är det den som får oss att slumra in.

50min

Can thorium reactors dispose of weapons-grade plutonium?

submitted by /u/TheCIASellsDrugs [link] [comments]

50min

Evolution, illustrated: Study captures one of the clearest pictures yet of evolution in vertebrates

What do you get when you put together several tons of steel plates, hundreds of mice, a few evolutionary and molecular biologists and a tiny Nebraska town near the South Dakota border?

51min

Male birth control for the malaria parasite

Disrupting two genes involved in the preservation of RNA molecules inhibits the ability of the male form of the malaria parasite to mature and be transmitted from human blood into mosquitoes, interrupting a key stage in the parasite's life-cycle and cutting off an important step in the spread of the disease. Researchers at Penn State and the University of South Florida have identified a complex of

51min

The Special Sleep That Kicks In During a Sickness

In 1909, the Japanese scientist Kuniomi Ishimori collected spinal fluid from sleep-deprived dogs and injected it into active, rested pooches. Within hours, the latter fell into a deep sleep. By coincidence, a pair of French researchers did the same experiments a few years later and got the same results. These studies, and others like them, suggested that the blood of sleepy animals contains some

52min

The Wild Experiment That Showed Evolution in Real Time

In the fall of 2010, Rowan Barrett was stuck. He needed a piece of land, one with plenty of mice, and after days of futile searching, he found himself at a motel bar in Valentine, Nebraska, doing what people do at bars: telling a total stranger about his problems. A young evolutionary biologist, Barrett had come to Nebraska’s Sand Hills with a grand plan. He would build large outdoor enclosures i

52min

Hacking a Mars rover’s tools has unearthed new insights into the planet

The Curiosity rover still has a few new tricks up its sleeve—and it’s helping us learn more about the planet’s geology.

52min

When organs start to scar: Connective tissue on the wrong road

The increased deposition of connective tissue is a problem in chronic diseases of many organs such as the lungs (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), liver (cirrhosis), kidneys (kidney fibrosis), gut (graft versus host disease), and the skin (systemic sclerosis). Up to 40 percent of all deaths in industrial nations are caused by the deposition of connective tissue with subsequent tissue scarring. In sp

56min

Estimation of technology level required for low-cost renewable hydrogen production

Scientists have evaluated the economic efficiency of hydrogen production systems combining photovoltaic power generation and rechargeable batteries and estimated technology levels necessary for the systems to produce hydrogen at a globally competitive cost. The results obtained in this research may provide vital guidelines for pushing the intermittent renewable power generation systems as a main p

56min

Robot combines vision and touch to learn the game of Jenga

Machine-learning approach could help robots assemble cellphones and other small parts in a manufacturing line.

56min

Iguana-sized dinosaur cousin discovered in Antarctica

Scientists have discovered the fossils of an iguana-sized reptile, which they named 'Antarctic king,' that lived at the South Pole 250 million years ago (it used to be warmer). Antarctanax was an early cousin of the dinosaurs, and it shows how life bounced back after the world's biggest mass extinction.

56min

Layered 2D materials: Maximizing the potential of MXenes

New research shows how to customize the properties of materials called MXenes, which have displayed exceptional abilities to conduct electricity and block electromagnetic radiation.

56min

Israeli Scientists Say They'll Have Cure for Cancer Within a Year. Here's Why That's Highly Unlikely

An Israeli biotech company said that it believes it will have a cure for cancer within a year, but experts contacted by Live Science say that's highly unlikely.

1h

Microsoft Super Bowl 2019 Ad Highlights Xbox Adaptive Controller

Super Bowl ads tend to get a lot of attention and Microsoft wants just that for the Xbox Adaptive Controller. The company is returning to this major sporting event with an ad that highlights …

1h

Could blocking these immune cells aid weight loss?

The small intestine harbors metabolism-regulating immune cells that can consign nutrients of digestion to fat storage rather than energy use.

1h

News media lobbies Merkel, Macron on copyright reform

European news media associations wrote to French President Emmanuel Macron and Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel on Thursday to push for action on online copyright reform.

1h

A 25% pay raise? That’s not nearly enough, young Indian scientists say

Protests set to continue after researchers reject government’s offer

1h

Tesla Paid for Elon Musk’s Private Jet While Laying off Thousands

Two Sides To hear Elon Musk tell it, 2018 was a terrible year. “It was excruciating,” he lamented to The New York Times in August. But a Washington Post story published Tuesday paints a different picture. The newspaper tracked every trip Musk took on Tesla’s corporate jet in 2018 and found that while his company was burning through $100 million per week and laying off thousands of employees, the

1h

Minority kidney transplants could increase with new option

Kidney transplant recipients are now benefiting from donor organs that do not match their blood type but are compatible and just as safe, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

1h

Passing aircraft wring extra snow and rain out of clouds

Planes flying over rain or snow can intensify the precipitation by as much as 10-fold, according to a new study. The rain- and snow-bursts are not caused by emissions from the aircraft but are the peculiar consequence of the aircrafts' wings passing though clouds of supercooled water droplets in cloud layers above a layer of active rain or snow.

1h

The Feeding Frenzy That Got Sea Lions Into Deep Trouble

Let us first establish that sea lions are supposed to live in the sea. Since the 1990s, however, male sea lions—a handful at first, now dozens—have been captivated by the attractions of the Willamette River. They travel all the way from Southern California to Oregon and then swim up 100 miles of river to arrive at an expansive waterfall, the largest in the region. Here, salmon returning to spawn

1h

Cooking chemistry minus heat equals new non-toxic adhesive

A new soy-based, non-toxic adhesive could be used in organic food packaging and some speciality food items.

1h

Americans concerned about weight, but don't understand link to heart conditions, health

A new survey finds that while most Americans (88 percent) understand that there is a connection between a healthy heart and a healthy weight, most aren't doing enough — or anything — to combat their own weight issues. The survey found 65 percent are worried about getting heart disease due to extra pounds, yet less than half (43 percent) of Americans have tried to make dietary changes to lose wei

1h

Hybrid electricity system would reduce rates, improve service

A new distribution system would reduce electricity prices by more than five per cent while also improving service reliability.

1h

Robot combines vision and touch to learn the game of Jenga

Machine-learning approach could help robots assemble cellphones and other small parts in a manufacturing line.

1h

Hög höjd problem för svenska Davis Cup-laget

Sverige är en seger från att få spela det nya Davis Cup-slutspelet i tennis. Sex raka DC-segrar har lyft Sverige till plats 14 på världsrankningen. Nu möter man Colombia i Bogotá på 2.640 meters höjd. – Deras spelare är vana vid den höga höjden, säger Sveriges DC-kapten Johan Hedsberg.

1h

A 25% pay raise? That's not nearly enough, young Indian scientists say

Protests set to continue after researchers reject government's offer

1h

Sodium, not heat, reveals volcanic activity on Jupiter's moon Io

A large volcanic event was detected on Jupiter's moon Io using Jovian sodium nebula brightness variation, a new paper in Astrophysical Journal Letters said.

1h

Deadly Arctic cold strains resources in US Midwest

Frozen water mains and strained natural gas supplies left the US Midwest struggling Thursday as a deadly Arctic air mass had tens of millions of Americans shivering for a second day.

1h

U.S. Prisons Are Covertly Gathering Inmates’ Biometric Voice Data

Automated Panopticons The Intercept published a shocking account Wednesday about how U.S. prisons are building biometric databases of inmates’ voices, in some cases without their consent. Hundreds of thousands of incarcerated people have had their voice prints digitized, according to the report, for the sake of prison security and surveillance — a grim example of how surveillance technologies can

1h

‘Mind reading’ technology poses ethical questions

Advertisers or employers could exploit individuals’ neural signals for own gain

1h

European colonization of Americas helped cause climate change

Research finds killing of native people indirectly contributed to a colder period by causing deaths of around 56 million by 1600 European colonization of the Americas resulted in the killing of so many native people that it transformed the environment and caused the Earth’s climate to cool down, new research has found. Settlers killed off huge numbers of people in conflicts and also by spreading

1h

The Human Genetics of Night Owls and Early Birds

When people prefer to go to bed is linked to hundreds of variations in their genes.

1h

1h

Water mismanagement triggered ecological disaster in Australian rivers, panel concludes

Yearlong investigation confirms irrigators are removing too much water

1h

South American hawk in Maine euthanized as condition worsens

A group caring for an injured South American hawk that turned up in a park in Maine says the bird had to be euthanized after its condition deteriorated.

1h

South American hawk in Maine euthanized as condition worsens

A group caring for an injured South American hawk that turned up in a park in Maine says the bird had to be euthanized after its condition deteriorated.

1h

El Niño bringer CO2 til nye højder

PLUS. Britiske MetOffice spår, at den årlige stigning i atmosfærens indhold af CO2 bliver højere i år end de to foregående år.

1h

1h

Tomb savers: Conservationists unveil work on Tutankhamun grave

After almost a decade, a team of international experts on Thursday revealed the results of their painstaking work to preserve the tomb of Egypt's legendary Pharaoh Tutankhamun.

1h

Firm abandons plan to help endangered salmon in Maine river

A plan to test the use of a new technology to help endangered salmon in a Maine river that is critical to their existence has been abandoned, at least for now.

1h

Companies hope vests will ease burden for assembly workers

Ford Motor Co. and other manufacturers want to help their workers take a load off. Or at least make it easier to lift a load up.

1h

Who's the daddy? Surprise in Swiss orangutan paternity test

A paternity test on a baby orangutan has come back with a surprising result.

1h

Earth's largest extinction event likely took plants first

Little life could endure the Earth-spanning cataclysm known as the Great Dying, but plants may have suffered its wrath long before many animal counterparts, says new research led by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

1h

Imperceptible movements guide juvenile zebra finch song development

New research from Cornell University shows zebra finches engage in socially-guided vocal learning, where they learn their songs by watching their mothers' reactions to their immature songs.

1h

AI and robots serve guests at Alibaba’s futuristic FlyZoo Hotel, China

submitted by /u/Carljohnson09 [link] [comments]

1h

1h

1h

Why the Greenland ice sheet is melting away

As global warming proceeds, the ice fields of southwest Greenland are becoming particularly sensitive to a climate cycle called the North Atlantic Oscillation. Summertime melting of the ice fields in southwest Greenland caused the largest sustained ice loss in Greenland from early 2003 to mid-2013, researchers say. “When we see really big changes in southwest Greenland, we can be sure it’s atmosp

1h

Firm abandons plan to help endangered salmon in Maine river

A plan to test the use of a new technology to help endangered salmon in a Maine river that is critical to their existence has been abandoned, at least for now.

1h

Who's the daddy? Surprise in Swiss orangutan paternity test

A paternity test on a baby orangutan has come back with a surprising result.

1h

Imperceptible movements guide juvenile zebra finch song development

New research from Cornell University shows zebra finches engage in socially-guided vocal learning, where they learn their songs by watching their mothers' reactions to their immature songs.

1h

Membraneless protocells could provide clues to formation of early life

Membraneless assemblies of positively- and negatively-charged molecules can bring together RNA molecules in dense liquid droplets, allowing the RNAs to participate in fundamental chemical reactions. These assemblies, called "complex coacervates," also enhance the ability of some RNA molecules themselves to act as enzymes—molecules that drive chemical reactions. They do this by concentrating the RN

1h

Salmon populations may adapt their eggs to survive in degraded rivers

A University of Southampton study suggests that the membrane of salmon eggs may evolve to cope with reduced oxygen levels in rivers, thereby helping their embryos to incubate successfully.

1h

Salmon populations may adapt their eggs to survive in degraded rivers

A University of Southampton study suggests that the membrane of salmon eggs may evolve to cope with reduced oxygen levels in rivers, thereby helping their embryos to incubate successfully.

1h

An App That Promoted Cyberbullying Shifts to the Workplace

Sarahah was banned from app stores because it became a vehicle for cyberbullying. Its creators are introducing Enoff, for anonymous workplace feedback.

1h

Graphene crinkles can be used as 'molecular zippers'

A decade ago, scientists noticed something very strange happening when buckyballs—soccer ball shaped carbon molecules—were dumped onto a certain type of multilayer graphene, a flat carbon nanomaterial. Rather than rolling around randomly like marbles on a hardwood floor, the buckyballs spontaneously assembled into single-file chains that stretched across the graphene surface.

1h

Extrem kyla beror på svag polarvirvel

Polarvirvel – ett begrepp som plötsligt är hett. Den extrema kyla som nu lamslår stora delar av USA beror på att virveln är försvagad så att polarkylan läcker ut mot söder. Kylan kan ha samband med den globala uppvärmningen.

1h

Sjukhusens överbeläggningar ökar

Vården fortsätter att hålla en hög kvalitet, även om skillnaderna över landet fortfarande är stora och många problem kvarstår. Som överbeläggningar på sjukhus.

1h

Bangkok använder drönare mot luftföroreningarna – får hård kritik

En flotta med drönare och flygplan har under torsdagen sprutat ut vatten över Bangkok, en insats som få tror ska kunna lösa de allvarliga luftföroreningarna i den thailändska huvudstaden. Nu ber Bangkoks guvernör om hjälp för att hantera situationen: – Snälla, ge mig råd.

1h

Beto O’Rourke Stopped Raising Money Months Ago

Beto O’Rourke would have two major advantages if he jumps into the presidential race: a virtuoso feel for social media that has made him a viral sensation, and an eye-popping ability to raise massive amounts of money. Since losing his Senate race against Ted Cruz last fall, he’s been showing up on Facebook Live and in Medium posts talking about a road trip he took through the Midwest, recounting

1h

New Evidence: E-Cigarettes Help Smokers Quit

Trendy Intervention When e-cigarettes first hit the market, two camps emerged. Some argued that the handheld vapes would help heavy smokers ease off of cigarettes, but others worried that fun-flavored e-cigs could get more people hooked on nicotine . Now there’s scientific evidence that says e-cigarettes not only make it easier to quit smoking than going cold-turkey, but also that a higher percen

1h

How machine learning could keep dangerous DNA out of terrorists' hands

How machine learning could keep dangerous DNA out of terrorists' hands How machine learning could keep dangerous DNA out of terrorists' hands, Published online: 31 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00277-9 Sophisticated algorithms could help DNA-synthesis companies avoid making dangerous organisms on demand.

1h

Feeding tubes shouldn't be on POLST forms: JAGS opinion paper

Following years of research that demonstrated feeding tubes can harm patients with dementia, the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society has published an OHSU opinion paper recommending patient preference for feeding tubes be excluded from Physician Order for Life-Sustaining Treatment, or POLST, forms. The paper was published after Oregon became the first state to remove the feeding tube sectio

1h

How government programs could boost recovery after financial crisis

Changing the way government loan programs programs assess risk may ease taxpayer burden and better prepare the country for extreme economic events, researchers argue. “There’s a debate among policy makers and academics over what is the best method for the government to report and account for the credit risks that the government takes on with insurance programs—like FHA insurance programs, Fannie

1h

Scubalike technology could suck carbon dioxide from smokestacks

Technique could be 24% more energy efficient than an industry standard method

1h

How the fruit fly got its stripes: Researchers explore precision of embryonic development

The first moments of life unfold with incredible precision. Now, using mathematical tools and the help of fruit flies, researchers at Princeton have uncovered new findings about the mechanisms behind this precision.

2h

Neandertal Spears Were Surprisingly Deadly

Javelin throwers chucking replicas of Neandertal spears were able to hit targets farther away, and with greater force than previously thought to be possible. Christopher Intagliata reports.

2h

How the fruit fly got its stripes: Researchers explore precision of embryonic development

The first moments of life unfold with incredible precision. Now, using mathematical tools and the help of fruit flies, researchers at Princeton have uncovered new findings about the mechanisms behind this precision.

2h

Elon Musk: Teslas Should Have “Full Self-Driving” by End of 2019

Full Self-Driving On Wednesday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk said that he expects the company’s electric vehicles to be capable of fully autonomous driving by the end of 2019. “When will we think it’s safe for full self-driving?” he asked during an earnings call, according to Business Insider . “It’s probably towards the end of this year, and then it’s up to regulators to decide when they want to approve

2h

Membraneless protocells could provide clues to formation of early life

Membraneless assemblies of positively- and negatively-charged molecules can bring together RNA molecules in dense liquid droplets, allowing the RNAs to participate in fundamental chemical reactions. These assemblies, called "complex coacervates," also enhance the ability of some RNA molecules themselves to act as enzymes—molecules that drive chemical reactions. They do this by concentrating the RN

2h

Earth's largest extinction event likely took plants first

New evidence from the cliffsides of Australia suggests that Earth's largest extinction event — a volcanic cataclysm occurring roughly 252 million years ago — extinguished plant life long before many animal counterparts.

2h

The Unstoppable Spread of Lethal Drones

Six years ago, I argued that the United States had been shortsighted in its decision to fund a lethal drone industry and to normalize the weapon’s use. Inevitably, the approach would hasten the proliferation of lethal drones. “Our military is the strongest in the world,” I argued at the time. “The gap between our Air Force and the next best is huge. In the short term, our near monopoly on drones

2h

Deep-sea mining could wreck the last unexplored ecosystem on Earth

As mining firms begin tests to pick up metal ores from the Pacific seabed, we need rules to protect this unusual ecosystem, says Olive Heffernan

2h

Game day gadgets you'll be happy to have all year round

Gadgets There are zero football-shaped dip bowls on this list. Super Bowl gadgets that you'll be happy to have on game day as well as all year round.

2h

Explainer: What is a quantum computer?

How it works, why it’s so powerful, and where it’s likely to be most useful first

2h

Fler poliser i Jakobsberg efter dödskjutningen

Ännu har ingen gripits för onsdagens mord på en man i Jakobsberg. Efter fem mord eller mordförsök på kort tid sätter polisen nu in särskilda trygghetsskapande åtgärder i området.

2h

Until Relatively Recently, Giant Pandas Ate Much More Than Bamboo

Pandas are picky eaters. The conservation icons live off a nearly exclusive diet of bamboo. Now, researchers have shown that ancient pandas once had a much broader palette and lived in a wider region. The discovery overturns a long-held belief that while pandas descended from meat-eating animals, they have been dining on bamboo for millions of years. “It has been widely accepted that giant pandas

2h

Virus lurking inside banana genome has been destroyed with CRISPR

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

2h

2h

2h

The Cost of Self-Driving Cars Will Be the Biggest Barrier to Their Adoption

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

2h

Huge Hole Discovered beneath Fast-Melting Antarctic Glacier

Ice in the hole disappeared in the last three years, worrying scientists about future ice loss — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Neandertal Spears Were Surprisingly Deadly

Javelin throwers chucking replicas of Neandertal spears were able to hit targets farther away, and with greater force than previously thought to be possible. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Ryssland hotar blockera norsk nyhetssajt

Ryska myndigheter hotar att blockera den norska nyhetssajten Barents Observer om inte en artikel om en homosexuell same avpubliceras. Chefredaktören Thomas Nilsen vägrar och tycker att det är skrämmande att rysk censur försöker påverka fria medier i ett grannland.

2h

Beyond Good or Bad: Searching For a Diet That Balances The Many Kinds of Fat

Public health guidelines, such as the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, have long emphasized reducing dietary fat intake, but nutritionists and other health scientists now have more recent evidence that not all fats have adverse effects. Dietary fats differ with regard to their effects on health and risk for chronic diseases, particularly in regard to effects on risk for heart disease. Indeed, som

2h

One Time America Thought About Nuking the Moon, and a Few Times Humans Smashed Things Into It Anyway

The 1950s were a bizarre period in American history. An economic boom brought joy to a generation home from war, and also harbored a strange level of distrust, of enemies both internal and external, in a nation not quite at war, but not quite at peace either. Technology was advancing in leaps and bounds, and the Space Race between the United States and the Soviet Union was underway. To America's d

2h

2h

Identity crisis of satiety neurons leads to obesity

Obesity — as research in the past decade has shown — is first and foremost a brain disease. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München, partners in the German Center for Diabetes Research, have now discovered a molecular switch that controls the function of satiety neurons and therefore body weight. The findings were published in the journal Nature Metabolism.

2h

UMD study finds exercise benefits brains, changes blood flow in older adults

Exercise training alters brain blood flow and improves cognitive performance in older adults, though not in the way you might think. A new study published by University of Maryland School of Public Health researchers in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease showed that exercise was associated with improved brain function in a group of adults diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and a decrea

2h

Imperceptible movements guide juvenile zebra finch song development

New research from Cornell University shows zebra finches engage in socially guided vocal learning, where they learn their songs by watching their mothers' reactions to their immature songs.

2h

Medical experts restore movement and autonomic function in patients with complete paralysis

There are more than 290,000 people estimated to be living in the United States with a spinal cord injury. Previously, it has been shown that it is possible to restore some function to young and healthy patients within a few years of injury. Now, researchers show spinal cord stimulation can immediately restore some voluntary movement and autonomic functions such as cardiovascular, bowel, and bladde

2h

Hubble fortuitously discovers a new galaxy in the cosmic neighborhood

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to study some of the oldest and faintest stars in the globular cluster NGC 6752 have made an unexpected finding. They discovered a dwarf galaxy in our cosmic backyard, only 30 million light-years away. The finding is reported in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.

2h

Mean streets: Self-driving cars will 'cruise' to avoid paying to park

If you think traffic in city centers is bad now, just wait until self-driving cars emerge on the scene, cruising around to avoid paying hefty downtown parking fees.

2h

How the fruit fly got its stripes: Researchers explore precision of embryonic development

A team at Princeton found that early steps in fruit fly development occur according to a mathematically optimal process. The findings provide evidence that biological events can be predicted from theoretical principles.

2h

Climate change and infertility — a ticking time bomb?

Rising temperatures could make some species sterile and see them succumb to the effects of climate change earlier than currently thought, scientists at the University of Liverpool warn.

2h

New computational method reduces risk of drug formulation

A team of researchers has developed a new method to calculate and predict how drug molecules in molecular crystals arrange themselves under changing energetic conditions. For pharmaceutical companies, this approach could be used to avoid expensive development failures, production errors, and potential litigation.

2h

Medical cannabis relieves symptoms in children with autism

Overall, after six months of treatment, 30 percent of patients reported a significant improvement, 53.7 percent reported moderate improvement, and only 15 percent had slight or no change. Quality of life, mood and ability to perform activities of daily living were assessed prior to treatment and at six months. Good quality of life was reported by 31.3 percent of patients prior to treatment initiat

2h

Self-taught robot figures out what it looks like and what it can do

A robot started off with no knowledge of itself, but through trial and error learned what it looked like and what abilities it had

2h

What Is Coral Bleaching?

Nature's red flag is the eerie white glow of one of the ocean's most biologically rich ecosystems.

2h

The Coming Democratic Drama Over Medicare for All

As more Democrats propose moving beyond the Affordable Care Act, the party may be steaming toward the same iceberg that sank Republican efforts to repeal the law. The GOP’s drive to rescind the ACA ran aground in part because it pitted the party’s predominant ideology against the material interests of its changing electoral coalition. The growing liberal discussion about replacing the ACA with a

2h

We Need to Stop Drug-Resistant Malaria at Its Source, Right Now

Immediate, targeted interventions in Southeast Asia could prevent a pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Tesla Plans to Mass-Produce the Model Y SUV Next Year

Round Five Tesla is gearing up to mass-produce its fifth vehicle, an electric SUV called the “Model Y.” The carmaker sent a letter to shareholders on Wednesday saying Tesla would switch on the assembly line for the Model Y, which has been in the works since 2015 , before the end of 2020, according to TechCrunch — and it’ll complete a cheeky joke hidden in the company’s model identifiers. Learning

2h

Actually, “It’s Colder than Mars” Could be True Year-Round

Cold Snap Record-smashing cold temperatures have led to a wave of headlines highlighting how parts of the U.S. are now colder than Mars. In parts of media, this is now a near-yearly ritual: The Atlantic had a story on it in 2017, and even NASA’s Curiosity Rover tweeted it a few winters ago. But what does “colder than Mars” really mean? Does it mean your friends in the Midwest — assuming they surv

2h

17-åring i bil gripen för misstänkt mordförsök mot poliser

Polisen har gripit en 17-årig pojke misstänkt för mordförsök efter att han ska ha försökt köra på två poliser i Östra Göinges kommun i Skåne.

2h

”Bingohallarna betyder mycket för mig och många andra”

Landets bingohallar går mot en oviss framtid efter den nya spelskatten. Platsen har kommit att spela en viktig roll för många äldre och ensamma människor. – Samvaron betyder enormt mycket, säger Britt Högdahl, 81 år.

2h

Bingohallarna pressas efter nya spellagen

Den nya spellagen pressar bingohallarna och flera kan gå under när de viktiga Vegasmaskinerna skattebeläggs. I slutändan kan svenskt föreningsliv gå miste om miljontals kronor. – Spelutredningen hann inte med oss, säger Patrick Hämquist, ordförande i bingohallarnas centralorganisation Svebico.

2h

We Tried 5 Cold-Weather Experiments. Instant Slushies, Frozen Bubbles and More.

With schools closed and temperatures well below zero, one family learned some hard lessons about the scientific process.

2h

Salmon populations may adapt their eggs to survive in degraded rivers

A new study suggests that the membrane of salmon eggs may evolve to cope with reduced oxygen levels in rivers, thereby helping their embryos to incubate successfully.

2h

How the immune system protects us against bowel cancer

Researchers have discovered a protective mechanism which is used by the body to protect intestinal stem cells from turning cancerous. The body's innate immune system was found to play a pivotal role in this regard. The researchers were able to demonstrate that, rather than having a purely defensive role, the immune system is crucial in maintaining a healthy body.

2h

Ancient pandas weren't exclusive bamboo eaters, bone evidence suggests

The giant pandas we know and love today live only in the understory of particular mountains in southwestern China, where they subsist on bamboo alone. But according to new evidence, extinct and ancient panda species most likely had a more varied and complex diet.

2h

Fasting ramps up human metabolism, study shows

Research uncovers previously unknown effects of fasting, including notably increased metabolic activity and possible anti-aging effects.

2h

Australian plants facing extinction

New research by the Threatened Species Recovery Hub has identified the top 100 Australian plant species at risk of extinction. Three quarters of Australia's threatened species are plants.

2h

Male mice hard-wired to recognize sex of other mice

A male mouse identifies the sex of an unfamiliar mouse because of hard-wired brain physiology, not previous experience, investigators have found.

2h

Foresight presentation structure help

Hey guys, I’m making a presentation on foresight (which I’m still new to) with the use of the golden circle structure. But I’d love some advice since I’m limited to 25 slides. So far I have Why? – change – Vuca context – example How? – foresight 1. Systems 2. Futures 3. Tools What? (Project I’m working on) Walkthrough. I’d love to talk with someone who has a better handle of this than I do. submi

2h

2h

2h

H&M:s vd om klimatet: ”Vi ska inte sluta konsumera”

När kunderna vill ha hem kläder som beställs utan fördröjning ökar kraven på de pressade modekedjorna. Samtidigt är snabbmodet utskällt i klimatdebatten. H&M:s vd Karl-Johan Persson ser inte minskad konsumtion som lösningen på problemet.

2h

For older people, medications are common; AGS Beers Criteria aims to make them appropriate, too

The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today unveiled its latest update to one of geriatrics' most frequently cited reference tools: The AGS Beers Criteria® for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults. A compendium of medications potentially to avoid or consider with caution because they often present an unfavorable balance of benefits and harms for older people, the AGS Beers Crit

2h

Graphene crinkles can be used as 'molecular zippers'

New research shows that electrically charged crinkles in layered graphene can be useful in the directed self- assembly of molecules.

2h

Membraneless protocells could provide clues to formation of early life

Membraneless protocells allow RNAs to participate in fundamental chemical reactions, providing clues to early steps in origin of life on earth.

2h

The search for environmental causes of Parkinson's disease moves forward

Environmental factors are widely believed to play a key role in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD), but little is known about specific environmental triggers. Writing in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, scientists review novel research hypotheses and approaches that may help better define the role of environment in the development of PD, especially before a diagnosis can be made based

2h

Bitter rapeseed

Rapeseed doesn't just contain oil but high-quality protein, too. However, protein extracts from rapeseed have an intense, bitter off-taste. A team led by food chemist Thomas Hofmann has now identified the substance that is pivotal for the bitter taste. This is a first step towards developing rapeseed for the human protein supply.

2h

Survivors of a firearm injury at risk for subsequent hospitalizations

Ten percent of firearm injury survivors will be readmitted to the hospital for further treatment within 90 days of their original injuries.

2h

We Need to Stop Drug-Resistant Malaria at Its Source, Right Now

Immediate, targeted interventions in Southeast Asia could prevent a pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Study: Quitting Facebook Makes You Less Politically Polarized

Quitting Facebook There are plenty of reasons to give Facebook the boot, from privacy to concerns about political manipulation . But according to a new study , there may be further benefits to quitting Facebook. Researchers from Stanford University and New York University found that deactivating Facebook helped some users reduce their online activity, increase offline activities including sociali

2h

Giant Void Hidden Under Antarctica’s Ice Threatens Vast Glacier

There's a giant void hiding under the Antarctic ice, and it's growing larger and more menacing by the day, a new study using satellite data finds.

2h

When the structure of tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) challenges the very concept of cell

Cells in our bodies have the ability to speak with one another much like humans do. This communication allows organs in our bodies to work synchronously, which in turn, enables us to perform the remarkable range of tasks we meet on a daily basis. One of this mean of communication is 'tunneling nanotubes' or TNTs. Researchers have discovered that the structure of these nanotubes challenged the very

2h

Children exposed to air pollution at school may be at greater risk of overweight and obesity

Exposure to air pollution, particularly at school, could be associated with a higher risk of overweight and obesity during childhood.

2h

High-dose radiation therapy improves long-term survival in patients with stage-IV cancers, trial finds

The first report from a phase II, multi-center clinical trial indicates that a newer, more aggressive form of radiation therapy — stereotactic radiation — can extend long-term survival for some patients with stage-IV cancers while maintaining their quality of life.

2h

Risk aversion rises with violent crime

Fear in the wake of violent conflicts causes people to take fewer risks, which may come at the expense of bettering their lives and the economy. Researchers looked at longitudinal survey data taken before and after the onset of the Mexican war on drugs and found a causal link between the fear of violence and its impact on the risk-taking attitudes of individuals living in affected communities.

2h

Evolutionary history of baboons

Life on earth is complex and diverse. In the course of evolution, more and more new species have emerged that are adapted to constantly changing environments. Using modern genetic analyses, researchers can now fully decipher the genetic information of organisms in order to better understand their evolutionary histories and adaptations.

2h

What causes rats without a Y chromosome to become male?

A look at the brains of an endangered spiny rat off the coast of Japan could illuminate the subtle genetic influences that stimulate a mammal's cells to develop as male versus female in the absence of a Y chromosome.

2h

Mario Kart mobile delayed until summer 2019

Nintendo announces the Mario Kart Tour app will be delayed until summer 2019.

2h

Sverige möter Kazakstan i VM-semi

Det blev 22–1 häromdagen. Nu ska Sverige möta Kazakstan igen, i VM-semifinal på fredagskvällen. Kazakstan slog Norge med 4–1 i torsdagens kvartsfinal.

3h

The Arrival Of 5G Will Unlock The Full Potential Of VR And AR

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

3h

Sös: Sexbrottsåtalad läkare kan få jobba kvar

Krisen på Södersjukhusets akutmottagning fördjupas. Den sexbrottsåtalade läkaren kan få arbeta kvar och verksamhetschefen som anklagas för att ha läckt visselblåsares namn hävdar sin oskuld. En tidigare anställd fick även jobba kvar i 16 månader efter att ha dömts för grov kvinnofridskränkning.

3h

Dynamic aspirin — molecular vibrations drive electrons over large distances

Aspirin is not only an important drug but also an interesting physics model system in which molecular vibrations and electrons are coupled in a particular way. For the first time, X-ray experiments in the ultrashort time domain make electron motions visible in real time. They demonstrate that very small atomic displacements shift electrons over much larger distances within the aspirin molecules.

3h

Quantum sensors providing magnetic resonance with unprecedented sensitivity

A piece of work involving international collaboration and the participation of the Quantum Technologies for Information Science (QUTIS) group of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry, has produced a series of protocols for quantum sensors that could allow images to be obtained by means of the nuclear magnetic resonance of single biomolecules using a minimal amount of radiation. The result

3h

Salmon populations may adapt their eggs to survive in degraded rivers

A University of Southampton study suggests that the membrane of salmon eggs may evolve to cope with reduced oxygen levels in rivers, thereby helping their embryos to incubate successfully.

3h

How the immune system protects us against bowel cancer

Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered a protective mechanism which is used by the body to protect intestinal stem cells from turning cancerous. The body's innate immune system was found to play a pivotal role in this regard. The researchers were able to demonstrate that, rather than having a purely defensive role, the immune system is crucial in maintaining a health

3h

Being Trapped Indoors Is the Worst

In January 2011, I got iced into my parents’ house in suburban Atlanta for what felt like 15 years, but was actually one week. The metro area was paralyzed by a storm unprecedented in its recorded history: A rare heavy snow was immediately followed by a stretch of finger-numbing cold. The combination plunged the area into a cycle of modest daytime melts and overnight freezes that left millions of

3h

Congress Just Wants to Be Left Alone

The group of bipartisan lawmakers tasked with reaching a deal on border security has only just begun its work. But as President Donald Trump’s border-wall demands hang over the deliberations like a storm cloud, members seem to have agreed on one fundamental principle: They’d like to be left alone. Asked by reporters on Wednesday whether he would prefer that Trump not get involved in the negotiati

3h

When the structure of tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) challenges the very concept of cell

Cells in our bodies have the ability to speak with one another much like humans do. This communication allows organs in our bodies to work synchronously, which in turn, enables us to perform the remarkable range of tasks we meet on a daily basis. One of this mean of communication is 'tunneling nanotubes' or TNTs. Researchers have discovered that the structure of these nanotubes challenged the very

3h

Citizen scientists discover pinhead-sized beetle in Borneo

No more than 10 curious non-professionals with a passion for nature is all it takes to find a new species of minute beetle in the tropical leaf litter, shows a recent expedition to the Ulu Temburong forest in Borneo.

3h

Hurricane Katrina's aftermath included spike in heart disease hospitalizations

Hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease rose precipitously in Orleans and Jefferson parishes after Hurricane Katrina. The increase in rates lasted for more than one month after landfall and rates were higher among the older black population, compared to the older white population.

3h

Crossbreeding threatens conservation of endangered milky storks

A team of researchers has discovered that the conservation of milky storks, an endangered wading bird native to Southeast Asia, is threatened due to crossbreeding with their more widespread cousins, the painted storks. The team's findings can contribute to the design of effective solutions for conservation management of the globally endangered species.

3h

Treatment for obesity and fatty liver disease may be in reach

Researchers have discovered 27 new molecules. These molecules all activate a special protein called PPAR-delta and have the potential to treat fatty liver disease, obesity, diabetic nephrotoxicity, and to heal wounds.

3h

Computational algorithm to reduce electromagnetic noise in electronic circuits developed

Two researchers have developed an algorithm for numerical calculation of EM noise (interference) in electric circuits. This algorithm is for computer simulation of electric circuits in which transmission lines are connected with lumped element models.

3h

Scientists shed light on processes behind age-related decline in brain structures

Aging can cause damage to support cells in the white matter, which in turn may lead to damage in the grey matter of the hippocampus, finds a new study.

3h

Adorable Clip of Tiger Cubs Learning to Wrestle Will Melt Your Heart on This 'Arctic' Day

They might look cute and helpless now, but someday, these tiger cubs will be able to rip their prey to pieces.

3h

In Photos: The Tigers of India's Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve

Meet Raj Bhera and her adorable cubs.

3h

Daily briefing: Learn to take exceptional scientific photos

Daily briefing: Learn to take exceptional scientific photos Daily briefing: Learn to take exceptional scientific photos, Published online: 31 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00409-1 You only need a mobile phone or a flatbed scanner. Plus: Neanderthals and Denisovans lived together in Denisova Cave and how Hollywood can get climate change right.

3h

Battle over when giant pandas started their bamboo diet heats up

Battle over when giant pandas started their bamboo diet heats up Battle over when giant pandas started their bamboo diet heats up, Published online: 31 January 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00301-y Switch to such restricted fare probably happened thousands of years ago, not millions, as some research has suggested.

3h

9 weird and terrifying monsters from Japanese mythology

Compared to Japan's menagerie of creatures, Western folklore can feel a little drab. The collection of yōkai —supernatural beasts or spirits—has a staggering amount of variety. Although there are many more creative folkloric creatures, here are nine that caught our attention. None Like any culture, Japan has its fair share of folkloric creatures. But to Westerners, whose folklore tends to recycle

3h

6 Movies That Show How Sundance Could Save Hollywood

Early reports that the streaming boom at Sundance was over were greatly exaggerated. At least that’s true for Amazon, which has made several eight-figure purchases at this year’s festival, muscling its way back into the film market after a quieter year and a transition in leadership. Though Netflix has yet to make a big buy, Apple recently sealed its first deal , picking up the coming-of-age film

3h

U.S., China take the lead in race for artificial intelligence: U.N.

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

3h

Effectively collecting tiny droplets for biomedical analysis and beyond

In a single sneeze or a cough, as many as 40,000 tiny droplets are forcibly propelled from our mouth and nose into the air. While we cannot control our sneezing, researchers from City University of Hong Kong's (CityU) have recently developed an original method to collect micro-droplets, such as these precious human dewdrops, which may shed light on applications in detecting disease-causing bacteri

3h

A new approach to peripheral nerve injury?

The lab of neuroscientist Michael Costigan, Ph.D., at Boston Children's Hospital is studying how the body's immune system breaks down damaged peripheral nerves. Their latest research, published in Cell, changes our understanding of neuropathic pain and how to treat it.

3h

Opposite effect: Protein widely known to fight tumors also boosts cancer growth

UC San Diego researchers studying p53, the heralded cancer-fighting 'guardian of the genome,' found that the human protein also plays a role in promoting tumors, in addition to suppressing them. They found that the PUMA protein works inside the cell's mitochondria to switch energy production processes and stimulate cancer growth.

3h

An unexpected mode of action for an antibody

Studies of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from survivors of coronavirus-induced severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle-East respiratory syndrome (MERS) are unveiling surprising immune defense tactics against fatal viruses. Atomic and molecular information about the workings of the highly potent antibodies may provide insights to prevent these serious and sometimes deadly lung inf

3h

Tweaking of hormone-producing cells in the intestine

Researchers from the group of Hans Clevers at the Hubrecht Institute (KNAW) in the Netherlands and their collaborators shed new light on the origin and function of hormone producing cells in the intestine and open new avenues to tweak gut hormone production to treat human disease. Their results were recently published in Nature Cell Biology and in Cell.

3h

Skin cancer can spread in mice by hijacking the immune system

Scientists have uncovered molecules released by invasive skin cancer that reprogram healthy immune cells to help the cancer to spread.

3h

Bacteria promote lung tumor development, study suggests

MIT cancer biologists have discovered a mechanism that lung tumors exploit to promote their own survival: The tumors alter bacterial populations within the lung, provoking the immune system to create an inflammatory environment that in turn helps the tumor cells to proliferate.

3h

Cell lines deserve unique considerations when creating research protections, authors say

New rules recently went into effect, seeking to protect patients who donate tissue samples for research in the age of genetic sequencing. But this rule could have unintended consequences for certain critical types of biospecimens.

3h

Commonly used anti-rejection drug could be repurposed to treat some liver cancers

Research in animal models suggest that liver cancers with a mutation in the β-catenin gene could respond to treatment with rapamycin, a commonly used immunosupressant.

3h

Researchers discover method to 'turn off' mutated melanoma

Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and notorious for its resistance to conventional chemotherapy. Approximately 25 percent of melanoma is driven by oncogenic mutations in the NRAS gene, making it a very attractive therapeutic target. However, despite decades of research, no effective therapies targeting NRAS have been forthcoming.

3h

Rigs to reefs

Offshore oil platforms have an immense presence, physically, financially and environmentally. Some 6,000 rigs pump petroleum and natural gas worldwide. But as they extract hydrocarbons from deep beneath the sea, these structures undergo a transformation invisible from above the waves. The ocean claims the platforms' enormous substructures and converts them into vertical reefs, home to millions of

3h

Researchers uncover intracellular longevity pathway

Researchers discovered an intracellular pathway that promotes health and longevity in the worm C. elegans.

3h

Learning new vocabulary during deep sleep

Researchers of the University of Bern, Switzerland, showed that we can acquire the vocabulary of a new language during distinct phases of slow-wave sleep and that the sleep-learned vocabulary could be retrieved unconsciously following waking. Memory formation appeared to be mediated by the same brain structures that also mediate wake vocabulary learning.

3h

Cells find their identity using a mathematically optimal strategy

Our bodies are made of many different types of cells arranged in a precise spatial pattern that gives rise to properly formed and well-functioning tissues and organs. But how do genetically identical cells in an organism find out which of these cell types they should become? Researchers, including Gašper Tkačik at IST Austria, have now shown that expression levels of four genes, so-called gap gene

3h

Discovery points to innovative new way to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have discovered a new way to treat the loss of muscle function caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy in animal models of the disease. As reported in Cell Stem Cell, the team restored muscle stem cell function that is impaired in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, resulting in efficient regeneration of the muscle and preventing the progressi

3h

Male mice hard-wired to recognize sex of other mice, Stanford study finds

A male mouse identifies the sex of an unfamiliar mouse because of hard-wired brain physiology, not previous experience, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have found.

3h

Carbon-capture technology scrubs CO2 from power plants like scuba-diving gear

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have developed a process that removes CO2 from coal-burning power plant emissions in a way that is similar to how soda lime works in scuba diving rebreathers. Their research, published Jan. 31 in the journal Chem, offers an alternative but simpler strategy for carbon capture and requires 24 percent less energy than indus

3h

Ancient pandas weren't exclusive bamboo eaters, bone evidence suggests

The giant pandas we know and love today live only in the understory of particular mountains in southwestern China, where they subsist on bamboo alone. But according to new evidence reported in Current Biology on Jan. 31, extinct and ancient panda species most likely had a more varied and complex diet.

3h

Pinpointing the cells that control the brain's memory flow

From the cab driver heading for Times Square to the commuter returning home on the freeway, we all carry maps in our head labeled with important locations. And a new Columbia study in mice shows that, by directing the delicate ebb-and-flow of brain activity, a small cluster of cells helps the brain's internal GPS remember which places matter most.

3h

Graphene crinkles create ‘molecular zippers’

Electrically charged crinkles in layered graphene can be useful in the directed self-assembly of molecules, research shows. A decade ago, scientists noticed something very strange happening when they dumped buckyballs—soccer ball-shaped carbon molecules—onto a certain type of multilayer graphene, a flat carbon nanomaterial. Rather than rolling around randomly like marbles on a hardwood floor, the

3h

Until Relatively Recently, Giant Pandas Ate Much More Than Bamboo

Pandas are picky eaters. The conservation icons live off a nearly exclusive diet of bamboo. Now, researchers have shown that ancient pandas once had a much broader palette and lived in a wider …

3h

Metro-arbejdet står stille: Risikoen for forsinkelse af Cityringen er »øget betydeligt«

Manglende bemanding og fremdrift på arbejdet med Cityringens stationer har øget risikoen for forsinkelse af projektet, lyder vurderingen fra Metroselskabet.

3h

3h

A new Harry Potter–themed cryptocurrency is like a more private version of Bitcoin

Grin, a strange new coin that runs on a technology called MimbleWimble, has captured the blockchain world’s imagination.

3h

Scuba-diving gear could help clean up carbon dioxide from power plants

Rebreathers allow scuba divers to stay underwater for hours by removing CO2 from their air supply, now the idea is being repurposed for carbon capture

3h

Matcher i Serie A ska stoppas för rasism – ”skrattretande” menar Salvini

Italiensk fotboll tar till nya åtgärder för att stoppa rasistiska yttringar under matcher. Efter två varningar ska lagen lämna planen. – Kom igen, det är skrattretande, tycker inrikesministern och vice statsministern Matteo Salvini.

3h

An unexpected mode of action for an antibody

Studies of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from survivors of coronavirus-induced severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle-East respiratory syndrome (MERS) are unveiling surprising immune defense tactics against fatal viruses. Atomic and molecular information about the workings of the highly potent antibodies may provide insights to prevent these serious and sometimes deadly lung inf

3h

Hubble fortuitously discovers a new galaxy in the cosmic neighbourhood

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to study some of the oldest and faintest stars in the globular cluster NGC 6752 have made an unexpected finding. They discovered a dwarf galaxy in our cosmic backyard, only 30 million light-years away. The finding is reported in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.

3h

Dark matter may not actually exist – and our alternative theory can be put to the test

Scientists have been searching for "dark matter" – an unknown and invisible substance thought to make up the vast majority of matter in the universe – for nearly a century. The reason for this persistence is that dark matter is needed to account for the fact that galaxies don't seem to obey the fundamental laws of physics. However, dark matter searches have remained unsuccessful.

3h

Superinsulators to become scientists' quark playgrounds

Scientists widely accept the existence of quarks, the elusive fundamental particles that make up protons and neutrons. But information about their properties is still lacking.

3h

Teen zebra finches seek moms’ approval for their new tunes

Female “fluff-ups” are first evidence of social learning in commonly studied songbirds

3h

Few open-access journals meet requirements of Plan S, study says

Smaller publishers may struggle to afford costs of satisfying open-access initiative’s rules

3h

What the heck is a frost quake?

Science Heard a big boom during a polar vortex? Here's what's up. Is it cold outside? Are you hearing loud booming sounds in the middle of the night? Don’t call the Ghostbusters—it’s probably just a frost quake.

3h

Citizen scientists discover pinhead-sized beetle in Borneo

How many citizen scientists does it take to discover a new species? A recent expedition to the Ulu Temburong forest in Borneo proved that you only need 10 enthusiasts with no professional training, yet fueled with curiosity and passion for the outdoors, to find a new beetle the size of a pinhead in leaf litter.

3h

You’re eating what?

Pandas haven’t always had a bamboo-only menu. Tanya Loos reports.

3h

Foundations Built for a General Theory of Neural Networks

When we design a skyscraper we expect it will perform to specification: that the tower will support so much weight and be able to withstand an earthquake of a certain strength. But with one of the most important technologies of the modern world, we’re effectively building blind. We play with different designs, tinker with different setups, but until we take it out for a test run, we don’t really

3h

Ancient asteroid impacts played a role in creation of Earth's future continents

The heavy bombardment of terrestrial planets by asteroids from space has contributed to the formation of the early evolved crust on Earth that later gave rise to continents – home to human civilization.

3h

Critical new clues about what goes awry in autistic brains

A team scientists has discovered important clues to what goes wrong in the brains of people with autism — a developmental disorder with no cure and for which scientists have no deep understanding of what causes it.

3h

Vaccination with Streptococcus mitis could protect against virulent sibling, Streptococcus pneumonia

Vaccinating laboratory mice with Streptococcus mitis bacteria prevents their virulent sibling, Streptococcus pneumoniae from infecting the mice. The research suggests that vaccination of humans with live S. mitis might offer protection from some of the many serotypes of S. pneumoniae that vaccines currently do not exist for. This pathogen is one of the most common causes of severe pneumonia, and c

3h

Researchers lay out the science and history behind transitioning old oil rigs into permanent reefs

Offshore oil platforms have an immense presence, physically, financially and environmentally. Some 6,000 rigs pump petroleum and natural gas worldwide. But as they extract hydrocarbons from deep beneath the sea, these structures undergo a transformation invisible from above the waves. The ocean claims the platforms' enormous substructures and converts them into vertical reefs, home to millions of

3h

Citizen scientists discover pinhead-sized beetle in Borneo

How many citizen scientists does it take to discover a new species? A recent expedition to the Ulu Temburong forest in Borneo proved that you only need 10 enthusiasts with no professional training, yet fueled with curiosity and passion for the outdoors, to find a new beetle the size of a pinhead in leaf litter.

3h

Achieving a balance: Animal welfare and conservation

In a paper recently published in the journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science, a team of researchers, animal care experts and veterinarians evaluate the balance between animal welfare and conservation needs for a number of rare species of native birds being raised in San Diego Zoo Global breeding centers in Hawaii. The paper shares the challenges and complexity of situations where the needs of an i

3h

Cells find their identity using a mathematically optimal strategy

Organisms are made of many types of cells arranged in a precise and reproducible spatial pattern that gives rise to properly formed and well-functioning tissues and organs. But how do genetically identical cells in an organism become differentiated? A team of researchers, including Gašper Tkačik at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), has now shown that in the developing

3h

Ancient pandas weren't exclusive bamboo eaters, bone evidence suggests

The giant pandas we know and love today live only in the understory of particular mountains in southwestern China, where they subsist on bamboo alone. In support of their tough and fibrous bamboo diet, they've got distinctive teeth, skull, and muscle characteristics along with a special pseudo-thumb, the better to grasp and hold bamboo stems, leaves, and shoots with. But according to new evidence

3h

Researchers uncover intracellular longevity pathway

The search for clues on how to live healthier, longer lives has led researchers at Baylor College of Medicine to look inside the cells of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans. The researchers report in the journal Developmental Cell the discovery of an intracellular pathway that mediates metabolic adjustments that promote health and longevity in the worm.

3h

An unexpected mode of action for an antibody

Studies of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from survivors of coronavirus-induced severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle-East respiratory syndrome (MERS) are unveiling surprising immune defense tactics against fatal viruses. Atomic and molecular information about the workings of the highly potent antibodies may provide insights to prevent these serious and sometimes deadly lung inf

3h

Male mice hard-wired to recognize sex of other mice, study finds

A male mouse identifies the sex of an unfamiliar mouse because of hard-wired brain physiology, not previous experience, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have found.

3h

Carbon-capture technology scrubs CO2 from power plants like scuba-diving gear

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have developed a process that removes CO2 from coal-burning power plant emissions in a way that is similar to how soda lime works in scuba diving rebreathers. Their research, published January 31 in the journal Chem, offers an alternative but simpler strategy for carbon capture and requires 24% less energy than industria

3h

Tweaking of hormone-producing cells in the intestine

Researchers from the group of Hans Clevers at the Hubrecht Institute (KNAW) in the Netherlands and their collaborators shed new light on the origin and function of hormone-producing cells in the intestine and open new avenues to tweak gut hormone production to treat human disease. Their results were recently published in Nature Cell Biology and in Cell.

3h

Giant pandas may have only recently switched to eating mostly bamboo

Giant pandas may have switched to an exclusive bamboo diet some 5,000 years ago, not 2 million years ago as previously thought.

3h

Deep learning hope and hype: MIT Technology Review’s Will Knight

Why researchers at the year’s biggest AI conference focused on how to keep human bias out of computer algorithms.

3h

Svenska kraftnät gav utländsk personal tillgång till styrsystem för elförsörjningen

Svenska kraftnät har gett utländska it-tekniker tillgång till system som styr drift och övervakning av stamnätet för el. Det har skett utan säkerhetsprövning enligt svensk lag. Systemet är klassat som av betydelse för rikets säkerhet. Genom systemet skulle teknikerna i praktiken kunna störa Sveriges elförsörjning.

3h

Achieving a balance: Animal welfare and conservation

In a paper recently published in the journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science, a team of researchers, animal care experts and veterinarians evaluate the balance between animal welfare and conservation needs for a number of rare species of native birds being raised in San Diego Zoo Global breeding centers in Hawaii. The paper shares the challenges and complexity of situations where the needs of an i

3h

Cells find their identity using a mathematically optimal strategy

Organisms are made of many types of cells arranged in a precise and reproducible spatial pattern that gives rise to properly formed and well-functioning tissues and organs. But how do genetically identical cells in an organism become differentiated? A team of researchers, including Gašper Tkačik at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), has now shown that in the developing

3h

Researchers uncover intracellular longevity pathway

The search for clues on how to live healthier, longer lives has led researchers at Baylor College of Medicine to look inside the cells of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans. The researchers report in the journal Developmental Cell the discovery of an intracellular pathway that mediates metabolic adjustments that promote health and longevity in the worm.

3h

Male mice hard-wired to recognize sex of other mice, study finds

A male mouse identifies the sex of an unfamiliar mouse because of hard-wired brain physiology, not previous experience, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have found.

3h

Tweaking of hormone-producing cells in the intestine

Researchers from the group of Hans Clevers at the Hubrecht Institute (KNAW) in the Netherlands and their collaborators shed new light on the origin and function of hormone-producing cells in the intestine and open new avenues to tweak gut hormone production to treat human disease. Their results were recently published in Nature Cell Biology and in Cell.

3h

Connective tissue on the wrong road — When organs start to scar

The increased deposition of connective tissue is a problem in chronic diseases of many organs such as the lungs (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), liver (cirrhosis), kidneys (kidney fibrosis), gut (graft versus host disease), and the skin (systemic sclerosis). Up to 40 percent of all deaths in industrial nations are caused by the deposition of connective tissue with subsequent tissue scarring. In sp

3h

A correlation found between psychiatric disorders and events during the prenatal stag

Particular genetic variants in the human genome that are important for the development of the brain early in the life of the foetus are frequently found in psychiatric disorders. This is shown by a study carried out by iPSYCH.

3h

Insecticide resistance genes affect vector competence for West Nile virus

In a context of overuse of insecticides, which leads to the selection of resistant mosquitoes, it is already known that this resistance to insecticides affects interactions between mosquitoes and the pathogens they transmit. Researchers from the Institut Pasteur (Paris) and its partners prove that mechanisms of insecticide resistance, observed in Culex quinquefasciatus vector, impact the transmiss

3h

Hurricane Katrina's aftermath included spike in heart disease hospitalizations

Hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease rose precipitously in Orleans and Jefferson parishes after Hurricane Katrina. The increase in rates lasted for more than one month after landfall and rates were higher among the older black population, compared to the older white population.

3h

Rewilding: Can it foster human coexistence with nature?

Rewilding may have the potential to drastically improve biodiversity but remains a highly controversial and divisive topic. A new book edited by scientists from ZSL (Zoological Society of London) and Utah State University aims to build common ground and show how rewilding can foster human coexistence with wildlife.

3h

2018 'worst year ever' for smartphone market: survey

Global smartphone sales saw their worst contraction ever in 2018, and the outlook for 2019 isn't much better, new surveys show.

3h

Robert Swan moves from interim to permanent CEO at IntelIntel Bob Swan R.

Intel is changing Robert Swan's status as interim CEO, to permanent.

3h

Rewilding: Can it foster human coexistence with nature?

Rewilding may have the potential to drastically improve biodiversity but remains a highly controversial and divisive topic. A new book edited by scientists from ZSL (Zoological Society of London) and Utah State University aims to build common ground and show how rewilding can foster human coexistence with wildlife.

3h

Certifying attack resistance of convolutional neural networks

When shopping for a watch, you may notice its water resistance rating, which indicates that the watch is warranted to be waterproof to a certain level. What about your neural network? Can one ensure a neural network is "attack proof", meaning that its functionality is robust against adversarial perturbations? If so, how can this be quantified with an attack resistance number? At AAAI 2019, our gro

4h

Så mäts synbarheten av vägmärken och vägmarkeringar

Äldre förare läser vägmärken på ungefär samma avstånd i både hel- och halvljus, medan yngre förare ser dem på längre avstånd med halvljus och kan generellt läsa på betydligt längre avstånd. För att utvärdera vägmärkens läsbarhet, så att det reflekterade ljuset varken är för intensivt eller för svagt, med hänsyn till bilförares variation i mörkerseende har man testat två sorters reflexmaterial. Ma

4h

Nätmobbning i ett gränslöst arbetsliv

Cybermobbning, eller nätmobbning, i arbetslivet är ganska vanligt. I digitala medier som e-post och SMS, eller sociala medier som exempelvis Facebook eller blogg ser mobbningen annorlunda ut än i det fysiska rummet. Det är också nya grupper som blir mobbade, allt oftare är det chefer och andra beslutsfattare som drabbas. Nätmobbning i arbetslivet är ett ganska outforskat ämne och ett relativt nyt

4h

Athletes can rest easy: Extreme exercise does not raise heart disease risk or mortality, study shows

High volumes of exercise are safe, even when coronary calcium levels are high, new research suggests.

4h

Females find social interactions to be more rewarding than males, study reveals

Females find same-sex social interactions to be more rewarding than males, and females are more sensitive to the rewarding actions of oxytocin than males, according to a new research on the brain mechanisms that determine the rewarding properties of social interactions.

4h

Superinsulators to become scientists' quark playgrounds

Scientists widely accept the existence of quarks, the elusive fundamental particles that make up protons and neutrons. But information about their properties is still lacking.

4h

Going for an MRI scan with tattoos?

Tattoos are increasingly popular. Every eighth person in Germany has already felt the sting of getting a tattoo. Yet, if tattooed people are to be examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the question often arises of how risky the procedure is for them. The first prospective study with statistically verifiable numbers has now been presented by a research team.

4h

How brain tumors escape the effects of antiangiogenic drugs

A study reveals details of a way the dangerous brain tumors called glioblastomas resist the effects of antiangiogenic drugs designed to cut off their blood supply, identifying what may be a new treatment target.

4h

Crustacean's dazzling light displays

Evolution is a rich and dynamic process. Species respond to pressures in a variety of ways, most of which reduce to finding food, avoiding becoming someone else's food and attracting a mate. To solve that last one the animal kingdom is replete with fantastic, bizarre and mesmerizing adaptions. The bioluminescent courtship displays of ostracods may encapsulate all three.

4h

The way we think about biological sex is wrong | Emily Quinn

Did you know that almost 150 million people worldwide are born intersex — with biology that doesn't fit the standard definition of male or female? (That's as many as the population of Russia.) At age 10, Emily Quinn found out she was intersex, and in this wise, funny talk, she shares eye-opening lessons from a life spent navigating society's thoughtless expectations, doctors who demanded she get

4h

4h

Politics this week

[no content]

4h

KAL’s cartoon

[no content]

4h

Business this week

[no content]

4h

Recent events highlight an unpleasant scientific practice: ethics dumping

Rich-world scientists conduct questionable experiments in poor countries

4h

The giant panda’s unusual diet may be the result of human pressure

Civilisation’s rise drove it into China’s bamboo forests

4h

A newly revived vaccine may deal a death blow to typhoid fever

It languished for 20 years for lack of development money

4h

4h

4h

Citizen scientists discover pinhead-sized beetle in Borneo

No more than 10 curious non-professionals with a passion for nature is all it takes to find a new species of minute beetle in the tropical leaf litter, shows a recent expedition to the Ulu Temburong forest in Borneo. Published in the open-access Biodiversity Data Journal, this is the latest discovery from Taxon Expeditions, an initiative that organizes regular scientific field trips to remote and

4h

Ancient asteroid impacts played a role in creation of Earth's future continents

The heavy bombardment of terrestrial planets by asteroids from space has contributed to the formation of the early evolved crust on Earth that later gave rise to continents – home to human civilization.

4h

When the structure of tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) challenges the very concept of cell

Cells in our bodies have the ability to speak with one another much like humans do. This communication allows organs in our bodies to work synchronously, which in turn, enables us to perform the remarkable range of tasks we meet on a daily basis. One of this mean of communication is 'tunneling nanotubes' or TNTs. In an article published in Nature Communications, researchers from the Institut Paste

4h

Scientists shed light on processes behind age-related decline in brain structures

Ageing can cause damage to support cells in the white matter, which in turn may lead to damage in the grey matter of the hippocampus, finds a new study by Cardiff University.

4h

Treatment for obesity and fatty liver disease may be in reach

Professor Amiram Goldblum and his team at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Institute for Drug Research have discovered 27 new molecules. These molecules all activate a special protein called PPAR-delta and have the potential to treat fatty liver disease, obesity, diabetic nephrotoxicity, and to heal wounds.

4h

Klart premiärdatum för Netflix första svenska originalserie

Den 5 april är det premiär för ”Störst av allt” på Netflix, som baseras på Malin Persson Giolitos roman med samma namn.

4h

New computational method reduces risk of drug formulation

One major factor that determines the efficacy of a drug is the structure that its molecules form in a solid state. Changed structures can entail that pills stop functioning properly and are therefore rendered useless.

4h

Top 10 Technologies to Learn in 2019

submitted by /u/MainBuilder [link] [comments]

4h

Embark Publishes First Disengagement Rates for Trucks

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

4h

Air-Filled Tent Lets Scuba Divers Camp Out Underwater

Cold Outside A new underwater tent can give divers a brief respite — the floating pocket of air could either let divers take a breather or help them prevent potentially dangerous cases of decompression sickness. The Ocean Space Habitat, recently patented by New York University researcher Winslow Burleson and National Geographic explorer Michael Lombardi, makes it possible for divers to stay under

4h

Sleep apnea creates gaps in life memories

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is estimated to affect over 936 million people worldwide, and people with OSA are known to suffer memory problems and depression. New research builds on the known links between depression and memory, finding that people with untreated OSA have problems recalling specific details about their lives.

4h

Environmentally stable laser emits exceptionally pure light

Researchers have developed a compact laser that emits light with extreme spectral purity that doesn't change in response to environmental conditions. The new potentially portable laser could benefit a host of scientific applications, improve clocks for global positioning (GPS) systems, advance the detection of gravitational waves in space and be useful for quantum computing.

4h

New knowledge could help predict and prevent depression

Researchers have demonstrated that people with the highest genetic propensity are over two and a half times as likely to be treated in a psychiatric hospital for depression compared to people with the lowest propensity. This knowledge could be utilized to strengthen preventative efforts for those who are at risk.

4h

Extreme rainfall events are connected around the world

An analysis of satellite data has revealed global patterns of extreme rainfall, which could lead to better forecasts and more accurate climate models.

4h

Babies who hear two languages at home develop advantages in attention

In the study, infants who are exposed to more than one language show better attentional control than infants who are exposed to only one language. This means that exposure to bilingual environments should be considered a significant factor in the early development of attention in infancy, the researchers say, and could set the stage for lifelong cognitive benefits.

4h

Filmsvepet, vecka 5: Ny engelsk skandal och "Koko-di-koko-da” på Sundance

DN Kultur samlar smånyheter från filmvärlden – från Hugh till Hugh. Från att Hugh Grants senaste succé följs upp till att man får sjunga med Hugh Jackman.

4h

Jared Leto arrangerar en europeisk ”Fyre festival”

Musikern och skådespelaren satsar på egen festival i lyxsegmentet.

4h

Will Cosmetic Surgery Make Me Happier?

Individuals who undergo cosmetic surgery expect to look better, but they also want to feel happier and more confident. Does it work? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Will Cosmetic Surgery Make Me Happier?

Individuals who undergo cosmetic surgery expect to look better, but they also want to feel happier and more confident. Does it work? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

4h

Filmrecension: ”Röjar-Ralf kraschar internet” – Charmigt radarpar sprider värme i kylig cyberrymd

Röjar-Ralf och Vanilja är ett varmt och livfullt äventyrspar i fartfyllda ”Röjar-Ralf kraschar internet”, men ibland blir den nya Disney-animationen lite för mekanisk, menar Mårten Blomkvist.

4h

Paradox Is Illuminating the Black Hole – Issue 68: Context

An Introduction to the Black Hole Institute Fittingly, the Black Hole Initiative (BHI) was founded 100 years after Karl Schwarzschild solved Einstein’s equations for general relativity—a solution that described a black hole decades before the first astronomical evidence that they exist. As exotic structures of spacetime, black holes continue to fascinate astronomers, physicists, mathematicians, p

4h

What Impossible Meant to Feynman – Issue 68: Context

I mpossible! The word resonated throughout the large lecture hall. I had just finished describing a revolutionary concept for a new type of matter that my graduate student, Dov Levine, and I had invented. The Caltech lecture room was packed with scientists from every discipline across campus. The discussion had gone remarkably well. But just as the last of the crowd was filing out, there arose a

4h

The Real Secret of Youth Is Complexity – Issue 68: Context

Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!” Henry David Thoreau exhorted in his 1854 memoir Walden , in which he extolled the virtues of a “Spartan-like” life. Saint Thomas Aquinas preached that simplicity brings one closer to God. Isaac Newton believed it leads to truth. The process of simplification, we’re told, can illuminate beauty, strip away needless clutter and stress, and help us focus on what r

4h

BDNF-VEGF interplay key to rapid antidepressant actions

A study by researchers at Yale University reveals a complex interplay of two different growth factors in the rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects of ketamine.

4h

Computational algorithm to reduce electromagnetic noise in electronic circuits developed

Two researchers at Osaka University developed an algorithm for numerical calculation of EM noise (interference) in electric circuits. This algorithm is for computer simulation of electric circuits in which transmission lines are connected with lumped element models.

4h

Scientists develop new recycling technology

Scientists of Ural Federal University of Ekaterinburg and Tyumen Industrial University (Russia) have proposed a new method for co-processing organic municipal solid waste (MSW) (food, plastic waste, scrap tires, etc.) with long residuum (tar).

4h

Crossbreeding threatens conservation of endangered milky storks: NUS study

A team of researchers led by Assistant Professor Frank Rheindt from the National University of Singapore has discovered that the conservation of milky storks, an endangered wading bird native to Southeast Asia, is threatened due to crossbreeding with their more widespread cousins, the painted storks. The team's findings can contribute to the design of effective solutions for conservation managemen

4h

Blood runs deep: Lab blood vessel model sheds light on angiogenesis

Researchers at the University of Tokyo and at CNRS in France revealed the importance of the molecule EGFL7 for angiogenesis and endothelial integrity using an artificially created blood vessel model called a microvessel-on-a-chip. They showed that EGFL7 knockdown in the endothelial cells forming this model resulted in reduced angiogenesis and impaired barrier function. This work suggested the valu

4h

Researchers breathe new life into COPD research using mouse models

Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers revealed that the immune cells basophils caused emphysema in mice with COPD-like features induced by intranasal administration of elastase. They showed that basophils, previously linked mainly to allergies and fighting parasites, initiated a cascade of reactions eventually leading to the release of excess MMP-12 and the destruction of alveolar

4h

Achieving a balance: Animal welfare and conservation

In a paper recently published in the journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science, a team of researchers, animal care experts and veterinarians evaluate the balance between animal welfare and conservation needs for a number of rare species of native birds being raised in San Diego Zoo Global breeding centers in Hawaii. The paper shares the challenges and complexity of situations where the needs of an i

4h

Sleep apnea creates gaps in life memories: Study

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is estimated to affect over 936 million people worldwide, and people with OSA are known to suffer memory problems and depression. New research builds on the known links between depression and memory, finding that people with untreated OSA have problems recalling specific details about their lives.

4h

UN University compares technologies that remove arsenic from groundwater

A UN University study compares for the first time the effectiveness and costs of many different technologies designed to remove arsenic from groundwater — a health threat to at least 140 million people in 50 countries.Released by UNU's Canadian-based Institute for Water, Environment and Health, the report draws on 31 peer-reviewed, comparable research papers published between 1996 and 2018, each

4h

Environmentally stable laser emits exceptionally pure light

Researchers have developed a compact laser that emits light with extreme spectral purity that doesn't change in response to environmental conditions. The new potentially portable laser could benefit a host of scientific applications, improve clocks for global positioning (GPS) systems, advance the detection of gravitational waves in space and be useful for quantum computing.

4h

Facebook at 15: It's not all bad, but now it must be good

It is almost too easy to bash Facebook these days. Nearly a third of Americans feel the country's most popular social media platform is bad for society. As the company approaches its 15th birthday, Americans rate its social benefit as better than Marlboro cigarettes, but worse than McDonald's.

4h

Expression of stop bands in forward volume spin waves

A research group led by assistant Professor Taichi Goto at Toyohashi University of Technology has, for the first time, demonstrated stop bands that prevent propagation of specific frequency components of forward volume spin waves. These are transmitted through magnetic insulators without the flow of current, and could be applied to the next generation of integrated circuits (ICs).

4h

Study reveals wildlife is abundant in Chernobyl

A scavenger study that used fish carcasses as bait provides additional evidence that wildlife is abundant in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, University of Georgia researchers said.

4h

Shark on UK plates highlights trade in endangered species

You could be unwittingly eating sharks that are on the brink of extinction, a study suggests.

4h

Vattenavvisande kemikalier i friluftskläder helt onödiga

I dag finns vattenavvisande alternativ för friluftskläder, som är bättre för miljön. Flera icke-fluorerade ämnen är i dag konkurrenskraftiga alternativ till fluorkemikalier när det gäller vattenavvisning. – Fram tills nyligen var fluorkemikalier (PFAS) det bästa alternativet för tillverkning av bra och hållbara friluftskläder. Men när trycket på att minska användningen av fluorkemikalier ökade me

4h

Endangered sharks being eaten in UK

Endangered species of hammerhead and dogfish are among the sharks being sold as food in the UK, researchers have revealed.

4h

Study reveals wildlife is abundant in Chernobyl

A scavenger study that used fish carcasses as bait provides additional evidence that wildlife is abundant in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, University of Georgia researchers said.

4h

Climate change and infertility – a ticking time bomb?

Rising temperatures could make some species sterile and see them succumb to the effects of climate change earlier than currently thought, scientists at the University of Liverpool warn.

4h

Apple’s Empty Grandstanding About Privacy

“We at Apple believe that privacy is a fundamental human right,” Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook, said in a privacy-conference keynote last year in Brussels. “But we also recognize that not everyone sees things as we do.” Cook was making an impassioned plea to end the technology industry’s collection and sale of user data. “This is surveillance,” he continued. “And these stockpiles of personal data serve o

4h

Kött från sjuka djur har ätits upp i Uppsala

14 kilo kött från sjuka djur har ätits upp på ett hotell i Uppsala. Det bekräftar Li Hermansson, livsmedelinspektör vid Stockholm stad. Ytterligare 80-90 kilo dåligt kött kan finnas i omlopp.

4h

Spelbolaget om sponsringsstoppet: Tråkigt att SVT fattat beslutet

Maria Casino sponsrar årets Melodifestival, vilket under veckan skapat en debatt kring spelbolagens reklam och sponsring i tv. Nu svarar Maria Casinos ägarbolag att deras närvaro under musiktävlingen enbart handlar om varumärkesbyggande.

4h

From deathtrap to lifesaver: The evolution of the carseat

Technology The first carseats were more about keeping kids corralled than protecting them in a crash. For squishy babies, cars present a fate worse than diaper rash. Securing kids during a ride took decades to perfect.

4h

Aarhus har fået nye bycykler: Selskab har store forventninger til 2019

Udlejningscyklerne fra Donkey Republic mangler stadig en tilladelse i København, men i Aarhus testes de som byens nye bycykler. Og selskabet er trods dalende brugertal tilfreds med den start, cyklerne har fået i det østjyske.

4h

Can the Sustainable Development Goals Be Measured By Satellite?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

4h

How to find Mayan ruins while sitting at your laptop

In the summer of 2014, Matthew Cardona was standing in a shed near his father's childhood home in Guatemala. The walls were lined with boxes and buckets filled with recently unearthed Mayan artifacts. He was shown intricate pottery and obsidian masks and knives. The items were being packed up and moved off site.

4h

Climate change and infertility – a ticking time bomb?

Rising temperatures could make some species sterile and see them succumb to the effects of climate change earlier than currently thought, scientists at the University of Liverpool warn.

4h

Uganda seizes 750 pieces of ivory, arrests two Vietnamese

Ugandan authorities have seized 750 pieces of ivory and thousands of pangolin scales being smuggled from neighboring South Sudan, the revenue agency said Thursday, in one of the largest seizures of wildlife contraband in the East African country.

4h

UN University compares technologies that remove arsenic from groundwater

A United Nations University study compares for the first time the effectiveness and costs of many different technologies designed to remove arsenic from groundwater—a health threat to at least 140 million people in 50 countries.

4h

2019 Mazda3 Review: The Luxurious Compact Sedan for Track Days

Mazda's compact sedan grows bigger inside with a sumptuous cockpit. The i-ActiveSense Driver safety suite (more complete than Honda, Toyota) is on most models. For fun-to-drive, this is the small sedan to take home with you. The post 2019 Mazda3 Review: The Luxurious Compact Sedan for Track Days appeared first on ExtremeTech .

4h

Uganda seizes 750 pieces of ivory, arrests two Vietnamese

Ugandan authorities have seized 750 pieces of ivory and thousands of pangolin scales being smuggled from neighboring South Sudan, the revenue agency said Thursday, in one of the largest seizures of wildlife contraband in the East African country.

4h

Handelskammaren: Hamnkonflikten riskerar att slå hårt mot företag

Parterna i den pågående hamnkonflikten har inte kommit närmare en lösning efter nya möten med medlarna. Nu varnar Västsvenska handelskammaren för att strejken kan slå hårt mot import– och exportberoende företag. – Det är redan kännbart och vi pratar om miljonbelopp, säger handelskammarens vd Johan Trouvé.

4h

Encapsulated protein oscillations cause dynamic membrane deformations in cells

Which criteria do a synthetically created cell have to meet to be considered alive? What are the minimal requirements for individual functions of such a cell?

4h

Dynamic aspirin – molecular vibrations drive electrons over large distances

Aspirin is not only an important drug, but also an interesting physics model system in which molecular vibrations and electrons are coupled in a particular way. For the first time, X-ray experiments in the ultrashort time domain make electron motions visible in real time. They demonstrate that very small atomic displacements shift electrons over much larger distances within the aspirin molecules.

4h

Text analysis of thousands of grant abstracts shows that writing style matters

Is there a financial relationship to what or how people communicate?

4h

Exploring the potential of tall timber buildings

University of Canterbury (UC) engineering doctoral candidate Justin Brown is guiding future timber core-wall design with his research, paving the way for eco-friendly, mid- to high-rise buildings.

4h

First private spacecraft shoots for the moon

"Moon of Israel" is an epic 1924 film from the golden era of silent movies, and helped launch the directing career of Michael Curtiz, of "Casablanca" fame. Sequels seldom live up to the original. But if Israel's plans to put a robotic lander on the moon in February 2019 can be considered a sequel, this new "Moon of Israel" mission, led by the nonprofit company SpaceIL, will be a blockbuster in its

4h

Photocurrent loss in particle interface quantified

With a growing global population will come increased energy consumption, and sustainable forms of energy sources such as solar fuels and solar electricity will be in even greater demand. And as these forms of power proliferate, the focus will shift to improved efficiency.

4h

Unik omröstning ökar öppenheten i EU

BRYSSEL. EU-parlamentet har röstat för att blir mer öppna och att framöver rapportera offentligt om sina möten med lobbyister. Omröstningen var hemlig, vilket är unikt i EU-sammanhang.

4h

Filmrecension: ”White boy Rick” är ett välspelat knarkdrama utan riktning

”White boy Rick” med Matthew McConaughey är ett välspelat knarkdrama från Detroit som dessvärre inte riktigt vet vart det ska ta vägen.

4h

Can the Sustainable Development Goals Be Measured by Satellite?

In 2015 the UN established 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be met by 2030. From universal access to clean water and education to gender equality and strong institutions, achieving the SDGs would mean a higher quality of life for people all over the world, and most importantly, for the poor and vulnerable. A handful of countries are on track to meet SDG targets , but many more are laggi

4h

Things We Loved in January, From Smart Glasses to Self-Lacing Shoes

Plus: Breville's $800 pizza oven, Fender's newest guitar, and a habit-breaking browser extension.

4h

Photo Gallery: Trippy Nocturnal Photos Capture Japan's Ever-Shifting Aura

Jean-Vincent Simonet's new book, 'In Bloom,' is anything but typical tourist shots.

4h

Virus lurking inside banana genome has been destroyed with CRISPR

A virus that inserts itself into the genome of a type of banana plagues plantations in Africa, but CRISPR gene editing can be used to eliminate the viral DNA

4h

Children exposed to air pollution at school may be at greater risk of overweight and obesity

Exposure to air pollution, particularly at school, could be associated with a higher risk of overweight and obesity during childhood

4h

What causes rats without a Y chromosome to become male?

A look at the brains of an endangered spiny rat off the coast of Japan by University of Missouri (MU) Bond Life Sciences Center scientist Cheryl Rosenfeld could illuminate the subtle genetic influences that stimulate a mammal's cells to develop as male versus female in the absence of a Y chromosome.

4h

High-dose radiation therapy improves long-term survival in patients with stage-IV cancers, trial finds

The first report from a phase II, multi-center clinical trial indicates that a newer, more aggressive form of radiation therapy — stereotactic radiation — can extend long-term survival for some patients with stage-IV cancers while maintaining their quality of life. The study is published in the January issue of International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics (Red Journal), the fl

4h

Rainfall extremes are connected across continents: Nature study

Extreme rainfall events in one city or region are connected to the same kind of events thousands of kilometers away, an international team of experts finds in a study now published in one of the world's leading scientific journals, Nature. They discovered a global connection pattern of extreme rainfall — this could eventually improve weather forecasts and hence help to limit damages and protect p

4h

Scientists Model How Prehistoric Shark Cut Through Prey With 'Scissor Jaws'

The 330-million-year-old species Edestus had one of the most unique bites in natural history

4h

AUH skal give Sundhedsstyrelsen flere oplysninger om gynækologisk onkologi

Bemanding af specialfunktioner inden for gynækologisk onkologi på Aarhus Universitetshospital skal beskrives mere præcist, mener Sundhedsstyrelsen.

4h

Pediatricians’ Group Says Spanking is Ineffective, Potentially Harmful

Guest blog by Brenda Patoine Photo: Shutterstock It’s official: spanking is out. Time-outs are in. That’s the lead message of a new policy statement from the largest pediatricians’ group, in its strongest warning yet against the use of spanking or other harsh punishments–ever–by parents and others charged with caring for children. It’s the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) first update to its

4h

Environmentally stable laser emits exceptionally pure light

Researchers have developed a compact laser that emits light with extreme spectral purity that doesn't change in response to environmental conditions. The new potentially portable laser could benefit a host of scientific applications, improve clocks for global positioning (GPS) systems, advance the detection of gravitational waves in space and be useful for quantum computing.

4h

Why outer suburbs lack inner city's 'third places': A partial defence of the hipster

One of the stark differences between neighbourhoods in the inner city and outer suburbs in Australia is the quality and type of retail offerings. Gentrifying inner-city suburbs – places like West End in Brisbane, Fitzroy in Melbourne and Newtown in Sydney – are characterised by independent owner-operated retail businesses. Busy "third places" such as cafes, bars and restaurants – where people spen

4h

Capturing carbon to fight climate change is dividing environmentalists

Environmental activists are teaming up with fresh faces in Congress to advocate for a Green New Deal, a bundle of policies that would fight climate change while creating new jobs and reducing inequality. Not all of the activists agree on what those policies ought to be.

4h

Risk aversion rises with violent crime

Fear in the wake of violent conflicts causes people to take fewer risks, which may come at the expense of bettering their lives and the economy.

4h

A first: Researchers quantify photocurrent loss in particle interface

With a growing global population will come increased energy consumption, and sustainable forms of energy sources such as solar fuels and solar electricity will be in even greater demand. And as these forms of power proliferate, the focus will shift to improved efficiency.

4h

Klart: Vranjes till Kristianstad

Nu är det officiellt att Ljubomir Vranjes kliver in som tränare för IFK Kristianstads handbollsherrar. Den nye tränaren presenterades på en presskonferens i dag, och ersätter Ola Lindgren.

4h

Health Startups’ Dark Secret: Most Don’t Publish Peer-Reviewed Research

Move Fast and Break Things Science, thankfully, is often a slow process. That’s especially true when it comes to medical and clinical research — there are multiple, rigorous steps before a new medication or treatment can hit the market. But startups move blisteringly fast, creating a philosophical incongruity for many healthtech ventures. Unfortunately, many of these startups are throwing caution

4h

Expert: Bill Gates Is “Completely Wrong” About Global Poverty

False Narrative On Jan. 19, billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates tweeted an infographic claiming that the percent of people living in extreme poverty dropped from 94 percent in 1820 to 10 percent today. “This is one of my favorite infographics,” Gates wrote. But according to anthropologist Jason Hickel, the narrative it presents is “completely wrong.” Numbers Crunched In an opinion piece publish

4h

Bizarre New Data Suggests That Dark Energy Is Getting Stronger

Dark Energy Physicists have long assumed that the mysterious force they call dark energy was a constant. But now, strange new observations from quasars suggest that it could be getting stronger over time. “We observed quasars back to just a billion years after the Big Bang, and found that the universe’s expansion rate up to the present day was faster than we expected,” University of Florence rese

4h

4h

New strategy fights hackers with ‘false hope’

A new method to fight hacking and cybersecurity threats uses artificial intelligence and psychology principles to give hackers false hope that they’re succeeding. With almost every online purchase, a person’s personal information—name, date of birth, and credit card number—is stored electronically often in the “cloud,” a network of internet servers. Now, as more people buy from online businesses,

4h

After mapping millions of galaxies, dark energy survey finishes data collection

For the past six years, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has been part of an international effort to create an unprecedented survey of distant galaxies and better understand the nature of dark energy—the mysterious force accelerating the expansion of the universe.

5h

Ancient asteroid impacts played a role in creation of Earth's continents

The heavy bombardment of terrestrial planets by asteroids from space has contributed to the formation of the early evolved crust on Earth.

5h

Video: Aircraft-inspecting suction robot successfully trialled

A prototype robot that uses intense suction to climb around the outside of aircraft and inspect them for damage has successfully been trialled at Cranfield University.

5h

Beach building is keeping the Atlantic Coast from going under

The artificial build-up of beaches is buffering the U.S. Atlantic coastline against the effects of sea level rise, but that benefit may not last as sand gets harder to come by in the coming decades.

5h

Nano-encapsulation technology enhances DHA absorption for early brain development

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) today announced the findings on its novel nano-encapsulation technology for optimising the maternal and fetal absorption of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The research, conducted by PolyU's Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology (ABCT), aimed to address the delivery and absorption issues of DHA that affect its potency and efficacy.

5h

Encapsulated protein oscillations cause dynamic membrane deformations in cells

Which criteria does a synthetically created cell have to meet to be considered alive? What are the minimal requirements for individual functions of such a cell?

5h

Biophotonics: In situ printing liquid superlenses to image butterfly wings and nanobiostructures

Nanostructures and natural patterns have long fascinated researchers in bioinspired materials engineering. Biological samples can be imaged and observed at the nanoscale using sophisticated analytical tools in materials science, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). While imaging methods contribute to the understanding of structures by revealing m

5h

Crime scene investigation technique offers a hard look at the traces that particles leave before fleeing the scene

Scientists solve neutrino mysteries by watching them interact with detectors—specifically, with the atomic nuclei in the detector material. Most of the time, a neutrino does not even shake hands with a nucleus. But when it does, the lightweight, neutral particle can transform into a charged particle and knock things out of the nucleus as it escapes—leaving a crime scene behind. Scientists at Fermi

5h

Riddle of a unique fish solved

A great mystery around a unique fish species — the Australian lungfish — has been solved.

5h

Pinpointing a cause of pigmentary glaucoma

An international team of researchers has identified a gene responsible for the onset of pigmentary glaucoma, which may lead to new therapies for the condition. It is the first time a cause of the disease has been identified.

5h

Atari master: New AI smashes Google DeepMind in video game challenge

A new breed of algorithms has mastered Atari video games 10 times faster than state-of-the-art AI, with a breakthrough approach to problem solving.

5h

Nano-encapsulation technology enhances DHA absorption for early brain development

Scientists have announced the findings on novel nano-encapsulation technology for optimizing the maternal and fetal absorption of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The research aimed to address the delivery and absorption issues of DHA that affect its potency and efficacy.

5h

Plastic in Britain's seals, dolphins and whales

Microplastics have been found in the guts of every marine mammal examined in a new study of animals washed up on Britain's shores.

5h

New knowledge could help predict and prevent depression

In a new study, researchers from the Danish iPSYCH project demonstrate that people with the highest genetic propensity are over two and a half times as likely to be treated in a psychiatric hospital for depression compared to people with the lowest propensity. This knowledge could be utilised to strengthen preventative efforts for those who are at risk.

5h

Estimation of technology level required for low-cost renewable hydrogen production

NIMS, the University of Tokyo and Hiroshima University jointly evaluated the economic efficiency of hydrogen production systems combining photovoltaic power generation and rechargeable batteries and estimated technology levels necessary for the systems to produce hydrogen at a globally competitive cost. The results obtained in this research may provide vital guidelines for pushing the intermittent

5h

How new species emerge

International research team reconstructs the evolutionary history of baboons.

5h

Fasting ramps up human metabolism, study shows

Research uncovers previously unknown effects of fasting, including notably increased metabolic activity and possible anti-aging effects.

5h

Carbon dioxide emissions from global fisheries larger than previously thought

Carbon dioxide emissions from fuel burnt by fishing boats are 30 per cent higher than previously reported, researchers with the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia and the Sea Around Us — Indian Ocean at the University of Western Australia have found.

5h

Succeeded in finding intermediates synthesized in oxidation

Korean researchers have discovered new active intermediates in high-efficient oxidation using biomimetic manganese enzyme and artificial oxidants

5h

New research: The Aussie plants facing extinction

New research by the Threatened Species Recovery Hub has identified the top 100 Australian plant species at risk of extinction. Researcher Dr Jennifer Silcock from the University of Queensland said three quarters of Australia's threatened species are plants.

5h

Stretchable multi-functional fiber for energy harvesting and strain sensing

Fiber-based electronics are expected to play a vital role in next-generation wearable electronics. Woven into textiles, they can provide higher durability, comfort, and integrated multi-functionality. A KAIST team has developed a stretchable multi-functional fiber (SMF) that can harvest energy and detect strain, which can be applied to future wearable electronics.

5h

5X rate of ’emergency’ blood pressure for African Americans

The rate of extremely high blood pressure, classified as hypertensive emergency, is five times higher in inner-city African-American patients than the national average, according to a recent study. The condition can lead to strokes, heart attacks, and acute kidney damage. The study, the largest one of its kind to compare the development of hypertensive emergency in a United States inner city, app

5h

Precision Medicine Real Soon Now

Here’s a strongly opinionated look at where the “precision medicine” field is these days, and I think that this is just the sort of article that the field (and the journalists covering it) need to see, whether you agree with it or not: In 1999 Francis Collins published a foundational document of precision medicine entitled “Medical and Societal Consequences of the Human Genome Project,”( 1 ) whic

5h

Photocurrent loss in particle interface quantified

With a growing global population will come increased energy consumption, and sustainable forms of energy sources such as solar fuels and solar electricity will be in even greater demand. And as these forms of power proliferate, the focus will shift to improved efficiency.

5h

Første patient er behandlet med partikelterapi

Dansk Center for Partikelterapi har åbnet for behandling af patienter. Det er en milepæl inden for kræftbehandling, mener regionsrådsformand.

5h

Peter Hovind bliver ledende overlæge på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital

Sektionsleder på klinisk fysiologi og nuklear afdeling på Rigshospitalet bliver ny ledende overlæge på samme afdeling bare på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital.

5h

Researchers solve the riddle of a unique fish

A great mystery around one of our most unique fish species has been solved by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU).

5h

Bigger dogs outdo little ones at this intelligence test

Bigger dogs, with larger brains, perform better than smaller pups on certain measures of intelligence, new research shows. Larger-brained dogs outperform smaller dogs on measures of executive functions—a set of cognitive processes that are necessary for controlling and coordinating other cognitive abilities and behaviors. In particular, bigger dogs have better short-term memory and self-control t

5h

Robot lär sig spela Jenga

Jenga är ett spel som går ut på att bygga ett så högt torn som möjligt med klossar. Från början är de staplade i lager om tre, vinkelrätt mot varandra. För spelarna gäller det att hitta de klossar som kan flyttas upp till toppen utan att tornet rasar. Det kräver både fingerfärdighet och känsla för fysikens lagar. Ett grupp forskare vid amerikanska Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, har nu

5h

Iguana-sized dinosaur cousin discovered in Antarctica

250 million years ago, it was covered in forests and rivers, and the temperature rarely dipped below freezing. It was also home to diverse wildlife, including early relatives of the dinosaurs. …

5h

Rob Gronkowski and the Cost of Greatness

Sunday evening in Atlanta, the New England Patriots will play in their ninth Super Bowl since 2001. Their appearance in this year’s game against the Los Angeles Rams, like their appearances in last year’s against the Eagles and 2017’s against the Falcons, only lengthens what was already one of the longest-running success stories in modern sports. Pro football is designed for turnover, but Tom Bra

5h

Study finds billion-year superocean cycles in Earth's history

Curtin researchers believe that ancient supercontinents formed and then fell apart through alternating cycles spanning hundreds of millions of years that involved superoceans being swallowed and the restructuring of the Earth's mantle.

5h

The less flexible the teaching, the more poorly boys read

Standardised education has a more negative influence on the reading performance of boys than on that of girls. This was shown in a study done among almost 1.5 million 15-year-olds in 37 countries. In all of those countries, boys read more poorly than girls. The results of the study by sociologists Margriet van Hek and Gerbert Kraaykamp of Radboud University and Claudia Buchmann of Ohio State Unive

5h

Crossbreeding threatens conservation of endangered milky storks

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has discovered that the conservation of milky storks (Mycteria cinerea), an endangered wading bird native to Southeast Asia, is threatened due to crossbreeding with their more widespread cousins, the painted storks (Mycteria leucocephala).

5h

Seattle's 'other' tech sector, life science, is on the upswing again

In a quiet business park far from Seattle's booming South Lake Union, players in the Northwest's "other" tech sector are coping with growing pains of their own.

5h

Atari master: New AI smashes Google DeepMind in video game challenge

A new breed of algorithms has mastered Atari video games 10 times faster than state-of-the-art AI, with a breakthrough approach to problem solving.

5h

Risk aversion rises with violent crime

Fear in the wake of violent conflicts causes people to take fewer risks, which may come at the expense of bettering their lives and the economy. University of Colorado Denver researchers looked at longitudinal survey data taken before and after the onset of the Mexican war on drugs and found a causal link between the fear of violence and its impact on the risk-taking attitudes of individuals livin

5h

Highly sensitive method to detect potential cancer biomarker

Exosomes regulate intercellular communication in cancers, and are drawing attention as a potential cancer biomarker. A Japanese research group has developed a highly sensitive method for detecting these exosomes that could potentially contribute to early detection of cancer.

5h

UAlberta scientists first to pinpoint a cause of pigmentary glaucoma

An international team of researchers has identified a gene responsible for the onset of pigmentary glaucoma, which may lead to new therapies for the condition. It is the first time a cause of the disease has been identified.

5h

ANU researchers solve the riddle of our most unique fish

A great mystery around one of our most unique fish species — the Australian lungfish — has been solved by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU).

5h

A first: Cornell researchers quantify photocurrent loss in particle interface

With a growing global population will come increased energy consumption, and sustainable forms of energy sources such as solar fuels and solar electricity will be in even greater demand. And as these forms of power proliferate, the focus will shift to improved efficiency.

5h

South Asians at risk for tuberculosis often are not tested

Many South Asian immigrants from countries where tuberculosis (TB) is common do not get tested even though they are at high risk for developing the disease, according to a recent study by Rutgers University and St. Peter's University Hospital.

5h

Researchers solve the riddle of a unique fish

A great mystery around one of our most unique fish species has been solved by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU).

5h

Crossbreeding threatens conservation of endangered milky storks

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has discovered that the conservation of milky storks (Mycteria cinerea), an endangered wading bird native to Southeast Asia, is threatened due to crossbreeding with their more widespread cousins, the painted storks (Mycteria leucocephala).

5h

Chinese rover finds lunar nights 'colder than expected'

China's lunar lander has woken from a freezing fortnight-long hibernation to find night-time temperatures on the moon's dark side are colder than previously thought, the national space agency said Thursday.

5h

IAEA urges Japan to take ample time in Fukushima cleanup

The International Atomic Energy Agency has urged Japan to spend ample time in developing a decommissioning plan for the tsunami-damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant and to be honest with the public about remaining uncertainties.

5h

GE reports 4Q profits, sees US settlement on mortgages

General Electric reported a profitable fourth quarter Thursday amid a big annual loss as it announced a preliminary $1.5 billion settlement with US officials over subprime mortgages.

5h

European heavyweights Airbus, Altran targeted by cyberattacks

European aerospace and defence group Airbus has launched an inquiry into the origin and targets of a cyberattack detected earlier in January, the same month that French IT consulting group Altran also saw attempts to breach its systems.

5h

Uber, Cabify stop services in Barcelona due to tighter laws

Ride-hailing companies Uber and Cabify say they will stop operating in Barcelona after the regional government in northeastern Spain passed tighter regulations.

5h

Germany sees surge in new solar power as prices drop

Germany added almost 3 gigawatts of new solar power generation in 2018, about 68 percent more than the previous year amid a drop in prices for new systems.

5h

Neanderthals were sprinters rather than distance runners, study surprisingly suggests

The image of Neanderthals as brutish and culturally unsophisticated has changed in recent years – they could make cave art, jewellery, complex stone tools and may have had language and cooked foods. Yes, they were extremely physically strong – certainly stronger than the vast majority of humans living today. And yes, they went extinct just after our own species entered their territories (albeit wi

5h

How we traced the underwater volcanic ancestry of Lord Howe Island

Lord Howe Island is a beautiful and incredibly isolated world heritage site some 600km off the coast of New South Wales, lauded for its unique volcanic landforms and endemic species.

5h

Computational algorithm to reduce electromagnetic noise in electronic circuits developed

In order to design noiseless electromagnetic (EM) devices, it is necessary to clarify the mechanism behind EM noise and theoretical calculations and computer simulations are performed for prediction assessment of devices. Two researchers at Osaka University developed an algorithm for numerical calculation of EM noise (interference) in electric circuits.

5h

Scientist at work: I'm a geologist who's dived dozens of times to explore submarine volcanoes

Staring up into the night sky as a kid and wondering what was out there started my journey to a career that involves diving in a cramped submersible vessel into the darkness of the deep sea to see what's there.

5h

Tesla shares fall after surprise CFO exit

Electric carmaker Tesla Motors saw its share price tumble early Thursday following the surprise replacement of the company's chief financial officer.

5h

Genome sequencing of baboon species provides new understanding of evolutionary diversification

Rapidly increasing efforts to generate whole genome sequences for many vertebrate species are providing a significantly improved understanding of the biological differences among animals across the tree of life. In a new study published in Science Advances, an international multi-institutional research team, led by the Human Genome Sequencing Center at Baylor College of Medicine, reports novel res

5h

5h

Filmlistan vecka 5: "The favourite" får konkurrens av två nya filmer

Filmfredag listar veckans bästa filmer på bio.

5h

Här är Liberalernas toppkandidater

Liberalernas toppkandidater till EU-valet är Cecilia Wikström, nuvarande parlamentariker samt Allan Widman som är försvarspolitisk talesperson. Det meddelas under en presskonferens.

5h

5h

Highly sensitive method to detect potential cancer biomarker

Exosomes regulate intercellular communication in cancers, and are drawing attention as a potential cancer biomarker. A Japanese research group has developed a highly sensitive method for detecting these exosomes that could potentially contribute to early detection of cancer.

5h

Kara Swisher and Ellen Shell on how to prepare for the future of work

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

5h

How AI is changing photography

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

5h

Filmrecension ”3 kvinnor”: En befriande mixtur av fiktion och verklighet

Tillsammans med skådespelerskan Behnaz Jafari besöker Jafar Panahi sina gamla hemtrakter i nordvästra Iran. ”3 kvinnor” är en rolig och vass metafilm om kvinnors villkor och vardagen i det iranska samhället.

5h

Vill höja garantipensionen – satsar 2,1 miljarder årligen

Regeringen och pensionsgruppen vill höja både bostadstillägget och garantipensionen för Sveriges pensionärer 2020, enligt ett pressmeddelande från regeringen.

5h

Genome sequencing of baboon species provides new understanding of evolutionary diversification

Rapidly increasing efforts to generate whole genome sequences for many vertebrate species are providing a significantly improved understanding of the biological differences among animals across the tree of life. In a new study published in Science Advances, an international multi-institutional research team, led by the Human Genome Sequencing Center at Baylor College of Medicine, reports novel res

5h

Bringing a Fossil to Life: Reverse Engineering Locomotion

How an animal moves can tell scientists a lot about how it lives. That is how researchers hope to learn more about an ancient crocodilelike creature called Orobates pabsti. Using scans of… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Flatworms found to regenerate faster or slower when exposed to weak magnetic field

A team of researchers from Western Michigan University and the University of Colorado Boulder has found that the regeneration rate for planaria flatworms can be impacted by a weak magnetic field. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes experiments they conducted with flatworms exposed to weak magnetic fields and what they found.

5h

How the 2011 English riots spread—new evidence shows sense of identity was key

New analysis led by a Sussex psychologist has explained the way in which the 2011 riots spread – something which may be useful for policy makers in future.

5h

Highly sensitive method to detect potential cancer biomarker

Exosomes regulate intercellular communication in cancers, and are drawing attention as a potential cancer biomarker. A Japanese research group has developed a highly sensitive method for detecting these exosomes that could potentially contribute to early detection of cancer.

5h

Vermicular Musui-Kamado Review: Luxurious, but Lacking

This induction-powered, cast-iron multicooker from Japan has an impressive array of capabilities, but it doesn't break any new ground.

5h

The Punishing Polar Vortex Is Ideal for Cassie the Robot

While humans suffer, a trunkless pair of ostrich-like legs is braving the frozen grounds of the University of Michigan, for the good of science.

5h

Virus threatening to wipe out bananas can be destroyed using CRISPR

A virus that inserts itself into the banana genome could destroy plantations, but CRISPR gene editing has been used to eliminate the viral DNA

5h

Flatworms found to regenerate faster or slower when exposed to weak magnetic field

A team of researchers from Western Michigan University and the University of Colorado Boulder has found that the regeneration rate for planaria flatworms can be impacted by a weak magnetic field. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes experiments they conducted with flatworms exposed to weak magnetic fields and what they found.

5h

Lægefaglig chef raser over sundhedsministerens brug af hjertestop-tal

Med henvisning til tal fra Hjertestopregisteret har sundhedsministeren peget på, hvordan Region Sjælland har langt højere dødelighed for patienter med hjertestop. Men tallene kan ikke sammenlignes, siger lægefaglig chef i regionen.

5h

Åkesson motiverar kappvändningen i EU-frågan

Länge har Sverigedemokraterna och Vänsterpartiet haft en sak gemensamt: båda vill att Sverige ska lämna EU. Men nu har SD bytt taktik och tycker sig ändå se vissa fördelar med det europeiska samarbetet. ”Men för att motverka dagens överstatlighet behöver man vara pragmatisk och fullt ut nyttja de möjligheter som finns”, skriver partiledaren Jimmie Åkesson (SD) på Aftonbladet Debatt.

5h

Filmrecension ”Chelas arv”: Elegant men undanglidande skildring av kvinnlig frigörelse

Ana Brun korades till fjolårets bästa skådespelare i Berlin för sitt starka porträtt av en mogen kvinna som tvingas göra en omstart i livet. Dessvärre är regissören Marcelo Martinessis avvaktande berättande ofta överdrivet undanglidande.

5h

Bringing a Fossil to Life: Reverse Engineering Locomotion

How an animal moves can tell scientists a lot about how it lives. That is how researchers hope to learn more about an ancient crocodilelike creature called Orobates pabsti. Using scans of… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

To observe photoswitches, stick on a platinum atom

Advances with photoswitches could lead to a smartphone that's soft and flexible and shaped like a hand so you can wear it as a glove, for example. Or a paper-thin computer screen that you can roll up like a window shade when you're done using it. Or a TV as thin as wallpaper that you can paste on a wall and hardly know it's there when you're not watching it.

5h

What causes rats without a Y chromosome to become male?

A look at the brains of an endangered spiny rat off the coast of Japan by University of Missouri (MU) Bond Life Sciences Center scientist Cheryl Rosenfeld could illuminate the subtle genetic influences that stimulate a mammal's cells to develop as male versus female in the absence of a Y chromosome.

5h

How old is Earth’s inner core? We finally know

Earth’s inner core is younger than scientists previously thought, according to new research. The findings offer new insight into the history of Earth’s magnetic shielding and planetary habitability. “Until this data, the age of the inner core was uncertain…” Researchers have long recognized that Earth’s core plays a vital role in generating the magnetic shield that protects our planet from harmfu

5h

What causes rats without a Y chromosome to become male?

A look at the brains of an endangered spiny rat off the coast of Japan by University of Missouri (MU) Bond Life Sciences Center scientist Cheryl Rosenfeld could illuminate the subtle genetic influences that stimulate a mammal's cells to develop as male versus female in the absence of a Y chromosome.

5h

Tullen uppmanar tusentals företag att förbereda sig för Brexit

Över 5.000 svenska företag kommer de närmaste dagarna får ett brev från Tullverket där de uppmanas att förbereda sig för en hård Brexit – att Storbritannien lämnar EU utan avtal.

5h

Criterion streaming service launches April 8 in US, Canada – CNET

You'll have access to a bunch of movies and other programming on The Criterion Channel.

6h

New treatment for bone infection using copper-rich glass implant

Researchers have developed a new treatment for the particularly difficult-to-treat bone infection, osteomyelitis.

6h

Dansk Miljøteknologi: Vandsektoren skal være energi- og klimaneutral

PLUS. Vi skal præsentere en samlet plan for en energi­neutral vandsektor på verdenskonference i oktober 2020, mener direktør.

6h

Ny World Cup-seger för lag Hasselborg

Lag Anna Hasselborg har fått en smakstart på curlingens World Cup i Jönköping. Under torsdagen kom andra raka segern, med 8–4 mot Kina.

6h

PolyU's nano-encapsulation technology enhances DHA absorption for early brain development

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) today announced the findings on its novel nano-encapsulation technology for optimising the maternal and fetal absorption of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The research, conducted by PolyU's Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology (ABCT), aimed to address the delivery and absorption issues of DHA that affect its potency and efficacy.

6h

New Guidelines on Artificial Intelligence and Personal Data Protection

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

6h

6h

Efficient adversarial robustness evaluation of AI models with limited access

Recent studies have identified the lack of robustness in current AI models against adversarial examples—intentionally manipulated prediction-evasive data inputs that are similar to normal data but will cause well-trained AI models to misbehave. For instance, visually imperceptible perturbations to a stop sign can be easily crafted and lead a high-precision AI model towards misclassification. In ou

6h

The 210-million-year-old Smok was crushing bones like a hyena

Coprolites, or fossilized droppings, of the dinosaur-like archosaur Smok wawelski contain lots of chewed-up bone fragments. This led researchers at Uppsala University to conclude that this top predator was exploiting bones for salt and marrow, a behavior often linked to mammals but seldom to archosaurs.

6h

Birthplace of Earth's Continents Discovered Under These Mountains

A missing rare-earth element points to the origin of continents.

6h

Fornling kan få drömmatch i USA: ”Förhandlingar pågår”

Den svenske världsmästaren i proffsboxning Sven Fornling har en stormatch mot WBC-mästaren Oleksandr Gvozdyk på gång. – Förhandlingar pågår om en match, säger han om en titelmatch om tyngsta VM-titeln.

6h

6h

Krångligt att välja och byta hemtjänst

I en nyligen genomförd studie från Göteborgs universitet har forskare undersökt förutsättningarna för äldre människors möjligheter att påverka vilken hemtjänst de får tillgång till. − Det finns ett stort utbud av utförare och tjänster. Men många av de äldre som deltog i vår studie kände inte till vilka valmöjligheter som fanns och vilka skillnaderna var emellan dem, säger Anna Dunér, professor i

6h

The Threat of Threat Assessments

On Tuesday, the intelligence community published its “ Worldwide Threat Assessment ,” which concluded—in sober, measured tones—that President Donald Trump is lying: North Korea is not abandoning its nuclear weapons, Iran has not violated the nuclear deal it signed under President Barack Obama, and America’s southern border does not pose a national-security crisis. Trump responded by ranting, “ Th

6h

Dags för årets Melodifestival – schlagerveteranerna är många

Röstningssystemet är nytt – men annars är det mesta sig likt när Melodifestivalen drar i gång igen på lördag. I den första deltävlingen har de flesta artisterna varit med förut.

6h

So long, veganuary: Here’s how to consume consciously year round

Cutting out meat and dairy products is a great way to save the world from your dinner plate, but there are many more, says P. K. Newby

6h

Genetic Tests for Autism Can Sometimes Change Lives

The assays don't always yield results, but the information they offer can, at times, alter the course of treatment or prevention — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Hole almost the size of Manhattan found under glacier

NASA observations prompt increased concern over Antarctic ice-melt. Andrew Masterson reports.

6h

Algorithm helps AI triumph in legendary Atari game

And that’s news for more than just gaming fans. Ben Lewis reports.

6h

Impact of NZ earthquake felt for years

Study reinforces the theory of health ups and downs. Nick Carne reports.

6h

Genetic Tests for Autism Can Sometimes Change Lives

The assays don't always yield results, but the information they offer can, at times, alter the course of treatment or prevention — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Image of the Day: Cellular Breakdown

Autophagy may keep cell division in check to help protect against cancer-causing DNA damage.

6h

Ocean heat waves like the Pacific’s deadly ‘Blob’ could become the new normal

Five years after massive patch of warm water appeared, scientists take stock

6h

Thermal testing of Solar Orbiter

A side view of ESA's Solar Orbiter as it entered a vacuum chamber for thermal vacuum testing at the IABG test facility in Ottobrunn, Germany, last month.

6h

The ‘Complete’ Cancer Cure Story Is Both Bogus and Tragic

An Israeli company claimed it will cure cancer in a year, and the internet erupted. But in this latest viral incident, everyone loses.

6h

The Very Vortex-y Science of Making Snow From Boiling Water

Turning hot water into snow might as well be the official sport of the polar vortex. Here's what's those water molecules are up to.

6h

Your ashes might say more about you than you’d think

Science A new strategy could help archaeologists reveal a cremated skeleton's sex. Ancient cremation methods left bones in tiny fragments, making it difficult for modern archaeologists to identify sex, gender, and population demographics. A new PLOS…

6h

Efter dödliga olyckorna: Trafikverket ska snabbare bygga bort farliga övergångar

De senaste veckorna har skarp kritik riktats mot Trafikverket efter att flera personer dött vid obevakade järnvägsövergångar. Nu får myndigheten i uppdrag av regeringen att påskynda processen för att säkra övergångarna.

6h

The Bitter Origins of the Fight Over Big Government

Christian Northeast In January 1933, President Herbert Hoover found himself in a position familiar at that point to millions of Americans: He was about to lose his job. Unsure of what the future might hold, he considered whether to accept an offer of a regular appearance on a weekly radio program sponsored by the Old Gold tobacco company. Hoover found the idea distasteful—becoming a speaker on a

6h

A Smithsonian Researcher Reflects on What It Will Take to Land Humans on Mars

In a new book on space exploration, Smithsonian curator emeritus Roger D. Launius predicts boots on the Red Planet ground by the 2030s

6h

Curiosity says hi from Mars

When you’re on a big trip, you gotta take a selfie.

6h

The future of in-space manufacturing

Hoisting heavy machinery into space is cumbersome and expensive. Soon, however, it won’t be a problem. Cathal O'Connell reports.

6h

Genetic Tests for Autism Can Sometimes Change Lives

The assays don't always yield results, but the information they offer can, at times, alter the course of treatment or prevention — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Sarah Huckabee Sanders: ”Gud ville att Trump skulle bli president”

Vita husets pressekreterare Sarah Huckabee Sanders tror att Gud ville ha Donald Trump som USA:s president. Hon säger till kristna CBN News att hon tycker Trump åstadkommit massor av saker som troende bryr sig om.

6h

Fusion in Five Years?

One time I would like to be wrong in my pessimism about some corporation claiming a huge breakthrough over a short time period. This could just be confirmation bias, but there seems to be a rash of companies over-hyping and over-promising on major breakthroughs. Just yesterday I wrote on SBM about an Israeli company that claims it will cure cancer within a year (Umm… No.). Now today I see a news

6h

Early pint: evidence of 'first British beer' found in Cambridgeshire

Signs of iron age brew, from as far back as 400BC, found during £1.5bn upgrade of A14 Evidence of the first beer believed to have been brewed in the UK, dating back more than 2,000 years, has been uncovered by road workers. Signs of the iron age brew from about 400BC were identified in fragments of charred residues from the beer-making process found during the £1.5bn upgrade of the A14 in Cambrid

7h

Kilauea eruption spurs creation of real-time air pollution network

As red molten lava oozed out of Kilauea on the Island of Hawaii ("the Big Island") in May 2018, destroying houses and property in its path, clouds of ash particles and toxic gases from the volcano—known as vog—filled the air and drifted across the island with the wind.

7h

China launches world's first rocket-deployed weather instruments from unmanned semi-submersible vehicle

For the first time in history, Chinese scientists have launched a rocketsonde—a rocket designed to perform weather observations in areas beyond the range of weather balloons—from an unmanned semi-submersible vehicle (USSV) that has been solely designed and specially developed by China for this task.

7h

Green alternative to PET could be even greener

One of the most successful plastics is polyethylene terephthalate (PET), the material we use to make bottles and fibers for clothing. However, PET is made from petroleum-based building blocks. An alternative to PET can be made from bio-based furan molecules, but to polymerize these furans you need toxic catalysts and high temperatures. Now, polymer chemists from the University of Groningen, led by

7h

Marknära ozon ger kraftigt minskade skördar

Förhöjda halter av marknära ozon gör att det det globala skördebortfallet för vete uppgår till sju procent, och för soja är bortfallet så mycket som tolv procent. Värst drabbas länder med hett och torrt klimat men även i kallare och fuktigare områden, som till exempel Sverige, är påverkan stor. I en världsomspännande studie där bland annat forskare från Göteborgs universitet har ingått har man un

7h

Idol firar 15 med stor castingturné

I år är det femtonde gången som Idol ger sig ut i jakten på unga talanger. Jubileet firas med den största castingturnén hittills. Juryn besöker flera nya städer, med nedslag i bland annat Boden, Motala och Hudiksvall. Precis som föregående år består juryn av Anders Bagge, Nikki Amini, Alexander Kronlund och Kishti Tomita.

7h

Ny udstilling synstolker historien om at læse og skrive i blinde

Hvordan læser og skriver man, når man ikke kan se? Det bliver udforsket i Medicinsk Museions…

7h

7h

A Study on Driverless-Car Ethics Offers a Troubling Look Into Our Values

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

7h

New study sheds light on illegal wildlife trade in Hong Kong

Hong Kong's illegal wildlife trade is contributing to a global extinction crisis. Every year millions of live animals, plants and their derivatives are illegally trafficked into and through Hong Kong, by transnational companies and organised crime syndicates.

7h

A sustainable and recyclable thermoelectric paper

Thermoelectric materials, capable of transforming heat into electricity, are very promising for converting residual heat into electrical energy, as they convert hardly usable or nearly lost thermal energy in an efficient way.

7h

Huge cavity in Antarctic glacier signals rapid decay

A gigantic cavity—two-thirds the area of Manhattan and almost 1,000 feet (300 meters) tall—growing at the bottom of Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica is one of several disturbing discoveries reported in a new NASA-led study of the disintegrating glacier. The findings highlight the need for detailed observations of Antarctic glaciers' undersides in calculating how fast global sea levels will rise

7h

Aussie plants facing extinction

The top 100 Australian plant species at risk of extinction have been identified by Threatened Species Recovery Hub research.

7h

How to talk about climate change on social media

Extreme weather events, from hurricanes to snowstorms, often serve as focal points for discussions about global climate change. And many of those discussions take place on social media. But do social media serve as good platforms for climate change discussion? And do extreme weather events serve as good opportunities for informing the public about the effects of climate change?

7h

New study sheds light on illegal wildlife trade in Hong Kong

Hong Kong's illegal wildlife trade is contributing to a global extinction crisis. Every year millions of live animals, plants and their derivatives are illegally trafficked into and through Hong Kong, by transnational companies and organised crime syndicates.

7h

Aussie plants facing extinction

The top 100 Australian plant species at risk of extinction have been identified by Threatened Species Recovery Hub research.

7h

Chelseas tränare: ”Kan kanske inte motivera spelarna”

Det är kris i Malmö FF:s kommande Europa League-motståndare Chelsea. På onsdagen åkte stjärnlaget på en blytung förlust – med 0–4 borta mot Bournemouth i Premier League. Då ifrågasätter också tränaren Maurizio Sarri sin egen roll. – Det är kanske mitt fel. Jag kan kanske inte motivera dem. Men laget är väldigt starkt, de ska också kunna vinna matcher utan tränaren, säger han till The Guardian.

7h

Tusentals ton unket kött exporterat från Polen

Polen har exporterat 2.700 ton kött från sjuka kor till bland annat Sverige. Det uppger den polske chefsveterinären på torsdagen efter att nya uppgifter om skandalen blivit kända.

7h

Before There Were Dinosaurs, This Triassic 'Lizard King' Ruled Antarctica

Meet the original "lizard king" — an iguana-size reptile that ruled Antarctica 250 million years ago.

7h

7h

7h

7h

Training AI to recognize nudity is more difficult than you think

submitted by /u/PilotPig [link] [comments]

7h

Gallery: Medieval Africa's Astounding Riches

Medieval Africa was home to the world's richest man – maybe ever.

7h

Medieval Map Points to World's Richest Man, Maybe Ever

The Medieval world's richest man was from Africa.

7h

När de smartaste flyttar växer klyftorna mellan stad och landsbygd

Städernas sociala och ekonomiska tillväxt ökar snabbt när fler människor flyttar in. Men vad är orsaken? Det beror på vilka individer det är som flyttar till städerna, visar forskare från Linköpings universitet med hjälp av unika svenska registerdata. Forskarnas resultat har publicerats i den ansedda tidskriften Science Advances. – Resultaten har stor politisk relevans. De visar att migrationen a

7h

A Jabberwocky Peace in Afghanistan

On Monday, the U.S. special representative for Afghanistan, Zalmay Khalilzad, announced a draft framework for a deal with the Taliban that could finally close the book on America’s longest war. As Khalilzad explained : “The Taliban have committed, to our satisfaction, to do what is necessary that would prevent Afghanistan from ever becoming a platform for international terrorist groups or individ

7h

Letters: ‘Fixing the Bad Will Be Just as Bad’

How Plastic Cleanup Threatens the Ocean’s Living Islands The Ocean Cleanup project, founded with the vision of clearing the world’s oceans of plastic, has designed a 600-meter-long barrier with a three-meter-deep net , ostensibly to collect plastic passively as the currents push water through the net in the open ocean. When she learned of the plan, Rebecca Helm wrote recently on TheAtlantic.com,

7h

Testkörning: Nya Teslan är snabb men dyr

Lasse Swärd: Första provkörningen på svensk mark av Tesla Modell 3.

7h

Aarhusiansk studenter-satellit er skudt i kredsløb fra rumstation

Astronauter på ISS har sendt den danske mini-satellit Delphini-1 i kredsløb, hvor den skal overvåge vulkanudbrud.

7h

Ingen planer om at udbygge enkelt-sporet flaskehals i Køge

Køge Nord station står klar til maj og bliver stoppested på den nye København – Ringsted bane. Men forbindelsen til Køges eksisterende station har kun ét enkelt spor. Kommunen kalder det en »betydelig flaskehals i togsystemerne.«

7h

The Emotional Toll of Graduate School

Mental health disorders and depression are far more likely for grad students than they are for the average American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Moderaterna KU-anmäler Löfven och Baylan

Efter turerna på Svenska kraftnät KU-anmäler Moderaterna nu statsminister Stefan Löfven och den tidigare energiministern Ibrahim Baylan. – Det är utomordentligt allvarliga uppgifter som har framkommit, säger näringsutskottets ordförande Lars Hjälmered (M) till DN.

7h

Vegan burgers make men feel fuller than beef, study finds

A recent study compared mens' physiological responses after eating beef and plant-based burgers. All men said they felt fuller after eating the plant-based burger. Vegan burgers are becoming increasingly popular in the U.S. and abroad, likely due to their health and environmental benefits. None Which do you think would leave you feeling more satiated: a cheeseburger made of good ol'-fashioned mea

7h

Filmrecension: ”Aniara” en hudnära och stilfull undergångsvision

Historiens första filmatisering av Harry Martinsons ”Aniara” imponerar. Med enkla medel har regiduon Pella Kågerman och Hugo Lilja skapat en känslostark undergångssaga i något som liknar en uppiffad Finlandsfärja i rymden.

7h

San Francisco Could Be First to Ban Facial Recognition Tech

A city supervisor has proposed banning local agencies from using facial recognition technology, warning of the potential bias and invasion of privacy.

7h

The WIRED Guide to Commercial Human Space Flight

Everything you need to know about SpaceX, Virgin Galactic, and more.

7h

Solving the mystery of Serengeti's vanishing wild dogs

In 1991, a strange thing happened in the wilds of Tanzania's Serengeti National Park.

7h

Nokia Q4 profit up as operators switching to 5G networks

Nokia has reported increased fourth-quarter earnings on the back of grown orders from telecom operators of new-generation mobile networks that are expected to be rolled out commercially this year.

7h

Solving the mystery of Serengeti's vanishing wild dogs

In 1991, a strange thing happened in the wilds of Tanzania's Serengeti National Park.

7h

No, we don’t know that gum disease causes Alzheimer’s

A recent study linked gum disease and Alzheimer’s disease, but the results are far from conclusive.

7h

The Emotional Toll of Graduate School

Mental health disorders and depression are far more likely for grad students than they are for the average American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Sjællands Universitetshospital får ny sygehusdirektør

Niels Würgler Hansen afløser Henrik Villadsen som sygehusdirektør for Sjællands Universitetshospital.

7h

Most Important Meal? Review Questions Whether Breakfast Is Really Good for Weight Loss

Breakfast may not be the "most important meal of the day" after all, at least for people trying to lose weight.

7h

The Emotional Toll of Graduate School

Mental health disorders and depression are far more likely for grad students than they are for the average American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Self-taught robot figures out what it looks like and what it can do

A robot started off with no knowledge of itself, but through trial and error learned what it looked like and what abilities it had

7h

Uber drar in taxitjänst i Barcelona efter protester

Den amerikanska taxitjänsten Uber ställer in sin taxiverksamhet i Barcelona tills vidare. Beskedet kommer efter det att lokala myndigheter beslutat om begränsningar för hur Uber får verka i staden.

7h

Iguana-sized dinosaur cousin discovered in Antarctica

250 million years ago, it was covered in forests and rivers, and the temperature rarely dipped below freezing. It was also home to diverse wildlife, including early relatives of the dinosaurs. Scientists have just discovered the newest member of that family—an iguana-sized reptile whose name means "Antarctic king."

8h

Apple's iPhone problem: It just needs lower pricing, analysts say

To hear Apple tell it, the reasons for the slowdown in iPhone sales can be attributed to changing economic conditions in China, the fluctuating change of the dollar in other countries and a shift in how people buy the iconic device.

8h

Research team demonstrates fractal light from lasers

Fractal patterns are common in nature, including in the geometric patterns of a tortoise shell, the structure of a snail shell, the leaves of a succulent plant that repeat to create an intricate pattern, and the frost pattern on a car's windshield in winter.

8h

Lost Opportunity: After a 15-Year Odyssey, NASA's Trailblazing Mars Rover Approaches Its End

Although resuscitation attempts are still underway, officials are on the verge of announcing the death of the Red Planet’s longest-lived robotic explorer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Europaparlamentet råder EU att erkänna Guaidó som president

Europaparlamentet uppmanar EU att erkänna Juan Guaidó som Venezuelas nya president, rapporterar AFP.

8h

Google+ shuts down April 2, all data will be deleted

Google's failed Facebook clone will be scrubbed from the Internet.

8h

Apple blokerer Facebooks interne apps efter overvågning af teenagere

Facebook kan ikke længere distribuere interne iOS apps efter at have brudt aftale om intern distribution med Apple.

8h

Lost Opportunity: After a 15-Year Odyssey, NASA's Trailblazing Mars Rover Approaches Its End

Although resuscitation attempts are still underway, officials are on the verge of announcing the death of the Red Planet’s longest-lived robotic explorer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

8h

Sundling knäckte Kalla i guldfajt

IFK Umeås längddamer tog sitt andra raka SM-guld i stafetten över 3×5 kilometer.

8h

Dansrecension. Svidande vackert när Leila Chahrour sjunger fram sin livsberättelse

Libanesiske koreografen Ali Chahrour förvandlar sin kusin Leilas historia till en allmänmänsklig och angelägen föreställning, skriver Lisa Boda.

8h

Filmrecension: Nicole Kidman för tuff för sitt eget bästa i hårdkokt LA-noir-thriller

Nicole Kidman vill slå världen med häpnad och komma ut som ful i Karyn Kusamas hårdkokta noirthriller. Det imponerar inte på Kerstin Gezelius som konstaterar att Kidman och denna film inte är skapta för varandra.

8h

The World-Record Instagram Egg Is Going to Make Someone Very Rich

Last week, a staffer at Need to Impeach , an organization that advocates for the impeachment of Donald Trump, received an outrageous proposal via email. Jerry Media , the viral marketing agency famous for promoting the ill-fated Fyre Festival, was now working in an unofficial capacity with the anonymous creator of the World Record Egg , and the company was hoping to broker a deal between the nonp

8h

Could Black English Mean a Prison Sentence?

A black man on the phone from a jail in San Francisco said, in 2015, “He come tell ’bout I’m gonna take the TV,” which meant that this man was not going to do so. The transcriber listening in couldn’t understand the first part, apparently, and recorded the whole statement as “I’m gonna take the TV.” It’s impossible to know how often mistakes of this sort occur, but chances are they’re common. An

8h

The Existential Zaniness of Russian Doll

The writer and director Leslye Headland seems to be fascinated by characters confined in prisons of their own making. In her 2008 play, Assistance , a cohort of ambitious 20-somethings compromise their own humanity to please a monstrous, legendary film producer (Headland worked for Harvey Weinstein for six years). In 2010’s caustic play, Bachelorette , which became a movie starring Kirsten Dunst

8h

8h

8h

8h

Blog: De nye kampflys hoved- og ørepine

Nu har cheferne for Danmarks nye kampfly fået endnu en hovedpine – nok som en direkte følge af at nogen har fået ørepine.

8h