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nyheder2019juli01

Insect apocalypse: German bug watchers sound alarm

For almost 30 years they passed as quirky eccentrics, diligently setting up their insect traps in the Rhine countryside to collect tens of millions of bugs and creepy crawlers.

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Ringstedbanen sat i drift trods heftige sikkerhedsadvarsler fra uvildig rådgiver

PLUS. Banedanmark blev ikke færdig til tiden, og derfor kører banen nu på dispensation med en såkaldt nulbloksløsning, som assessor mener kan resultere i en farlig fejl en gang om måneden.

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Deal or no deal? How discounts for unhappy subscribers can backfire on businesses

New research from the University of Notre Dame demonstrates discounts may not be successful in retaining customers in the long term.

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NETRF-funded research may help predict pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) recurrence

NETRF-funded researchers identified a cancer cell type that is associated with non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) recurrence. Alpha-like pNET cell expression of the protein ARX can guide prognosis.

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WVU researcher studies how nursing homes can accommodate obese residents

West Virginia University researcher Nicholas Castle is part of a team investigating how nursing homes can best meet obese residents' healthcare needs. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality — a division of the Department of Health and Human Services — has awarded them nearly $2 million for the project.

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Location-based data can provide insights for business decisions

Data from social commerce websites can provide essential information to business owners before they make decisions that could determine whether a new venture succeeds or fails.

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Big Little Lies Exhumes the Secrets of Marriage

This article contains spoilers through Season 2, Episode 4 of Big Little Lies . Early in Sunday evening’s episode of Big Little Lies , Madeline (Reese Witherspoon) smokes a cigarette with all the finesse of a teenager cutting class for the first time. Lounging affectedly on her back deck with Jane (Shailene Woodley) and Renata (Laura Dern), Madeline is unprepared for the accidental blow that esca

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Photos From Glastonbury 2019

This weekend, approximately 175,000 music fans gathered at Worthy Farm, near Glastonbury, England, for the 2019 Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts. Tickets for this year’s festival sold out in just 36 minutes. Attendees were treated to performances by Stormzy, The Killers, Janet Jackson, Billie Eilish, Jeff Goldblum, Kylie Minogue, The Cure, and many more. The five-day festival

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Biased data undermine an iconic weather record

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02057-x Flaws are revealed in a highly cited database that dates back more than two centuries.

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Analysis finds US ecosystems shifting hundreds of miles north

Researchers with the Center for Resilience in Working Agricultural Landscapes used 50 years of data on bird distributions and concluded that ecosystems have shifted northward by hundreds of miles. The data suggests that climate change and other phenomena are at play.

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The UK's incredible shift away from coal since 2012

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Blisteringly Fast Machine Learning On An Arduino Uno

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Was Mexico’s freak summer hail storm due to global warming?

The Mexican city of Guadalajara was hit by an unusual storm that left cars buried beneath 2 metres of hail – but we can’t say that climate change is responsible

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How antioxidants can hasten the spread of lung cancer

Two new studies have uncovered cell mechanisms through which lung cancer uses antioxidants to help it spread to other parts of the body.

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SpaceX Being Sketch(X) About the 3 Starlink Satellites That Failed

Starlink Failures Elon Musk’s SpaceX launched 60 satellites into Earth’s orbit on May 23 as part of Starlink, an initiative to deliver broadband internet to the entire world. On Friday, a company spokesperson sent a statement to Business Insider detailing the current state of SpaceX’s ambitious project. That statement revealed that three of the 60 satellites have failed in the past month — and Sp

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Philanthropy Serves the Status Quo

Most Americans give money to charity. They donate to local food banks, foreign disaster-relief funds, museums, and animal rescues. They drop bills into church collections and the cups homeless people hold out on the street. They contribute to GoFundMe pages to pay for medical expenses or college tuition. But in recent years, Americans of average means have started donating smaller portions of the

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Uber Now Shows Bikes And Scooters Prominently In App

Uber has been working on micromobility solutions as well with scooters and bikes. The company today announced that it’s now integrating micromobility into its core services. Not only …

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It’d Take a Nuke to Destroy These Futuristic Sneakers From ‘Indestructible Shoes’

When it comes to shoes , most of us would love to wear sneakers all the time. They’re light. They’re comfortable. Best of all, they’re stylish. The only problem is that sneakers are not very durable, nor do they offer much protection for your feet. That means they’re not very suitable for spending time in the great outdoors or doing work around the house – let alone for physically demanding jobs

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Research misconduct claim upheld against former head of UCL lab

Reports released after FoI request criticise Prof David Latchman’s ‘recklessness’ A lab run by one of Britain’s foremost academics published fraudulent scientific papers for more than a decade, according to investigators. Work at Prof David Latchman’s laboratory at UCL Institute of Child Health came under scrutiny from senior academics after an anonymous whistleblower alleged that dozens of paper

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Here's How You Can Watch Tuesday's Total Solar Eclipse

The diamond ring phase over Newberry, South Carolina, during the total solar eclipse August 21, 2017. (Credit: Michael Roudabush/Wikimedia Commons) Tuesday, July 2, will bring a special kind of darkness to South America. In certain parts of Chile and Argentina, people will find a strange twilight falling as the Moon inches across and ultimately covers the Sun’s disk completely in a total solar ecl

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How Do We Solve the Problem of Predators?

Humans don’t have a great track record of coexisting with top predators, and wolves are no exception. By the early 1900s, wolves were nearly extinct in all of western Europe as a result of government programs that rewarded people for killing them. While the animals’ population numbers dwindled, humans got used to life without them—despite the fact that their status as top predators means they hav

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Detecting a Single Unit of Sound

Detecting a Single Unit of Sound Researchers can now measure individual phonons — a single unit of sound. single-phonon3.gif Image credits: Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer and Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Physics Monday, July 1, 2019 – 13:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Just as light waves have a particle version — the photon — sound waves do too. Called a phonon, it's a way to quant

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Toddler Dies from E. Coli After Visiting Petting Zoo at County Fair

A toddler died from an E. coli infection, and three other children fell ill with the same disease, after visiting the San Diego County Fair last month.

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There's a Total Solar Eclipse Tomorrow: Here's What You Need to Know

This will be 2019's only total solar eclipse.

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Glowing brain cells illuminate stroke recovery research

A promising strategy for helping stroke patients recover, transplanting neural progenitor cells to restore lost functions, asks a lot of those cells. To help them to integrate into the brain, the cells get help from 'optochemogenetics.'

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Scientists track the source of the 'Uncanny Valley' in the brain

Scientists have identified mechanisms in the human brain that could help explain the phenomenon of the 'Uncanny Valley' — the unsettling feeling we get from robots and virtual agents that are too human-like. They have also shown that some people respond more adversely to human-like agents than others.

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Sleep readies synapses for learning

Synapses in the hippocampus are larger and stronger after sleep deprivation, according to new research in mice published in JNeurosci. Overall, this study supports the idea that sleep may universally weaken synapses that are strengthened from learning, allowing for new learning to occur after waking.

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Stem cell stimulation improves stroke recovery

Stem cell stimulation shows promise as a potential noninvasive stroke treatment, according to research in mice published in JNeurosci. If extended to humans, this technique could greatly improve patients' quality of life.

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Brain network evaluates robot likeability

Researchers have identified a network of brain regions that work together to determine if a robot is a worthy social partner, according to a new study published in JNeurosci.

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Trump’s Lies Are Bad. What He Did in Osaka Was Worse.

President Donald Trump’s penchant for out-and-out deception—lies, in common parlance, and as more and more observers are willing to label them—has meant that another of his tendencies has been eclipsed: the tendency to bluff blithely and obviously falsely. During his trip to Asia over the past few days, however, Trump has made that tendency unavoidable, offering blusteringly confident answers to

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Creepy robots are all in your head

Scientists have identified how the brain assesses robots – and possibly people – as potential social partners. Mark Bruer reports.

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The Witcher First Look: Henry Cavill Is Legolas' Second Coming, Plus Ciri and Yennefer Strike a Pose

Netflix knows that people are curious as hell to see just what its upcoming live-action adaptation of The Witcher is going to look like, and it’s perfectly comfortable making everyone wait until …

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Universities show their true colours in court

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02065-x Institutions cannot boast of a respectful environment for researchers and trainees if they flout those values to cut legal liability, says Steven Piantadosi.

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Vision cells can pull double duty in the brain, detecting both color and shape

Neurons in a brain area that handles vision fire in response to more than one aspect of an object, countering earlier ideas, a study in monkeys finds.

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They Kinda Want to Believe Apollo 11 Was Maybe a Hoax

Conspiracy theories were once deadly serious. On the internet, skepticism about the moon landing shows how the mood has shifted.

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Creepy robots are all in your head

Scientists have identified how the brain assesses robots – and possibly people – as potential social partners. Mark Bruer reports.

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Physicists use light waves to accelerate supercurrents, enable ultrafast quantum computing

Iowa State's Jigang Wang and a team of collaborators have discovered that terahertz light — light at trillions of cycles per second — can act as a control knob to accelerate supercurrents. That can help open up the quantum world of matter and energy at atomic and subatomic scales to practical applications such as ultrafast computing.

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Scissors get stuck — another way bacteria use CRISPR/Cas9

Before humans repurposed it as a gene editing tool, CRISPR/Cas9 was a sort of internal immune system bacteria use to defend themselves against phages. Emory and Max Planck scientists have found that the 'scissors' component of CRISPR/Cas9 sometimes gets stuck.

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Researchers discover genetic mutation behind serious skull disorder

An international collaboration has identified a new genetic mutation behind the premature fusing of the bony plates that make up the skull.

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'Gentle recovery' of Brazil's leatherback turtles

Brazil's leatherback turtles are making a 'gentle recovery' after 30 years of conservation efforts, new research shows.

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Study finds electronic cigarettes damage brain stem cells

A research team at the University of California, Riverside, has found that electronic cigarettes, often targeted to youth and pregnant women, produce a stress response in neural stem cells, which are critical cells in the brain.

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Noninvasive test improves detection of aggressive prostate cancer

A team of researchers from UCLA and the University of Toronto have identified a new biomarker found in urine that can help detect aggressive prostate cancer, potentially saving hundreds of thousands of men each year from undergoing unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy treatments.

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How to Speak to Someone Who’s Suffering

Kate Bowler felt like her life was just beginning. At 35, she was married to the love of her life. She had a young son and a dream job as a historian of Christianity. She had written a book, Blessed , about the origins of the notion that good things happen to good people. Then one day, in 2015, she received a call from a physician’s assistant. The cause of some intense stomach pains she had recen

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Transformer cells: Shaping cellular 'behaviour'

Scientists from Sechenov University, conjointly with their fellow Chinese and American researchers, have examined the latest advances in the use of skeletal muscle progenitor cells, specifying the core challenges inherent to the applicability of MPCs in cell therapy, and outlining the most promising breakthrough technologies. The outcomes of this research were reported in Applied Physics Reviews,

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Machine detection of human-object interaction in images and videos

Jia-Bin Huang, assistant professor in the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a faculty member at the Discovery Analytics Center, has received a Google Faculty Research Award to support his work in detecting human-object interaction in images and videos.

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Cutting-edge food science reveals how to finish your plates and reduce food waste

The team from the National Centre for Food Manufacturing (NCFM), at the University's Holbeach Campus, is cooking up innovative ways to help consumers significantly reduce food waste, through food preservation and packaging design.

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A month under the Med: French divers launch daring deep-sea expedition

A team of French divers took to the sea off Marseille in a canary yellow capsule on Monday to spend a month exploring the deep waters of the Mediterranean, without decompressing until the very end.

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Top 10 schools in Asia

China's Tsinghua and Peking University are on par with Harvard and MIT. These 10 universities consistently shuffle around for top tier status in Asian college rankings. Universities in Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and China have churned out dozens of Nobel Laureates and other renowned figures. Asia has some of the most cutting edge and finest universities in the world. While we're all accustome

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Standard TB tests may not detect infection in certain exposed individuals

In a study, infectious disease experts identified a large group of people who were clearly exposed to TB for more than 10 years but the two most reliable tests (TST and IGRA) came back negative on repeated tests. While further research is needed, the results seem to indicate that either the tests are not sufficiently sensitive to detect a low-level case of TB or some people are mounting a natural

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Fairtrade benefits rural workers in Africa, but not the poorest of the poor

A new study from the University of Göttingen and international partners has analysed the effects of Fairtrade certification on poor rural workers in Africa. The results show that Fairtrade improves the situation of employees in agricultural cooperatives, but not of workers in the smallholder farm sector, who are often particularly disadvantaged. The study was published in "Nature Sustainability".

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Research questions link between unconscious bias and behavior

Implicit bias, a term for automatically activated mental associations, is often seen as a primary cause of discrimination against social groups such as women and racial minorities. But a new look at the body of research questions the link between implicit bias and discriminatory behavior.

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Good medicine depends on diversity

Nearly 80 percent who have contributed DNA for research are of European ancestry. Columbia University Medical Center leads a National Human Genome Research Institute study designed to understand the barriers to minority participation and to support the creation of policies and approaches that will help build a diverse genetic database. The four-year study will analyze inclusion practices at academ

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Transformer cells: Shaping cellular 'behaviour'

Scientists from the Sechenov University, conjointly with their fellow Chinese and American researchers, have examined the latest advances in the use of skeletal muscle progenitor cells, specifying the core challenges inherent to the applicability of MPCs in cell therapy, and outlining the most promising breakthrough technologies. The outcomes of this research were reported in Applied Physics Revie

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Hubble captures the galaxy's biggest ongoing stellar fireworks show

Imagine slow-motion fireworks that started exploding 170 years ago and are still continuing. This type of firework is not launched into Earth's atmosphere, but rather into space by a doomed super-massive star called Eta Carinae. A new Hubble view, which includes ultraviolet light, shows its hot, expanding gases glowing in red, white and blue.

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Chemists give chance a helping hand

The chemical industry depends on efficient, long-term methods of producing synthetically derived molecules. For this purpose, chemists often use catalysts, i.e. additives with which they can facilitate and control chemical reactions. But how are such reactions discovered and developed? Not infrequently, chance plays a decisive role. A team of chemists have developed a strategy for generating such

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Catheters: Big source of infection, but often overlooked

Indwelling devices like catheters cause roughly 25% of hospital infections, but ongoing efforts to reduce catheter use and misuse haven't succeeded as much as health care workers would like.

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New BU program prepares trainees for teaching modern, integrated medical curriculum

'Integrating the Educators,' a pilot internship program at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), is successful in training biomedical science trainees (graduate students/Ph.D. and postdocs) in the skills of being a medical educator.

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New study solves mystery of salt buildup on bottom of Dead Sea

New research explains why salt crystals are piling up on the deepest parts of the Dead Sea's floor, a finding that could help scientists understand how large salt deposits formed in Earth's geologic past.

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A month under the Med: French divers launch daring deep-sea expedition

A team of French divers took to the sea off Marseille in a canary yellow capsule on Monday to spend a month exploring the deep waters of the Mediterranean, without decompressing until the very end.

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New study solves mystery of salt buildup on bottom of Dead Sea

New research explains why salt crystals are piling up on the deepest parts of the Dead Sea's floor, a finding that could help scientists understand how large salt deposits formed in Earth's geologic past.

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NASA finds winds tore Tropical Storm 04W apart

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed Tropical Cyclone 04W had been torn apart from wind shear in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

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NASA looks at Tropical Storm Barbara's heavy rainfall

Tropical Storm Barbara formed on Sunday, June 30 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean over 800 miles from the coast of western Mexico. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the storm and measured the rate in which rain was falling throughout it.

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Germany’s prestigious Max Planck Society conducts huge bullying survey

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02052-2 Thousands of employees took part in social study after high-profile bullying scandals emerged last year.

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California Mandates Zero-Emission Vehicles at Airports

The policy, the first such in the nation, is aimed at reducing the state’s emissions from transportation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fair Trade Helps Farmers, But Not Their Hired Workers

According to a new study of cocoa-producing cooperatives, Fair Trade certification boosts the income of small farmers, but those benefits aren't shared with their hired workers. (Image credit: Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images)

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Daily briefing: 10 great things about being an academic

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02059-9 On the plus side of being a prof, how the Soviet collapse cut down on meat (and carbon) and the 13-year-old scientist uncovering why children hate hand dryers.

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Birthplace of England's '9-Day Queen,' Jane Grey, Discovered Under Park

Archaeologists have uncovered what may be the foundations of the childhood home of Lady Jane Grey — a relative of King Henry VIII and Queen of England for nine days in July 1553.

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NASA looks at Tropical Storm Barbara's heavy rainfall

Tropical Storm Barbara formed on Sunday, June 30 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean over 800 miles from the coast of western Mexico. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the storm and measured the rate in which rain was falling throughout it.

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NASA finds winds tore Tropical Storm 04W apart

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed Tropical Cyclone 04W had been torn apart from wind shear in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

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Two-degree climate goal attainable without early infrastructure retirement

If power plants, boilers, furnaces, vehicles, and other energy infrastructure is not marked for early retirement, the world will fail to meet the 1.5-degree Celsius climate-stabilizing goal set out by the Paris Agreement, but could still reach the 2-degree Celsius goal, says the latest from the ongoing collaboration between the University of California Irvine's Steven Davis and Carnegie's Ken Cald

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Researchers clock DNA's recovery time after chemotherapy

A team of researchers led by Nobel laureate Aziz Sancar found that DNA damaged by the widely used chemotherapy drug cisplatin is mostly good as new in noncancerous tissue within two circadian cycles, or two days. The results published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry could inform the development of chronochemotherapies — strategies aimed at administering chemotherapy drugs at times that max

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Cancer cell's 'self eating' tactic may be its weakness

Researchers reveal how pancreatic cancer cells adapt to the low energy environment of a tumor: by eating their own mitochondria! Now, by targeting this process, researchers hope to halt cancer cell proliferation.

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Scientists Want Your Input on Our Alien Response Plan

Message Received Watch enough movies in which aliens contact humans, and you’ll notice a trend: the people deciding how Earth should respond to the extraterrestrial communications are usually politicians or scientists. But the UK Seti Research Network (UKSRN) thinks the average person should have a say in how Earth responds if aliens ever decide to say “hello” to humanity. Power to the People To

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Readers Defend the Boomer Generation

The Boomers Ruined Everything In a variety of areas, Lyman Stone argued last week, the Baby Boomer generation created, advanced, or preserved policies that made American institutions less dynamic. “For virtually the entire period of Boomer political dominance,” Stone wrote, “it has been obvious that long-term obligations needed to be fixed. And yet, the problem has not been fixed. Younger America

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The Education Deserts of Rural America

One in three Montanans lives more than 60 minutes from the nearest college campus. The tracts of land that separate these individuals and institutions are sometimes called “education deserts,” and they cover many patches of rural America. Add to that the fact that nearly 40 percent of first-time, full-time freshmen attend institutions fewer than 50 miles from home, and these statistics begin to s

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Researchers clock DNA's recovery time after chemotherapy

In the time it takes for an Amazon Prime delivery to arrive, cells damaged by chemotherapy can almost completely fix their most important DNA. That is the case in the livers of mice at least, according to a new study.

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Researchers clock DNA's recovery time after chemotherapy

In the time it takes for an Amazon Prime delivery to arrive, cells damaged by chemotherapy can almost completely fix their most important DNA. That is the case in the livers of mice at least, according to a new study.

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Aggression in kids with autism may signal G.I. trouble

Problematic behaviors, such as aggression, might indicate gastrointestinal distress in children and adolescents with autism, according to new research. Bradley Ferguson, assistant research professor in the departments of health psychology, radiology, and the Thompson Center for Autism & Neurodevelopmental Disorders at the University of Missouri, examined records from 340 children and adolescents

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America’s shift from coal to renewable energy has begun

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Did you solve it? Ace these tennis teasers

The answers to today’s puzzles Earlier today I set you the following puzzles. 1) Ashleigh Barty and Naomi Osaka are playing a set of tennis. In the last eight points, Barty has served seven aces and Osaka has served one. What’s the score? Continue reading…

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Coupled proteins: How human cells react to external signals and further process them

Researchers from Heidelberg University and Sendai University in Japan have used new biotechnological methods to study how human cells react to and further process external signals. They focused on the interaction between so-called G-proteins—the "mediators" of signal transmission—and the receptors known as GPCRs, which trigger signal processes. The researchers not only gained a better understandin

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Treating depression takes much more than serotonin

This series highlights the written work of scientists, engineers, analysts, and other experts. Have something to say? Email perspectives@popsci.com . "Serotonin’s association with happiness and depression recovery is so well known that the molecule has become lucrative." (topteen/depositphotos/) Grace Huckins is a Ph.D. student in neuroscience and philosophy at Stanford University. She holds two

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Coupled proteins: How human cells react to external signals and further process them

Researchers from Heidelberg University and Sendai University in Japan have used new biotechnological methods to study how human cells react to and further process external signals. They focused on the interaction between so-called G-proteins—the "mediators" of signal transmission—and the receptors known as GPCRs, which trigger signal processes. The researchers not only gained a better understandin

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The Mycelium Revolution Is Upon Us

It's the fungus mushrooms are made of, but it can also produce everything from plastics to plant-based meat to a scaffolding for growing organs—and much more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rise of the robots: Coming to a first-year Intro to Journalism class near you

Artificial intelligence (AI) is transforming human interactions in nearly every aspect of life, from how business is conducted to how people access healthcare to how news is delivered and consumed.

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East Asian hot spring linked to the Atlantic sea surface temperature anomaly

The changes in spring surface air temperature can exert significant impacts on human health and lead to considerable socioeconomic consequences. Therefore, it is of great interest to understand and predict the variations of spring temperatures. However, the dynamics and predictability of East Asian temperatures during boreal spring are more challenging compared to those in the other seasons. Part

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Recycling plastic: Vinyl polymer broken down to aspirin components

Before you read this, look around your room. How much of your surroundings are made of plastic? The chair that you sit on, the desk, the casing on your computer and monitor, the pen you use, the carpet, the shoes you wear, your clothes, your bag, the soda bottle you sip from, the furniture, the walls and even the plumbing—how many items can you identify that are plastic?

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First proof-of-concept demonstrates genetic sex selection in mammals

Certain plants, insects, crustaceans and fish possess the uncanny ability to change the sex of their offspring before they are born. Mammals have never before demonstrated this genetic skill, until now.

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The Mycelium Revolution Is Upon Us

It's the fungus mushrooms are made of, but it can also produce everything from plastics to plant-based meat to a scaffolding for growing organs—and much more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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First proof-of-concept demonstrates genetic sex selection in mammals

Certain plants, insects, crustaceans and fish possess the uncanny ability to change the sex of their offspring before they are born. Mammals have never before demonstrated this genetic skill, until now.

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Virus that can drive bats to madness spreads through NC's abandoned gold mines

A virus that can lead to a form of madness in bats has spread across four additional counties in North Carolina, thanks in part to countless abandoned gold mines from the 1800s, according to the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.

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Wired Bacteria Form Nature’s Power Grid: ‘We Have an Electric Planet’

Electroactive bacteria were running current through “wires” long before humans learned the trick.

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California was warned about climate change 30 years ago—now it's feeling the effects

Back in 1989, Californians received a sobering warning: The accumulation of heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere would likely bring more droughts, floods, fires and heat waves to the state.

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Virus that can drive bats to madness spreads through NC's abandoned gold mines

A virus that can lead to a form of madness in bats has spread across four additional counties in North Carolina, thanks in part to countless abandoned gold mines from the 1800s, according to the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.

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Hubble captures cosmic fireworks in ultraviolet

Hubble offers a special view of the double star system Eta Carinae's expanding gases glowing in red, white, and blue. This is the highest resolution image of Eta Carinae taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

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Danish researchers create worldwide solar energy model

Solar cells are currently the world's most talked-about renewable energy source, and for any future sustainable energy system, it is crucial to know about the performance of photovoltaic systems at local, regional and global levels. Danish researchers have just set up an historically accurate model, and all the data have been made available for anyone who wants to use it.

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America has outgrown its ‘Judeo-Christian’ label. What’s next?

America wasn't always known as Judeo-Christian nation. Rather, it used to be considered a Protestant nation. As Jews and Catholics began to represent a larger share of the nation, activists realized that America needed to reinvent itself if the voices of these growing groups were to be heard. In this way, the "Judeo-Christian" label was conceived. Today, that label doesn't quite fit anymore. What

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Shorter courses of proton therapy can be just as effective as full courses prostate cancer

Treating prostate cancer with higher doses of proton therapy over a shorter amount of time leads to similar outcomes when compared to standard dose levels and treatments and is safe for patients.

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Coupled proteins

Researchers from Heidelberg University and Sendai University in Japan used new biotechnological methods to study how human cells react to and further process external signals. They focussed on the interaction between so-called G-proteins — the 'mediators' of signal transmission — and the receptors known as GPCRs, which trigger signal processes.

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Some children are more likely to suffer depression long after being bullied

Some young adults who were bullied as a child could have a greater risk of ongoing depression due to a mix of genetic and environmental factors.

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Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, July 2019

ORNL story tips: Study of waste soft drinks for carbon capture could help cut carbon dioxide emissions; sharing secret messages among three parties using quantum communications just got more practical for better cybersecurity; designed synthetic polymers can serve as high-performance binding material for next-generation li-ion batteries; high-fidelity modeling for predicting radiation interactions

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Samsung's Bixby Marketplace is live in the U.S. and Korea

Samsung today opened a dedicated app store for Bixby, allowing Galaxy users to discover new ways to enhance the digital assistant on their phone. It’s called the Bixby Marketplace, and it’s …

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Leveling up: Danny DeVito and Danny Glover steal trailer for Jumanji sequel

Sony looks to repeat success of its 2017 blockbuster Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle.

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We need to shut power plants early to stay under 1.5°C warming

Despite all the talk and target setting, emissions from existing and planned fossil fuel energy infrastructure will take the world well past the 1.5°C mark, unless we shut them down

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World’s Largest Individual Solar Power Project Launched In Abu Dhabi

The United Arab Emirates has a knack for building the biggest and largest of everything. It’s home to the tallest building in the world and the world’s largest mall. Abu Dhabi, …

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We need to shut power plants early to stay under 1.5°C warming

Despite all the talk and target setting, emissions from existing and planned fossil fuel energy infrastructure will take the world well past the 1.5°C mark, unless we shut them down

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Interstellar object 'Oumuamua almost definitely not aliens, we think

After the interstellar asteroid ‘Oumuamua flew through our solar system in 2017, some researchers speculated it might be an alien ship – it’s very likely not

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Near-Death Experiences May Stem from the Brain Blending Waking and Dreaming States, Study Suggests

Although the exact cause of these experiences remains a mystery, the authors say the phenomenon may be tied to certain sleep abnormalities.

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Alaska Governor Cuts $130 Million for University of Alaska System

Mike Dunleavy vetoes funding that would have made up 40 percent of the university system's total budget.

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Where We See Shapes, AI Sees Textures

When you look at a photograph of a cat, chances are that you can recognize the pictured animal whether it’s ginger or striped — or whether the image is black and white, speckled, worn or faded. You can probably also spot the pet when it’s shown curled up behind a pillow or leaping onto a countertop in a blur of motion. You have naturally learned to identify a cat in almost any situation. In contr

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Our water cycle diagrams give a false sense of water security

Pictures of the earth's water cycle used in education and research throughout the world are in urgent need of updating to show the effects of human interference, according to new analysis by an international team of hydrology experts.

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Benzodiazepine use with opioids intensifies neonatal abstinence syndrome

Babies born after being exposed to both opioids and benzodiazepines before birth are more likely to have severe drug withdrawal, requiring medications like morphine for treatment, compared to infants exposed to opioids alone, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in Hospital Pediatrics.

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Blood pressure self-monitoring helps get patients with hypertension moving, study says

Using blood pressure self-monitoring is an effective way to empower patients with hypertension to stick with an exercise program, according to a first-of-its-kind study conducted by a multidisciplinary team of UConn researchers in collaboration with Hartford Hospital.

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NLST follow up reaffirms that low dose CT reduces lung cancer mortality

The authors of the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial report on an extended analysis of the patient cohort that was followed up on after the 2011 study was published. The authors report that their original findings that low dose CT scans reduce lung cancer mortality, have been sustained.

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Danish researchers create worldwide solar energy model

For any future sustainable energy system, it is crucial to know the performance of photovoltaic (solar cell) systems at local, regional and global levels. Danish researchers have investigated and mapped the capacities of photovoltaic generation in the European countries in four different configurations: Rooftop, optimum tilt, tracking and delta configuration, and made the data openly available. Th

3h

Hubble captures cosmic fireworks in ultraviolet

Hubble offers a special view of the double star system Eta Carinae's expanding gases glowing in red, white, and blue. This is the highest resolution image of Eta Carinae taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

3h

New metalloenzyme-based system allows selective targeting of cancer cells

RIKEN researchers have developed a promising method to deliver a drug to cancer cells without affecting surrounding tissues, involving a clever combination of an 'artificial metalloenzyme' that protects a metal catalyst, and a sugar chain that guides the metalloenzyme to the desired cells.

3h

World's smallest MRI performed on single atoms

IBS-QNS researchers have made a major scientific breakthrough by performing the world's smallest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In an international collaboration with colleagues from the US, they used their new technique to visualize the magnetic field of single atoms.

3h

Three-dimensional model illuminates key aspects of early development

Researchers have created a new 3D model of human embryonic tissue that promises to shed light on critical components of development — including processes that go awry during pregnancy complications.

3h

How to protect corals facing climate change

The best way to protect corals threatened by climate change is to conserve a wide range of their habitats, according to a study in Nature Climate Change. The finding likely applies to conservation efforts for many other species in the ocean and on land, including trees and birds.

3h

Evolution of life in the ocean changed 170 million years ago

New research led by the University of Plymouth identifies a previously overlooked global event which changed the course of the evolution of life in the oceans. It coincided with a rise in calcium carbonate-secreting plankton and their subsequent deposition on the ocean floor.

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'Committed' CO2 emissions jeopardize international climate goals, UCI-led study finds

To meet internationally agreed-upon climate targets, the world's industrial nations will need to retire fossil fuel-burning energy infrastructure ahead of schedule, according to a new study in Nature from the University of California, Irvine and other institutions.

3h

Theoretical physicists unveil one of the most ubiquitous and elusive concepts in chemistry

Even if we study them at school, oxidation numbers have so far eluded any rigorous quantum mechanical definition. A new SISSA study, published in Nature Physics, provides such a definition, based on the theory of topological quantum numbers, honored with the 2016 Nobel prize in Physics. This result paves the way to an accurate, yet tractable, numerical simulation of a broad class of materials that

3h

Spiraling filaments feed young galaxies

The Keck Cosmic Web Imager's improved sensitivity and resolution are giving astronomers a better look at galaxy mechanics.

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Mutation discovery leads to precise treatment for child with severe lymphatic disorder

Faced with a preteen boy who had painful swelling and respiratory distress from a severe, deteriorating rare condition, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia identified the responsible gene mutation and harnessed that knowledge to develop a novel treatment that dramatically improved the problem. The patient had been born with a complex defect that disrupted the circulation of lymphati

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Protein clumps in ALS neurons provide potential target for new therapies

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified chemical compounds that prevent stress-induced clumping of TDP-43 protein in ALS motor neurons grown in the lab — a starting point for new ALS therapeutics.

3h

'Oumuamua is not an alien spacecraft

Early reports of the interstellar visitor 'Oumuamua's odd characteristics led some to speculate that the object could be an alien spacecraft, sent from a distant civilization to examine our star system. But a new analysis by an international team of 14 astronomers, published in the journal Nature Astronomy, strongly suggests that 'Oumuamua has a purely natural origin.

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What is association of radioactive iodine treatment for overactive thyroid with risk of cancer death?

Radioactive iodine has been used since the 1940s to treat hyperthyroidism, an overactive thyroid. This study is an extension of one that has followed patients in the United States and the United Kingdom treated for hyperthyroidism for nearly 70 years. Researchers sought to determine the association of doses of radioactive iodine absorbed by organs or tissue with overall and site-specific cancer de

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A cold-tolerant electrolyte for lithium-metal batteries emerges in San Diego

Improvements to a class of battery electrolyte first introduced in 2017 — liquefied gas electrolytes – could pave the way to a high-impact and long-sought advance for rechargeable batteries: replacing the graphite anode with a lithium-metal anode. The research, published July 1, 2019 by the journal Joule, builds on innovations first reported in Science in 2017 by the same research group at the Un

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A bacteria likely to reduce the cardiovascular risks of 1 in 2 people

University of Louvain conducted the first pilot study in humans to observe the impact of the bacteria Akkermansia. Results: the bacterium limits the increase of several risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, moderates the progression of pre-diabetes and reduces cholesterol levels in humans. A major discovery since one in two individuals is overweight and cardiovascular risk factors. The results

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Scientists identify interactions that stabilize a neurodegeneration-associated protein

A team of researchers led by Nicolas Fawzi, an associate professor in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology and Biotechnology at Brown University, used a combination of techniques to determine the atomic interactions that stabilize the liquid, yet 'condensed' phase of FUS, which is found in a a 'solid' or aggregate phase in some people with severe cases of amyotrophic lateral sclero

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After WIC offered better food options, maternal and infant health improved

A major 2009 revision to a federal nutrition program for low-income pregnant women and children improved recipients' health on several key measures, researchers at UC San Francisco have found.

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Researchers identify new way to make cancer self-destruct

Researchers have identified a method that can make tumors grow too quickly and die from the stress.

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NCI study finds increased risk of cancer death following treatment for hyperthyroidism

Findings from a study of patients who received radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment for hyperthyroidism show an association between the dose of treatment and long-term risk of death from solid cancers, including breast cancer. The study, led by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, was published July 1, 2019 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Current pledges to phase out coal power are critically insufficient to slow climate change

The Powering Past Coal Alliance, or PPCA, is a coalition of 30 countries and 22 cities and states, that aims to phase out unabated coal power. But analysis led by Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shows that members mainly pledge to close older plants near the end of their lifetimes, resulting in limited emissions reductions.

3h

Combing nanowire noodles

Brain-machine interfaces could one day help monitor and treat symptoms of neurological disorders, provide a blueprint to design artificial intelligence, or even enable brain-to-brain communication. But, to achieve the reachable and the quixotic, devices need a way to literally dive deeper into cells to perform reconnaissance. Now, researchers have designed a way to make a nanoscale army that could

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Committed emissions from existing energy infrastructure jeopardize 1.5 °C climate target

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1364-3 Committed emissions from existing energy infrastructure jeopardize 1.5 °C climate target

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Smoothened stimulation by membrane sterols drives Hedgehog pathway activity

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1355-4 The crystal structure of active mouse SMO in complex with the SAG21k agonist and a stabilizing intracellular binding nanobody reveals the structural basis of SMO regulation by PTCH1.

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How the Memory of Stonewall Lives On in a Meme

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series about the gay-rights movement and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. One of the most enduring questions about the Stonewall riots is, Who threw the first brick? According to what has become a sort of origin myth, someone flung a chunk of masonry at police officers as they hauled revelers away during a routine raid of the Stonewall Inn,

3h

Video game designer establishes lab for renewable energy

A Dutch video game designer and entrepreneur has established a laboratory on the Big Island that is focused on developing alternatives to fossil fuels for energy, the Hawaii Tribune-Herald reported.

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Buzz Aldrin: Stephen Hawking Said We Shouldn’t Colonize Mars Yet

Order of Space Operations In May, astronaut Buzz Aldrin penned a Washington Post op-ed piece calling for a “ great migration ” of humanity to Mars — but not until after “a sustainable international return to the Moon.” We now know who was responsible for convincing Aldrin that Moon colonization should precede any similar plans for the Red Planet: late astrophysicist Stephen Hawking . Hawking Advi

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Pharmaconutrition: Modern drug design for functional studies

Antonella Di Pizio and Maik Behrens of the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich, together with their cooperation partners, have developed highly effective activators for the bitter receptor TAS2R14 in a German-Israeli research project. The new substances are used to investigate the as yet unknown physiological functions of the receptor, for example, in t

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World’s supply of frankincense could go up in smoke

Human activity threatens the trees from which the incense is made

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CO2 emissions are on track to take us beyond 1.5 degrees of global warming

Current and planned infrastructure will exceed the level of emissions that would keep global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, a new analysis finds.

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We’ve already built too many power plants and cars to prevent 1.5 ˚C of warming

Unless we begin shutting down coal and natural-gas facilities, and stop building new ones, we’re doomed to miss the targets of the Paris treaty.

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New edition of ‘American Judaism’ reflects recent history

A new edition of the authoritative textbook on American Judaism features updates on identity, politics, and the role of religion in culture. Published in 2004, historian Jonathan Sarna’s American Judaism (Yale University Press) was praised as “the single best description of American Judaism during its 350 years on American soil.” This year, its second edition brings the story of American Judaism

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Scientists Took an M.R.I. Scan of an Atom

The hospital technology, typically used to identify human ailments, captured perhaps the world’s smallest magnetic resonance image.

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Three-dimensional model illuminates key aspects of early development

From a biological standpoint, the earliest stages of life are the most mysterious. A developing human embryo undergoes a flurry of rapid changes, and these changes are exceedingly difficult to study because they transpire within the confines of a womb.

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Scientists identify interactions that stabilize a neurodegeneration-associated protein

Most of the well-studied proteins in our bodies are like metal; some can change shape easily, like aluminum foil, and others are rigid, like steel beams, but they typically have a solid, well-defined structure. Many other essential proteins are more like water—able to change phase from liquid to solid ice.

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We’re already committed to too many emissions

Paris Agreement target in jeopardy without changes, report says. Nick Carne reports.

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Early life illuminated in 3D

New model mimics an embryo’s shape and size.

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Scientists Make Model Embryos From Stem Cells To Study Key Steps In Human Development

Researchers hope these "embryoids" could provide crucial new insights into how to treat infertility and prevent miscarriages, birth defects and many diseases. But they stir ethical concerns. (Image credit: Mijo Simunovic, Ph.D., Simons Junior Fellow, The Rockefeller University)

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How augmented reality is changing activism | Glenn Cantave

Glenn Cantave uses technology to highlight narratives of the oppressed. In a tour of immersive visual projects, he shares his work with the team at Movers and Shakers NYC, a coalition that executes direct action and advocacy campaigns for marginalized communities using virtual reality, augmented reality and the creative arts.

3h

Motordel fra Airbus 380-fly fundet på Indlandsisen efter to års jagt

I 2017 tabte en fransk A380-800 store dele af motoren over Sydgrønland. Nu er den fundet af en GEUS-ledet ekspedition, der var lige ved at give op.

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Current pledges to phase out coal power are critically insufficient to slow climate change

The Powering Past Coal Alliance, or PPCA, is a coalition of 30 countries and 22 cities and states, that aims to phase out unabated coal power. But analysis led by Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, published in Nature Climate Change, shows that members mainly pledge to close older plants near the end of their lifetimes, resulting in limited emissions reductions. The research also shows tha

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World's smallest MRI performed on single atoms

Researchers at the Center for Quantum Nanoscience (QNS) within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) at Ewha Womans University have made a major scientific breakthrough by performing the world's smallest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In an international collaboration with colleagues from the U.S., QNS scientists used their new technique to visualize the magnetic field of single atoms.

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'Oumuamua is not an alien spacecraft: study

On October 19, 2017, astronomers discovered the first known interstellar object to visit our solar system. First spotted by the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (PanSTARRS1) telescope located at the University of Hawaii's Haleakala Observatory, the object defied easy description, simultaneously displaying characteristics of both a comet and an asteroid.

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Three-dimensional model illuminates key aspects of early development

From a biological standpoint, the earliest stages of life are the most mysterious. A developing human embryo undergoes a flurry of rapid changes, and these changes are exceedingly difficult to study because they transpire within the confines of a womb.

3h

How to protect corals facing climate change

The best way to protect corals threatened by climate change is to conserve a wide range of their habitats, according to a study in Nature Climate Change. The finding likely applies to conservation efforts for many other species in the ocean and on land, including trees and birds.

3h

Evolution of life in the ocean changed 170 million years ago

The ocean as we understand it today was shaped by a global evolutionary regime shift around 170 million years ago, according to new research.

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New twist in the race to replace the graphite anode for better rechargeable batteries

Improvements to a class of battery electrolyte first introduced in 2017—liquefied gas electrolytes—could pave the way to a high-impact and long-sought advance for rechargeable batteries: replacing the graphite anode with a lithium-metal anode.

3h

New metalloenzyme-based system allows selective targeting of cancer cells

RIKEN researchers have developed a promising method to deliver a drug to cancer cells without affecting surrounding tissues, involving a clever combination of an artificial metalloenzyme that protects a metal catalyst, and a sugar chain that guides the metalloenzyme to the desired cells.

3h

Theoretical physicists unveil one of the most ubiquitous and elusive concepts in chemistry

Oxidation numbers have so far eluded any rigorous quantum mechanical definition. A new SISSA study, published in Nature Physics, provides such a definition based on the theory of topological quantum numbers, which was honored with the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics, awarded to Thouless, Haldane and Kosterlitz. This result, combined with recent advances in the theory of transport achieved at SISSA, pa

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'Committed' CO2 emissions jeopardize international climate goals, study finds

The nations that have signed agreements to stabilize the global mean temperature by 2050 will fail to meet their goals unless existing fossil fuel-burning infrastructure around the world is retired early, according to a study—published today in Nature – by researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions.

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New technique lets researchers make thousands of nanowires, capable of recording intracellular signals, at the same time

Machines are getting cozy with our cells. Embeddable sensors record how and when neurons fire; electrodes spark heart cells to beat or brain cells to fire; neuron-like devices could even encourage faster regrowth after implantation in the brain.

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Scientists identify interactions that stabilize a neurodegeneration-associated protein

Most of the well-studied proteins in our bodies are like metal; some can change shape easily, like aluminum foil, and others are rigid, like steel beams, but they typically have a solid, well-defined structure. Many other essential proteins are more like water—able to change phase from liquid to solid ice.

3h

Spiraling filaments feed young galaxies

Galaxies grow by accumulating gas from their surroundings and converting it to stars, but the details of this process have remained murky. New observations, made using the Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI) at the W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii, now provide the clearest, most direct evidence yet that filaments of cool gas spiral into young galaxies, supplying the fuel for stars.

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Corals in Singapore likely to survive sea-level rise

Global sea levels are expected to rise by at least half a metre by the year 2100 due to climate change. The projected rise can affect important environmental factors such as habitat suitability and availability of light, threatening the health and survival of marine ecosystems.

3h

Women missing class and missing out due to period pain

Period pain significantly impacts young women's academic performance worldwide, according to new Australian-led research — and women are 'putting up with it' rather than seeking treatment.New research from Western Sydney University published in the Journal of Women's Health has found that, regardless of geographical location or economic status, more than two thirds (71%) of young women globally s

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Corals in Singapore likely to survive sea-level rise

Global sea levels are expected to rise by at least half a metre by the year 2100 due to climate change. The projected rise can affect important environmental factors such as habitat suitability and availability of light, threatening the health and survival of marine ecosystems.

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Ocean’s CO2 absorbing powers change over time

New research digs into how the ocean’s processes for absorbing carbon change over time, and how they might affect its ability to buffer climate change For Timothy DeVries, an oceanographer at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and graduate student Michael Nowicki, gaining a good understanding of the trends in the ocean’s carbon cycle is key to improving current models of carbon uptake b

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Video game designer establishes lab for renewable energy

A Dutch video game designer and entrepreneur has established a laboratory on the Big Island that is focused on developing alternatives to fossil fuels for energy, the Hawaii Tribune-Herald reported.

3h

Pharmaconutrition: Modern drug design for functional studies

Antonella Di Pizio and Maik Behrens of the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich, together with their cooperation partners, have developed highly effective activators for the bitter receptor TAS2R14 in a German-Israeli research project. The new substances are used to investigate the as yet unknown physiological functions of the receptor, for example, in t

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Taiwan to crack down on unauthorized research collaborations with mainland China

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01982-1 Fears about a brain drain have prompted Taiwan to look more closely at the mainland talent-recruitment programme.

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India culls hundreds more ‘dubious’ journals from government approved list

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02038-0 Publications on the updated white list will now be assessed for legitimacy and quality.

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Don’t Let the Bedbugs Bite

They have returned with a vengeance. Scientists are scrambling to find new ways to exterminate them.

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BioSA — Bridging the gap with biodegradable metals

The University of Malta has teamed up with Mater Dei Hospital to address the shortcomings of current bone scaffolds on the market in a project entitled Biodegradable Iron for Orthopaedic Scaffold Applications — BioSA.

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Simulating quantum systems with neural networks

A new computational method, based on neural networks, can simulate open quantum systems with unprecedented versatility. The method was independently developed by physicists at EPFL, France, the UK, and the US, and is published in Physical Review Letters.

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The answer to forecasting Bitcoin may lie in artificial intelligence

As Bitcoin tries to regain some of the lustre it held in late 2017 when it nearly reached US$20,000 in value, investors are still questioning how to predict such a volatile currency.

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Does poor sleep in your 50s warn of Alzheimer’s?

People who report worsening sleep quality as they age from their 50s to their 60s have more protein tangles in their brain, putting them at higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease later in life, according to a new study. The new finding highlights the importance of sleep at every age to maintain a healthy brain into later life. “Insufficient sleep across the lifespan is significantly predic

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Scientists propose gait-based biometric identification method for the old with wearable devices

Human gait is a unique feature that could be used for robust identity recognition. The gait-based identity recognition method combines several advantages, such as high fraud-resistance, secure data collection, no need for explicit user interaction, and continuous and long-distance authentication. This combination makes gait a very suitable biometric parameter for user verification when associated

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Insects inspire greener, cheaper membranes for desalination

A new membrane made from water-wet materials has specially designed gas-entrapping pores that allow it to simultaneously separate hot, salty from cool, pure water while facilitating the transfer of pure vapor from one side to the other. This principle, designed by KAUST researchers, could lead to greener, cheaper desalination membranes.

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Well-meaning climate measures can make matters worse

Lifestyle changes can reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and help protect nature. While some actions offer great potential, some aren't as effective as we think and may even require more land and water, such as shifting to renewable energy.

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Neil Gaiman's 'Sandman' Comics Reportedly Getting a Netflix Series

In other news, Paul Rudd is joining 'Ghostbusters 2020' and Lady Gaga might be in 'Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3'.

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See remarkable NASA photos of a new volcano eruption

Astronauts and satellites take memorable photos of the Raikoke volcano eruption in the Kuril Islands. The eruption is the first in volcano since 1924. The plume of the eruption got as high as 17 km (10 mi). None As far as out-of-this-world pictures go, NASA got an amazing opportunity to snap photos of an erupting volcano from the International Space Station. On June 22nd, 2019, the Raikoke Volcan

4h

Controlling weeds on playing fields, parks and lawns without herbicides

Turfgrass covers more than 40 million acres of land in the continental United States, including lawns, parks, commercial landscapes, sports fields and golf courses. It is the single largest irrigated crop in the nation.

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What happens when a country drowns?

Global climate change is endangering small island countries, many of them developing nations, potentially harming their ability to function as independent states.

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Controlling weeds on playing fields, parks and lawns without herbicides

Turfgrass covers more than 40 million acres of land in the continental United States, including lawns, parks, commercial landscapes, sports fields and golf courses. It is the single largest irrigated crop in the nation.

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Hydrogel based water purification system 12 times better than current systems

A team of researchers from the University of Texas at Austin, collaborating with a group from the Lockheed Martin Corporation, has developed a new hydrogel-based water purification system—it is approximately 12 times better than existing commercial systems. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their system and how well it tested.

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New measurements shed light on the impact of water temperatures on glacier calving

Calving, or the breaking off of icebergs from glaciers, has increased at many glaciers along the west coast of Svalbard. Now, researchers at Stockholm university have shown that, whilst subsurface water temperatures are the most important driver of frontal mass loss, they are not as important as previously thought.

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Would your mobile phone be powerful enough to get you to the moon?

Many people who are old enough to have experienced the first moon landing will vividly remember what it was like watching Neil Armstrong utter his famous quote: "That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.". Half a century later, the event is still one of the top achievements of humankind. Despite the rapid technological advances since then, astronauts haven't actually been back t

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To carve out a niche in space industries, Australia should focus on microgravity research rockets

Australia now has a space agency, and our federal and South Australian governments are looking to grow a prosperous space industry to boost productivity and employment.

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New measurements shed light on the impact of water temperatures on glacier calving

Calving, or the breaking off of icebergs from glaciers, has increased at many glaciers along the west coast of Svalbard. Now, researchers at Stockholm university have shown that, whilst subsurface water temperatures are the most important driver of frontal mass loss, they are not as important as previously thought.

4h

Pharmaconutrition — Modern drug design for functional studies

Antonella Di Pizio and Maik Behrens of the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich, together with their cooperation partners, have developed highly effective activators for the bitter receptor TAS2R14 in a German-Israeli research project. The new substances are used to investigate the as yet unknown physiological functions of the receptor, for example, in t

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Radio telescope ALMA finds earliest example of merging galaxies

Researchers using ALMA observed signals of oxygen, carbon, and dust from a galaxy in the early Universe 13 billion years ago. This is the earliest galaxy where this useful combination of three signals has been detected. By comparing the different signals, the team determined that the galaxy is actually two galaxies merging together, making it the earliest example of merging galaxies yet discovered

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Building up an appetite for a new kind of grub

Researchers have reviewed current insect farming methods, processing technologies and commercialisation techniques, as well as current perceptions towards edible insects. Their report highlights that insects could be a key ingredient to avoiding a global food crisis but there are significant barriers to overcome before they are part of the mainstream.

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Scientists alarmed by bark beetle boom

Bark beetles are currently responsible for killing an unprecedented number of trees in forests across Europe and North America. Why the beetle populations first explode to decline naturally after a few years is largely unknown. Researchers are therefore urging to step up research into the dynamics of bark beetle populations. They believe that more needs to be done also in view of climate change.

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New model suggests lost continents for early Earth

A new radioactivity model of Earth's ancient rocks calls into question current models for the formation of Earth's continental crust, suggesting continents may have risen out of the sea much earlier than previously thought but were destroyed, leaving little trace.

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Inexpensive equipment and training can improve melanoma detection and reduce biopsies

Researchers say non-dermatologist physicians can make earlier and more accurate diagnoses of melanomas using a dermatoscope. This would be particularly beneficial for patients who lack access to dermatologists, the authors noted, because primary care physicians typically biopsy suspicious spots or refer patients to a specialist.

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Simulating quantum systems with neural networks

Even on the scale of everyday life, nature is governed by the laws of quantum physics. These laws explain common phenomena like light, sound, heat, or even the trajectories of balls on a pool table. But when applied to a large number of interacting particles, the laws of quantum physics actually predict a variety of phenomena that defy intuition.

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Using mobile phone data to estimate air pollution exposure

Air pollution is one of the greatest challenges cities are facing today, and improving air quality is a pressing need to reduce negative health impacts. In order to efficiently evaluate which are the most appropriate policies to reduce the impact of urban pollution sources (such as road traffic), it is essential to conduct rigorous population exposure assessments.

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Solubility mystery of widely-used plastic solved

Polyether molecules tend to dissolve better in water as they contain more oxygen and fewer carbon atoms. But there are very counter-intuitive exceptions to this trend, the most well-known being the widely used plastic POM. It has the highest possible oxygen/carbon ratio but is completely insoluble. In the current issue of Nature Communications, researchers from the University of Amsterdam and the

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Enhancing the performance of metal-organic framework materials

Researchers at the group of Dr. Stefania Grecea at the University of Amsterdam's Research Priority Sustainable Chemistry have devised a way to enhance the practical performance of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). By using leaves from the black poplar as a template, they produced hierarchical porous structures of mixed-metal oxide materials that can act as support for MOF crystals. In a recent edit

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Demolishing your front fence could be an act of kindness

A few years ago, I reflected on years of doctoral field-notes documenting the homes of tinkerers—people with an extraordinary commitment to DIY living. It occurred to me that despite their DIY skills, few of these tinkerers had built or maintained front fences.

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Sitting is the new smoking, but not all types of sitting are made equal

Too much sitting is horrible for you, but not all sitting is the same. A new study finds even short bouts of movement during the day can dramatically reduce your risk of death. While it found light exercise was able to counter some effects of sitting, it found moderate to vigorous workouts did better. Americans have a sitting problem. A quarter of us are sedentary for eight waking hours a day , w

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10 Medical Myths We Should Stop Believing. Doctors, Too.

Researchers identified nearly 400 common medical practices and theories that were contradicted by rigorous studies. Here are some of the most notable findings.

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Personalized medicine software vulnerability uncovered by Sandia researchers

A weakness in one common open source software for genomic analysis left DNA-based medical diagnostics vulnerable to cyberattacks.

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You've Never Seen Skate Parks Like This Before

Photographer Amir Zaki finds sculptural beauty in the concrete playgrounds of southern California.

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The LightSail-2 Mission Launched Last Week. It Could Shape the Future of Solar Spaceflight

Just like the early explorers harnessed the wind to sail around the world, scientists have long dreamed of using light to sail through the cosmos. Last week an ambitious trial of a technology called LightSail-2 took to the skies aboard SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket . The idea of solar sailing has a long pedigree. As far back as the 17 th century, renowned astronomer Johannes Kepler speculated that

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It’s not just Titan. Astrobiologists still have eyes for Enceladus

Small it may be, but it excites those looking for life out there. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Body shape linked to heart risk post-menopause

Study shows that where weight is stored is as important as how much weight is stored. Nick Carne reports.

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San Francisco Banned Facial Recognition. Will California Follow?

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New Solar + Battery Price Crushes Fossil Fuels, Buries Nuclear

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CPAP provides relief from depression

Researchers have found that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can improve depression symptoms in patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases. Using data from the major international Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Endpoints (SAVE) trial led by Flinders University, the new study has found a significant decrease in cases of depression after patients

4h

Well-meaning climate measures can make matters worse

Lifestyle changes can reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and help protect nature. While some actions offer great potential, some aren't as effective as we think and may even require more land and water, such as shifting to renewable energy.

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Environmentally friendly control of common disease infecting fish and amphibians

Aquatic organisms in marine systems and freshwaters are threatened by fungal and fungal-like diseases globally. These pathogens are especially dreaded in aquaculture. But they also pose a threat to biodiversity of amphibians. There are few approved chemical means for combating these pathogens, and many have unwanted side-effects. Scientists at the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland

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Space Weather causes years of radiation damage to satellites using electric propulsion

The use of electric propulsion for raising satellites into geostationary orbit can result in significant solar cell degradation according to a new study being presented at the Royal Astronomical Society's National Astronomy Meeting. The extended journey time results in greater exposure to the damaging effects of space weather. Understanding the size of this risk is essential for commercial satelli

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Long-haul flights and Super Rugby performance: what the science says

Super Rugby is arguably the highest expression of rugby at club level in the world. Its next closest rival in the world of international competitive rugby at club level is the European Rugby Champions Cup (Heineken Champions Cup). Super Rugby involves teams from South Africa, Argentina, New Zealand, Australia and Japan. As the competition is conducted in multiple countries, teams have to travel fr

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Grand Theft Auto 6 Rumors Run Wild About Netflix Narcos Themed Mayhem

A massive dump of allegedly leaked information has surfaced about the Rockstar title Grand Theft Auto 6. The leak says that the game is codenamed Project America and the leaker on Reddit is …

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OpenID Alleges Sign In With Apple Is An Epic Privacy Fail And Major Security Risk

The OpenID Foundation has penned an open letter to Apple imploring the company to make changes to its 'Sign-In with Apple' technology that is infused in iOS 13. According to the letter, there …

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Smart glasses follow our eyes, focus automatically

Though it may not have the sting of death and taxes, presbyopia is another of life's guarantees. This vision defect plagues most of us starting about age 45, as the lenses in our eyes lose the …

4h

Facebook to make jobs, credit ads searchable for US users

Facebook says it will make advertisements for jobs, loans and credit card offers searchable for all U.S. users following a legal settlement designed to eliminate discrimination on its platform.

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Recycling plastic: Vinyl polymer broken down to aspirin components

Not a day goes by without news of microplastics in our oceans. There are not many efficient methods of recycling plastics without compromising quality. A beacon of hope was recently lit at Shinshu University where researchers discovered acid hydrolysis of a vinyl polymer breaks down into salicylic acid and acetic acid, precursors to dehydroaspirin which in theory can be made into vinyl polymers ag

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Alcohol and pregnancy policies: Birth outcomes & prenatal care use by race

This research examines whether effects of alcohol/pregnancy policies vary by race.Results show that the effect of alcohol/pregnancy policies varied by race for preterm birth, varied in a few cases for low birthweight, and generally did not vary for prenatal care use.

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Insects inspire greener, cheaper membranes for desalination

Insect-inspired design principles lead to first-ever water-repellent membranes made from water-wet materials.

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Health checks from age 40 avoid 'black hole'

Seeing a health professional for a full health screening – even when you feel healthy — from around age 40 enables people to make changes when problems first set in, experts say. Flinders University research on a group of 561 seemingly healthy adults found that there was an average of five unidentified health problems per person, including undiagnosed blood pressure or early hearing loss. The 21

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East Asian hot spring linked to the Atlantic sea surface temperature anomaly

A Chinese research team investigated the spatiotemporal patterns of the record-breaking temperatures in East Asia in spring 2018 based on ERA-Interim reanalysis data. Their research linked East Asian extreme heat in boreal spring to North Atlantic SST anomalies.

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Mathematical models can predict animals' risk of extinction

Can we predict the extinction of endangered species? In short: yes—and we can achieve this by using mathematical models as our windows into the future.

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Sixth right whale death in Canadian waters sets researchers on urgent mission for solutions

There is a growing urgency to identify where endangered North Atlantic right whales are migrating, say researchers after a sixth dead mammal was discovered in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

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Earth to Mars in 100 days: The power of nuclear rockets

The solar system is a really big place, and it takes forever to travel from world to world with traditional chemical rockets. But one technique developed back in the 1960s might provide a way to shorten our travel times dramatically: nuclear rockets.

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Publication Rankings

I enjoyed looking through the Nature Indexes section recently in that journal – I believe that they do this primarily as a way to make a new section in which to sell advertisements, to be honest, but the content itself is worth a look. They’re tracking publications in 82 leading scientific journals and looking for trends in publication frequency, etc. Some of the results are not particularly surp

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Mathematical models can predict animals' risk of extinction

Can we predict the extinction of endangered species? In short: yes—and we can achieve this by using mathematical models as our windows into the future.

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Sixth right whale death in Canadian waters sets researchers on urgent mission for solutions

There is a growing urgency to identify where endangered North Atlantic right whales are migrating, say researchers after a sixth dead mammal was discovered in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

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How historic Jupiter comet impact led to planetary defense

Twenty-five years ago, humanity first witnessed a collision between a comet and a planet. From July 16 to 22, 1994, enormous pieces of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9), discovered just a year prior, crashed into Jupiter over several days, creating huge, dark scars in the planet's atmosphere and lofting superheated plumes into its stratosphere.

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Synthetic skin could aid wound healing

Engineers have devised a fabric dressing whose thickness and elasticity can be custom-matched to specific areas of the body.

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Study unveils new supersymmetry anomalies in superconformal quantum field theories

Researchers at the University of Southampton and the Korea Institute for Advanced Study have recently showed that supersymmetry is anomalous in N=1 superconformal quantum field theories (SCFTs) with an anomalous R symmetry. The anomaly described in their paper, published in Physical Review Letters, was previously observed in holographic SCFTs at strong coupling, yet their work confirms that it is

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How celebrity activists are changing morality in America

Are celebrities increasingly acting as our moral compass?

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An innovative method for detecting defaulting participants based on sparse reconstruction

In the contract-based demand response, some of the participants may default in providing the scheduled negawatt energy owing to demand-side fluctuations faults. Thus, the detection of defaulting participants is an important function of the aggregator. A group of Japanese researchers has developed a method to detect defaulting participants based on sparse reconstruction. This enables assured detect

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Imitation breeds war in new evolutionary theory

When anthropologists consider the origins of warfare, their evolutionary theories tend to boil it down to the resource-scarcity trifecta of food, territory and mates—three resources that would justify the loss of life and risk to a warring group of hunter-gatherers.

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Space weather causes years of radiation damage to satellites using electric propulsion

The use of electric propulsion for raising satellites into geostationary orbit can result in significant solar cell degradation according to a new study. The extended journey results in greater exposure to the damaging effects of space weather. Understanding the size of this risk is essential for commercial operators to take steps to mitigate the effects and protect their assets.

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Study results pave the way to programmable electronic inks

Conjugated polymers are important materials because of their special electronic and optical properties and low cost, making them very promising for a wide range of applications. An international research team led by Professor René Janssen developed a method to create two subtypes of one polymer, with different semiconductor characteristics, simply by changing the solvent from which the polymer fil

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Competition leads to fathers who produce more male sperm

New research led by The University of Western Australia has shown that the social conditions that a male experiences while growing up can influence the amount of X and Y chromosome sperm that he produces as an adult.

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Surprise: Bluntnose sixgill sharks may like to prowl urban waters

They are large, rarely seen and thought to inhabit deep waters far from shore.

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Imitation breeds war in new evolutionary theory

When anthropologists consider the origins of warfare, their evolutionary theories tend to boil it down to the resource-scarcity trifecta of food, territory and mates—three resources that would justify the loss of life and risk to a warring group of hunter-gatherers.

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Competition leads to fathers who produce more male sperm

New research led by The University of Western Australia has shown that the social conditions that a male experiences while growing up can influence the amount of X and Y chromosome sperm that he produces as an adult.

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Surprise: Bluntnose sixgill sharks may like to prowl urban waters

They are large, rarely seen and thought to inhabit deep waters far from shore.

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There are 2 types of god. Only one is within the boundary of science.

Science is about natural law, while religion is about ethics. As long as you keep these two separate, Kaku says, there's no problem at all. Problems arise, however, when the natural sciences begin to "pontificate upon ethics" and when religious people begin to pontificate about natural law. Albert Einstein believed in the "god of Spinoza" — not a personal god, but one who has set order and harmon

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Art Meets Science in These Dazzling Lamps Made of Microbes

Swedish designer Jan Klingler has garnered attention for his stunning lighting featuring bacteria — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The World's First Virus-Proof Cell, with Redesigned DNA, Is about to Meet the Test of Its Life

Biologists are building an organism that can shrug off any virus on the planet. Impervious human cells may be next — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Image: Mars 2020 rover's seven-foot-long robotic arm installed

In this image, taken on June 21, 2019, engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, install the main robotic arm on the Mars 2020 rover. (A smaller arm to handle Mars samples will be installed inside the rover as well.) The main arm includes five electrical motors and five joints (known as the shoulder azimuth joint, shoulder elevation joint, elbow joint, wrist joint and

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Current sexual abuse laws leave online victims unprotected

People's lives have been shattered by so-called "revenge porn," upskirting, fake porn, sexual extortion and videos of sexual assaults and rape shared online. Victims and survivors can experience profound "social rupture"—a major devastation that drastically alters all aspects of their lives, as well as the lives of those who love and support them.

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Peer support reduces carer burden

In a world first, La Trobe University research has shown how peer-led support programs for family and friends who provide regular support to an adult diagnosed with a mental health condition can significantly improve carer well-being.

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PBS restrictions result in outdated and unsafe care

Prescribing restrictions for anti-epileptic drugs expose flaws in the review process of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), a University of Queensland researcher proposes.

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Corals in Singapore likely to survive sea-level rise: NUS study

Marine scientists from the National University of Singapore found that coral species in Singapore's sedimented and turbid waters are unlikely to be impacted by accelerating sea-level rise

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An innovative method for detecting defaulting participants based on sparse reconstruction

In the contract-based demand response, some of the participants may default in providing the scheduled negawatt energy owing to demand-side fluctuations faults. Thus, the detection of defaulting participants is an important function of the aggregator. A group of Japanese researchers has developed a method to detect defaulting participants based on sparse reconstruction. This enables assured detect

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High doses of 60 plus-year-old chemo drug found to spur immune system attack on lymphoma

Cyclophosphamide, a mainstay of chemotherapy for many cancers, acts as both chemotherapy and immunotherapy at high doses, study finds.

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Why is the Earth's F/Cl ratio not chondritic?

It is generally believed that terrestrial planets were made from chondrites. However, geochemical observations have shown that the abundance pattern of volatile elements, such as fluorine and chorine in the Earth is inconsistent with chondrites. New high-pressure experiments on the silicate mineral-melt partitioning of F and Cl suggest that F and Cl fractionation during magma ocean crystallization

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Scientists propose gait-based biometric identification method for the old with wearable devices

Professor Li Ye and his colleagues Dr. Sun Fangmin and Dr. Zang Weilin at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in cooperation with colleagues from the University of Calabria in Italy, have proposed a gait-based identification method for elderly users.

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Environmentally friendly control of common disease infecting fish and amphibians

Aquatic organisms in marine systems and freshwaters are threatened by fungal and fungal-like diseases globally. These pathogens are especially dreaded in aquaculture. But they also pose a threat to biodiversity of amphibians. There are few approved chemical means for combating these pathogens, and many have unwanted side-effects. Scientists at the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland

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Environmentally friendly control of common disease infecting fish and amphibians

Aquatic organisms in marine systems and freshwaters are threatened by fungal and fungal-like diseases globally. These pathogens are especially dreaded in aquaculture. But they also pose a threat to biodiversity of amphibians. There are few approved chemical means for combating these pathogens, and many have unwanted side-effects. Scientists at the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland

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How shiny are near-Earth objects?

Near-Earth objects (NEOs) are small solar system bodies whose orbits sometimes bring them close to the Earth. NEOs are consequently potential collision threats, but scientists are also interested in them because they offer keys to the composition, dynamics and environmental conditions of solar system and its evolution. Most meteorites for example, one of the key sources of knowledge about the earl

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Why is the Earth's F/Cl ratio not chondritic?

Primitive chondrites, un-molten stony meteorites, are believed to be the building blocks of the Earth. Because terrestrial planets have experienced chemical differentiation in the core, mantle, and hydrosphere, the elemental abundance pattern of some elements at the planetary surface is not chondritic. In other words, the non-chondritic abundance pattern of elements on the planetary surface is a k

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A Surprising Idea About the Risks of Extinction

Isle Royale is 200 square miles of land in the watery expanse of Lake Superior. One cold winter 70 years ago, wolves came over an ice bridge and settled into a largely isolated island existence. Unfortunately, island life has not been good for them. By 2016 , the number of wolves on Isle Royale declined from a peak of 50 to just two, a male and a female. As a result of inbreeding, they were half-

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Poachers Are Invading Botswana, Last Refuge of African Elephants

New data leave little doubt that the illegal ivory trade has reached the country, scientists say.

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These cells may link Alzheimer’s amyloid and tau

The link between the two proteins that build up in the brain of people with Alzheimer’s disease may lie in the brain’s immune cells that hem in clumps of amyloid. If the immune cells falter, amyloid clumps, or plaques, injure nearby neurons and create a toxic environment that accelerates the formation and spread of tau tangles, the researchers report. Years before symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease

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Scientists alarmed by bark beetle boom

Bark beetles are currently responsible for killing an unprecedented number of trees in forests across Europe and North America. Why the beetle populations first explode to decline naturally after a few years is largely unknown. Researchers are therefore urging to step up research into the dynamics of bark beetle populations. They believe that more needs to be done also in view of climate change.

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Edible insects could be a key ingredient to avoiding a global food crisis, researchers insist

Edible insects could be a key ingredient to avoiding a global food crisis, according to a new report, but there are significant barriers to overcome before they are part of the mainstream.

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Embracing bioinformatics in gene banks

The preservation of plant biodiversity is the task of the roughly 1,750 gene banks distributed around the world. They store plant samples and sometimes additional phenotypic or genetic information of around 7.4 million accessions of plant species in total. It is expected that with facilitated access to improved, quicker and cheaper sequencing and other omics technologies, the number of well-charac

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Scientists alarmed by bark beetle boom

Bark beetles are currently responsible for killing an unprecedented number of trees in forests across Europe and North America. Why the beetle populations first explode to decline naturally after a few years is largely unknown. Researchers are therefore urging to step up research into the dynamics of bark beetle populations. They believe that more needs to be done also in view of climate change.

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Embracing bioinformatics in gene banks

The preservation of plant biodiversity is the task of the roughly 1,750 gene banks distributed around the world. They store plant samples and sometimes additional phenotypic or genetic information of around 7.4 million accessions of plant species in total. It is expected that with facilitated access to improved, quicker and cheaper sequencing and other omics technologies, the number of well-charac

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Research shows governance is key to better resource management strategies

For resource managers charged with maintaining important assets like croplands or fisheries, quantitative modeling is a critical tool. But these sophisticated decision-support models often overlook an essential element of resource management: governance.

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1,000 Years of Congruent Numbers

These integers have inspired one of the most important unsolved problems in mathematics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How the Mind Emerges from the Brain's Complex Networks

The new discipline of network neuroscience yields a picture of how mental activity arises from carefully orchestrated interactions among different brain areas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nature-based solutions: The missing ingredient in climate adaptation?

The upcoming United Nations Climate Action Summit in September 2019 will attempt to bring about transformative change and resounding actions to accelerate climate solutions aligned with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Of the summit's six action areas, the concept of nature-based solutions has caught the imagination of conservation supporters and development practitioners alike.

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Research shows governance is key to better resource management strategies

For resource managers charged with maintaining important assets like croplands or fisheries, quantitative modeling is a critical tool. But these sophisticated decision-support models often overlook an essential element of resource management: governance.

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Physicists OK commercial graphene for T-wave detection

Russian researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) and Valiev Institute of Physics and Technology have demonstrated resonant absorption of terahertz radiation in commercially available graphene. This is an important step toward designing efficient terahertz detectors to enable faster internet and a safe replacement for X-ray body scans. The research findings were publis

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Scientists control the electrical characteristics of optical memory devices

A group of researchers from Skoltech, the Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics of RAS, and N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry of RAS, led by Skoltech Professor P.A. Troshin, has discovered a relationship between the structure of photochromic molecules and electrical characteristics of memory devices built using these compounds. Their findings open new opportunities for the rational

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Drone transmits uncompressed 4K video in real time using millimeter wave tech

SECOM and Tokyo Institute of Technology have jointly developed a millimeter-wave wireless communication system that enables long distance communication, and succeeded in transmitting 4K uncompressed video in real time from a drone.

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Women vs. men—tactical efficiency in football

In modern football, tactics are relevant across all age groups and performance levels. Yet for a long time, they have received little attention in the training process. Today, tactical performance offers enormous potential. In a new project, sports scientists at the German Sport University Cologne have been comparing the soccer-specific tactical performance of male and female players in Europe wit

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Utrafast magnetism: Electron-phonon interactions examined at BESSY II

How fast can a magnet switch its orientation, and what are the microscopic mechanisms at play? An HZB team at BESSY II has, for the first time, experimentally assessed the principal microscopic process of ultra-fast magnetism. The methodology developed for this purpose can also be used to investigate interactions between spins and lattice oscillations in graphene, superconductors or other quantum

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Amphibians infected by ranavirus found in Atlantic Rainforest

Researchers have found bullfrog tadpoles with clear signs of infection by ranavirus in Brazil. The specimens were collected from two ponds in the city of Passo Fundo, South of the country (state of Rio Grande do Sul), in November 2017. Ranavirus causes skin ulcerations, edema and internal hemorrhage. It does not affect humans but can be lethal to amphibians and fish.

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The One Free Press Coalition Spotlights Journalists Under Attack – July 2019 List

So far in 2019, Mexico is the deadliest country for journalists.

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Amphibians infected by ranavirus found in Atlantic Rainforest

Researchers have found bullfrog tadpoles with clear signs of infection by ranavirus in Brazil. The specimens were collected from two ponds in the city of Passo Fundo, South of the country (state of Rio Grande do Sul), in November 2017. Ranavirus causes skin ulcerations, edema and internal hemorrhage. It does not affect humans but can be lethal to amphibians and fish.

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Astronomers conduct chemical investigation of globular cluster NGC 6723

By analyzing high-resolution spectra for 11 red giant branch (RGB) stars, astronomers have conducted a chemical investigation of the globular cluster NGC 6723. Results of the study, presented in a paper published June 24 on arXiv.org, offer more insights on the chemical enrichment of NGC 6723 and could be important to better understand chemical composition of globular clusters in general.

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Art Meets Science in These Dazzling Lamps Made of Microbes

Swedish designer Jan Klingler has garnered attention for his stunning lighting featuring bacteria — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Social Media Bots Deceive E-cigarette Users

Social media bots promote unproved benefits of e-cigarettes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Symphony of Science

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Readers Respond to the March 2019 Issue

Letters to the editor from the March 2019 issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Genomic Surveillance Could Make a Big Difference in the Fight against Malaria

It can flag pathogens long before patients show up in clinics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Come One, Come All: Building a Moon Village

Humanity first went to the moon to make a point. Now it’s time to overcome rivalries and pitch in together — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Ecologists and the Mine

Mining giant Rio Tinto made a high-profile pledge to improve the ecology of its ilmenite sites in Madagascar in cooperation with conservation scientists. Then its bottom line began to suffer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In Case You Missed It

Top news from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How the Mind Emerges from the Brain's Complex Networks

The new discipline of network neuroscience yields a picture of how mental activity arises from carefully orchestrated interactions among different brain areas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Jared Diamond's New Book Upheaval Looks at Lessons to Be Found from Countries in Crisis

Fixing a problem first requires recognizing that it exists — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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"Emotional AI" Might Sound Good, but It Could Have Some Troubling Consequences

But its consequences could be troubling — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cannabis Could Help Solve the Opioid Crisis

Not alone, but it could be part of the solution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The World's First Virus-Proof Cell, with Redesigned DNA, Is about to Meet the Test of Its Life

Biologists are building an organism that can shrug off any virus on the planet. Impervious human cells may be next — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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1969: Catching Small Particles; 1919: Crashing Large Airplanes

Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We Should Be More Worried about Climate Change Than We Are about Nuclear Power

Climate change scares me more than the risk of meltdowns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Search for a Brexit-Era Margaret Thatcher

In the Gothic grandeur of London’s ancient Guildhall, the great and the good of trans-Atlantic conservatism gathered to search for the conviction they once had. The conference was in honor of Margaret Thatcher, 40 years after her era-defining election in 1979 as Britain’s first female prime minister. The event was slated as an opportunity to examine the “special relationship” between Britain and

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Dear Therapist: I’m So Upset by My Kids’ Middle-School Drama

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, We have two sons, fraternal twins, who are in middle school. They both play sports, participate in other activities, and have some mutual friends. This past school year, I’ve become more emotionally involved i

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Night King: Australia bee fly named after Game of Thrones villain

A new species of bee fly discovered in Western Australia is named after the Game of Thrones villain.

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Apple TV+ Swears It Won't Be as Shitty as Netflix

Apple’s foray in the ever-crowded streaming space raises some big questions about the kinds of content an otherwise clean-cut company plans to create. If Eddy Cue is to be believed, Apple plans …

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Smart glasses follow our eyes, focus automatically

By using eye-tracking technology to automatically control a pair of autofocus lenses, engineers have created a prototype for 'autofocals' designed to restore proper vision in people who would ordinarily need progressive lenses.

6h

Gut bacteria biomarker may flag I.B.D. early

Small molecules in fecal matter could provide clues to the early inflammation in chronic gut conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, a new study reports. Researchers found they could use fecal miRNA, small nucleic acid sequences, as a tool to assess the healthiness of gut microbiota, the microorganisms living in our gastrointestinal tract, and provide early clues to intestinal inflammatio

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Nye Borgelige: Regeringens klimamål er trukket ud af den blå luft

Fremskridtsordfører hos NB er ingeniør og kalder sig klimarealist. Han sigter efter rentabel teknologi, der kan reducere drivhusgasudledningen.

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Varme-nedbrud på datacenter i Ballerup sendte store hjemmesider i knæ

Et kollapset køleanlæg hos datacentervirksomheden Interxion fik søndag aften flere danske medie-hjemmesider til at gå ned. NemLog-in, DSB App, MobilePay og Saxo har angiveligt også haft problemer på grund af nedbruddet.

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Amerikansk universitet sagsøges for at dele patientdata med Google

Ifølge anklagen er det muligt for Google at identificere patienter ud fra de delte sundhedsoplysninger.

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Is Medicine Overrated?

Given medicine’s poor record, physicians should prescribe and patients consume far fewer medications, a new book argues. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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YouTube anti-vax videos are on the decline but are yet to be wiped out

Anti-vaccination views are often spread on YouTube, but new research suggests the site has begun to get a handle on its vaccine disinformation problem

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Vattentemperaturens betydelse för glaciärernas kalvning

Med hjälp av ny mätteknik som utvecklats i samarbete med KTH har forskarna tagit fram kontinuerliga mätserier av vattentemperatur direkt vid glaciärerna Tunabreen och Kronebreen på Svalbards västkust. Resultaten visar att undervattentemperaturen utgör den viktigaste faktorn för glaciärernas minskning – men att den inte är lika viktig som man tidigare trott. – En av de största osäkerheterna när de

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Techtopia #112: Er cyberkrigen brudt ud?

Foregår der allerede en usynlig krig i vores netværk af computere? Det mente mange af de 400 talere på konferencen Cyberweek i Israel.

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The Second Coming of the Robot Pet

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Young hackers to be lured into legitimate employment with Government scheme.

Young people referred to Cyber Choices will be assessed by a panel composed of members of the police, local councils and the NHS. Following this, they may be given support for housing, mental health and social skills, as well as access to an online portal where they can test their coding skills and engage with potential employers. Schools and social services can refer children to the project, whi

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New Analysis Techniques Unearth a Trove of Unusual Minerals

Ion beams and special x-rays mean that ever-smaller slivers of material can be scanned without destroying the surrounding rock.

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Fujifilm Instax Mini LiPlay Review: A Cam and Printer In One

Fujifilm's latest instant camera offers the best of both Instax worlds: It's an instant camera and printer in one.

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Europe failed to act after the 2003 French heatwave. We cannot ignore this one | Ruben Hallali

Record temperatures are being recorded as warnings pile up. It’s vital action is taken against climate breakdown now Several French temperature records were broken on 28 June during this historic heatwave, including the highest temperature ever recorded in the country since records began – 45.9C. The previous high was set during the 2003 heatwave , which was the most significant episode in France

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Image of the Day: Bee Bot

Developers made an insect-like robot with two pairs of wings.

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Meet the Ebola Workers Battling a Virus in a War Zone

Nature's Amy Maxmen reports from the front line of the crisis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Privacy in the Age of AI

How strong is the password you use for your e-mail account? When was the last time you changed it? Your e-mail is the gateway to pretty much the rest of your security – someone who has captured your e-mail can use it to reset many of your other passwords. Yet, the top 10 passwords that people use are: “123456, 123456789, qwerty, password, 111111, 12345678, abc123, 1234567, password1, and 12345.”

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Before there was an Apple iPod, there was Sony Walkman. 40 years of music on the move

If you wanted to listen to music a generation ago, it wasn't in your phone. You likely did it with a Sony Walkman. The original debuted July 1, 1979.

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Solens stråler udnyttes på Roskilde Festival – en parallel til u-lande

U-lande og Roskildefestival: Solar Cooker er en patenteret plastiklinse, der varmer en pande op til 300 grader. Når man altså laver mad om dagen.

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Nanocoating prevents greasy smears

Not only are greasy fingerprints on shiny stainless steel surfaces unattractive, they also attack the surface. A new nanocoating being developed by Fraunhofer researchers will in the future prevent the annoying smudges that result from fingers touching stainless steel surfaces. The key to their approach: special nanoparticles added to the coating.

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Birdwatchers highlight declines of seabirds off south-eastern Australia

Thirteen species of seabirds are declining off the coast of south-eastern Australia, a 17-year study by researchers at the Centre for Ecosystem Science at UNSW Sydney revealed.

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Here's the Best Way for Humans to Conquer the Galaxy, According to NASA

A team of Chinese researchers hasve won a NASA competition to design the best- possible method for humans to spread across our galaxy.

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AI Created a 3D Replica of Our Universe. We Have No Idea How It Works.

The first artificial intelligence-created universe is almost as mysterious as the real thing.

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Alien Life Might 'Think' More Like an Octopus Than a Human

When an octopus uses its arms, it's a no-brainer.

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These Ghostly Blue Clouds Only Appear at Night — And They're Made of Meteors

When ice grabs onto bits of meteor dust high in the atmosphere, it forms a show of light and cloud like no other.

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NASA tracked small asteroid before it broke up in atmosphere

When a lightning detector on a NOAA weather satellite detected something that wasn't lightning last Saturday, a scientist at the Center for Near Earth Object Studies at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, did some detective work.

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Birdwatchers highlight declines of seabirds off south-eastern Australia

Thirteen species of seabirds are declining off the coast of south-eastern Australia, a 17-year study by researchers at the Centre for Ecosystem Science at UNSW Sydney revealed.

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New model suggests lost continents for early Earth

A new radioactivity model of Earth's ancient rocks calls into question current models for the formation of Earth's continental crust, suggesting continents may have risen out of the sea much earlier than previously thought but were destroyed, leaving little trace.

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Video: Proba-2's predicted view of 2 July eclipse

On 2 July 2019, a total solar eclipse will be visible from the South Pacific, falling over land for some parts of Chile and Argentina, with other South American countries enjoying a partial eclipse.

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Soviet Union’s collapse led to massive drop in carbon emissions

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02024-6 Economic downturn changed people’s meat-heavy diets.

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Fishing out a feeding paradox

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02008-6 If an animal’s body shape is specialized in a way that aids feeding on specific organisms, does this restrict what the animal can prey on? An observation of fishes feeding in the wild might now help to settle this question.

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London Considers Bubbling, Beeping, and Other 'Irritating' Sci-Fi Sounds for Electric Bus Fleet

The European Union is making a major safety push to add fake noises to electric vehicles, but some may sound goofier than others and that’s causing disagreement in the UK. Read more…

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Jony Ive reportedly felt that Tim Cook wasn’t interested in design

Jony Ive's departure was made official last week, but may have begun years ago because of Apple's shift in focus from design to operations, according to the WSJ and Bloomberg. …

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How the Supreme Court Messed Up the Census Case

A divided Supreme Court last week blocked Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross from adding an untested citizenship question to the 2020 census. The Court’s ruling is a victory for representative democracy over the Trump administration’s latest power play, which would have led to a dramatic undercount of the country’s noncitizen population, with substantial implications for federal funding and political

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Sliding along on water

Machine bearings are usually lubricated with various oils. But today large quantities of these oils still end up in the environment. The Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM has developed a method which will in the future make it possible to lubricate slide bearings using water, a much more environmentally friendly approach.

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What Game of Thrones Reveals about Moral Decision-Making

The fantasy series highlights profound questions of philosophy and psychology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Second Coming of the Robot Pet

Man's best friend isn't a dog—it's a doglike robot, designed to perform tricks and tug at your heartstrings.

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Health Brands Hims and Hers Flout Facebook’s Rules on Drug Ads

Wellness brands Hims and Hers violate Facebook policies by offering prescription drugs in ads. The ads also don't disclose side effects, as required by the FDA.

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How Remote Lakes Could Help Unravel Microplastic's Mysteries

The Experimental Lakes Area is a one-of-a-kind platform for potentially testing how omnipresent microplastics are stressing ecosystems.

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‘Slime’ shows how algae have shaped our climate, evolution and daily lives

The new book ‘Slime’ makes the case that algae deserve to be celebrated.

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Assessing the danger of drone strike: unique test bench to measure collision impact

The rapid rise in the number of drones worldwide has been accompanied by increasing reports of near misses with commercial aircraft. In 2017, while coming in to land, a Canadian passenger aircraft actually collided with a drone, narrowly escaping catastrophe. Bird-strike tests for aircraft are mandatory. To date, however, there is no equivalent standard test procedure for collisions with drones. I

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Porsche leveraging the benefits of organic materials in automotive manufacturing applications

Automaker Porsche is leveraging the benefits of organic materials in automotive manufacturing applications. The new 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport features body parts made of natural-fiber composite materials developed in the Application Center for Wood Fiber Research HOFZET, which is part of the Fraunhofer Institute for Wood Research, Wilhelm-Klauditz-Institut WKI, together with the Institute for Biopl

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Melting scrapped devices as sustainable needs heat up

Melting metals from scrapped electronic devices are among solutions for the sustainable supply of critical materials being investigated by University of Queensland researchers.

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What Game of Thrones Reveals about Moral Decision-Making

The fantasy series highlights profound questions of philosophy and psychology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What Game of Thrones Reveals about Moral Decision-Making

The fantasy series highlights profound questions of philosophy and psychology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Babies Know the Difference between the Laughter of Friends and Strangers

Five-month-olds may use chuckles to identify information about social interactions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Detecting the softest sounds in the Universe

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02009-5 A quantum object called a qubit helps scientists to pick out a single unit of sound.

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Andean hummingbirds take different evolutionary paths to high altitudes

Scientists have found that multiple hummingbird species have adapted to life at high altitudes in the Andes through distinct genetic mutations that nonetheless affect the same biochemical pathways. This suggests that while the details of molecular adaptation may differ at the amino acid and protein levels, there is predictability in evolution at the level of biochemical pathways.

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Babies Know the Difference between the Laughter of Friends and Strangers

Five-month-olds may use chuckles to identify information about social interactions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Andean hummingbirds take different evolutionary paths to high altitudes

Scientists have found that multiple hummingbird species have adapted to life at high altitudes in the Andes through distinct genetic mutations that nonetheless affect the same biochemical pathways. This suggests that while the details of molecular adaptation may differ at the amino acid and protein levels, there is predictability in evolution at the level of biochemical pathways.

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Atomic 'patchwork' using heteroepitaxy for next-generation semiconductor devices

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have grown atomically thin crystalline layers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) with varying composition over space, continuously feeding in different types of TMDC to a growth chamber to tailor changes in properties. Examples include 20-nanometer strips surrounded by TMDCs with atomically straight interfaces and layered structures. They als

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Artificial DNA can control release of active ingredients from drugs

A drug with three active ingredients that are released in sequence at specific times is under development by a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). What was once a pharmacologist's dream is now much closer to reality. With a combination of hydrogels and artificial DNA, nanoparticles can be released in sequence under conditions similar to those in the human body.

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Many grandparents' medicines not secure enough around grandchildren, poll suggests

Whether it's a rare treat or a weekly routine, many older adults enjoy spending time with grandchildren. But a new poll suggests many could do more to reduce the risk of their medications harming their grandchild. More than 80% of the grandparents polled say they keep their medication in the same place as usual when their grandchildren visit their house — and 72% keep them in their purse or bag w

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The Pitfalls of Searching for Alien Life

The hunt for alien intelligence is alive and well, but scientists face the threat of being written off as kooks when investigating evidence of extraterrestrial life. Despite the skepticism, some researchers note that many discoveries have their roots in theories that were initially dismissed.

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Jhhhggg

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Saturn's moon Titan is chosen by NASA as its next destination

submitted by /u/saiteja13427 [link] [comments]

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When can an artificial intelligence be considered as a living being ?

To construct artificial intelligence that adapt to change, natural processes are my main sources of inspiration. During a discussion with a friend, he asked me a question that I could not answer: your artificial intelligence has a lifespan, a tonnage of health, a libido gauge, a hunger gauge… can we consider them as living beings? I replied, with little conviction: no there are not physical bei

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Nyudnævnt professor spiller en betydningsfuld rolle i kunstig intelligens revolutionen

I 2018 blev Christina Lioma leder af Machine Learning forskningssektionen på Datalogisk Institut,…

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Fra forskning og udenrigspolitik i Oslo til statskundskab i København

Med 25 års erfaring med forskning og rådgivning af norske regerings- og udenrigspolitikere…

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There’s a Generational Shift in the Debate Over Busing

During the second Democratic presidential debate, Senator Kamala Harris of California challenged former Vice President Joe Biden regarding a topic that has received little attention in recent presidential elections: school desegregation. Harris described Biden’s recent remarks in which he fondly recalled his “civil” working relationships with segregationist senators such as James O. Eastland of M

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The U.S.-Saudi Alliance Is on the Brink

A n effort is under way in Washington to fundamentally overhaul, if not end, a decades-old American alliance—but it didn’t come at the direction of the alliance-skeptical Donald Trump. The president, in fact, has paradoxically emerged as the greatest force of resistance to the change. Fed up with the catastrophic human cost of Saudi Arabia’s military intervention in Yemen’s civil war and appalled

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Jacob Bronowski: the complex life of a science popularizer

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02010-y David Edgerton parses a biography of the polymath whose science documentary series The Ascent of Man galvanized 1970s Britain.

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Monsoon rains soak India's financial capital

Heavy rains flooded parts of India's financial capital of Mumbai on Monday, as the country's four-month summer monsoon swung into full force.

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Machine learning has been used to automatically translate long-lost languages

Some languages that have never been deciphered could be the next ones to get the machine translation treatment.

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How to support open-source software and stay sane

Nature, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02046-0 Releasing lab-built open-source software often involves a mountain of unforeseen work for the developers.

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Author Correction: Forearc carbon sink reduces long-term volatile recycling into the mantle

Nature, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1298-9 Author Correction: Forearc carbon sink reduces long-term volatile recycling into the mantle

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OnePlus users worry after being sent bizarre notifications

Nonsensical messages appear to have come from 'internal test'

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Findings that many unconscious people may be aware is a wake-up call

Startling revelations of covert consciousness in 1 in 10 people in vegetative states makes their care more important than ever

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An ErbB2/c-Src axis links bioenergetics with PRC2 translation to drive epigenetic reprogramming and mammary tumorigenesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10681-4 Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2) is frequently up-regulated in cancers. Here, the authors show that the tyrosine kinase c-Src stimulates mitochondrial function to signal energy sufficiency to mTORC1, increasing translation of the PRC2 subunits EZH2 and SUZ12 to support ErbB2-dependent tumours.

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Author Correction: The gut microbiota in infants of obese mothers increases inflammation and susceptibility to NAFLD

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10943-1 Author Correction: The gut microbiota in infants of obese mothers increases inflammation and susceptibility to NAFLD

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Activating an anterior nucleus gigantocellularis subpopulation triggers emergence from pharmacologically-induced coma in rodents

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10797-7 The reticular activating system (RAS) of the brainstem regulates wakefulness, and stimulation of RAS areas can reverse effects of anaesthesia. Here, the authors show that stimulation of a particular RAS area, the anterior portion of nucleus gigantocellularis, can produce arousal from deep coma.

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Author Correction: Tau binding protein CAPON induces tau aggregation and neurodegeneration

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10990-8 Author Correction: Tau binding protein CAPON induces tau aggregation and neurodegeneration

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Difficult-to-neutralize global HIV-1 isolates are neutralized by antibodies targeting open envelope conformations

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10899-2 Here, the authors report that specific monoclonal antibodies isolated from vaccinated rhesus macaques can neutralize a subset of Tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 that express Env in an open conformation, suggesting that V3 loop-specific targeting can bias the estimation of vaccine-induced bnAbs.

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Dietary fatty acids promote lipid droplet diversity through seipin enrichment in an ER subdomain

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10835-4 Lipid droplets (LDs) are fat storage organelles that are initiated and expanded by seipins at ER contact sites. Here the authors show that the C. elegans seipin ortholog SEIP-1 is recruited to these sites by certain dietary fatty acids to support the expansion of a subset of LDs.

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Structure and function of the Orc1 BAH-nucleosome complex

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10609-y The Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) plays conserved and diverse roles in eukaryotes. Here the authors present the structure of a chromatin interacting domain of yeast Orc1 in complex with the nucleosome core particle, revealing that Orc1 interacts with the histone H4 tail irrespective of K16 acetylation; a modi

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Low voltage control of exchange coupling in a ferromagnet-semiconductor quantum well hybrid structure

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10774-0 Manipulating magnetic orders by electric fields promises energy efficient spintronic applications. Here the authors demonstrate electrical control of s-p exchange interaction in a ferromagnet-semiconductor quantum well structure due to the phononic ac Stark effect.

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More people born with a single lower heart chamber survive; but, face challenges in quality and length of life

The Fontan procedure has saved the lives of many people born with only one ventricle, but their unique circulatory system requires lifelong medical monitoring and care. A new scientific statement provides an overview of what is currently known about Fontan circulation and provides guidance for healthcare providers on how to monitor the health of both the cardiovascular system and other organ syste

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Low vitamin D at birth raises risk of higher blood pressure in kids

Vitamin D deficiency from birth to early childhood was associated with an increased risk of elevated systolic blood pressure during childhood and adolescence. The study findings suggest that vitamin D screening and supplementation in pregnancy and early childhood could prevent or reduce the risk of elevated blood pressure later in life.

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Cannabis has great medical potential. But don’t fall for the CBD scam | Mike Power

The UK market for cannabidiol, a compound found in cannabis, will soon be worth £1bn. But consumers are being conned Roll up, roll up, ladies and gentleman, and gather around. Do you, your loved one – or family pet – suffer from any of the following conditions? Cancer, epilepsy, diabetes, arthritis, anxiety, menstrual cramps, insomnia, dry skin, psychosis, Alzheimer’s, dementia, anger, depression

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Church of England creates first social media guidelines

The Church of England has launched its first set of guidelines for social media, designed to make online platforms happier places.

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Nyt våben mod kræft og hjertefejl: Danmark åbner nationalt genomcenter

60.000 danskere skal have deres arvemasse helgehomsekventeret i det nye danske genomcenter. Målet er at helbrede flere arvelige sygdomme.

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Antifungal synergy of a topical triazole, PC945, with a systemic triazole against respiratory Aspergillus fumigatus infection

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45890-w Antifungal synergy of a topical triazole, PC945, with a systemic triazole against respiratory Aspergillus fumigatus infection

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Neighborhood environments influence emotion and physiological reactivity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45876-8 Neighborhood environments influence emotion and physiological reactivity

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A novel method for rapid detection of a Helicobacter pylori infection using a γ-glutamyltranspeptidase-activatable fluorescent probe

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45768-x A novel method for rapid detection of a Helicobacter pylori infection using a γ-glutamyltranspeptidase-activatable fluorescent probe

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Pharmacologic treatment with CPI-613 and PS48 decreases mitochondrial membrane potential and increases quantity of autolysosomes in porcine fibroblasts

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45850-4 Pharmacologic treatment with CPI-613 and PS48 decreases mitochondrial membrane potential and increases quantity of autolysosomes in porcine fibroblasts

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Inferring fine-scale spatial structure of the brown bear (Ursus arctos) population in the Carpathians prior to infrastructure development

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45999-y Inferring fine-scale spatial structure of the brown bear ( Ursus arctos ) population in the Carpathians prior to infrastructure development

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Retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide induce lasting differentiation and demethylation of target genes in APL cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45982-7 Retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide induce lasting differentiation and demethylation of target genes in APL cells

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Deciphering the genetic basis for vitamin E accumulation in leaves and grains of different barley accessions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45572-7 Deciphering the genetic basis for vitamin E accumulation in leaves and grains of different barley accessions

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Arsenic accumulation in lentil (Lens culinaris) genotypes and risk associated with the consumption of grains

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45855-z Arsenic accumulation in lentil ( Lens culinaris ) genotypes and risk associated with the consumption of grains

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The Science Of Smiles, Real And Fake

According to the facial feedback hypothesis, the simple act of putting a smile on your face can boost your mood. But recent research shows pasting on a grin can have mixed results. (Image credit: Paige Vickers for NPR)

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How 3D printing allows scientists to grow new human hairs

Researchers have found a way of using 3D printing technology to grow human hairs in the laboratory, without the need for skin implantation.

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Amazon Fire TV Recast discounted to $130 in run up to Prime Day 2019

Amazon’s Fire TV Recast, its Alexa-enabled take on the Slingbox, is currently discounted from its regular price of $230 down to $130. You’ll need to be a Prime subscriber to take …

10h

My chronic pain taught me about the links between the mind and body | Hannah Millington

Standard therapies were not working. But once I discovered the role of the brain in physical pain, I began to mend Chronic pain is an ongoing epidemic. It debilitates around 28 million adults in the UK alone. Yet society seems to have grown comfortable with there being no cure. Perhaps this is because we have been searching for the wrong type of answer, in the wrong place. I should begin by briefl

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Store forskelle på tværs af Danmark: Havet vil stige mere i Esbjerg end i København

Havet stiger i løbet af de næste 80 år, og nogle danske byer er mere sårbare end andre.

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We are much less security savvy with our smartphones than we think

Many people who say they would never compromise their security, such as by giving personal details to a pop-up ad, still fall into traps

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Paris bans old diesels to tackle pollution

Paris on Monday banned all diesel vehicles aged 13 years or over from the city centre, the latest move in a campaign to tackle pollution on the city's streets.

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Firms violating non-accounting securities laws more likely to breach GAAP

Firms who breach non-accounting securities laws are more likely to subsequently violate accounting rules.

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Whaling ships set sail as Japan resumes commercial hunts

Japan began its first commercial whale hunts in more than three decades on Monday, brushing aside outrage over its resumption of a practice that conservationists say is cruel and outdated.

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New Zealand bans single-use plastic bags

New Zealand officially banned single-use plastic shopping bags Monday, introducing hefty fines for businesses that continue to provide them.

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Cooler for parts of Europe, Spain battles wildfires

A welcome temperature drop came to western parts of Europe on Sunday, after almost a week-long heatwave, but hundreds of Spanish firefighters and soldiers continued to battle three major blazes.

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Whaling ships set sail as Japan resumes commercial hunts

Japan began its first commercial whale hunts in more than three decades on Monday, brushing aside outrage over its resumption of a practice that conservationists say is cruel and outdated.

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Insect apocalypse: German bug watchers sound alarm

For almost 30 years they passed as quirky eccentrics, diligently setting up their insect traps in the Rhine countryside to collect tens of millions of bugs and creepy crawlers.

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Genealogy Sites Have Helped Identify Suspects. Now They’ve Helped Convict One.

A new forensic technique sailed through its first test in court, leading to a guilty verdict. But beyond the courtroom, a battle over privacy is intensifying.

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Melted Alaska sea ice alarms coast residents, scientists

Sea ice along northern Alaska disappeared far earlier than normal this spring, alarming coastal residents who rely on wildlife and fish.

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Facebook to make jobs, credit ads searchable for US users

Facebook says it will make advertisements for jobs, loans and credit card offers searchable for all U.S. users following a legal settlement designed to eliminate discrimination on its platform.

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The Israeli Academy of Sciences and Humanities elects antivaxer Yehuda Shoenfeld to its ranks

Yehuda Shoenfeld is an Israeli scientist who has promoted the idea that adjuvants in vaccines cause ASIA, Autoimmunity/Autoinflammation Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants, a vaguely defined catch-all diagnosis that encompasses vague symptomatology and unproven links to certain autoantibodies, all caused by adjuvants in vaccines, especially aluminum. Last week, Shoenfeld was elected to the Israel Academ

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What makes a good excuse work? A Cambridge philosopher may have the answer

We've all done it, offered an excuse for our poor behaviour or rude reactions to others in the heat of the moment, after a long commute or a tough day with the kids. Excuses are commonplace, an attempt to explain and justify behaviours we aren't proud of, to escape the consequences of our acts and make our undesirable behaviour more socially acceptable.

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Firms violating non-accounting securities laws more likely to breach GAAP

Firms who breach non-accounting securities laws are more likely to subsequently violate accounting rules.

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Genomic warning flag just in time for beach season: Jellyfish toxins

An article published today in the Open Access journal GigaScience might make you squirm if you plan to hit the beach this summer. The article presents the draft genomes of three different jellyfish species. The international group of researchers, lead by Joseph Ryan, chose to examine jellyfish that present a range of physical traits and level of toxicity (from minor annoyance to deadly)—jellyfish

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Night King: Australia bee fly named after Game of Thrones villain

A new species of bee fly discovered in Western Australia is named after the Game of Thrones villain.

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Genomic warning flag just in time for beach season: Jellyfish toxins

An article published today in the Open Access journal GigaScience might make you squirm if you plan to hit the beach this summer. The article presents the draft genomes of three different jellyfish species. The international group of researchers, lead by Joseph Ryan, chose to examine jellyfish that present a range of physical traits and level of toxicity (from minor annoyance to deadly)—jellyfish

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Can you solve it? Ace these tennis teasers

Three smashing puzzles UPDATE: To read the solutions click here The peculiarities of tennis throw up some nice problems. When better to ponder them than on the opening day of Wimbledon? 1) Ashleigh Barty and Naomi Osaka are playing a set of tennis. In the last eight points, Barty has served seven aces and Osaka has served one. What’s the score? Continue reading…

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Skal dine sundhedsdata stilles til rådighed for medicinalindustrien?

Erhvervsfond ønsker sundhedsloven ændret, så personhenførbare data kan anvendes til forskning uden patientens tilladelse. Men 'opt out' kan paradoksalt nok sætte bremse for forskning.

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How should we respond to alien contact? Scientists ask the public

Scientists searching the universe for aliens to conduct survey of the public for views on first contact Scientists wrestling with the delicate issue of how to respond should humanity ever be contacted by an alien civilisation have hit on a radical idea: a survey that asks what the public would do. Members of the UK Seti Research Network (UKSRN) are to launch what they believe will be the largest

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Collection of space sounds released to mark 50 years since the moon landings – video

To mark the 50th anniversary of the moon landings, an interactive collection of the sounds of space and the history of space travel has been launched by global sound project Cities and Memory. The project, called Space is the Place , combines 80 recordings from Nasa and the European Space Agency for the first time with reimagined, remixed interpretations of those space sounds, all designed to ans

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May Griffith innocent of misconduct, decide Montreal, Swedish Court and Ethics Board

After her lawyers threatened Linköping whistleblower Jaywant Phopase, accusing him of slander and demanding money, regmed researcher May Griffith wrote to me. She sent me a whole dossier: all misconduct findings against her were overruled, even in court. Turns out, ethics dumping is good and anyway, she is not responsible for her own publications.

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Mystiske metan-skyer målt på Mars kan være forbundet til liv

En rekordstor mængde naturgas, som forsvandt igen med det samme, har begejstret Marsforskere i hele verden

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Alcohol causes significant harm to those other than the drinker

Each year, one in five US adults — an estimated 53 million people — experience harm because of someone else's drinking, according to new research in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

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Japan to tighten tech material exports to South Korea in wartime labor row

Japan will tighten curbs on exports of high-tech materials used in smartphone displays and chips to South Korea amid a growing dispute over South Koreans forced to work for Japanese firms during …

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Life Among the Dwarfs

The nearby red dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 has a system of seven Earth-size planets, all jammed into a space much smaller than the gap between the Sun and Mercury. (Credit: ESO/O. Furtak) When I was an astronomy-obsessed kid, I learned that most of the stars in our galaxy and beyond are very similar to our Sun. No less an authority than Carl Sagan wrote that "the Sun is an ordinary, even a mediocre star

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Firms violating non-accounting securities laws more likely to breach GAAP

New research published in the Journal of Business Finance & Accounting shows a link between non-compliance with securities laws – such as insider trading, stock manipulation and providing false or misleading information about securities or the company's operation — and future Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) violations.

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Extreme Physics

Physicists are pushing into the extreme ends of the universe as we know it—from invisible particles and colliding massive black holes to the most crushing gravitational forces ever detected and… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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ARK Invest's Tasha Keeney on the self-driving car showdown

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AI system spots reckless driving, issues speedy corrections

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Nokia reveals next-generation battery with 2.5 times longer life

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This AI-Powered Cat Door Is a Brilliant Way to Keep a Kitty's Murder Presents Outside

What do you do if your cat often gets in a murdery mood and tries to bring dead, blood-dripping varmints into your house? Well, if you’re engineer Ben Hamm, you create an AI-powered cat door …

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Android will have an equivalent to Apple's AirDrop file sharing

Ask iPhone users about the creature comforts they like and there's a good chance they'll mention AirDrop — it's an easy way to share a photo with a nearby Apple device …

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Netflix Is Reportedly Adapting Neil Gaiman’s ‘Sandman’ Comics Into TV Series

Sandman, Neil Gaiman’s dark mythology comic, is reportedly coming to Netflix: The streaming company and Warner Bros. are signing a major deal to adapt the best-seller comic into a new …

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Genomic warning flag just in time for beach season: Jellyfish toxins

An article published today in the Open Access journal GigaScience might make you squirm if you plan to hit the beach. This article presents the draft genomes of three jellyfish species, which have a range of physical traits and level of toxicity. Jellyfish kill more people than sharks, stingrays, and sea snakes combined; thus, having sequences and their analyses available provides an essential res

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Apple recalls some MacBook Pro laptops due to fire hazard

Apple is recalling some MacBook Pro laptops due to a fire hazard.

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HYPE protein could halt Parkinson’s Lewy body build-up

One protein could help stop the aggregation of another protein called alpha-synuclein (aSyn) that tends to build-up in the brain cells of many patients with Parkinson’s disease. HYPE, the only Fic protein found in humans, is a key regulator of whether cells live or die under stress. In order to work properly, proteins need to fold in the correct shape. When cells are stressed, their proteins can

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A Single Court-Authorized Wiretap Order in 2018 Swept Up 9.2 Million Intercepts

A single court-authorized wiretap order resulted in authorities in the Southern District of Texas scooping up more than 9.2 million communications—becoming “the federal wiretap with the most …

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Uranus pics show off the planet’s mostly invisible rings

The rings of Uranus, while invisible to all but the largest telescopes, are surprisingly bright in new heat images of the planet taken by two large telescopes in the high deserts of Chile. The thermal glow gives astronomers another window onto the rings, which have been seen only because they reflect a little light in the visible, or optical, range and in the near-infrared. Scientists first disco

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The Shock of the Unknown in Aphantasia: Learning that Visual Imagery Exists

Qualia are private. We don’t know how another person perceives the outside world: the color of the ocean, the sound of the waves, the smell of the seaside, the exact temperature of the water. Even more obscure is how someone else imagines the world in the absence of external stimuli. Most people are able to generate an internal “ representation ” 1 of a beach — to deploy imagery — when asked, “pi

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Managed fires create haven for Midwest birds

A diverse array of Midwest birds are thriving, thanks to restoration of pine woodlands, through intentional, managed fires and strategic thinning of tree density, report researchers. Millions of acres of pine woodlands once covered a large portion of the Midwest. But as humans logged trees and suppressed natural fires, they gave way to dense forests with less fire-resistant leaf litter and tree s

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‘Hunger neurons’ control energy output, too

A group of brain cells previously shown to regulate hunger also controls energy expenditure, according to new research. Since our body weight depends both on the calories we consume and the energy we burn, the findings could lead to a new type of weight-loss medication that acts on both sides of the energy equation. Effective weight-loss strategies call for eating less food, burning more calories

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Early warning signs of eating disorder revealed

Early warning signs that someone may have an eating disorder have been revealed in a large-scale data study conducted by Swansea University researchers. The results, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry by the Royal College of Psychiatrists, showed that people diagnosed with a disorder had higher rates of other conditions and of prescriptions in the years before their diagnosis. The find

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What makes a good excuse work? A Cambridge philosopher may have the answer

The things we appeal to when making excuses are myriad: tiredness, stress, a looming work deadline, a wailing infant. But what do these various excuses have in common that allows us to recognize them all as plausible? A researcher from Cambridge University has suggested that the answers lie in what they all tell us about our underlying motivation. When excuses are permissible, it's because they sh

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Pear-shaped is better for postmenopausal women, even if they are normal weight

Postmenopausal women who are 'apple' shaped rather than 'pear' shaped are at greater risk of heart and blood vessel problems, even if they have a normal, healthy body mass index (BMI) according to new research published in the European Heart Journal.

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Neurotechnology holds promise for chronic stroke patients

Personalized neurotechnology-aided rehabilitation of the arm could improve recovery in severe chronic stroke patients according to a new paper published today in the journal Brain.

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Toddler Dies From E. Coli Linked to Contact With Animals at San Diego County Fair

Officials say a 2-year-old boy, who died on June 24, was one of four children who showed symptoms of E. coli after coming in contact with animals at the fair in June.

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Synthetic proteins mimic the real thing

Researchers are creating synthetic versions of proteins with improved properties. Imagine synthetic antibiotics that could fight infections like MRSA, custom pharmaceuticals to treat advanced prostate cancer, and new enzymes that will turn cellulose into fuel. Chemist Kent Kirshenbaum and his team at New York University are engineering molecules to mimic the shape, structure, and function of natu

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India is now producing the world’s cheapest solar power

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Madagascar to build three photovoltaic solar power plants

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Facebook ban on white nationalism too narrow, say auditors

Company policy prohibits praise or support for specific term ‘white nationalism’Facebook’s new policy banning white nationalism from its site has been undercut by the company’s decision to ignore …

20h

Journalism schools tell students to branch out, hustle

As the journalism industry changes, what are professors telling students about their job prospects? To look for work outside the news business, find researchers. Researchers say they conducted the study, which appears in Social Forces , in response to the massive transformations taking place in journalism, particularly in the field’s labor market. “The post-Watergate media era where you would wor

20h

Statin use reduces mortality and stroke risk in dementia patients, new study shows

The study, which analyzed 44,920 Swedish dementia patients from the Swedish Dementia Registry between 2008-2015, found users of statins had a 22% lower risk of all-cause death compared to matched non-users. The research also demonstrated that statin users had a 23% reduction in the risk of stroke, which is three times more likely in patients with mild dementia and seven times more likely in those

20h

New strategies and approaches needed to cope with growing burden of brain diseases

Professor Anne Hege Aamodt, President of the Norwegian Neurological Association, presented The Norwegian Brain Health Strategy 2018-2024 to attendees at the congress. Norway are the first country in Europe to launch a national brain health strategy.

20h

New study reveals biological toll on brain function of Holocaust survivors

The novel research, due to be presented at the 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress, found that surviving the Holocaust had a life-long psychological and biological effect with grey matter reduction affecting the parts of their brain responsible for stress response, memory, motivation, emotion, learning, and behavior.

20h

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