Search Posts

nyheder2019juli04

Samtlige danske havbrug kører på ulovlige tilladelser

En ny redegørelse fra Kammeradvokaten viser, at placeringstilladelserne til 13 af de 19 danske havbrug er udstedt uden at foretage den lovpligtige habitatvurdering. De resterende 6 har slet ingen placeringstilladelse.

9h

Tiny change has big effects, reverses prediabetes in mice

A small chemical change — shifting the position of two hydrogen atoms — makes the difference between mice that are healthy or that have insulin resistance and fatty liver, major risk factors for diabetes and heart disease. Making the change prevented the onset of these symptoms in mice fed a high-fat diet and reversed these prediabetes obese mice. Published in Science, the finding pinpoints a 'd

5min

Strain of common cold virus could revolutionize treatment of bladder cancer

A strain of the common cold virus has been found to potentially target, infect and destroy cancer cells in patients with bladder cancer, a new study in the medical journal Clinical Cancer Research reports. No trace of the cancer was found in one patient following treatment with the virus.

29min

After concussion, biomarkers in the blood may help predict recovery time

A study of high school and college football players suggests that biomarkers in the blood may have potential use in identifying which players are more likely to need a longer recovery time after concussion.

5min

Researchers map crystals to advance treatments for stroke, diabetes, dementia

A team of researchers have mapped the crystal structure of a protein called 'mitoNEET' and pinpointed how a drug latches on it.

5min

More 'reactive' land surfaces cooled the Earth down

In a new study, researchers show that a paradigm on a global temperature drop that started around 15 million years ago cannot be upheld. With the help of a computer model they explain the Earth's cooling with an increased 'reactivity' of the land surface that has led to a decrease in CO2 in the atmosphere, reducing the Earth's natural green house effect.

5min

Respiratory symptoms predict life expectancy in older adults

New research suggests that some respiratory symptoms may predict an earlier death in older adults. Also, such predictions differ by smoking status.

5min

Preventing hereditary deafness

An optimized version of the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system prevents hearing loss with no detectable off-target effects in so-called Beethoven mice, which carry a mutation that causes profound hearing loss in humans and mice alike. Results offer proof of principle for using the same gene-editing technique for other inherited human genetic diseases.

5min

Imprinted spheres fight breast cancer

A particularly aggressive, metastasizing form of cancer, HER2-positive breast cancer, may be treated with nanoscopic particles "imprinted" with specific binding sites for the receptor molecule HER2. The selective binding of the nanoparticles to HER2 significantly inhibits multiplication of the tumor cells.

5min

World first: Homing instinct applied to stem cells show cells 'home' to cardiac tissue

In a world first, scientists have found a new way to direct stem cells to heart tissue. The findings could radically improve the treatment for cardiovascular disease, which causes more than a quarter of all deaths in the UK (1).

20min

Irrigated farming in Wisconsin's central sands cools the region's climate

Irrigation dropped maximum temperatures by one to three degrees Fahrenheit on average while increasing minimum temperatures up to four degrees compared to unirrigated farms or forests, new research shows. In all, irrigated farms experienced a three- to seven-degree smaller range in daily temperatures compared to other land uses. These effects persisted throughout the year.

20min

Hundreds of sharks and rays tangled in plastic

Hundreds of sharks and rays have become tangled in plastic waste in the world's oceans, new research shows.

29min

The Lancet: Nerve transfer surgery restores hand function and elbow extension in 13 young adults with complete paralysis

Nerve transfer surgery has enabled 13 young adults with complete paralysis to regain movement and function in their elbows and hands, according to the largest case series of this technique in people with tetraplegia (paralysis of both the upper and lower limbs), published in The Lancet.

1h

Pioneering surgery brings movement back to paralysed hands

Melbourne-based Natasha van Zyl has treated 13 young adults with nerve transfer surgery Thirteen young adults who were paralysed in sporting or traffic accidents have had movement in their hands restored through pioneering nerve transfer surgery, enabling them to feed themselves, hold a drink, write and in some cases return to work. Natasha van Zyl, the Melbourne-based surgeon who leads a researc

1h

Author Correction: Electrospun nerve guide conduits have the potential to bridge peripheral nerve injuries in vivo

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44658-6 Author Correction: Electrospun nerve guide conduits have the potential to bridge peripheral nerve injuries in vivo

1h

Author Correction: Ceratosaur palaeobiology: new insights on evolution and ecology of the southern rulers

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43725-2 Author Correction: Ceratosaur palaeobiology: new insights on evolution and ecology of the southern rulers

1h

Author Correction: Transcriptional Regulation on Aneuploid Chromosomes in Diverse Candida albicans Mutants

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44362-5 Author Correction: Transcriptional Regulation on Aneuploid Chromosomes in Diverse Candida albicans Mutants

1h

The best wild game and fish recipes for the Fourth of July

This story originally published on Fieldandstream.com . If you have a slab or two of wild boar ribs in the freezer, now is a good time to thaw them. (Christopher Testani / Food and prop styling by Roscoe Betsill/) The Fourth of July is sort of like the Thanksgiving of Summer—which is to say that it’s a holiday centered around a lot of great food shared with friends and family. Whereas the oven do

2h

Fifty years ago Hasselblad sent the first cameras to the moon

View of the Earth rising over the moon's horizon taken from the Apollo 11 spacecraft. (NASA/) On July 20th Hasselblad celebrates its fiftieth anniversary as the maker of the camera that documented the historic moon landing. NASA and Hasselblad began working together in 1962 during the Mercury program, seven years before the moon mission, to ensure that the cameras would function properly in the i

2h

Does the world need a 3D-printed rocket?

submitted by /u/ChickenTeriyakiBoy1 [link] [comments]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

Hybrid cruise ship powers through the water on battery-power in world first

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

2h

2h

Could Planting Tons of Trees Solve Climate Change?

(Credit: Jay Mantri/Shutterstock) Climate change is devastating coral reefs, raising sea levels and displacing people across the globe. Now researchers say the best solution is also the simplest: plant more forests. In a new analysis out Thursday in the journal Science, scientists report restoring forests could cut atmospheric carbon by 25 percent. “We all knew restoring forests could play a part

3h

New study suggests seaweed influx will continue in Florida

The clumps of brown seaweed that smell like rotten eggs and are causing disruptions along Florida's Atlantic beaches won't be going away anytime soon, a new study released Thursday has found.

4h

Best way to fight climate change? Plant a trillion trees

The most effective way to fight global warming is to plant lots of trees, a study says. A trillion of them, maybe more.

4h

6.4-magnitude quake hits Southern California: USGS

A 6.4 magnitude earthquake hit Southern California on Thursday at 10:33 am (17:33 GMT) near the Searles Valley in San Bernardino County, the United States Geological Survey said.

4h

Climate change: Trees 'most effective solution' for warming

A controversial study suggests extreme climate change can be averted by planting a billion hectares of trees.

4h

Climate change should be part of regular savings and investment decisions

As a member of the Expert Panel on Sustainable Finance, we recently published our final report on mobilizing financial services to support Canada's economic prosperity through the global transition to cleaner growth.

5h

Sargassum: The biggest seaweed bloom in the world

Known as the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt, the seaweed stretches from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico.

5h

New technologies are gearing up to find fugitive methane leaks

A suite of new technologies may soon be patrolling for fugitive —invisible but harmful —natural gas leaks from the oil and gas sector. Our recent study suggests that drones, aircraft, trucks, fixed sensors and even satellites may be poised to help find gas leaks quickly, preventing damage to the environment and human health.

5h

Gallup: Americans’ pride in U.S. hits record low

Gallup has conducted its American pride survey since 2001. Democrats — but not Republicans — reported significant drops in American pride compared to recent years, while independents reported minor drops. Despite the diminished pride, President Donald Trump has ordered what will surely be one of the largest Independence Day celebrations Washington D.C. has even seen. None Americans' pride in the

5h

Camera brings unseen world to light

Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a highly compact, portable camera that can image polarization in a single shot. The miniature camera — about the size of a thumb — could find a place in the vision systems of autonomous vehicles, onboard planes or satellites to study atmospheric chemistry, or be used to detect camouflaged

5h

'Eyes' for the autopilot

Automatic landings have long been standard procedure for commercial aircraft. While major airports have the infrastructure necessary to ensure the safe navigation of the aircraft, this is usually not the case at smaller airports. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and TU Braunschweig have now demonstrated a completely automatic landing with vision assisted navigation that func

5h

How trees could save the climate

Around 0.9 billion hectares of land worldwide would be suitable for reforestation, which could ultimately capture two thirds of human-made carbon emissions. The Crowther Lab of ETH Zurich has published a study in the journal Science that shows this would be the most effective method to combat climate change.

5h

Scientists discover the biggest seaweed bloom in the world

The record-breaking belt of brown algae stretches from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico — and it's likely here to stay, says a team led by the USF College of Marine Science

5h

Satellite data reveals largest-ever macroalgae bloom

Scientists have used satellite observations to identify the largest bloom of macroalgae in the world, the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt — a heavy mass of brown algae stretching from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico.

5h

Area for restoring trees far greater than imagined and 'best climate change solution available'

In the first study to quantify how many trees the Earth can support, where, and how much carbon they could store, researchers report that Earth could support enough additional trees to cut carbon levels in the atmosphere by nearly 25% — levels not seen for almost a century.

5h

Molecular oxygen sensing systems conserved across kingdoms

Researchers have discovered a biochemical oxygen sensing system conserved across biological kingdoms, which allows both plant and animal cells to sense and respond appropriately to changes in oxygen levels — an ability central to the survival of most forms of life.

5h

Tiny change has big effects, reverses prediabetes in mice

A small chemical change — shifting the position of two hydrogen atoms — makes the difference between mice that are healthy or that have insulin resistance and fatty liver, major risk factors for diabetes and heart disease. Making the change prevented the onset of these symptoms in mice fed a high-fat diet and reversed these prediabetes obese mice. Published in Science, the finding pinpoints a 'd

5h

The global tree restoration potential

Restoration of the Earth's forests is the world's most effective solution to climate change available today and has the potential to capture two thirds of man-made carbon emissions, finds landmark research by the Crowther Lab, published today in the journal Science.

5h

Why Waves of Seaweed Have Been Smothering Caribbean Beaches

In 2018, as seaweed piled up on beaches throughout the Caribbean, it began to rot. Already stinking and sulfurous, the thick layers began to attract insects and repel tourists. The seaweed—a type of brown algae called sargassum—had grown in the ocean and washed ashore in unprecedented quantities. It prevented fishers from getting into the water, and entangled their nets and propellers. It entangl

5h

Massive Forest Restoration Could Greatly Slow Global Warming

The right trees, planted in the right locations, could store 205 gigatons of carbon dioxide — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

From dealing drugs to selling tortillas: the surprising future of former gang members

Becoming a gang member is often assumed to imply few long-term life opportunities beyond dying or being imprisoned. In most of the world, however, this only concerns a minority of gang members, with the majority tending to "mature out" out of their gang, and becoming (more or less) upstanding members of society.

5h

Butikshylderne bugner af øko-grøntsager – men gavner de egentlig miljøet?

Grøntsagsmysteriet er mere kompliceret end som så.

5h

Billions of extra trees may give us 20 years to tackle climate change

The world could support nearly 1 billion hectares of extra forest, covering the size of the United States and giving us 20 more years to tackle climate change

5h

9000 km belt of seaweed spanning the Atlantic threatens marine life

A massive 9000-kilometre-stretch of algae spanning between west Africa and the Gulf of Mexico is threatening marine life and ecosystems

5h

We subscribe to movies and music, why not transport?

Many mainstays in our lives—phones, personal music libraries and movies—began as pay-as-you-go services. But subscription services are starting to rule, from iTunes shifting to Apple Music, and "all-you-can-watch" subscriptions to the Netflix catalogue.

5h

Bonuses for clicks: the Herald Sun model can't be the future of journalism

As newspapers around the world struggle with revenue, News Corp Australia's Melbourne tabloid the Herald Sun is trialling a bold idea to lure more readers over its paywall.

5h

This is the world’s largest patch of seaweed. And it’s growing in an unexpected place

Study seeks to solve the mystery of massive Sargassum bloom

5h

Adding 1 billion hectares of forest could help check global warming

Trees could remove two-thirds of human-caused emissions

5h

The biggest bloom

[no content]

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

World could support many more trees, research shows

Nearly a billion hectares, in fact, which could capture a lot of carbon. Dyani Lewis reports.

5h

The largest seaweed bloom ever detected spanned the Atlantic in 2018

Nutrient-rich water from the Amazon River may be helping massive seaweed mats to flourish each summer in the Atlantic Ocean.

5h

'Mirror Worlds' Creator Wants to Displace Facebook—With Blockchain

Computer science professor David Gelernter envisaged social networks long before Facebook. Now, he wants to reclaim the concept, using blockchain technology.

5h

5h

News at a glance

[no content]

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

Quest for fire

[no content]

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

The biggest bloom

[no content]

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

Coordinating organs

[no content]

5h

5h

High-latitude stakes

[no content]

5h

RNA-guided DNA insertion with CRISPR-associated transposases

CRISPR-Cas nucleases are powerful tools for manipulating nucleic acids; however, targeted insertion of DNA remains a challenge, as it requires host cell repair machinery. Here we characterize a CRISPR-associated transposase from cyanobacteria Scytonema hofmanni (ShCAST) that consists of Tn7-like transposase subunits and the type V-K CRISPR effector (Cas12k). ShCAST catalyzes RNA-guided DNA transp

5h

A COPII subunit acts with an autophagy receptor to target endoplasmic reticulum for degradation

The COPII-cargo adaptor complex Lst1-Sec23 selectively sorts proteins into vesicles that bud from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and traffic to the Golgi. Improperly folded proteins are prevented from exiting the ER and are degraded. ER-phagy is an autophagic degradation pathway that uses ER-resident receptors. Working in yeast, we found an unexpected role for Lst1-Sec23 in ER-phagy that was inde

5h

Proton uptake mechanism in bacteriorhodopsin captured by serial synchrotron crystallography

Conformational dynamics are essential for proteins to function. We adapted time-resolved serial crystallography developed at x-ray lasers to visualize protein motions using synchrotrons. We recorded the structural changes in the light-driven proton-pump bacteriorhodopsin over 200 milliseconds in time. The snapshot from the first 5 milliseconds after photoactivation shows structural changes associ

5h

Conserved N-terminal cysteine dioxygenases transduce responses to hypoxia in animals and plants

Organisms must respond to hypoxia to preserve oxygen homeostasis. We identify a thiol oxidase, previously assigned as cysteamine (2-aminoethanethiol) dioxygenase (ADO), as a low oxygen affinity (high- K m O 2 ) amino-terminal cysteine dioxygenase that transduces the oxygen-regulated stability of proteins by the N-degron pathway in human cells. ADO catalyzes the conversion of amino-terminal cystei

5h

Civic honesty around the globe

Civic honesty is essential to social capital and economic development but is often in conflict with material self-interest. We examine the trade-off between honesty and self-interest using field experiments in 355 cities spanning 40 countries around the globe. In these experiments, we turned in more than 17,000 lost wallets containing varying amounts of money at public and private institutions an

5h

Large plasticity in magnesium mediated by pyramidal dislocations

Lightweight magnesium alloys are attractive as structural materials for improving energy efficiency in applications such as weight reduction of transportation vehicles. One major obstacle for widespread applications is the limited ductility of magnesium, which has been attributed to dislocations failing to accommodate plastic strain. We demonstrate, using in situ transmission electron microscope

5h

The global tree restoration potential

The restoration of trees remains among the most effective strategies for climate change mitigation. We mapped the global potential tree coverage to show that 4.4 billion hectares of canopy cover could exist under the current climate. Excluding existing trees and agricultural and urban areas, we found that there is room for an extra 0.9 billion hectares of canopy cover, which could store 205 gigat

5h

Direct mapping of curve-crossing dynamics in IBr by attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

The electronic character of photoexcited molecules can abruptly change at avoided crossings and conical intersections. Here, we report direct mapping of the coupled interplay between electrons and nuclei in a prototype molecule, iodine monobromide (IBr), by using attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A few-femtosecond visible pulse resonantly excites the , Y(0 + ), and Z(0 + ) states of I

5h

The great Atlantic Sargassum belt

Pelagic Sargassum is abundant in the Sargasso Sea, but a recurrent great Atlantic Sargassum belt (GASB) has been observed in satellite imagery since 2011, often extending from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico. In June 2018, the 8850-kilometer GASB contained >20 million metric tons of Sargassum biomass. The spatial distribution of the GASB is mostly driven by ocean circulation. The bloom of 2011

5h

New Products

[no content]

5h

5h

Matrix Fourier optics enables a compact full-Stokes polarization camera

Recent developments have enabled the practical realization of optical elements in which the polarization of light may vary spatially. We present an extension of Fourier optics—matrix Fourier optics—for understanding these devices and apply it to the design and realization of metasurface gratings implementing arbitrary, parallel polarization analysis. We show how these gratings enable a compact, f

5h

The heme-regulated inhibitor is a cytosolic sensor of protein misfolding that controls innate immune signaling

Multiple cytosolic innate sensors form large signalosomes after activation, but this assembly needs to be tightly regulated to avoid accumulation of misfolded aggregates. We found that the eIF2α kinase heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI) controls NOD1 signalosome folding and activation through a process requiring eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), the transcription factor ATF4, and the heat shoc

5h

A glycine-specific N-degron pathway mediates the quality control of protein N-myristoylation

The N-terminal residue influences protein stability through N-degron pathways. We used stability profiling of the human N-terminome to uncover multiple additional features of N-degron pathways. In addition to uncovering extended specificities of UBR E3 ligases, we characterized two related Cullin-RING E3 ligase complexes, Cul2 ZYG11B and Cul2 ZER1 , that act redundantly to target N-terminal glyci

5h

Structured spike series specify gene expression patterns for olfactory circuit formation

Neural circuits emerge through the interplay of genetic programming and activity-dependent processes. During the development of the mouse olfactory map, axons segregate into distinct glomeruli in an olfactory receptor (OR)–dependent manner. ORs generate a combinatorial code of axon-sorting molecules whose expression is regulated by neural activity. However, it remains unclear how neural activity

5h

Ancient DNA reveals a multistep spread of the first herders into sub-Saharan Africa

How food production first entered eastern Africa ~5000 years ago and the extent to which people moved with livestock is unclear. We present genome-wide data from 41 individuals associated with Later Stone Age, Pastoral Neolithic (PN), and Iron Age contexts in what are now Kenya and Tanzania to examine the genetic impacts of the spreads of herding and farming. Our results support a multiphase mode

5h

No-take marine areas help fishers (and fish) far more than we thought

One hectare of ocean in which fishing is not allowed (a marine protected area) produces at least five times the amount of fish as an equivalent unprotected hectare, according to new research published today.

5h

The real Tinkerbell: don't mess with these tiny fairy wasps

Have you ever seen a fairy? They exist, and may very well be in your garden. But you would need a high-powered microscope to spot the dainty creatures.

5h

Four steps to make your lawn a wildlife haven – from green desert to miniature rainforest

If you could ask British insects about the habitats they prefer, they'd probably tell you that you can't improve on grassland that's rich with wildflowers. For farmers, though, grassland is said to be "improved" if it has been treated with fertiliser and sown with fast growing grasses.

5h

The Rituals of ‘Becoming America’

Our two great American holidays are, of course, Thanksgiving and the Fourth of July. They’re particularly American: Independence Day, for obvious reasons. Thanksgiving, because no one else observes it (other than Canadians, who have their own version on their own timetable), or can keep track of when it is. For Americans overseas it’s a particularly wonderful gathering day, on what the Brits or K

5h

5h

5h

Black (nano)gold to combat climate change

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

5h

No-take marine areas help fishers (and fish) far more than we thought

One hectare of ocean in which fishing is not allowed (a marine protected area) produces at least five times the amount of fish as an equivalent unprotected hectare, according to new research published today.

5h

The real Tinkerbell: don't mess with these tiny fairy wasps

Have you ever seen a fairy? They exist, and may very well be in your garden. But you would need a high-powered microscope to spot the dainty creatures.

5h

Four steps to make your lawn a wildlife haven – from green desert to miniature rainforest

If you could ask British insects about the habitats they prefer, they'd probably tell you that you can't improve on grassland that's rich with wildflowers. For farmers, though, grassland is said to be "improved" if it has been treated with fertiliser and sown with fast growing grasses.

5h

Scientists discover the biggest seaweed bloom in the world

Scientists led by the USF College of Marine Science used NASA satellite observations to discover the largest bloom of macroalgae in the world called the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt (GASB), as reported in Science.

5h

Portable polarization-sensitive camera could be used in machine vision, autonomous vehicles, security and more

When the first full-length movie made with the advanced, three-color process of Technicolor premiered in 1935, The New York Times declared "it produced in the spectator all the excitement of standing upon a peak … and glimpsing a strange, beautiful and unexpected new world."

5h

Creams, massage and police escort: how Russian whales were freed

Whales were massaged and lathered in special balm as they rode toward the ocean in a motorcade as part of their release from a "jail" in the Russian far east, the institute overseeing the operation said Thursday.

5h

New automatic aircraft landing system passes its first test

Ironing out the glitches with GPS negates the need for ground support. Nick Carne reports.

5h

Now that’s quite a belt

Scientists discover the biggest seaweed bloom in the world.

5h

CRISPR helps to rid mice of HIV

Nature, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02076-8 Gene-editing tool joins forces with antiretroviral drugs to drive HIV from its sanctuaries.

5h

Massive Forest Restoration Could Greatly Slow Global Warming

The right trees, planted in the right locations, could store 205 gigatons of carbon dioxide — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Creams, massage and police escort: how Russian whales were freed

Whales were massaged and lathered in special balm as they rode toward the ocean in a motorcade as part of their release from a "jail" in the Russian far east, the institute overseeing the operation said Thursday.

5h

Programming bacteria to fight cancer

Scientists have shown that programming bacteria to help the immune system fight cancer can shrink tumors and increase survival in mice.

5h

Daylight robbery: how human-built structures leave coastal ecosystems in the shadows

About half of the coastline of Europe, the United States and Australasia is modified by artificial structures. In newly published research, we identified a new effect of marine urbanisation that has so far gone unrecognised.

5h

Daylight robbery: how human-built structures leave coastal ecosystems in the shadows

About half of the coastline of Europe, the United States and Australasia is modified by artificial structures. In newly published research, we identified a new effect of marine urbanisation that has so far gone unrecognised.

6h

High-value opportunities exist to restore tropical rainforests around the world—here's how we mapped them

The green belt of tropical rainforests that covers equatorial regions of the Americas, Africa, Indonesia and Southeast Asia is turning brown. Since 1990, Indonesia has lost 50% of its original forest, the Amazon 30% and Central Africa 14%. Fires, logging, hunting, road building and fragmentation have heavily damaged more than 30% of those that remain.

6h

Measures that Matter: Microbiological Quality Control for Pharma

Download this eBook to learn more about the importance of sterility testing and workflow monitoring, particulate problems and monitoring laboratory air quality, microbial enumeration in liquid samples, and dealing with the threat of mycoplasma contamination!

6h

If you're traveling July 4th, be careful with free Wi-Fi and protect your data

You can protect yourself during the holiday weekend if you change your passwords twice, subscribe to a VPN app, encrypt your data and avoid using public Wi-Fi in a hotel, restaurant or airport, says security expert Ted Harrington.

6h

Instagram's new group chats sticker for Stories lets your followers request to join

Instagram is making it easier to get in touch with your circle of friends.

6h

French MPs back giving online platforms 24 hours to remove hate speech

French MPs on Thursday backed a proposal to give online platforms just 24 hours to remove hate speech or face hefty fines, the latest initiative in Europe to tackle online racism, anti-Semitism, sexism and homophobia.

6h

The mission of a lifetime: a drone on Titan in 2034

Elizabeth Tuttle was overjoyed when, on June 26, she received a call from NASA: her project to send a drone copter to Titan, Saturn's largest moon, was given the green light and a budget of nearly a billion dollars.

6h

Wide Sargasso seaweed: 5,500-mile algae belt keeps on growing

‘Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt’ now appears almost every year, forming largest record bloom It weighs 20m tonnes, stretches from west Africa to the Gulf of Mexico, and washes up on beaches creating a malodorous stench. Now scientists say a vast swathe of brown seaweed could be becoming an annual occurrence. Researchers say the explosion in sargassum seaweed first materialised in 2011. But new res

6h

Wimbledon reworks AI tech to reduce bias in game highlights

Efforts to make artificial intelligence fairer now extend to Wimbledon's courts.

6h

Researchers elucidate mechanism between exercise and improved motor learning

Researchers in Jinan University, China has identified a critical molecular pathway that underlies exercise-improved neural plasticity and cognitive functions. This finding will benefit the future development of exercise intervention in ameliorating psychiatric disorders.

7h

Happy Fourth of July

“ What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as freedom should not be highly rated. ” – Thomas Paine, “The American Crisis” “ At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer, if it ever reach us, it must

7h

YouTube suggests extremist content more often than alt-right site Gab

YouTube’s recommendation algorithm is the worst at recommending extremist content compared to Gab, a right wing social media site, and Reddit

7h

VIDEO Hvorfor skal vi motionere, når aber ikke skal?

Chimpansen bruger 20 timer om dagen på at slappe af og sove.

7h

These are the top 10 emerging technologies of 2019

Which of today's technologies will shape tomorrow's world? A new report compiled by the World Economic Forum reveals some of the breakthrough innovations that are expected to radically impact the global social and economic order. "From income inequality to climate change, technology will play a critical role in finding solutions to all the challenges our world faces today," says Jeremy Jurgens, C

7h

A Drone, a $12,000 Lens, and the Magic of a Total Solar Eclipse

Eclipse chasers plan for months for the jaw-dropping spectacle of a total solar eclipse. But when totality hits, even the ultra-prepared can end up scrambling.

7h

How robo-boat tech could help uncover ocean secrets

By launching underwater vehicles in situ the boat will allow more time to survey the ocean floor.

7h

Are parts of India becoming too hot for humans?

submitted by /u/ngt_ [link] [comments]

8h

8h

8h

8h

Scientists invent fast method for 'directed evolution' of molecules

Scientists demonstrated the technique by evolving several proteins to perform precise new tasks, each time doing it in a matter of days. Existing methods of directed evolution are more laborious and time-consuming, and not in human cells, which limits the usefulness of this technology for research and developing new therapeutics.

8h

Sports playbook helps doctors predict cancer patient outcomes, say Stanford researchers

Using in-game win probability techniques, Stanford researchers devised a way to predict a cancer patient's outcome at any point during treatment. The approach could also inform treatment decisions.

8h

Computing Biology's Future

Life scientists need new training to grapple with their discipline’s explosion of data — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

What Do We Owe Our National Parks?

Letters From the Archives is a series in which we highlight past Atlantic stories and reactions from readers at the time. The 2,221,766 acres that make up Yellowstone National Park now receive 4 million to 6 million visitors annually. But in 1872, the land was practically untouched. That year, President Ulysses S. Grant signed “an Act to set apart a certain Tract of Land lying near the Head-water

8h

PlayStation Classic hits all-time low price of $24.99

In an attempt to follow in the footsteps of the NES Classic Mini and SNES Classic Mini, Sony announced it was joining the mini retro console bandwagon last September with the PlayStation Classic, …

8h

Computing Biology's Future

Life scientists need new training to grapple with their discipline’s explosion of data — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

What are the odds of beating cancer?

Researchers are trying to better predict outcomes using ‘in-game probability’. Nick Carne reports.

8h

Politics this week

[no content]

8h

Business this week

[no content]

8h

KAL’s cartoon

[no content]

8h

Scientists invent fast method for 'directed evolution' of molecules

UNC School of Medicine scientists created a powerful new "directed evolution" technique for the rapid development of scientific tools and new treatments for many diseases.

8h

The Colorful Science of Why Fireworks Look Bad on TV

Even the best TVs fall short of capturing all the colors in fireworks that humans can perceive.

8h

How to make a better raincoat with tiny “water bowls”

Superhydrophobic shapes for repelling water from surfaces

8h

8h

8h

8h

Buried metal artefacts gather stories on their surfaces

The result is a chemical biography of the object

8h

Scientists invent fast method for 'directed evolution' of molecules

UNC School of Medicine scientists created a powerful new "directed evolution" technique for the rapid development of scientific tools and new treatments for many diseases.

8h

Computing Biology's Future

Life scientists need new training to grapple with their discipline’s explosion of data — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Data can now be stored inside the molecules that power our metabolism

The small molecules we use during metabolism form the basis of a new way to store digital information – and it could be more stable than electronic memory

9h

Your boss could use your smartwatch to check your productivity levels

AI can predict people’s performance levels at work based on data from their electronic devices. However, there are concerns about how the tech could be used

9h

Ten Arctic fox cubs born at Highland Wildlife Park

RZSS's Highland Wildlife Park, near Aviemore, has welcomed ten Arctic fox cubs.

9h

Suns, sloths and spy satellites — June’s best science images

Nature, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02074-w The month’s sharpest science shots, selected by Nature’s photo team.

9h

The American Paranoia of Stranger Things 3

This article contains some spoilers for Season 3 of Stranger Things. Burger King. Sam Goody. Ghostbusters. New Coke. Vending machines that get stuck. Sitting in the trunk of a station wagon. Stranger Things , Netflix’s mega-smash show about monsters in small-town Indiana, is so replete with the motifs of 1980s Americana that watching it can feel like an exercise in affective memory. The series is

9h

Exclusive: Five couples lined up for CRISPR babies to avoid deafness

Russian biologist Denis Rebrikov plans to help five couples who are deaf try CRISPR gene-editing to avoid having a child that inherits the condition

9h

Male elephants stick together when humans are around

Behavioural adaption is creating a new social order, research suggests. Natalie Parletta reports.

9h

The keyboard in Apple's 2019 MacBook Air and 2020 MacBook Pro will have new scissor switches

Every year or so, the Cupertino giant likes to announce shiny new MacBooks with all the usual incremental upgrades in computing power, and the promise that they may cost more than a kidney. …

9h

Court says Amazon could be liable for third-party vendors' products

Amazon faced lawsuits over third-party sellers in the past, but it always came out unscathed. Now, though, a federal appeals court in Philadelphia has decided that the e-commerce giant …

9h

Flying on Saturn's moon Titan: What we could discover with NASA's new Dragonfly mission

Flying on other worlds is the next leap in the exploration of our solar system. The Mars Helicopter will piggyback on the NASA Mars 2020 rover mission to demonstrate the technology. But this is only the start. The real prize will be the Dragonfly mission in 2026, sending a drone to Saturn's largest moon, Titan – as just announced by NASA.

9h

Going to space probably won't give you cancer, research suggests

But there are quite a few issues to consider. Richard A Lovett reports.

9h

Male elephants stick together when humans are around

Behavioural adaption is creating a new social order, research suggests. Natalie Parletta reports.

9h

Attempting to Fry an Egg on the Sidewalk Has Been a Summer Pastime for Over 100 Years

The Fourth of July is also National Fry an Egg on the Sidewalk Day, and no amount of scientific logic can crack this tradition

9h

Why the 'molecular scissors' metaphor for understanding CRISPR is misleading

Last week I read an article about CRISPR, the latest tool scientists are using to edit DNA. It was a great piece—well researched, beautifully written, factually accurate. It covered some of the amazing projects scientist are working on using CRISPR, like bringing animals back from extinction and curing diseases. It also gave me the heebies, but not for the reason you might expect.

9h

Why the 'molecular scissors' metaphor for understanding CRISPR is misleading

Last week I read an article about CRISPR, the latest tool scientists are using to edit DNA. It was a great piece—well researched, beautifully written, factually accurate. It covered some of the amazing projects scientist are working on using CRISPR, like bringing animals back from extinction and curing diseases. It also gave me the heebies, but not for the reason you might expect.

9h

Are self-driving cars really the answer for older drivers?

With more of us living longer, driving is becoming increasingly important in later life, helping us to stay independent, socially connected and mobile.

10h

Want a truly mind-expanding experience? Learn another language | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett

That Brexit has put British pupils off studying languages is tragic – it’s not just great for your brain, it opens up whole new worlds More than half the world’s people speak more than one language , and I am one of them: I speak English, Welsh, French and Italian, and wish that I could speak more. Being able to speak more than one language has opened up whole worlds of experience and understandin

10h

Professor efter eksplosion på brinttank: Ideen om brint som brændstof bør være helt død

Norsk professor mener, at eksplosionen på brinttankstationen i Kjørbo i Norge demonstrere en naiv opfattelse af, hvor farlig brint kan være.

10h

The rock-paper-scissors game and coexistence

In 1975, R.M. May and W.J. Leonard first used the rock-paper-scissors game to model ecological scenarios in which three species cyclically dominate each other: one species dominates a second species, the second species dominates a third species, and the third species dominates the first species. The game works well, for example, for modeling different strains of cyclically dominant E. coli bacteri

10h

Fra larve til snacks på spisebordet: Forbrugere sporer insekter i realtid

Spiselige insekter kan i dag følges fra producent til supermarkedet i realtid på et nyt blockchain-netværk. Projektet skal bane vejen for bedre sporbarhed i fødevaresektoren.

10h

Three zombie stars on the run

Nature, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02083-9 Stars moving at high velocity seem to have managed to live on after cataclysm.

10h

Ancient DNA reveals the roots of the Biblical Philistines

Nature, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02081-x Bones found in the Philistine city of Ashkelon and dating to the twelfth century bc hint at European heritage.

10h

Nestle creates wrapper that degrades in the sea within six months

submitted by /u/Sumit316 [link] [comments]

10h

10h

10h

1st Vaccine Designed by AI

submitted by /u/PHealthy [link] [comments]

10h

10h

10h

10h

Robots compete to hunt snipers in Navy challenge

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

10h

10h

10h

10h

Are self-driving cars really the answer for older drivers?

New study highlights the delay and deterioration in driving when older drivers have to 'take-back' control of their vehicle in difficult conditions.

10h

Elephants Now Gang Up In Human-Dominated Areas

(Credit: Natthawut Raruen/Shutterstock) Elephants might be popular in zoos and older kids’ TV shows, but they’re not doing so great in the wild. Asian elephants are classified as endangered, thanks in large part to human activity. But the big beasts are brainy, and they’re trying apparently trying new things in the face of these changing conditions to survive and even thrive. At least, that’s what

10h

Space Radiation Hasn't Contributed to Astronaut Mortality — Yet, Study Shows

Astronauts and cosmonauts aren't at any elevated risk from radiation damage — at least so far. (Credit: NASA) As NASA and other agencies look forward to placing humans on the Moon, Mars, and other destinations far beyond Earth’s sheltering atmosphere and magnetic fields, their worries about the harmful radiation that permeates space will only grow. Many aspects of how the human body will react to

10h

Contrapositive logic suggests space radiation not having a strong impact on mortality of US astronauts and Soviet and Russian cosmonauts

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44858-0 Contrapositive logic suggests space radiation not having a strong impact on mortality of US astronauts and Soviet and Russian cosmonauts

10h

Astronauts don't seem to be dying from exposure to space radiation

An analysis of cancer and heart diseases rates amongst people who have been to space has found no difference to the general population on Earth

10h

Is organic food better for you? Here's the truth about the benefits

Claims about the health benefits of organic foods are often linked to their higher levels of vitamins and antioxidants. Is organic food really better for you? James Wong investigates

10h

What to an American Is the Fourth of July?

His impatience had thinned like the length of his letters back home to his wife, Abigail, in Boston. On June 7, 1776, John Adams finally had the opportunity to second the resolution that led to the Declaration of Independence at the Second Continental Congress. Though it was drafted by Thomas Jefferson, the declaration’s editors and defenders behind history’s scenes piloted its approval on July 2

10h

An atomic-scale erector set

To design buildings that can withstand the largest of storms, Kostas Keremidis, a Ph.D. candidate at the MIT Concrete Sustainability Hub, is using research at the smallest scale—that of the atom.

10h

'The Walking Dead' (Comic) Is Over

The final issue of Robert Kirkman's zombie series, on which the AMC show is based, went out this week.

10h

Why Bigger Roads Make Traffic Worse, and Other Summer Travel News

Your airline stranded you. What do you now? And what does July 4 shopping have to do with traffic congestion?

10h

In Defense of Mayonnaise

The internet's most hated condiment is entirely misunderstood—and you should enjoy some this Fourth of July.

10h

Best Podcasts for Kids: Stories, Circle Round, Rebel Girls, Brains On

Keep your children entertained and ease the stress of getting there with these podcasts for kids.

10h

Families biting their tongues to avoid Brexit rows, research shows

Experts at the University of Sheffield have found that people are avoiding conversations about politics in order to prevent fall-outs over Brexit.

10h

David Cameron rudest prime minister at PMQs, according to study

Research analysing Prime Minister's Questions (PMQs) over a period of nearly 40 years has revealed that David Cameron personally insulted the leader of the opposition more than any other prime minister.

10h

Asteroid Vesta originates from a cosmic 'hit-and-run' collision

The asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter preserves the processes of planetary formation, frozen in time. Vesta, the second largest asteroid in this belt, provides an outstanding opportunity for scientists to investigate the origin and formation of planets. In particular, Vesta has kept its crust, mantle and metallic core, much like Earth. Careful mapping of Vesta by NASA's Dawn mission showed th

10h

Men do see the mess—they just aren't judged for it the way women are

On a typical day, men spend a third as much time cleaning as women.

11h

The Most Critical Argument Democrats Will Have in 2020

The battle over health care is emerging as the most consequential policy choice facing Democrats in the 2020 presidential contest—and it’s one that could play out over time to Joe Biden’s advantage. As last week’s debates demonstrated, Democrats now face a stark choice: a nominee who would establish a government-funded, single-payer, national health-care system that bans private health insurance,

11h

Some green ash trees show some resistance to emerald ash borers

Genes in green ash trees that may confer some resistance to attacks by the emerald ash borer express themselves only once the tree detects the invasive beetle's feeding, according to Penn State researchers.

11h

Some green ash trees show some resistance to emerald ash borers

Genes in green ash trees that may confer some resistance to attacks by the emerald ash borer express themselves only once the tree detects the invasive beetle's feeding, according to Penn State researchers.

11h

Scientists develop new method for studying early life in ancient rocks

Scientists have developed a new method for detecting traces of primordial life in ancient rock formations using potassium.

11h

Safer Nuclear Reactors Are on the Way

Resilient fuels and innovative reactors could enable a resurgence of nuclear power — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Safer Nuclear Reactors Are on the Way

Resilient fuels and innovative reactors could enable a resurgence of nuclear power — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

How comb jellies adapted to life in the deep sea

Washed up on a beach, a comb jelly or ctenophore (pronounced "teen-oh-four") might look like a little transparent grape. But ctenophores are extremely diverse, living from the equator to the poles and from the ocean surface to more than 7,000 meters, or more than four miles, down. MBARI researchers and their collaborators are developing computer models that compare the genetic material of many spe

11h

How comb jellies adapted to life in the deep sea

Washed up on a beach, a comb jelly or ctenophore (pronounced "teen-oh-four") might look like a little transparent grape. But ctenophores are extremely diverse, living from the equator to the poles and from the ocean surface to more than 7,000 meters, or more than four miles, down. MBARI researchers and their collaborators are developing computer models that compare the genetic material of many spe

11h

The Slow, Messy Evolution of LGBTQ Dating Shows

The MTV reality dating series Are You the One? pairs the pursuit of romance with a pretty sweet deal: If every one of the show’s contestants correctly identifies their “perfect match,” the group splits a grand prize of $1 million. In each of the show’s first seven seasons, 20 singles (and sometimes an additional wild card or two) were put through a “ rigorous matchmaking process ” and chosen to l

11h

New technique could brighten screens and make smartphone batteries last longer

Our future TV and smartphone screens could have double the energy efficiency, thanks to a technique invented by Imperial scientists.

11h

Sharing control with robots may make manufacturing safer, more efficient

Hulking robots common to assembly line manufacturing tend to be loners. They often cut, bend and weld metal inside cages and behind barriers meant to safely separate them from human workers.

11h

Making wireless communication more energy efficient

Omer Tanovic, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, joined the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) because he loves studying theory and turning research questions into solvable math problems. But Omer says that his engineering background—before coming to MIT he received undergraduate and master's degrees in electrical engineering and

11h

Why Do People Scrunch Up Their Faces After Tasting Something Sour?

Why do we give such a sour-looking response to sour foods?

11h

Advanced Food Tracking and Packaging Will Save Lives and Cut Waste

A combination of two technologies could vastly improve food safety — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Depth of Field: Alex Morgan and the Politics of Women in Celebration

The US women’s soccer team forward scored in the team’s semifinal win over England. It is her moment alone. She’s earned it. We would do well to remember it.

11h

An Itty-Bitty Robot That Lifts Off Like a Sci-Fi Spaceship

Ion propulsion is a fantastical new way to power robots by accelerating ions instead of burning fuel or spinning rotors.

11h

The Largest Black Holes in the Universe Formed in a Snap — Then Stopped

The biggest, oldest black holes in the universe shouldn't technically exist. A new study provides fresh evidence for the weird, "direct collapse" process that may have made them.

11h

Unusually Large 2-Billion-Year-Old Microbe Fossils Reveal Clues About Our Ancient World

These fossils could show the life-forms that gave Earth its earliest whiffs of oxygen, but not everyone is convinced.

11h

The First Fireworks Came from a 2,000-Year-Old Chinese Quest for Immortality

Ancient alchemy never did discover a death defying concoction — but it did produce a bang

11h

Stromboli clears up ash after deadly volcano eruption

The village of Ginostra on Stromboli began sweeping away layers of ash on Thursday, the day after a dramatic volcanic eruption on the tiny Italian island killed a hiker.

11h

11h

Advanced Food Tracking and Packaging Will Save Lives and Cut Waste

A combination of two technologies could vastly improve food safety — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Scientists combine light and matter to make particles with new behaviors

Every type of atom in the universe has a unique fingerprint: It only absorbs or emits light at the particular energies that match the allowed orbits of its electrons. That fingerprint enables scientists to identify an atom wherever it is found. A hydrogen atom in outer space absorbs light at the same energies as one on Earth.

11h

New Zealand slams Google over murder case gaffe

Google was accused of "giving the middle finger" by New Zealand's Justice Minister Thursday, after the US tech giant refused to tighten publication standards after breaching court suppression orders in a high-profile murder case.

11h

Chinese official: Pig fever outbreak 'complicated and grim'

The death toll from a disease outbreak in China's pig herds that has pushed up global pork prices has risen to 1.2 million animals, but its spread has "significantly slowed," a deputy agriculture minister said Thursday.

11h

French lawmakers approve 3% tax on online giants

France's lower house of parliament approved Thursday a small, pioneering tax on internet giants like Google, Amazon and Facebook—and the French government hopes other countries will follow suit.

11h

Hot weather in Greek capital shuts down Acropolis

Greece's most famous archaeological site, the Acropolis in Athens, has shut down to visitors for four hours because of hot weather in the capital.

11h

Jakarta residents sue Indonesia government over air pollution

Residents of Indonesia's capital on Thursday filed a lawsuit against the government over the toxic levels of air pollution that regularly blanket the city.

11h

Chinese official: Pig fever outbreak 'complicated and grim'

The death toll from a disease outbreak in China's pig herds that has pushed up global pork prices has risen to 1.2 million animals, but its spread has "significantly slowed," a deputy agriculture minister said Thursday.

11h

Pseudodemocracy

The Constitution Today is the Fourth of July. First, I want to say happy birthday to my two brothers, Bob and Joe, fraternal twins who were born on the 4th. But also happy birthday to America. The 4th is always a good time to reflect on what the American experiment in constitutional democracy really means. I tend to look at it this way – process is more important than outcome. This is true in the

12h

Lessons I’ve learnt from creating a science podcast

Nature, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02096-4 Making a podcast as a side project involves a steep learning curve, and although it might never beat Serial in the podcast rankings, the process can have myriad other benefits, says Katherine Bassil.

12h

Earth could have more water than we thought while exoplanets have less

New experiments with ice at very high pressures could force us to rethink our understanding of water on Earth and other planets

12h

Why We’re Patriotic – Issue 73: Play

It started with one man quietly sipping a Tom Collins in the lounge car of the Cleveland-bound train. “God bless America,” he sang, “land that I love …” It didn’t take long. Others joined in. “Stand beside her … and guide her …” Soon the entire train car had taken up the melody, belting out the patriotic song at the top of their lungs. It was 1940 and such spontaneous outpourings, this one desc

12h

Raising the American Weakling – Issue 73: Play

When she was a practicing occupational therapist, Elizabeth Fain started noticing something odd in her clinic: Her patients were weak. More specifically, their grip strengths, recorded via a hand-held dynamometer, were “not anywhere close to the norms” that had been established back in the 1980s. Fain knew that physical activity levels and hand-use patterns had changed a lot since then. Jobs had

12h

We Need Insects More Than They Need Us – Issue 73: Play

The interconnection of the world is a wonder. Consider the United States Declaration of Independence, says Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson, a conservation biologist. It was written with the help of a wasp. In July, 1776, when Timothy Matlack, a clerk with stately penmanship, copied the bold resolution on parchment, he dipped his pen in ink derived from tannins inside galls, tiny pods or growths, formed on

12h

The Dr. Strange of the American Revolution – Facts So Romantic

Benjamin Rush was a strange, or a strangely gifted, man, and one of the youngest—at 30—to sign the Declaration of Independence. Painting by John Trumbull / Wikicommons I ascribe the Success of our Revolution to a Galaxy,” Benjamin Rush wrote to John Adams, in 1812. He wasn’t invoking the astrological. It was commonplace then to associate a bright assembly of people with the starry band in the nig

12h

Evaluering: Danmark får fuld valuta for milliard-satsning på energi-udvikling

En ny evaluering af Danmarks væsentligste udviklingsstøtte til grønne energiprojekter, EUDP, viser, at virksomhederne er superglade for ordningen og selv spæder mere i kassen end staten.

12h

Can't Set Off Fireworks? Try These Science-Backed Alternatives

Blowing things up is a basic part of the Fourth of July. Here's what to try when fireworks aren't an option.

12h

4th of July Sales (2019): 25 Best Tech Deals This Weekend

If you're looking for outdoor and indoor essentials, you can save a lot of cash this Independence Day weekend.

12h

In Season 3, 'Stranger Things' Rediscovers Its Groove

The Netflix show roars back by sticking to one core rule: Keep the dark stuff dark and the light stuff light.

12h

My Psychedelic Trip Out of Depression

During my sixth infusion, I felt an ephemeral opening up, as if my brain and heart were more available to the world and to relationships and work. I felt a sense of joy, something I had a very hard time experiencing in my daily life. My positive experiences were not necessarily typical, however.

13h

The Fourth of July Has Always Been Political

Is President Donald Trump politicizing the Fourth of July, allowing the crassness of partisanship to intrude on a sacred civic celebration? That widely posed question is built on a faulty premise. From the very beginning, Independence Day celebrations have been deeply political—in fact, the early celebrations were far more overtly political than today’s festivities. The right question isn’t wheth

13h

Go Read the Declaration of Independence

There are July 4 traditions that are welcome and seemingly indestructible: barbecues and fireworks, most notably. There are some that are fortunately defunct: hours-long orations by stuffed-shirt politicians. There are some innovations that one hopes do not become traditions: 60-ton tanks rolling through Washington, D.C., most notably. And there is one that has faded with time, yet is worth prese

13h

Independence Day in a Divided America

John Adams predicted in a 1776 letter that the nation would mark the anniversary of its independence as “the most memorable Epocha in the History of America,” hosting a great anniversary festival that ought to be “solemnized” forever after with “Pomp and Parade … Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other.” That was prescient. This ye

13h

Conservatives Conjure Up Liberal Support for Antifa Violence

On June 29, a video appeared showing masked activists wearing black clothing—the garb commonly associated with “antifa,” the self-described anti-fascist movement—assaulting the conservative journalist Andy Ngo in Portland, Oregon. As if in unison, conservative publications published articles accusing the “left,” “liberal journalists,” and “reporters” of condoning the attack. That’s a disturbing c

13h

China Is Leading the Next Step in Fighting Malaria in Africa

MOMBASA, Kenya—In 2007, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation said it was committed to eradicating malaria across the globe. By then, it was late to the game. That year, Chinese scientists working with a Chinese philanthropist and his company, New South, had already begun eradicating malaria from the small African nation of Comoros. Now they’re setting their sights on a more ambitious location: Ken

13h

Having 30,000 followers makes you a celebrity, UK advertising watchdog rules

The UK’s Advertising Standards Authority has ruled that 30,000 is the magic number of followers that makes you a celebrity. The decision means that if you have such a following then …

13h

The first rule of Fight Club is … you do not republish Fight Club

A pair of therapists has lost a paper in Sage Open because they’d previously published the article in another journal (more on that in a bit). The article, “Bridging the gap between theory and practice with film: How to use Fight Club to teach existential counseling theory and techniques,” appeared in 2013. The authors were … Continue reading The first rule of Fight Club is … you do not republish

13h

The only way to 'build a wall' without destroying the U.S.

In times of crisis, we often 'build a wall' that separates the part of our lives that feels out of control from the parts that are more in control. This is healthy and can help us maintain perspective. Nations, too, build walls during times of crisis. But those walls can't be designed to isolate ourselves from others; rather, they need to delineate what is working and what isn't. Upheaval: Turnin

13h

14h

Ethics in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

submitted by /u/cryptologs [link] [comments]

14h

14h

With the internet and other recording assets available to us modern humans, what do you think historians 2000 years from now will wish they knew about our lifetime because they have no record of it? What information will get lost with time?

There is so much we do not know about what occurred 200 years ago, let alone 1000 or further back, but obviously there was no internet, no multi-terabyte hard drives. I wonder what historians in 4019 will know about what occurred in our lifetime or even care to know. Obviously the significance of an event and its impact has a large role in the way we remember, but now so much seemingly useless an

14h

De bedste sommeropfindelser: Kuglegrillen

Kuglegrillen kom til Danmark i 1991, men blev først populær, da et tv-program flere år senere viste, at låget skulle blive på. Så dens historie i fjerde afsnit af Ingeniørens sommergrafikserie.

14h

Sådan testes 5G i Aalborg

Telenors første 5G-mast i Danmark er blevet aktiveret i Aalborg i denne uge. Ingeniøren har talt med netværksstrateg Jesper Mølbak om de kommende måneders test og potentialerne i 5G.

14h

Satellite that could revolutionise weather forecasting

Aeolus measures wind speeds across the entire planet

14h

New Markers For Alzheimer's Disease Could Aid Diagnosis And Speed Up Drug Development

Researchers are using brain scans, blood and spinal fluid to detect early signs of Alzheimer's disease. These "biomarkers" may also offer a quicker way to test new Alzheimer's drugs. (Image credit: Courtesy of the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health)

14h

14h

Crystal Protein of a Novel Bacillus thuringiensis Strain Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Leukemic Cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45928-z Crystal Protein of a Novel Bacillus thuringiensis Strain Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Leukemic Cells

14h

Whole-genome re-sequencing association study for direct genetic effects and social genetic effects of six growth traits in Large White pigs

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45919-0 Whole-genome re-sequencing association study for direct genetic effects and social genetic effects of six growth traits in Large White pigs

14h

Reproduction of molecular subtypes of gastric adenocarcinoma by transcriptome sequencing of archival tissue

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46216-6 Reproduction of molecular subtypes of gastric adenocarcinoma by transcriptome sequencing of archival tissue

14h

Prognostic implications of post-percutaneous coronary intervention neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio on infarct size and clinical outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46117-8 Prognostic implications of post-percutaneous coronary intervention neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio on infarct size and clinical outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction

14h

Association between a High-Potassium Diet and Hearing Thresholds in the Korean Adult Population

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45930-5 Association between a High-Potassium Diet and Hearing Thresholds in the Korean Adult Population

14h

Angiographic Subtypes of Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration in Korean: A New Diagnostic Challenge

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46235-3 Angiographic Subtypes of Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration in Korean: A New Diagnostic Challenge

14h

Pattern of population structuring between Belgian and Estonian bumblebees

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46188-7 Pattern of population structuring between Belgian and Estonian bumblebees

14h

Assessing radiomic feature robustness to interpolation in 18F-FDG PET imaging

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46030-0 Assessing radiomic feature robustness to interpolation in 18 F-FDG PET imaging

14h

Beverage Companies Embrace Recycling, Until It Costs Them

They have pledged to help fix U.S. recycling, but for decades the companies have fought against “bottle bills,” which result in more bottles and cans being recycled but are costly for the industry.

14h

Is fungal or animal protein better for building muscle?

A small new study suggests that fungus-derived protein present in some meat replacement products may be better for building muscles than animal protein.

14h

Creation of big data tool leads to new ideas on form and function of insect eggs

Sometimes disproving an old hypothesis is as important as proving a new one. In a new paper in Nature, Cassandra G. Extavour manages to do both, while helping create a tool that will enable …

15h

Creation of big data tool leads to new ideas on form and function of insect eggs

Sometimes disproving an old hypothesis is as important as proving a new one. In a new paper in Nature, Cassandra G. Extavour manages to do both, while helping create a tool that will enable similar big-data studies moving forward.

15h

Creation of big data tool leads to new ideas on form and function of insect eggs

Sometimes disproving an old hypothesis is as important as proving a new one. In a new paper in Nature, Cassandra G. Extavour manages to do both, while helping create a tool that will enable similar big-data studies moving forward.

15h

Torr is avslöjar asteroiders ursprung

Mellan planeterna Mars och Jupiter ligger tiotusentals asteroider i ett ringformat bälte runt solen. Tidigare beräkningar har gjort gällande att en del av dessa asteroider inte har bildats på sin nuvarande plats utan att de istället har sina rötter i de yttre delarna av vårt solsystem. Enligt de teoretiska beräkningarna, som gjorts med hjälp av datormodeller, ska dessa asteroider ha transporterat

15h

15h

16h

16h

16h

Exomoons that run away from their planets could become 'ploonets'

We haven’t found any moons around exoplanets, which may be because they are flung away and turn into “ploonets” – a fate that could one day befall our own moon

16h

Researchers map crystals to advance treatments for stroke, diabetes, dementia

Medications attach to the proteins in our bodies the way spacecrafts dock into the International Space Station. Describing that process in detail can reveal a lot about how the medications work—and what form new medications should take.

16h

16h

17h

17h

17h

Samsung sued by Australian watchdog over "deceptive" Galaxy ads

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) alleges that Samsung made “false, misleading and deceptive representations” in its ads for Galaxy phones.

17h

More money, skills and knowledge needed for social prescribing to serve as route into work

New funding, greater expertise and wider awareness in the system—and beyond—are needed to embed work outcomes into social prescribing practice.

17h

Facebook services back online after worldwide outage

Facebook said it was "back at 100 percent" Wednesday evening after an outage on all of its services affected users in various parts of the world.

17h

Tornado kills 6, injures nearly 200 in China

A tornado has left six people dead and nearly 200 injured after ripping through a northeastern Chinese city, local authorities said Thursday.

17h

Prisoners of the Moon review – the dark side of the Apollo 11 story

This unsettling documentary focuses on an engineer from Nazi Germany who was a key player in America’s lunar programme This considered documentary blends archive, original interviews and reconstruction to track down an ugly, sticky thread from the great tapestry of self-congratulation that is forming around the 50-year anniversary of the first moon landing . Where a number of recent documentaries

17h

Amerikansk batteri-brand kan bremse energilagre

I april måned udbrød der brand i et batterilager i Arizona. En undersøgelse er undervejs og i mellemtiden skal amerikanske myndigheder, elselskaber og batterivirksomheder finde en balance mellem udrulning af teknologien og sikkerheden.

18h

Over grænsen: Kina installerer spion-app på turisters smartphones

Ved flere kinesiske grænseovergange gennemrodes telefoner, og SMS-beskeder kopieres.

18h

An Independence Day Tribute to Vaccination

In language that still resonates, Jacobson v. Massachusetts (U.S. Supreme Court, 1905) affirmed state authority to protect health, safety and welfare for the common good with mandatory vaccination despite individual non-medical objections.

18h

Some Hot Dog Histology

A lab analysis found that even an all-beef frankfurter had very little skeletal muscle, or 'meat.' So what’s in there? Christopher Intagliata reports.

18h

More money, skills and knowledge needed for social prescribing to serve as route into work

A new report from The Work Foundation, Embedding Work and Related Outcomes into Social Prescribing: Overcoming Challenges and Maximising Opportunities, says social prescribing can be an effective means of integrating people into work. However, government and wider stakeholders must address a range of cultural and practical barriers to realise this potential.

19h

Lord of the Rings Amazon series hires Jurassic director J.A. Bayona – CNET

From Isla Nublar to Middle-earth: Orcs aren't that different from dinosaurs, are they?

19h

Some Hot Dog Histology

A lab analysis found that even an all-beef frankfurter had very little skeletal muscle, or 'meat.' So what’s in there? Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Amazon vil stramme op for sikkerheden i skyen: »Der bør ikke være adskillelse mellem udvikling og sikkerhed«

Amazon ønsker at gøre god sikkerhed i skyen let tilgængelig ved at tilbyde værktøjer og sikkerhedsløsninger, som er nemme at anvende for alle udviklere. Men et delt sikkerhedsansvar kan også føre udfordringer med sig.

20h

20h

20h

Superhuman, Silicon Valley's Hottest Email App, Kills Location Tracking After Privacy Backlash

Email startup Superhuman ruffled some feathers this week thanks to a viral blog post by former Twitter vice president of design Mike Davidson detailing how one of the $30 a month service’s core …

21h

The real-world Mount Doom just erupted (again)

Ey, that's a spicy Stromboli! (Pixabay/) On Wednesday afternoon, videos of an ashy blast went viral when the volcano Stromboli erupted, killing one hiker. But the seismic belch isn’t a surprising event: After all, the hyperactive volcano has been in a near-ceaseless state of activity for the better part of 2,000 years, regularly spewing debris from its spot in an island chain near the end of Ital

21h

21h

22h

GPS on the Moon? NASA working on it | TechCrunch

submitted by /u/yieldingTemporarily [link] [comments]

22h

22h

22h

How technology has improved rescue searches in the wilderness

submitted by /u/MaikeruShogun [link] [comments]

22h

A ‘molecular thumb drive’ stores big files in small droplets

Nature, Published online: 03 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02070-0 Information is encoded in spots made of assorted substances.

22h

A Hearing in the Census Case Turns Surreal

There’s a three-year-old tweet from Donald Trump that I think about a lot. I’ve forgotten the context in which he made the statement, but the idea remains straightforward: Don't believe the biased and phony media quoting people who work for my campaign. The only quote that matters is a quote from me! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump), May 28, 2016 As became clear Wednesday, it’s still true, su

22h

When big data aren’t the answer [Letters (Online Only)]

In PNAS, Greenberg, et al. (1) use data collected using 4 surveys from over half a million people to support the Extreme Male Brain (EMB) theory of autism and the Empathizing–Systematizing (E-S) theory of sex differences. Large sample sizes are—all other things being equal—better than small sample sizes. However, the…

22h

Reply to Perrykkad and Hohwy: When big data are the answer [Letters (Online Only)]

Perrykkad and Hohwy (1) argue that autism was historically diagnosed predominantly in males (4 males to 1 female) (2) and thus the defining characteristics of autism are male biased. They conclude that because the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) was developed within this historical framework, (i) the AQ may not capture…

22h

No compelling evidence for clathrate hydrate formation under interstellar medium conditions over laboratory time scales [Letters (Online Only)]

In PNAS, Ghosh et al. (1) report their experimental observations of methane and CO2 clathrate formation at conditions similar to the interstellar medium (ISM), namely 10 to 30 K and 10−10 mbar. The authors conducted time-dependent reflection–absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) of vapor-deposited H2O–CH4 and H2O–CO2 mixtures and interpreted new blue…

22h

Reply to Choukroun et al.: IR and TPD data suggest the formation of clathrate hydrates in laboratory experiments simulating ISM [Letters (Online Only)]

In their letter, Choukroun et al. (1) caution against our results (2) as definitive evidence for the formation of clathrate hydrates (CHs) in the interstellar medium (ISM). We show the emergence of an infrared (IR) feature at 3,017 cm−1 in vapor-deposited CH4–water mixture upon ∼25 h of annealing, at 30…

22h

A di-iron protein recruited as an Fe[II] and oxygen sensor for bacterial chemotaxis functions by stabilizing an iron-peroxy species [Chemistry]

Many bacteria contain cytoplasmic chemoreceptors that lack sensor domains. Here, we demonstrate that such cytoplasmic receptors found in 8 different bacterial and archaeal phyla genetically couple to metalloproteins related to β-lactamases and nitric oxide reductases. We show that this oxygen-binding di-iron protein (ODP) acts as a sensor for chemotactic responses…

22h

Variational implicit-solvent predictions of the dry-wet transition pathways for ligand-receptor binding and unbinding kinetics [Applied Mathematics]

Ligand–receptor binding and unbinding are fundamental biomolecular processes and particularly essential to drug efficacy. Environmental water fluctuations, however, impact the corresponding thermodynamics and kinetics and thereby challenge theoretical descriptions. Here, we devise a holistic, implicit-solvent, multimethod approach to predict the (un)binding kinetics for a generic ligand–pocket mod

22h

{alpha}-synuclein-lipoprotein interactions and elevated ApoE level in cerebrospinal fluid from Parkinson's disease patients [Neuroscience]

The progressive accumulation, aggregation, and spread of α-synuclein (αSN) are common hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease (PD) pathology. Moreover, numerous proteins interact with αSN species, influencing its toxicity in the brain. In the present study, we extended analyses of αSN-interacting proteins to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Using coimmunoprecipitation, followed by mass spectrometry,…

22h

Ternary nitride semiconductors in the rocksalt crystal structure [Applied Physical Sciences]

Inorganic nitrides with wurtzite crystal structures are well-known semiconductors used in optical and electronic devices. In contrast, rocksalt-structured nitrides are known for their superconducting and refractory properties. Breaking this dichotomy, here we report ternary nitride semiconductors with rocksalt crystal structures, remarkable electronic properties, and the general chemical formula M

22h

Deep evolutionary origin of limb and fin regeneration [Evolution]

Salamanders and lungfishes are the only sarcopterygians (lobe-finned vertebrates) capable of paired appendage regeneration, regardless of the amputation level. Among actinopterygians (ray-finned fishes), regeneration after amputation at the fin endoskeleton has only been demonstrated in polypterid fishes (Cladistia). Whether this ability evolved independently in sarcopterygians and actinopterygian

22h

Antigen structure affects cellular routing through DC-SIGN [Immunology and Inflammation]

Dendritic cell (DC) lectins mediate the recognition, uptake, and processing of antigens, but they can also be coopted by pathogens for infection. These distinct activities depend upon the routing of antigens within the cell. Antigens directed to endosomal compartments are degraded, and the peptides are presented on major histocompatibility complex…

22h

Cellular responses to reactive oxygen species are predicted from molecular mechanisms [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Catalysis using iron–sulfur clusters and transition metals can be traced back to the last universal common ancestor. The damage to metalloproteins caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) can prevent cell growth and survival when unmanaged, thus eliciting an essential stress response that is universal and fundamental in biology. Here we…

22h

Toxicity drives facilitation between 4 bacterial species [Ecology]

Competition between microbes is extremely common, with many investing in mechanisms to harm other strains and species. Yet positive interactions between species have also been documented. What makes species help or harm each other is currently unclear. Here, we studied the interactions between 4 bacterial species capable of degrading metal…

22h

22h

23h

Cheaper elements can replace rare ones in future electronics

Researchers have devised a way to make materials for electronics and lighting from cheaper, more abundant elements. The new compounds can also be “tuned” to efficiently harvest electrical energy from the different wavelengths of light in the solar spectrum and to produce the range of colors we like to use in lighting. Today, optoelectronic materials in thin-film solar panels, the cell phone in yo

23h

That giant cigar that zipped through our solar system definitely wasn’t a spaceship

Forgive us for being blunt. (NASA/) Do you remember 'Oumuamua? The rod-shaped interstellar rock that, for some reason, some Harvard University scientists said might actually be a spacecraft built by intelligent extraterrestrials —even though pretty much every other scientist disagreed? Well, in case the message was still unclear to you: It. Is. Not. Aliens , according to the conclusions of a new

1d

‘Atlas’ of the body’s sugars could shed light on disease

A new tool promises to advance understanding of the importance of sugars in the human body. Most people understand sugar as something sweet that we eat, but complex structures of sugars actually decorate the surface of every cell in the human body. Scientists often find new ways in which sugars affect the communication of the cells with proteins, viruses, and other cells, and so what makes us sic

1d

Collision course: Amateur astronomers play a part in efforts to keep space safe

Heavy traffic is commonplace on Earth but now congestion is becoming an increasing problem in space. With over 22,000 artificial satellites in orbit it is essential to keep track of their positions in order to avoid unexpected collisions. Amateur astronomers from the Basingstoke Astronomical Society have been helping the Ministry of Defence explore what is possible using high-end consumer equipmen

1d

Deep-CEE: The AI deep learning tool helping astronomers explore deep space

Galaxy clusters are some of the most massive structures in the cosmos, but despite being millions of lightyears across, they can still be hard to spot. Researchers at Lancaster University have turned to artificial intelligence for assistance in finding galaxy clusters, developing 'Deep-CEE' (Deep Learning for Galaxy Cluster Extraction and Evaluation), a novel deep learning technique to speed up th

1d

One in 10 UK hospital inpatients is alcohol dependent

A new review of evidence from the UK has found high levels of alcohol dependence among hospital inpatients. The researchers estimate one in five patients in the UK hospital system uses alcohol harmfully, and one in 10 is alcohol dependent.

1d

Using maths to mix the perfect perfume

Researchers use online data and network analysis to find the best blend of scents. Mark Bruer reports.

1d

Epidemic forecasts can miss the human reaction

New research focuses on incorporating the way humans react to the news of outbreaks into disease outbreak models. When governments and institutions deploy epidemic forecast models when facing an outbreak, they sometimes fail to factor in human behavior and over-allocate precious resources as a result. Adding these criteria will allow professionals and communities to mobilize adequate resources du

1d

James Lovelock on the future of AI and climate change

Scientist James Lovelock speaks to the BBC's Mishal Husain ahead of his 100th birthday.

1d

UK’s National Trust to sell off fossil fuel investments worth £45m

The National Trust, a UK conservation charity, will sell off its investments in fossil fuel companies including BP, Shell and Total over the next three years

1d

1d

1d

Deep-CEE: The AI deep learning tool helping astronomers explore deep space

Galaxy clusters are some of the most massive structures in the cosmos, but despite being millions of lightyears across, they can still be hard to spot. Researchers at Lancaster University have turned to artificial intelligence for assistance, developing "Deep-CEE" (Deep Learning for Galaxy Cluster Extraction and Evaluation), a novel deep learning technique to speed up the process of finding them.

1d

Collision course: Amateur astronomers play a part in efforts to keep space safe

Heavy traffic is commonplace on Earth but now congestion is becoming an increasing problem in space. With over 22,000 artificial satellites in orbit it is essential to keep track of their positions in order to avoid unexpected collisions. Amateur astronomers from the Basingstoke Astronomical Society have been helping the Ministry of Defence explore what is possible using high-end consumer equipmen

1d

The Lancet Public Health: Incarceration and economic hardship strongly associated with drug-related deaths in the USA

Growing rates of incarceration in the USA since the mid-1970s may be linked with a rise in drug-related mortality, and may exacerbate the harmful health effects of economic hardship, according to an observational study involving 2,640 US counties between 1983 and 2014, published in The Lancet Public Health journal.

1d

Substantial increase in body weight since 1960s due to interplay between genes and environment

People with a genetic predisposition to obesity are not only at greater risk of excess weight, their genes interact with an increasingly 'obesogenic' environment, resulting in higher body mass index (BMI) in recent decades, finds a study from Norway published by The BMJ today.

1d

China forcing travelers to install text-stealing malware when crossing border

The malware records calls, texts, calendar info, and other data and also searches for Islamic extremist content. China has been spying on its own citizens for years, but this marks a new shift in the overt ways in which the nation monitors foreigners. While there's no evidence that the U.S. installs malware on travelers' phones, customs officials are allowed to inspect the phones and laptops of p

1d

Everything you need to know about uranium

Yellowcake uranium. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission via Flickr/) Since the German chemist Martin Heinrich Klaproth identified uranium in 1789, atomic number 92 has become one of the most troubling substances on the planet. It's naturally radioactive, but its isotope uranium-235 also happens to be fissile, as Nazi nuclear chemists learned in 1938, when they did the impossible and split a uranium nu

1d

Author Correction: Early fungi from the Proterozoic era in Arctic Canada

Nature, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1396-8 Author Correction: Early fungi from the Proterozoic era in Arctic Canada

1d

Protein-linked sugars are crucial for the uptake of proteins linked to Parkinson's disease

New research shows how glycoproteins, proteins with added sugar molecules, influence the uptake of protein aggregates that are associated with Parkinson's disease. The researchers also identified a specific presynaptic protein as a key regulator in this process, which opens the door for future research into new therapeutic targets.

1d

Ovarian and breast cancer research finds new ways BRCA1 gene functions

Research has found important new ways that the BRCA1 gene functions which could help develop our understanding of the development of ovarian and breast cancers.

1d

Phillistines, Biblical Enemies of the Israelites, Were European, DNA Reveals

The ancient Philistines weren't local to what is now modern-day Israel. Instead, this enigmatic group descended from a group of seafaring Europeans, a new study of ancient DNA finds.

1d

Tough choice: Porsche makes supercar buyers decide between acceleration or handling

The GT2 RS is red, and the GT3 RS is "lizard green." (Porsche/) Consider these two vehicles, twins in both names and looks: the 2019 Porsche 911 GT2 RS, and the 2019 Porsche 911 GT3 RS. The nearly indistinguishable designations of these cars—one has a “2” in the name, the other, a “3”—and their doppelganger appearance will lead fans to wonder what exactly the difference is between them. Our effor

1d

Eta Carinae Explodes in a Vibrant Fireworks Show in New Hubble Image

(Credit: NASA, ESA, N. Smith (University of Arizona) and J. Morse (BoldlyGo Institute)) As though in preparation for summer festivities, the Hubble Space Telescope captured this cosmic fireworks show from Eta Carinae. The double star system, glowing in red, white, and blue, has exploded several times. The most recent explosion was nearly 200 years ago, in 1838, when an event called the Great Erupt

1d

Astronomers Peer Into the Atmosphere of a Super-Earth for the First Time

The planet GJ 3470 b has a rocky core and a thick hydrogen and helium atmosphere, and circles quite close to its dim red star. (Credit: NASA/ESA/L. Hustak) The Kepler Space Telescope revealed planets outside our solar system by the thousands. With this wave of discoveries, astronomers realized something peculiar: the most common type of planet in the galaxy is one our solar system doesn’t have. It

1d

Lichens Survived A Mass Extinction, Scientists Find. But How Are They Doing Now?

Lichens come in many colors. (Credit: Field Museum) 65 million years ago, a meteor catastrophically changed our planet’s biodiversity. All non-avian dinosaurs went extinct. By some estimates, 15,000 teragrams (that’s equal to the mass of 10 million redwood trees) of soot darkened the air. Lush and flowering plants that had proliferated around 40 million years earlier were decimated, deprived of li

1d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Giving Tanks

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Wednesday, July 3. We’ll be off for the fourth, but back with dispatches on Friday. (Jeremy Raff / The Atlantic ) All Eyes on the Border: There is “dangerous overcrowding” in at least five of the Customs and Border Prot

1d

Stored in Synapses: How Scientists Completed a Map of the Roundworm’s Brain

Redrawing neural connections led to new clues about sex differences in scientists’ favorite model organism.

1d

Robert Levine, Who Studied Kindness, Identity and Time, Dies at 73

His social experiments explored how people around the world spend time, whether kindness varies by city and what compels us to buy things we may not need.

1d

1d

Researchers announce a breakthrough HIV cure in mice

submitted by /u/deftware [link] [comments]

1d

AI-designed heat pumps consume less energy

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

1d

1d

Boeing to give $100 mn to 737 MAX crash victims' families, communities

Boeing announced Wednesday it would give $100 million to communities and families affected by two crashes on its 737 MAX planes that claimed 346 lives.

1d

Scientists discover autoimmune disease associated with testicular cancer

Using advanced technology, scientists at Chan Zuckerberg (CZ) Biohub, Mayo Clinic and University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), have discovered an autoimmune disease that appears to affect men with testicular cancer.Called 'testicular cancer-associated paraneoplastic encephalitis,' the disease causes severe neurological symptoms in men. They progressively lose control of their limbs, eye mov

1d

Tesla Model 3 Crash Results, Europe's Record Heat, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

1d

Alcohol's secondhand effects are more serious than we think, study says

A new study reveals that 21 percent of females and 23 percent of males have suffered the consequences of someone else's drinking. The secondhand effects of alcohol, including threats, vandalism, and financial problems, are underreported. Experts in the field recommend higher taxation to curb excessive drinking. None We certainly have strange definitions of freedom. Often the "freedom" one takes i

1d

With little training, machine-learning algorithms can uncover hidden scientific knowledge

Researchers have shown that an algorithm with no training in materials science can scan the text of millions of papers and uncover new scientific knowledge. They collected 3.3 million abstracts of published materials science papers and fed them into an algorithm called Word2vec. By analyzing relationships between words the algorithm was able to predict discoveries of new thermoelectric materials y

1d

WVU researchers map crystals to advance treatments for stroke, diabetes, dementia

A team of WVU researchers — including Werner Geldenhuys, John Hollander and Aaron Robart–have mapped the crystal structure of a protein called 'mitoNEET' and pinpointed how a drug latches on it.

1d

Low Levels of 'Bad' Cholesterol May Have a Downside

When it comes to "bad" cholesterol, lower is usually better. But a new study suggests it may be possible for cholesterol levels to be too low.

1d

Common scents don't always make the best perfumes, suggests mathematical study

Perfumes that use the most popular scents do not always obtain the highest number of ratings, according to an analysis of online perfume reviews.

1d

Molecular thumb drives: Researchers store digital images in metabolite molecules

In a step toward molecular storage systems that could hold vast amounts of data in tiny spaces, researchers have shown it's possible to store image files in solutions of common biological small molecules.

1d

With little training, machine-learning algorithms can uncover hidden scientific knowledge

Researchers have shown that an algorithm with no training in materials science can scan the text of millions of papers and uncover new scientific knowledge. They collected 3.3 million abstracts of published materials science papers and fed them into an algorithm called Word2vec. By analyzing relationships between words the algorithm was able to predict discoveries of new thermoelectric materials y

1d

How protein mutation is involved in rare brain development disorder

Christianson Syndrome is a rare disorder whose symptoms include intellectual disability, seizures and difficulty standing or walking. Researchers focusing on the intellectual disability aspect of the disease, have shown for the first time how a specific mutant form of the SLC9A6 encoding gene for the NHE6 protein affects the ability of neurons to form and strengthen connections.

1d

Common scents don't always make the best perfumes, suggests mathematical study

Perfumes that use the most popular scents do not always obtain the highest number of ratings, according to an analysis of online perfume reviews.

1d

Murder in the Paleolithic? Evidence of violence behind human skull remains

New analysis of the fossilized skull of an Upper Paleolithic man suggests that he died a violent death, according to a new study.

1d

Molecular thumb drives: Researchers store digital images in metabolite molecules

In a step toward molecular storage systems that could hold vast amounts of data in tiny spaces, researchers have shown it's possible to store image files in solutions of common biological small molecules.

1d

Researchers controlled the behavior in a mouse's brain with single-cell precision

Researchers have demonstrated that specific groups of neurons, known as neuronal ensembles, have a causal role in behavior. The researchers used new optical and analytical tools to identify cortical ensembles in mice while they performed a visual task. They also used high-resolution optogenetics to simultaneously target selected neurons with single-cell precision, taking control of the mice's beha

1d

First complete wiring diagram of an animal's nervous system

Researchers describe the first complete wiring diagram of the nervous system of an animal, the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, used by scientists worldwide as a model organism. The study includes adults of both sexes and reveals substantial differences between them.

1d

Immune cells invade aging brains, disrupt new nerve cell formation

A study has revealed that immune cells infiltrate the rare newborn nerve-cell nurseries of the aging brain. There's every reason to think those interlopers are up to no good. Experiments in a dish and in living animals indicate they're secreting a substance that chokes off new nerve cell production.

1d

Hungarian Law Wrests Control of Research from Scientific Academy

Protestors disapprove of putting scientific institutions under the authority of a government-led committee.

1d

DNA Study Reveals Philistines Were Originally From Europe

A DNA study of an archaeological site shows the biblical Philistines, long vanished and derided as primitive, were originally from Europe.

1d

Judge to reassess $80 million award in Monsanto cancer case

A federal judge will reconsider a jury's $80 million damage award to a cancer victim who used Monsanto's Roundup weed-killer.

1d

Arctic mission will trap scientists in ice to study climate

Cranes hoist cargo onto the deck, power tools scream out and workers bustle through the maze of passageways inside the German icebreaker RV Polarstern, preparations for a yearlong voyage that organizers say is unprecedented in scale and ambition.

1d

Judge to reassess $80 million award in Monsanto cancer case

A federal judge will reconsider a jury's $80 million damage award to a cancer victim who used Monsanto's Roundup weed-killer.

1d

After concussion, biomarkers in the blood may help predict recovery time

A study of high school and college football players suggests that biomarkers in the blood may have potential use in identifying which players are more likely to need a longer recovery time after concussion, according to a study published in the July 3, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

1d

Canon sees crowdfunding opportunity for little clippable camera

Canon has turned to crowdfunding for a camera. The camera, said the campaign page, is feature-packed: 13.0 Megapixel 1/3-inch CMOS sensor, full HD video shooting at 1080p up to 60fps, Bluetooth …

1d

Ancient DNA Sheds New Light on the Biblical Philistines

A team of scientists sequenced genomes from people who lived in a port city on the Mediterranean coast of Israel between the 12th and 8th centuries B.C.

1d

X-rays spot spinning black holes across cosmic sea

Like whirlpools in the ocean, spinning black holes in space create a swirling torrent around them. However, black holes do not create eddies of wind or water. Rather, they generate disks of gas and dust heated to hundreds of millions of degrees that glow in X-ray light.

1d

New dairy cattle breeding method increases genetic selection efficiency

Inclusion of a parameter that measures an animal's capacity to transmit its genetic traits resulted in gains of up to 16% compared with a traditional method of selection.

1d

Super-resolution microscopy illuminates associations between chromosomes

Thanks to super-resolution microscopy, scientists have now been able to unambiguously identify physical associations between human chromosomes. The findings have brought to light a new understanding to a curious observation first made more than 50 years ago.

1d

Physicists develop model that describes length growth in biological systems

One of science's unsolved puzzles is that concerning the growth of biological systems. Whether it's a microscopic protozoa or a blue whale, all living systems grow. Physicists have now discovered a mechanism that could well provide a means to explain this mystery. They have developed a mathematical model that offers a precise explanation of growth in biological systems.

1d

Developing Monoclonal Antibodies: Challenges and Solutions

Download this infographic from Sartorius to explore some common challenges to mAb development and their potential solutions!

1d

Sample Preparation for Single Cell Analysis: Tips and Tricks

In this LabTools webinar, sponsored by 10X Genomics, Dr. Jill Herschleb will explore critical sample prep decisions and consideration for assay design and optimization.

1d

B cells off rails early in lupus

Scientists could discern that in people with SLE, signals driving expansion and activation are present at an earlier stage of B cell differentiation than previously appreciated.

1d

Super-resolution microscopy illuminates associations between chromosomes

Thanks to super-resolution microscopy, scientists have now been able to unambiguously identify physical associations between human chromosomes. The findings have brought to light a new understanding to a curious observation first made more than 50 years ago.

1d

Two new species of parasitic wasps described from an altitude of over 3,400 m in Tibet

Specimens kept in the collection of the Institute of Beneficial Insects at the Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University (China) revealed the existence of two previously unknown species of endoparasitic wasps. Looking very similar to each other, yet clearly distinct from species in other wasp genera, both have once been collected from prairies and bushes in high-altitude areas in Tibet, China.

1d

Treatment targeted at a genetic mutation relieves psychosis symptoms

Treatment of psychosis can be targeted to a specific genetic mutation in patients with psychotic disorders. The study provides a proof-of-principle demonstration that treatments can be tailored to a specific genotype, rather than diagnosis, to relieve symptoms. The findings also link an individual structural mutation to the underlying biology of psychosis and treatment response.

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

Chicago-to-Cleveland hyperloop gets funding from U.S. House

submitted by /u/Tycoonkoz [link] [comments]

1d

1d

1d

Cancer doctors are guardedly optimistic about artificial intelligence – STAT

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

1d

1d

1d

Orange fireball lighting Florida sky was Chinese space junk

Conspiracy theorists took to social media in a flurry of excitement Wednesday after a mysterious flying object resembling an orange fireball streaked across the Florida sky.

1d

Treated Gut Bacteria Help Slim Down Cardiovascular Risks in Obese People

(Credit: aijiro/Shutterstock) Nearly a third of all deaths in the world are due to heart diseases. Now, a new study suggests that an infusion of gut bacteria might hold promise for treating cardiovascular conditions. The proof-of-concept study looked at obese people given a daily supplement of helpful bacteria that had been killed with heat, or pasteurized. The study paves the way for a larger hum

1d

Volcano erupts on Sicily's Stromboli island; 1 person killed

Italian news agency ANSA says eruptions from a volcano on the Sicilian island of Stromboli sent about 30 tourists jumping into the sea for safety.

1d

Heat Wave Nudged the Planet to Its Hottest June, European Forecasters Say

A United States government analysis due this month is expected to reach similar conclusions, though the rankings of record months might differ slightly.

1d

Superbug virulence regulatory mechanism revealed: Pave ways for developing new antibiotics

As antibiotic resistance is growing and posing a threat on public health, developing new antibiotics has become more urgent than ever. Researchers have recently revealed the virulence regulatory mechanism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a superbug which is common in patients with a weak immune system and is resistant to many antibiotics. The findings pave ways for identifying good antibiotic targets fo

1d

Blood pressure drug linked with increased risk of bowel condition

A type of blood pressure lowering medication, called a calcium-channel blocker, may be linked with an increased risk of a type of bowel condition called diverticulosis.

1d

Protection mechanism in bacteria

Scientists have shed fresh light on the mechanism used by certain types of bacteria to protect themselves against attack.

1d

Winter monsoons became stronger during geomagnetic reversal

New evidence suggests that high-energy particles from space known as galactic cosmic rays affect the Earth's climate by increasing cloud cover, causing an 'umbrella effect'.

1d

Physicists develop model that describes length growth in biological systems

One of science's unsolved puzzles is that concerning the growth of biological systems. Whether it's a microscopic protozoa or a blue whale, all living systems grow. Physicists have now discovered a mechanism that could well provide a means to explain this mystery. They have developed a mathematical model that offers a precise explanation of growth in biological systems.

1d

Activity of fuel cell catalysts doubled

An interdisciplinary research team has built platinum nanoparticles for catalysis in fuel cells: The new size-optimized catalysts are twice as good as the best process commercially available today.

1d

Perfect timing: Making the 'switch' from juvenile to adult

Very little is known about how the onset of puberty is controlled in humans, but the discovery of a new gene in the roundworm C. elegans could be the 'missing link' that determines when it's time to make this juvenile-to-adult transition.

1d

For first time, U.S. renewable energies surpass coal

Wind and solar saw the biggest increases in April. Spring is when coal-generated electricity is typically lowest, and when hydro-generated electricity is highest. American coal-fired power plants are shutting down at record rates, putting thousands of jobs at risk. None In April, the U.S. generated more electricity from renewable energies than coal, marking a first for the country. Renewable ener

1d

Exercise improves anxiety and mood in older adults undergoing chemotherapy

Although we know that exercise improves anxiety and mood problems in younger people with cancer, few studies have looked at the effects of exercise on older adults with cancer. Since most new cancer cases occur in adults aged 60 or older, a team of researchers from the University of Rochester Medical Center and other institutions designed a study to learn more.

1d

Outage hits Facebook services worldwide

Facebook acknowledged Wednesday an outage affecting users in various parts of the world and said it was working on a fix.

1d

Uber Eats bows to fans and removes green from Marseille shirt logo

Uber Eats has changed the colour of the logo that will appear on Marseille shirts next season to placate the club's fans.

1d

Scientists sound alarm after 6 rare whale deaths in a month

A half-dozen North Atlantic right whales have died in the past month, leading scientists, government officials and conservationists to call for a swift response to protect the endangered species.

1d

How scientists used NASA data to predict appearance of July 2 eclipse

As sunset drew near on July 2, 2019, thousands along a ribbon of land stretching across Chile and Argentina looked to the skies, waiting for the Moon's shadow to cast them into momentary darkness. They knew a total solar eclipse was coming, and counted down the seconds.

1d

Scientists sound alarm after 6 rare whale deaths in a month

A half-dozen North Atlantic right whales have died in the past month, leading scientists, government officials and conservationists to call for a swift response to protect the endangered species.

1d

6 ways you can ease your dog's fear of fireworks

Loud noises can be scary for pups (Deposit Photos/) The Fourth of July can be a miserable day for dogs. The fireworks make scaredy-cats out of many canines. That's because dogs, like humans, are hardwired to be afraid of sudden, loud noises. It is what keeps them safe. Some dogs, though, take that fear to the extreme with panting, howling, pacing, whining, hiding, trembling, and even self-injury

1d

Protein-linked sugars are crucial for the uptake of proteins linked to Parkinson's disease

New research from the University of Pennsylvania shows how glycoproteins, proteins with added sugar molecules, influence the uptake of protein aggregates that are associated with Parkinson's disease. The researchers also identified a specific presynaptic protein as a key regulator in this process, which opens the door for future research into new therapeutic targets.

1d

Researchers reveal how protein mutation is involved in rare brain development disorder

Christianson Syndrome is a rare disorder whose symptoms include intellectual disability, seizures and difficulty standing or walking. Researchers at McGill University focusing on the intellectual disability aspect of the disease, have shown for the first time how a specific mutant form of the SLC9A6 encoding gene for the NHE6 protein affects the ability of neurons to form and strengthen connection

1d

Decoupling of timescales reveals sparse convergent CPG network in the adult spinal cord

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10822-9 Spinal CPGs transmit movement commands through rhythmic synaptic drive onto the spinal premotor network. Here, the authors use paired recordings to demonstrate that spinal neurons have decorrelated synaptic activity suggesting a CPG network with sparse convergent connectivity.

1d

An integrated genomic regulatory network of virulence-related transcriptional factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10778-w The virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regulated by many transcriptional factors (TFs). Here, the authors study the crosstalk between 20 key virulence-related TFs, validate 347 functional target genes, and describe the regulatory relationships of the 20 TFs with their targets in a network that is available a

1d

Mendelian randomisation analysis of the effect of educational attainment and cognitive ability on smoking behaviour

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10679-y Higher educational attainment is positively associated with a number of health outcomes. Here, Sanderson et al. use multivariable Mendelian randomisation analysis to test whether the association of educational attainment with smoking behaviour is direct or indirectly mediated via general cognitive ability.

1d

Iron-dependent histone 3 lysine 9 demethylation controls B cell proliferation and humoral immune responses

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11002-5 The authors show an important role for iron in B cell proliferation via histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9) demethylation at the cyclin E1 promoter. Using a measles vaccination murine model, they show that iron-deficient individuals have a significantly reduced antibody response to the vaccine when compared to iron-normal

1d

Analogue of dynamic Hall effect in cavity magnon polariton system and coherently controlled logic device

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11021-2 Exploring photon-polariton interactions advances not only the understanding of polariton dynamics but also the modern technologies. Here the authors take advantage of strong coupled magnons and microwave photons in a cross-cavity to achieve tunable cavity magnon polariton transport which can be potentially appli

1d

Neuroepigenetic signatures of age and sex in the living human brain

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11031-0 Gene transcription is known to vary with age and sex, although the underlying mechanisms are unresolved. Here, the authors show that epigenetic enzymes known as HDACs, which regulate gene transcription, are increasingly expressed with age in the living human brain, with sex differences also observed.

1d

PRC1 collaborates with SMCHD1 to fold the X-chromosome and spread Xist RNA between chromosome compartments

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10755-3 The inactive X (Xi)-specific S1/S2 chromosome compartments are merged by SMCHD1, but how the S1/S2 structure is constructed is unclear. The authors find that PRC1 drives the formation of S1/S2s and that the stepwise folding process of the Xi facilitates Xist RNA spreading between Xi compartments.

1d

Locus coeruleus-CA1 projections are involved in chronic depressive stress-induced hippocampal vulnerability to transient global ischaemia

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10795-9 Depression and transient ischaemic attacks are tightly regulated but the neural circuits underlying depression-modulated ischaemic injury are not known. Here, the authors show that the locus coeruleus-CA1 pathway is involved in depression-associated ischaemia susceptibility.

1d

Why the community that sings together stays together

In Bohemian Rhapsody (2018), the movie about the British band Queen, the scene that sticks in my mind depicts the Live Aid concert in London in 1985. Queen belt out their best-loved songs and the crowd is singing along, swaying, clapping and stamping its feet. I could empathise a potent sense of togetherness in the audience, a feeling of cohesion between thousands of fans, coming not only from a

1d

Professors Could Lose Jobs for Housing Rare, Psychedelic Plant

Miami University's plant conservatory was growing seedlings of iboga, which contains an illegal, psychoactive substance.

1d

We May Never Know When That Third CRISPR Baby Is Born

Save The Date In November, Chinese scientist He Jiankui shocked the world when he announced that he had brought CRISPR-edited human babies into the world. But the Chinese government has kept quiet in the face of news that a third CRISPR birth is expected soon, according to MIT Technology Review . In January, Stanford bioethicist William Hurlbut announced that He had gene-hacked a third embryo and

1d

Modern forensics solves Stone Age murder mystery after 33,000 years

A forensic analysis of a 33,000-year-old skull finds a clear explanation for the mysterious pattern of fractures preserved in the bone: it was murder

1d

Experiments show dramatic increase in solar cell output

Researchers have found a way to increase the output of silicon solar cells by allowing a single photon to release two electrons in the silicon.

1d

Columbia researchers controlled the behavior in a mouse's brain with single-cell precision

In their study, published in Cell, the researchers demonstrated that specific groups of neurons, known as neuronal ensembles, have a causal role in behavior. The researchers used new optical and analytical tools to identify cortical ensembles in mice while they performed a visual task. They also used high-resolution optogenetics to simultaneously target selected neurons with single-cell precision,

1d

Discovery of pancreatic neuroendocrine subtypes could help predict likelihood of recurrence

Researchers have discovered two distinct subtypes of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors – known as pNETs – that have dramatically different risks of recurrence following surgical treatment [or surgery]. The finding could yield predictive tests, ease anxiety in patients whose tumors are found to be unlikely to recur, while focusing vigilant follow-up monitoring on patients with pNETs having a higher

1d

How to pack exactly what you need when you travel

This is… absolutely never a good plan. (Deposit Photos/) The travel world seems to be divided into those who try to bring the smallest, lightest bag possible, even for months at a time (“one-bagging”) and those who act with reckless abandon and bring more than they could ever need. I’ve tried both ends of the spectrum and they both have their flaws; the ideal situation is to pack exactly what y

1d

1d

Experiments show dramatic increase in solar cell output

Researchers have found a way to increase the output of silicon solar cells by allowing a single photon to release two electrons in the silicon.

1d

Maize-centric diet may have contributed to ancient Maya collapse

Researchers look at the role of diet in the ability of the ancient Maya to withstand periods of severe climatic stress. They found that an increase in the elite Maya's preference for a maize-based diet may have made the population more vulnerable to drought, contributing to its societal collapse.

1d

IDT and 3CR pool expertise to provide a custom genotyping solution for low- to high-throughput screening

New high-performance, cost-effective PACE SNP assays will lower the cost and improve the reliability of SNP or indel screening

1d

The Era of Sex for Reproduction Is Coming to an End, Says Author

The Sex Talk Henry T. Greely is the director of Stanford University’s Center for Law and the Biosciences, as well as its Program in Neuroscience and Society. Clearly, the guy knows a thing or two about technology and the role it plays in people’s lives — and he’s now predicting that technological advances will one day make sex for reproduction a thing of the past. “My strongest prediction is in t

1d

Ancient DNA reveals the roots of the Biblical Philistines

Nature, Published online: 04 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02081-xBones found in the Philistine city of Ashkelon and dating to the twelfth century bc hint at European heritage.

1d

Common scents don't always make the best perfumes, suggests mathematical study

Perfumes that use the most popular scents do not always obtain the highest number of ratings, according to an analysis of online perfume reviews.

1d

Reprogramming pancreatic cancer

A type of white blood cell that has been especially susceptible to being deceived by pancreatic cancer cells into not attacking them can be 're-programmed' via a specially designed molecule that activates a protein found on their surfaces. The finding, which are the cover story of the July 3, 2019 issue of the Science Translational Medicine. Despite being the 3rd leading cause of cancer deaths, on

1d

Joslin researchers uncover protective factor in diabetic eye disease

At high enough levels, Retinol Binding Protein 3 (or RBP3) prevents the development of diabetic retinopathy. If introduced early enough in the development of the disease, RBP3 was shown to reverse the effects of the complication in rodent models of diabetes.

1d

Mechanism of scorpion toxin inhibition of K+ channel elucidated using high-speed AFM

Agitoxin-2 (AgTx2) from scorpion venom is a potent blocker of K+ channels. Here, we observed the binding dynamics of AgTx2 to the KcsA channel using high-speed atomic force microscopy. From the images obtained, single-molecule kinetic analyses revealed that the affinity of the channel for AgTx2 increased during persistent binding and decreased during persistent dissociation. We propose a four-stat

1d

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image