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nyheder2019juli10

'Oldest remains' outside Africa reset human migration clock

A 210,000-year-old skull has been identified as the earliest modern human remains found outside Africa, putting the clock back on mankind's arrival in Europe by more than 150,000 years, researchers said Wednesday.

1h

Mechanisms of RALF peptide perception by a heterotypic receptor complex

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1409-7 Mechanisms of RALF peptide perception by a heterotypic receptor complex

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Rekordgammelt kranie-fund ændrer menneskets historie: ‘Det er meget stort det her'

Et 210.000 år gammelt fossil kan gøre op med den idé, vi har om det moderne menneskes udviklingshistorie.

4h

Two Supermassive Black Holes Are on a Devastating Crash Course

Collision Course Two supermassive black holes, each 800 million times more massive than our sun, are on a cosmic collision course with each other. Thankfully, the two black holes are both about 2.5 billion light-years away from us here on Earth, according to research published in the journal The Astrophysical Journal Letters on Wednesday, so it will take that long for astronomers to detect the co

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How the mosquito immune system fights off the malaria parasite

A new study describes the way mosquito immune systems fight malaria parasites using various waves of resistance. The study could lay the groundwork for future research to combat the transmission of malaria, which sickens millions of people across the globe every year.

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New filter enhances robot vision on 6D pose estimation

Robots are good at making identical repetitive movements, such as a simple task on an assembly line. But they lack the ability to perceive objects as they move through an environment. A recent study has developed a filter to give robots greater spatial perception so they can manipulate objects and navigate through space more accurately.

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Robot-ants that can jump, communicate with each other and work together

A team of researchers has developed tiny 10-gram robots that are inspired by ants: they can communicate with each other, assign roles among themselves and complete complex tasks together. These reconfigurable robots are simple in structure, yet they can jump and crawl to explore uneven surfaces.

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Surging cases have dashed all hope that polio might be eradicated in 2019

Virus refuses to budge in Afganistan and Pakistan, while vaccine-derived strains trigger fresh outbreaks in Africa

6min

Brain-monitoring headbands could track your sleep as well as a sleep lab

Technology could reshape the way scientists diagnose sleep disorders

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Shingles vaccine safely prevents outbreaks among stem cell transplant patients

A newer form of shingles vaccine reduced outbreaks of the painful rash among patients who were transplanted with their own stem cells, according to a new study. The vaccine appears to offer protection from one of the most common and painful side effects of cell therapy and shows promise for patients with immune-compromising conditions.

18min

Are doctors treating more thyroid cancer patients than necessary?

New research may help change treatment practices for patients diagnosed with low risk thyroid cancer.

18min

New way to measure the stability of next-generation magnetic fusion devices

Scientists have discovered an alternative method for measuring the stability of fusion plasma, a critical task for researchers seeking to bring the fusion that powers the sun to Earth.

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Mussels are inspiring new technology that could help purify water and clean up oil spills

Mussels are notorious maritime stowaways known for damaging the hulls of boats, but these same adhesive properties have widespread engineering applications, scientists say. They suggest that the chemistry of mussel threads is inspiring engineering innovations that address a wide range of problems, from cleaning up oil spills to treating contaminated water.

18min

Puzzling on a quantum chessboard

Physicists are proposing a new model that could demonstrate the supremacy of quantum computers over classical supercomputers in solving optimization problems. They demonstrate that just a few quantum particles would be sufficient to solve the mathematically difficult N-queens problem in chess even for large chess boards.

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Unravelling the 3-dimensional genomic structure of male germ cells

A study has revealed the three-dimensional genomic structure of male germ cells and how this structure determines function. It represents a significant advance in our understanding of how the dynamics of insulator proteins and transcriptional activity are coupled during the 3D genome re-organization that takes place during the formation of male germ cells.

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Larger drug trials that intervene earlier needed for Alzheimer's disease

There are currently no drugs that stop or inhibit Alzheimer's disease. Despite drug trials showing plaque reduction in the brain, the patients' cognitive function did not improve. Would the results be different if it were possible to design studies that intervene much earlier on in the disease, before cognition is affected? This is what an international study has attempted to facilitate.

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How to discover new materials quickly

A lot hinges on new materials, including efficient energy conversion for environmentally friendly engines of the future. In the past and still today, chance plays a great role for the discovery of new materials, according to a researcher. He describes how the process of materials discovery could be accelerated by combining combinatorial materials science with computational methods.

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Mussels are inspiring new technology that could help purify water and clean up oil spills

Mussels are notorious maritime stowaways known for damaging the hulls of boats, but these same adhesive properties have widespread engineering applications, scientists say. They suggest that the chemistry of mussel threads is inspiring engineering innovations that address a wide range of problems, from cleaning up oil spills to treating contaminated water.

20min

On the way to printable organic light emitting diodes

OLEDs are used today in many electronic devices for display applications. Scientists have now developed a new design for these LEDs. They have reduced the number of different layers that make up an OLED to just one. In the future, this could allow light-emitting diodes that can be inkjet-printed. The first prototype of the developed diode can already compete with commercially available OLEDs in te

20min

How a popular antidepressant drug could rewire the brain

Prozac®, the trade name for the drug fluoxetine, was introduced to the US market for the treatment of depression in 1988. Thirty years later, scientists still don't know exactly how the medication exerts its mood-lifting effects. Now, researchers report that, in addition to the drug's known action on serotonin receptors, fluoxetine could rearrange nerve fibers in the hippocampus of mouse brains.

20min

The All New Raspberry Pi 4 Is the Best Version yet, and It’s Finally Here

Over the last seven years the Raspberry Pi has become hugely popular among tech enthusiasts. They’ve come up with all sorts of clever and innovative uses for the pocket-sized mini-PC. However, with the recent introduction of the all new and seriously beefed up Raspberry Pi 4 , this miniature computer is about to become more popular than ever. For those who don’t know the Raspberry Pi origin story

21min

How Cameron Boyce’s Epilepsy May Have Caused His Death at 20

The Disney Channel star’s family released a statement confirming his medical condition, which led to a fatal seizure over the weekend. In the U.S., about 2,600 people a year die from a disorder known as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.

27min

The Fed Chair Says Facebook's Libra Raises 'Serious Concerns'

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell is the latest regulator questioning Facebook's plan to launch a cryptocurrency.

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Can computer use, crafts and games slow or prevent age-related memory loss?

A new study has found that mentally stimulating activities like using a computer, playing games, crafting and participating in social activities are linked to a lower risk or delay of age-related memory loss called mild cognitive impairment, and that the timing and number of these activities may also play a role. The study is published in the July 10, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical

29min

Understanding how the mTOR complex comes together

Learning more about the mTOR complex and how it works is a stepping stone for others who might look for cancer therapies or ways to help treat diabetes and other diseases.

29min

A Rocket-Launching Plane, Nintendo Switch Lite, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

39min

Will your future computer be made using bacteria?

Graphene is a revolutionary nanomaterial, the discovery of which led to a Nobel Prize. By mixing graphite with bacteria, Rochester scientists are making graphene easier and more environmentally friendly to produce, paving the way for future products and applications.

43min

Maternal obesity linked to childhood cancer

New study analyzed 2 million birth records and 3,000 cancer registry records and found that children born to obese mothers were 57% more likely to develop cancer, independent of other factors. This finding offers a rare opportunity for childhood cancer prevention.

47min

On the way to printable organic light emitting diodes

OLEDs are used today in many electronic devices for display applications. Scientists have now developed a new design for these LEDs. They have reduced the number of different layers that make up an OLED to just one. In the future, this could allow light-emitting diodes that can be inkjet-printed. The first prototype of the developed diode can already compete with commercially available OLEDs in te

47min

Researchers determine bacteria structure responsible for traveler's diarrhea

For the first time researchers have deciphered the near-atomic structure of filaments, called 'pili', that extend from the surface of bacteria that cause traveler's diarrhea. Without pili, these bacteria do not cause disease. Knowing this structural information may lead to the development of new preventive therapies for the disease.

47min

Cycling success may hold key to free up fifth of agricultural land

Making minor changes to how food is produced, supplied and consumed around the world could free up around a fifth of agricultural land, research suggests.

47min

Awareness of product transformation increases recycling

A plastic bottle becomes a jacket, an aluminum can a bicycle. When consumers are reminded of the products that their recyclables can be turned into they are more likely to recycle, according to researchers.

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Auroral crackling sounds are related to the electromagnetic resonances of the Earth

A new study shows that the sounds generated at an altitude of 70 to 80 meters are the result of the activation of Schumann resonances.

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Heat, salt, drought: This barley can withstand the challenges of climate change

A new line of barley achieves good crop yields even under poor environmental conditions. It has been bred by crossing a common variety of barley with various types of wild barley. The researchers then planted the new lines of barley in five very different locations around the world, observed the growth of the plants and analyzed their genetic make-up.

47min

Pair of supermassive black holes discovered on a collision course

Astronomers have spotted a pair of supermassive black holes on a collision course in a galaxy 2.5 billion light-years away. Coincidentally, the pair will begin producing gravitational waves in roughly 2.5 billion years, the researchers estimate. The duo can be used to estimate how many supermassive black hole pairs are detectable in the nearby, present-day universe and when the historic first dete

47min

Holes in the Universe sharpen cosmic measurements

Regions of the Universe containing very few or no galaxies — known as voids — can help measure cosmic expansion with much greater precision than before, according to new research.

47min

Carbon nanotube tape stays sticky in extreme temperatures

In very hot or cold environments, conventional tape can lose its stickiness and leave behind an annoying residue. But while most people can avoid keeping taped items in a hot car or freezer, those living in extreme environments such as deserts and the Antarctic often can't avoid such conditions. Now, researchers say they have developed a new nanomaterial tape that can function over a wide temperat

47min

20 overlooked benefits of distributed solar energy

A study released today provides the most complete list yet of the advantages of solar energy — from carbon sequestration to improvements for pollinator habitat.

50min

Quantum sensor breakthrough using naturally occurring vibrations in artificial atoms

A team of scientists have discovered a new method that could be used to build quantum sensors with ultra-high precision.

50min

Instead of an Apology, Acosta Offers Epstein’s Victims Implicit Blame

Facing calls for his resignation, Labor Secretary Alex Acosta held a press conference today in Washington to address his handling of the 2007 case against Jeffrey Epstein , the billionaire sex offender. It didn’t go well. Acosta, then a U.S. attorney in Florida, oversaw a sweetheart deal for Epstein, which required him to register as a sex offender and sentenced him to 13 months in prison. Epstei

51min

A Timeline of Apollo's Journey to the Moon

Tracking the moments from when JFK declared the moonshot to "one giant leap to mankind"

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Expert: Future Robots Could Steal Your Children

Robot Babysitter Unlike the average parent, a robot is never tired. It’s never annoyed, or distracted, or impatient — and, according to author and AI ethics expert John C. Havens, that means bots might one day steal the right to raise children away from humans. “When it comes to roles that could be replaced by machines, the job of parenting is often not discussed,” Havens wrote in a fascinating n

57min

'Tree Man' Gets Pioneering Surgery for Rare Skin Condition

A man in Gaza with an extremely rare skin condition dubbed "tree man syndrome" says his life has been changed by a pioneering surgical treatment.

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#MeTooSTEM Founder BethAnn McLaughlin Has Left Vanderbilt

Her departure follows her denial of tenure.

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Loneliness heightened among gay men in certain age group in China

Gay men in China ages 25-29 are eight times more likely to feel criticized and rejected compared with men in that country ages 20 or younger, new research shows. The study is part of a recent effort among international public health researchers to develop a better understanding of the mental health of the LGBTQ community.

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When a Dominant Male Disappears, These Female Fish Change Sex

The blueheaded wrasse. (Credit: Leonardo Gonzalez/shutterstock) Sex transitions are commonplace for several species of fish, and that's consistently puzzling for scientists. How these changes …

1h

Food may have been scarce in ancient Chaco Canyon

Chaco Canyon, a site that was once central to the lives of precolonial peoples called Anasazi, may not have been able to produce enough food to sustain its estimated population numbers.

1h

How a popular antidepressant drug could rewire the brain

Prozac®, the trade name for the drug fluoxetine, was introduced to the US market for the treatment of depression in 1988. Thirty years later, scientists still don't know exactly how the medication exerts its mood-lifting effects. Now, researchers report that, in addition to the drug's known action on serotonin receptors, fluoxetine could rearrange nerve fibers in the hippocampus of mouse brains.

1h

Shared e-cargo bikes: Boom and barriers in Basel

Sustainable means of mobility are becoming ever more popular. In Switzerland, around 15,000 people have registered with the online platform carvelo2go, which hires out electric cargo bikes. The use of this sharing service in the Basel area is now the subject of scientific investigation. Despite strong growth in member numbers, there are still fundamental barriers. The study indicates ways that sha

1h

Unprecedented display of concern towards unknown monkey offers hope for endangered species

A wild group of endangered Barbary macaques have been observed, for the first time, 'consoling' and adopting an injured juvenile from a neighboring group.

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Bringing the blockchain into the physical world

A team of computer scientists have created the prototype BlocKit because blockchain — the decentralzed digital infrastructure that is used to organize the cryptocurrency Bitcoin and holds promise to revolutionize many other sectors from finance, supply-chain and healthcare — is so difficult for people to comprehend.

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The path to China's 'ecological civilization' starts with national parks

President Xi Jinping staked out China's role as a committed player to tackle the climate crisis and build an 'ecological civilization.' Researchers discuss one of the Chinese government's efforts — reforming the management of protected areas by streamlining agencies' responsibilities and reducing functional overlaps.

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Expert mathematicians stumped by simple subtractions

Mathematics is seen as the pinnacle of abstract thinking. But are we capable of filtering out our knowledge about the world to prevent it from interfering with our calculations? Researchers have demonstrated that our ability to solve mathematical problems is influenced by non-mathematical knowledge, which results in mistakes. The findings indicate that high-level mathematicians can be duped by som

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New terahertz sensors work at room temperature, unlike current technology

Researchers have developed an ultra-sensitive light-detecting system that could enable astronomers to view galaxies, stars and planetary systems in superb detail.

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Hawaii Telescope Project, Long Disputed, Approaches Construction

The governor is expected to announce that the Thirty Meter Telescope on Mauna Kea, bitterly opposed by local activists, will get underway.

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An Alternative Route to Anesthesia-Induced Anaphylaxis

A study in patients identifies a nontraditional immune pathway that can cause a severe reaction to anesthetic drugs.

1h

Terahertz technology escapes the cold

Scientists have achieved the first realization of a terahertz quantum cascade laser operating without cryogenic cooling. This feat heralds the widespread use of these devices in practical applications.

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Could vacuum physics be revealed by laser-driven microbubble?

Scientists have discovered a novel mechanism which they refer to as microbubble implosion (MBI) in 2018. In this study, the group confirmed that during MBI, an ultrahigh electrostatic field close to the Schwinger field could be achieved because micron-sized bubbles embedded in a solid hydride target implode to have nanometer-sized diameters upon ionization.

1h

20 overlooked benefits of distributed solar energy

A study released today provides the most complete list yet of the advantages of solar energy — from carbon sequestration to improvements for pollinator habitat.

1h

Pet tags link widely used flame retardant to hyperthyroidism in cats

Feline hyperthyroidism is the most common endocrine-related disease of older cats, and its prevalence has skyrocketed since the first case was diagnosed in 1979. At the same time, new household flame retardants were introduced, and recently, scientists have suspected a link. Now, researchers have associated hyperthyroidism with another class of flame retardants, using silicone pet tags similar to

1h

Quantum sensor breakthrough using naturally occurring vibrations in artificial atoms

A team of scientists have discovered a new method that could be used to build quantum sensors with ultra-high precision.

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Best male biathletes 'more attractive'

Top male biathletes are more attractive to the opposite sex, according to a new study.

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New evidence shows cytotoxic T cells can identify, invade, and destroy targets of large mass like Toxoplasma gondii tissue cysts

CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes can kill host cells infected with various microorganisms and single individual cancer cells through direct cell-to-cell contact, but their ability to destroy a target of large mass remains unexplored. A study provided novel evidence on the capability of the immune system to eliminate large parasite-filled cysts associated with chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection by uti

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Preeclampsia risk may be reduced by a healthy high-fiber diet

New research suggests that gut bacteria could have an impact on the outcome of pregnancies with a high plant-based fiber diet recommended.

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Flu fact sheet for parents increases vaccination rate in children

Parents given a handout with flu facts at their pediatrician's office were significantly more likely to get their kids vaccinated before the end of flu season, pediatricians have found.

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The Russian Orthodox Church May Stop Blessing Nuclear Weapons

Gesundheit? A faction of clergy within the Russian Orthodox Church wants to end the eyebrow-raising practice of blessing the country’s nuclear missiles. First of all, yes: Russian priests currently sprinkle holy water on nuclear missiles as part of an old tradition in which Orthodox priests bless soldiers and their weapons, reports Religion News Service . But that may change, as some priests feel

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Ped EM docs at risk for developing compassion fatigue, burnout, low compassion satisfaction

Pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) physicians are at risk for developing compassion fatigue (CF), burnout (BO), and low compassion satisfaction (CS), but proactive awareness of these phenomena and their predictors may allow providers to better manage the unique challenges and emotional stressors of the pediatric ED to enhance personal well-being and professional performance.

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Antibiotic stewardship intervention improves prescribing for acute respiratory infection

Antibiotic stewardship interventions for acute respiratory infection (ARI) is feasible and effective and can significantly reduce overuse in the emergency department (ED) and urgent care center (UCC) settings, potentially up to one-third.

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Robotic pancreas transplant offers hope for obese patients with Type 1 diabetes

Surgeons at UI Health have demonstrated that obese patients with Type 1 diabetes can safely receive a pancreas transplant when the surgery is performed robotically.

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Study contributes to the production of flexible electronic devices

Research conducted by Brazilian and Italian scientists ordered the structure of polythiophene to enhance the optical and electronic properties of this organic conductive polymer.

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When a Dominant Male Disappears, These Female Fish Change Sex

The blueheaded wrasse. (Credit: Leonardo Gonzalez/shutterstock) Sex transitions are commonplace for several species of fish, and that's consistently puzzling for scientists. How these changes occur on a genetic level is still not fully understood, but a new study published in the journal Science offers some insights. A team of researchers say they've found that social stressors may play a role in

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Why Do Babies Point? It Starts With Our Desire To Touch

(Credit: anetta/shutterstock) Anyone who’s hung out with babies knows how eager they are to communicate, even if they can’t do it very well. One way they do this is with the gesture of pointing, sticking out the index finger to indicate some object without touching it. Babies all over the world point in roughly the same way, starting at around 9 to 14 months. It’s a fundamental part of human inter

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Food may have been scarce in Chaco Canyon

Chaco Canyon, a site that was once central to the lives of pre-colonial peoples called Anasazi, may not have been able to produce enough food to sustain thousands of residents, according to new research. The results could shed doubt on estimates of how many people were able to live in the region year-round.

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Facebook is rumored to be developing VR versions of Assassin's Creed and Splinter Cell

Fans of Ubisoft's long-running stealth-oriented Splinter Cell franchise have found themselves disappointed by the lack of information or announcements regarding any future entries in the series. …

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What a deer-tooth necklace says about our Ice Age ancestors

Ice Age Europe, approximately 20,000-13,500 years ago; a period known as the Magdalenian. The climate is gradually ameliorating after glaciers and cold temperatures reached their height in the Last Glacial Maximum. Despite this, the landscape is frozen, arid and unforgiving for all who live within it. Dispersed and highly mobile hunter-gatherers populate this harsh environment. These Magdalenian

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New Orleans threatened by floods as big storm forms

The US city of New Orleans was under a storm-surge watch Wednesday along with a stretch of Louisiana coast as a tropical storm formed in the Gulf of Mexico, threatening the region with potentially life-threatening rains.

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Last ever VW Beetle model rolls off Mexican production line

German auto giant Volkswagen launched the final edition of its iconic "Beetle" car from its Mexican factory on Wednesday at a ceremony accompanied by a Mariachi band.

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Virgin Orbit conducts drop-test of rocket from Boeing 747

Virgin Galactic's sister company Virgin Orbit conducted a drop test of its air-launched satellite booster over California on Wednesday, a key step toward space missions.

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Virgin Just Dropped a Massive Rocket from a Gutted Jumbo Jet

LauncherOne Virgin Orbit — Virgin’s satellite launch subsidiary and Virgin Galactic spinoff — just dropped a 70-foot rocket from a modified Boeing 747 jumbo jet at 35,000 feet. The rocket plummeted down to Earth, as intended by the company, in the final major test for Virgin Orbit’s satellite launch system LauncherOne. The idea is to bring down the cost of launching satellites by flying them to h

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Food may have been scarce in Chaco Canyon

Chaco Canyon, a site that was once central to the lives of precolonial peoples called Anasazi, may not have been able to produce enough food to sustain its estimated population numbers.

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US central bank to study Facebook virtual currency

The US Federal Reserve has created a "working group" that is coordinating with government agencies and other central banks to consider the implications of Facebook's planned virtual currency Libra, chairman Jerome Powell said Wednesday.

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Dramatic warming projected in world's major cities by 2050

By the year 2050, London's climate will resemble Madrid's today; Paris will be more like Canberra; Stockholm like Budapest and Moscow like Sofia, according to a new analysis published Wednesday that relied on optimistic projections.

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Epic research endeavor reveals cause of deadly digestive disease in children

Medical researchers have solved the mystery of a rare inherited disease that caused extreme, and sometimes fatal, chronic diarrhea in children. Now, following an arduous investigative odyssey that expanded our understanding of regulatory sequences in the human genome, the multinational scientific group has announced the discovery of the genetic explanation for this disease.

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How does playing with other children affect toddlers' language learning?

Toddlers are surprisingly good at processing the speech of other young children, according to a new study. And toddlers who have more exposure to other children, such as those in daycare, may be particularly good at certain word learning skills.

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Terahertz technology escapes the cold

Scientists have achieved the first realization of a terahertz quantum cascade laser operating without cryogenic cooling. This feat heralds the widespread use of these devices in practical applications.

1h

How to capture waste heat energy with improved polymers

By one official estimate, American manufacturing, transportation, residential and commercial consumers use only about 40 percent of the energy they draw on, wasting 60 percent. Very often, this wasted energy escapes as heat, or thermal energy, from inefficient technology that fails to harvest that potential power.

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Research finds thicker pavement is more cost effective down the road

As the summer months heat up, so will the asphalt and other materials used to make roads. Pavements, which are vulnerable to increased temperatures and excessive flooding due to sea level rise, can crack and crumble. Climate change can be a major contributor and as greenhouse gas emissions continue, which scientists say have caused an increase in global temperatures since the mid-20th century, the

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New research helps managers and ship crews predict locations of blue whales so ships can maintain safe distances

A new model based on daily oceanographic data and the movements of tagged whales has opened the potential for stakeholders to see where in the ocean endangered blue whales are most likely to be so that ships can avoid hitting them.

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Thought AIs could never replace human imagination? Think again

Back in the 1980s, Hans Moravec, an AI scientist, discovered a paradox : What is easy for humans, such as visual or auditory understanding, is hard for machines. Things have changed since then. Today's AIs are much better at understanding what they see. It is not that AI has caught up with all of our human visual capabilities, but rather that the technology is developing in different ways. When w

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New research helps managers and ship crews predict locations of blue whales so ships can maintain safe distances

A new model based on daily oceanographic data and the movements of tagged whales has opened the potential for stakeholders to see where in the ocean endangered blue whales are most likely to be so that ships can avoid hitting them.

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How sounds, shapes, speech and body movements convey emotion through one shared property

Death metal band logos often have a spiky look while romance novel titles often have a swirly script. The jaggedness or curviness of a font can be used to express an emotional tone. A Dartmouth study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B finds that sounds, shapes, speech and body movements convey emotional arousal the same way across the senses. The findings explain why nearly anythi

2h

How to capture waste heat energy with improved polymers

By one official estimate, American manufacturing, transportation, residential and commercial consumers use only about 40 percent of the energy they draw on, wasting 60 percent. Often, this wasted energy escapes as heat, or thermal energy, from inefficient technology that fails to harvest that potential power. Now a team at UMass Amherst led by chemist Dhandapani Venkataraman reports in Nature Comm

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Photos of the 2019 Women’s World Cup Champions Victory Ticker-Tape Parade

After the U.S. women’s national soccer team defeated the Netherlands in France on Sunday, winning the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup for a record fourth time, the players received a hero’s welcome today. Tens of thousands of soccer fans lined New York City’s “Canyon of Heroes,” cheering for the team, throwing confetti from windows, and shouting “U.S.A.!” and “Equal pay!” Arriving at city hall, each

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This Drug, Underused in the U.S., May Help Make H.I.V. Very Rare in Australia

The most recent advance in Australia’s decades-long fight against the virus is the rapid adoption of a preventive drug regimen known as PrEP.

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Study: New cars are safer, but women most likely to suffer injury

Cars built in the last decade have been shown to be safer than older models, including in the most common types of crashes—frontal collisions. However, a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Virginia's Center for Applied Biomechanics shows that women wearing seat belts are significantly more likely to suffer injury than their male counterparts.

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Ultra-fast communication allows aquatic cells to release toxins in unison, researchers find

Crouching in the boot-sucking mud of the Baylands Nature Preserve in Palo Alto, Manu Prakash, associate professor of bioengineering at Stanford University, peered through his Foldscope—a $1.75 origami microscope of his own invention—scrutinizing the inhabitants of the marsh's brackish waters. With his eye trained on a large single-cell organism, called Spirostomum, he watched it do something that

2h

Study: Minimum wage 'an effective tool' for increasing incomes of older workers

A new paper co-written by a University of Illinois expert who studies labor economics says the minimum wage is an effective tool to increase the incomes of older workers who are at or near retirement and—contrary to the notion that higher minimum wages force earlier retirements—has no discernible "disemployment" effects.

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More than 25 million Android devices infected with 'Agent Smith' malware

According to a press release from security firm Check Point, once Agent Smith is active on the device, the malware looks for common apps and replaces them with malicious versions. The altered …

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Rymdsond ska läggas i vänteläge – i jakt på en ny komet

Om nio år vill ESA, Europeiska rymdorganisationen, få upp en rymdsond som ska parkeras i vänteläge – tills det dyker upp en komet från solsystemets yttersta utkanter. – Vi vill komma åt sådant som funnits där ute sedan solsystemet bildades för 4,5 miljarder år sedan och som inte varit nära solen, säger en av de deltagande svenska forskarna.

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Ultra-fast communication allows aquatic cells to release toxins in unison, researchers find

Crouching in the boot-sucking mud of the Baylands Nature Preserve in Palo Alto, Manu Prakash, associate professor of bioengineering at Stanford University, peered through his Foldscope—a $1.75 origami microscope of his own invention—scrutinizing the inhabitants of the marsh's brackish waters. With his eye trained on a large single-cell organism, called Spirostomum, he watched it do something that

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Japanese spacecraft to probe asteroid’s guts for first time

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02136-z Hayabusa2 prepares to collect material from inside asteroid Ryugu in finale manoeuvre.

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A Green Future is Possible for NYC Thanks to One Innovative Organization

As a part of their Explorer Series, Allianz is bringing a team of innovators to MoMA’s PS1 for a night full of urban sustainability solutions. You’ll have the chance to collaborate with experts and forge connections with your NYC neighbors who also believe that they can lead the charge in the sustainable revolution. One such New York City organization helping to achieve this is Green City Force.

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Our Moon Could Escape Earth’s Orbit and Become a “Ploonet”

Meet the Ploonets Our Moon might not always be the dedicated companion to Earth that it is now. An international team of researchers has proposed a hypothetical new type of world it calls a “ploonet”: a former moon that escaped its host planet’s orbit and began circling its host star instead. The team thinks ploonets could explain several unusual astronomical phenomena — and that our own Moon cou

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Researchers discover ice is sliding toward edges off Greenland Ice Sheet

Ice on the Greenland Ice Sheet doesn't just melt. The ice actually slides rapidly across its bed toward the ice sheet's edges. As a result, because ice motion is from sliding as opposed to ice deformation, ice is being moved to the high-melt marginal zones more rapidly than previously thought.

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Genetic breakthrough in cereal crops could help improve yields worldwide

A team of Clemson University scientists has achieved a breakthrough in the genetics of senescence in cereal crops with the potential to dramatically impact the future of food security in the era of climate change.

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Satellites analyzing developing gulf potential Tropical Cyclone Two

A massive complex of thunderstorms over the southeastern United States slid into the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and now has the potential to develop into a tropical cyclone. NOAA's National Hurricane Center or NHC in Miami, Florida issued the first advisory of Potential Tropical Cyclone Two and NOAA's GOES-East satellite and NASA's GPM satellite provided views of the storm.

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No more trial-and-error when choosing an electrolyte for metal-air batteries

Metal-air batteries have been pursued as a successor to lithium-ion batteries due to their exceptional gravimetric energy densities. They could potentially enable electric cars to travel a thousand miles or more on a single charge.

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Genetic breakthrough in cereal crops could help improve yields worldwide

A team of Clemson University scientists has achieved a breakthrough in the genetics of senescence in cereal crops with the potential to dramatically impact the future of food security in the era of climate change.

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Pre-ordering groceries could lead to healthier choices

Yeah, right. (Shutterstock.com/Davizro Photography/) I often toss items into my grocery cart that I have vowed to never buy again. Maybe I cave into my 3-year-old’s demands for sugary cereal and cookies. Or perhaps I fail to resist my own urge to snack on chocolate-covered raisins. I'm not alone. Most Americans consume more added sugar , saturated fat and sodium—and fewer servings of fruits and v

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Our species got to Europe 165,000 years earlier than we thought

The first modern humans were not supposed to have reached Europe until 45,000 years ago, but a skull from a Greek cave turns out to be 210,000 years old

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Theory explains ferromagnetic superconductor behavior

Researchers from France and Russia have offered a theoretical explanation for the behavior of a recently discovered material combining superconducting and ferromagnetic properties. The new theoretical model also predicts so far unobserved effects in materials of this kind. The study was published in Physical Review Letters.

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Modern Humans Failed in Early Attempt to Migrate Out of Africa, Old Skull Shows

A prehistoric, broken skull is revealing the secrets of ancient humans, divulging that early modern humans left Africa much earlier than previously thought, a new study finds.

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No more trial-and-error when choosing an electrolyte for metal-air batteries

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed a one-parameter measure that makes selecting the correct electrolyte for potassium-air batteries an exercise in rationality, rather than patience.

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Satellites analyzing developing gulf potential Tropical Cyclone Two

A massive complex of thunderstorms over the southeastern United States slid into the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and now has the potential to develop into a tropical cyclone. NOAA's National Hurricane Center or NHC in Miami, Florida issued the first advisory of Potential Tropical Cyclone Two and NOAA's GOES-East satellite and NASA's GPM satellite provided views of the storm.

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The oldest known Homo sapiens was Greek

The skull was dug up in the 1970s, but only now identified

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The Cultural Fault Lines of I Love You, Now Die

If you are having thoughts of suicide, please know that you are not alone. If you are in danger of acting on suicidal thoughts, call 911. For support and resources, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 or text 741-741 for the Crisis Text Line. Conrad Roy died by suicide in Massachusetts in 2014, after repeated attempts the 18-year-old had made to take his own life. Roy, w

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How primary care physicians can make Astana work

The Astana Declaration, adopted by the World Health Organization in October 2018, acknowledges the importance of primary health care to achieve better health outcomes globally. But how, the authors ask, can physicians make this declaration work?

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A new approach to primary care: Advanced team care with in-room support

In this special report, the authors argue that the current primary care team paradigm is underpowered, in that most of the administrative responsibility still falls mainly on the physician. Jobs not requiring a medical education, such as entering data into electronic health records, should not be handled by physicians and advanced practitioners.

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Nonphysician practitioners absorbing more new patient requests post Affordable Care Act

The advent of the Affordable Care Act has led to millions of new patients seeking primary care. Because the number of primary care physicians has remained stable, access to care has been a concern.

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Are physical examinations really necessary?

As technology has gained ground in medicine and critics have called into question the diagnostic accuracy of physical examinations, what place does the practice of the physical exam have in today's clinic?

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A structured approach to detecting and treating depression in primary care

A questionnaire-based management algorithm for major depressive disorder in primary care is feasible to implement, though attrition from treatment is high.

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Study: Minimum wage 'an effective tool' for increasing incomes of older workers

In an era of rising inequality and aging populations in the US, the effect of the minimum wage on the labor market for older workers is increasingly important, says new research from Mark Borgschulte, a professor of economics at Illinois.

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Caught in the middle: Family physicians discuss their role in the opioid crisis

Family physicians prescribe the greatest volume of opioids (22.9%) and number of prescriptions (31.2%) to individuals with chronic noncancer pain, making them targets for quality improvements in safer prescribing practices.

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Cleveland Clinic releases fourth installment of Alzheimer's Disease Drug Pipeline Report

Cleveland Clinic's fourth annual analysis of Alzheimer's disease drug development found that the pipeline has grown in the number and variety of agents being tested over the past year, while highlighting several advances in the field including new clinical trial designs, more detailed criteria for making a research diagnosis, and an increased use of biological tests reflecting of the disease.

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'Flash mob' study puts clinical decision rules for ACS to the test

A novel 'flash mob' study finds that, in emergency care, acute coronary syndrome cannot be safely ruled out using the Marburg Heart Score or the family physicians' clinical assessment.

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Authoritarians are less willing to make sacrifices for the environment

People who endorse authoritarian views and those who favour social hierarchies are less willing to act on climate change than others

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Babies point at objects because they really want to touch them

Infants across the world begin pointing with their index finger between 9 and 14 months of age – perhaps because of an urge to touch objects beyond their reach

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Bluehead wrasse fish switch from female to male in just 20 days

Hundreds of fish can change sex, but only now have we discovered exactly how at least one makes this change

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World’s top personality test doesn’t really work – should we ditch it?

The 'Big Five' model of personality is widely used, but it turns out it doesn't work for people in low- and middle-income countries, or even just older people in the West

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An #Instaworthy Deal: Reformation, the Fashion Brand, Sells a Majority Stake

Permira’s acquisition of the eco-friendly label underscores a recent shift by private equity firms from high-end to contemporary fashion.

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Impossible Foods Is Trying to Make Fake Fish Now

Fishy Smell Impossible Foods, the meatless meat company behind the plant-based Impossible Burger you’ve probably seen at trendy gastropubs, is moving into the fake fish market. The company is reworking its recipe for plant-based beef to recreate a fishy flavor and texture, according to The New York Times . The move makes Impossible Foods the latest to enter the race to develop convincing and tast

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Many still uninsured after Affordable Care Act Implementation

In community health centers in Medicaid expansion states, among established patients who were uninsured prior to the Affordable Care Act, many remained uninsured after implementation of the Obama-era law.

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Researchers discover ice is sliding toward edges off Greenland Ice Sheet

They found that ice slides over the bedrock much more than previous theories predicted of how ice on the Greenland Ice Sheet moves.

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Redesign of opioid medication management shows impact in rural clinics

In rural practice, a system redesign resulted in declines in the proportion of patients on high dose opioids and the number of patients receiving opioids.

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Metformin could lower risk of dementia in African Americans with type 2 diabetes

A large observational cohort study examining male veterans aged over 50 years with type 2 diabetes found that metformin use was associated with a significantly lower risk of dementia in African American patients.

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Diabetes patients experiencing empathy from PCPs have lower risk of mortality

A United Kingdom study designed to examine the association between primary care practitioner empathy and incidence of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality among type 2 diabetes patients found that those patients experiencing greater empathy in the year following their diagnosis saw beneficial long-term clinical outcomes.

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Genetic breakthrough in cereal crops could help improve yields worldwide

A team of Clemson University scientists has achieved a breakthrough in the genetics of senescence in cereal crops with the potential to dramatically impact the future of food security in the era of climate change.

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Jump test tool to predict athletic performance

Researchers studying the impact of fatigue on athletic performance have developed prototype software that can enable coaches to predict when elite athletes will be too fatigued to perform at their best.

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New antibody treatment provides little relief for high-frequency migraine patients

An early assessment reveals that the newly approved antibody treatment Erenumbab does not seem effective among patients who suffer from high-frequency migraines.

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Anaphylactic shock: IgG antibodies and neutrophils play an unexpected role

Teams from the Institut Pasteur, Inserm, the Paris Public Hospital Network (AP-HP), the CNRS, Paris-Sud University and Sorbonne University have successfully identified a new pathological mechanism responsible for the unexplained cases of anaphylactic shock, involving neutrophils activated by antibodies of the IgG class. These findings, published on July 10, 2019 in the journal Science Translationa

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Anaphylactic shock: IgG antibodies and neutrophils play an unexpected role

Anaphylactic shock is sometimes caused by the use of drugs during surgery. In most of these extreme reactions, evidence shows that patients have anti-drug antibodies of the IgE class. Teams from the Institut Pasteur, Inserm, the AP-HP, CNRS, Paris-Sud University and Sorbonne University have successfully identified a new pathological mechanism responsible for these previously unexplained cases, inv

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In cases when patients under anesthesia experience anaphylaxis, hyperactive immune…

A study of 86 patients reveals how drugs used for anesthesia can induce life-threatening anaphylaxis (a dangerous type of allergic reaction) through an alternative immune pathway.

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Surveys fail to capture big five personality traits in non-WEIRD populations

Questions commonly used to explore the "Big Five" personality traits–Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism–generally fail to measure the intended personality traits in developing countries, according to a new study. This is because measurement of these traits relies on surveys typically applied to White Educated

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Puzzling brain disease could now be better diagnosed, treated

Scientists have developed an animal model that may provide a path toward improving the diagnosis and treatment of the devastating brain disease chronicled in the bestselling autobiography 'Brain on Fire.' The book, along with a 2017 movie by the same name, traces newspaper reporter Susannah Cahalan's harrowing descent into the throes of the disease.

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A moderate dose of novel form of stress promotes longevity

A newly described form of stress called chromatin architectural defect, or chromatin stress, triggers in cells a response that leads to a longer life.

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Secrets of a sex-changing fish revealed

We may take it for granted that the sex of an animal is established at birth and doesn't change. However, about 500 species of fish change sex in adulthood, often in response to environmental cues. How these fish change sex has, until now, been a mystery.

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Caterpillars turn anti-predator defense against sticky toxic plants

A moth caterpillar has evolved to use acids, usually sprayed at predators as a deterrent, to disarm the defenses of their food plants, according to a study publishing July 10, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Dussourd from the University of Central Arkansas and colleagues.

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New Zealand study unlocks secrets of sex change in fish

A University of Otago-led study is heralding advances in our understanding of one of the most startling transformations in the natural world — the complete reversal of sex that occurs in about 500 species of fish.

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YouTube says copyright claims must be more specific – CNET

Those crying foul over intellectual property must now provide a time stamp to point out where in a video the alleged infringement occurs.

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Scottish girl is world's youngest deep brain stimulation patient

Two-year-old has had brain surgery to treat spasms, raising hopes for other children A two year-old girl from Glasgow has become the youngest person in the world to undergo brain surgery that doctors say could help limit severe disability among children afflicted by uncontrollable body movements. Viktoria Kaftanikaite was just 32 months old when she had deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat a con

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Trump’s Tweets Take Down Another Career

No one who has to deal with President Donald Trump can long survive his wrath once he feels he’s been wronged. Rex Tillerson might still be secretary of state had press reports not revealed in October 2017 that he had privately called Trump a “moron.” Five months later, Tillerson was gone (having not jumped at Trump’s proposal that they square off in an IQ test ). Jeff Sessions made the fatal err

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GP38-targeting monoclonal antibodies protect adult mice against lethal Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus infection

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is an important human pathogen. Limited evidence suggests that antibodies can protect humans against lethal CCHFV disease but the protective efficacy of antibodies has never been evaluated in adult animal models. Here, we used adult mice to investigate the protection provided against CCHFV infection by glycoprotein-targeting neutralizing and non-neutr

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Temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition governed by aggregate protection and microbial communities

Temperature sensitivity ( Q 10 ) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is a crucial parameter for predicting the fate of soil carbon (C) under global warming. However, our understanding of its regulatory mechanisms remains inadequate, which constrains its accurate parameterization in Earth system models and induces large uncertainties in predicting terrestrial C-climate feedback. Here, we co

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Accessing neuroinflammation sites: Monocyte/neutrophil-mediated drug delivery for cerebral ischemia

Cerebral ischemia (CI) results from inadequate blood flow to the brain. The difficulty of delivering therapeutic molecules to lesions resulting from CI hinders the effective treatment of this disease. The inflammatory response following CI offers a unique opportunity for drug delivery to the ischemic brain and targeted cells because of the recruitment of leukocytes to the stroke core and penumbra

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Cellular response to moderate chromatin architectural defects promotes longevity

Changes in chromatin organization occur during aging. Overexpression of histones partially alleviates these changes and promotes longevity. We report that deletion of the histone H3-H4 minor locus HHT1-HHF1 extended the replicative life span of Saccharomyces cerevisiae . This longevity effect was mediated through TOR signaling inhibition. We present evidence for evolutionarily conserved transcrip

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The origin of pointing: Evidence for the touch hypothesis

Pointing gestures play a foundational role in human language, but up to now, we have not known where these gestures come from. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that pointing originates in touch. We found, first, that when pointing at a target, children and adults oriented their fingers not as though trying to create an "arrow" that picks out the target but instead as though they were aiming t

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Control of TLR7-mediated type I IFN signaling in pDCs through CXCR4 engagement–A new target for lupus treatment

Type I interferons are highly potent cytokines essential for self-protection against tumors and infections. Deregulations of type I interferon signaling are associated with multiple diseases that require novel therapeutic options. Here, we identified the small molecule, IT1t, a previously described CXCR4 ligand, as a highly potent inhibitor of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7)–mediated inflammation. IT

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Molecular basis of tRNA recognition by the Elongator complex

The highly conserved Elongator complex modifies transfer RNAs (tRNAs) in their wobble base position, thereby regulating protein synthesis and ensuring proteome stability. The precise mechanisms of tRNA recognition and its modification reaction remain elusive. Here, we show cryo–electron microscopy structures of the catalytic subcomplex of Elongator and its tRNA-bound state at resolutions of 3.3 a

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Imaging striatal dopamine release using a nongenetically encoded near infrared fluorescent catecholamine nanosensor

Neuromodulation plays a critical role in brain function in both health and disease, and new tools that capture neuromodulation with high spatial and temporal resolution are needed. Here, we introduce a synthetic catecholamine nanosensor with fluorescent emission in the near infrared range (1000–1300 nm), near infrared catecholamine nanosensor (nIRCat). We demonstrate that nIRCats can be used to m

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Nerve injury drives a heightened state of vigilance and neuropathic sensitization in Drosophila

Injury can lead to devastating and often untreatable chronic pain. While acute pain perception (nociception) evolved more than 500 million years ago, virtually nothing is known about the molecular origin of chronic pain. Here we provide the first evidence that nerve injury leads to chronic neuropathic sensitization in insects. Mechanistically, peripheral nerve injury triggers a loss of central in

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Mutant CEBPA directly drives the expression of the targetable tumor-promoting factor CD73 in AML

The key myeloid transcription factor (TF), CEBPA, is frequently mutated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but the direct molecular effects of this leukemic driver mutation remain elusive. To investigate CEBPA mutant AML, we performed microscale, in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and identified a set of aberrantly activated enhancers, exclusively occupied by the leukemia-associated C

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Charge-switchable polymeric complex for glucose-responsive insulin delivery in mice and pigs

Glucose-responsive insulin delivery systems with robust responsiveness that has been validated in animal models, especially in large animal models, remain elusive. Here, we exploit a new strategy to form a micro-sized complex between a charge-switchable polymer with a glucose-sensing moiety and insulin driven by electrostatic interaction. Both high insulin loading efficiency (95%) and loading cap

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Challenges to capture the big five personality traits in non-WEIRD populations

Can personality traits be measured and interpreted reliably across the world? While the use of Big Five personality measures is increasingly common across social sciences, their validity outside of western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic (WEIRD) populations is unclear. Adopting a comprehensive psychometric approach to analyze 29 face-to-face surveys from 94,751 respondents in 23 l

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The somatosensory cortex receives information about motor output

During voluntary movement, the somatosensory system not only passively receives signals from the external world but also actively processes them via interactions with the motor system. However, it is still unclear how and what information the somatosensory system receives during movement. Using simultaneous recordings of activities of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1), the motor cortex (MCx),

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Sliding dominates slow-flowing margin regions, Greenland Ice Sheet

On the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), ice flow due to deformation and sliding across the bed delivers ice to lower-elevation marginal regions where it can melt. We measured the two mechanisms of motion using a three-dimensional array of 212 tilt sensors installed within a network of boreholes drilled to the bed in the ablation zone of GrIS. Unexpectedly, sliding completely dominates ice motion all w

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The NIH Common Fund/Roadmap Epigenomics Program: Successes of a comprehensive consortium

The NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program was launched to deliver reference epigenomic data from human tissues and cells, develop tools and methods for analyzing the epigenome, discover novel epigenetic marks, develop methods to manipulate the epigenome, and determine epigenetic contributions to diverse human diseases. Here, we comment on the outcomes from this program: the scientific contributions mad

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Stress, novel sex genes, and epigenetic reprogramming orchestrate socially controlled sex change

Bluehead wrasses undergo dramatic, socially cued female-to-male sex change. We apply transcriptomic and methylome approaches in this wild coral reef fish to identify the primary trigger and subsequent molecular cascade of gonadal metamorphosis. Our data suggest that the environmental stimulus is exerted via the stress axis and that repression of the aromatase gene (encoding the enzyme converting

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Mechanical spectroscopy of insect swarms

Social animals routinely form groups, which are thought to display emergent, collective behavior. This hypothesis suggests that animal groups should have properties at the group scale that are not directly linked to the individuals, much as bulk materials have properties distinct from those of their constituent atoms. Materials are often probed by measuring their response to controlled perturbati

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Secrets of a sex-changing fish revealed

We may take it for granted that the sex of an animal is established at birth and doesn't change.

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Caterpillars turn anti-predator defense against sticky toxic plants

A moth caterpillar has evolved to use acids, usually sprayed at predators as a deterrent, to disarm the defenses of their food plants, according to a study publishing July 10 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Dussourd from the University of Central Arkansas and colleagues.

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Global heating: London to have climate similar to Barcelona by 2050

Nearly 80% of cities to undergo dramatic and potentially disastrous changes, study finds London will have a similar climate in three decades’ time to that of Barcelona today, according to research – but if that seems enticing, a warning: the change could be accompanied by severe drought. Madrid will feel like present-day Marrakech by 2050, and Stockholm like Budapest, according to a report on the

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The oldest known modern human in Europe

Skull from a Greek cave is at least 210,000 years old. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Major insurer plans to drop coverage for coal companies

Chubb Ltd., which operates in the U.S., plans to no longer underwrite construction of new coal-fired power plants and to stop investing in companies that generate significant revenue from coal. Insurance companies have to cover losses from natural disasters, which are increasing in frequency and intensity as a result of climate change. Climate change could also cause individual insurance premiums

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How Swarming Insects Act Like Fluids

Starlings take to the sky in swirling vortices; ants teem like rivers. “They stretch, they move around, but they retain cohesion in a way you’d expect from a fluid moving,” said Nicholas Ouellette , a physicist at Stanford University. That’s why to him, it isn’t far-fetched to think about collective animal behavior in the language of fluid mechanics, or to analyze groups of organisms much as an e

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Sweden Passes Law For National Research Misconduct Agency

After several high-profile cases, the country's government is creating a board to oversee and investigate all serious allegations of scientific misconduct.

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London’s climate will feel like Barcelona by 2050, study says

Cities in Northern latitudes forecast seeing biggest shifts in extreme temperatures

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Study confirms disparities in triple-negative breast cancer diagnoses

Previous US studies have found racial disparities in triple-negative breast cancer diagnoses, but few have looked beyond the scope of one state. To conduct a larger study, researchers in the Georgia State University School of Public Health analyzed all breast cancer cases diagnosed during 2010-14 from the United States Cancer Statistics database, a surveillance system of cancer registries with dat

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Nuclear physics in search of world artifacts

NUST MISIS scientists together with the colleagues from PN Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics Lomonosov Moscow State University and Dagestan State University have published the first results of a 'scan' obtained by the method of muon radiography of the underground space in the Derbent fortress of

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Giving nanowires a DNA-like twist

Argonne National Laboratory played a critical role in the discovery of a DNA-like twisted crystal structure created with a germanium sulfide nanowire, also known as a 'van der Waals material.' Researchers can tailor these nanowires in many different ways — twist periods from two to twenty micrometers, lengths up to hundreds of micrometers, and radial dimensions from several hundred nanometers to

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Pointing originates from touch

Study sheds new light on how babies start to communicate. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Secrets of a sex-changing fish revealed

We may take it for granted that the sex of an animal is established at birth and doesn't change.

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Caterpillars turn anti-predator defense against sticky toxic plants

A moth caterpillar has evolved to use acids, usually sprayed at predators as a deterrent, to disarm the defenses of their food plants, according to a study publishing July 10 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Dussourd from the University of Central Arkansas and colleagues.

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Alzheimer's: Cell mechanism removes defective protein

Buildup of defective tau protein is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Now, scientists have identified a molecule that helps clear it from brain cells.

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Striped Maples Can Change Sex Repeatedly

Unassuming tree has unusual sex life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Skull shows our species got to Europe 165,000 earlier than we thought

The first modern humans were not supposed to have reached Europe until 45,000 years ago, but a skull from a Greek cave turns out to be 210,000 years old

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Washington Changed. British Diplomacy Failed to Keep Pace.

When I first moved to Washington, D.C., I couldn’t get the special relationship out of my head. I kept thinking of Margaret Thatcher in the Rose Garden, and the smile of Tony Blair. I was utterly sure I’d get special attention here, with everything I knew about Westminster, simply because I was British. But a few years living in this town, watching American eyes glaze over the moment I mentioned

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Amazon is co-developing a 'Lord of the Rings' game

Lord of the Rings fans have been patiently waiting for the long-promised Amazon series. While we still don't know when the show will debut or who will star in it, Amazon has more …

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Cells synchronize to release toxins in unison

Observations of cellular life in a local marsh lead researchers to the discovery of a new type of intercellular communication.

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Study: New cars are safer, but women most likely to suffer injury

UVA's Center for Applied Biomechanics finds that seat-belted females are more vulnerable to injury in front-end car crashes than males.

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'Traffic light' food labels reduce calories purchased in hospital cafeteria

A new study by Massachusetts General Hospital shows that labeling food choices in a hospital cafeteria with simple 'traffic-light' symbols indicating their relative health value was associated with a reduction in calories purchased by employees.

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New research helps predict locations of blue whales so ships can avoid them

A new model based on daily oceanographic data and the movements of tagged whales has opened the potential for stakeholders to see where in the ocean endangered blue whales are most likely to be so that ships can avoid hitting them.

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Sloppy sea urchins

Marine scientists discover an important, overlooked role sea urchins play in the kelp forest ecosystem.

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July/August 2019 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheet

Annals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines.

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Don't Waste Your Emotions on Plants, They Have No Feelings, Grumpy Scientists Say

You can talk to your plants — but they won't care.

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Both fish and humans have REM-like sleep

Sleeping zebrafish have brain and body activity similar to snoozing mammals, suggesting that sleep evolved at least 450 million years ago.

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Apidima Skull Is Earliest Homo Sapiens Outside Africa, Say Researchers

The skull fragment known as Apidima 1 (right) is about 210,000 years old, according to a new analysis. Seen from the rear (middle) and side (left) in a reconstruction, the partial skull's rounded shape shares a unique feature of modern humans. (Credit: Katerina Harvati, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen) A scrap of skullcap collected in 1978 and stored for decades in an Athens museum may rewri

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We Can't Just Plant Billions of Trees to Stop Climate Change

Planting trees, while beneficial to the planet, is not an easy solution to climate change. (Credit: Janelle Lugge/Shutterstock) Last week, a new study in the journal Science highlighted the role forests could play in tackling climate change. Researchers estimated that by restoring forests to their maximum potential, we could cut down atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) by 25 percent — a move that wou

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Free up space on your laptop by moving all your files to the cloud

Your computer won't actually be lighter if you store stuff in the cloud, but it might feel that way. (Christin Hume via Unsplash/) Disk space is always at a premium—especially as we amass more and more photos each year—so take every opportunity to free up as much as you can. All the popular cloud storage services now let you free up local storage on your computer while keeping your files safely s

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The Guardian view on the climate emergency: a dangerous paralysis | Editorial

The closer the prospect of disaster becomes, the less the government manages to do The difference between speed limits and speed cameras is that speed cameras work. They arouse fear and frustration, but they are in the end obeyed. Speed limits, on the other hand, are generally treated as moralistic exhortations which no one ought to take literally. The distinction between exhortation and enforceme

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Picking up Branson’s rocketing carbon bill | Letters

Virgin Galactic | Headlines | Women’s tennis | Saw joke | Bull run | Izal I was surprised to find no mention in your report ( Floating into space: Branson reveals plans to list Virgin Galactic on stock exchange , 10 July) of the environmental costs of using a huge aircraft and a rocket ship to give super-rich clients a few minutes in space. How many hard-working families do we need to persuade to

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High-Tide Flooding On The Rise, Especially Along The East Coast, Forecasters Warn

As sea levels rise, coastal flooding that used to happen only during storms is increasingly occurring on sunny days. That has local officials reconsidering everything from zoning to police budgets. (Image credit: Wilfredo Lee/AP)

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New Mom First in US to Give Birth Using Deceased Donor’s Uterus

Two of a Kind A Brazilian baby born in 2017 is no longer the only child born from a transplanted uterus doctors harvested from a deceased donor. Last month, a woman at the Cleveland Clinic delivered the second baby brought to term using the same cutting-edge method — signaling that it could help others achieve their dreams of becoming parents in the future. Healthy and Happy The woman received he

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A Skull Bone Discovered in Greece May Alter the Story of Human Prehistory

The bone, found in a cave, is the oldest modern human fossil ever discovered in Europe. It hints that humans began leaving Africa far earlier than once thought.

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Keeping a cell's powerhouse in shape

A German-Swiss team around Professor Oliver Daumke from the MDC has investigated how a protein of the dynamin family deforms the inner mitochondrial membrane. The results, which also shed light on a hereditary disease of the optic nerve, have been published in Nature.

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UNH research finds thicker pavement is more cost effective down the road

Pavements, which are vulnerable to increased temperatures and excessive flooding due to sea level rise, can crack and crumble. Climate change can be a major contributor and as greenhouse gas emissions continue these issues are projected to accelerate. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire say because of this one of the best ways to extend the life cycle of roads, and keep future costs dow

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A human liver cell atlas

The cellular composition of the liver is incompletely understood. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Immunobiology and Epigenetics have created a comprehensive map of all cell types in the healthy human liver using a method named single-cell RNA sequencing. They discovered new subpopulations of liver cell types and demonstrated the usefulness of their human liver cell atlas as a resource

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Repair of aged tissue can be enhanced by inhibiting signals from neighboring cells

Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered how regenerative capacity of intestinal epithelium declines when we age. Targeting of an enzyme that inhibits stem cell maintaining signaling rejuvenates the regenerative potential of an aged intestine. This finding may open ways to alleviate age-related gastrointestinal problems, reduce side-effects of cancer treatments, and reduce healthc

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Robot-ants that can jump, communicate with each other and work together

A team of EPFL researchers has developed tiny 10-gram robots that are inspired by ants: they can communicate with each other, assign roles among themselves and complete complex tasks together. These reconfigurable robots are simple in structure, yet they can jump and crawl to explore uneven surfaces. The researchers have just published their work in Nature.

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Origin of life insight: peptides can form without amino acids

Peptides, one of the fundamental building blocks of life, can be formed from the primitive precursors of amino acids under conditions similar to those expected on the primordial Earth, finds a new UCL study published in Nature.

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Neural sleep patterns emerged at least 450 million years ago, Stanford researchers find

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that neural signatures in sleeping zebrafish are analogous to those of humans, suggesting that the brain activity evolved at least 450 million years ago, before any creatures crawled out of the ocean.

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Designer proteins form wires and lattices on mineral surface

This research is a fundamental discovery of how to engineer proteins onto non-biological surfaces. Artificial proteins engineered from scratch have been assembled into nanorod arrays, designer filaments and honeycomb lattices on the surface of mica, demonstrating control over the way proteins interact with surfaces to form complex structures previously seen only in natural protein systems. This st

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Modeling early meteorite impacts on the moon

A detailed reconstruction of meteorite impacts resolves a longstanding problem and gives new insight into how the moon formed.

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Earliest modern human found outside Africa

Researchers have found the earliest example of our species outside Africa.

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Engineers develop chip that converts wasted heat to usable energy

Mechanical engineers have discovered a way to produce more electricity from heat than thought possible by creating a silicon chip, also known as a 'device,' that converts more thermal radiation into electricity. This could lead to devices such as laptop computers and cellphones with much longer battery life and solar panels that are much more efficient at converting radiant heat to energy.

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New potential target in glioblastoma

Researchers are hopeful that new strategies could emerge for slowing the growth and recurrence of the most common primary brain cancer in adults, glioblastoma, based on the results of a new study.

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A $100 Breathalyzer Can Tell if You’re Sneaking Carbs

Counting Carbs A new breathalyzer called the Keyto can help health enthusiasts stick to the trendy ketogenic diet, which foregoes carbs to burn off stores of fat. The breathalyzer picks up on different compounds found in the gut when digesting fat instead of carbs, most notably acetone, according to Business Insider . Then it gives users a score ranging from “not in ketosis” to “deep ketosis” — o

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Can you tell me some hard to believe facts/ easy to believe lies about AI?

Hey, im preparing a workshop for kids 14-18 about AI. I thought i would be a nice starter too give them little cards with true and false facts about the current status of AI research, which they have to sort. I would appriciate your help with collecting those hard to believe facts and also some false statements which you assume could be easily believed. Thanks a lot in advance and please share yo

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Robots Have a Hard Time Grasping These "Adversarial Objects"

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Origin of life insight: peptides can form without amino acids

Peptides, one of the fundamental building blocks of life, can be formed from the primitive precursors of amino acids under conditions similar to those expected on the primordial Earth, finds a new UCL study.

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Designer proteins form wires and lattices on mineral surface

The goal of the research, published July 11 in the journal Nature, was to engineer artificial proteins to self-assemble on a crystal surface by creating an exact match between the pattern of amino acids in the protein and the atoms of the crystal. The ability to program these interactions could enable the design of new biomimetic materials with customized colors, chemical reactivity or mechanical

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The Story of Humans and Neanderthals in Europe Is Being Rewritten

In 1978, in a cave called Apidima at the southern end of Greece, a group of anthropologists found a pair of human-like skulls. One had a face, but was badly distorted; the other was just the left half of a braincase. Researchers guessed that they might be Neanderthals, or perhaps another ancient hominin. And since they were entombed together, in a block of stone no bigger than a microwave, “it wa

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'Oldest remains' outside Africa reset human migration clock

A 210,000-year-old skull has been identified as the earliest modern human remains found outside Africa, putting the clock back on mankind's arrival in Europe by more than 150,000 years, researchers …

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m6A enhances the phase separation potential of mRNA

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1374-1 The cytosolic N6-methyladenosine (m6A)-binding proteins YTHDF1, YTHDF2 and YTHDF3 undergo liquid–liquid phase separation in vitro and in cells; this is enhanced by polymethylated mRNAs to form complexes that partition into different cellular phase-separated compartments.

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A deep dive into the development of sea squirts

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01967-0 An analysis of gene expression in sea-squirt embryos at different stages of development deepens our understanding of how the body plans of vertebrates might have evolved from those of less complex animals.

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Collective intercellular communication through ultra-fast hydrodynamic trigger waves

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1387-9 Ultra-fast hydrodynamic communication between cells emerges in colonies of Spirostomum ambiguum through the generation of long-ranged vortex flows that are sensed by neighbouring cells, leading to propagating trigger waves that coordinate the release of toxins.

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Podcast: The Moon, past, present, and future

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02135-0 Nick Howe talks to reporter Alex Witze about the history and future of Moon exploration.

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From discoveries in ageing research to therapeutics for healthy ageing

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1365-2 The milestones that mark the advances in ageing research, the medical, commercial and societal implications of ageing and the different ageing pathways and processes that are associated with ageing are discussed.

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Cell communication in the blink of an eye

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02069-7 The bodies of unicellular organisms called protists can contract extremely fast. Analysis reveals that the flow of surrounding fluid during contraction triggers a chain reaction of contraction of neighbouring protists.

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Structure and assembly of the mitochondrial membrane remodelling GTPase Mgm1

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1372-3 Crystal and electron cryo-tomography structures of Mgm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum reveal that Mgm1 forms bent tetramers, which further assemble into helical filaments on both positively and negatively curved membranes.

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Tumour lineage shapes BRCA-mediated phenotypes

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1382-1 Analysis of more than 17,000 tumours suggests that the contribution of germline and somatic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to oncogenesis depends on tumour lineage.

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Designing minimal and scalable insect-inspired multi-locomotion millirobots

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1388-8 A ten-gram insect-inspired robot capable of crawling, walking, jumping, somersaulting and performing collective tasks is built from low-cost, assembly-free components, demonstrating its scalability for collective applications with expanded mobility.

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Reconstructing the late-accretion history of the Moon

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1359-0 Lunar impact simulations find an impactor-retention ratio three times lower than previously thought and indicate that highly siderophile element retention began 4.35 billion years ago, resolving accretion mass discrepancies between Earth and the Moon.

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A human liver cell atlas reveals heterogeneity and epithelial progenitors

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1373-2 Single-cell RNA sequencing of cells from healthy human liver, hepatocellular carcinoma and chimaeric mouse liver identifies subtypes of liver cells, epithelial progenitors and differences between healthy and diseased cells.

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Controlling protein assembly on inorganic crystals through designed protein interfaces

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1361-6 The controlled design of arrays of carboxylates geometrically matched to a potassium ion sublattice leads to the formation of extended self-assembled protein structures on mica.

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Planar perovskite solar cells with long-term stability using ionic liquid additives

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1357-2 Addition of an ionic liquid, BMIMBF4, to metal halide perovskite solar cells improves their efficiency and long-term operation under accelerated aging conditions of high temperature and full-spectrum sunlight.

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Comprehensive single-cell transcriptome lineages of a proto-vertebrate

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1385-y Comprehensive single-cell transcriptomes in the proto-vertebrate Ciona intestinalis identified provisional gene networks for 41 different neural subtypes, providing insights into the swimming circuit of tadpoles and the evolution of the vertebrate telencephalon.

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Notum produced by Paneth cells attenuates regeneration of aged intestinal epithelium

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1383-0 Ageing-associated decline in intestinal stem cell function is mediated by increased Notum, a protein inhibitor of stemness-maintaining Wnt signalling, which is secreted by Paneth cells.

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scSLAM-seq reveals core features of transcription dynamics in single cells

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1369-y A technique known as scSLAM-seq that combines single-cell RNA sequencing with metabolic RNA labelling and nucleoside conversion is used to study the onset of cytomegalovirus infection in single mouse fibroblasts.

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Peptide ligation by chemoselective aminonitrile coupling in water

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1371-4 Prebiotic peptide formation is achieved through chemoselective, high-yielding ligation of α-aminonitriles in water, showing selectivity for α-peptide coupling and tolerance of all proteinogenic amino acid residues.

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An early dispersal of modern humans from Africa to Greece

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02075-9 Analysis of two fossils from a Greek cave has shed light on early hominins in Eurasia. One fossil is the earliest known specimen of Homo sapiens found outside Africa; the other is a Neanderthal who lived 40,000 years later.

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Apidima Cave fossils provide earliest evidence of Homo sapiens in Eurasia

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1376-z Detailed comparative analyses of two fossil crania from Apidima Cave, Greece, indicate that two late Middle Pleistocene human groups were present at this site; first an early Homo sapiens population followed by a Neanderthal population.

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Low retention of impact material by the Moon

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02066-w Simulations demonstrate that the Moon’s ability to retain material from striking impactors is lower than was previously assumed. This finding helps to explain the scarcity of precious metals in the Moon relative to Earth.

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Neural signatures of sleep in zebrafish

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1336-7 Fluorescence-based polysomnography in zebrafish reveals two major sleep signatures that share features with those of amniotes, which suggests that common neural sleep signatures emerged in the vertebrate brain over 450 million years ago.

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How to 'lock' heat in place using quantum mechanics

In a global first, scientists have demonstrated that heat energy can be manipulated by utilizing the quantum mechanical principle of anti-parity-time symmetry. Using this method, they were able to control the flow of heat in a material.

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Best healthy eating nudges

In a meta-analysis of real-life experiments drawn from food science, nutrition, health economics, marketing and psychology, the authors find that behavioral nudges — facilitating action rather than providing knowledge or inducing feelings — can reduce daily energy intake by up to 209 kcal, the same number of calories as in 21 cubes of sugar.

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Safety concerns: Herbal supplement used to treat addiction and pain

The herb kratom is increasingly being used to manage pain and treat opioid addiction, but new research suggests that it is not safe to use as an herbal supplement.

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Paris Agreement does not rule out ice-free Arctic

A research team reveals a considerable chance for an ice-free Arctic Ocean at global warming limits stipulated in the Paris Agreement.

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Microrobots to change the way we work with cellular material

Scientists have developed a system in which moving patterns of light are used to control the activity of microrobots, which are programmed to 'scoop up' mammalian cells so that they can be isolated and evaluated independently.

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On the way to nanotheranostics: Diagnosing and treating diseases simultaneously

Nanotheranostics is a cutting-edge field of medicine that uses nanoparticles to simultaneously diagnose and treat diseases. Chemical engineers have now developed a novel nanotheranostic system that uses tunable light to activate or image nanoparticles, thus opening a new path for the field.

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Neural sleep patterns emerged at least 450 million years ago, researchers find

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that neural signatures in sleeping zebrafish are analogous to those of humans, suggesting that the brain activity evolved at least 450 million years ago, before any creatures crawled out of the ocean.

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HSE scholars propose new method for measuring individual well-being

Researchers at HSE University have applied an emotion recognition method to measure the subjective well-being of individuals. Their initial tests were carried out with football fans, by measuring their emotional state. It turned out that, on average, uncertainty about a match result can increase the probability of unhappiness by 13.6%. The results of this study were published in the Journal of Hap

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Shingles vaccine safely prevents outbreaks among stem cell transplant patients

A newer form of shingles vaccine reduced outbreaks of the painful rash among patients who were transplanted with their own stem cells, according to a study led by a Duke Health researcher and published today in JAMA. The vaccine appears to offer protection from one of the most common and painful side effects of cell therapy and shows promise for patients with immune-compromising conditions.

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New filter enhances robot vision on 6D pose estimation

Robots are good at making identical repetitive movements, such as a simple task on an assembly line. But they lack the ability to perceive objects as they move through an environment. A recent study was conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, NVIDIA, the University of Washington, and Stanford University, developed a filter to give robots greater spatial percepti

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In UK's third largest city intervention program helps reduce childhood obesity

Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions, and continues to rise globally, particularly for children living in poverty. But Leeds, England has seen a significant fall in obesity, particularly among the city's poorest and most disadvantaged children. The decline coincides with a strategy introduced in 2009 which aimed to tackle the obesity epidemic. At its heart was HENRY, an intervention

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Study shows early arrival of modern humans in Europe

Homo sapiens skull discovered in Greek cave is 210,000 years old

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Origin of life insight: peptides can form without amino acids

Peptides, one of the fundamental building blocks of life, can be formed from the primitive precursors of amino acids under conditions similar to those expected on the primordial Earth, finds a new UCL study.

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Neural sleep patterns emerged at least 450 million years ago, researchers find

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that neural signatures in sleeping zebrafish are analogous to those of humans, suggesting that the brain activity evolved at least 450 million years ago, before any creatures crawled out of the ocean.

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Designer proteins form wires and lattices on mineral surface

The goal of the research, published July 11 in the journal Nature, was to engineer artificial proteins to self-assemble on a crystal surface by creating an exact match between the pattern of amino acids in the protein and the atoms of the crystal. The ability to program these interactions could enable the design of new biomimetic materials with customized colors, chemical reactivity or mechanical

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Modeling early meteorite impacts on the moon

As our solar system was forming nearly four and a half billion years ago, a planet-sized object struck the early Earth, leading to the formation of the moon, possibly from a hot, spinning cloud of rock vapor called a synestia. But after the Earth and moon had condensed from the vapor, there was another phase of growth as meteorites crashed into both bodies.

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Piece of skull found in Greece ‘is oldest human fossil outside Africa’

Remains discovered on Mani peninsula could rewrite history of Homo sapiens in Eurasia A broken skull chiselled from a lump of rock in a cave in Greece is the oldest modern human fossil ever found outside Africa, researchers claim. The partial skull was discovered in the Apidima cave on the Mani peninsula of the southern Peloponnese and has been dated to be at least 210,000 years old. Continue rea

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Is 'Race Science' Making A Comeback?

We talked to Angela Saini, author of the new book Superior: The Return of Race Science, about how race isn't real (but you know … still is) and how race science crept its way into the 21st century. (Image credit: Henrietta Garden)

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A Greek skull may belong to the oldest human found outside of Africa

Humans possibly reached southeastern Europe by 210,000 years ago.

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Why Tom Steyer Changed His Mind on Running for President

Tom Steyer’s surprise entry this week into the Democratic primary has confused and annoyed many professional Democrats, with the party desperate to start winnowing the field and focus its resources on running against President Donald Trump and winning back the Senate. Republicans, meanwhile, have greeted Steyer with glee, convinced that he’s going to make sure the primary race becomes a self-defe

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Virgin Orbit Just Dropped a Rocket From a Boeing 747

Richard Branson's air-launch system is getting very close to opening for business after successfully completing one of its last big tests.

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Plants inspire waterproof ‘nanoflower’ for medical uses

Inspired by natural designs, researchers have developed an innovative way to make a surface superhydrophobic to benefit the biomedical field. Plant leaves have a natural superpower—they’re designed with water repelling characteristics. Called a superhydrophobic surface, this trait allows leaves to cleanse themselves from dust particles. Researchers in Akhilesh K. Gaharwar’s lab in the biomedical

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The Gut Microbiome Can Be a Boon or a Bane for Cardiovascular Health

Researchers seek to untangle the biological mechanisms linking resident microbes to our hearts—and to harness them therapeutically.

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How the mosquito immune system fights off the malaria parasite

A new study describes the way mosquito immune systems fight malaria parasites using various waves of resistance. The study could lay the groundwork for future research to combat the transmission of malaria, which sickens millions of people across the globe every year.

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Impaired learning linked to family history of Alzheimer's

Adults with a first-degree relative with Alzheimer's disease perform more poorly on online paired-learning tasks than adults without such a family history, and this impairment appears to be exacerbated by having diabetes or a genetic variation in the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene linked to the disease.

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The Zika epidemic in Cuba, reflected by imported cases in Barcelona

Travelers returning to Barcelona mirrored the 2017 Zika outbreak in Cuba, according to a study led by the Hospital Clínic of Barcelona and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health, an institution supported by 'la Caixa'.

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Study finds subclinical cardiovascular disease associated with higher fall risk

A new study out of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) identifies new factors that contribute to falls among seniors, pointing towards interventions that may help prevent them.

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Researchers identify cancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin have identified, for the first time in oesophageal cancer, the cancer killing capability of a lesser-known type of immune cell, presenting a new potential therapeutic target.

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Discovered: A new way to measure the stability of next-generation magnetic fusion devices

Scientists seeking to bring to Earth the fusion that powers the sun and stars must control the hot, charged plasma—the state of matter composed of free-floating electrons and atomic nuclei, or ions—that fuels fusion reactions. For scientists who confine the plasma in magnetic fields, a key task calls for mapping the shape of the fields, a process known as measuring the equilibrium, or stability, o

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Exoplanet evolution: Astronomers expand cosmic 'cheat sheet'

Cornell astronomers have reached into nature's color palette from early Earth to create a cosmic "cheat sheet" for looking at distant worlds. By correlating tints and hues, researchers aim to understand where discovered exoplanets may reasonably fall along their own evolutionary spectrum.

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The 10 Presidential Candidates Who Support Busing

In the two weeks since Senator Kamala Harris of California delivered a pointed attack on former Vice President Joe Biden over his past criticism of federally mandated school busing, it’s become clear that the two Democratic candidates don’t differ all that much in their views: They both support voluntary busing, but seem hesitant to endorse it as a federal mandate. But at least 10 2020 Democratic

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Boris Johnson’s Pivot: Goodbye EU, Hello U.S.

The British national story goes like this: Here is the country whose empire once spanned the globe, and whose plucky citizens stood up to the Nazis—several years before the United States deigned to get involved in the Second World War. That mythology has been hugely useful to supporters of Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union. Freed from the shackles of the EU, these Brexiteers argue, the

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Using artificial intelligence to detect discrimination

A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool for detecting unfair discrimination—such as on the basis of race or gender—has been created by researchers at Penn State and Columbia University.

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Small Temperature Bumps Can Cause Big Arctic Methane Burps

Warming can encourage the growth of microbes in permafrost that produce more greenhouse gases — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Daily briefing: ‘Ploonets’ are moons that escape their planets and start to orbit their stars

Nature, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02138-x Ploonets could explain some of the mysteries already observed in exoplanet systems, the Apollo Moon landing was nearly a joint US–Soviet mission and legal action to fight climate change is on the rise.

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Socrates' Critique of 21st-Century Neuroscience

The ancient thinker saw limits to what natural science can tell us about ourselves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Van der Waals negative capacitance transistors

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10738-4 The adaptation to atomically thin 2D semiconductors and van der Waals layered ferroelectrics can enable negative capacitance transistors with superior performance and bendability. Here, the authors report flexible negative capacitance transistors based on MoS2 and a ferroelectric dielectric CIPS with a minimum s

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Use cases, best practice and reporting standards for metabolomics in regulatory toxicology

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10900-y Lack of best practice guidelines currently limits the application of metabolomics in the regulatory sciences. Here, the MEtabolomics standaRds Initiative in Toxicology (MERIT) proposes methods and reporting standards for several important applications of metabolomics in regulatory toxicology.

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Ion buffering and interface charge enable high performance electronics with organic electrochemical transistors

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11073-4 The rationale design of optimized organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) for next-generation bioelectronics requires further exploration of the underlying device physics. Here, the authors report the role of ionic-electronic charge interactions on OECTs and high-performance unipolar inverters.

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Integrating biomedical research and electronic health records to create knowledge-based biologically meaningful machine-readable embeddings

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11069-0 The Scalable Precision Medicine Oriented Knowledge Engine (SPOKE) is a heterogeneous knowledge network that integrates information from 29 public databases. Here, Nelson et al. extend SPOKE to embed clinical data from electronic health records to create medically meaningful barcodes for each medical variable.

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Decreased maternal serum acetate and impaired fetal thymic and regulatory T cell development in preeclampsia

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10703-1 Maternal immunological dysregulation might affect the immunological development of the fetus. Here the authors show that decreased maternal acetate is associated with preeclampsia, impaired fetal thymic output and regulatory T cell development.

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Probing the Unruh effect with an accelerated extended system

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10962-y The Unruh effect is a seminal result which illustrates the relative character of the particle concept in QFT, but its validity for extended systems is debated. Here, the authors show how a uniformly accelerated extended system of two coupled spins will evolve to a Gibbs thermal state at the Unruh temperature.

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Author Correction: Sema7A/PlxnCl signaling triggers activity-dependent olfactory synapse formation

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11055-6 Author Correction: Sema7A/PlxnCl signaling triggers activity-dependent olfactory synapse formation

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Paternal-age-related de novo mutations and risk for five disorders

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11039-6 Advanced paternal age associates with increased risk for psychiatric and developmental disorders in offspring. Here, Taylor et al. utilize parent-child trio exome sequencing data sets to estimate the contribution of paternal age-related de novo mutations to multiple disorders, including heart disease and schizop

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This Sunken Nuclear Sub Is Leaking Radiation Into the Ocean

Sunken Measures A team of Russian and Norwegian scientists just made a grim, timely discovery. Just one week after a nuclear-powered Russian submarine caught fire , killing 14 sailors, researchers sent a remote submarine to collect samples around the sunken wreckage of another nuclear sub, which caught fire in 1989 leading to the deaths of 42 crew members. The preliminary results of their investi

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Astronomers expand cosmic 'cheat sheet' in hunt for life

Using nature's color palette from early Earth, Cornell University astronomers have created a cosmic 'cheat sheet' in order to understand where discovered exoplanets may fall along their own evolutionary spectrum.

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Getting to zero malaria cases in zanzibar

New research led by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs, Ifakara Health Institute and the Zanzibar Malaria Elimination Program suggests that a better understanding of human behavior at night — when malaria mosquitoes are biting — could be key to preventing lingering cases.

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Discovered: A new way to measure the stability of next-generation magnetic fusion devices

Feature reports discovery of an alternative method for measuring the stability of fusion plasma, a critical task for researchers seeking to bring the fusion that powers the sun to Earth.

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Using artificial intelligence to detect discrimination

A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool for detecting unfair discrimination — such as on the basis of race or gender — has been created by researchers at Penn State and Columbia University.

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Study finds ACOs need a balance of PCPs and specialists to best reduce health care costs

Accountable care organizations (ACOs), the health care delivery model created by the Affordable Care Act in an effort to reduce Medicare costs while improving coordination and quality of care, typically rely on primary care providers (PCPs) to steer the boat.

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AT&T becomes first major wireless company to automatically block spam calls

AT&T will automatically block fraudulent calls for all customers for free. This makes it the first major US carrier to enable the free service for all customers after a June FCC ruling that …

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Forget Tesla – China’s BYD is driving the electric car revolution

Shifting to electric vehicles is an essential part of tackling climate change and China is doing far better than the West

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Nintendo Switch Lite: Release Date, Price, Specs

The new version of the hit handheld console is $100 cheaper and more portable, but it strips out some of the Switch's trademark features.

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California, an island? Meet cartography's most persistent mistake

California was born a fiction: named after a made-up island the name of which could be translated as 'caliphate'. For centuries, California was a cartographic fiction as well: it was shown as an island until as late as 1865. Over 40 years, Glen McLaughlin dug up more than 700 maps of California as an island – the world's biggest collection on cartography's most persistent mistake. A nameless peni

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Toxic caterpillars spark Dutch health scare

Millions of tiny caterpillars that shoot toxic hairs have triggered a health scare in the Netherlands, with hundreds of people seeking medical help for symptoms including severe skin irritation and asthma attacks.

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India Is Launching a Moon Mission This Weekend

Chandrayaan-2 India is getting ready to launch its first-ever lunar lander on Sunday. As part of the Chandrayaan-2 mission, the lander will be riding on top of the country’s most powerful rocket, the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mark III. The plan is to both launch an orbiter module and a 56-pound mobile rover from a 1.4 ton landing craft called Vikram. India successfully completed its

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Canada's Bombardier lays off 550 workers

The Canadian group Bombardier announced Wednesday it will lay off 550 employees from its Thunder Bay, Ontario plant, cutting the site's workforce in half.

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'A floodier future': Scientists say records will be broken

The federal government is warning Americans to brace for a "floodier" future.

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Ukraine inaugurates giant dome over destroyed Chernobyl reactor

Ukraine and its European partners on Wednesday formally inaugurated a new metal dome encasing the destroyed reactor at the infamous Chernobyl plant, wrapping up a two-decade effort.

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Two U.K. Hospitals Allow Vape Shops in Bid to Promote Smoking Ban

Although e-cigarettes have met with criticism in the United States, public health officials in Britain have embraced their use as effective for people who want to quit smoking.

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Armstrong review – moon landing doc gets lost in space

This retelling of the Neil Armstrong story has been eclipsed by superior studies of his historic lunar mission This Neil Armstrong documentary feels like unrequired viewing coming so soon after two cracking moon landing movies: Damien Chazelle’s First Man , a character study correcting the myth of Armstrong as a surly recluse, and Apollo 11 , the thrilling documentary made with colour footage of

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The weirdest things we learned this week: Nazis ate camel poop and pregnancy tests spread a fungal plague

Yikes. (DepositPhotos/) What's the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you'll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci's hit podcast . The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week hits Apple , Anchor , and everywhere else you listen to podcasts every Wednesday morning. It's your new favorite source for the strangest science-adjacent facts, figures, and Wiki

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Socrates' Critique of 21st-Century Neuroscience

The ancient thinker saw limits to what natural science can tell us about ourselves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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As Visa Difficulties Persist, Scientists Push for Change

Individual researchers and science societies are finding solutions so colleagues around the globe can attend conferences, from remote presentations to relocating conferences.

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Socrates' Critique of 21st-Century Neuroscience

The ancient thinker saw limits to what natural science can tell us about ourselves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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On the way to printable organic light emitting diodes

Organic light-emitting diodes are components that no longer consist of compounds containing the semiconducting material gallium, but of so-called organic compounds in which carbon is a main component. Compared to conventional light-emitting diodes, however, the luminosity and lifetime of OLEDs is currently lower, which is why they represent a current field of research.

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Cycling success may hold key to free up fifth of agricultural land

Making minor changes to how food is produced, supplied and consumed around the world could free up around a fifth of agricultural land, research suggests.

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The Reason Anxious People Often Have Allergies

A few years ago, Maya Nanda began noticing a strange pattern among her patients. A pediatric allergist at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center at the time, Nanda treated children who had reactions to everything from pollen to pets, and she realized that kids with severe allergies also seemed to have higher rates of anxiety and depression. These young patients seemed anxious when they wer

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Russia is Planning to 3D Print a Moon Base

Printing Shelter Russian space agency Roscosmos has confirmed that it’s planning to 3D print structures on the surface of the Moon. The plan is to use on-site material such as lunar regolith, the rocky material that covers the Moon’s surface. A Roscosmos spokesperson told Russian news agency TASS that Russia’s moon program will see “the launch of construction of large-scale structures with the us

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Cycling success may hold key to free up fifth of agricultural land

Making minor changes to how food is produced, supplied and consumed around the world could free up around a fifth of agricultural land, research suggests.

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Researchers determine bacteria structure responsible for traveler's diarrhea

For the first time researchers have deciphered the near-atomic structure of filaments, called 'pili', that extend from the surface of bacteria that cause traveler's diarrhea. Without pili, these bacteria do not cause disease. Knowing this structural information may lead to the development of new preventive therapies for the disease.

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Are doctors treating more thyroid cancer patients than necessary?

New research may help change treatment practices for patients diagnosed with low risk thyroid cancer.

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How a popular antidepressant drug could rewire the brain

Prozac®, the trade name for the drug fluoxetine, was introduced to the US market for the treatment of depression in 1988. Thirty years later, scientists still don't know exactly how the medication exerts its mood-lifting effects. Now, researchers report that, in addition to the drug's known action on serotonin receptors, fluoxetine could rearrange nerve fibers in the hippocampus of mouse brains. T

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Holes in the universe sharpen cosmic measurements

Regions of the universe containing very few or no galaxies — known as voids — can help measure cosmic expansion with much greater precision than before, according to new research.

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Chemical makers oppose new tariffs

In June, chemical manufacturers converged on Washington, D.C., to urge the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) to remove certain chemicals from a new list of tariffs proposed by the Trump administration. The additional taxes on $300 billion of Chinese goods could hurt U.S. chemical companies' competitiveness, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news

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Carbon nanotube tape stays sticky in extreme temperatures

In very hot or cold environments, conventional tape can lose its stickiness and leave behind an annoying residue. But while most people can avoid keeping taped items in a hot car or freezer, those living in extreme environments such as deserts and the Antarctic often can't avoid such conditions. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' journal Nano Letters say they have developed a new nanomaterial tape

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Heat, salt, drought: This barley can withstand the challenges of climate change

Research for the benefit of food security: A new line of barley achieves good crop yields even under poor environmental conditions. It has been bred by a research team from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), which crossed a common variety with various types of wild barley. The researchers then planted the new lines of barley in five very different locations around the world, observed

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Solving problems on a quantum chessboard

Physicists at the University of Innsbruck are proposing a new model that could demonstrate the supremacy of quantum computers over classical supercomputers in solving optimization problems. In a recent paper, they demonstrate that just a few quantum particles would be sufficient to solve the mathematically difficult N-queens problem in chess even for large chess boards.

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Heat, salt, drought: This barley can withstand the challenges of climate change

Research for the benefit of food security: A new line of barley achieves good crop yields even under poor environmental conditions. It has been bred by a research team from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), which crossed a common variety with various types of wild barley. The researchers then planted the new lines of barley in five very different locations around the world, observed

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Shorter proton therapy can safely treat prostate cancer

Treating prostate cancer with higher doses of proton therapy over a shorter amount of time leads to similar outcomes when compared to standard dose levels and treatments—and it’s safe for patients, according to a new study. Researchers examined data on non-metastatic prostate cancer patients treated with 28 doses of proton therapy instead of the standard 44 and found that the rates of cancer cont

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Engineers Build “Adversarial Objects” to Confuse Grabby Robots

D20 Robots are getting pretty good at interacting with the world, whether they’re carrying a coffee mug or mixing a cocktail . But that’s because mugs, shakers, and other things robots are good at grasping and carrying were built with ergonomics in mind — when it comes to more bizarrely-shaped objects, robots still tend to fumble. That’s why scientists at UC Berkeley are building what they call “

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Apollo 11 moon mission drew space-related companies to Central Florida

On May 25, 1961, President John F. Kennedy announced that the U.S. would land astronauts on the moon "before the decade is out."

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A Reporter's View of the Apollo Missions: White Fire and a Pillar of Sun

A Reporter's View of the Apollo Missions: White Fire and a Pillar of Sun How you cover a trip to the moon and share the news with the world. JS_topNteaser.jpg A pool of reporters, including Joel Shurkin, interview the Apollo 11 crew on July 14, 1969. The astronauts are in quarantine before the launch and speak to the reporters by closed circuit TV. Image credits: David Chudwin Rights information:

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Awareness of product transformation increases recycling

A plastic bottle becomes a jacket, an aluminum can a bicycle. When consumers are reminded of the products that their recyclables can be turned into they are more likely to recycle, according to researchers at Penn State and Boston College.

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Surgeon Transfers Nerves to Let Paralyzed Patients Use Hands

Previously Paralyzed Natasha van Zyl has dramatically improved the lives of 13 people — by moving their nerves around . Prior to going under the Australian surgeon’s knife, all four of each patients’ limbs were paralyzed due to a recent sporting or traffic accident. Using a technique known as nerve transfer, van Zyl restored the patients’ ability to extend their elbows and grasp and pinch with th

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Carbon nanotube tape stays sticky in extreme temperatures

In very hot or cold environments, conventional tape can lose its stickiness and leave behind an annoying residue. But while most people can avoid keeping taped items in a hot car or freezer, those living in extreme environments such as deserts and the Antarctic often can't avoid such conditions. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' journal Nano Letters say they have developed a new nanomaterial tape

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On the way to printable organic light emitting diodes

OLEDs are used today in many electronic devices for display applications. Scientists at the Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research have now developed a new design for these LEDs. They have reduced the number of different layers that make up an OLED to just one. In the future, this could allow light-emitting diodes that can be inkjet-printed. The first prototype of the developed diode can alread

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Maternal obesity linked to childhood cancer

New study analyzed 2 million birth records and 3,000 cancer registry records and found that children born to obese mothers were 57% more likely to develop cancer, independent of other factors. This finding offers a rare opportunity for childhood cancer prevention.

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Awareness of product transformation increases recycling

A plastic bottle becomes a jacket, an aluminum can a bicycle. When consumers are reminded of the products that their recyclables can be turned into they are more likely to recycle, according to researchers at Penn State and Boston College.

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Yale-developed scorecard promotes better clinical trial data sharing

A tool developed by researchers at Yale, Stanford, and Bioethics International can promote greater sharing of clinical trial data by pharmaceutical companies. While nearly one-third of the companies that the researchers assessed met standards for sharing data, others could be more transparent to the benefit of science and the public, the researchers said.

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Unprecedented display of concern towards unknown monkey offers hope for endangered species

A wild group of endangered Barbary macaques have been observed, for the first time, 'consoling' and adopting an injured juvenile from a neighboring group. The observations by a scientist from Oxford University and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (ifaw) are published today in the journal Primates.

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Evaluating risk of death, complications in patients with heart failure after ambulatory, noncardiac

Veterans Affairs data for 355,121 patients undergoing ambulatory, elective, noncardiac surgery were used to compare the risk of death and complications in patients with and without heart failure.

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Is elevated systolic blood pressure associated with risk for valvular heart disease?

A group of 329,237 men and women of white Bristish ancestry with genetic data in the UK Biobank and blood pressure measurements were included in a study that examined the association between systolic blood pressure and risk of major valvular heart disease.

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Did food labeling help hospital employees make healthier cafeteria choices?

This observational study of nearly 5,700 hospital employees who used the workplace cafeteria reports on whether food placement and traffic light labeling (green for healthy, yellow for less healthy and red for least healthy) was associated with a reduction in calories in the food purchased by employees.

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Study examined short-term treatment of internet, computer game addiction

This randomized clinical trial of 143 men tested a short-term treatment for internet and computer game addiction.

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Arts & Medicine: Video, articles look back at 1978 novel 'The House of God'

The 1978 novel 'The House of God' is a fictional account of the internship experience of Samuel Shem, the pen name of Stephen Bergman, at Beth Israel Hospital in 1973-1974. Funny, angry, honest, and absurd, the book spotlighted the injustices of medical training and the patient care of that era and was pilloried by establishment medicine for years after publication for its razor-sharp version of t

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Mussels are inspiring new technology that could help purify water and clean up oil spills

Mussels are notorious maritime stowaways known for damaging the hulls of boats, but these same adhesive properties have widespread engineering applications, scientists in China and the United states write in review published July 10 in the journal Matter. They suggest that the chemistry of mussel threads is inspiring engineering innovations that address a wide range of problems, from cleaning up o

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The path to China's 'ecological civilization' starts with national parks

President Xi Jinping staked out China's role as a committed player to tackle the climate crisis and build an 'ecological civilization.' In a review published July 10 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, researchers discuss one of the Chinese government's efforts — reforming the management of protected areas by streamlining agencies' responsibilities and reducing functional overlaps.

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AI can teach doctors to spot signs of cancer-causing viruses

AI can spot previously unknown signs of cancer-related viruses in tissue samples, and can teach doctors to look for these patterns themselves

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Earth's helium is running out and it has dire consequences for science

Helium's essential for party balloons, but also for MRI scanners, physics experiments and space rockets. But supplies on Earth are getting dangerously low, warns Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

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Pair of supermassive black holes discovered on a collision course

Astronomers have spotted a distant pair of titanic black holes headed for a collision.

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Engineers develop chip that converts wasted heat to usable energy

It's estimated that as much as two-thirds of energy consumed in the U.S. each year is wasted as heat. Take for example, car engines, laptop computers, cell phones, even refrigerators, that heat up with overuse.

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Chimp champ Jane Goodall enlists advanced mapping technology for nature and humanity

In groundbreaking research beginning nearly 60 years ago, Jane Goodall has devoted her life to understanding our closest relatives, chimpanzees.

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Trump Proposes Ways to Improve Care for Kidney Disease

The administration set ambitious goals to move people out of traditional dialysis and to encourage more organ transplants.

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3D Printing Is Finally Ready For Its Close-Up

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Are dinosaur fossils ‘minerals’? The Montana Supreme Court will decide high stakes case

Paleontologists are closely watching lawsuit over ownership of "dueling dinosaurs"

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Chimp champ Jane Goodall enlists advanced mapping technology for nature and humanity

In groundbreaking research beginning nearly 60 years ago, Jane Goodall has devoted her life to understanding our closest relatives, chimpanzees.

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Where is ocean biodiversity most at risk?

New research provides an overview of where ocean biodiversity is most at risk, and how that compares with protected areas. The results present the first comprehensive map of risks to biodiversity in the ocean. Roughly 1 million plant and animal species face extinction, according to a multinational study by a United Nations-backed panel. But where are these species concentrated, and which regions

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How to discover new materials quickly

A lot hinges on new materials -including efficient energy conversion for environmentally friendly engines of the future. In the past and still today, chance plays a great role for the discovery of new materials, according to Professor Alfred Ludwig, Chair of 'Materials Discovery and Interfaces' at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB). He describes how the process of materials discovery could be accelerat

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Larger drug trials that intervene earlier needed for Alzheimer's disease

There are currently no drugs that stop or inhibit Alzheimer's disease. Despite drug trials showing plaque reduction in the brain, the patients' cognitive function did not improve. Would the results be different if it were possible to design studies that intervene much earlier on in the disease, before cognition is affected? This is what an international study, led by Lund University in Sweden, has

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Attitude towards new educational standards in Russia shows conflicting opinions

'The objective was to find out how ready the teachers are to implement the expected changes. That is, do they understand what is required of them, are they motivated to implement the federal educational standard, do they have the necessary resources, etc.,' explains the author.

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Unravelling the 3-dimensional genomic structure of male germ cells

A study led by the UAB and the CNAG-CRG reveals the three-dimensional genomic structure of male germ cells and how this structure determines their function. Published in Cell Reports, it represents a significant advance in our understanding of how the dynamics of insulator proteins and transcriptional activity are coupled during the 3D genome re-organisation that takes place during the formation o

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Psychotherapy may help with gaming addiction

German study takes a new approach to dealing with a modern disease. Paul Biegler reports.

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The path to China's 'ecological civilization' starts with national parks

President Xi Jinping staked out China's role as a committed player to tackle the climate crisis and build an "ecological civilization." In a review published July 10 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, researchers discuss one of the Chinese government's efforts—reforming the management of protected areas by streamlining agencies' responsibilities and reducing functional overlaps.

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Mussels are inspiring new technology that could help purify water and clean up oil spills

Mussels are notorious maritime stowaways known for damaging the hulls of boats, but these same adhesive properties have widespread engineering applications, scientists in China and the United states write in review published July 10 in the journal Matter. They suggest that the chemistry of mussel threads is inspiring engineering innovations that address a wide range of problems, from cleaning up o

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Cleaning up oil spills with mussel power

Researchers are finding widespread applications for novel chemistry. Mark Bruer reports.

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The path to China's 'ecological civilization' starts with national parks

President Xi Jinping staked out China's role as a committed player to tackle the climate crisis and build an "ecological civilization." In a review published July 10 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, researchers discuss one of the Chinese government's efforts—reforming the management of protected areas by streamlining agencies' responsibilities and reducing functional overlaps.

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Origami robots that reshape and transform themselves | Jamie Paik

Taking design cues from origami, robotician Jamie Paik and her team created "robogamis": folding robots made out super-thin materials that can reshape and transform themselves. In this talk and tech demo, Paik shows how robogamis could adapt to achieve a variety of tasks on earth (or in space) and demonstrates how they roll, jump, catapult like a slingshot and even pulse like a beating heart.

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3D-Printed Human Skin and Bone Could Save Astronauts on Mars

Skin and Bone Scientists from the University Hospital of Dresden Technical University (TUD) in Germany just 3D printed skin and bone samples to see if astronauts on Mars could use the technology in low-gravity environments. The research is part of the European Space Agency’s 3D Printing of Living Tissue for Space Exploration project, a mission to explore different ways astronauts could recover fr

6h

$15 minimum wage would boost pay for 27 million — but it might raise unemployment.

The Raise the Wage Act has been introduced in Congress. If passed, it will increase the minimum wage to $15 by 2025. A report by the Congressional Budget Office warns it may lead to job losses. There are plenty of other estimates of what might happen and few of them agree on much. None Unless you haven't been paying much attention to anything over the last few years, you are probably well aware o

6h

The Raspberry Pi 4 Has a Flawed USB-C Port

The Raspberry Pi 4 launched recently, moving from micro USB to USB-C for power. However, it looks like the designers made a crucial error in designing the board that limits which USB-C cables …

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Auroral crackling sounds are related to the electromagnetic resonances of the Earth

A new study shows that the sounds generated at an altitude of 70 to 80 metres are the result of the activation of Schumann resonances.

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Pair of supermassive black holes discovered on a collision course

Astronomers have spotted a pair of supermassive black holes on a collision course in a galaxy 2.5 billion light-years away. Coincidentally, the pair will begin producing gravitational waves in roughly 2.5 billion years, the researchers estimate. The duo can be used to estimate how many supermassive black hole pairs are detectable in the nearby, present-day universe and when the historic first dete

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Patients with mental health conditions denied access to 'best available' stop smoking treatments

New research suggests that rethinking prescriptions for smokers with mental health conditions wishing to kick the habit could have a significant impact.

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Bringing the blockchain into the physical world

A team of computer scientists from Lancaster University, the University of Edinburgh in the UK, and the Universiti Teknologi MARA, in Malaysia, created the prototype BlocKit because blockchain — the decentralised digital infrastructure that is used to organise the cryptocurrency Bitcoin and holds promise to revolutionise many other sectors from finance, supply-chain and healthcare — is so diffic

6h

Shared e-cargo bikes: boom and barriers in Basel

Sustainable means of mobility are becoming ever more popular. In Switzerland, around 15,000 people have registered with the online platform carvelo2go, which hires out electric cargo bikes. The use of this sharing service in the Basel area is now the subject of scientific investigation. Despite strong growth in member numbers, there are still fundamental barriers. The study by the University of Ba

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Heat, salt, drought: This barley can withstand the challenges of climate change

A new line of barley achieves good crop yields even under poor environmental conditions. It has been bred by a research team from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), which crossed a common variety with various types of wild barley. The researchers then planted the new lines of barley in five very different locations around the world, observed the growth of the plants and analysed thei

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Puzzling on a quantum chessboard

Physicists at the University of Innsbruck are proposing a new model that could demonstrate the supremacy of quantum computers over classical supercomputers in solving optimization problems. In a recent paper, they demonstrate that just a few quantum particles would be sufficient to solve the mathematically difficult N-queens problem in chess even for large chess boards.

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Women played crucial roles in the space program, yet we don't know much about them. Why?

Edith Gustan's name appears in the fourth paragraph of a Seattle Times article from 1970, a skinny strip of text above a nearly full-page ad for Sears' Mother's Day sale that advertises, among other things, "incontestably female … cardigans!"

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Editorial: Diesel trucks are among California's biggest polluters—smog-check them

The routine smog check is one of the basic requirements of owning a car in California. Older cars have to be taken to the shop every other year to ensure that they have been properly maintained and don't spew excessive emissions from their tailpipes.

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Terahertz technology escapes the cold

Terahertz (THz) radiation is a bit like a treasure chest that resists being opened fully. Residing in the electromagnetic spectrum between the infrared and microwave regions, THz radiation combines a range of properties that are ideal with a view to applications. It provides a window to unique spectroscopic information about molecules and solids, it can penetrate non-conducting materials such as t

6h

Geophysical observations reveal the water distribution and effect in Earth's mantle

Professor Eiji Ohtani from Tohoku University, Japan, summarized the content, distribution and effect of water in the Earth's mantle, published in National Science Review.

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Cooking skills aren't enough to make you eat a healthy diet

A lack of cooking skills has been linked to eating poorer diets, but a study of culinary students has found kitchen skills don't always lead to a better diet

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Study finds severely disturbed habitats have impacted health of Madagascar's critically endangered lemurs

A new study led by Mitch Irwin and Karen Samonds of Northern Illinois University finds that degraded rainforest habitats are having an unhealthy impact on at least one species of Madagascar's treasured lemurs, the most endangered mammal group in the world.

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Study finds severely disturbed habitats have impacted health of Madagascar's critically endangered lemurs

A new study led by Mitch Irwin and Karen Samonds of Northern Illinois University finds that degraded rainforest habitats are having an unhealthy impact on at least one species of Madagascar's treasured lemurs, the most endangered mammal group in the world.

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The race to predict our behavior: Tristan Harris testifies before Congress

Former Google design ethicist, Tristan Harris, recently spoke in front of Congress about the dangers of Big Tech. Harris told senators that behavior prediction models are a troublesome part of design in the race for attention. He warned that without ethical considerations, the dangers to our privacy will only get worse. None In a strange cultural turn of events, ethics are at the forefront of num

7h

Expert mathematicians stumped by simple subtractions

Mathematics is seen as the pinnacle of abstract thinking. But are we capable of filtering out our knowledge about the world to prevent it from interfering with our calculations? Researchers (UNIGE) have demonstrated that our ability to solve mathematical problems is influenced by non-mathematical knowledge, which results in mistakes. The findings indicate that high-level mathematicians can be dupe

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It's not an antibody, it's a frankenbody: A new tool for live-cell imaging

Scientists at Colorado State University (CSU) and Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed a new powerful tool called a 'frankenbody', for imaging protein dynamics in living cells. Just as Frankenstein's monster is stitched together from different limbs, the frankenbody was created by taking the binding regions of a normal antibody, the 'sticky parts,' and grafting them onto a dif

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Epic research endeavor reveals cause of deadly digestive disease in children

Nearly 10 years ago, a group of Israeli clinical researchers emailed Berkeley Lab geneticist Len Pennacchio to ask for his team's help in solving the mystery of a rare inherited disease that caused extreme, and sometimes fatal, chronic diarrhea in children. Now, following an arduous investigative odyssey that expanded our understanding of regulatory sequences in the human genome, the multinational

7h

UCLA-developed terahertz sensors work at room temperature, unlike current technology

Researchers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering have developed an ultra-sensitive light-detecting system that could enable astronomers to view galaxies, stars and planetary systems in superb detail.

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Beat the heat

University of Utah mechanical engineering associate professor Mathieu Francoeur has discovered a way to produce more electricity from heat than thought possible by creating a silicon chip, also known as a 'device,' that converts more thermal radiation into electricity. This could lead to devices such as laptop computers and cellphones with much longer battery life and solar panels that are much mo

7h

Study identifies new potential target in glioblastoma

Researchers are hopeful that new strategies could emerge for slowing the growth and recurrence of the most common primary brain cancer in adults, glioblastoma, based on the results of a study published today in Cancer Research.

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Tucker Carlson Has Failed to Assimilate

While I favor granting citizenship automatically to children born in the United States, I was reminded of birthright citizenship’s biggest downside Tuesday while listening to Tucker Carlson on his Fox News show. Unlike immigrants, natural-born citizens such as Carlson are neither screened nor forced to pass a citizenship test nor made to swear an oath. And when they stray from the American way, n

7h

Watching the news on smaller screens saps its impact

We’re less attentive and engaged when we watch news videos on smaller screens, according to new research. The findings document less variability in heart rate and muted changes in sweat when the screen shrinks. The work is in line with previous research on movie and television screens. This study, however, finds significant differences for news content, even across rather small changes in screen

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Terahertz technology escapes the cold

The group of Jérôme Faist in the Department of Physics at ETH Zurich achieved the first realization of a terahertz quantum cascade laser operating without cryogenic cooling. This feat heralds the widespread use of these devices in practical applications.

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Cancer-Killing Living Drug Is Made Safer With a Simple Off Switch

When it comes to battling cancer, our most powerful weapon is also our most dangerous. You’ve heard of CAR-T: the cellular immunotherapy extracts a patient’s own immune cells, amps up their tumor-hunting prowess using gene therapy, and infuses the super-soldiers back into the patient to pursue and rip their targets to shreds—literally. Since late 2017, the FDA has approved CAR-T therapy for leuke

7h

A Brief History of Smokey Bear, the Forest Service's Legendary Mascot

How the beloved figure has become a lightning rod in a heated environmental debate

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Watching Nemo can cause problems

Artificial night light affects clownfish hatching, research shows. Amelia Nichele reports.

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Reefs on the move

New research reveals a dramatic rebalancing of young corals.

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UK plan to control online porn is watched as test case

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Does anyone use AI to generate poetry?

I was working on cut-off poetry and word collages to use as song lyrics and recently I've got curious about AI poetry. A different consciousness generating poems, out of romance and based on statistics sounds fascinating to me. I'd love to learn about the process and see some results of yours ⚘ submitted by /u/okviv [link] [comments]

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Lys kan have en hidtil ukendt egenskab: Selvinduceret drejningsmoment

PLUS. Spanske forskere fik en 'lys' idé, og amerikanske forskere efterviste, og nu har lys endnu en særlig egenskab, som måske kan udnyttes i en lang række teknologier.

7h

The U.K. Ambassador’s Crime Was Stating the Obvious

Theresa May did everything she could to accommodate Donald Trump. She was the first leader to visit him after he became president. She offered him a state visit to the United Kingdom at a much earlier stage in his tenure than his predecessors had received one. She uttered nary a word of criticism of his administration. She had a foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, whom Trump likes. She accepted wit

7h

A Vibrating Haptic Feedback Vest Could “Steer” Rescue Dogs

Rare Puppers A new vibrating vest could help extremely good working dogs perform their jobs better than before. The vest, basically an off-the-shelf dog harness equipped with communication gear and four vibrating motors, can give dogs tactile feedback or be used to issue commands from a distance. The ultimate goal is to give a high-tech upgrade to dogs working jobs that humans and robots can’t do

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Geophysical observations reveal the water distribution and effect in Earth's mantle

Professor Eiji Ohtani from Tohoku University, Japan, summarized the content, distribution and effect of water in the Earth's mantle, published in National Science Review.

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20 overlooked benefits of distributed solar energy

A study released today provides the most complete list yet of the advantages of solar energy — from carbon sequestration to improvements for pollinator habitat.

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Mazda recalls over 262K vehicles to fix engine stall problem

Mazda is recalling more than 262,000 SUVs and cars in the U.S. to fix a software problem that could cause the engines to stall unexpectedly.

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The wild relatives of livestock and crops are disappearing

"Transformative change" is needed to prevent a million species going extinct, according to a new report on the world's biodiversity. Based on information gathered over three years from land, freshwater and marine ecosystems, and drawing heavily from the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, the report from the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services warns that Earth's life

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Programmable soft actuators show the great potential of soft robotics

Researchers at TU Delft have developed highly programmable actuators that, similar to the human hand, combine soft and hard materials to perform complex movements. These materials have great potential for soft robots that can safely and effectively interact with humans and other delicate objects. The scientists report on their work in Materials Horizon in the issue of July 8th.

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Five ways to be a responsible wildlife tourist

Imagine walking through a lush tropical forest. You hear a rustle overhead, and a half-eaten fruit plops onto the trail. You lock eyes with a howler monkey, before he gives a soft grunt and moves higher into the trees. These magical, fleeting connections with a wild animal can be the highlight of a holiday.

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Film expert explains why Moon landing footage would have been impossible to fake

It's been a half-century since the magnificent Apollo 11 moon landing, yet many people still don't believe it actually happened. Conspiracy theories about the event dating back to the 1970s are in fact more popular than ever. A common theory is that film director Stanley Kubrick helped NASA fake the historic footage of its six successful moon landings.

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Unraveling the three-dimensional genomic structure of male germ cells

The genome is not just a linear sequence of letters, but is also compartmentalized into a specifically tailored chromatin structure within cell nuclei. This three-dimensional genomic structure is fundamental, given that it determines which genes are turned on and off in each cell type.

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Skywatcher and satellite tracker photographs US Air Force's secret space plane in orbit

Ever since it started taking to space, there has been a lot of mystery and controversy surrounding the USAF's X-37B space plane. Despite the fact that this militarized version of NASA's orbital vehicle has conducted several spaceflights since its first in 2010, we still have no idea what its true purpose is. But so far, the smart money believes it's an advanced spy plane.

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The wild relatives of livestock and crops are disappearing

"Transformative change" is needed to prevent a million species going extinct, according to a new report on the world's biodiversity. Based on information gathered over three years from land, freshwater and marine ecosystems, and drawing heavily from the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, the report from the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services warns that Earth's life

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Five ways to be a responsible wildlife tourist

Imagine walking through a lush tropical forest. You hear a rustle overhead, and a half-eaten fruit plops onto the trail. You lock eyes with a howler monkey, before he gives a soft grunt and moves higher into the trees. These magical, fleeting connections with a wild animal can be the highlight of a holiday.

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Unraveling the three-dimensional genomic structure of male germ cells

The genome is not just a linear sequence of letters, but is also compartmentalized into a specifically tailored chromatin structure within cell nuclei. This three-dimensional genomic structure is fundamental, given that it determines which genes are turned on and off in each cell type.

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Paper tsunami: How the move to digital medical records is leaving us drowning in old paper files

The recent case of paper medical files from a Brisbane hospital found on a busy street highlights the need for secure, controlled disposal of medical records.

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Capturing heat wasted in solar panels for use in distilling clean drinking water

A team of researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology has developed a way to use waste heat from solar panels to distill clean drinking water. In their paper published …

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Measuring light and vacuum fluctuations from a time flow perspective

Some of the greatest unanswered questions about the nature of the universe are related to light, the vacuum (i.e. space where neither matter nor radiation exists), and their relationship with time. In the past, physicists and philosophers have addressed a variety of complex questions, for instance, what is the nature of the vacuum, and how is the propagation of light connected to the passing of ti

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Text messaging to Whatsapp—early adopters and inertia

Text messaging remains an important means of electronic communication for many people requiring only the simplest connection to the cell phone network. Nevertheless, other more sophisticated tools such as Whatsapp are increasingly prevalent given their multimedia capabilities and the near ubiquity of smartphones and almost universal wireless broadband connectivity in major towns and cities and bey

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New Device Purifies Water While Generating Solar Power

Soak It In Conventional wisdom dictates you should keep water and electricity far away from one another. But now, a team of Saudi Arabian researchers say they’ve created a two-in-one solar power device that purifies water while producing electricity from sunlight — tech that could help solve a pair of global crises. Tier One According to the team’s study, published on Tuesday in the journal Natur

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Exhibit A and other true crime shows can fuel misconceptions about forensic science

Forensic science is under attack. A string of recent collapsed trials and quashed convictions that relied on forensic evidence have led some experts to say the field is in crisis.

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NASA maps surface changes from California quakes

Damage from two strong earthquakes that rattled Southern California on July 4 and July 5—a magnitude 6.4 and a magnitude 7.1, respectively—can be seen from space. The epicenter of the quakes was near the city of Ridgecrest, about 150 miles (241 kilometers) northeast of Los Angeles. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the 7.1 quake was one of the largest to hit the region in some 40 years.

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Holes in the Universe sharpen cosmic measurements

Regions of the Universe containing very few or no galaxies—known as voids—can help measure cosmic expansion with much greater precision than before, according to new research.

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Solar power with a free side of drinking water

An integrated system seamlessly harnesses sunlight to cogenerate electricity and fresh water.

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NUS scientists discover how to 'lock' heat in place using quantum mechanics

In a global first, NUS scientists have demonstrated that heat energy can be manipulated by utilising the quantum mechanical principle of anti-parity-time symmetry. Using this method, they were able to control the flow of heat in a material.

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Buried Treasure – Of a Sort

A former colleague was telling me the other day about some not-so-pleasant surprises that occurred when he was helping to clean out a lab that hadn’t had some cabinets opened in a while, and I think many readers will have had such experiences. Academic labs are particularly prone to Easter eggs of this sort, since there’s a continual turnover of lab occupants over the years, a number of common st

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How to discover new materials quickly

The number of potential new materials that can be assembled from elements in the periodic table is immense—even if researchers were to limit themselves to the 40 to 50 elements that are non-toxic, eco-friendly, and available on Earth in sufficient quantities. These possibilities remain as yet for the most part unexplored.

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Could studying human origins help teenagers understand their complex emotions?

They were once considered our inferior, brutish relatives, but now researchers are using the story behind early humans to help teenagers understand their emotions.

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Auroral crackling sounds are related to the electromagnetic resonances of the Earth

A new study shows that the sounds generated at an altitude of 70 to 80 metres are the result of the activation of Schumann resonances.

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Vetesorterna som ska klara ett extremt klimat

Det kalla och regniga vädret för två år sedan resulterade i att endast en bråkdel av det svenska vetet höll tillräcklig kvalitet för bakning. Förra årets avkastning var bedrövlig till följd av värme och torka. På grund av klimatet ökade livsmedelsimporten och de svenska lantbrukarna drabbades av stora inkomstbortfall. – Vi kommer att få uppleva liknande situationer igen. Klimatförändringarna komm

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A virtual substrate opens path to oxide films on silicon for application in 5G, MEMS, sensors and quantum computation

Proof that a new ability to grow thin films of an important class of materials called complex oxides will, for the first time, make these materials commercially feasible, according to Penn State materials scientists.

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Comment: Schoolchildren helped redesign a city to cut air pollution

Air pollution has a particularly damaging effect on children. They're still growing and breathe faster than adults do. They also live closer to the ground, where the most polluting gases from vehicles accumulate. Pollution from traffic has been linked to problems with brain development, stunted growth, respiratory conditions, cancers and 300,000 child deaths worldwide.

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Choking India gets first fully-fledged electric car

Motorists in India, home to some of the world's most polluted cities, can now buy a fully-fledged electric car after Hyundai unveiled a model that can travel 452 kilometres (281 miles) on one charge.

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'Plan Bee' gets Indian elephants to buzz off railways

Indian Railways have come up with a novel way of getting elephants to buzz off from train tracks: speakers that play the sound of bees to scare the jumbos away.

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Survey reveals students’ hopes and fears about sex

A survey of people aged 18 to 25 found that women are more interested in the quality of their sexual encounters, while men are more focused on quantity

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'Plan Bee' gets Indian elephants to buzz off railways

Indian Railways have come up with a novel way of getting elephants to buzz off from train tracks: speakers that play the sound of bees to scare the jumbos away.

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Thousands of endangered animals seized in customs operation

Police and customs officials have carried out the most widespread anti-wildlife-trafficking operation ever in a joint global operation that's led to the seizure of tens of thousands of endangered animals and the arrest of nearly 600 suspects.

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The 'Super Mario Maker 2' Community Is a Haven of Player Creativity

The hallowed halls of Mario have become, in the hands of fans, shrines to the gods of difficulty.

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How Phone Taps and Swipes Train Us to Be Better Consumers

Opinion: Smartphone interfaces train our motions, closing the gap between our bodies and our virtual selves. But what does that mean when our movements are choreographed by corporate interests?

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The Awesome Bowling Robot Is Surely Fake. Here's How to Tell

The viral video of BowlBot 5000 throwing a strike inspires great physics questions, even if robots aren't yet coming for our bowling alleys.

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Thousands of endangered animals seized in customs operation

Police and customs officials have carried out the most widespread anti-wildlife-trafficking operation ever in a joint global operation that's led to the seizure of tens of thousands of endangered animals and the arrest of nearly 600 suspects.

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New system ensures traceability in the textile industry

How can a garment's origin be derived in a safe and credible way? How can the producer guarantee that it has been produced in a socially, environmentally and economically sustainable way? Now, a new, secure traceability system has been developed in a research project at the University of Borås.

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Geometry transition detected in nearby active galactic nuclei jets

An international team of astronomers has found that jets of 10 nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) have changed their shape from parabolic to conical. The finding, reported in a paper published July 2 on the arXiv pre-print repository, could hold the key to improving our understanding about the formation, acceleration and collimation of relativistic jets in AGNs.

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Image: European Service Module 2 assembly

The European Service Module-2 (ESM-2) is somewhat like the portal it appears to be in this image. By providing power and propulsion for the Orion spacecraft, it will transport humans back to the Moon, roughly fifty years after humankind first landed on its surface.

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4 questions answered on sex trafficking in the US

The revelations about billionaire Jeffrey Epstein, who is accused of sex trafficking girls, paint a grim picture of sex trafficking in the U.S. The buying and selling of human beings is strong in America more than 150 years since the end of the Civil War.

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Fossil fuel mapping database results released

A new online mapping tool highlighting the 50 most influential fossil fuel industry players in Western Canada was launched today to help shed light on who's who in the oil resource sector.

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Marine scientists discover an important, overlooked role sea urchins play in the kelp forest ecosystem

Sea urchins have gotten a bad rap on the Pacific coast. The spiky sea creatures can mow down entire swaths of kelp forest, leaving behind rocky urchin barrens. An article in the New York Times went so far as to call them "cockroaches of the ocean." But new research suggests that urchins play a more complex role in their ecosystems than previously believed.

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Mathematician to present a proof of the Sensitivity Conjecture

The Sensitivity Conjecture has stood as one of the most important, and baffling, open problems in theoretical computer science for nearly three decades. It appears to have finally met its match through work by Hao Huang, an assistant professor of mathematics at Emory University.

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Upside-down, 3-D-printed skin and bone for Mars explorers

3-D printing human tissue could help keep astronauts healthy all the way to Mars. An ESA project has produced its first bioprinted skin and bone samples.

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Marine scientists discover an important, overlooked role sea urchins play in the kelp forest ecosystem

Sea urchins have gotten a bad rap on the Pacific coast. The spiky sea creatures can mow down entire swaths of kelp forest, leaving behind rocky urchin barrens. An article in the New York Times went so far as to call them "cockroaches of the ocean." But new research suggests that urchins play a more complex role in their ecosystems than previously believed.

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Unprecedented display of concern and 'consolation' toward an unknown monkey offers hope for endangered macaques

A wild group of endangered Barbary macaques have been observed, for the first time, "consoling" and adopting an injured juvenile from a neighbouring group. The observations by a scientist from Oxford University and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (ifaw) are published today in the journal Primates.

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Unprecedented display of concern and 'consolation' toward an unknown monkey offers hope for endangered macaques

A wild group of endangered Barbary macaques have been observed, for the first time, "consoling" and adopting an injured juvenile from a neighbouring group. The observations by a scientist from Oxford University and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (ifaw) are published today in the journal Primates.

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U.S. has its wettest 12 months on record—again

Rain—and plenty of it—was the big weather story in June, adding to a record-breaking 12 months of precipitation for the contiguous U.S. It's the third consecutive time in 2019 (April, May and June) the past 12-month precipitation record has hit an all-time high.

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Three generations of space experts react to the Moon landings

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02134-1 Rewatching the Apollo 11 mission footage 50 years on.

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Image: X-ray serendipity

The purple lines and blotches scattered across this image show something incredible: all of the X-ray sources that were serendipitously detected—that is, not intentionally targeted—by ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray space observatory from 2000 to 2017.

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Houses for a warmer future are currently restricted by Australia's building code

Australian houses use significantly more electricity to stay warm or cool than estimated during the design stage.

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Equations from fluid dynamics used to find optimum arrangement of rods in dandelion pappus

A team of researchers from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, the University of Twente and Università di Pisa has used equations from fluid dynamics to find the optimum arrangement of rods in a dandelion pappus. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their work and what it showed.

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Scientists discover how to 'lock' heat in place using quantum mechanics

A ground-breaking study conducted by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has revealed a method of using quantum mechanical wave theories to "lock" heat into a fixed position.

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Nintendo Switch Lite drops September 20 for $100 less than the original

Nintendo on Wednesday formally introduced a new addition to the Switch family. The Nintendo Switch Lite is described as a compact and lightweight version of the original designed specifically …

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Want to invest into space? Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic is going public

Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic will go public later this year. People will be able to buy shares when Virgin Galactic merges with a shell company. The company aims to raise enough capital through investment to sustain itself until profitability. None Many may dream of space but have no viable paths towards it. Becoming a government agency astronaut is for the select few or you need to shell ou

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Shared e-cargo bikes: Boom and barriers in Basel

Sustainable means of mobility are becoming ever more popular. In Switzerland, around 15,000 people have registered with the online platform carvelo2go, which hires out electric cargo bikes. The use of this sharing service in the Basel area is now the subject of scientific investigation. Despite strong growth in member numbers, there are still fundamental barriers. The study by the University of Ba

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Chasing the elusive Magellanic Woodpecker

University of North Texas Ph.D. candidate, Amy Wynia, traveled more than 6,000 miles to Navarino Island in southern-most Chile to explore the forests in search of the Magellanic Woodpecker (Campephilus magellanicus), the largest woodpecker in South America. While Wynia went to the ends of the earth to collect information for her Ph.D. dissertation, she also went because she really loves woodpecker

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Beyond sex robots: Erobotics explores erotic human-machine interactions

Science fiction films such as Blade Runner (1982), Lars and the Real Girl (2007) and Her (2013) explore the advent of human-machine relationships. And in recent years, reality has met fiction.

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Expert mathematicians stumped by simple subtractions

Mathematical thought is seen as the pinnacle of abstract thinking. But are we capable of filtering out our knowledge about the world to prevent it from interfering with our calculations? Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, and the University of Bourgogne Franche-Comté, France, have demonstrated that our ability to solve mathematical problems is influenced by non-mathema

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Styrketräning kan hjälpa mot klimakterieproblem

Studien är den första i världen som studerar sambandet mellan styrketräning och klimakteriebesvär. Tidigare forskning har ibland visat på vissa samband mellan motion i allmänhet och minskade vallningar. Andra studier har dock inte kunnat visa något tydligt samband. En förklaring till de olika resultaten kan vara att intensiteten i träningen varierat. – Det är förmodligen så att motionen måste inn

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Are we living in a simulated universe? Here's what scientists say.

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Chasing the elusive Magellanic Woodpecker

University of North Texas Ph.D. candidate, Amy Wynia, traveled more than 6,000 miles to Navarino Island in southern-most Chile to explore the forests in search of the Magellanic Woodpecker (Campephilus magellanicus), the largest woodpecker in South America. While Wynia went to the ends of the earth to collect information for her Ph.D. dissertation, she also went because she really loves woodpecker

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How we organized a conference for 570 people without using plastic

What did we use before single-use plastics became ingrained in our everyday lives? Before the 1980s, plastic bags were a rarity in our supermarkets. In 2019, excessive plastic use feels not just normal, but necessary to sustain our hectic lifestyles. From takeaway containers and supermarket packaging to cheap, low-quality goods, plastic permeates our daily lives.

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At least 2% of US public water systems are like Flint's—Americans just don't hear about them

More than five years after Flint's water crisis first hit the news, the city has successfully lowered the lead levels in its water.

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Discovery of Raptor-Like Dinosaur Adds a New Wrinkle to the Origin of Birds

A small, 150 million-year-old dinosaur unearthed in Wyoming ran on the ground, but it may have been closely related to some of the first fliers

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Svensk regering kræver ny kulegravning efter gasbus-eksplosion

Efter en voldsom eksplosion i en biogas-drevet bus i Stockholm vil de svenske politikere nu have endelig klarhed omkring sikkerheden ved gasdrevne busser.

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Mattresses could emit higher levels of VOCs during sleep

Hundreds of household items, including furniture, paint and electronics, emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which at high levels can pose health risks. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have measured the emission rates of the gaseous compounds released by several types of polyurethane mattresses under simulated sleeping conditions, finding levels of some VO

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Pet tags link widely used flame retardant to hyperthyroidism in cats

Feline hyperthyroidism is the most common endocrine-related disease of older cats, and its prevalence has skyrocketed since the first case was diagnosed in 1979. At the same time, new household flame retardants were introduced, and recently, scientists have suspected a link. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have associated hyperthyroidism with another class of

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France To End Reimbursement for Homeopathy

Setback for homeopathy in France as a government agency actually does its job, but the fight against pseudoscience is long from over.

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ICE and the Ever-Widening Surveillance Dragnet

Over the weekend, the U.S. took another step in the slow march toward normalizing hidden database searches as a fact of urban life. A new report from Georgetown Law’s Center on Privacy and Technology revealed that Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials requested access to DMV databases in Utah, Washington State, and Vermont, with the intention of using facial-recognition technology to scan

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Awkwafina Gives a Stellar Breakout Performance in The Farewell

Nai Nai (played by Zhao Shuzhen), the beloved grandmother of Billi (Awkwafina) in The Farewell , begins each morning with a set of exercises. She strides around outside her home in Changchun, China, pushing her hands out in front of her and belting out “ Hah! ” every few seconds. Doing this gets rid of the toxins, she assures her granddaughter, and as absurd as that might sound, it’s hard to doub

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Twitter Needs a Pause Button

A s a shooter in Christchurch, New Zealand, set about massacring dozens of worshippers at two mosques on March 15, his body cam beamed live footage to social media. Soon after, Susan Wojcicki, the CEO of YouTube, learned that it was being uploaded to the platform. The company put thousands of human beings and a pile of algorithms to work finding and removing the snuff footage. It was already too

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Ancient ‘seaway’ used to cover the Sahara desert

New research describes the ancient Trans-Saharan Seaway of Africa that existed 50 to 100 million years ago in the region of the current Sahara Desert. The paper contains the first reconstructions of extinct aquatic species in their habitats and sheds light on the huge climate and sea level changes that can happen on Earth. The region now holding the Sahara Desert was once underwater, in striking

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Toddlers tend to opt for the last thing in a set, so craft your questions carefully

Two-year-olds demonstrate a verbal quirk that makes their answers less reliable.

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Mattresses could emit higher levels of VOCs during sleep

Hundreds of household items, including furniture, paint and electronics, emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which at high levels can pose health risks. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have measured the emission rates of the gaseous compounds released by several types of polyurethane mattresses under simulated sleeping conditions, finding levels of some VO

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Pet tags link widely used flame retardant to hyperthyroidism in cats

Feline hyperthyroidism is the most common endocrine-related disease of older cats, and its prevalence has skyrocketed since the first case was diagnosed in 1979. At the same time, new household flame retardants were introduced, and recently, scientists have suspected a link. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have associated hyperthyroidism with another class of

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Study: firm governance key as shareholders assess risk of political activity

It's the structure of a firm's governance that may cause shareholders to walk away if they think they can't hold the firm accountable for its political activity, according to a new study.

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Whale hunt, climate lawsuits and chaos-theory pioneer

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02085-7 The week in science: 5–11 July 2019.

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Faulty machines

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02092-8 A logical position.

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Little Plastic 'Nurdles' Are Flooding Beaches and Waterways

These lentil-sized pellets are used to make nearly all plastic goods. But they often escape and end up polluting oceans and coastal communities.

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This Neat Design Could Make a Plane’s Middle Seats Tolerable

Molon Labe designed a middle seat for airplanes that is set lower and three inches back from the seats on either side.

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Image of the Day: Second Hand

A 3-D printed prosthetic hand moves by reading the signals in forearm muscles.

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Earthquake scientists race to the scene of temblor

After a 6.4 magnitude earthquake struck near Ridgecrest, California, on July Fourth, Christine Goulet packed her bags and headed for an area near the epicenter of the Searles Valley Quake.

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Navigating the winding road toward driverless mobility

As we all watch automakers and autonomous tech companies team up in various alliances, it's natural to wonder about their significance and what the future will bring. Are we realizing that autonomous driving technology and its acceptance by society could take longer than expected? Is the cost of investing in such technology proving more than any single organization can sustain? Are these alliances

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Earth's core has been leaking for billions of years

Earth's magnetic field protects and makes our planet habitable by stopping harmful high-energy particles from space, including from the Sun. The source of this magnetic field is the core at the centre of our planet.

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Nanoporous material nets contaminant from water

Barely visible material that looks like tiny grains of sand may hold the key to removing an invisible health threat that has contaminated water supplies across the country. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have successfully tested highly porous materials and found they can absorb key components of a class of toxic chemicals found in 43 states.

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Footprints on the Moon and cemeteries on Mars: Interview with space archaeologist Alice Gorman

There is a lot of documentation about what's been left on the moon—but it's amazing how much we don't know.

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How puffins catch food outside the breeding season

Little is known about how seabirds catch their food outside the breeding season but using modern technology, researchers at the University of Liverpool and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology have gained new insight into their feeding habits.

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New research shows a glaring lack of transparency in environmental organizations

New research finds that environmental organizations are still reluctant to release data or report on the gender, race and LGBTQ composition of their staff.

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How puffins catch food outside the breeding season

Little is known about how seabirds catch their food outside the breeding season but using modern technology, researchers at the University of Liverpool and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology have gained new insight into their feeding habits.

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Giorgio Zauli: Nazi comparisons, legal threats and totalitarian rule in Ferarra

Cancer researcher Giorgio Zauli publicly declared himself exonerated because he simply forbids his University of Ferrara to publish the investigative report. The ultra-right connected rector used the occasion to equal his critics to Nazis and to announce defamation lawsuits.

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FDA lifts import ban for genetically modified salmon eggs

submitted by /u/dorafins [link] [comments]

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The Neural Similarities Between Remembering and Imagining – Facts So Romantic

The act of recalling something that happened to you looks very much like what happens when you imagine something new. Photograph by HBRH / Shutterstock Imagine a living room. Not yours or your friend’s or one you saw in a home makeover show, but one purely from your imagination—perhaps your ideal living room. You should have no trouble doing it: We take this kind of imagination for granted. Rarel

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Our Disabilities Have Made Us Better Scientists

But only because we have had access to health care, emotional support and institutional backing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cancer, climate, plastics: why ‘earthshots’ are harder than moonshots

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02093-7 Apollo was a triumph, but 50 years on, moonshots to solve more-complex global challenges face a different set of hurdles.

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It's not just tennis players – grunters are everywhere. And they're not to be trusted | Andre Spicer

From archaeologists to office workers, people feel the need to accompany hard work with a grunt. But why do they do it? When the umpire at Wimbledon calls out “quiet, please”, a religious hush falls over the court. The only things that break the silence are the gentle pop of a bouncing tennis ball, the faint murmur of the crowd, and the passionate grunting of the players . Related: What can scien

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In New York, Friendships Run Along Subway Lines

A study finds New Yorkers are more likely to be Facebook friends if they live along the same subway line.

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Inside Dave Asprey’s Bulletproof Body-Hacking Gym

Dave Asprey of Bulletproof Coffee fame is sharing his high-tech workout secrets with the public at workout facilities called Upgrade Labs.

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Reddit’s ‘Manosphere’ and the Challenge of Quantifying Hate

Researchers analyzed Reddit's most misogynist communities. It's exactly as bad as you thought.

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Our Disabilities Have Made Us Better Scientists

But only because we have had access to health care, emotional support and institutional backing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Was the Moon Made? We Won’t Know Until We Go Back

The closer scientists look at theories of how the moon formed, the more questions they find.

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Affaldsselskab vender på en tallerken: Vi kan ikke dokumentere genanvendelse af københavnernes plast

Vestforbrænding har annulleret et udbud af sortering af plast fra 15 kommuner i hovedstadsområdet. Efter Ingeniøren henvendelse mener selskabet ikke længere, at der er dokumentation for, at 75 procent bliver genanvendt som lovet.

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How This Huge, Superfast Asteroid Stayed Hidden in Near-Earth Orbit

The year goes by quickly for this newfound asteroid.

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2 SoCal Earthquakes Warped the Ground for Miles. And It's Visible from Space.

Japanese satellite shows where the ground was broken up and even sliced open during the twin earthquakes near Ridgecrest.

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12,000 Years Ago, a Boy Had His Skull Squashed into a Cone Shape. It's the Oldest Evidence of Such Head-Shaping.

Ancient people in China practiced human head-shaping about 12,000 years ago — meaning they bound some children's maturing skulls, encouraging the heads to grow into elongated ovals — making them the oldest known group to purposefully squash their skulls.

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Python Swallows Crocodile Whole. Photographer Captures Every Last, Grisly 'Bite.'

Teeth and scales didn't stop an Australian olive python from getting a meal.

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Science and Sustainability May Clash on the Moon

Lunar ice could be a crucial resource for future explorers. It could also be an astrobiological treasure trove. Can it be used as both? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Science and Sustainability May Clash on the Moon

Lunar ice could be a crucial resource for future explorers. It could also be an astrobiological treasure trove. Can it be used as both? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Star formation may be halted by cold ionized hydrogen

For the first time ionized hydrogen has been detected at the lowest frequency ever towards the center of our Galaxy. The findings originate from a cloud that is both very cold (around -230 degrees Celsius) and also ionized, something that has never been detected before. This discovery may help to explain why stars don't form as quickly as they theoretically could.

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There’s a Deal to Be Had Between the U.S. and Iran

Iran is now incrementally walking away from the limits imposed on it in the nuclear deal—the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA—exceeding the 300 kilograms of low enriched uranium it can have on hand and now enriching above the 3.67 percent allowed under the terms of the understanding. Don’t be surprised if it either starts to install its advanced centrifuges or begins to operate more t

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Hard soil, big jumps and epiphanies: what it's like on the Moon

Twelve American men walked on the Moon between 1969 and 1972, with most describing in great detail their experiences on the dusty, low-gravity world lit by the blinding light of the Sun.

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What Acosta Has Done Other Than Let Epstein Off the Hook

President Donald Trump’s labor secretary, Alex Acosta, is facing calls to resign because of his role in negotiating a lenient 2008 plea deal for the financier Jeffrey Epstein, now charged with child sex trafficking by federal authorities in New York. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi , a spate of 2020 candidates, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer have all insisted that Acosta—until now a r

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Democrats’ Ominous Shift on School Segregation

In the second debate among Democratic presidential candidates, Senator Kamala Harris expressed her disappointment with former Vice President Joe Biden’s favorable and apparently unprompted recent comments about a raft of southern politicians who had distinguished themselves as segregationists and fervent racists. Harris also leveled a deeply personal criticism of Biden for his past opposition to

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Nytt system säkrar spårbarhet inom textilbranschen

– Konsumenter vill i allt större utsträckning veta var kläderna de köper kommer ifrån, vad de är tillverkade av för material och om de är etiskt producerade. Samtidigt vill producenterna kunna visa att deras produkter håller utlovad kvalitet och kunna skydda sig mot förfalskningar, säger Tarun Kumar Agrawal, doktorand inom textil management och en av dem som jobbar med att utveckla ett nytt spårb

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Chemistry researcher who studies oil wells is up to seven retractions

A chemistry researcher in India is up to seven retractions and one correction for problematic images and other issues. The researcher, Mahendra Yadav, was the first author on an article titled “Corrosion inhibition of tubing steel during acidization of oil and gas wells,” which appeared in 2013 in the Journal of Petroleum Engineering (JPE). Yadav, … Continue reading Chemistry researcher who studie

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See how visualizations of the moon have changed over time

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, here’s a collection of images that show how the moon has been visualized over the ages.

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How “stalkerware” apps are letting abusive partners spy on their victims

Many women are unaware that they are being spied on with apps hidden on their phones. App-store owners must do more.

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Refuelling under scrutiny as S.Africa penguins hit by oil spill

Rangers in wet suits have been searching for oil-tarred penguins in shallow water around St Croix Island off the South African coast as a refuelling spill highlights conservationists' fears over pollution.

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Med 429 km/l er DTU-studerende europamestre i øko-bykørsel

DTU-bilen ’Dynamo’ forbedrede sin rekord fra sidste år med 50 km/l og genvandt konkurrencen for biler i bytrafik i den europæiske udgave af årets Shell Eco-marathon.

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How to defeat moral grandstanders (and stay classy while doing it)

What is moral grandstanding? Here's a comprehensive explanation of the psychology that drives this disruptive and divisive online behavior. Moral grandstanding may have very serious consequences for social discourse, but calling it out and shaming moral grandstanders is unproductive, says Brandon Warmke. To defeat moral grandstanding, you can do several things. Before posting anything online, ask

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Does the Microbiome Help the Body Fight Cancer?

Research in mice and humans is beginning to establish a link between the composition of microbes in the gut and immune responses to tumor cells, but the mechanisms are not yet clear.

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Refuelling under scrutiny as S.Africa penguins hit by oil spill

Rangers in wet suits have been searching for oil-tarred penguins in shallow water around St Croix Island off the South African coast as a refuelling spill highlights conservationists' fears over pollution.

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Revealing the Secret Lives of Cells With Advanced Microscopy

How do cells differentiate into brain, organ muscles, or any of the other approximately 200 different human cell types? How do they change as they age? How do these little bags of water and chemicals turn a set of DNA instructions into a dynamic living creature capable of autonomous behaviors?

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Ecotax championed, contested and still marginal in EU

Green taxes such as the one that France said Tuesday it would impose on plane tickets in 2020 are struggling to develop across the European Union, where they frequently faces resistance and protests.

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Monaco rolls out Huawei-built 5G network in European first

Monaco on Tuesday became the first country in Europe to inaugurate a next-generation 5G mobile phone network based on technology from Chinese firm Huawei, which is seen by the US as a major security risk.

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Trump can't block Twitter critics, appeals court affirms

A federal appeals court ruled Tuesday that US President Donald Trump cannot legally block users on Twitter based on their political differences with him, affirming a lower court decision.

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A waste of good wine? Non! Spitting is essential to tasting

Spitting is frowned upon in polite society—unless of course the spitter is engaged in tasting wines.

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Paris declares 'climate emergency'

Paris, which in 2015 hosted the signing of a historic agreement on fighting global warming, on Tuesday declared a climate emergency following similar moves by other cities and national parliaments.

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Nine deer dead in Japan after eating plastic: wildlife group

Nine deer have died after swallowing plastic bags in Japan's Nara Park, a wildlife group said on Wednesday, warning that a surge in tourism may be to blame.

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'Alexa, my head hurts': UK health service signs up Amazon

"Alexa, what are the symptoms of flu?"

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UK plan to control online porn is watched as test case

The global push to more tightly regulate the internet and big tech firms is spreading to one of the web's biggest and least visible corners: porn.

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British inventor Dyson pays $54 mln for Singapore's priciest penthouse

British billionaire inventor James Dyson has paid a reported $54 million for Singapore's biggest, most expensive penthouse: a three-floor residence with a rooftop terrace, private pool, and jacuzzi.

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Nine deer dead in Japan after eating plastic: wildlife group

Nine deer have died after swallowing plastic bags in Japan's Nara Park, a wildlife group said on Wednesday, warning that a surge in tourism may be to blame.

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WeChat is running a natural experiment in human generosity

Altruism is a puzzle for behavioral biologists. Now the largest-ever study of pay-it-forward reciprocity is throwing new light on the phenomenon.

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Arresting Jeffrey Epstein Is Just the Start

“I’ve known Jeff for fifteen years. Terrific guy,” the then-socialite Donald Trump told New York in 2002, in a profile of Jeffrey Epstein. “He’s a lot of fun to be with. It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side. No doubt about it—Jeffrey enjoys his social life.” The quote is stunning to read today, after Epstein’s arrest for the sex t

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Ny studie: Gorillor har kompisar

Gorillor formar sociala band, även utanför sin närmsta familj, på ett sätt som liknar människors. Det visar en ny studie ledd av forskare på universitetet i Cambridge.

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Preeclampsia risk may be reduced by a healthy high-fiber diet

New research suggests that gut bacteria could have an impact on the outcome of pregnancies with a high plant-based fiber diet recommended.

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Bystander CPR less likely for black kids in poorest neighborhoods

African-American kids from the most disadvantaged areas are about half as likely to receive emergency bystander CPR following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest than white children in disadvantaged or more prosperous neighborhoods.Targeted CPR training for non-white majority, lower education and low-income neighborhoods may increase bystander CPR rates.

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Quantum sensor breakthrough using naturally occurring vibrations in artificial atoms

A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have discovered a new method that could be used to build quantum sensors with ultra-high precision.

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Comprehensive quantitative analysis of vector beam states based on vector field reconstruction

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46390-7 Comprehensive quantitative analysis of vector beam states based on vector field reconstruction

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Development of liver surface nodularity quantification program and its clinical application in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46442-y Development of liver surface nodularity quantification program and its clinical application in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

12h

Anti-cancer activity of the novel 2-hydroxydiarylamide derivatives IMD-0354 and KRT1853 through suppression of cancer cell invasion, proliferation, and survival mediated by TMPRSS4

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46447-7 Anti-cancer activity of the novel 2-hydroxydiarylamide derivatives IMD-0354 and KRT1853 through suppression of cancer cell invasion, proliferation, and survival mediated by TMPRSS4

12h

Precursor RNA processing 3 is required for male fertility, and germline stem cell self-renewal and differentiation via regulating spliceosome function in Drosophila testes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46419-x Precursor RNA processing 3 is required for male fertility, and germline stem cell self-renewal and differentiation via regulating spliceosome function in Drosophila testes

12h

Improving the management procedures in farms infected with the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus using PDP models

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46339-w Improving the management procedures in farms infected with the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus using PDP models

12h

Optimal design of lattice structures for controllable extremal band gaps

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46089-9 Optimal design of lattice structures for controllable extremal band gaps

12h

Study of Gene Expression Profiles of Breast Cancers in Indian Women

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46261-1 Study of Gene Expression Profiles of Breast Cancers in Indian Women

12h

Differential expression of individual transcript variants of PD-1 and PD-L2 genes on Th-1/Th-2 status is guaranteed for prognosis prediction in PCNSL

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46473-5 Differential expression of individual transcript variants of PD-1 and PD-L2 genes on Th-1/Th-2 status is guaranteed for prognosis prediction in PCNSL

12h

The Clarence Thomas Effect

Clarence Thomas is the longest-serving justice currently sitting on the Supreme Court. For much of his tenure, court watchers and critics have dismissed his jurisprudence as largely irrelevant, demoting him to the late Justice Antonin Scalia’s judicial sidekick. In the public imagination, he is most remembered for his worst moment. Last fall’s confirmation hearings for Justice Brett Kavanaugh res

12h

First Moon landing was nearly a US–Soviet mission

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02088-4 As today’s tensions mount, it is salutary to recall that cooperation was on the table during the cold war, writes Roger D. Launius.

12h

These young scientists will shape the next 50 years of Moon research

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02086-6 Half a century after Apollo, Nature profiles five researchers who are shaking up lunar exploration.

12h

The Fish Is Boneless. (Fishless, Too.)

Several companies are developing sustainable, plant-based or laboratory-made seafood alternatives. It might help the planet, but will anyone eat it?

12h

Forsker finder sårbarheder i Logitech-dongles: Muligt at opsnappe tastetryk

En sikkerhedsforsker har fundet flere sårbarheder i Logitechs Unifying-dongles, der forbinder trådløse tastaturer og mus til computere i hobetal verden over.

12h

Quantum sensor breakthrough using naturally occurring vibrations in artificial atoms

A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have discovered a new method that could be used to build quantum sensors with ultra-high precision.

12h

Scientists create an AI from a sheet of glass.

submitted by /u/candiedbug [link] [comments]

12h

Cyber attacks cost $45 bn in 2018 as ransomware hits hard

An estimated two million cyber attacks in 2018 resulted in more than $45 billion in losses worldwide as local governments struggled to cope with ransomware and other malicious incidents, a study showed Tuesday.

12h

Clownfish reproduction threatened by artificial light in coral reefs

The popular story about a clownfish that got lost at sea in the movie Finding Nemo could have a much darker sequel—as artificial light in coral reefs leaves the famous fish unable to reproduce offspring, according to a new study.

12h

Virgin Galactic seeks space tourism boost with market launch

British billionaire Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic will merge with a US investment firm to become the world's first publicly-traded space tourism venture—with an eye on sending its first clients into space within a year, the group's chief executive said Tuesday.

12h

Clownfish reproduction threatened by artificial light in coral reefs

The popular story about a clownfish that got lost at sea in the movie Finding Nemo could have a much darker sequel—as artificial light in coral reefs leaves the famous fish unable to reproduce offspring, according to a new study.

12h

Japan's asteroid probe Hayabusa2 set for final touchdown

Japan's Hayabusa2 probe began descending on Wednesday for its final touchdown on a distant asteroid, hoping to collect samples that could shed light on the evolution of the solar system.

12h

Sturgeon, America's forgotten dinosaurs, show signs of life

Sturgeon were America's vanishing dinosaurs, armor-plated beasts that crowded the nation's rivers until mankind's craving for caviar pushed them to the edge of extinction.

13h

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