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nyheder2019juli08

Quitting alcohol may improve mental well-being, health-related quality of life

Quitting alcohol may improve health-related quality of life for women, especially their mental well-being, according to a study from Hong Kong published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

15h

Mette har brugt 10 år på at forstå kroniske smerter: Nu forærer hun sin viden til medicinalindustrien

Mette Richner håber, at virksomheder kan bruge grundforskningen til at lave ny medicin mod kroniske smerter.

14h

Letbanedirektør efter dødsulykke: Bommene lå klar til at blive sat op

Den tragiske ulykke ved letbaneoverkørsel på Djursland skete, mens Banedanmark var ved at installere bomme til at sikre overkørslen bedre og øge hastigheden.

10h

Ridehailing services may be driving up traffic deaths

The arrival of ridehailing is associated with an increase of approximately 3 percent in the number of motor vehicle fatalities and fatal accidents, according to research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

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Breaching a 'carbon threshold' could lead to mass extinction

Carbon dioxide emissions may trigger a reflex in the carbon cycle, with devastating consequences, study finds.

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Ancient molar points to interbreeding between archaic humans and Homo sapiens in Asia

An analysis of a 160,000-year-old archaic human molar fossil discovered in China offers the first morphological evidence of interbreeding between archaic humans and Homo sapiens in Asia.

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CNIO researchers discover that the rate of telomere shortening predicts species lifespan

Comparison of telomeres of goats, dolphins, gulls, reindeer, vultures, flamingos, elephants, mice and humans reveals that species whose telomeres shorten faster have shorter lives.'We have found a universal pattern, a phenomenon that explains the lifespans of the species,' says Maria Blasco, senior author of the study.The results are published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of

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No Plans for Aerial Survey of Arctic Refuge, Company Says

The announcement means there will most likely be no new information about any potential oil and gas riches in the refuge when drilling leases are sold this year.

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Steve Wozniak Thinks You Should Dump Facebook If You Are Concerned About Privacy

Do you think Facebook is listening to your conversations, through your smartphone or any other gadget? There is an easy solution—stop using Facebook. That is the advice Apple co-founder Steve …

4min

Facebook used tools to hunt down misinformation and hoaxes when the site itself was the subject

Hoaxes included popular 'copy-and-paste' posts that alleged Facebook would start charging users and other campaigns accusing the company of tapping users' microphones to spy on them.

4min

Elon Musk: It’ll Take “Massive Effort” to Create Safe Autopilot

Chip Shot Elon Musk has good news and bad news for Tesla owners eager to let Autopilot take the wheel. On Sunday, Musk tweeted that Tesla will “ most likely ” begin retrofitting its older electric vehicles with custom-built computer chips before the end of the year. Once paired with the necessary software, the plan is that those chips will enable Teslas to drive themselves. That’s the good news.

6min

This Robot Arm Can Help Wheelchair Users Drink Coffee, Open Doors

Extra Reach A new robot arm can help people who use wheelchairs better handle the day-to-day tasks that might otherwise be too challenging or awkward. The Jaco, a robotic arm made by the tech company Kinova Robotics, can attach to a wheelchair and operate as a sort of third arm, according to Digital Trends — helping people with limited mobility go about their lives with a greater degree of indepe

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12min

Arctic ice reveals 1500 years of progress and pollution

Lead concentrations tell a story of humans and their environment. Natalie Parletta reports.

17min

A rare dental trait lives on

Three-rooted molars in modern humans could have come from Denisovans. Dyani Lewis reports.

17min

Tiny homes and floating apartments: California mayors' reply to the growing homeless problem

As the homeless population soars in California, city mayors are contemplating a variety of initiatives to combat the problem. San Francisco mayor London Breed has published the most extensive list of solutions, including supportive housing, eviction prevention, and rental subsidies. Other mayors are creating tiny home villages and even considering a floating apartment complex in the San Francisco

19min

Instability in Antarctic ice projected to make sea level rise rapidly

Images of vanishing Arctic ice and mountain glaciers are jarring, but their potential contributions to sea level rise are no match for Antarctica's, even if receding southern ice is less eye-catching. Now, a study says that instability hidden within Antarctic ice is likely to accelerate its flow into the ocean and push sea level up at a more rapid pace than previously expected.

21min

Rising tundra temperatures create worrying changes in microbial communities

Rising temperatures in the tundra of the Earth's northern latitudes could affect microbial communities in ways likely to increase their production of greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide, a new study of experimentally warmed Alaskan soil suggests.

21min

Academic conferences lack tools to prevent sexual misconduct, discrimination

A new study has found that over three-quarters of biology conferences do not have codes of conduct. Half of conferences that do have codes of conduct fail to mention sexual misconduct, and many do not include methods for reporting misconduct and consequences for violators.

21min

Lead pollution in Arctic ice show economic impact of wars and plagues for past 1,500 years

How did events like the Black Death plague impact the economy of Medieval Europe? Particles of lead trapped deep in Arctic ice can tell us.

21min

Researchers discover that the rate of telomere shortening predicts species lifespan

A flamingo lives 40 years and a human being lives 90 years; a mouse lives two years and an elephant lives 60. Why? What determines the lifespan of a species? After analyzing nine species of mammals and birds, researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO) found a very clear relationship between the lifespan of these species and the shortening rate of their telomeres, the structu

21min

It Sure Seems Like the Trump Administration Is Suppressing Reports of Climate Change at USGS

Trump administration officials are removing references to climate change from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) press releases, according to a ClimateWire report.

22min

Researchers discover that the rate of telomere shortening predicts species lifespan

A flamingo lives 40 years and a human being lives 90 years; a mouse lives two years and an elephant lives 60. Why? What determines the lifespan of a species? After analyzing nine species of mammals and birds, researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO) found a very clear relationship between the lifespan of these species and the shortening rate of their telomeres, the structu

24min

UTA researchers identify genetic pathway that could enhance survival of coral

Three researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have made a groundbreaking discovery that could enhance the ability of reef-building corals to survive a rapidly warming and disease-filled ocean.

37min

Trump Administration Officials Scrubbed Climate Change from Press Releases

The dire predictions of a recent USGS study on sea level rise were removed from the agency’s release — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

39min

Just How Many Extinct Types of Human Did Our Ancestors Meet?

Long before this cave painting was made, our ancestors met and interacted with multiple types of ancient human. (Credit: Jannarong/Shutterstock) For the past ~40,000 years, Homo sapiens — modern humans — has been the only Homo species on Earth. But for most of our history, there were close evolutionary cousins of ours, human but not quite like us, coexisting and evolving at the same time in differ

55min

Sneaky mating may be in female damselfies' interest

New research on damselflies in northern Africa suggests that females may facilitate the reproductive success of inferior males when their health is at risk.

59min

Portland State study shows ways to reduce extreme heat in city neighborhoods

Planting more vegetation, using reflective materials on hard surfaces and installing green roofs on buildings can help cool potentially deadly urban heat islands — a phenomenon that exists in nearly all large cities — a new study from Portland State University shows.

59min

Research yields new clues to the origin of Tamu Massif

The discovery of Tamu Massif, a gigantic volcano located about 1,000 miles east of Japan, made big news in 2013 when researchers reported it was the largest single volcano documented on earth, roughly the size of New Mexico. New findings, reported this week in Nature Geoscience, conclude that it is a different breed of volcanic mountain than earlier thought, throwing into doubt the prior claim tha

59min

First hi-res images of active CRISPR enzyme will help improve genome editing

For the first time, scientists grappling with how to improve the efficiency of CRISPR technology — a gene-editing platform that uses an enzyme called Cas9 to precisely cut and edit specific sequences of DNA within a live cell — have captured atomic-level, three-dimensional images of the enzyme before and after cutting the DNA.

59min

CNIC is the coordinator of an international consensus document on the use of magnetic resonance

CNIC has coordinated the first international consensus document providing guidelines on the conduct of magnetic resonance imaging studies after a myocardial infarction in clinical trials or experimental models. The document concludes that the main outcome parameter in studies assessing new treatments should be absolute infarct size: the percentage of the left ventricle that is irreversibly damaged

59min

Amazon Workers Plan to Strike on Prime Day

Employees at Amazon’s now-infamous Shakopee, Minnesota, warehouse—the first of the famously anti-union retailer’s locations to stage a walkout in the U.S.—is planning a strike next week to coincide …

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How a minty fresh flavouring could control useful genes

Nature, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02119-0 The cooling compound menthol sets a human protein to work, triggering a cellular cascade.

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‘We Cannot Save Everything’: A Historic Neighborhood Confronts Rising Seas

Colonial-era homes line the streets of The Point in Newport, R.I. Climate change is forcing experts to reimagine the future of historic preservation here.

1h

Could targeting this heart hormone help control blood pressure?

The heart releases a hormone that has a key role in blood pressure. Now, a study of rats shows that its function depends on a sugar molecule attachment.

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Festivalen er forbi: Derfor lider du af 'Roskilde-blues'

Din krop trænger til hvile, men dit hoved vil feste videre med dine venner.

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New Approach Could Sink Floating Point Computation

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Renewables Catching Nuclear Power In Global Energy Race

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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NASA satellites find biggest seaweed bloom in the world

An unprecedented belt of brown algae stretches from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico–and it's likely here to stay. Scientists at the University of South Florida in St. Petersburg's College of Marine Science used NASA satellite observations to discover and document the largest bloom of macroalgae in the world, dubbed the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt, as reported in Science.

1h

Too much screen time for the kids? Grandparents may also be complicit

A new study by Rutgers and other researchers finds that today's grandparents are still true to their traditional fun-loving image — allowing their grandchildren, while under their supervision, to spend about half of their time on a mobile phone, tablet, computer or TV.

1h

NASA catches Post Tropical Cyclone Cosme fading

Tropical Storm Cosme formed in the Eastern Pacific Ocean over the weekend of July 6 and 7 and after two days, the storm already weakened to a remnant low pressure area. NASA's Aqua satellite found the storm devoid of strong thunderstorms and appeared as a wispy ring of clouds.

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Uranium toxicity may be causing high rates of obesity and diabetes in Kuwait

Kuwait has some of the highest rates of obesity and diabetes in the world, and scientists don't know why. This question was addressed by Dr. Max Goodson, Emeritus Professor at the Forsyth Institute.

1h

Scientists' warning to humanity: Microbiology and climate change

When it comes to climate change, ignoring the role of microorganisms could have dire consequences, according to a new statement issued by an international team of microbiologists.

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'Liquid forensics' could lead to safer drinking water

Ping! The popular 1990 film, The Hunt for Red October, helped introduce sonar technology on submarines to pop culture. Now, nearly 30 years later, a team of scientists at the University of Missouri is using this same sonar technology as inspiration to develop a rapid, inexpensive way to determine whether the drinking water is safe to consume. Based on their results, the scientists said they can de

1h

Highway medians are a source of food for wildlife, study shows

Vegetated highway medians are a proverbial buffet for small mammals, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. Animals such as weasels, mink, and chipmunks use the roadside bands of vegetation as habitat to find food.

1h

New model forecasts anomalous growth patterns for substitutive products and behaviors

Data analysis shows that products that are considered to be substitutive in nature have a very different growth trajectory from traditional product models.

1h

Key early steps for origin of life occur under a variety of conditions

Potential precursors to life on Earth form from a variety of complex mixtures, according to a team of scientists who say this could point to the development of building blocks crucial to forming genetic molecules for the origins of life on Earth.

1h

Horizon Discovery’s SMARTvector shRNA technology deployed in Celyad’s successful IND filing for next-generation CAR-T cell therapy, CYAD-02

· Phase 1 trial scheduled for early 2020 will be first CAR-T cell therapy clinical trial to employ SMARTvector technology· Horizon will receive a milestone payment for the successful IND filing of CYAD-02, autologous NKG2D-based CAR-T candidate

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The Science Behind Washington's Scary 'Flash Flood Emergency'

One critical factor turned the heavy rainfall in Virginia and Washington D.C. into a flash flood emergency.

1h

Scientists develop new method for studying early life in ancient rocks

Scientists have developed a new method for detecting traces of primordial life in ancient rock formations using potassium.

1h

Researchers: Eggshells can help grow, heal bones

Eggshells can enhance the growth of new, strong bones needed in medical procedures, a team of UMass Lowell researchers has discovered.

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Ancient Saharan seaway shows how Earth's climate and creatures can undergo extreme change

A new paper integrates 20 years of research by a diverse scientific team and describes the ancient Trans-Saharan Seaway of Africa that existed 50 to 100 million years ago in the region of the current Sahara Desert. The study is a comprehensive synthesis and contains the first reconstructions of extinct aquatic species in their habitats along the seaway and places in context massive climate and sea

1h

GW pilot study finds collagen to be effective in wound closure

Researchers in the George Washington University Department of Dermatology found that collagen powder is just as effective in managing skin biopsy wounds as primary closure with non-absorbable sutures.

1h

Indications why older people are more susceptible to Alzheimer's disease

The risk of developing Alzheimer's disease increases with age. Susanne Wegmann of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) in Berlin and US colleagues have uncovered a possible cause for this connection: Certain molecules involved in the disease, termed tau-proteins, spread more easily in the aging brain. The results were recently published in the journal 'Science Advances'.

1h

Blood test may predict risk of recurrence for breast cancer patients

A special blood test may one day predict if a newly diagnosed breast cancer patient will likely relapse years later. 'This is the first success linking a solid tumor with blood biomarkers — an indicator of whether a patient will remain in remission,' said Peter Lee, from City of Hope and study author. 'When patients are first diagnosed with cancer, it's important to identify those at higher risk

1h

UCI team pioneers cancer treatment that targets bone metastases while sparing bone

University of California, Irvine researchers have developed and tested on mice a therapeutic treatment that uses engineered stem cells to target and kill cancer bone metastases while preserving the bone.

1h

Combining antibiotics, researchers deliver one-two punch against ubiquitous bacterium

By combining two well-established antibiotics for the first time, a scientific team led by Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center has delivered a 'double whammy' against the pervasive Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a potentially deadly form of bacteria that is a major source of hospital-based infections.

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Study: Some stereotypes seem to be universally applied to biracial groups in the US

A new Northwestern University study has found evidence that there are some stereotypes that seem to be universally applied to biracial groups in the U.S.

1h

Looking at how the brain reacts to boredom could help people cope

New WSU research shows people can be taught coping mechanisms to avoid negative responses to boring situations.

1h

Natural antioxidant helps improve immune-based therapies by modulating T-cells

Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina discovered a way to improve immune-based treatments by modulating T-cells. The advancement can help increase anti-tumor efficiency of T-cell therapy and protect patients from graft-versus-host disease resulting from hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

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Prediction tool from Kaiser Permanente researchers may identify patients at risk for HIV

Researchers have developed a new analytical tool that identifies people at risk of contracting HIV so they may be referred for preventive medication. A study describing the tool was published July 5, 2019, in The Lancet HIV by investigators at Kaiser Permanente San Francisco, the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Harvard Medical School.

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Want to boost creativity? Try playing Minecraft

Video games that foster creative freedom can increase creativity under certain conditions, according to new research from Iowa State University. The experimental study compared the effect of playing Minecraft, with or without instruction, to watching a TV show or playing a race car video game. Those given the freedom to play Minecraft without instruction were most creative.

1h

'You all look alike to me' is hard-wired in us, research finds

We are hard-wired to process — or not process — facial differences based on race. And that process occurs in the earliest filters of our thought process, according to newly published research.

1h

Russia: Dead Nuclear Sub Somehow Avoided “Planetary Catastrophe”

Close Call Last week, a nuclear-powered Russian submarine caught fire , killing 14 sailors who were on board. Since then, the Russian government has kept details of the incident under wraps . But one Russian Navy official now claims that the sailors “prevented a planetary catastrophe,” according to Bloomberg . Though it’s unclear exactly what sort of catastrophe he meant, it’s an unsettling hint

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Allianz Explorer Series Is Taking NYC on a First-Class Ride to a Sustainable Future

New York City has always been home to rabble-rousers who challenge the status quo and imagine innovative futures. And this month, it’s going to be home to three events that showcase some of those fearless thinkers – and some very fast cars – and offer the city a glimpse into a bold and sustainable future. The creativity kicks off with a stop on Allianz’s Explorer Series world tour. Fresh off even

1h

Fat Is Not the Problem—Fat Stigma Is

“Health experts” are sending incorrect and destructive messages about the relationship between weight and wellness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Fat Is Not the Problem—Fat Stigma Is

“Health experts” are sending incorrect and destructive messages about the relationship between weight and wellness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

X-rays reveal monolayer phase in organic semiconductor

An international team of researchers has investigated how the electrical properties of dihexyl-quarterthiophene thin films depend on their structure. This material is an organic semiconductor with prospects for flexible electronics. It turned out that once the thin films undergo a transition from the crystal to the liquid-crystal state, they lose some of their electrical conductivity. The team als

1h

New method may resolve difficulty in measuring universe's expansion

Radio telescope observations have made it possible for astronomers to use mergers of neutron-star pairs as a valuable new tool for measuring the Universe's expansion.

1h

First proof-of-concept demonstrates genetic sex selection in mammals

A new Tel Aviv University study reveals a genetic system in mammals that enables two animals to mate and produce only females. A similar system based on identical principles would produce only males.

1h

Journal of Dental Research Centennial July 2019: Fluoride Revolution and Dental Caries

While the global epidemic of dental caries that began about 140 years ago was very largely caused by the rise in sugar consumption, the more recent decline in caries during the last 50 years has been due largely to the use of fluoride.

1h

Screen size matters: Consumers less attentive to news content on small screens

If you're getting your news from a smartphone, size matters.

1h

Jurassic shift: Changing the rules of evolution

Is the success of species mainly dependent on environmental factors such as climate changes or do interactions between the species have a greater role to play? A British-German study involving Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Kießling from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has investigated this question in more detail.

1h

Structure of brain networks is not fixed, study finds

The shape and connectivity of brain networks — discrete areas of the brain that work together to perform complex cognitive tasks — can change in fundamental and recurring ways over time, according to a study led by Georgia State University.

1h

Pairing 'glue' for electrons in iron-based high-temp superconductors studied

Newly published research from a team of scientists led by the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory sheds more light on the nature of high-temperature iron-based superconductivity.

1h

Playfully discover atom manipulation

The team of Toma Susi at the University of Vienna uses an electron microscope to manipulate strongly bound materials with atomic precision. Since the instruments used are fully computerized, it is possible to show in a simulation how researchers actually use them. A simulation game on display at the Vienna Technical Museum in their special exhibition is now also released online, together with the

1h

Producing graphene from carbon dioxide

The general public knows the chemical compound of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and because of its global-warming effect. However, carbon dioxide can also be a useful raw material for chemical reactions. A working group has now reported on this unusual application. They are using carbon dioxide as a raw material to produce graphene, a technological material which is currentl

2h

Thought experiment: Switzerland without fossil fuels. Can that succeed?

A new study shows how much work still lies ahead of us if Switzerland is to do without fossil fuels in the future. There are two possible solutions: storing large amounts of energy in summer and limiting our demand in winter, or generating energy in the "sunny south" or "windy north" of the world and transporting it here.

2h

Yearlong birth control supply would cut unintended pregnancies, costs

By dispensing a year's worth of birth control pills up front, the VA could prevent 583 unintended pregnancies and save $2 million per year on health care costs each year.

2h

How the brain remembers where you're heading to

The brain appears to implement a GPS system for spatial navigation; however, it is not yet fully understood how it works. Researchers now suggest that rhythmic fluctuations in brain activity, so-called theta oscillations, may play a role in this process.

2h

Molecular energy machine as a movie star

Researchers have used the Swiss Light Source SLS to record a molecular energy machine in action and thus to reveal how energy production at cell membranes works. For this purpose they developed a new investigative method that could make the analysis of cellular processes significantly more effective than before.

2h

Wind, warmth boost insect migration

Researchers equipped monarch butterflies and green darner dragonflies with radio transmitters and tracked them through southern Ontario and several northern States to learn how environmental factors affect daytime insect migration. Learning about what happens to insects during their migration may help in conservation efforts. The study found wind and temperature are more important influences than

2h

Producing graphene from carbon dioxide

The general public knows the chemical compound of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and because of its global-warming effect. However, carbon dioxide can also be a useful raw material for chemical reactions. A working group has now reported on this unusual application. They are using carbon dioxide as a raw material to produce graphene, a technological material which is currentl

2h

Thought experiment: Switzerland without fossil fuels. Can that succeed?

A new study shows how much work still lies ahead of us if Switzerland is to do without fossil fuels in the future. There are two possible solutions: storing large amounts of energy in summer and limiting our demand in winter, or generating energy in the "sunny south" or "windy north" of the world and transporting it here.

2h

Five Couples Agree to CRISPR Their Babies to Avoid Deafness

Hearing Things Denis Rebrikov wants to use CRISPR to create more gene-edited babies — and he already knows who their parents might be. In June, the Russian biologist told Nature he planned to gene-edit human embryos and then bring them to term. To date, only one person — Chinese scientist He Jiankui — has ever openly produced gene-edited babies, with the claim that the edits would prevent the bab

2h

Gene-editing enzymes in action

For the first time, scientists have captured high-resolution, three-dimensional images of an enzyme in the process of precisely cutting DNA strands.

2h

Composition of human skin microbiome can be modulated

Scientists have demonstrated the use of living bacteria to modulate skin microbiome composition. Mixtures of different skin microbial components have been used to temporarily modulate the composition of recipient skin bacteria for therapeutic or cosmetic purposes.

2h

Climate change and deforestation together push tropical species towards extinction

Only 38 per cent of tropical forest is 'wildlife friendly' as a result of deforestation, increasing the likelihood that vulnerable species will go extinct, say scientists.

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Cave secrets unlocked to show past drought and rainfall patterns

Global trends in cave waters identify how stalagmites reveal past rainfall and drought patterns.

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Optimizing the growth of coatings on nanowire catalysts

A chemical surface treatment boosts the catalytic activity of the wire-looking nanostructures for a key reaction in solar fuel production.

2h

Knowing BRCA status associated with better breast cancer outcomes even without surgery

Study: Women who knew their BRCA+ status were diagnosed with earlier stage breast cancer, needed less chemotherapy, less extensive surgery, and had greater overall 5-year survival (98 percent vs. 74 percent).

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Evolutionary coupling analysis identifies the impact of disease-associated variants

Predicting the impact of DNA sequence variants is important for sorting disease-associated variants (DVs) from neutral variants. Korean researchers at Pohang University of science and technology (POSTECH) report the development of a method to predict the impact of DVs. The study appears in the journal Nucleic Acids Research in June.

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Immunotherapy could work against bowel cancers resistant to important targeted treatment

Patients with bowel cancer who have stopped responding to a widely used targeted drug could benefit from immunotherapy, a major new study reveals. Scientists found that bowel tumours which had initially responded to cetuximab before developing resistance became more visible to the immune system — potentially leaving them vulnerable to immunotherapies. A phase II clinical trial has already begun t

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Cancer cells will become vulnerable

Researchers from HSE University (The Higher School of Economics) have used machine learning to discover that the two most widespread DNA structures — stem-loops and quadruplexes — cause genome mutations that lead to cancer. The results of the study were published in BMC Cancer.

2h

On the way to nanotheranostics

Nanotheranostics is a cutting-edge field of medicine that uses nanoparticles to simultaneously diagnose and treat diseases. Chemical engineers at EPFL have now developed a novel nanotheranostic system that uses tunable light to activate or image nanoparticles, thus opening a new path for the field. The work is published in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

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Heat transport can be blocked more effectively with a more optimized holey nanostructure

The research group of Nanoscience Center at University of Jyvaskyla confirms its earlier observations that by using the wave nature of heat in holey nanostructures heat conduction can be reduced by over hundredfold. The research was published in the journal Physical Review Applied on the 3rd of July, 2019.

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UK researchers develop ultrafast semiconductors

UK researchers have developed world-leading Compound Semiconductor (CS) technology that can drive future high-speed data communications. A team from Cardiff University's Institute for Compound Semiconductors (ICS) worked with collaborators to innovate an ultrafast and highly sensitive 'avalanche photodiode' (APD) that creates less electronic 'noise' than its silicon rivals.

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Study finds psychiatric diagnosis to be 'scientifically meaningless'

A new study, published in Psychiatry Research, has concluded that psychiatric diagnoses are scientifically worthless as tools to identify discrete mental health disorders.

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Left out to dry: A more efficient way to harvest algae biomass

Researchers at the University of Tsukuba develop a new system for evaporating the water from algae biomass with reusable nanoporous graphene, which can lead to cheaper, more environmentally friendly biofuels and fine chemicals.

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New review highlights evidence on how to increase physical activity in everyday life

Physical activity is important for physical and mental wellbeing and keeping socially connected. This themed review, Moving Matters, brings together more than 50 published and ongoing studies funded by the NIHR on ways to increase physical activity in everyday life. This review considers the changing needs and opportunities of different age groups from infancy onwards, as well as considering inter

2h

Istanbul: Seafloor study proves earthquake risk for the first time

Istanbul is located in close proximity to the North Anatolian fault, a boundary between two major tectonic plates where devastating earthquakes occur frequently. Using an autonomous measuring system on the seafloor, researchers of the GEOMAR, Kiel, together with colleagues from France and Turkey, have now for the first time measured deformation underwater and detected a considerable build-up of te

2h

No escape for mosquitoes

Venus flytraps are capable of detecting the movements of even the smallest insects. This mechanism protects the plant against starving from hyperactivity as a new study conducted by scientists from Würzburg and Cambridge reveals.

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BU researchers: Allowing the sale of buprenorphine without a prescription could save lives

In an effort to address the opioid epidemic in new, safe and effective ways, increasing access to buprenorphine, without a prescription, could prove helpful for treating persons with opioid use disorder (OUD), according to a Viewpoint in this week's JAMA.

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Surprising NYC ridesharing study findings have implications for policymakers

Researchers have limited access to information about how people use popular ridesharing services like Uber and Lyft. But recent analysis of aggregate data about ridesharing trips in New York City, conducted by researchers at UConn and published last month in Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, sheds new light on use of the service by people in the city's o

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Fish die-offs linked to hotter summers

Fish die-offs in Wisconsin lakes are expected to double by mid-century and quadruple by 2100 due to warmer summer temperatures, according to a study published today in the journal Nature Climate Change.

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Development of 3-D particle model for single particles in battery electrodes

A model with a 3-D observation of micrometer-sized particles in a cell has been developed. Through the analysis and research of micrometer-sized particles in a cell, this model is expected to enhance energy efficiency of cells.

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How I lost my identity — and embraced a new one

Nature, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02123-4 It was tough for Lia Paola Zambetti to leave the bench after dreaming for more than a decade of becoming a scientist, and reaching her goal. But now she enjoys her work’s broader impact.

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When Small Towns Take the Big Stage

The longer and farther that Jim and I have traveled with our earlier American Futures reporting in The Atlantic , and then with Our Towns the book, and now for this new Our Towns project, the more frequently people have asked some version of these questions: We admire how Greenville has rebuilt its downtown and Main Street from seedy to spectacular, but how do we do that? Or, Fresno had some crea

2h

Plant nutrient detector breakthrough

Findings from La Trobe University-led research could lead to less fertiliser wastage, saving millions of dollars for Australian farmers.

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Video: Can we make ocean water drinkable—and should we?

We need water to survive—and Earth is covered in it! Unfortunately, almost all of that water is salty.

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Researchers develop ultrafast semiconductors

UK researchers have developed world-leading Compound Semiconductor (CS) technology that can drive future high-speed data communications.

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Satellite sees smoke from multiple fires in New Mexico

The U.S. Forest Service's Gila National Forest reported four naturally caused fires on July 4, 2019, and three of them generated enough smoke to be seen from space by satellite.

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Arizona's Whiting Knoll fire seen by NASA-NOAA satellite

The Whiting Knoll fire burning in east central Arizona is generating enough smoke to be seen from space.

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NASA-NOAA satellite catches Hurricane Barbara's closing eye

Hurricane Barbara continued to track west through the Eastern Pacific Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead on July 4. Satellite imagery revealed clouds filling into Barbara's eye as wind shear continued to weaken the storm and push the bulk of its clouds north of the center.

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Supercomputer shows 'Chameleon Theory' could change how we think about gravity

Supercomputer simulations of galaxies have shown that Einstein's theory of General Relativity might not be the only way to explain how gravity works or how galaxies form.

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One-molecule-thick coating to help improve disease and drug testing

A new breakthrough has the potential to improve sensors used to test for diseases and detect doping in sports.

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Plant nutrient detector breakthrough

Findings from La Trobe University-led research could lead to less fertiliser wastage, saving millions of dollars for Australian farmers.

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Members of Congress Are Gonna Play “Rocket League” on Twitch

Gamer Representatives It sounds like a joke, but members of Congress and their staff are getting together Wednesday to play the video game “Rocket League” — and, as the icing on the cake, they’ll be streaming the event live on Twitch . “Members of Congress and their staff will play the video game ‘Rocket League,’ which will be streamed on the online platform Twitch, and answer questions as they c

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Scientists create new 'Y-shaped' synthetic consortium for efficient bio-manufacturing

A group of Chinese scientists have recently developed a new synthetic consortium for efficient pentose-hexose co-utilization that could improve bio-manufacturing. Converting biomass into valuable fuels and chemicals using microbes is a hot topic in bio-manufacturing. However, inefficient pentose-hexose co-utilization has hindered the conversion process.

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Live fast and die young, or play the long game? Scientists map 121 animal life cycles

Scientists have pinpointed the "pace" and "shape" of life as the two key elements in animal life cycles that affect how different species get by in the world. Their findings, which come from a detailed assessment of 121 species ranging from humans to sponges, may have important implications for conservation strategies and for predicting which species will be the winners and losers from the global

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Quantum satellite combines art with science

A satellite built by the National University of Singapore (NUS) entered orbit in June carrying both a high-tech quantum device from the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) and a quotation from a play written for the NUS Arts Festival.

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Scientists create new 'Y-shaped' synthetic consortium for efficient bio-manufacturing

A group of Chinese scientists have recently developed a new synthetic consortium for efficient pentose-hexose co-utilization that could improve bio-manufacturing. Converting biomass into valuable fuels and chemicals using microbes is a hot topic in bio-manufacturing. However, inefficient pentose-hexose co-utilization has hindered the conversion process.

2h

Live fast and die young, or play the long game? Scientists map 121 animal life cycles

Scientists have pinpointed the "pace" and "shape" of life as the two key elements in animal life cycles that affect how different species get by in the world. Their findings, which come from a detailed assessment of 121 species ranging from humans to sponges, may have important implications for conservation strategies and for predicting which species will be the winners and losers from the global

2h

Scientists capture images of gene-editing enzymes in action

For the first time, scientists have captured high-resolution, three-dimensional images of an enzyme in the process of precisely cutting DNA strands.

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A common gut virus that maps our travels

Travelling abroad for the summer can change a person's perspective—and it can also change the makeup of his gut.

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Scientists capture images of gene-editing enzymes in action

For the first time, scientists have captured high-resolution, three-dimensional images of an enzyme in the process of precisely cutting DNA strands.

2h

A common gut virus that maps our travels

Travelling abroad for the summer can change a person's perspective—and it can also change the makeup of his gut.

2h

High rates of opioid prescriptions for osteoarthritis

Opioids work against severe pain but the risks of side effects and addiction are high. In the US alone, 26 people die every day from overdoses. Now researchers in an international collaboration have investigated how common opioid prescriptions are for osteoarthritis patients in Sweden. It emerged that every fourth patient was prescribed opioids at some point between November 2014 and October 2015.

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Moffitt researchers identify effective drug combination against uveal melanoma

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have identified a new drug combination that is effective against metastatic uveal melanoma cells in preclinical studies.

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Surprising NYC ridesharing study findings have implications for policymakers

Researchers have limited access to information about how people use popular ridesharing services like Uber and Lyft. But recent analysis of aggregate data about ridesharing trips in New York City, conducted by researchers at UConn and published last month in Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, sheds new light on use of the service by people in the city's o

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New technique allows real-time microscopy at high heat and loading

Researchers have demonstrated a technique that allows them to track microscopic changes in metals or other materials in real time even when the materials are exposed to extreme heat and loads for an extended period of time — a phenomenon known as 'creep.' The technique will expedite efforts to develop and characterize materials for use in extreme environments, such as nuclear reactors.

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Quantum chemistry on quantum computers

A new quantum algorithm has been implemented for identifying important physical quantities such as spin quantum numbers relevant to convoluted electronic wave functions on quantum computers, serving as tracking complex chemical reactions without exponential/combinatorial explosion, giving exact solutions of Schroedinger Equations for chemistry, for the first time.

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One-molecule-thick coating to help improve disease and drug testing

A new breakthrough has the potential to improve sensors used to test for diseases and detect doping in sports.An international research team led by scientists from Lancaster University have created a coating only one molecule thick that modifies the surface of sensor electrodes.

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Cave droplets provide window into past climates

The chemistry of drip waters that form stalagmites and stalactites in caves around the world have given researchers an insight into our past climate.

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Global survey shows crAssphage gut virus in the world's sewage

A global survey shows that a family of gut bacteria viruses called crAssphage is found in people — and their sewage — all over the world. Closely related viruses are found in monkeys and apes, so crAssphage has probably been with us for millions of years.

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The parallel ecomorph evolution of scorpionflies: The evidence is in the DNA

Defying expectations, scorpionflies were found to have ecomorphed in parallel evolutions, independently adapting along different high altitude locations in Japan. Using Bayesian simulations and molecular phylogenetic analysis, scientists at the Institute for Mountain Science, Shinshu University were able to show the differing lineages of the 'alpine' and 'general' types of scorpionflies in their D

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Fish die-offs linked to hotter summers

Fish die-offs in Wisconsin lakes are expected to double by mid-century and quadruple by 2100 due to warmer summer temperatures, according to a study published today in the journal Nature Climate Change.

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Human waste an asset to economy, environment, study finds

Human waste might be an unpleasant public health burden, but scientists at the University of Illinois see sanitation as a valuable facet of global ecosystems and an overlooked source of nutrients, organic material and water.

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Supercomputer shows 'Chameleon Theory' could change how we think about gravity

Supercomputer simulations of galaxies have shown that Einstein's theory of General Relativity might not be the only way to explain how gravity works or how galaxies form.

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Using an embryonic pause to save the date

A date palm seedling can pause its development to boost its resilience before emerging into the harsh desert environment.

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Plant nutrient detector breakthrough

Findings from La Trobe University-led research could lead to less fertilizer wastage, saving millions of dollars for Australian farmers.

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Arizona's Whiting Knoll fire seen by NASA-NOAA satellite

The Whiting Knoll fire burning in east central Arizona is generating enough smoke to be seen from space.

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Stem Cell Funding Agency CIRM Is Nearly Out of Funds

The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has been funding research since it formed in 2004, giving out nearly $3 billion in grants to date.

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Biologists Create New Maps of Caenorhabditis elegans Neurons

The connectomes trace 385 neurons in the male worm and 302 neurons in the hermaphrodite worm.

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Grazing animals drove domestication of grain crops

During the Pleistocene, massive herds directed the ecology across much of the globe and caused evolutionary changes in plants. Studies of the ecology and growing habits of certain ancient crop relatives indicate that megafaunal herds were necessary for the dispersal of their seeds prior to human intervention. Understanding this process is providing insights into the early domestication of these pl

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Scientists find urine test could offer a non-invasive approach for diagnosis of IBS

Scientists have identified new biomarkers for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in urine, which could lead to better treatments and reduce the need for costly and invasive colonoscopy procedures currently used for diagnosis.

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Tuning the energy levels of organic semiconductors

Physicists were able to demonstrate how electronic energies in organic semiconductor films can be tuned by electrostatic forces.

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A study in scarlet Japanese macaques

From peacocks to butterflies and betta fish, mother nature never disappoints when it colors the males of a species. Which makes sense, in species with traditional sex roles, males are more involved in competing for mates, leading females to be choosier in their selection. As a result, males evolve to display even flashier and attractive ornaments.

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A study in scarlet Japanese macaques

From peacocks to butterflies and betta fish, mother nature never disappoints when it colors the males of a species. Which makes sense, in species with traditional sex roles, males are more involved in competing for mates, leading females to be choosier in their selection. As a result, males evolve to display even flashier and attractive ornaments.

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Despite effort, there’s a racial disparity in sepsis care

Hospitals with more black patients saw smaller increases in compliance with new sepsis protocols than those that treat mainly white patients, a new study shows. The findings highlight a need to evaluate the effects of quality improvement projects for minority groups, researchers say. The New York Sepsis Initiative launched in 2014 with the goal of improving prompt identification and treatment of

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Why is east Asian summer monsoon circulation enhanced under global warming?

The near-surface southerly wind is a key feature of East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) circulation, and a stronger EASM circulation leads to a northward shift of East Asian rainfall. Almost all climate models show an enhanced EASM circulation in a warmer climate, and previous studies attributed the enhanced EASM to the enhanced zonal land-sea thermal contrast.

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Study: Poor women are more hopeful than poor men

According to a new study by researchers from the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare, poor men's future outlooks are much shorter that poor women's. Poor men also experience more profound worthlessness than women do.

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Teens abusing painkillers are more likely to later use heroin

A new study shows that teens who use prescription opioids to get high are more likely to start using heroin by high school graduation.

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Only half of countries globally have cardiac rehab programs

There is only one cardiac rehab spot for every 12 of those patients to prevent another heart event, according to new research. A global audit and survey of cardiac rehab showed that cardiac rehab is available in only half of the world's countries, and the programs that do exist can only serve 1.65 million patients, leaving a gap of over 18 million patients in need.

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Blood flow monitor could save lives

A tiny fibre-optic sensor has the potential to save lives in open heart surgery, and even during surgery on pre-term babies. The continuous cardiac flow monitoring probe is a safe way to give a real-time measurement of blood flow.

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A study in scarlet Japanese macaques

Researchers assumed that the red faces in Japanese macaques signaled fertility. But new research indicates that it acts more as a 'badge' of social status and is involved in signaling social attributes than fertility.

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Coral bleaching: Altered gene expression may trigger collapse of symbiotic relationship

Researchers have identified the potential genes responsible for coral bleaching caused by temperature elevation.

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Researchers discover semiconducting nanotubes that form spontaneously

Researchers have discovered a way of making semiconducting, photoluminescent nanotubes form spontaneously in liquid solutions. The tubes, which consist of several walls that are perfectly uniform and just a few atoms thick, display optical properties that make them perfect for use as fluorophores or photocatalysts.

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Transformed tobacco fields could cuts costs for medical proteins

A new study describes the first successful rearing of engineered tobacco plants in order to produce medical and industrial proteins outdoors in the field, a necessity for economic viability, so they can be grown at large scales.

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Glowing crystals help to measure temperatures from afar

Nature, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02082-w New crystalline materials aid in the detection of tiny temperature shifts in a target object.

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Window film could even out the indoor temperature using solar energy

A window film with a specially designed molecule could be capable of taking the edge off the worst midday heat and instead distributing it evenly from morning to evening. The molecule has the unique ability to capture energy from the sun's rays and release it later as heat.

3h

Live fast and die young, or play the long game? Scientists map 121 animal life cycles

Scientists have pinpointed the 'pace' and 'shape' of life as the two key elements in animal life cycles that affect how different species get by in the world. The findings have important implications for predicting which species will be the winners and losers from the global environment crisis.

3h

UBC scientists capture images of gene-editing enzymes in action

For the first time, scientists have captured high-resolution, three-dimensional images of an enzyme in the process of precisely cutting DNA strands.

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A common gut virus that maps our travels

This benign virus changes as we travel, is found in two-thirds of the world's population, and has deep implications for future drug delivery and personalized medicine.

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Development of 3D particle model for single particles in battery electrodes

DGIST Professor Yong Min Lee's team in the Department of Energy Science and Engineering succeeded in developing an electrochemical model that can predict and analyze the electrochemical phenomena of the single particles of electrode active materials. Expects to be used in a single particle design research to improve cell efficiency.

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Genomic 'map' reveals not all fat is equal

Garvan and CSIRO researchers have uncovered key differences underlying harmful and non-harmful fat.

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Is nonmedical opioid use by adolescents associated with later risk of heroin use?

This observational study used data from a survey of behavioral health that included students from 10 Los Angeles-area high schools to examine whether nonmedical prescription opioid use was associated with later risk of heroin use in adolescents.

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Novel method identifies patients at risk for HIV who may benefit from PrEP strategies

Researchers have demonstrated the effectiveness of using algorithms that analyze electronic health records to help physicians identify patients at risk for HIV who may benefit from preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), which significantly reduces the risk of getting HIV. The studies, which were supported by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectio

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How is marijuana legalization associated with teen use?

This research letter reports on the association between the legalization of medical and recreational marijuana and teen marijuana use. Researchers used data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveys from 1993 to 2017, when 27 states and Washington, D.C., contributed data to the survey before and after medical marijuana laws were adopted and seven states contributed data before and after recreational ma

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Is caregiver depression associated with more emergency department visits by patients with dementia?

An observational study of 663 caregivers and the patients with dementia they care for suggests caregiver depression is associated with increased emergency department visits for their patients. A total of 84 caregivers had depression at the study start and it was associated with an increase in rates of emergency department use by patients after accounting for a number of other potential mitigating

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Cave secrets unlocked to show past drought and rainfall patterns

Global trends in cave waters identify how stalagmites reveal past rainfall and drought patterns.

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NASA-NOAA satellite sees smoke from multiple fires in New Mexico

The USFo rest Service's Gila National Forest reported four naturally caused fires on July 4, 2019, and three of them generated enough smoke to be seen from space by satellite.

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NASA-NOAA satellite catches Hurricane Barbara's closing eye

Hurricane Barbara continued to track west through the Eastern Pacific Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead on July 4. Satellite imagery revealed clouds filling into Barbara's eye as wind shear continued to weaken the storm and push the bulk of its clouds north of the center.

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Stranger Things time-warps PCs with Windows 1.11 app – CNET

Something to do after binging on the third season over the holiday.

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Exploiting green tides thanks to a marine bacterium

Ulvan is the principal component of Ulva or "sea lettuce" which causes algal blooms (green tides). Scientists at the Station Biologique de Roscoff (CNRS/Sorbonne Université) and their German and Austrian colleagues have identified a marine bacterium whose enzymatic system can break down ulvan into an energy source, or molecules of interest for use by the agrifood or cosmetics industries. Twelve en

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Exploiting green tides thanks to a marine bacterium

Ulvan is the principal component of Ulva or "sea lettuce" which causes algal blooms (green tides). Scientists at the Station Biologique de Roscoff (CNRS/Sorbonne Université) and their German and Austrian colleagues have identified a marine bacterium whose enzymatic system can break down ulvan into an energy source, or molecules of interest for use by the agrifood or cosmetics industries. Twelve en

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Dual-polarization radars for forecasting heavy rainfall in China: Research and development

China is an example of a country that suffers severe damage caused by high-impact weather and accompanying floods and mudslides. Dual-polarization (dual-pol) radars, first developed in the United States in the late 1970s, have been extensively used for monitoring and nowcasting these high-impact weather events. Dual-pol parameters contain a rich amount of microphysical information on these heavy p

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Secure data protection in the new internet of things

The core idea of the team headed by Magdeburg project leader, Professor Dr. Mesut Güne is to develop the self-organizing migration of services. This means that the services—such as home automation, data management, and business logic—no longer operate, as they have until now, centrally in a cloud, but instead can also act independently within a local infrastructure ecosystem. This local server inf

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Potential for reduced methane from cows

Scientists have shown it is possible to breed cattle to reduce their methane emissions. The researchers showed that the genetics of an individual cow strongly influenced the make-up of the microorganisms in its rumen (the first stomach in the digestive system of ruminant animals which include cattle and sheep).

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Window film could even out the indoor temperature using solar energy

A window film with a specially designed molecule could be capable of taking the edge off the worst midday heat and instead distributing it evenly from morning to evening. The molecule has the unique ability to capture energy from the sun's rays and release it later as heat.

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Snowball the dancing cockatoo has many moves

A sulphur-crested cockatoo named Snowball garnered YouTube fame and headlines a decade ago for his uncanny ability to dance to the beat of the Backstreet Boys. Now, researchers are back with new evidence that Snowball isn't limited in his dance moves. Despite a lack of dance training, new videos show that Snowball responds to music with diverse and spontaneous movements using various parts of his

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Researchers combine quantum expertise to advance research in ultracold molecules

Leaders in the field of ultracold molecule research from Columbia and Harvard universities are teaming up to propel understanding of the quantum mechanics of chemical reactions.

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Sarah Parcak Thinks We Need to Learn From the Fall of Egypt’s Old Kingdom

In a new book, the archaeologist makes the case that ancient history illuminates solutions to modern problems.

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Men with High HIV Risk Have Unique Gut Microbes, Inflammation: Study

The microbiomes of men who have sex with men are associated with greater immune system activation and promote elevated rates of viral infection in vitro.

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The Last Good Gig: A Summer at the South Pole

Nobody has lukewarm feelings about Antarctica, and some people don’t fit in anywhere else — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fighting drug resistance with fast, artificial enhancement of natural products

Japanese researchers have identified multiple promising new drug candidates to treat antibiotic-resistant infections, including superbugs. The team developed a new technique to enhance the infection-fighting potential of natural chemicals and test them quickly. In laboratory tests, three of the synthetic molecules that the researchers built are four times more effective at killing bacteria than th

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Hormone therapy for prostate cancer may raise risk of Alzheimer's, Dementia

A Penn study of more than 150,000 men with prostate cancer shows androgen deprivation therapy was associated with a higher likelihood of developing dementia when compared to patients who were not exposed to the treatment.

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Cannabis dosage studied to reduce seizures in children with severe epilepsy

Medicinal cannabis oil containing both cannabidiol (CBD) and a small amount of THC ended or reduced the number of seizures in children with severe, drug-resistant epilepsy. The children also experienced improvements in their quality of life after taking low doses of medicinal cannabis oil. Researchers believe this could open up a treatment option for children with severe epilepsy who have failed t

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Uncovering possible role of polyphosphate in dialysis-related amyloidosis

Researchers from Osaka University found that the low concentrations of the naturally occurring biopolymer, polyphosphate (polyP), induces amyloid formation from β2 microglobulin under both acidic and neutral conditions but by different mechanisms. In the future, monitoring blood serum concentrations of polyP in people receiving long-term dialysis may offer opportunity for preventive measures again

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Producing graphene from carbon dioxide

The general public knows the chemical compound of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and because of its global-warming effect. However, carbon dioxide can also be a useful raw material for chemical reactions. A working group at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has now reported on this unusual application in the ChemSusChem journal. They are using carbon dioxide as a raw ma

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Researchers show that the composition of human skin microbiome can be modulated

Scientists at UPF and the company S-Biomedic have demonstrated the use of living bacteria to modulate skin microbiome composition. In the study, published in Microbiome, mixtures of different skin microbial components have been used to temporarily modulate the composition of recipient skin bacteria for therapeutic or cosmetic purposes.

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Study: Poor women are more hopeful than poor men

The researchers concluded that even when men are poor and unemployed, their recognition and role is tied to work, money, and markets. Women, however, have more means to attain a sense of worth outside the economic realm.

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Killing the seeds of cancer: A new finding shows potential in destroying cancer stem cells

When doctors remove a tumor surgically or use targeted therapies, the cancer may appear to be gone. However, evidence suggests a tiny subpopulation of adaptable cancer cells can remain and circulate through the body to seed new metastasis in far-off locations. A collaborative research project The University of Toledo has identified an entirely new class of molecules that shows promise in rooting o

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Climate change and deforestation together push tropical species towards extinction

Only 38 per cent of tropical forest is 'wildlife friendly' as a result of deforestation, increasing the likelihood that vulnerable species will go extinct, say scientists.

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Modern medicine still needs leeches

Hirudo medicinalis Some hospitals keep their pharmacies fully-stocked with Hirudo medicinalis , or medical leeches. (Deposit Photos/) It’s not exactly the kind of therapy you’d expect to get at the hospital: a black, slippery, thirsty leech picked up by forceps from a bucket of its brethren and placed directly onto your skin. But sometimes—­to some patients’ probable dismay—leeches are, indeed, w

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Team programs a humanoid robot to communicate in sign language

For a robot to be able to "learn" sign language, it is necessary to combine different areas of engineering such as artificial intelligence, neural networks and artificial vision, as well as underactuated robotic hands. "One of the main new developments of this research is that we united two major areas of Robotics: complex systems (such as robotic hands) and social interaction and communication,"

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A New Website Tracks the Just-Launched Solar Sail Spaceship

Locked On Last month, a spacecraft called LightSail 2 — which uses a solar sail to propel itself using sunlight — was sent into space . Now a new website run by The Planetary Society, the space research organization that developed the solar sail, publishes every update it sends down. The Planetary Society expects LightSail 2’s sail to unfurl some time this week, according to The Verge , at which

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The Last Good Gig: A Summer at the South Pole

Nobody has lukewarm feelings about Antarctica, and some people don’t fit in anywhere else — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Most powerful and mildest reagents obtained based on eco-friendly iodine

An international collaboration of chemists from Tomsk Polytechnic University, USA, Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, and France has developed a line of polyvalent iodine-based reagents for organic synthesis. This is an eco-friendly replacement of conventional reagents based on toxic compounds such as vanadium and nitrous oxide. The line includes both the most powerful reagent and the mildest one. Th

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Highest energy light ever seen traced to Crab nebula

Record-shattering gamma rays from exploded star detected by observatory in Tibet

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Climate change and deforestation together push tropical species towards extinction

Only 38 per cent of tropical forest is 'wildlife friendly' as a result of deforestation, increasing the likelihood that vulnerable species will go extinct, say scientists.

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Indian Ocean causes drought and heatwaves in South America

New research has found the record-breaking South American drought of 2013/14 with its succession of heatwaves and long lasting marine heatwave had its origins in a climate event half a world away—over the Indian Ocean.

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The Moon Is a Hazardous Place to Live

If we get back to the lunar surface, astronauts will have to contend with much more than perilous rocket flights and the vacuum of space.

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Cellular Life, Death and Everything in Between

“When cells are no longer needed, they die with what can only be called great dignity,” Bill Bryson wrote in A Short History of Nearly Everything . The received wisdom has long been that this march toward oblivion, once sufficiently advanced, cannot be reversed. But as science charts the contours of cellular function in ever-greater detail, a more fluid conception of cellular life and death has b

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It’s New York vs. California in a New Climate Race. Who Will Win?

The two giant states have set some of the world's most ambitious climate targets, aiming to slash emissions close to zero in just decades.

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Brunel fine-tunes next-generation digital engine

Brunel University London is the first UK university to start researching car engines of the future using new single cylinder intelligent valve technology.

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Autistic adults experience high rates of negative life events

Autistic adults are vulnerable to many types of negative life experience, including employment difficulties, financial hardship, domestic abuse and 'mate-crime', according to new research published today in the journal Autism Research.

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A new rare metals alloy can change shape in the magnetic field

Scientists developed multifunctional metal alloys that emit and absorb heat at the same time and change their size and volume under the influence of a magnetic field. This effect is caused by changes in the structure of the substance. The alloys may be used in medicine and industry.

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Thought experiment: Switzerland without fossil fuels. Can that succeed?

A new Empa study shows how much work still lies ahead of us if Switzerland is to do without fossil fuels in the future. There are two possible solutions: storing large amounts of energy in summer and limiting our demand in winter, or generating energy in the "sunny south" or "windy north" of the world and transporting it here. The Empa researchers see their study as a thought-provoking impulse for

3h

Exploiting green tides thanks to a marine bacterium

Ulvan is the principal component of Ulva or 'sea lettuce' which causes algal blooms (green tides). Frenc sientists and their German and Austrian colleagues have identified a marine bacterium whose enzymatic system can break down ulvan into an energy source or molecules of interest for use by the agrifood or cosmetics industries. Twelve enzymes have thus been discovered and they constitute as many

3h

Dual-polarization radars for forecasting heavy rainfall in China: Research and development

In recent years, with the advent of dual-pol radar technologies in China, dozens of dual-pol radars have been developed by universities, research institutes, and weather observatories. China's nationwide radar network is currently being upgraded to dual-pol capability.

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Investigating the role of the nasal flora & viral infection on acquisition of Pneumococcus

Researchers at LSTM, along with colleagues at the University of Edinburgh and the University Medical Center Utrecht have looked at the impact of the natural microbial flora or microbiota in the nose and viral co-infection on pneumococcal acquisition in healthy adults.

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Scientists create new 'y-shaped' synthetic consortium for efficient bio-manufacturing

A group of Chinese scientists have recently developed a new synthetic consortium for efficient pentose-hexose co-utilization that could improve bio-manufacturing.

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The UC3M programs a humanoid robot to communicate in sign language

Scientists from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have published a paper featuring the results of research into interactions between robots and deaf people, in which they were able to programme a humanoid – called TEO – to communicate in sign language.

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Window film could even out the indoor temperature using solar energy

A window film with a specially designed molecule could be capable of taking the edge off the worst midday heat and instead distributing it evenly from morning to evening. The molecule has the unique ability to capture energy from the sun's rays and release it later as heat. This is shown by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, in the scientific journal Advanced Science.

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Research team deciphers enzymatic degradation of sugar from marine alga

Enzymes are biocatalysts that are crucial for the degradation of seaweed biomass in oceans. For the first time, an international team of 19 scientists recently decoded the complete degradation pathway of the algal polysaccharide Ulvan by biocatalysts from a marine bacterium. The results of their study are presented in Nature Chemical Biology.

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Massive stars grow same way as light stars, just bigger

Astronomers obtained the first detailed face-on view of a gaseous disk feeding the growth of a massive baby star. They found that it shares many common features with lighter baby stars. This implies that the process of star formation is the same, regardless of the final mass of the resulting star. This finding paves the way for a more complete understanding of star formation.

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The ancestor of the great white shark

Mackerel sharks are a group consisting of some of the most iconic sharks we know, including the mako shark, the great white shark and Megalodon, the biggest predatory shark. Researchers found a unique feature in the teeth of these apex predators, which allowed them to trace back the origin of this group to a small benthic shark from the Middle Jurassic (165 mya).

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Snowball the dancing cockatoo is back—with a whole new set of moves

Research suggests parrots might use dance to create bonds with their owners

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Bioaccumulation of methylmercury in wood frogs and spotted salamanders in Vermont vernal pools

Mercury (Hg), and its more biologically available form, methylmercury (MeHg), are powerful neurotoxins that impact development and function of the central nervous system. The Northeast is considered a mercury "hotspot," due largely to airborne mercury emissions originating in the industrialized Midwest. Few studies have examined mercury in northeastern vernal pools, even though these ephemeral wet

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As deaths mount, have right whales reached a 'tipping point'?

In February 2016, East Central Florida animal lovers were riveted by an endangered right whale nicknamed Clipper and her baby. Clipper gave birth to the calf off Florida's east coast, then found her way into Sebastian Inlet, giving many people their first look at two of the massive, endangered whales.

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Researchers discover semiconducting nanotubes that form spontaneously

If scientists could find a way to control the process for making semiconductor components on a nanometric scale, they could give those components unique electronic and optical properties—opening the door to a host of useful applications.

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Wind, warmth boost insect migration, study reveals

Wind and warmth can improve travel time for the billions of insects worldwide that migrate each year, according to a first-ever radio-tracking study by University of Guelph biologists.

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The war on Southern California smog is slipping. Fixing it is a $14 billion problem

The war on smog has been called one of America's greatest environmental successes. Decades of emissions-cutting regulations under a bipartisan law—the 1970 Clean Air Act—have eased the choking pollution that once shrouded U.S. cities. Cleaner air has saved lives and strengthened the lungs of Los Angeles children.

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Watch Snowball the cockatoo show off the 14 dance moves he's invented

Snowball the cockatoo can not only dance in time to music, he's also invented a range of dance moves and can even combine moves like foot lifts and head bangs

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Immunotherapy may help treat some resistant bowel cancers

A small study of drug-resistant bowel cancers suggests that it might be possible to treat these tumours using immunotherapy drugs

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Cleaning up China's dirty air would give solar energy a huge boost

Air pollution from human activities in China has decreased the potential output of solar panels by 13 per cent between 1960 and 2015, resulting in loss electricity generation and revenue

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US teens may be finding it harder to buy cannabis after legalisation

After seven US states legalised recreational use of marijuana, teenagers reported less use of the drug in anonymous surveys, perhaps because legal dispensaries require proof of age

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Half of babies affected by Zika virus are developing normally by age 2

In a group of about 200 babies affected by Zika virus, about half of those with abnormal brain scans after birth are developing normally by age 2 or 3

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'Hawking' Profiles The Ever-Fascinating Scientist — Minus The Nefarious Equations

There's little to surprise in this story, especially if you know a bit about the subject's life and his ideas. But author Jim Ottaviani finds a nice balance between the personal and the theoretical. (Image credit: First Second)

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Bioaccumulation of methylmercury in wood frogs and spotted salamanders in Vermont vernal pools

Mercury (Hg), and its more biologically available form, methylmercury (MeHg), are powerful neurotoxins that impact development and function of the central nervous system. The Northeast is considered a mercury "hotspot," due largely to airborne mercury emissions originating in the industrialized Midwest. Few studies have examined mercury in northeastern vernal pools, even though these ephemeral wet

3h

As deaths mount, have right whales reached a 'tipping point'?

In February 2016, East Central Florida animal lovers were riveted by an endangered right whale nicknamed Clipper and her baby. Clipper gave birth to the calf off Florida's east coast, then found her way into Sebastian Inlet, giving many people their first look at two of the massive, endangered whales.

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Wind, warmth boost insect migration, study reveals

Wind and warmth can improve travel time for the billions of insects worldwide that migrate each year, according to a first-ever radio-tracking study by University of Guelph biologists.

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Your brain turns down the ‘noise’ to see motion better

One reason human beings are good at discerning smaller moving objects in the foreground is that our brain becomes desensitized to motion in the larger background, report researchers. Conversely, when a person’s brain is more sensitive to background motion, the negative trade-off is that she will be less sensitive to smaller foreground objects. The research, which appears in Nature Communications

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An Executive Order Can’t Fix Trump’s Census Problem

President Donald Trump’s announcement that he will consider using an executive order to get a citizenship question on the 2020 census is but the latest presidential attempt to exaggerate or mythologize the power of the executive order. But a president who wants to shape the world via executive order must face four inconvenient legal truths. The first is that the Constitution gives presidents very

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Why is east Asian summer monsoon circulation enhanced under global warming?

A collaborated study shows that the Tibetan Plateau plays an essential role in enhancing the East Asian summer monsoon circulation under global warming through enhanced latent heating over the Tibetan Plateau.

3h

Massive stars grow same way as light stars, just bigger

Astronomers obtained the first detailed face-on view of a gaseous disk feeding the growth of a massive baby star. They found that it shares many common features with lighter baby stars. This implies that the process of star formation is the same, regardless of the final mass of the resulting star. This finding paves the way for a more complete understanding of star formation.

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Bacteria associated with hospital infections are found in raw meat

Bacteria of the Acinetobacter ACB complex, which are frequently acquired in hospital settings, can also be found in beef meat, according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa' and performed with meat samples from markets in Lima, Peru. Although the isolates were susceptible to most antibiotics, these results suggest that raw meat can act as a reservoir for these pathoge

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Study shows potential for reduced methane from cows

An international team of scientists has shown it is possible to breed cattle to reduce their methane emissions. The researchers showed that the genetics of an individual cow strongly influenced the make-up of the microorganisms in its rumen (the first stomach in the digestive system of ruminant animals which include cattle and sheep).

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Indian Ocean causes drought and heatwaves in South America

Researchers have revealed that atmospheric waves originating from convection over the Indian Ocean had a dramatic impact on climate conditions over South America and South Atlantic, leading to drought and marine heatwaves. Importantly, these conditions are not a one-off and are likely to happen again.

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Most powerful and mildest reagents obtained based on eco-friendly iodine

An international team of chemists from Tomsk Polytechnic University, USA, Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, and France has synthesized environmentally friendly reagents for the pharmaceutical industry. Polyvalent iodine-based reagents are a promising replacement of conventional reagents based on toxic compounds such as vanadium and nitrous oxide, which can work at room temperature.

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Sedentary time increases after retirement — especially in women

The FIREA study, conducted at the University of Turku (Finland), revealed that the amount of sitting time increased in women after the transition to retirement. A similar change was not discovered in men. However, men did spend significantly more time sitting down than women, both during working life and retirement. Spending prolonged time periods sedentary, i.e. sitting down, lying or reclining d

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Cancer genes and the tumor milieu

In a recent study published in Cancer Research, researchers demonstrate the role of an oncogene in altering the immediate environment of tumors.

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The declining impact of federal funding on cancer innovation

New research featured in Nature Biotechnology studies the impact of the funding by the National Institutes of Health in the field of cancer research. Using patents as proxies, it finds evidence for a productivity slowdown around 1995. The study suggests that the results are in line with an incremental, rather than a high-risk high-rewards funding strategy by the federal agencies.

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Teens abusing painkillers are more likely to later use heroin

A USC study in the July 8, 2019 issue of JAMA Pediatrics shows that teens who use prescription opioids to get high are more likely to start using heroin by high school graduation.

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Grazing animals drove domestication of grain crops

During the Pleistocene, massive herds directed the ecology across much of the globe and caused evolutionary changes in plants. Studies of the ecology and growing habits of certain ancient crop relatives indicate that megafaunal herds were necessary for the dispersal of their seeds prior to human intervention. Understanding this process is providing insights into the early domestication of these pl

3h

Transformed tobacco fields could cuts costs for medical proteins

A new Cornell University-led study describes the first successful rearing of engineered tobacco plants in order to produce medical and industrial proteins outdoors in the field, a necessity for economic viability, so they can be grown at large scales.

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Researchers can finally modify plant mitochondrial DNA

Researchers in Japan have edited plant mitochondrial DNA for the first time, which could lead to a more secure food supply. Nuclear DNA was first edited in the early 1970s, chloroplast DNA was first edited in 1988, and animal mitochondrial DNA was edited in 2008. However, no tool previously successfully edited plant mitochondrial DNA. Researchers used their technique to create four new lines of ri

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More money, more gabapentin

Pharmaceutical companies' payments to doctors may be influencing them to prescribe more expensive, brand-name versions of the pain drug gabapentin, a team of researchers report in the July 8, 2019 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, and the increasing use of the drug suggests it may be being abused.

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Yearlong birth control supply would cut unintended pregnancies, costs

By dispensing a year's worth of birth control pills up front, the VA could prevent 583 unintended pregnancies and save $2 million per year on health care costs each year.

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Snowball the dancing cockatoo has many moves

A sulphur-crested cockatoo named Snowball garnered YouTube fame and headlines a decade ago for his uncanny ability to dance to the beat of the Backstreet Boys. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on July 8, 2019 are back with new evidence that Snowball isn't limited in his dance moves. Despite a lack of dance training, new videos show that Snowball responds to music with diverse and spon

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Standing Out From the Herd

In some species, individual animals can be distinguished by unique identifiers, not unlike human fingerprints.

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Aid in Dying Soon Will be Available to More Americans. Few Will Choose It.

By October, more than one in five U.S. adults will be able to obtain lethal prescriptions if terminally ill. But for those who try, obstacles remain.

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Watch Snowball the cockatoo show off the 14 dance moves he's invented

Snowball the cockatoo can not only dance in time to music, he's also invented a range of dance moves and can even combine moves like foot lifts and head bangs

4h

Grazing animals drove domestication of grain crops

Many familiar grains today, like quinoa, amaranth, millets, hemp and buckwheat, have traits that indicate that they co-evolved for dispersion by large grazing mammals. During the Pleistocene, …

4h

Researchers can finally modify plant mitochondrial DNA

Researchers in Japan have edited plant mitochondrial DNA for the first time, which could lead to a more secure food supply. Nuclear DNA was first edited in the early 1970s, chloroplast DNA was …

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Nonlinear optics in the fractional quantum Hall regime

Nature, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1356-3 Nonlinear optical measurements in a two-dimensional electron system embedded in an optical cavity show enhanced polariton–polariton interactions in the fractional quantum Hall regime.

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Bankole: Facial recognition dangerous for Detroit

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Saving the secrets of the jars of Laos

In the mountains and plains of upper Laos sit thousands of stone jars, the only relics of an ancient civilisation possibly 2500 years old.

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Indoor carbon dioxide levels could be a health hazard, scientists warn

CO 2 in bedrooms and offices may affect cognition and cause kidney and bone problems Indoor levels of carbon dioxide could be clouding our thinking and may even pose a wider danger to human health, researchers say. While air pollutants such as tiny particles and nitrogen oxides have been the subject of much research , there have been far fewer studies looking into the health impact of CO 2 . Cont

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Scientists discover Snowball the cockatoo has 16 distinct dance moves – video

A sulphur-crested cockatoo named Snowball garnered YouTube fame and headlines a decade ago for his uncanny ability to dance to the beat of the Backstreet Boys. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology are back with evidence that Snowball is not limited in his dance moves. Despite a lack of dance training, videos show, Snowball responds to music with diverse and spontaneous movements using va

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Cockatoo choreographs his own dance moves, researchers believe

New study of Snowball the prancing parrot points to bird at peak of his creative powers Block-rocking beaks: Snowball’s moves reviewed by our dance critic When Snowball the sulphur-crested cockatoo revealed his first dance moves a decade ago he became an instant sensation. The foot-tapping, head-bobbing bird boogied his way on to TV talkshows and commercials and won an impressive internet audienc

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How the media stokes compassion. And why it's a double-edged sword.

How the media frame a story can influence who the audience feels compassionate toward. Part of telling a story requires combatting inherent obstacles to sustained compassion. Compassion is one of several news values that determine if a story is published. Media sausage In 2003, author and journalist Nancy Rommelmann could not tear herself away from the story of the Jesica Santillan, a teenage chi

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Not a Human, but a Dancer

Before he became an internet sensation, before he made scientists reconsider the nature of dancing, before the children’s book and the Taco Bell commercial , Snowball was just a young parrot, looking for a home. His owner had realized that he couldn’t care for the sulfur-crested cockatoo any longer. So in August 2007, he dropped Snowball off at the Bird Lovers Only rescue center in Dyer, Indiana—

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Future Gravitational Wave Detectors Could Find Exoplanets, Too

Although meant to study merging supermassive black holes, the European Space Agency’s LISA mission might also discover hundreds of worlds around white dwarf stars — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sweet Almonds: One Amino Acid Did the Trick

Well, I spent the holiday weekend here sending out pictures of food on my Twitter account, so I suppose it’s only fitting that I blog about a related topic today. But it also touches on metabolic enzymes, transcription factors, and death by cyanide, so there’s something for most everyone. I refer to this paper which appeared recently in Science , where a multinational team (Spain, Denmark, Italy,

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Blood flow monitor could save lives

A tiny fibre-optic sensor has the potential to save lives in open heart surgery, and even during surgery on pre-term babies. The continuous cardiac flow monitoring probe, under development at Flinders University, is a safe way to give a real-time measurement of blood flow.

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A study in scarlet Japanese macaques

Researchers assumed that the red faces in Japanese macaques signaled fertility. But new research indicates that it acts more as a 'badge' of social status and is involved in signaling social attributes than fertility.

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New research shows only half of countries globally have cardiac rehab programs

There is only one cardiac rehab spot for every 12 of those patients to prevent another heart event, according to new research from York University. A global audit and survey of cardiac rehab conducted in York University's Faculty of Health showed that cardiac rehab is available in only half of the world's countries, and the programs that do exist can only serve 1.65 million patients, leaving a gap

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'You all look alike to me' is hard-wired in us, UCR research finds

We are hard-wired to process — or not process — facial differences based on race. And that process occurs in the earliest filters of our thought process, according to newly published UC Riverside research.

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IOF review of impact of drug holidays on bone health

The impact of interruption of anti-osteoporosis treatment in patients on therapy with bisphosphonates or denosumab is reviewed in a new IOF Working Group paper. The aim of the study was to assess what evidence exists to inform decision making on drug holidays and to identify any indicators that might help clinicians decide whether to continue or discontinue therapy in individual patients.

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Wind, warmth boost insect migration, first-ever University of Guelph study reveals

Researchers equipped monarch butterflies and green darner dragonflies with radio transmitters and tracked them through southern Ontario and several northern States to learn how environmental factors affect daytime insect migration. Learning about what happens to insects during their migration may help in conservation efforts. The study found wind and temperature are more important influences than

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Altered gene expression may trigger collapse of symbiotic relationship

Researchers in Japan have identified the potential genes responsible for coral bleaching caused by temperature elevation.

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Stop using Al Gore as an excuse for rejecting science

There are a lot of bad reasons for rejecting the science of climate change (indeed, there are no good reasons), but some arguments are more well thought out than others. This is not going to be an article about one … Continue reading →

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Transformed tobacco fields could cuts costs for medical proteins

A new Cornell University-led study describes the first successful rearing of engineered tobacco plants in order to produce medical and industrial proteins outdoors in the field, a necessity for economic viability, so they can be grown at large scales.

4h

Snowball the dancing cockatoo has many moves

A sulphur-crested cockatoo named Snowball garnered YouTube fame and headlines a decade ago for his uncanny ability to dance to the beat of the Backstreet Boys. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on July 8 are back with new evidence that Snowball isn't limited in his dance moves. Despite a lack of dance training, new videos show that Snowball responds to music with diverse and spontaneou

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Researchers can finally modify plant mitochondrial DNA

Researchers in Japan have edited plant mitochondrial DNA for the first time, which could lead to a more secure food supply. Nuclear DNA was first edited in the early 1970s, chloroplast DNA was first edited in 1988, and animal mitochondrial DNA was edited in 2008. However, no tool previously successfully edited plant mitochondrial DNA.

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Regulation and reality in reducing global warming

While Donald Trump's functionaries continue to deny the science of climate change, American states are setting ambitious greenhouse gas reduction targets and nations all over the world are struggling to deal with the difficulty of growing their economies while reducing pollution. Although American leadership could help the world address this existential threat, the short-sighted short-term perspec

4h

Grazing animals drove domestication of grain crops

Many familiar grains today, like quinoa, amaranth, millets, hemp and buckwheat, have traits that indicate that they co-evolved for dispersion by large grazing mammals. During the Pleistocene, massive herds directed the ecology around much of the globe and caused evolutionary changes in plants. Studies of the ecology and growing habits of certain ancient crop relatives indicate that megafaunal herd

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Cockatoo gives researchers dance lessons

Snowball is more than just an internet sensation. Mark Bruer reports.

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Future Gravitational Wave Detectors Could Find Exoplanets, Too

Although meant to study merging supermassive black holes, the European Space Agency’s LISA mission might also discover hundreds of worlds around white dwarf stars — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Transformed tobacco fields could cuts costs for medical proteins

A new Cornell University-led study describes the first successful rearing of engineered tobacco plants in order to produce medical and industrial proteins outdoors in the field, a necessity for economic viability, so they can be grown at large scales.

4h

Snowball the dancing cockatoo has many moves

A sulphur-crested cockatoo named Snowball garnered YouTube fame and headlines a decade ago for his uncanny ability to dance to the beat of the Backstreet Boys. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on July 8 are back with new evidence that Snowball isn't limited in his dance moves. Despite a lack of dance training, new videos show that Snowball responds to music with diverse and spontaneou

4h

Researchers can finally modify plant mitochondrial DNA

Researchers in Japan have edited plant mitochondrial DNA for the first time, which could lead to a more secure food supply. Nuclear DNA was first edited in the early 1970s, chloroplast DNA was first edited in 1988, and animal mitochondrial DNA was edited in 2008. However, no tool previously successfully edited plant mitochondrial DNA.

4h

Grazing animals drove domestication of grain crops

Many familiar grains today, like quinoa, amaranth, millets, hemp and buckwheat, have traits that indicate that they co-evolved for dispersion by large grazing mammals. During the Pleistocene, massive herds directed the ecology around much of the globe and caused evolutionary changes in plants. Studies of the ecology and growing habits of certain ancient crop relatives indicate that megafaunal herd

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Grief and love in the animal kingdom | Barbara J. King

From mourning orcas to distressed elephants, biological anthropologist Barbara J. King has witnessed grief and love across the animal kingdom. In this eye-opening talk, she explains the evidence behind her belief that many animals experience complex emotions, and suggests ways all of us can treat them more ethically — including every time we eat. "Animals don't grieve exactly like we do, but this

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Map reveals proteins in heart’s natural pacemaker

Researchers have mapped the proteins in the heart’s natural pacemaker, the sinus node, in mice. This means that researchers can now measure and analyze the proteins that make up the sinus node. More knowledge of its structure opens the door to a better understanding of the heart’s electrical systems and to further research into heart diseases. In order to produce the heartbeats that keep you aliv

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Next Generation Biomarkers Driving Neuroinflammation and Autoimmune Reactions in Immunotherapy

Download this eBook to learn about how neuroinflammation affects diseases of the CNS and how the drivers of the immune response can be identified using profiling proteomics techniques!

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Everest: I interviewed people risking their lives in the 'death zone' during one of the deadliest seasons yet

Climbing some of the world's tallest mountains, you enter the "death zone" when you are 8,000 metres from sea level—where oxygen is 34% the concentration it is on the ground below. Climbing here is one of the most dangerous forms of tourism there is. For mountaineers, the most tantalising goal is to climb the world's 14 highest peaks, all of which stretch into the death zone.

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Before moon landing, astronauts learned geology in Arizona

Before Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin knew they would be the first to walk on the moon, they took crash courses in geology at the Grand Canyon and a nearby impact crater that is the most well-preserved on Earth.

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Just the tonic! How an afternoon tipple made from peas could help save the rainforest

It's the season for a cold, refreshing gin and tonic. We may question the health impact of one too many, but what is the environmental footprint of that classically delicious aperitif?

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Southern resident orcas spotted in home waters off San Juan Island after unusual absence

Breaking an unprecedented run of days this summer without frequenting their home waters, J, K and even possibly L pod southern resident orcas were all seen Friday morning on the west side of San Juan Island.

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Southern resident orcas spotted in home waters off San Juan Island after unusual absence

Breaking an unprecedented run of days this summer without frequenting their home waters, J, K and even possibly L pod southern resident orcas were all seen Friday morning on the west side of San Juan Island.

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11% chance of another huge earthquake in Southern California, scientists say

The odds that Southern California will experience another earthquake of magnitude 7 or greater in the next week are now nearly 11%, according to preliminary estimates from seismologists.

4h

Wimbledon: lawns look lovely, but time to keep off the grass

The 133rd Wimbledon tennis championships are in full swing and, in time-honoured British tradition, the nation is fixated on seedings, scorelines, and strawberries and cream. While The Championships have been modernised with the introduction of Hawk-eye line-calling technology and the installation of retractable roofs on Centre Court and No. 1 Court, they remain firmly traditional with the grass p

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Key early steps for origin of life occur under a variety of conditions

Potential precursors to life on Earth form from a variety of complex mixtures, according to a team of scientists who say this could point to the development of building blocks crucial to forming genetic molecules for the origins of life on Earth.

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Researchers discover semiconducting nanotubes that form spontaneously

EPFL researchers have discovered a way of making semiconducting, photoluminescent nanotubes form spontaneously in liquid solutions. The tubes, which consist of several walls that are perfectly uniform and just a few atoms thick, display optical properties that make them perfect for use as fluorophores or photocatalysts.

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Two new algorithms can identify patients at risk of HIV

Two new studies developed algorithms that can identify patients who are at risk of acquiring HIV and may benefit from preventive care. Both studies appear in the July 5, 2019 issue of The Lancet HIV.

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Just the tonic! How an afternoon tipple made from peas could help save the rainforest

Using peas instead of wheat to produce gin significantly reduces the carbon footprint associated with the process. This finding could be utilised in the production of other alcoholic drinks and greener biofuels, and could also help in the fight to save the rainforests.

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Problematic smartphone use linked to poorer grades, alcohol misuse, more sexual partners

A survey of more than 3,400 university students in the US has found that one in five respondents reported problematic smartphone use. Female students were more likely be affected and problematic smartphone use was associated with lower grade averages, mental health problems and higher numbers of sexual partners.

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Tuning the energy levels of organic semiconductors

Physicists from the Dresden Integrated Center for Applied Physics and Photonic Materials (IAPP) and the Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) at the TU Dresden, together with researchers from Tübingen, Potsdam and Mainz were able to demonstrate how electronic energies in organic semiconductor films can be tuned by electrostatic forces.

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Infection-fighting protein also senses protein misfolding in non-infected cells

Researchers at the University of Toronto have uncovered an immune mechanism by which host cells combat bacterial infection, and at the same time found that a protein crucial to that process can sense and respond to misfolded proteins in all mammalian cells.

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Scientists find urine test could offer a non-invasive approach for diagnosis of IBS

Scientists at McMaster University have identified new biomarkers for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in urine, which could lead to better treatments and reduce the need for costly and invasive colonoscopy procedures currently used for diagnosis.

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Wimbledon: lawns look lovely, but time to keep off the grass

The 133rd Wimbledon tennis championships are in full swing and, in time-honoured British tradition, the nation is fixated on seedings, scorelines, and strawberries and cream. While The Championships have been modernised with the introduction of Hawk-eye line-calling technology and the installation of retractable roofs on Centre Court and No. 1 Court, they remain firmly traditional with the grass p

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The Progressive Nonargument Against Biden

Although Joe Biden leads in the polls, he is opposed by many of the progressive opinion-makers who exercise disproportionate influence in the press, social media, think tanks, and academia. They don’t tend to attack his electability, and only rarely discuss what he is likely to do in office in comparison to Democratic rivals. Instead, they’re obsessed with how he presents himself and his ideas, w

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Amateur Astronomer Spots US Air Force Space Plane Lurking in Orbit

Top Secret Dutch astronomer and satellite tracker Ralf Vanderberg just spotted something extraordinary and rare: the U.S. Air Force’s top-secret X-37B space plane . Also known as the Orbital Test Vehicle, the military craft looks like a scaled-down version of NASA’s Space Shuttle and measures just 29 feet long with a wingspan of 15 feet. The craft spotted by Vanderberg is the fifth iteration, lau

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Eight ways to halt a global food crisis

There are serious challenges to global food supply everywhere we look. Intensive use of fertilisers in the US Midwest is causing nutrients to run off into rivers and streams, degrading the water quality and causing a Connecticut-size dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. Chocolate production will soon be challenged in West Africa – home to over half of global production. A variety of nutritional impact

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Summer Eurasian nonuniform warming found related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation

The positive-phase of Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) can indeed cause Eurasian summer nonuniform warming, according to Prof. Shuanglin Li, Dean of Atmospheric Science at the University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Executive Vice-Director at the Climate Change Research Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and one of the authors of a recently published study.

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Two tiny supercomputing Pioneer nanosatellites launched

The latest ESA Partnership Projects mission has launched two tiny supercomputing nanosatellites aboard a Soyuz rocket from Vostochny in Russia.

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Direct after-fabrication tailoring of molybdenum disulphide transistors

The fabrication of electronic devices from exfoliated 2-D materials can be tricky. The group of Daniel Granados at IMDEA Nanociencia has engineered a solution that consists of the after-fabrication tailoring of MoS2-FET transistors using pulsed-focused electron beam induced etching.

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Left out to dry: A more efficient way to harvest algae biomass

A team at the University of Tsukuba introduced a new procedure of harvesting energy and organic molecules from algae using nanoporous graphene and porous graphene foams. By developing a reusable system that can evaporate water at high rate without the need for centrifugation or squeezing. This research has a great potential for the application of producing cleaner, cheaper, and more efficient biof

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How Ghana is acing its transition to mobile financial services

In the past few years, the unprecedented growth of mobile financial services in sub-Saharan Africa has defied all expectations. While Kenya is often cited as a leading example of digital transformation, Ghana has recently become the fastest-growing mobile money market in Africa, with registered accounts increasing six-fold between 2012 and 2017. The country's experience provides a fresh perspectiv

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'Curvy bacteria' weigh the benefits of different shapes

Research by scientists into why some bacteria have different shapes has found that a curved shape can make it easier to find food.

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New probe could help surgeons more accurately remove tumours

A study led by researchers at RCSI's Department of Chemistry has the potential to help surgeons more accurately remove tumours and detect cancer in lymph nodes during surgery. The research, led by RCSI Professor of Chemistry Donal O'Shea, has been published in Chemical Science.

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Castor oil-based inhibitors to remove gas hydrate plugs in Arctic deposits

The castor-based waterborne polyurea/urethanes (CWPUUs) were synthesized on the basis of the waterborne technique. The high-pressure autoclave cell and high-pressure micro-differential scanning calorimeter using methane gas were applied to evaluate the inhibition performance of CWPUUs as an inhibitor for methane gas hydrate formation.

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CNIC scientists identify an essential protein for correct heart contraction and survival

A new study published in Circulation Research shows that loss of cardiac expression of SRSF3 leads to a critical reduction in the expression of genes related to contraction.

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Global animal tracking system Icarus is switched on

The German-Russian observation system for animal movements, Icarus, will go into operation on 10 July 2019. In the subsequent test phase, the Icarus engineers and scientists will check the system components on the ground, on board the International Space Station (ISS) and the transmitters that collect the animals' data. After completion of all tests, Icarus is expected to be available to the scien

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Massive stars grow same way as light stars, just bigger

Astronomers obtained the first detailed face-on view of a gaseous disk feeding the growth of a massive baby star. They found that it shares many common features with lighter baby stars. This implies that the process of star formation is the same, regardless of the final mass of the resulting star. This finding paves the way for a more complete understanding of star formation.

5h

Expert panel identifies top climate risks for Canada, potential for adaptation

An expert panel convened by the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) has identified Canada's top climate change risks and determined that many costs and damages could be avoided with prompt and thoughtful adaptation.

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Global animal tracking system Icarus is switched on

The German-Russian observation system for animal movements, Icarus, will go into operation on 10 July 2019. In the subsequent test phase, the Icarus engineers and scientists will check the system components on the ground, on board the International Space Station (ISS) and the transmitters that collect the animals' data. After completion of all tests, Icarus is expected to be available to the scien

5h

'Curvy bacteria' weigh the benefits of different shapes

Research by scientists into why some bacteria have different shapes has found that a curved shape can make it easier to find food.

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Armyworms are devastating Asia's crops, but researchers have a plan to save them

A very hungry caterpillar is rampaging through crops across the world, leaving a trail of destruction in its wake. The fall armyworm, also known as Spodoptera frugiperda (fruit destroyer), loves to eat maize (corn) but also plagues many other crops vital to human food security, such as rice and sorghum.

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Water-sharing experiment suggests people put their own survival first

There's been talk lately about empathy, its components and its general decline. A decline in empathy concerns me as an assistant professor in the University of Saskatchewan's School of Environment and Sustainability: I study how people cope with water problems or learn to share scarce resources, like water, gas, oil and energy.

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Human waste an asset to economy, environment, study finds

Human waste might be an unpleasant public health burden, but scientists at the University of Illinois see sanitation as a valuable facet of global ecosystems and an overlooked source of nutrients, organic material and water.

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New technique allows real-time microscopy at high heat and loading

Researchers have demonstrated a technique that allows them to track microscopic changes in metals or other materials in real time even when the materials are exposed to extreme heat and loads for an extended period of time—a phenomenon known as "creep." The technique will expedite efforts to develop and characterize materials for use in extreme environments, such as nuclear reactors.

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Declining fire threatens Serengeti ecosystem

A study of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem led by University of Liverpool researchers has found that an increase in livestock numbers is threatening the ecology of the region due to a decline in both the number and area of land burnt by fires,

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Heat transport can be blocked more effectively with a more optimized holey nanostructure

The group of professor Ilari Maasilta at the Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä specializes on studying how different nanostructures can be used to enhance or impede the transport of heat. The group's latest results, published in the journal Physical Review Applied on 3 July, 2019, confirm its earlier observations that by using the wave nature of heat in holey nanostructures heat conducti

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On the way to nanotheranostics

Theranostics is an emerging field of medicine whose name is a combination of "therapeutics" and "diagnostics." The idea behind theranostics is to combine drugs and/or techniques to simultaneously—or sequentially—diagnose and treat medical conditions, and also monitor the response of the patient. This saves time and money, but can also bypass some of the undesirable biological effects that may aris

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Can Switzerland succeed without fossil fuels?

If we want to get rid of fossil fuels nationwide, there is a lot to do. It will be a generation project, that much is clear. Empa researchers Martin Rüdisüli, Sinan Teske and Urs Elber have now calculated how long and steep the road to a sustainable energy system might be; their study was published at the end of June in the journal Energies.

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New probe could help surgeons more accurately remove tumours

A study led by researchers at RCSI's Department of Chemistry has the potential to help surgeons more accurately remove tumours and detect cancer in lymph nodes during surgery. The research, led by RCSI Professor of Chemistry Donal O'Shea, has been published in Chemical Science.

5h

Top climate risks for Canada, potential for adaptation

An expert panel has identified Canada's top climate change risks and determined that many costs and damages could be avoided with prompt and thoughtful adaptation.

5h

'Curvy bacteria' weigh the benefits of different shapes

Research by scientists into why some bacteria have different shapes has found that a curved shape can make it easier to find food. Computer simulations were used to compare the swimming of differently shaped bacteria. Results showed that a curved shape can be beneficial for efficient swimming and for finding food through the use of chemical trails (known as chemotaxis) – but at the expense of high

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A tale of two proteins: The best and worst of metabolic adaptation

The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease hypothesis states that the nutritional environment in early life makes people susceptible to lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and heart attack, as adults. Many of those diseases exhibit reduced mitochondrial metabolism in the tissues of the body. Now, researcher reveal that two metabolic pathways involved in energy metabolism may

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Scientists discover origin of cell mask that hides stomach cancer

In a recent study, researchers have uncovered the origin of a layer of cells that look like normal stomach lining on top of sites of stomach cancer: it is produced by the cancer tissue itself.

5h

Ignoring cues for alcohol and fast food is hard — but is it out of our control?

A psychology experiment has shown why it can be so hard to direct our attention away from cues that might lead to behavior we'd like to avoid, like drinking alcohol and eating unhealthy food.

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Do passengers prefer autonomous vehicles driven like machines or like humans?

Passenger and pedestrian confidence are key to future development of autonomous vehicles so researchers have conducted and reported an experiment to see which driving style engendered the highest levels of confidence among autonomous vehicles passengers – driving with full machine efficiency, or driving in a way that emulates average human driving. The surprising result was that neither was optima

5h

'Curvy bacteria' weigh the benefits of different shapes

Research by scientists into why some bacteria have different shapes has found that a curved shape can make it easier to find food.

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Armyworms are devastating Asia's crops, but researchers have a plan to save them

A very hungry caterpillar is rampaging through crops across the world, leaving a trail of destruction in its wake. The fall armyworm, also known as Spodoptera frugiperda (fruit destroyer), loves to eat maize (corn) but also plagues many other crops vital to human food security, such as rice and sorghum.

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Declining fire threatens Serengeti ecosystem

A study of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem led by University of Liverpool researchers has found that an increase in livestock numbers is threatening the ecology of the region due to a decline in both the number and area of land burnt by fires,

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Blue carbon can be reactivated, research shows

Disruption and oxygen a deadly combination. Nick Carne reports.

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Saudi carrier cancels troubled Boeing 737 order for Airbus

A Saudi budget airline is ordering 30 Airbus planes in a deal that replaces a $6 billion agreement it had with Boeing for its troubled 737 Max jets, which have been grounded after two deadly crashes.

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2 rare Barbary lion cubs born in Czech zoo

Two Barbary lion cubs have been born in a Czech zoo, a welcome addition to a small surviving population of a rare lion subspecies that has been extinct in the wild.

5h

'Black box' reveals last moments of doomed Himalayan climbers

Indian authorities on Monday showed heart-wrenching images of the final moments of an international team of climbers swept away in an avalanche as they attempted to scale an unconquered Himalayan peak.

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Virtual Influencers Are on the Rise. How Far Will Their Influence Go?

In early April 2019, something was suddenly very different about Kentucky Fried Chicken’s Instagram account . In lieu of retro-style pictures of chicken, a decidedly 21st century Colonel Sanders with “Secret Recipe For Success” tattooed across his abs starting posting. In one post, he was cracking jokes with celebrities. In others, riding a horse, at a business meeting, laying down tracks in the

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What an image of Trump golfing says about political cartooning

A cartoon has drawn controversy for depicting president Trump playing golf near the corpses of two migrants. The artist who drew the images was let go from several major newspapers after the image went viral. The incident speaks to the continuing power of political cartoons, even as the medium declines. A Canadian political cartoonist started a firestorm of controversy and lost his jobs with seve

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A man-made embryo shows how a stem cell finds its role

Researchers observe the beginning of embryonic stem cells dividing into upper and lower body sections. An interdisciplinary team invents an impressively accurate 10-day-old "embryoid." The team's model may be important to other future research on pregnancy. None What makes stem cells so attractive for research is that they start off in an undifferentiated state — they're capable of becoming anyth

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Summer Eurasian nonuniform warming found related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation

The positive-phase of Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) can indeed cause Eurasian summer nonuniform warming, according to a study led by professor Shuanglin Li from Institute of Atmospheric Physics at Chinese Academy of Sciences.

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New probe could help surgeons more accurately remove tumours

A study led by researchers at RCSI's Department of Chemistry has the potential to help surgeons more accurately remove tumours and detect cancer in lymph nodes during surgery. The research, led by RCSI Professor of Chemistry Donal O'Shea, has been published in Chemical Science.

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Molecular energy machine as a movie star

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have used the Swiss Light Source SLS to record a molecular energy machine in action and thus to reveal how energy production at cell membranes works. For this purpose they developed a new investigative method that could make the analysis of cellular processes significantly more effective than before.

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Cartoons are appropriate for developing children's narrative skills and values

A study by the UPV/EHU's Department of Evolutionary Psychology and Education has explored the validity of narrative and non-narrative cartoons for developing narrative skills, moral reasoning and values and countervalues in children in mainstream and non-mainstream education. The effect that may be exerted by the structure of the cartoons on these aspects when the children process the information

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How the brain remembers where you're heading to

The brain appears to implement a GPS system for spatial navigation; however, it is not yet fully understood how it works. In the journal Science Advances, researchers now suggest that rhythmic fluctuations in brain activity, so-called theta oscillations, may play a role in this process.

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A 100-hour MRI scan captured the most detailed look yet at a whole human brain

Researchers report ultraprecise imaging of a postmortem human brain.

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2 rare Barbary lion cubs born in Czech zoo

Two Barbary lion cubs have been born in a Czech zoo, a welcome addition to a small surviving population of a rare lion subspecies that has been extinct in the wild.

5h

Simple ‘APEX’ blood test may detect Alzheimer’s

New findings suggest a simple blood test could one day offer a way to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease—and monitor patients’ response to treatment. Researchers designed a new system called APEX (Amplified Plasmonic Exosome) to pick up the aggregated amyloid beta (Aβ), an early-stage molecular marker of Alzheimer’s. The new technology is highly sensitive and provides an accurate diagnosis—comparable t

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Robot harvests lettuce, and that’s impressive

Machine learning may boost automation of agriculture. Nick Carne reports.

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A galaxy in bloom

Hydrogen gas makes NGC 972 shine bright.

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Transfer deadline medicals – how inaccurate tests may lead to clubs making the wrong decisions about players

The football transfer deadline day is a highly anticipated event in any fan's calendar. Signing one or two key players can be the difference between winning the league or relegation. But before a footballer can be signed, they have to pass a medical to see if they are "fit".

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5 moon landing innovations that changed life on Earth

Much of the technology common in daily life today originates from the drive to put a human being on the moon. This effort reached its pinnacle when Neil Armstrong stepped off the Eagle landing module onto the lunar surface 50 years ago.

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Three runaway stars believed to be survivors of thermonuclear explosions

A team of researchers with members from Germany, the U.K. and the U.S. has found what they describe as three stars that are example remnants of thermonuclear explosions. They have written a paper describing their findings and have uploaded it to the arXiv preprint server and onto Oxford's Monthly Notices of the Royal Academic Astronomical Society.

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Spreading the load on fisheries through balanced harvesting

A more balanced approach to harvesting fish could slow down fisheries-induced evolution and result in other conservation benefits, according to collaborative research from UC's School of Mathematics and Statistics.

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En kvart milliard oveni: Niels Bohr Bygningen ramt af endnu en kæmperegning

Først lød regningen på 1,6 mia. kr. Så måtte Bygningsstyrelsen krybe til Finansudvalget for at få godkendt en fordyrelse til det nuværende budget på 2,9 mia. kr. Nu stiger prisen på den skandaleombruste Niels Bohr-bygning igen.

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What are your reasons for following futurology/new and emerging science and technology?

I'm interested in why other people who follow these things do so. For me, on the one hand I enjoy learning about and thinking about all the new emerging cool technologies, and learning as much as possible about how (at least in principle) one would design and build them at home. I like to fantasize about a home lab building robots and AI and other cool technology. Also, I think there's a pragmati

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This is who controls the climates future

submitted by /u/ShibbyHaze1 [link] [comments]

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Spreading the load on fisheries through balanced harvesting

A more balanced approach to harvesting fish could slow down fisheries-induced evolution and result in other conservation benefits, according to collaborative research from UC's School of Mathematics and Statistics.

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Comment: Here's how the English language will change after Brexit

Britain is facing an uncertain future and an uneasy relationship with Europe after Brexit. Among other things, the country's woeful inability to learn languages has been raised as a key stumbling block—with the decline in foreign language learning among school and university students across the UK also raising alarm.

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Tiny nanocrystals create 'brighter' future for TV viewers, study finds

Curtin University researchers have discovered tiny 'greener' nanocrystals that can be manipulated to produce high-quality pictures and lighting in electronic devices such as televisions.

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Findings upend assumptions about racial gaps in special ed

Racial disparity in special education is growing, and it’s more complex than previously thought. New research examines how often black and Hispanic students are identified as needing special education compared to white students, leading to new findings on disproportionality and racial gaps. “When looking at numbers and data more closely, what many think about this racial disproportionality gets t

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Kirigami ‘ribbons’ reveal microscopic twists in tissue

A light-spinning device inspired by the Japanese art of paper cutting can detect microscopic twists in the internal structure of plant and animal tissue without harmful X-rays. The approach is the first that can fully rotate terahertz radiation in real time, and it could open new dimensions in medical imaging, encrypted communications, and cosmology. The researchers are most interested in using t

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With cultured meat burgers on the menu, the next big challenge is animal-free steaks

The meat you eat, if you're a carnivore, comes from animal muscles. But animals are composed of a lot more than just muscle. They have organs and bones that most Americans do not consume. They require food, water, space and social connections. They produce waste.

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AI made from a sheet of glass can recognise numbers just by looking

A sheet of glass can distinguish between drawings of 0 to 9, because light waves reflected off the images are bent differently as they pass through the glass

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Dear Therapist: Can I Still Trust My Husband?

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, Twenty-six years ago, my husband and I had a rough spot in our now 50-year marriage. We were both unfaithful, but we knew we loved each other, and went to counseling to learn how to have honesty and trust in o

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Window film could even out the indoor temperature using solar energy

A window film with a specially designed molecule could be capable of taking the edge off the worst midday heat and instead distributing it evenly from morning to evening. The molecule has the …

5h

With cultured meat burgers on the menu, the next big challenge is animal-free steaks

The meat you eat, if you're a carnivore, comes from animal muscles. But animals are composed of a lot more than just muscle. They have organs and bones that most Americans do not consume. They require food, water, space and social connections. They produce waste.

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Overfishing plus climate change equals threat to fisheries

Overfishing plus climate change equals threat to fisheries

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The ancestor of the great white shark

Mackerel sharks are a group consisting of some of the most iconic sharks we know, including the mako shark, the great white shark and Megalodon, the biggest predatory shark. An international team of researchers from the University of Vienna found a unique feature in the teeth of these apex predators, which allowed them to trace back the origin of this group to a small benthic shark from the Middle

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Scientists discover origin of cell mask that hides stomach cancer

In a recent study, researchers from Hiroshima University have uncovered the origin of a layer of cells that look like normal stomach lining on top of sites of stomach cancer: it is produced by the cancer tissue itself.

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A tale of two proteins: The best and worst of metabolic adaptation

The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis states that the nutritional environment in early life makes people susceptible to lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and heart attack, as adults. Many of those diseases exhibit reduced mitochondrial metabolism in the tissues of the body. Now, researchers in Japan reveal that two metabolic pathways involved in ene

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'Curvy bacteria' weigh the benefits of different shapes

Research by scientists into why some bacteria have different shapes has found that a curved shape can make it easier to find food. Computer simulations were used to compare the swimming of differently shaped bacteria. Results showed that a curved shape can be beneficial for efficient swimming and for finding food through the use of chemical trails (known as chemotaxis) – but at the expense of high

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Expert panel identifies top climate risks for Canada, potential for adaptation

An expert panel convened by the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) has identified Canada's top climate change risks and determined that many costs and damages could be avoided with prompt and thoughtful adaptation.

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Unlocking magnetic properties for future faster, low-energy spintronics

An Australian collaboration combines theory and experimental expertise, discovering new magnetic properties of two-dimensional Fe3GeTe2 (FGT) towards spintronic applications promising faster, more efficient computing.

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New study shows public wants renewables—but the government is not listening

Subsidies for onshore wind power were cut by the UK government in 2015. Then the main reasons given were that it was too expensive and that the public didn't support it. Amber Rudd MP, then head of what was the Department of Energy and Climate Change, said in a statement to parliament: "We are reaching the limits of what is affordable and what the public is prepared to accept."

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Overfishing plus climate change equals threat to fisheries

Overfishing plus climate change equals threat to fisheries

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Cutting back forest in southern Rockies could cut risk of severe wildfires: study

Reversing the encroachment of the coniferous forest that happened in the southern Rockies during the last century would significantly lower the probability of high-intensity wildfires in the region, according to new University of Alberta research.

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Antigravity water transport system inspired by trees

Efficiently moving water upward against gravity is a major feat of human engineering, yet one that trees have mastered for hundreds of millions of years. In a new study, researchers have designed a tree-inspired water transport system that uses capillary forces to drive dirty water upward through a hierarchically structured aerogel, where it can then be converted into steam by solar energy to prod

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Camera traps reveal Romania's incredible wildlife

Grey wolves, brown bears and Eurasian lynx have all been captured on film by camera traps in Romania. The camera traps were carefully positioned to monitor the distribution of bears and wolves, but Fauna & Flora International's (FFI) team in Romania was delighted by the diversity of species recorded in the area, which also included European wildcat, wild boar and red deer.

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Shoring up coastal defences

Throughout civilisation, coastal defences have been an issue for those people who live by the sea. Now, climate change and its implications for rising sea levels make the issue increasingly pressing for more and more people. Research published in the International Journal of Lifecycle Performance Engineering, discusses the issue of over-topping of sea defences in the face of a changing environment

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Camera traps reveal Romania's incredible wildlife

Grey wolves, brown bears and Eurasian lynx have all been captured on film by camera traps in Romania. The camera traps were carefully positioned to monitor the distribution of bears and wolves, but Fauna & Flora International's (FFI) team in Romania was delighted by the diversity of species recorded in the area, which also included European wildcat, wild boar and red deer.

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Blockchain benefits sustainable food production

Adapting new data technologies may lead to fairer food prices for consumers and producers, by increasing transparency.

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Sustainability important to international tourists—new research

New research shows that international visitors to New Zealand value sustainability and protecting the environment but there are gaps and opportunities for local tourism service providers to do more to promote eco-friendly practices.

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Optimizing the growth of coatings on nanowire catalysts

Solar energy harvested by semiconductors—materials whose electrical resistance is in between that of regular metals and insulators—can trigger surface electrochemical reactions to generate clean and sustainable fuels such as hydrogen. Highly stable and active catalysts are needed to accelerate these reactions, especially to split water molecules into oxygen and hydrogen. Scientists have identified

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Secret of UK chocolate manufacture inspires discovery of new lactose form

A new form of crystalline lactose has been discovered using part of the technique that gives UK chocolate its unique appeal.

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Researchers examine benefits of sheep grazing in vegetable farming

Farmers and ranchers have long been in search of ways to limit the need for tillage and chemical herbicides on farmland, and two researchers in Montana State University's College of Agriculture are working on a project that may provide a solution.

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Window film could even out the indoor temperature using solar energy

A window film with a specially designed molecule could be capable of taking the edge off the worst midday heat and instead distributing it evenly from morning to evening. The molecule has the unique ability to capture energy from the sun's rays and release it later as heat. This is shown by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, in the scientific journal Advanced Science.

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Humans 'must be better neighbours' to save elephants

Habitat loss as a result of a human population boom in Africa could threaten the very existence of elephants there, according to a new study.

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Dust storms swirl at the north pole of Mars

ESA's Mars Express has been keeping an eye on local and regional dust storms brewing at the north pole of the Red Planet over the last month, watching as they disperse towards the equator.

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Solving a molecular scissors mystery

A Netherlands Cancer Institute team, co-led by Thijn Brummelkamp and Anastassis (Tassos) Perrakis, reported independently, but almost simultaneously with three more groups from all over the world, on the crystal structure and mechanism of a peculiar molecular end-tail of the microtubules that constitute the cell skeleton.

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Domestic U.K. corruption is going unnoticed, say experts

A new report has found that corruption in the U.K. is being overlooked, despite the risk of corruption being fuelled by self-regulation, conflicts of interest and austerity.

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A new method to study polarons in insulators and semiconductors

A team of researchers at the University of Oxford have recently introduced a new way to model polarons, a quasiparticle typically used by physicists to understand interactions between electrons and atoms in solid materials. Their method, presented in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, combines theoretical modeling with computational simulations, enabling in-depth observations of these q

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Discovery of mechanism behind precision cancer drug opens door for more targeted treatment

New research that uncovers the mechanism behind the newest generation of cancer drugs is opening the door for better targeted therapy. PARP inhibitors are molecular targeted cancer drugs used to treat women with ovarian cancer who have the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations. The drugs are showing promise in late-stage clinical trials for breast cancer, prostate cancer and pancreatic cancer.

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Scientists invent fast method for 'directed evolution' of molecules

Scientists demonstrated the technique by evolving several proteins to perform precise new tasks, each time doing it in a matter of days. Existing methods of directed evolution are more laborious and time-consuming, and not in human cells, which limits the usefulness of this technology for research and developing new therapeutics.

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Ancient DNA sheds light on the origins of the Biblical Philistines

An international team analyzed for the first time, genome-wide data from people who lived during the Bronze and Iron Age in the ancient city of Ashkelon, one of the core Philistine cities. The team found that a European derived ancestry was introduced in Ashkelon around the time of the Philistines' estimated arrival, suggesting that ancestors of the Philistines migrated across the Mediterranean. T

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Humans 'must be better neighbours' to save elephants

Habitat loss as a result of a human population boom in Africa could threaten the very existence of elephants there, according to a new study.

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Solving a molecular scissors mystery

A Netherlands Cancer Institute team, co-led by Thijn Brummelkamp and Anastassis (Tassos) Perrakis, reported independently, but almost simultaneously with three more groups from all over the world, on the crystal structure and mechanism of a peculiar molecular end-tail of the microtubules that constitute the cell skeleton.

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Cave secrets unlocked to show past drought and rainfall patterns

A first-ever global analysis of cave drip waters has shown where stalagmites can provide vital clues towards understanding past rainfall patterns.

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Extremely hard yet metallically conductive: Researchers develop novel material with high-tech prospects

An international research group led by scientists from the University of Bayreuth has produced a previously unknown material: Rhenium nitride pernitride. Thanks to combining properties that were previously considered incompatible, it looks set to become highly attractive for technological applications. Indeed, it is a super-hard metallic conductor that can withstand extremely high pressures like a

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Accelerating the grapevine effect

Gossip is an efficient way to share information across large networks and has unexpected applications in solving other mathematical and machine-learning problems.

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Spatial confinement modulates cell velocity in collective migration

Depending on the physiological or pathological conditions under consideration, cells can migrate as large and cohesive epithelial sheets. Whereas most of the previous works suggest that migratory mechanisms are strongly regulated by intercellular contacts, the impact of physical constraints on collective migration remains unclear.

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Localised excitons in 2-D materials for integrated quantum optics

NUS scientists have found that the oxygen interstitials in single-layer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) enable it to function as single photon emitters (SPEs) for quantum optical applications.

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Do passengers prefer autonomous vehicles driven like machines or like humans?

Passenger and pedestrian confidence are key to future development of autonomous vehicles so researchers at WMG at the University of Warwick have conducted and reported an experiment to see which driving style engendered the highest levels of confidence among autonomous vehicles passengers – driving with full machine efficiency, or driving in a way that emulates average human driving. The surprisin

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Ignoring cues for alcohol and fast food is hard — but is it out of our control?

A UNSW psychology experiment has shown why it can be so hard to direct our attention away from cues that might lead to behavior we'd like to avoid, like drinking alcohol and eating unhealthy food.

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Simple 'smart' glass reveals the future of artificial vision

University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have devised a method to create pieces of 'smart' glass that can recognize images without requiring any sensors or circuits or power sources.

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Discovery of mechanism behind precision cancer drug opens door for more targeted treatment

New research that uncovers the mechanism behind the newest generation of cancer drugs is opening the door for better targeted therapy. PARP inhibitors are molecular targeted cancer drugs used to treat women with ovarian cancer who have the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations. The drugs are showing promise in late-stage clinical trials for breast cancer, prostate cancer and pancreatic cancer.

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Quitting alcohol may improve mental well-being, health-related quality of life

Quitting alcohol may improve health-related quality of life for women, especially their mental well-being, according to a new study.

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Is that news really 'fake,' or is it just biased?

In an era of concern over 'fake news,' a new study finds that people draw a distinction between information sources that are dishonest and those that are biased. Researchers found that a source seen as biased may lose credibility with people, even if they believe the source is scrupulously honest.

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Microvascular disease anywhere in the body may be linked to higher risk of leg amputations

Microvascular disease, a disorder of very small blood vessels, may increase the risk of leg amputation independent of other blood vessel conditions and regardless of the location of the microvascular issue, such as eyes (retinopathy), kidneys (nephropathy) or feet (neuropathy). Study participants with both microvascular disease and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) had an almost 23-fold increased

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Robot uses machine learning to harvest lettuce

A vegetable-picking robot that uses machine learning to identify and harvest a commonplace, but challenging, agricultural crop has been developed by engineers.

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Strain of common cold virus could revolutionize treatment of bladder cancer

A strain of the common cold virus has been found to potentially target, infect and destroy cancer cells in patients with bladder cancer, a new study reports. No trace of the cancer was found in one patient following treatment with the virus.

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Sports playbook helps doctors predict cancer patient outcomes

Using in-game win probability techniques, researchers devised a way to predict a cancer patient's outcome at any point during treatment. The approach could also inform treatment decisions.

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Scientists discover autoimmune disease associated with testicular cancer

Using advanced technology, scientists have discovered an autoimmune disease that appears to affect men with testicular cancer.

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Using an embryonic pause to save the date

A date palm seedling can pause its development to boost its resilience before emerging into the harsh desert environment.

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Women's football may be growing in popularity, but the game is still fighting for survival

As the World Cup has vividly shown, women's football is growing in popularity and status with increasing participation, professionalization and media attention across the world. But, in our recent investigation into the women's game, we find it is still fighting for a stable footing.

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Fighting drug resistance with fast, artificial enhancement of natural products

Researchers in Japan have identified multiple promising new drug candidates to treat antibiotic-resistant infections, including the superbug MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). The team developed a new technique to enhance the infection-fighting potential of natural chemicals and test them quickly.

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Dr. Mario World Copies The Worst Mechanics of Mobile Gaming and It's Our Fault

Back in 2015 when Nintendo announced that it would start developing games for smartphones and tablets, I was excited by the prospect of playing Nintendo classics like Mario, Animal Crossing, …

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Using an embryonic pause to save the date

A date palm seedling can pause its development to boost its resilience before emerging into the harsh desert environment.

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Researchers in China find some of the oldest examples of cranial modification

A team with members from China, Singapore and the U.S. has found some of the oldest examples of cranial modification in a northeastern part of China. In their paper published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, the group describes the skeletons they studied and what they found.

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Fighting drug resistance with fast, artificial enhancement of natural products

Researchers in Japan have identified multiple promising new drug candidates to treat antibiotic-resistant infections, including the superbug MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). The team developed a new technique to enhance the infection-fighting potential of natural chemicals and test them quickly.

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Five reasons future space travel should explore asteroids

On the same day that the Earth survived an expected near-miss with asteroid 367943 Duende, Russian dashcams unexpectedly captured footage of a different asteroid as it slammed into the atmosphere, exploded, and injured more than 1,000 people. That day in Chelyabinsk in February 2013 reminded the world that the Earth does not exist in a bubble.

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Young Asian elephants form all-male groups to survive

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in India has found evidence of young Asian elephants forming all-male groups as a way to survive. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group describes their study of the elephants in different parts of India, and what they found.

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FBI udnyttede database med millioner af kørekort som guldmine for ansigtsgenkendelse

Amerikanske politikere kritiserer forbundspolitiet og den amerikanske grænsemyndighed for at søge efter ansigter i databaser med kørekort, uden hverken at have fået eller spurgt om lov.

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Young Asian elephants form all-male groups to survive

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in India has found evidence of young Asian elephants forming all-male groups as a way to survive. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group describes their study of the elephants in different parts of India, and what they found.

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The New App Gem Takes a Unique Approach to News Recommendations

In an attempt to combat the echo-chamber effect of algorithm-driven news apps, the new iOS app Gem tries something new.

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A Global Pollution Observatory Hunts for Hidden Killers

The first worldwide effort to measure all forms of pollution is calculating staggering numbers on its human toll.

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Becoming new parents increases produce purchases

In the United States, both children and adults eat too few fruits and vegetables, which puts them at risk for poor diet quality and adverse health consequences. A new study found new parents increased their spending on produce in middle- and high-income households.

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Determined DNA hunt reveals schizophrenia clue

An 18-year study using the DNA of thousands of people in India has identified a new clue in the quest for causes of schizophrenia, and for potential treatments. This study identified a gene called NAPRT1 that encodes an enzyme involved in vitamin B3 metabolism.

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Simple 'smart' glass reveals the future of artificial vision

The sophisticated technology that powers face recognition in many modern smartphones someday could receive a high-tech upgrade that sounds—and looks—surprisingly low-tech.

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Loggerhead turtles headed for record-breaking season

This summer is shaping up to be a banner year for sea turtles, according to data collected by University of Georgia researchers.

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Loggerhead turtles headed for record-breaking season

This summer is shaping up to be a banner year for sea turtles, according to data collected by University of Georgia researchers.

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Chefer väljer samarbete – och tjänar på det

– Det mest slående resultatet är att verkställande direktörer inte svarar så som de ”borde”, enligt tidigare teorier. Vi ser också att de tjänar ekonomiskt på att samarbeta och spela mindre aggressivt, jämfört med kontrollgruppen i studien, säger Jerker Holm. Experimentet ryms inom det som nationalekonomerna kallar spelteori. Genom att utsättas för en rad val med olika konsekvenser, får deltagarn

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Keeping older employees engaged and at work

A new research paper published in A-ranked journal Personnel Review has identified the factors most likely to keep older employees engaged and in the workforce.

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Are forests our best weapon against climate change?

Around 0.9 billion hectares—roughly 3.5 million square miles—of land worldwide would be suitable for forest restoration, which could ultimately capture two-thirds of human-made carbon emissions, say researchers. In the journal Science , researchers report that this would be the most effective way to combat climate change. The Crowther Lab at ETH Zurich investigates nature-based solutions to clima

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The meat planter: An ecological case for 'planted meat'

To meet the soaring demand for sustainable protein, Lukas Böni and his start-up company Planted are developing a plant-based meat substitute. Their first product is "chicken" made from peas—with both the texture and taste of poultry.

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New research explores contemporary Muslim girlhoods in Assam, India

A new book by Dr. Saba Hussain of the University of Warwick Department of Sociology offers new insights into the nature of educational disadvantage experienced by Muslim girls in the Assam region of India, exploring the impact of religion, culture, location, class and ethnicity on their educational experience, and arguing for a novel theoretical framework which centres Muslim women and girls in sc

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Klimarådets formand: Vi har ikke set så stor en omvæltning af Danmark siden 1950'erne

PLUS. Hvis regeringen skal få succes med at skære 70 pct. af udledningen af drivhusgasser, vil det ifølge Klimarådets formand repræsentere den største omvæltning af det danske samfund siden efterkrigstiden.

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GM's self-driving unit is close to receiving a $2.25 billion boost

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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'Rewiring nerves' reverses hand and arm paralysis

"It's made a huge difference in my life," says one patient who can now live independently.

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The meat planter: An ecological case for 'planted meat'

To meet the soaring demand for sustainable protein, Lukas Böni and his start-up company Planted are developing a plant-based meat substitute. Their first product is "chicken" made from peas—with both the texture and taste of poultry.

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Researcher tests the lifespan of C. elegans to understand how the brain dictates age

The key to living a long life is a lot less glamorous than sipping from the Fountain of Youth. Stress, starvation, and other hostile living conditions are actually the secret ingredients for longer lifespans—at least when it comes to worms.

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Extracting sperm directly from testicles could help infertility issues

Some male infertility may be down to the damage sperm experiences as it matures and enters semen – so taking immature sperm directly from the testes could help

6h

Producing graphene from carbon dioxide

The general public knows the chemical compound of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and because of its global-warming effect. However, carbon dioxide can also be a useful raw material for chemical reactions. A working group at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has now reported on this unusual application in the ChemSusChem journal. They are using carbon dioxide as a raw ma

6h

Researcher tests the lifespan of C. elegans to understand how the brain dictates age

The key to living a long life is a lot less glamorous than sipping from the Fountain of Youth. Stress, starvation, and other hostile living conditions are actually the secret ingredients for longer lifespans—at least when it comes to worms.

6h

Study suggests space travelers are not yet at greater risk of dying from cancer or cardiovascular disease

A team of researchers with Mortality Research & Consulting, Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution Izmerov Research Institute of Occupational Health and the Russian State Research Center has found that thus far, astronauts and cosmonauts are not at increased risk of dying from cancer or cardiovascular disease (CVD) due to radiation exposure during their space adventures.

6h

New magnetic properties unlocked for future spintronic applications

A theoretical-experimental collaboration across two FLEET nodes has discovered new magnetic properties within 2-D structures, with exciting potential for researchers in the emerging field of spintronics.

6h

'Digital alchemy' to reverse-engineer new materials

In work that upends materials design, researchers have demonstrated with computer simulations that they can design a crystal and work backward to the particle shape that will self-assemble to create it.

6h

Lack of trust muddies the water in UK fishing industry

A survey of UK fishermen has revealed low levels of trust in key government organisations and scientists.

6h

Proper handling of fresh produce can reduce risk of foodborne illness

Fresh produce is plentiful right now, but it's important to follow some safe-handling tips to help protect yourself and your family, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

6h

Climate change could make real estate worth billions obsolete unless owners act now

From the school strikes for climate, to Extinction Rebellion protests and calls for a Green New Deal, citizens around the world are putting pressure on their governments to prevent global warming more than 2°C above pre-industrial levels.

6h

Proper handling of fresh produce can reduce risk of foodborne illness

Fresh produce is plentiful right now, but it's important to follow some safe-handling tips to help protect yourself and your family, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

7h

Jodrell Bank Observatory made Unesco World Heritage site

Jodrell Bank has now joined locations such as the ancient city of Babylon on the prestigious list.

7h

Air pollution in Birmingham may cut months off life expectancy

A child born in Birmingham, UK, in 2011 may die between two to seven months early due to predicted pollution concentrations, according to a report

7h

What the Measles Epidemic Really Says About America

I n two essays, “Illness as Metaphor” in 1978 and “AIDS and Its Metaphors” in 1988, the critic Susan Sontag observed that you can learn a lot about a society from the metaphors it uses to describe disease. She also suggested that disease itself can serve as a metaphor—a reflection of the society through which it travels. In other words, the way certain illnesses spread reveals something not just

7h

This Summer's Weird Weather Is the Death of Predictability

Extreme heat, hailstorms, and monstrous floods have made for an intense summer. But there's still more seasonal strangeness to come.

7h

Ground beetle genitals have the genetic ability to get strange. They don’t

A new look at the genetics of sex organs finds underpinnings of conflicts over genital size.

7h

Image of the Day: Multilayered

Human embryonic stem cells differentiate and organize themselves on a chip.

7h

Cancer Quackery on YouTube

Many outlets are covering the story of Mari Lopez, a YouTuber who claimed, along with her niece, Liz Johnson, that a raw vegan diet cured her breast cancer. Johnson recently updated the videos with a notice that Mari Lopez died of cancer in December 2017. She has refused, however, to take down the videos. The story, unfortunately, is a common one. When people are diagnosed with cancer it is under

7h

Apollo as it Really Happened: A Conversation with Tom Jennings and Mike Massimino

For children of the 1960s, Apollo was a not a single event but an extended way of looking at the world. Here, boys watch the Apollo 8 Christmas Eve broadcast. (Credit: Bruce Dale/National Geographic Creative) The 50th anniversary of Apollo 11–which kissed lunar soil on July 20, 1969–has prompted a flood of retrospectives. My local Barnes & Noble features an entire long table covered with anniver

7h

These Odd 'Quasiparticles' Could Finally Unmask Dark Matter

Tiny ripples called magnons could lure even a fleeting, lightweight dark matter particle out of hiding.

7h

Rapport: Drop tre lag glas i nye vinduer – to lag er sundere

PLUS. Når man udskifter vinduerne i bygninger, der er opført før 1985, bør man hellere bruge tolags jernfattigt glas end trelags energiglas, konkluderer en rapport fra byggeforskere og DTU. Men i mange bygninger vil det give store problemer, siger glasspecialist.

7h

Ford and VW Are Set to Cooperate on Self-Driving and Electric Cars

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Indoor farmers bet on robots, AI

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Machine learning helps robot harvest lettuce for the first time

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

8h

How to boost your career in a ruthless job market

Modern jobs come with a tour of duty expectation — that is, you provide a certain commitment to the employer, and the employer provides a certain commitment to you, but it's not forever. After a few years, results and options are re-evaluated. Rather than thinking of a career ladder, it's more important in the modern job market to view it as a career lattice — a grid. It's not always about moving

8h

Old Teslas To Get Free Self-Driving Chip Upgrade This Year

Old Tesla vehicles will most likely be retrofitted with the company’s new and more powerful self-driving chip for free later this year, this according to Tesla CEO Elon Musk. He gave …

8h

Bill Gates Likens Steve Jobs' Business Acumen To Casting Spells On People

In a recent interview, Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Bill Gates described his one-time arch nemesis Steve Jobs as a wizard of sorts, saying he was adept at "casting spells" during …

8h

Book Excerpt: 'Archaeology From Space'

'Space archaeology' is transforming how experts study ancient civilizations.

8h

Man's Foot Pain Was Due to Rare 'Hair Splinter'

For one man in Brazil, a fallen strand of hair became more than a nuisance when it got embedded in his foot.

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Waze Data Can Help Predict Car Crashes and Cut Response Time

Waze users notify the app of crashes an average of 2 minutes, 41 seconds before anyone alerts law enforcement.

8h

Social Media Could Make It Impossible to Grow Up

Early internet scholars bemoaned the loss of childhood. In reality, the exact opposite is happening.

8h

The Meat-Allergy Tick Also Carries a Mystery Killer Virus

A tick best known for making people allergic to red meat can also infect its victims with the deadly Bourbon virus.

8h

Jodrell Bank Observatory honoured with UNESCO World Heritage status

Jodrell Bank Observatory, a world-leading centre for radio astronomy in the UK, has been added to the UNESCO World Heritage List

8h

Thousands of Sharks and Rays May Be Getting Strangled by Plastic Waste

No one is talking about this killer of sharks and rays.

8h

Could Massive SoCal Earthquakes Trigger the 'Big One' on the San Andreas Fault?

It's possible that the recent quakes could be the straw that broke the camel's back for the San Andreas Fault, which is way overdue for a major rupture.

8h

A Fight for the Purity of the Night Sky

The recent controversy over a constellation of SpaceX satellites echoes a similar uproar that happened back in the early 1960s — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

A Fight for the Purity of the Night Sky

The recent controversy over a constellation of SpaceX satellites echoes a similar uproar that happened back in the early 1960s — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Molekylen som fördelar värmen varma sommardagar

En fönsterfilm med en specialdesignad molekyl skulle kunna ta udden av den värsta värmen mitt på dagen och istället fördela den jämnt från morgon till kväll. Molekylen har den unika förmågan att fånga upp energi ur solens strålar för att senare avge den som värme. Soliga sommardagar kan det vara snudd på outhärdligt att vistas inomhus eller i bilar. Värmen strålar in och skapar en obehagligt hög

8h

FBI, ICE find state driver’s license photos are a gold mine for facial-recognition searches

The state DMV databases form the bedrock of an unprecedented surveillance infrastructure, allowing federal investigative and immigration agents to scan hundreds of millions of Americans’ faces …

8h

British Airways faces largest ever data breach fine for 2018 hack

A hack that accessed the personal data of around half a million British Airways customers has earned the firm a record £183 million fine

8h

180 km/t og ekstra tog på Ringstedbanen: Nu er midlertidigt signalsystem endelig klar

Trafikstyrelsen har godkendt Banedanmarks linjebloksystem på Ringstedbanen. Dermed er det slut med den manuelle kontrol, som assessor advarede imod.

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Huawei chief claims its own Android alternative will 'likely' be faster

Ren Zhengfei, Huawei's founder and CEO, told French publication Le Point about HongMeng OS, an operating system Huawei is creating which will 'likely' be 60 per cent faster than Android.

9h

Georgia State researcher has two papers retracted, eight flagged. He’s not happy about it.

The Journal of Biological Chemistry has retracted two papers by a Georgia State University researcher, as well as flagged eight more with expressions of concern, a move the scientist called “unfair and unjustified.” Ming-Hui Zou, the common author on all ten papers — as well as on two more that have been corrected by the … Continue reading Georgia State researcher has two papers retracted, eight f

9h

California earthquake: Power 'restored to most' after 7.1-magnitude quake

Power has been restored to most homes that lost it in the 7.1-magnitude earthquake.

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Chernobyl: Rescuing the abandoned dogs in the exclusion zone

The offspring of abandoned pets in the nuclear exclusion zone are receiving veterinary help.

9h

The nuclear fight for Sizewell on Suffolk's coast

The nuclear industry says new plants are essential, but protesters say the environment is under threat.

9h

Why blue jeans are going green

A growing number of denim producers are embracing environmentally-friendly production methods.

9h

How China is trying to stop its deserts spreading

The deserts in China are constantly spreading due to human activities.

9h

Moonlight shapes how some animals move, grow and even sing

The moon’s light influences lion prey behavior, dung beetle navigation, fish growth, mass migrations and birdsong.

9h

The Census Case Could Provoke a Constitutional Crisis

Many years ago, I spent a restless night as a volunteer in a North Carolina homeless shelter listening to the man in the next room promise that in just about one more minute, he was coming over to punch me in the face. Eventually he talked himself down, fell asleep, and woke up remembering nothing. Over the July 4 holiday, however, I was reminded of that evening: The White House has adopted the s

9h

New York’s Socialist Revolution Isn’t What It Seems

Bernie Sanders has a new rival in Bill de Blasio, the mayor of New York City, who recently made a feisty case that he, not the senator from Vermont, should be the tribune of the Democratic Party’s socialist left. Jaded New Yorkers have for the most part treated de Blasio’s presidential campaign as a joke, one that reflects the delusions of a mayor notorious for his laziness and gargantuan self-re

9h

New Evidence on Pot During Pregnancy

As more states legalize marijuana, usage rates are going up, and so are questions about the plant’s health benefits or risks, including during pregnancy. Many women of childbearing age use marijuana recreationally, and wonder about continuing occasional use when they become pregnant. When people ask me whether marijuana poses a risk to the fetus—which they do, frequently—my stock answer has been,

9h

Georgia’s New Election System Raises Old Computer Security Concerns

With many states seeking to overhaul their election systems before 2020, Georgia's decision has experts worried that lessons learned over nearly two decades of computerized voting are being woefully ignored. Among the recommendations in a recent report: States should return to paper ballots marked by hand.

9h

Mystery 'tequila plant' agave to flower in Cambridge after 57 years

University gardeners are ready to remove a glasshouse roof after the plant had a sudden growth spurt.

9h

Can NASA really return people to the Moon by 2024?

Nature, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02020-w Donald Trump wants US astronauts back on the Moon. But his ambitious plan faces formidable political, financial and technical challenges.

9h

Techtopia #13: Hvordan sikrer vi hospitaler mod computervirus?

Podcast: I denne uge er vi også på Cyberweek og høre om Internet of Things, truslen mod hospitaler og anden livsvigtig teknologi. Vært: Henrik Føhns.

9h

Museum starts 'live' restoration of Rembrandt masterpiece

Amsterdam's famed Rijksmuseum on Monday began a historic restoration of Rembrandt's "The Night Watch", erecting a huge glass cage around the painting so the public can see the work carried out live.

9h

Færre unge søger ind på et ingeniørstudie

I år har 7.119 ansøgt om at komme ind på en ingeniøruddannelse. Det er 164 færre end sidste år. Til gengæld vil flere kvinder være ingeniører.

9h

Microvascular disease anywhere in the body may be linked to higher risk of leg amputations

Microvascular disease, a disorder of very small blood vessels, may increase the risk of leg amputation independent of other blood vessel conditions and regardless of the location of the microvascular issue, such as eyes (retinopathy), kidneys (nephropathy) or feet (neuropathy).Study participants with both microvascular disease and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) had an almost 23-fold increased r

9h

Atomic-level passivation mechanism of ammonium salts enabling highly efficient perovskite solar cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10985-5 Various approaches have been developed to push higher the efficiency of halide perovskite solar cells. Here Alharbi et al. show that ammonium salts treatment can reduce the defect density at the perovskite surface and understand the passivation mechanism with 2D-solid state NMR.

10h

Paradoxical impact of memory on color appearance of faces

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10073-8 What is the function of color vision? Here, the authors show that when retinal mechanisms of color are impaired, memory has a paradoxical impact on color appearance that is selective for faces, providing evidence that color contributes to face encoding and social communication.

10h

An adaptive variational algorithm for exact molecular simulations on a quantum computer

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10988-2 Quantum algorithms for simulating chemical systems are limited because of the a priori assumption about the form of the target wavefunction. Here the authors present a new variational hybrid quantum-classical algorithm which allows the system being simulated to determine its own optimal state.

10h

Coherent microwave-photon-mediated coupling between a semiconductor and a superconducting qubit

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10798-6 Hybrid quantum devices combine different platforms with the prospect of exploiting the advantages of each. Scarlino et al. demonstrate strong, coherent coupling between a semiconductor qubit and a superconducting qubit by using a high-impedance superconducting resonator as a quantum bus.

10h

Chemical genomics reveals histone deacetylases are required for core regulatory transcription

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11046-7 Core regulatory transcription factors are usually regulated by cell-type specific super enhancers (SEs). Here, the authors screen for chemical probes able to distinguish between SE-driven and promoter-driven transcription and find that histone deacetylases are selectively required for core regulatory transcripti

10h

The effect of X-linked dosage compensation on complex trait variation

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10598-y Dosage compensation (DC) on the X chromosome has predictable effects on genetic and phenotypic trait variance. Here, the authors use information for 20 quantitative traits in the UK Biobank and across-tissue gene expression to compare X-linked heritability and the effects of trait-associated SNPs between the sex

10h

Author Correction: Arylmethylamino steroids as antiparasitic agents

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11018-x Author Correction: Arylmethylamino steroids as antiparasitic agents

10h

The cryo-electron microscopy supramolecular structure of the bacterial stressosome unveils its mechanism of activation

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10782-0 The bacterial stressosome is a large nanomachine and a key inducer of stress response. Here, the authors present the cryo-EM structure of the stressosome from the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes at 3.38 Å resolution and discuss its activation mechanism.

10h

Static magnetic stimulation of the primary motor cortex impairs online but not offline motor sequence learning

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46379-2 Static magnetic stimulation of the primary motor cortex impairs online but not offline motor sequence learning

10h

Human Polyclonal Antibodies Prevent Lethal Zika Virus Infection in Mice

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46291-9 Human Polyclonal Antibodies Prevent Lethal Zika Virus Infection in Mice

10h

Seafloor hydrothermal activity along mid-ocean ridge with strong melt supply: study from segment 27, southwest Indian ridge

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46299-1 Seafloor hydrothermal activity along mid-ocean ridge with strong melt supply: study from segment 27, southwest Indian ridge

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BODIPY-cholesterol can be reliably used to monitor cholesterol efflux from capacitating mammalian spermatozoa

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45831-7 BODIPY-cholesterol can be reliably used to monitor cholesterol efflux from capacitating mammalian spermatozoa

10h

Recovery of haemal lordosis in Gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46334-1 Recovery of haemal lordosis in Gilthead seabream ( Sparus aurata L.)

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Physiological condition of nestling great tits (Parus major) declines with the date of brood initiation: a long term study of first clutches

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46263-z Physiological condition of nestling great tits ( Parus major ) declines with the date of brood initiation: a long term study of first clutches

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Blockade of L-type Ca2+ channel attenuates doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy via suppression of CaMKII-NF-κB pathway

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46367-6 Blockade of L-type Ca 2+ channel attenuates doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy via suppression of CaMKII-NF-κB pathway

10h

An Innovative Platform Merging Elemental Analysis and Ftir Imaging for Breast Tissue Analysis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46056-4 An Innovative Platform Merging Elemental Analysis and Ftir Imaging for Breast Tissue Analysis

10h

Use peer support to improve well-being and research outcomes

Nature, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02104-7 PhD students’ knowledge can and should be harnessed to help others who are beginning their postgraduate journey.

10h

Propulsive reading: books on the Moon

Nature, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02089-3 Alexandra Witze savours seven books commemorating the 50th anniversary of the lunar landings.

10h

Spis fisk, hvis din partner skal være med rogn: Omega-3 gør sædceller til bedre svømmere

Nyt studie fra Regionshospitalet Horsens viser, at fisk styrker sædkvaliteten markant.

10h

Robots, Not Humans, Are The New Space Explorers

Landing a man on the moon captures the public's imagination. But in the decades after the Apollo program, robots have also generated public excitement about space exploration. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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Hungarian government takes control of research institutes despite outcry

Nature, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02107-4 But the international scientific community continues to protest against the takeover, saying it will harm science.

10h

How Quantum Physics Built The Modern Age

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Robot uses machine learning to harvest lettuce

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Kæmpe-bøde for datalæk: British Airways skal betale 1,5 milliarder kr.

Persondata og kreditkortoplysninger om 380.000 af British Airways kunder blev stjålet i efteråret. Nu falder der rekord-hård straf fra den britiske GDPR-myndighed.

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Robot harvests lettuce, and that’s impressive

Machine learning may boost automation of agriculture. Nick Carne reports.

11h

British Airways faces $230 million fine for customer data theft

The company’s chairman said he’s “surprised and disappointed” by the proposed penalty.

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Is that news really 'fake,' or is it just biased?

In an era of concern over "fake news," a new study finds that people draw a distinction between information sources that are dishonest and those that are biased.

11h

Snow algae thrive in high-elevation ice spires, an unlikely oasis for life

High in the Andes Mountains, dagger-shaped ice spires house thriving microbial communities, offering an oasis for life in one of Earth's harshest environments as well as a possible analogue for life on other planets.

11h

Good home learning in early years boosts your secondary school achievements

The positive effects of a rich home learning environment during a child's early years continue into adolescence and help improve test scores later in life, according to a new study published in School Effectiveness and School Improvement.

11h

Facebook, Google, and social media vs. medical misinformation: An update

Over the last couple of weeks, there have been two major stories on the efforts of social media companies to combat health misinformation on their platforms. What are they doing, and are they succeeding? Dr. Gorski decided to look into these questions.

11h

Indonesia cancels tsunami alert after strong quake

A strong magnitude 6.9 earthquake struck off Indonesia on Sunday, the US Geological Survey reported, triggering a brief tsunami warning that sent panicked residents fleeing to higher ground.

11h

BA fined £183m over computer theft of passenger data

The UK's data privacy watchdog has fined British Airways more than £183 million after computer hackers last year stole bank details from hundreds of thousands of passengers, the pair said on Monday.

11h

Italy's Prosecco hills join UNESCO World Heritage list

Italy's Prosecco hills northeast of Venice, which have been cultivated for centuries, were on Sunday added to the World Heritage list by the UN cultural organisation.

11h

How conspiracy theories followed man to the Moon

It was the biggest piece of supposed fake news before the term "fake news" was even invented.

11h

Put off by US, Chinese students eye other universities

Caught in the crossfire of the US-China trade war, Chinese students are looking for alternative study destinations—threatening to turn off an important source of revenue for American universities.

11h

DJ set to be first black African in space killed in bike crash

A South African man who won the chance to be the first black African in space has died in a motorbike crash before turning his dream into reality, his family announced Sunday.

11h

Is that news really 'fake,' or is it just biased?

In an era of concern over 'fake news,' a new study finds that people draw a distinction between information sources that are dishonest and those that are biased. Researchers found that a source seen as biased may lose credibility with people, even if they believe the source is scrupulously honest.

11h

How visions of the Moon inspired centuries of storytellers

By landing on the Moon in 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin arrived at a place which, up until that point, had been the stuff of fantasy.

12h

Small step, giant memories: Neil Armstrong's moonwalk remembered

Half a century has passed—but the moment Moon pioneer Neil Armstrong took his historic first step on the lunar surface is etched in the memories of those who tuned in.

12h

Quakes push Californians to prepare for the next big jolt

Shaken residents were cleaning up Sunday from two of the biggest earthquakes to rattle California in decades as scientists warn that both should serve as a wake-up call to be ready when the long-dreaded "Big One" strikes.

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Google's New Chip Eliminates Touchscreens

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The return of David Latchman Show

In the David Latchman affair, UCL denied me access to investigative reports. The university however did give same files to proper journalists now. The censored documents still do not reveal fraudulent papers, but at least we know the Master of Birkbeck was found guilty of misconduct by recklessness. Trice.

14h

Taiwan’s Status is a Geopolitical Absurdity

TAIPEI—After nine years of construction, more than 400 American diplomats and staff have moved into new offices here, a $250 million compound built into a lush hill with security provided by marines. Employees will offer American citizens in Taiwan consular services and help Taiwanese obtain visas to visit the United States, just as they would anywhere else in the world. Yet this is not an embass

14h

Scientists Are Giving Dead Brains New Life. What Could Go Wrong?

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Almost 50% of the new cars sold in Norway are fully electric

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14h

Does anybody know of a site that does a “Future idea of the week” feature

I’m looking for a site or blog (or YouTube channel or podcast) that every week postulates a future science idea or technology. Amateur blogs and sites are EXTREMELY welcome and it has to focus on a specific concept. It should have this feature every week. Metro UK has a future article published every Wednesday but the stuff is often broad, Isaac Arthur focuses mostly on space. I’m looking for som

14h

Snow algae thrive in high-elevation ice spires, an unlikely oasis for life

High in the Andes Mountains, dagger-shaped ice spires house thriving microbial communities, offering an oasis for life in one of Earth's harshest environments as well as a possible analogue for life on other planets.

15h

Study confirms disparities in triple-negative breast cancer diagnoses

A new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, shows that women of color and young women may face elevated risks of developing triple-negative breast cancers, which are often aggressive and do not respond to hormone therapy or targeted therapy.

15h

Becoming new parents increases produce purchases

In the United States, both children and adults eat too few fruits and vegetables, which puts them at risk for poor diet quality and adverse health consequences. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, found new parents increased their spending on produce in middle- and high-income households.

15h

Bike crash kills South African man set to be first 'Afronaut'

Mandla Maseko, a DJ who won the chance to be the first black African in space, has died in a motorbike accident A South African man who won the chance to be the first black African in space has died in a motorbike crash before turning his dream into reality. Mandla Maseko, a part-time DJ and candidate officer with the South African air force, was nicknamed “Afronaut” after landing a coveted seat

15h

Apple Brings Touch ID And Face ID iCloud Logins To iOS 13, macOS Catalina

Apple is trying out a new way to login to your iCloud account using either Face ID or Touch ID. Both will be welcome login options for users of iCloud, and to use either of the new login methods …

15h

How do deer grow antlers so quickly?

A whitetail buck in the early stages of antler growth. (brm1949/depositphotos.com/) This story originally published on outdoorlife.com When you stop and think about it, antlers seem like the stuff of science fiction rather than real life. They're bones that grow extremely fast outside of a mammals body, and every year they fall off and grow back. For whitetails, at the peak of development, antler

16h

Aarhusforskere har en forklaring på methanmysterium på Mars

Observationer viser, at methan på mystisk vis opstår og på lige så mystisk vis hurtigt forsvinder på Mars. En forskergruppe ved Aarhus Universitet kommer med en mulig forklaring på forsvindingsprocessen.

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Tom Steyer Is Telling Allies He’s Running for President

The presidential-campaign announcements may not be over yet—with the latest potentially coming from a person who ruled out a run just a few months ago. The billionaire investor Tom Steyer, who in the past decade has been both the top Democratic donor in the country and the prime engine for pushing for the impeachment of President Donald Trump, appears ready to become Democratic candidate No. 26.

16h

Wildfires: Our generation needs to stop climate change

The UK has had more wildfires in half of 2019 than any year on record, Joe wants to learn why.

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World’s Largest Hydrogen Refueling Station Opens in Shanghai

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Mandla Maseko: Would-be African astronaut dies in road crash

Mandla Maseko, from South Africa, won a chance to become the first black African in space.

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2020 Audi R8 LMS GT2 Is A Raucous 630HP Race Car You Can Actually Buy

Audi has a new racing car that is built based on the street-legal R8 V10 car that you can use to cruise around Main Street. The car is called the R8 LMS GT2, and while it's a hard top, Audi …

19h

Robot uses machine learning to harvest lettuce

A vegetable-picking robot that uses machine learning to identify and harvest a commonplace, but challenging, agricultural crop has been developed by engineers.

20h

Good home learning in early years boosts your secondary school achievements

The positive effects of a rich home learning environment during a child's early years continue into adolescence and help improve test scores later in life, according to a new study published in School Effectiveness and School Improvement.

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Ancient life awakens amid thawing ice caps and permafrost

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What if Greenland Melted?

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Take the EarthEcho Water Challenge to Protect Local Waterways!

Take action with the EarthEcho Water Challenge to collect and share water quality data. Then, work to protect your local water resources. About the EarthEcho Water Challenge On March 22, this year’s EarthEcho Water Challenge kicked off, empowering young people and community members around the world to monitor and protect local water resources in their communities. Initiated in 2003 as the World Wa

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The U.S. Women’s Soccer Team’s Biggest Battle Is Yet to Be Won

There is only one appropriate reward for the U.S. Women’s National Team upon their return home as the winners of back-to-back World Cup championships: equal pay. If the U.S. Soccer Federation wants to win another, it has to stop underpaying its banner team. The USWNT is set to enter mediation with the Federation when they return from France, after bringing a gender-discrimination lawsuit in March

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Iran's Uranium Enrichment Breaks Nuclear Deal Limit. Here's What That Means

The move signals that Iran is losing patience with the 2015 agreement after the U.S. blocked the economic relief promised. (Image credit: Vahid Salemi/AP)

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