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nyheder2019juli11

New species of lizard found in stomach of microraptor

A team of paleontologists led by Professor Jingmai O'Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with researchers from the Shandong Tianyu Museum of Nature, have discovered a new specimen of the volant dromaeosaurid Microraptor zhaoianus with the remains of a nearly complete lizard preserved in its stomach.

5h

Possible link between sugary drinks and cancer

Findings from a new study suggest that limiting sugary drinks might contribute to a reduction in cancer cases, say researchers.

1h

Nordsjællands affaldsforbrænding står bag årelang forurening med et af verdens mest giftige stoffer

Affaldsselskabet I/S Norfors i Hørsholm har udledt for store mængder dioxin. Trods påbud fra Miljøstyrelsen er grænseværdierne overskredet i tre ud af fem år på én forbrændingsovn. Meget alvorligt og uden fortilfælde, siger Danmarks Naturfredningsforening.

16h

Twitter is back up after global outage – CNET

Some features are slowly coming back online.

now

New alternate cell growth pathway could lead to better treatments for metastatic cancers

A new study has found that the gene, mEAK-7, which they discovered last year, may play a key role in cancer metastasis. By comparing mEAK-7 expression levels in normal and cancer cells, they found that the gene was highly expressed in the cancer cells. They also found that the gene, when combined with a large molecule, created an alternative pathway used by cancer to grow and spread.

2min

Arthroscopy more effective than MRI for chondral defects of the knee

Using arthroscopy to stage a lesion in the chondral area of the knee is more accurate than magnetic resonance imaging, according to researchers.

2min

Opioid use is reduced in patients treated with NSAIDS

Patients receiving a post-surgery prescription of ibuprofen with a rescue prescription of Percocet used less opioids than a group of similar patients who were prescribed just Percocet.

2min

Does platelet-rich plasma therapy lower risk of meniscus repair

The use of platelet-rich plasma therapy can reduce the risk of a second meniscus failure after operation but does not seem to protect patients who have had surgery to repair an anterior cruciate ligament, according to new research.

2min

Raising eyebrows on neuroinflammation: Study finds novel role for 'skin plumping' molecule

Scientists have discovered a novel mechanism and role in the brain for hyaluronic acid — a clear, gooey substance popularized by cosmetic and skin care products. Hyaluronic acid may be the key in how an immune signal moves from the blood stream to the brain, activating the brain's resident immune cells, the microglia. Findings from this study have important implications for better treatments for

2min

Yield-boosting stay-green gene identified from 118-year-old experiment in corn

A corn gene identified from a 118-year-old experiment could boost yields of today's elite hybrids with no added inputs. The gene controls a critical piece of senescence, or seasonal die-back, in corn. When the gene is turned off, field-grown elite hybrids yielded 4.6 bushels more per acre on average than standard plants.

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New virus found in one-third of all countries may have coevolved with human lineage

A new study has investigated the origin and evolution of a virus called crAssphage, which may have coevolved with human lineage.

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Gene identified that will help develop plants to fight climate change

Hidden underground networks of plant roots snake through the earth foraging for nutrients and water, similar to a worm searching for food. Yet, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that govern which parts of the soil roots explore remain largely unknown. Now, researchers have discovered a gene that determines whether roots grow deep or shallow in the soil.

2min

Mathematical model explores daily rhythms in pain sensitivity

A new computational model successfully predicts how daily pain sensitivity rhythms affect pain processing, both in healthy adults and in people with neuropathic pain.

2min

Capping medical residency hours does not hamper new doctors' quality of training

First national study shows cutting residents' training hours has not resulted in lower performance for new doctors. Resident training was capped at 80 hours per week in 2003, down from 100+ hours, a controversial move that left many worried. Despite worries, reduced hours did not change 30-day patient mortality, readmissions or spending.

2min

Spacewatch: India prepares to launch Chandrayaan 2 moon mission

If successful, India will become fourth country to soft-land on moon after Russia, US and China India is making final preparations for the launch this Sunday of the Chandrayaan 2 moon mission. The spacecraft will take two months to cruise to the moon. Following its arrival, it will manoeuvre into a circular orbit just 62 miles (100km) above the lunar surface. It will then deploy the Vikram lander

10min

The Smithsonian Museum is looking to acquire drawings made by migrant children

Photos taken by a staff member of the American Academy of Pediatrics has caught the eye of a Smithsonian curator. The drawings made by the migrant children features bars and cages. The Smithsonian Museum believes that it is important to record and catalogue these types of historical situations. The Smithsonian National Museum of American History has recently expressed interest in acquiring drawin

26min

BellBrook Labs Receives NIH Grant for the Discovery of cGAS Inhibitors to Treat Autoimmune Diseases

The National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Disease recently awarded BellBrook Labs a $300,000 Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grant to develop novel inhibitors for the target cyclic GAMP Synthase (cGAS). The grant will be used to accelerate the discovery of new treatments for autoimmune diseases by targeting the cGAS-STING pathway.

29min

Ford, VW to broaden global alliance

Ford and Volkswagen plan to unveil a broader global alliance on Friday that will focus on developing autonomous technology and electric vehicles.

31min

Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Moon Landing by Owning a Piece of the Apollo 11 Command Module

On July 16, 1969, the Apollo 11 mission began when astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins were launched into space atop a Saturn V rocket. Four days later, while Collins manned the command module in orbit around the moon, Armstrong and Aldrin landed the lunar module in the sea of tranquility, where one small step for man would become one giant leap for mankind. The moon landi

34min

One Giant Leap for Mankind

Space Read Inside Science 's coverage of the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11. 07/11/2019 Inside Science Contributor To read more…

34min

Man Goes Blind After Wearing Contact Lenses in the Shower

Your daily shower isn't usually a health risk, but for one man in England, it may have led to a serious eye infection.

37min

After This Young Monkey Got Hit by a Car, Monkey Strangers Comforted Him

A juvenile macaque from the new group started grooming the injured monkey, then adults followed suit.

43min

Andrew Dibner, Medical Alert Pioneer, Is Dead at 93

Concerned about what happens when people fall and can’t reach a telephone to call an ambulance, Mr. Dibner, a psychologist, developed a system to help.

46min

Francine Shapiro, Developer of Eye-Movement Therapy, Dies at 71

Dr. Shapiro’s technique for dealing with trauma was initially met with some skepticism. But it has attracted devotees worldwide.

46min

This $500 Lidar System Could Prove Elon Musk Wrong

Fool’s Errand Lidar is a radar-like technology that uses laser pulses to create a 3D-map of its environment. Many see it as integral to the development of self-driving cars — but not Elon Musk . “Lidar is a fool’s errand,” he told attendees at Tesla’s Autonomy Day in April. “Anyone relying on lidar is doomed. Doomed! [They are] expensive sensors that are unnecessary… it’s ridiculous, you’ll see.”

56min

NASA’s Apollo Mission Tapes

NASA’s Apollo Mission Tapes Digitizing all of Apollo would have taken an appalling 175 years. NASA’s Apollo Mission Tapes Video of NASA’s Apollo Mission Tapes Space Thursday, July 11, 2019 – 15:45 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) – Researchers use language processing algorithms to provide a new perspective on the NASA Apollo missions. For more information visit: https://exploreapollo

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World's fastest soft robotic fish

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The future of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy

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Physicists use nanostructures to free photons for highly efficient white OLEDs

Thanks to intensive research in the past three decades, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been steadily conquering the electronics market — from OLED mobile phone displays to roll-out television screens, the list of applications is long. Current OLED research focuses in particular on improving the performance of white OLEDs for lighting elements such as ceiling or car interior lighting.

1h

What Makes a Modern ‘Moonshot’ Successful?

What Makes a Modern ‘Moonshot’ Successful? A different set of ingredients may be needed to take the next giant leap for humankind. moonshotillo_1.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Space Thursday, July 11, 2019 – 14:15 Ramin Skibba, Contributor (Inside Science) — A half century ago this July,

1h

New alternate cell growth pathway could lead to better treatments for metastatic cancers

A UCLA Dentistry led research study has found that the gene, mEAK-7, which they discovered last year, may play a key role in cancer metastasis. By comparing mEAK-7 expression levels in normal and cancer cells, they found that the gene was highly expressed in the cancer cells. They also found that the gene, when combined with a large molecule, created an alternative pathway used by cancer to grow a

1h

Condor chick confirmed at Zion National Park in Utah

A sweeping red-rock cliff at Utah's Zion National Park is now the home of a new California condor chick as the species makes a comeback in the wild three decades after they were on the brink of extinction, biologists have confirmed.

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Condor chick confirmed at Zion National Park in Utah

A sweeping red-rock cliff at Utah's Zion National Park is now the home of a new California condor chick as the species makes a comeback in the wild three decades after they were on the brink of extinction, biologists have confirmed.

1h

Twitter appears to be back after outage

Twitter was down for about an hour Thursday in an outage that appeared to affect users around the world.

1h

Moon-forming disk discovered around distant planet

Using Earth's most powerful array of radio telescopes, astronomers have made the first observations of a circumplanetary disk of gas and dust like the one that is believed to have birthed the moons of Jupiter.

1h

Physicists use nanostructures to free photons for highly efficient white OLEDs

Thanks to intensive research in the past three decades, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been steadily conquering the electronics market — from OLED mobile phone displays to roll-out television screens, the list of applications is long. Current OLED research focuses in particular on improving the performance of white OLEDs for lighting elements such as ceiling or car interior lighting.

1h

Our brains appear uniquely tuned for musical pitch

Results of a study involving primates suggest that speech and music may have shaped the human brain's hearing circuits.

1h

Bet On The Bot: AI Beats The Professionals At 6-Player Texas Hold 'Em

Six-player Texas Hold 'em has been too tough for a machine to master — until now. A bot named Pluribus crushed some of the world's best poker players using brash and unorthodox strategies. (Image credit: Facebook AI Research)

1h

GPM satellite provides a 3D look at Tropical Storm Barry

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a couple of views of Tropical Storm Barry that showed its cloud heights and rainfall rates.

1h

Moon-forming disk discovered around distant planet

Using Earth's most powerful array of radio telescopes, astronomers have made the first observations of a circumplanetary disk of gas and dust like the one that is believed to have birthed the moons of Jupiter.

1h

Opioid use is reduced in patients treated with NSAIDS

Patients receiving a post-surgery prescription of ibuprofen with a rescue prescription of Percocet used less opioids than a group of similar patients who were prescribed just Percocet. The research was presented by a group from the New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases in New York City today at the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting.

1h

Study suggests arthroscopy more effective than MRI for chondral defects of the knee

Using arthroscopy to stage a lesion in the chondral area of the knee is more accurate than magnetic resonance imaging, according to researchers from the Rothman Institute, La Jolla, Calif. The findings were presented today at the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

1h

Does platelet-rich plasma therapy lower risk of meniscus repair

The use of platelet-rich plasma therapy can reduce the risk of a second meniscus failure after operation but does not seem to protect patients who have had surgery to repair an anterior cruciate ligament, according to research presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine.

1h

Moon-forming disk discovered around distant planet

Using Earth's most powerful array of radio telescopes, astronomers have made the first observations of a circumplanetary disk of gas and dust like the one that is believed to have birthed the moons of Jupiter.

1h

Changing your diet and taking supplements may not do anything for your heart health

You can't fix your heart by popping a pill. (Deposit Photos/) Americans are growing larger and more sedentary , and it shows in our cardiovascular systems. One in every four deaths in the country is due to heart disease. Over the years, cardiologists have recommended a wide variety of interventions to prevent these deaths— less salt , more omega-3s—but unfortunately, few of them seem to work. A r

1h

Human workers can listen to Google Assistant recordings

Google said its contractors are able to listen to recordings of what people say to its artificial-intelligence system Google Assistant.

1h

Sigma's new fp is the world's smallest full-frame mirrorless camera

Japanese photography company Sigma has unveiled the world’s smallest and lightest pocketable full-frame camera.

1h

Immune system effectiveness appears key to antibiotic success against persistent bacteria

Mathematical modeling suggests that the rate at which a patient's immune system clears slow-growing variants of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria is a key determinant of whether antibiotics can cure the infection.

1h

Endometriosis: Immune cell discovery could provide relief for women with 'hidden' pain disorder

A key cause for the pelvic pain experienced by women with endometriosis has been uncovered, potentially opening new opportunities for pain relief for the condition.

1h

Protesters Interrupt Amazon Event to Decry Its Work With ICE

Mass Protests Protests broke out at Amazon’s AWS Summit, a conference hosted in New York City to celebrate the company’s cloud computing services, on Thursday. As Amazon CTO Werner Vogels gave a presentation, a group led by a man identified in a tweet as a tech worker interrupted to protest the online retailer-turned-tech giant’s ties with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the feder

1h

Japanese Asteroid Mission Touches Down on Ryugu, Collects Sample

Hayabusa2 has successfully collected its second sample from the surface of asteroid Ryugu. (Credit: Illustration by Akihiro Ikeshita (C), JAXA) Hayabusa2’s encounters with asteroid Ryugu have been delightfully action-packed. In February, the Japanese spacecraft collected its first sample by swooping close and firing a bullet into the asteroid’s surface to stir up material it then snagged with a ho

1h

How Did 5,500 Miles of Seaweed Spread Across the Atlantic? Researchers Still Aren't Sure

Sargassum covers a beach in Playa del Carmen, Mexico, in April 2019. (Credit: Kamira/shutterstock) Marine scientist Mengqiu Wang is no stranger to questions about the forecast. The seaweed forecast, that is. Wang, a researcher at the University of South Florida, is one of the scientists who tracked the largest seaweed bloom in history – an expansive 5,500 mile cluster that stretched from the Gulf

1h

As Climate Changes, Hurricanes Get Wetter

The Gulf Coast is being inundated with rain and preparing for possible landfall of a tropical storm. A study of recent hurricanes found that climate change increased rainfall by up to 9 percent.

1h

Study questions if tongue-tie surgery for breastfeeding is always needed

New research raises questions as to whether too many infants are getting tongue-tie and lip tether surgery (also called frenulectomy) to help improve breastfeeding, despite limited medical evidence supporting the procedure. In a new study of 115 newborns referred for tongue-tie surgery, nearly 63% of children ended up not needing the procedure, and were able to successfully breastfeed following a

1h

Scientists map high-risk areas for hepatitis E

A team of scientists has compiled environmental and epidemiological data from around the world to develop a map that shows the riskiest areas for hepatitis E outbreaks. Their work opens the way to new avenues of research and prevention.

1h

Study finds no correlation between brain function and head impacts after 2 seasons of tackle football

To date, most studies that have attempted to understand connections between neurocognitive function and sub-concussive head impacts have been retrospective — and inconclusive.

1h

GPM satellite provides a 3D look at Tropical Storm Barry

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a couple of views of Tropical Storm Barry that showed its cloud heights and rainfall rates.

1h

Study suggests surgery better than observation for older patients with meniscus tear

Patients over age 50 who underwent an all inside arthroscopic repair technique had lower rates of subsequent total knee surgery than a similar group that was only observed, according to research presented at the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting today.Dr. Jason L. Dragoo from Stanford Medicine in Redwood City, Calif., and his team of researchers followed 48 patients ove

1h

Nanotechnology delivers hepatitis B vaccine

X-ray imaging shows that nanostructured silica acts as a protective vehicle to deliver intact antigen to the intestine so that it can trigger an immune response. The material can give rise to a polyvaccine against six diseases.

1h

Drug companies' sexually explicit ads reaching too many youngsters

A new study finds that though drug companies marketing erectile dysfunction drugs claim to be self-policing their advertising so that 90 percent of the audience viewing sexually explicit advertisements must be 18 or older, compliance is not being taken seriously.

1h

A New Twist on Artificial Muscles

Several designs could find uses in tiny robots and biomedical devices — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

No limit: AI poker bot is first to beat professionals at multiplayer game

Nature, Published online: 11 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02156-9 Triumph over five human opponents at Texas hold’em brings bots closer to solving complicated real-world problems.

1h

A New Twist on Artificial Muscles

Several designs could find uses in tiny robots and biomedical devices — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Hold ‘Em or Fold ‘Em? This A.I. Bluffs With the Best

Pluribus, a poker-playing algorithm, can beat the world’s top human players, proving that machines, too, can master our mind games.

1h

Russian nuclear submarine: Norway finds big radiation leak

Experts say there is no alarm, despite a high level of caesium at a Soviet-era submarine wreck.

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DeepMind’s ‘StarCraft II’ AI Will Soon Play Public Matches

It will soon be possible for players to take on DeepMind’s StarCraft II AI. Blizzard and Alphabet will be testing out the AlphaStar AI in a select number of public matches, giving the …

2h

Engineers revolutionize molecular microscopy

Engineers have developed a method for measuring the electrical potentials of molecules and molecular surfaces with previously unattainable precision and speed. They have, for the first time, succeeded in creating high resolution maps of molecular electrical potentials, i.e. the electric fields that surround all matter, within just a few minutes.

2h

Finger-prick blood test could safely reduce antibiotic use in patients with COPD

A simple finger-prick blood test could help prevent unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics for people with the lung condition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study.

2h

How procrastinators and doers differ genetically

Some people tend to postpone actions. In women, this trait is associated with a genetic predisposition towards a higher level of dopamine in the brain. This is what researchers discovered using genetic analyses and questionnaires. They were unable to identify this correlation in men.

2h

Experimental mini-accelerator achieves record energy

Scientists have achieved a new world record for an experimental type of miniature particle accelerator: For the first time, a terahertz powered accelerator more than doubled the energy of the injected electrons. At the same time, the setup significantly improved the electron beam quality compared to earlier experiments with the technique.

2h

No new males: Climate change threat to Cape Verde turtles

Rising temperatures could mean no male loggerhead turtles hatch at a key breeding ground by the end of this century, new research suggests.

2h

Molecular 'clutch' puts infection-fighting cells into gear

Two proteins that act as a 'clutch' in cells to put them in gear and drive our immune response have been identified for the first time.

2h

REM sleep silences the siren of the brain

Something frightening or unpleasant does not go unnoticed. In our brain, the so-called limbic circuit of cells and connections immediately becomes active. First and foremost, such experiences activate the amygdala. In order for the brain to function properly, the siren must also be switched off again. For this, a restful REM sleep, the part of the sleep with the most vivid dreams, turns out to be

2h

First step to induce self-repair in the central nervous system

Injured axons instruct Schwann cells to build specialized actin spheres to break down and remove axon fragments, thereby starting the regeneration process.

2h

Engineers revolutionize molecular microscopy

Engineers have developed a method for measuring the electrical potentials of molecules and molecular surfaces with previously unattainable precision and speed. They have, for the first time, succeeded in creating high resolution maps of molecular electrical potentials, i.e. the electric fields that surround all matter, within just a few minutes.

2h

Greater prevalence of anal cancer precursors for women living with HIV than prior reports

The prevalence of anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), which precede anal cancer, is much higher in women living with HIV than previously reported, a multi-site, national study involving hundreds of patients has found.

2h

Undersøgelse: Jo mere vi taler om klimaforandringer, desto mere tror vi på dem

Når du diskuterer klimaforandringer med vennerne, har du nemmere ved at anerkende klimavidenskaben.

2h

NASA selects UMD-led proposal to upgrade lunar instruments placed by Apollo missions

In 1969, University of Maryland physicist Doug Currie helped design three still-in-use lunar instruments placed on the moon by Apollo 11, 14 and 15. Fifty years later, Currie is the lead scientist for a just-approved NASA project to place next-generation versions of these instruments on the Moon.

2h

Expect another huge blob of algae on Lake Erie this summer

Heavy rains that inundated the Great Lakes region this spring will fuel another massive algae bloom across parts of western Lake Erie later this summer, researchers said Thursday.

2h

Pick the best produce with these science tricks

With our tips, you'll be able to pick a pineapple as confidently as this child. (Deposit Photos/) If you’ve ever stared at a pyramid of watermelons and just grabbed the one on top, keep reading. You and your probably-subpar fruit could use a lesson or two in how to select the ripest, juiciest melon at the market. Produce selection is one of those valuable life lessons most people never get. And h

2h

Who Owns the ‘Dueling Dinos’? Montana Supreme Court To Decide

The answer has broad implications for paleontology research—and maybe for museum collections, too.

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Former astronaut helps break flight record over poles

A former astronaut is back at NASA's Kennedy Space Center after helping to shatter a pair of records for a round-the-world airplane flight over the North and South poles.

2h

Harley-Davidson's electric Hog: 0 to 60 mph in 3 seconds

Harley-Davidson is releasing details about the electric motorcycle it's rolling out this year that it hopes will capture the imagination of a new generation of riders and put a charge into its diminishing sales.

2h

Through smoke and fire, NASA searches for answers

NASA satellites reveal a world marked by fire: a global patchwork of flame and smoke driven by the seasons and people. Summer wildfires rage across the western United States and Canada, Australia and Europe. In early spring, agricultural fires blanket the breadbasket regions of Southeast Asia as they do throughout the dry season in central and southern Africa and Brazil.

2h

Online calculator shows how trees can improve air quality and cut health costs

A new interactive online tool is set to encourage tree planting initiatives across the UK. It calculates how much pollution would be removed by planting trees in local areas, as well as the corresponding public health cost savings.

2h

What happens when you explode a chemical bond?

On bright summer days, the sunlight all around us is breaking bad by breaking bonds. Chemical bonds.

2h

My poker face: AI wins multiplayer game for first time

Pluribus wins 12-day session of Texas hold’em against some of the world’s best human players Rack up another win for the machines. An artificial intelligence called Pluribus has emerged victorious from a marathon 12-day poker session during which it played five human professionals at a time. Over 10,000 hands of no-limit Texas hold’em, the most popular form of the game, Pluribus won a virtual $48

2h

Feds: Truck driver likely caused self-driving shuttle crash

A collision between an experimental self-driving shuttle and a semi in downtown Las Vegas was probably the truck driver's fault, but the shuttle operator didn't have quick access to a controller that could have honked the horn or moved the autonomous vehicle, contributing to the accident, federal investigators have determined.

2h

Premera Blue Cross pays states $10 million over data breach

Premera Blue Cross, the largest health insurer in the Pacific Northwest, has agreed to pay $10 million to 30 states following an investigation into a data breach that exposed confidential information on more than 10 million people across the country.

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AI beats professionals at six-player Texas Hold ’Em poker

For the first time, an AI has won six-player, no-limit Texas Hold ’Em, beating professional poker players who each have more than $1 million in winnings

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Molecules pictured changing shape as they gain and lose electrons

When molecules gain even a small electric charge, their shapes and chemical properties shift. Now we’ve watched those changes in action for the first time

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Superstrong artificial muscle can lift 1000 times its own weight

Extremely strong artificial muscles that can lift 1000 times their own weight could be used for prosthetic limbs, exoskeletons and robots

2h

New virus found in one-third of all countries may have coevolved with human lineage

Published in Nature Microbiology, a new study has investigated the origin and evolution of a virus called crAssphage, which may have coevolved with human lineage.

2h

Mad cow disease: A computational model reveals the mechanism of replication of prions

An article published in the journal PLOS Pathogens reports a realistic computational model for the structure and mechanism of replication of prions, infectious agents responsible for mad cow disease and other neurodegenerative disorders of human and animals.

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Artificial 'muscles' achieve powerful pulling force

As a cucumber plant grows, it sprouts tightly coiled tendrils that seek out supports in order to pull the plant upward. This ensures the plant receives as much sunlight exposure as possible. Now, researchers at MIT have found a way to imitate this coiling-and-pulling mechanism to produce contracting fibers that could be used as artificial muscles for robots, prosthetic limbs, or other mechanical a

2h

Genomic analysis reveals ancient origins of domestic cattle

A new genome-wide analysis by Marta Pereira Verdugo and colleagues uncovers the complex origins of domestic cattle (Bos taurus), demonstrating why it has been difficult to untangle these origins from studies of modern breeds.

2h

Fiber-based artificial muscles get new and powerful twists

Three papers in this issue demonstrate new fiber-based designs within the world of artificial muscles, showing how these twisted and coiled designs can be controlled via heat, electricity and chemistry.

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Designing a diet to repair the gut after childhood malnutrition

Jeanette Gehrig and colleagues have designed a diet that can help digestive tracts damaged by acute childhood malnutrition develop a mature gut microbial community, necessary for proper growth and functioning.

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High-risk pregnancy: The interferon effect

Teams from the Institut Pasteur, the CNRS, Inserm, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital (AP-HP) and Université de Paris have identified a new cellular mechanism that alters placental development, potentially causing serious complications during pregnancy. The mechanism is linked with the production of interferon, a molecule produced in response to infection, especially viral infection.

2h

At last, an AI that outperforms humans in six-player poker

Achieving a milestone in artificial intelligence (AI) by moving beyond settings involving only two players, researchers present an AI that can outperform top human professionals in six-player no-limit Texas hold'em poker, the most popular form of poker played today.

2h

For malnourished children, new therapeutic food boosts gut microbes, healthy development

A new type of therapeutic food, specifically designed to repair the gut microbiomes of malnourished children, is superior to standard therapy in an initial clinical trial conducted in Bangladesh. Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research in Dhaka, Bangladesh, have undertaken a new approach for addressing the

2h

Area of brain linked to spatial awareness and planning also plays role in decision making

New research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows that the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), an area of the brain often associated with planning movements and spatial awareness, also plays a crucial role in making decisions about images in the field of view.

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New CRISPR platform expands RNA editing capabilities

The new system, dubbed RESCUE, allows RNA edits to be made that were not previously possible.

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Elicio Therapeutics' Darrell Irvine co-authors research published in Science

Elicio Therapeutics, a next generation immuno-oncology company, today announced that studies of its Amphiphile platform in combination with CAR-T therapy (AMP-CAR-T) have shown that activation of CAR-T cells in the lymphatic system gives massive CAR-T cell expansion, and significant functional improvements including enhanced CAR-T cell infiltration of solid tumors, increased anti-tumor cytolytic p

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New vaccine strategy boosts T-cell therapy

Super-charging a treatment for leukemia also makes it effective on solid tumors.

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Patterns in DNA reveal hundreds of unknown protein pairings

Researchers have now found a new way to extract useful information out of sequenced DNA. By cataloging subtle evolutionary signatures shared between pairs of genes in bacteria, the team discovered hundreds of previously unknown protein interactions. This method is now being applied to the human genome to seek new insights into how our proteins interact.

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Carnegie Mellon and Facebook AI beats professionals in six-player poker

An artificial intelligence program developed by Carnegie Mellon University in collaboration with Facebook AI has defeated leading professionals in six-player no-limit Texas hold'em poker, the world's most popular form of poker.

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Ancient genomics pinpoint origin and rapid turnover of cattle in the Fertile Crescent

Ancient DNA has revealed how the prehistory of the Near East's largest domestic animal, the cow, chimes with the emergence of the first complex economies, cities and the rise and fall of the world earliest human empires.

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Immune system effectiveness appears key to antibiotic success against persistent bacteria

Mathematical modeling suggests that the rate at which a patient's immune system clears slow-growing variants of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria is a key determinant of whether antibiotics can cure the infection. Tsuyoshi Mikkaichi and Alexander Hoffmann of the University of California, Los Angeles, and the MRSA Systems Immunobiology Group present this work in PLOS Compu

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Mathematical model explores daily rhythms in pain sensitivity

A new computational model successfully predicts how daily pain sensitivity rhythms affect pain processing, both in healthy adults and in people with neuropathic pain. Jennifer Crodelle of New York University and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

2h

Sheaths drive powerful new artificial muscles

Over the last 15 years, researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and their international colleagues have invented several types of strong, powerful artificial muscles using materials ranging from high-tech carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to ordinary fishing line. In a new study published July 12, 2019 in the journal Science, the researchers describe their latest advance, called sheath-run artifici

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Researchers survey immune molecules found inside mycetoma lesions

Mycetoma is a common neglected disease caused by either fungi or bacteria which organize themselves into grains–areas of inflammation surrounded by a collagen capsule. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have studied two immune molecules inside these grains and discovered patterns to where the molecules appear.

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House mouse shapes Toxoplasma gondii distribution

The humble house mouse has dramatically shaped parasitic Toxoplasma gondii populations in West Africa and around the world, according to research in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. As different strains affect their hosts differently, the research, led by Lokman Galal and Aurelien Mercier of INSERM and the University of Limoges, provides insights into which populations are infecting humans and an

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Running of the Bulls 2019: The Fiesta de San Fermín

The annual nine-day Fiesta de San Fermín began in Spain this week. The festival, including the famous Running of the Bulls, attracts thousands of visitors to Pamplona every year. The festival kicks off with massive crowds awaiting the chupinazo in Pamplona’s town square, followed by a carnival, fireworks, the Running of the Bulls, and many bullfights. Held since 1591, San Fermín remains a popular

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Ancient DNA sheds light on early cattle

Genomic analysis reveals a complex history in the ancient Near East. Dyani Lewis reports.

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AI beats professionals at six-player Texas Hold ’Em poker

For the first time, an AI has won six-player, no-limit Texas Hold ’Em, beating professional poker players who each have more than $1 million in winnings

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Concerned about climate change? Plant a Victory Garden

Catherine McDonnell-Forney has been growing food at her Minneapolis home for the entire decade that she's lived there. But now she tends a registered Climate Victory Garden.

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Skopje zoo's chimp returns after recovering from depression

Koko the chimpanzee, once a star in Skopje's zoo, has returned home after spending 10 years in the Netherlands recovering from depression, the zoo says.

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With no 737 MAX exposure, Delta reports banner quarter

Delta Air Lines rode strong consumer travel demand to banner earnings last quarter, benefiting from the company's lack of exposure to Boeing's grounded 737 MAX planes.

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Coral skeleton crystals record ocean acidification

The acidification of the oceans is recorded in the crystals of the coral skeleton. This is a new tool for studying past environmental changes and combating climate change. Such is the main conclusion of a study led by the Spanish scientist Ismael Coronado Vila, from the Institute of Paleobiology in Warsaw (Poland).

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No link between flu vaccine in pregnancy and later health problems in children

There is no association between exposure to the 2009 H1N1 'swine flu' vaccine during pregnancy and health problems in early childhood, concludes a new study.

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Mattresses could emit higher levels of VOCs during sleep

Hundreds of household items, including furniture, paint and electronics, emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which at high levels can pose health risks. Now, researchers have measured the emission rates of the gaseous compounds released by several types of polyurethane mattresses under simulated sleeping conditions, finding levels of some VOCs that could be worrisome for children and infants.

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Cats in Australia Kill Over 2 Billion Wild Animals Each Year

Humans love cats, but the furry felines are stone-cold killers

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Skopje zoo's chimp returns after recovering from depression

Koko the chimpanzee, once a star in Skopje's zoo, has returned home after spending 10 years in the Netherlands recovering from depression, the zoo says.

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Facebook’s new poker-playing AI could wreck the online poker industry—so it’s not being released

Multiplayer poker is the latest game to fall to artificial intelligence—and the techniques used could be vital for trading, product pricing, and routing vehicles.

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A shiatsu foot massager for 44 percent off? I'd buy it.

For more deals and product chatter, check out our exclusive Facebook group . Mynt Tapping Foot Massager (Amazon/) I have been trying to go for a run every day over the past few weeks. If I'm bored or have an extra hour to kill before I need to leave my apartment, I might even go on two runs. It feels great until later on that night when my feet ache and I debate never leaving my couch. My solutio

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Starving children often don’t recover, even when fed enough. Restoring their gut bacteria could help

Most of the new experiments were in animals, but a small group of malnourished children improved

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News at a glance

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Silanone synthesis

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Cats in trees

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Molecular structure elucidation with charge-state control

The charge state of a molecule governs its physicochemical properties, such as conformation, reactivity, and aromaticity, with implications for on-surface synthesis, catalysis, photoconversion, and applications in molecular electronics. On insulating, multilayer sodium chloride (NaCl) films, we controlled the charge state of organic molecules and resolved their structures in neutral, cationic, an

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Strain-programmable fiber-based artificial muscle

Artificial muscles may accelerate the development of robotics, haptics, and prosthetics. Although advances in polymer-based actuators have delivered unprecedented strengths, producing these devices at scale with tunable dimensions remains a challenge. We applied a high-throughput iterative fiber-drawing technique to create strain-programmable artificial muscles with dimensions spanning three orde

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Sheath-run artificial muscles

Although guest-filled carbon nanotube yarns provide record performance as torsional and tensile artificial muscles, they are expensive, and only part of the muscle effectively contributes to actuation. We describe a muscle type that provides higher performance, in which the guest that drives actuation is a sheath on a twisted or coiled core that can be an inexpensive yarn. This change from guest-

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Shape memory nanocomposite fibers for untethered high-energy microengines

Classic rotating engines are powerful and broadly used but are of complex design and difficult to miniaturize. It has long remained challenging to make large-stroke, high-speed, high-energy microengines that are simple and robust. We show that torsionally stiffened shape memory nanocomposite fibers can be transformed upon insertion of twist to store and provide fast and high-energy rotations. The

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Chloride capture using a C-H hydrogen-bonding cage

Tight binding and high selectivity are hallmarks of biomolecular recognition. Achieving these behaviors with synthetic receptors has usually been associated with OH and NH hydrogen bonding. Contrary to this conventional wisdom, we designed a chloride-selective receptor in the form of a cryptand-like cage using only CH hydrogen bonding. Crystallography showed chloride stabilized by six short 2.7-a

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Enhanced CAR-T cell activity against solid tumors by vaccine boosting through the chimeric receptor

Chimeric antigen receptor–T cell (CAR-T) therapy has been effective in the treatment of hematologic malignancies, but it has shown limited efficacy against solid tumors. Here we demonstrate an approach to enhancing CAR-T function in solid tumors by directly vaccine-boosting donor cells through their chimeric receptor in vivo. We designed amphiphile CAR-T ligands (amph-ligands) that, upon injectio

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Characterization of hydrogen-substituted silylium ions in the condensed phase

Hydrogen-substituted silylium ions are long-sought reactive species. We report a protolysis strategy that chemoselectively cleaves either an Si–C(sp 2 ) or an Si–H bond using a carborane acid to access the full series of [CHB 11 H 5 Br 6 ] – -stabilized R 2 SiH + , RSiH 2 + , and SiH 3 + cations, where bulky tert -butyl groups at the silicon atom (R = t Bu) were crucial to avoid substituent redis

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Ancient cattle genomics, origins, and rapid turnover in the Fertile Crescent

Genome-wide analysis of 67 ancient Near Eastern cattle, Bos taurus, remains reveals regional variation that has since been obscured by admixture in modern populations. Comparisons of genomes of early domestic cattle to their aurochs progenitors identify diverse origins with separate introgressions of wild stock. A later region-wide Bronze Age shift indicates rapid and widespread introgression of

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IFITM proteins inhibit placental syncytiotrophoblast formation and promote fetal demise

Elevated levels of type I interferon (IFN) during pregnancy are associated with intrauterine growth retardation, preterm birth, and fetal demise through mechanisms that are not well understood. A critical step of placental development is the fusion of trophoblast cells into a multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast (ST) layer. Fusion is mediated by syncytins, proteins deriving from ancestral endogenou

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Posterior parietal cortex plays a causal role in perceptual and categorical decisions

Posterior parietal cortex (PPC) activity correlates with monkeys’ decisions during visual discrimination and categorization tasks. However, recent work has questioned whether decision-correlated PPC activity plays a causal role in such decisions. That study focused on PPC’s contribution to motor aspects of decisions (deciding where to move), but not sensory evaluation aspects (deciding what you a

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Protein interaction networks revealed by proteome coevolution

Residue-residue coevolution has been observed across a number of protein-protein interfaces, but the extent of residue coevolution between protein families on the whole-proteome scale has not been systematically studied. We investigate coevolution between 5.4 million pairs of proteins in Escherichia coli and between 3.9 millions pairs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis . We find strong coevolution for

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New Products

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A father's odyssey

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A sense of space in postrhinal cortex

A topographic representation of local space is critical for navigation and spatial memory. In humans, topographic spatial learning relies upon the parahippocampal cortex, damage to which renders patients unable to navigate their surroundings or develop new spatial representations. Stable spatial signals have not yet been observed in its rat homolog, the postrhinal cortex. We recorded from single

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Effects of microbiota-directed foods in gnotobiotic animals and undernourished children

To examine the contributions of impaired gut microbial community development to childhood undernutrition, we combined metabolomic and proteomic analyses of plasma samples with metagenomic analyses of fecal samples to characterize the biological state of Bangladeshi children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) as they transitioned, after standard treatment, to moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) wi

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A sparse covarying unit that describes healthy and impaired human gut microbiota development

Characterizing the organization of the human gut microbiota is a formidable challenge given the number of possible interactions between its components. Using a statistical approach initially applied to financial markets, we measured temporally conserved covariance among bacterial taxa in the microbiota of healthy members of a Bangladeshi birth cohort sampled from 1 to 60 months of age. The result

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Late Pleistocene exploration and settlement of the Americas by modern humans

North and South America were the last continents to be explored and settled by modern humans at the end of the Pleistocene. Genetic data, derived from contemporary populations and ancient individuals, show that the first Americans originated from Asia and after several population splits moved south of the continental ice sheets that covered Canada sometime between ~17.5 and ~14.6 thousand years (

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Comment on "Long-term measles-induced immunomodulation increases overall childhood infectious disease mortality"

Mina et al . (Reports, 8 May 2015, p. 694) used population-level statistical analysis to argue that measles infection results in a 2- to 3-year immunomodulation, implicating measles in substantially more child mortality than previously thought. We show, using both simulation and data from Iceland, that the statistical approach used may be confounded by the 2-year periodicity of measles incidence

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Response to Comment on "Long-term measles-induced immunomodulation increases overall childhood infectious disease mortality"

Thakkar and McCarthy suggest that periodicity in measles incidence artifactually drives our estimates of a 2- to 3-year duration of measles "immune-amnesia." We show that periodicity has a negligible effect relative to the immunological signal we detect, and demonstrate that immune-amnesia is largely undetectable in small populations with large fluctuations in mortality of the type they use for i

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The DNC Army That Could Soon Descend on Swing States

ATLANTA—A sort of heat-induced hush settled over the city’s concrete downtown. The morning rain had just stopped, and the sun peeked out occasionally from behind the clouds to bake the sidewalk. Cars and people seemed to move through the streets at half their usual pace, dreamily, through thick layers of humid air. And inside a university building on Luckie Street, 300 college juniors were learni

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The U.S. Is Worried About China’s Investments—This Time in Israel

U.S. national-security officials have for years warned developing nations about the dangers of allowing Chinese investment in their countries. But now the Defense Department is worried about China’s investments in one of America’s closest allies, Israel. China’s ultimate aim, defense officials fear, is the same as the one it has pursued in Africa, East Asia, and elsewhere: to chip away at America

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Artificial intelligence has now pretty much conquered poker

A new artificial intelligence called Pluribus is a real card shark at six-player no-limit Texas Hold’em.

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Sheaths drive powerful new artificial muscles

Over the last 15 years, researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and their international colleagues have invented several types of strong, powerful artificial muscles using materials ranging from high-tech carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to ordinary fishing line.

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Mathematical model explores daily rhythms in pain sensitivity

A new computational model successfully predicts how daily pain sensitivity rhythms affect pain processing, both in healthy adults and in people with neuropathic pain. Jennifer Crodelle of New York University and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Ancient genomics pinpoint origin and rapid turnover of cattle in the Fertile Crescent

The keeping of livestock began in the Ancient Near East and underpinned the emergence of complex economies and then cities. Subsequently, it is there that the world's first empires rose and fell. Now, ancient DNA has revealed how the prehistory of the region's largest domestic animal, the cow, chimes with these events.

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New CRISPR platform expands RNA editing capabilities

CRISPR-based tools have revolutionized our ability to target disease-linked genetic mutations. CRISPR technology comprises a growing family of tools that can manipulate genes and their expression, including by targeting DNA with the enzymes Cas9 and Cas12 and targeting RNA with the enzyme Cas13. This collection offers different strategies for tackling mutations. Targeting disease-linked mutations

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Patterns in DNA reveal hundreds of unknown protein pairings

Sequencing a genome is getting cheaper, but making sense of the resulting data remains hard. Researchers have now found a new way to extract useful information out of sequenced DNA.

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Mathematical model explores daily rhythms in pain sensitivity

A new computational model successfully predicts how daily pain sensitivity rhythms affect pain processing, both in healthy adults and in people with neuropathic pain. Jennifer Crodelle of New York University and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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This New Poker Bot Can Beat Multiple Pros—at Once

Software designed by a Carnegie Mellon professor and Facebook researcher beat five human pros in No Limit Texas Hold 'Em.

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AI conquers multi-player no-limit poker

Researchers show that artificial intelligence can beat the best in the world’s most popular gambling game. Barry Keily reports.

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Ancient DNA sheds light on early cattle

Genomic analysis reveals a complex history in the ancient Near East. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Hayabusa2 Probe Collects Second Sample From Asteroid Ryugu

The spacecraft gathered samples from the surface of the asteroid Ryugu earlier this year, and it bombed the asteroid a few months later. Now, the probe has taken another trip to the surface to scoop up pristine material that used to be buried below the surface. The post Hayabusa2 Probe Collects Second Sample From Asteroid Ryugu appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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How Do You Put a Plane Engine in a Car?

High-risk design trials could create super-efficient vehicles — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New CRISPR platform expands RNA editing capabilities

CRISPR-based tools have revolutionized our ability to target disease-linked genetic mutations. CRISPR technology comprises a growing family of tools that can manipulate genes and their expression, including by targeting DNA with the enzymes Cas9 and Cas12 and targeting RNA with the enzyme Cas13. This collection offers different strategies for tackling mutations. Targeting disease-linked mutations

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Patterns in DNA reveal hundreds of unknown protein pairings

Sequencing a genome is getting cheaper, but making sense of the resulting data remains hard. Researchers have now found a new way to extract useful information out of sequenced DNA.

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Giant batteries and cheap solar power are shoving fossil fuels off the grid

Cost of solar power has dropped by 76% since 2012

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A Groundbreaking Study Is Good News for Cats—And People

Of the many parasites known to control the mind of their host, none is more famous than Toxoplasma gondii —the single-celled organism known colloquially as Toxo. It can survive in a variety of animals, but it only reproduces sexually in cats . If it gets into mice or rats, it alters their behavior so they become fatally attracted to the scent of feline urine. They get eaten, the cat gets infected

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What happens when you explode a chemical bond?

Light-induced breakage of chemical bonds can lead to damage in the body and environment, but techniques for studying this photochemical reaction have been limited to before and after snapshots. With attosecond lasers and a technique to probe the energy states of photoexcited molecules, chemists have made a movie of the process preceding breakup. The technique will help study biological molecules t

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Valve launches 'Steam Labs,' a new hub for testing out experimental features

"Steam Labs" is Valve's new experiment hub, which lets anyone test out various "rough, ephemeral" work-in-progress features across the storefront and give the company their feedback.

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This blockchain-based card game shows us the future of ownership

Gods Unchained is riding a wave of hype because of the way it lets players own digital cards. But the core concept could reach beyond games.

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Courting controversy, scientists team with industry to tackle one of the world’s most destructive crops

Growing number of researchers say it’s time to make the best of a bad situation

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Hear what music would have sounded like at Stonehenge 4000 years ago

You can now listen to what music would have sounded like at Stonehenge 4000 years ago, with all of its stones in their original positions

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Karaoke-Sleep Study Links Disrupted REM With Poor Memory Processing

An unusual experiment suggests that interrupted REM sleep can interfere with the amygdala’s ability to process emotional memories overnight—in this case, the distressing memories of listening to oneself sing out of tune.

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Controversial mega-telescope set to begin construction in Hawaii

Nature, Published online: 11 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02155-w Thirty Meter Telescope project has faced years of legal challenges over planned Mauna Kea site.

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How the Spanish press became corrupted

David Jiménez, former editor of El Mundo , recently published a book called El Director that describes the rampant corruption he saw while running the newspaper. The corruption of Spanish press is symptomatic of a larger issue with corruption that is on-going in Spain. Most recently, the People's Party was ousted from power after a massive corruption scandal, leading to the rise of the Spanish So

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'Renegade' White Dwarf Survived a Supernova. Now It's Warping the Little Dipper Before Our Eyes.

Four stars that seemingly survived a massive supernova explosion are now lighter, speedier and anxious to leave their home galaxy.

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How DVR is changing the world of TV advertising

As digital advertising takes over the world of marketing, with popular focus on everything from social media ads to search engine ads, it can be easy to forget about television. In recent years, though, the TV landscape has changed significantly. For example, half of TV drama viewers now watch through digital video recorders (DVR).

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What happens when you explode a chemical bond?

Light-induced breakage of chemical bonds can lead to damage in the body and environment, but techniques for studying this photochemical reaction have been limited to before and after snapshots. With attosecond lasers and a technique to probe the energy states of photoexcited molecules, chemists have made a movie of the process preceding breakup. The technique will help study biological molecules t

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Survivors' near-miss experiences on 9/11 linked to post-traumatic stress

People who narrowly avoid disaster do not necessarily escape tragedy unharmed, and their knowledge of the victims' fate shapes how survivors respond to traumatic events, according to results that explore the effects of near-miss experiences associated with the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

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Early puberty in girls may be 'big bang theory' for migraine

Adolescent girls who reach puberty at an earlier age may also have a greater chance of developing migraine headaches, according to new research.

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The best of both worlds: How to solve real problems on modern quantum computers

Researchers have developed hybrid algorithms to run on size-limited quantum machines and have demonstrated them for practical applications.

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For non-Hispanic whites in the US, life expectancy outlook worsens

For nearly a century, life expectancy in the United States has been increasing. By contrast, research shows that mortality numbers for non-Hispanic whites in the U.S. are now rising, especially for women, 25- to 44-year-olds, and people living in rural areas.

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What will it take to live on the moon?

With NASA planning to revisit the lunar surface by 2024 and send multiple expeditions by 2028, Rutgers University's Haym Benaroya is optimistic that people will someday live on the moon.

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Hear what music would have sounded like at Stonhenge 4000 years ago

You can now listen to what music would have sounded like at Stonehenge 4000 years ago, with all of its stones in their original positions

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The Magic In Your Eyes

What spectators' gaze reveals about the conjuring arts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What happens when you explode a chemical bond?

Light-induced breakage of chemical bonds can lead to damage in the body and environment, but techniques for studying this photochemical reaction have been limited to before and after snapshots. With attosecond lasers and a technique to probe the energy states of photoexcited molecules, UC Berkeley chemists have made a movie of the process preceding breakup. The technique will help study biological

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Beckman Coulter: Ultra Harmonic Technology for Better Centrifugation

Prevent poor centrifugal separation with Ultra Harmonic Technology!

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Career differences main driver of wage inequality

Why does a 55-year-old worker earn on average around 40 percent more than a 25-year-old? Is there a link between average wage growth and rising wage inequality? Many answers to these fundamental questions have so far remained largely unanswered. The economists Prof. Moritz Kuhn and Prof. Christian Bayer from the University of Bonn have now evaluated wage data for the period from 2006 to 2016. They

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'Crosstalk' between genes promotes brain inflammation in Alzheimer's

A new study offers clues about how to prevent inflammation of brain tissue, which promotes Alzheimer's disease (AD).

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Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time

Researchers have shot a 'movie' of subtle molecular motions in unprecedented detail, shedding light on previously unseen chemical dynamics.

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Prescribing opioids for a sprained ankle?

A new research report shows an increase in patients being prescribed opioids after experiencing an ankle sprain. The authors urge fellow physicians to be aware of the current treatment guidelines.

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New superomniphobic glass soars high on butterfly wings using machine learning

Glass for technologies like displays, tablets, laptops, smartphones, and solar cells need to pass light through, but could benefit from a surface that repels water, dirt, oil, and other liquids. Researchers have created a nanostructure glass that takes inspiration from the wings of the glasswing butterfly to create a new type of glass that is not only very clear across a wide variety of wavelength

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VR app gives students a new way to see inner workings of cells

An educational app created at the University of Alberta is giving cell biology students a brand new perspective on their subject and may also offer a glimpse into the not-so-distant future of post-secondary education.

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Commercial supersonic aircraft could return to the skies

Flying faster than the speed of sound still sounds futuristic for regular people, more than 15 years after the last commercial supersonic flights ended. The planes that made those journeys, the 14 aircraft collectively known as the Concorde, flew from 1976 to 2003. It traveled three times faster than regular passenger aircraft, but the airlines that flew it couldn't make a profit on its trips.

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New virtual laboratory for merging neutron stars

For the first time, a high-performance computer will make it possible to simulate gravitational waves, magnetic fields and neutrino physics of neutron stars simultaneously.

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Long-Toed Bird Preserved In Amber For 99 Million Years

A long-toed bird preserved in amber from Myanmar is the first of its kind. (Credit: Lida Xing) Smaller than a sparrow, a bird that lived 99 million years ago in what's now Southeast Asia had legs unlike any other avian. The bird's hindlimb features one toe longer than its entire lower leg bone. Lucky for paleontologists, a piece of amber has preserved the animal's odd anatomy. Found in Burmese amb

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Ex-Tesla Engineer: Okay, Yes, I Uploaded Autopilot Trade Secrets to My iCloud—What's the Big Deal?

A former Tesla engineer admitted on Monday that ahead of leaving the company and joining a competitor, he uploaded Tesla files to his personal iCloud account as well as made .zip files with …

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Climate Change Is Destroying Greenland’s Historic Viking Towns

Ghost Town The world’s worsening climate crisis is erasing traces of human history. By the end of the century, most of the historic Viking settlements dotting the coastlines of Greenland will rot away, according to new climate models published in the journal Scientific Reports on Thursday. The report is a troubling sign that global climate change is not only threatening humanity’s future — but al

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New Tool Helps Contain Molten Plasma in Fusion Reactors

Under The Hood As scientists try to ramp up nuclear fusion reactors, they’ll need better ways to monitor and diagnose the volatile reactions. Current diagnostic systems aren’t strong enough to survive industrial-scale reactions like what might occur at ITER, the experimental facility currently being built in France, according to a Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory press release . So a team of P

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Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time

Researchers have shot a 'movie' of subtle molecular motions in unprecedented detail, shedding light on previously unseen chemical dynamics.

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US government watchdog gets new director

The U.S. Office of Research Integrity (ORI) has a new director. Elisabeth (Lis) Handley, currently deputy operations director of the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) Center for Program Integrity, will become interim director of the ORI on August 26. (CMS and ORI are both part of the Department of Health and Human Services … Continue reading US government watchdog gets new director

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The Democrats’ Gamble on Health Care for the Undocumented

Anxiety spiked among many centrist Democrats when all 10 presidential candidates at a recent debate raised their hand, as if pledging allegiance, to declare they would support providing health care to undocumented immigrants. The image, which drew instant ridicule from President Donald Trump on Twitter, seemed to encapsulate the primary’s larger lurch to the left during the early stages of the 20

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Pete Buttigieg Is Ready to Talk About Racial Inequality

Frederick Douglass’s warning to lawmakers was sharp and direct. “No republic is safe that tolerates a privileged class, or denies to any of its citizens equal rights and equal means to maintain them,” he wrote in The Atlantic in 1866. The postwar government had not done its job, and it needed to be “consistent with itself”; consistent with the founding document that said “all men are created equa

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For non-Hispanic whites in the US, life expectancy outlook worsens

For nearly a century, life expectancy in the United States has been increasing. By contrast, research from Irma Elo and Samuel Preston of the University of Pennsylvania shows that mortality numbers for non-Hispanic whites in the U.S. are now rising, especially for women, 25- to 44-year-olds, and people living in rural areas.

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The best of both worlds: how to solve real problems on modern quantum computers

Researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, along with researchers at Clemson University and Fujitsu Laboratories of America, have developed hybrid algorithms to run on size-limited quantum machines and have demonstrated them for practical applications.

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Cincinnati researchers say early puberty in girls may be 'big bang theory' for migraine

Adolescent girls who reach puberty at an earlier age may also have a greater chance of developing migraine headaches, according to new research from investigators at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine.

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Yield-boosting stay-green gene identified from 118-year-old experiment in corn

A corn gene identified from a 118-year-old experiment at the University of Illinois could boost yields of today's elite hybrids with no added inputs. The gene, identified in a recent Plant Biotechnology Journal study, controls a critical piece of senescence, or seasonal die-back, in corn. When the gene is turned off, field-grown elite hybrids yielded 4.6 bushels more per acre on average than stand

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New superomniphobic glass soars high on butterfly wings using machine learning

Glass for technologies like displays, tablets, laptops, smartphones, and solar cells need to pass light through, but could benefit from a surface that repels water, dirt, oil, and other liquids. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have created a nanostructure glass that takes inspiration from the wings of the glasswing butterfly to create a new type of gla

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Researching new ways to use secondary logging materials

The first image that may come to mind when someone says "logging" is trucks loaded with logs, ready for transport to a sawmill. But what about the rest of the tree: the branches and tops that cannot be cut into boards or made into plywood?

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Tsunami-safe Gulf is nothing but, experts warn

A major oil tanker expressway in the Persian Gulf once thought a low-risk area is actually a 'highly vulnerable hotspot' for monster waves, new research reveals.

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Yield-boosting stay-green gene identified from 118-year-old experiment in corn

A corn gene identified from a 118-year-old experiment at the University of Illinois could boost yields of today's elite hybrids with no added inputs. The gene, identified in a recent Plant Biotechnology Journal study, controls a critical piece of senescence, or seasonal die-back, in corn. When the gene is turned off, field-grown elite hybrids yielded 4.6 bushels more per acre on average than stand

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Norway Surveys Sunken Soviet Submarine

A Norwegian team has found some radioactivity leaking from the sub, which sank in 1989. But they say it poses no threat to the environment. (Image credit: Ægir 6000/Institute of Marine Research Norway)

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Brooklyn Electric Car Races Add Showroom Stock Cars

Formula E electric car racing returns to New York City. For the first time, batteries are strong enough to last the full race. More automakers are getting involved; Porsche comes in next year. The post Brooklyn Electric Car Races Add Showroom Stock Cars appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Anonymous apps risk fuelling cyberbullying but they also fill a vital role

When the anonymous social media app YOLO was launched in May 2019, it topped the iTunes downloads chart after just one week, despite the lack of a major marketing campaign. Designed to be used with social network Snapchat, YOLO lets users invite people to send them anonymous messages. Its viral popularity followed that of other apps, such as the now infamously defunct Yik Yak as well as Whisper, S

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Preventing colorectal cancer and stillbirths

Characterizing a tiny protein—determining its shape and what it does—was the first step taken by Dr. Kirsten Wolthers and her colleagues in their effort to learn more about a very common molecule that is implicated in a wide range of human ailments.

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SLAC makes 'electron camera,' a world-class tool for ultrafast science, available to scientists worldwide

Over the past few years, the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has developed a new tool to visualize physical and chemical processes with outstanding clarity: an ultra-high-speed "electron camera" capable of tracking atomic motions in a broad range of materials in real time. Starting this week, the lab has made this tool available to researchers worldwide.

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U.S. ties record for number of high tide flooding days in 2018

Coastal communities across the U.S. continued to see increased high tide flooding last year, forcing their residents and visitors to deal with flooded shorelines, streets and basements—a trend that is expected to continue this year. The elevated water levels affected coastal economies, tourism and crucial infrastructure like septic systems and stormwater systems, according to a new NOAA report.

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The environmental cost of abandoning your tent at a music festival

After years of depressing images of huge fields strewn with abandoned tents and rubbish in the aftermath of music festivals, it was heartening to hear Glastonbury Festival organisers claim that 99% of festival-goers' tents were picked up after the festival. For a festival of 200,000 people this is a huge achievement. But really it should be normal. Hopefully this bodes well for future years, becau

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A connection between quantum correlations and spacetime geometry

Researchers of the Academy explore the consequences of locality for measurements distributed in spacetime. Their article has now been published in the Nature journal Quantum Information.

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Bird-like dinosaur is oldest unearthed in North America

A team of palaeontologists from the UK and US have identified a one of a kind 150 million year old dinosaur skeleton. The specimen has been classified as a new species to science with the discovery also raising questions about the evolution of avian flight.

4h

Study provides framework for assessing historic wrought iron structures

The Institution of Civil Engineers will honor the research of a New York University professor who employed terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to examine Ireland's historic Guinness Bridge.

4h

Disney’s New Lion King Remake Is Predictably Weird

For the Millennials who experienced The Lion King as children, Disney’s mega-popular 1994 animated feature likely didn’t require much suspension of disbelief. Sure, there was a Hamlet -esque regicide plot line among some lions. Yes, animals of all stripes communed in relative harmony before that. But the royal intrigue and interspecies relationships were tied together with some undeniably catchy

4h

Teflon Salvini: Italy’s Untouchable Politician

ROME—The scoop from BuzzFeed News was a huge one: audio recordings in which a close associate of Matteo Salvini, Italy’s interior minister and the country’s most powerful politician, is heard negotiating a complex energy deal with Russian interlocutors that would route funds to Salvini’s right-wing populist League party ahead of European Parliament elections. “A new Europe has to be close to Russ

4h

Why Americans Just Can’t Quit Their Microwaves

For millions of American college students, the first taste of adult freedom comes in a bite of Stouffer’s French Bread Pizza or a salty slurp from a Cup Noodles. Hemmed in by fire-safety rules and tight budgets, dorm dwellers have long embraced such microwaved delicacies, honing cook times in shared lounges with low-powered appliances balanced atop mini fridges. When I was in school, my first mic

4h

DNA analysis reveals cryptic underwater ecosystem engineers

They look like smears of pink bubblegum on the rocks off British Columbia's coast, indistinguishable from one another.

4h

Survivors' near-miss experiences on 9/11 linked to post-traumatic stress

People who narrowly avoid disaster do not necessarily escape tragedy unharmed, and their knowledge of the victims' fate shapes how survivors respond to traumatic events, according to the results of a new paper by a UB psychologist that explores the effects of near-miss experiences associated with the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

4h

'Crosstalk' between genes promotes brain inflammation in Alzheimer's

A new study by scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) offers clues about how to prevent inflammation of brain tissue, which promotes Alzheimer's disease (AD).

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Yield-boosting stay-green gene identified from 118-year-old experiment in corn

A corn gene identified from a 118-year-old experiment at the University of Illinois could boost yields of today's elite hybrids with no added inputs. The gene, identified in a new Plant Biotechnology Journal study, controls a critical piece of senescence, or seasonal die-back, in corn. When the gene is turned off, field-grown elite hybrids yielded 4.6 bushels more per acre on average than standard

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Prescribing opioids for a sprained ankle?

A new research report shows an increase in patients being prescribed opioids after experiencing an ankle sprain. The Michigan Medicine authors urge fellow physicians to be aware of the current treatment guidelines.

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New in the Hastings Center Report

Regulating heritable genome editing, why gynecological surgery needs reform, and more in the latest issue.

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DNA analysis reveals cryptic underwater ecosystem engineers

They look like smears of pink bubblegum on the rocks off British Columbia's coast, indistinguishable from one another. But a new DNA analysis of coralline algae has revealed a wealth of different species — a diversity that could hold the key to protecting critical underwater habitats like kelp forests.

4h

Cancer scientists identify new drug target for multiple tumor types

A dysfunctional enzyme involved in building cancer cell membranes helps fuel tumor growth; when it's disabled or depleted in mouse models, tumors shrank significantly.

4h

Fossil fuels increasingly offer a poor return on energy investment

Researchers have calculated the EROI for fossil fuels over a 16 year period and found that at the finished fuel stage, the ratios are much closer to those of renewable energy sources — roughly 6:1, and potentially as low as 3:1 in the case of electricity.

4h

How plague pathogens trick the immune system

Yersinia have spread fear and terror, especially in the past, but today they have still not been completely eradicated. The bacteria inject various enzymes, including YopO, into the macrophages of the immune system. There it is activated and prevents the defense cells from enclosing and digesting the plague bacteria. Using the latest methods, scientists have now deciphered how YopO changes its sha

4h

Facial plastic surgery in men enhances perception of attractiveness, trustworthiness

In the first of a kind study, plastic surgeons found that when a man chose to have facial plastic surgery, it significantly increased perceptions of attractiveness, likeability, social skills, or trustworthiness. The study did not show a significant impact on perceptions of gender (masculinity), whereas a similar study performed with women in 2015 showed a significant increase in ratings of femini

4h

Scientists gain new insights into the mechanisms of cell division

Mitosis is the process by which the genetic information encoded on chromosomes is equally distributed to two daughter cells, a fundamental feature of all life on earth. Scientists now examine how centrioles contribute to this process. The findings help to elucidate the function of these tiny cellular structures in mitosis.

4h

Mustering a milder mustard, broccoli, cabbage

Cruciferous vegetables — the mustards, broccolis and cabbages of the world — share a distinct taste. But the same compounds that make them bitter also make them toxic at some levels. Biologists have mapped the crystal structure of a key protein that makes the metabolites responsible for the bitter taste in Brassicas. A new study is the first snapshot of how the protein evolved and came to churn

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Daily briefing: Homo sapiens fossil is the oldest ever found outside Africa

Nature, Published online: 08 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02158-7 Skull found in Greece might rewrite history of humans in Europe, Hayabusa2 probes an asteroid’s interior for the first time and rewatching the Apollo 11 landing with space legend Wally Funk.

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Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time

Researchers have used ultra-high-speed X-ray pulses to make a high-resolution "movie" of a molecule undergoing structural motions. The research, published in Nature Chemistry, reveals the dynamics of the processes in unprecedented detail—capturing the excitation of a single electron in the molecule.

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DNA analysis reveals cryptic underwater ecosystem engineers

They look like smears of pink bubblegum on the rocks off British Columbia's coast, indistinguishable from one another.

4h

Physicists use nanostructures to free photons for highly efficient white OLEDs

Thanks to intensive research in the past three decades, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been steadily conquering the electronics market—from OLED mobile phone displays to roll-out television screens, the list of applications is long.

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Coral skeleton crystals record ocean acidification

The acidification of the oceans is recorded in the crystals of coral skeletons. This is a new tool for studying past environmental changes and combating climate change. Such is the main conclusion of a study led by the Spanish scientist Ismael Coronado Vila, from the Institute of Paleobiology in Warsaw (Poland).

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Alternating currents cause Jupiter's aurora

An international team of researchers has succeeded in measuring the current system responsible for Jupiter's aurora. Using data transmitted to Earth by NASA's Juno spacecraft, they showed that the direct currents were much weaker than expected and that alternating currents must therefore play a special role. On Earth, on the other hand, a direct current system creates its aurora. Jupiter's electri

4h

'John Wick' Writer Heading to Marvel's 'Falcon & Winter Soldier'

The show will eventually air on the Disney+ streaming service.

4h

Coral skeleton crystals record ocean acidification

The acidification of the oceans is recorded in the crystals of coral skeletons. This is a new tool for studying past environmental changes and combating climate change. Such is the main conclusion of a study led by the Spanish scientist Ismael Coronado Vila, from the Institute of Paleobiology in Warsaw (Poland).

4h

An 'EpiPen' for spinal cord injuries

An injection of nanoparticles can prevent the body's immune system from overreacting to trauma, potentially preventing some spinal cord injuries from resulting in paralysis.

4h

NIST's compact atomic gyroscope displays new twists

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have upgraded their compact atomic gyroscope to enable multitasking measurement capabilities and measure its performance, important steps toward practical applications.

4h

Hubble discovers mysterious black hole disc

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have observed an unexpected thin disc of material encircling a supermassive black hole at the heart of the spiral galaxy NGC 3147, located 130 million light-years away.

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Women of color face higher triple-negative breast cancer risk

Women of color and young women may face elevated risks of developing triple-negative breast cancers, a new study reports. Triple-negative breast cancer spreads more quickly than most other types and doesn’t respond well to hormone or targeted therapies. Previous US studies have found racial disparities in triple-negative breast cancer diagnoses, but few have looked beyond the scope of one state.

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Climate change threatens Greenland's archeological sites: study

In Greenland, climate change isn't just a danger to ecosystems but also a threat to history, as global warming is affecting archeological remains, according to a study published Thursday.

4h

Severely disturbed habitats impacting health of Madagascar's lemurs

A new study finds that degraded rainforest habitats are impacting the health of at least one species of Madagascar's treasured lemurs. Researchers captured, measured and released 113 critically endangered diademed sifakas — and then compared the health of the animals living in intact continuous rainforest versus those in fragmented habitats. In the two most degraded of all fragmented habitats, th

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Hubble uncovers black hole that shouldn't exist

As if black holes weren't mysterious enough, astronomers have found an unexpected thin disk of material furiously whirling around a supermassive black hole at the heart of the magnificent spiral galaxy NGC 3147, located 130 million light-years away.

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Novel perception mechanism regulates important plant processes

Scientists report on a discovery will lead to a better understanding of multiple processes in cells.

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Global farming trends threaten food security

Citrus fruits, coffee and avocados: the food on our tables has become more diverse in recent decades. However, global agriculture does not reflect this trend. Monocultures are increasing worldwide, taking up more land than ever. At the same time, many of the crops being grown rely on pollination by insects and other animals. This puts food security at increased risk.

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Minimum wage 'an effective tool' for increasing incomes of older workers

In an era of rising inequality and aging populations in the US, the effect of the minimum wage on the labor market for older workers is increasingly important, says new research.

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New sensor could shake up earthquake response efforts

An optical sensor could speed up the time it takes to evaluate whether buildings are safe to occupy after a major earthquake. After four years of extensive peer-reviewed research and simulative testing, the Discrete Diode Position Sensor (DDPS) will be deployed for the first time this summer in a multi-story building — which sits adjacent to the Hayward Fault, considered one of the most dangerous

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Ammonia from agriculture influences cloud formation over Asia

The Asian tropopause aerosol layer (ATAL) is located at twelve to 18 kilometers height above the Middle East and Asia. This accumulation of aerosols in the Asian monsoon was discovered first in 2011. Its composition and effect, however, have been unknown so far. Scientists have now found crystalline ammonium nitrate in this layer. In the AIDA cloud chamber, climate researchers have demonstrated ho

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Alternating currents cause Jupiter's aurora

An international research team has measured the system of currents that generates Jupiter's aurora. The scientists found out that sulphur dioxide gas from the gas giant's Moon Io is the cause of the system of currents.

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Arctic lead pollution can tell us a lot about medieval economies

Before the Industrial Revolution, the primary source of lead in the atmosphere came from making coins. (Wikimedia/) For millennia, humans were all-in on lead. It was used to brew wine, make silver coins, and to channel water in plumbing. Even 50 years ago, it was still added to gasoline and included in house paint. Then, finally, governments enacted strict regulations to curb the neurotoxic metal

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Wreckfish: The fish that gobbles up unsuspecting sharks

These sharks thought it was swordfish on the menu, but there was something hungrier in the darkness.

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Scientists discover a novel perception mechanism regulating important plant processes

An international research team has revealed a novel mechanism for the perception of endogenous peptides by a plant receptor. The discovery of this activation mechanism sets a new paradigm for how plants react to internal and external cues. The study "Mechanisms of RALF peptide perception by a heterotypic receptor complex" was published today in the journal Nature.

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Harris Gains Momentum With Democrats’ Most Important Voter Base

NEW ORLEANS—Senator Kamala Harris’s line sisters took up two rows. They had pledged Alpha Kappa Alpha, the nation’s oldest black sorority, alongside Harris at Howard University back in 1986. At Essence Festival here on Saturday, they wore matching T-shirts, and pink-and-green beaded necklaces to represent AKA’s signature colors. As soon as Harris acknowledged their presence and support, they chee

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Siberians flock to toxic lake for 'Maldives' selfies

An industrial dump site in Siberia whose turquoise lake resembles a tropical paradise has become a magnet for Instagrammers who risk their health in the toxic water to wow online followers.

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UK unveils draft law to tax tech giants

Britain on Thursday unveiled draft legislation for a "digital services tax" on global tech giants, which it plans to impose until leading economies reach an agreement on the contentious issue.

4h

Scientists discover a novel perception mechanism regulating important plant processes

An international research team has revealed a novel mechanism for the perception of endogenous peptides by a plant receptor. The discovery of this activation mechanism sets a new paradigm for how plants react to internal and external cues. The study "Mechanisms of RALF peptide perception by a heterotypic receptor complex" was published today in the journal Nature.

4h

Here's a fact: We went to the moon in 1969

Fifty years after Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon, some people insist it never happened and was all a big hoax by the U.S. government.

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Mustering a milder mustard

The mustards, broccolis and cabbages of the world share a distinct and bitter taste. Some consider the flavor of cruciferous plants their strongest attribute. But even in India and China, where Brassicas have been cultivated for more than 4,000 years, scientists have sought to tone down the chemical compounds responsible for their pungent flavor. Turns out the same compounds that make them bitter

4h

Scientists gain new insights into the mechanisms of cell division

Mitosis is the process by which the genetic information encoded on chromosomes is equally distributed to two daughter cells, a fundamental feature of all life on earth. Scientists led by Alexander Dammermann at the Max Perutz Labs, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, now examine how centrioles contribute to this process. The findings, published in Deve

4h

Butterfly numbers fell by one-third in the US over past two decades

Butterfly numbers have dropped by one-third in the US over 20 years because of climate change and habitat destruction – and other insects may be declining too

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The Simplest and Most Successful Experiment Onboard Apollo 11

How the Lunar Laser Retroreflector, still operating 50 years later, ended up going to the moon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

An Ancient Bird With an Insanely Long Toe Has Been Found Preserved in Amber

Like no other bird we know of, extinct or living.

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Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time

Researchers have shot a 'movie' of subtle molecular motions in unprecedented detail, shedding light on previously unseen chemical dynamics.

4h

Hubble discovers mysterious black hole disc

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have observed an unexpected thin disc of material encircling a supermassive black hole at the heart of the spiral galaxy NGC 3147, located 130 million light-years away.

4h

NIST's compact atomic gyroscope displays new twists

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have upgraded their compact atomic gyroscope to enable multitasking measurement capabilities and measure its performance, important steps toward practical applications.

4h

DNA analysis reveals cryptic underwater ecosystem engineers

They look like smears of pink bubblegum on the rocks off British Columbia's coast, indistinguishable from one another.But a new DNA analysis of coralline algae led by UBC and Hakai Institute researchers has revealed a wealth of different species — a diversity that could hold the key to protecting critical underwater habitats like kelp forests.

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New superomniphobic glass soars high on butterfly wings using machine learning

Glass for technologies like displays, tablets, laptops, smartphones, and solar cells need to pass light through, but could benefit from a surface that repels water, dirt, oil, and other liquids. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have created a nanostructure glass that takes inspiration from the wings of the glasswing butterfly to create a new type of gla

4h

The Simplest and Most Successful Experiment Onboard Apollo 11

How the Lunar Laser Retroreflector, still operating 50 years later, ended up going to the moon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Mustering a milder mustard

The mustards, broccolis and cabbages of the world share a distinct and bitter taste. Some consider the flavor of cruciferous plants their strongest attribute. But even in India and China, where Brassicas have been cultivated for more than 4,000 years, scientists have sought to tone down the chemical compounds responsible for their pungent flavor. Turns out the same compounds that make them bitter

4h

Scientists gain new insights into the mechanisms of cell division

Mitosis is the process by which the genetic information encoded on chromosomes is equally distributed to two daughter cells, a fundamental feature of all life on earth. Scientists led by Alexander Dammermann at the Max Perutz Labs, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, now examine how centrioles contribute to this process. The findings, published in Deve

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New developments with Chinese satellites over the past decade

To date, 17 Chinese self-developed FengYun (FY) meteorological satellites have been launched, which are widely applied in weather analysis, numerical weather forecasting and climate prediction, as well as environment and disaster monitoring. Currently, seven satellites are in operation.

4h

NASA takes potential tropical cyclone 2's temperature

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Gulf of Mexico and took the temperature of Potential Tropical Cyclone 2 as it moved westward through the Gulf of Mexico. NASA found the very cold cloud tops indicating the storm had potential for dropping heavy rain.

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Oldest completely preserved lily discovered in Brazil

Already 115 million years ago, tropical flowering plants were apparently very diverse and showed all typical characteristics. This is the conclusion of an international team of researchers led by Clément Coiffard, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin. The team reported in the renowned journal Nature Plants on the oldest completely preserved lily, Cratolirion bognerianum, which was discovered at a site in

4h

Whale mothers and calves whisper to avoid attracting predators

Southern right whale mothers and calves communicate with one another using quiet moo-like calls to avoid attracting predators such as killer whales and sharks

4h

Unknown species of lizard found inside a gliding dinosaur's stomach

A near complete fossil of a lizard has been found inside the stomach of a microraptor, a kind of feathered dinosaur that lived 100 million years ago

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Oldest completely preserved lily discovered in Brazil

Already 115 million years ago, tropical flowering plants were apparently very diverse and showed all typical characteristics. This is the conclusion of an international team of researchers led by Clément Coiffard, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin. The team reported in the renowned journal Nature Plants on the oldest completely preserved lily, Cratolirion bognerianum, which was discovered at a site in

4h

Stonehenge mini model reveals sound of monument

The model gives an insight "into what our ancestors would have heard", an academic says.

5h

IVF Mix-Ups Have Broken the Definition of Parenthood

Anni and Ashot Manukyan had spent several months unsuccessfully trying to get pregnant through IVF when they received a bewildering message this April. According to a lawsuit filed yesterday, their clinic in L.A., CHA Fertility Center, needed the couple to come in immediately. When they arrived, they found out their son had just been born—to complete strangers, 3,000 miles away in New York City.

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UC San Diego cancer scientists identify new drug target for multiple tumor types

A dysfunctional enzyme involved in building cancer cell membranes helps fuel tumor growth; when it's disabled or depleted in mouse models, tumors shrank significantly.

5h

NASA takes potential tropical cyclone 2's temperature

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Gulf of Mexico and took the temperature of Potential Tropical Cyclone 2 as it moved westward through the Gulf of Mexico. NASA found the very cold cloud tops indicating the storm had potential for dropping heavy rain.

5h

Hubble uncovers black hole that shouldn't exist

As if black holes weren't mysterious enough, astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have found an unexpected thin disk of material furiously whirling around a supermassive black hole at the heart of the magnificent spiral galaxy NGC 3147, located 130 million light-years away.

5h

Successful T cell engineering with gene scissors

The idea of genetically modifying a patient's own immune cells and deploying them against infections and tumors has been around since the 1980s. But to this day modified T cells are still not as effective as natural T cells and have been only been of limited clinical value. Using the new CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing tool, a team (TUM) has now engineered T cells that are very similar to physiological i

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Oldest completely preserved lily discovered

Botanists have discovered the oldest, completely preserved lily in a research collection: Cratolirion bognerianum was found in calcareous sediments of a former freshwater lake in Crato in northeastern Brazil. With an age of about 115 million years, Cratolirion is one of the oldest known monocotyledonous plants. These include orchids, sweet grasses, lilies and lilies of the valley.

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Study finds nearly half of shared e-scooters being ridden illegally

An observational study of electric scooter riding in central Brisbane has found nearly half of shared e-scooters were being ridden illegally.

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Researchers identify health conditions likely to be misdiagnosed

For a patient, a diagnostic error can mean the difference between life and death. While estimates vary, likely more than 100,000 Americans die or are permanently disabled each year due to medical diagnoses that initially miss conditions or are wrong or delayed.

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Wakanda forever! Scientists describe new species of 'twilight zone' fish from Africa

Deep-diving scientists spotted dazzling fairy wrasses — previously unknown to science — in the dimly lit mesophotic coral reefs of eastern Zanzibar. The multicolored wrasses sport deep purple scales so pigmented, they even retain their color (which is typically lost) when preserved for research. The scientists name this 'twilight zone' reef-dweller Cirrhilabrus wakanda (common name 'Vibranium fa

5h

An 'EpiPen' for spinal cord injuries

An injection of nanoparticles can prevent the body's immune system from overreacting to trauma, potentially preventing some spinal cord injuries from resulting in paralysis.

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Scientists identify spasm in women with endometriosis-associated chronic pelvic pain

Pelvic pain associated with endometriosis often becomes chronic and can persist (or recur) following surgical and hormonal interventions. Treating pelvic floor muscle spasm with botulinum toxin may relieve pain and improve quality of life.

5h

Fatal Accident With Metal Straw Highlights a Risk

The disturbing death of a woman in Britain renewed a debate that has followed bans on plastic straws around the world.

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Wakanda forever! Scientists describe new species of 'twilight zone' fish from Africa

Africa has new purple-clad warriors more than 200 feet beneath the ocean's surface. Deep-diving scientists from the California Academy of Sciences' Hope for Reefs initiative and the University of Sydney spotted dazzling fairy wrasses—previously unknown to science—in the dimly lit mesophotic coral reefs of eastern Zanzibar, off the coast of Tanzania. The multicolored wrasses sport deep purple scale

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Wakanda forever! Scientists describe new species of 'twilight zone' fish from Africa

Africa has new purple-clad warriors more than 200 feet beneath the ocean's surface. Deep-diving scientists from the California Academy of Sciences' Hope for Reefs initiative and the University of Sydney spotted dazzling fairy wrasses—previously unknown to science—in the dimly lit mesophotic coral reefs of eastern Zanzibar, off the coast of Tanzania. The multicolored wrasses sport deep purple scale

5h

Environmental work in Brecon Beacons estate handed to young people

The project will restore habitats and ecosystems and explore innovative farming and forestry approaches.

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Scientists turn to 'laser accurate' model to test Stonehenge acoustics

Salford team explores sound qualities of ancient Wiltshire monument using 1:12 replica based on data from scans A diminutive model of Stonehenge could help crack the acoustic secrets of the ancient site, according to scientists who have built a version of the megaliths at a 12th of their size. The team say the 1:12 model, with a stone circle spanning 2.6 metres, has an edge over other replicas of

5h

Robot Umpires Make Professional Baseball Debut

Strike Gold For the first time ever, a robot umpire has called a professional baseball game. Like pro baseball players themselves, the robot ump didn’t go straight to the majors. Instead, it debuted at the independent Atlantic League’s all-star game Wednesday night — but its first time behind home plate is a promising sign that the technology could be ready for Major League Baseball. Baller Bot T

5h

Could Mussels Teach Us How To Clean Up Oil Spills?

A review of "mussel-inspired chemistry" points to promising ways we can learn from mussels about how to clean up water. (Image credit: Paul Kay/Getty Images)

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Long-Toed Bird Preserved In Amber For 99 Million Years

A long-toed bird preserved in amber from Myanmar is the first of its kind. (Credit: Lida Xing) Smaller than a sparrow, a bird that lived 99 million years ago in what's now Southeast Asia …

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Almost 300,000 People Say They’re Gonna Storm Area 51

Storm Area 51 A Facebook event called “Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us” has amassed an army of memers, schemers and tinfoil hat-wearing conspirators to raid the top-secret Air Force military base in the middle of Nevada’s desert. Over 289,000 users confirmed they’re planning to come along, while 314,000 are “interested.” It’s gotten so big that the event is grabbing the attention of loca

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Soft Robotics Grippers Assist in Bakery Automation

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Falcon has landed: Japan's Hayabusa2 probe touches down on asteroid | Science

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Can Robots Solve the Affordable Housing Crisis?

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Restoring Vision With Bionic Eyes: No Longer Science Fiction

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Fusion scientists have developed a 'nano-scale sculpture technique'

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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This Report Makes It Perfectly Clearly Who Automation Is Working For

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Unknown species of lizard found inside a gliding dinosaur's stomach

A near complete fossil of a lizard has been found inside the stomach of a microraptor, a kind of feathered dinosaur that lived 100 million years ago

5h

Whale mothers and calves whisper to avoid attracting predators

Southern right whale mothers and calves communicate with one another using quiet moo-like calls to avoid attracting predators such as killer whales and sharks

5h

Something is seriously wrong with our understanding of the cosmos

Our two ways of measuring the universe’s expansion disagree, and a third method is intensifying that clash – which may mean big changes in how we view the universe

5h

Human workers can listen to Google Assistant recordings

Google said its contractors are able to listen to recordings of what people say to its artificial-intelligence system Google Assistant.

5h

Severely disturbed habitats impacting health of Madagascar's lemurs

A new study finds that degraded rainforest habitats are impacting the health of at least one species of Madagascar's treasured lemurs. Researchers captured, measured and released 113 critically endangered diademed sifakas — and then compared the health of the animals living in intact continuous rainforest versus those in fragmented habitats. In the two most degraded of all fragmented habitats, th

5h

Mustering a milder mustard

Cruciferous vegetables — the mustards, broccolis and cabbages of the world — share a distinct taste. But the same compounds that make them bitter also make them toxic at some levels. Biologists have mapped the crystal structure of a key protein that makes the metabolites responsible for the bitter taste in Brassicas. A study published this month in the journal The Plant Cell is the first snapsho

5h

Raising eyebrows on neuroinflammation: Study finds novel role for 'skin plumping' molecule

Scientists have discovered a novel mechanism and role in the brain for hyaluronic acid — a clear, gooey substance popularized by cosmetic and skin care products. Hyaluronic acid may be the key in how an immune signal moves from the blood stream to the brain, activating the brain's resident immune cells, the microglia. Findings from this study have important implications for better treatments for

5h

How plague pathogens trick the immune system

Yersinia have spread fear and terror, especially in the past, but today they have still not been completely eradicated. The bacteria inject various enzymes, including YopO, into the macrophages of the immune system. There it is activated and prevents the defense cells from enclosing and digesting the plague bacteria. Using the latest methods, scientists from the University of Bonn have now deciphe

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New study discovers genetic changes linked to leukaemia in children with down's syndrome

Researchers at the University of Oxford, in collaboration with colleagues from Hannover Medical School and Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, have discovered the specific gene mutations that are required for the development of leukaemia in children with Down's syndrome.

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REM sleep silences the siren of the brain

Something frightening or unpleasant does not go unnoticed. In our brain, the so-called limbic circuit of cells and connections immediately becomes active. First and foremost, such experiences activate the amygdala. In order for the brain to function properly, the siren must also be switched off again. For this, a restful REM sleep, the part of the sleep with the most vivid dreams, turns out to be

5h

Scientists gain new insights into the mechanisms of cell division

Mitosis is the process by which the genetic information encoded on chromosomes is equally distributed to two daughter cells, a fundamental feature of all life on earth. Scientists led by Alexander Dammermann at the Max Perutz Labs, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, now examine how centrioles contribute to this process. The findings help to elucidate

5h

Fossil fuels increasingly offer a poor return on energy investment

University of Leeds researchers have calculated the EROI for fossil fuels over a 16 year period and found that at the finished fuel stage, the ratios are much closer to those of renewable energy sources — roughly 6:1, and potentially as low as 3:1 in the case of electricity.

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Is facial cosmetic surgery associated with perception changes for attractiveness, masculinity, personality traits in men?

Photographs of 24 men before and after facial cosmetic surgery were part of this survey study to examine whether surgery was associated with perceived changes in attractiveness, masculinity and a variety of personality traits.

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Ancient defense strategy continues to protect plants from pathogens

Plant scientists at the University of Cambridge have discovered a suite of microbe-responsive gene families that date back to early land plant evolution.

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Study questions if tongue-tie surgery for breastfeeding is always needed

New research raises questions as to whether too many infants are getting tongue-tie and lip tether surgery (also called frenulectomy) to help improve breastfeeding, despite limited medical evidence supporting the procedure. In a new study of 115 newborns referred for tongue-tie surgery, nearly 63% of children ended up not needing the procedure, and were able to successfully breastfeed following a

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Adding immunotherapy after initial treatment can benefit metastatic lung cancer patients

Treating metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab after they've completed locally ablative therapy almost tripled the median progression-free survival (PFS) compared to the historical average.

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Facial plastic surgery in men enhances perception of attractiveness, trustworthiness

In the first of a kind study, plastic surgeons at Georgetown University found that when a man chose to have facial plastic surgery, it significantly increased perceptions of attractiveness, likeability, social skills, or trustworthiness. The study, published in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery, did not show a significant impact on perceptions of gender (masculinity), whereas a similar study performed w

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Enzyme responsible for dangerous properties of brain tumor stem cells

The relapse of brain tumors after therapy is driven by cancer stem cells that were not affected by the treatment. In mouse models of glioblastoma, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) were now looking for molecular markers that specifically characterize brain tumor stem cells. They identified an enzyme that is responsible for the threatening st

5h

Whispering southern right whale mums and calves seek refuge in surf

How do southern right whale mothers protect their precious calves from killer whale attacks when the predators can listen out for their conversations? It turns out that the mothers and their offspring shelter in the noisy surf, stay in close proximity and effectively whisper, calling softly less than once per dive, to avoid attracting any unwanted attention.

5h

Gene identified that will help develop plants to fight climate change

Hidden underground networks of plant roots snake through the earth foraging for nutrients and water, similar to a worm searching for food. Yet, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that govern which parts of the soil roots explore remain largely unknown. Now, Salk Institute researchers have discovered a gene that determines whether roots grow deep or shallow in the soil.

5h

Bird with unusually long toes found fossilized in amber

Meet the ancient bird that had toes longer than its lower legs. Researchers have discovered a bird foot from 99 million years ago preserved in amber that had a hyper-elongated third toe. The study, published in the journal Current Biology on July 11, 2019, suggests that this bird might have used its toes to hook food out of tree trucks. This is the first time such a foot structure has been observe

5h

New sensor could shake up earthquake response efforts

Last week's massive southern California earthquakes shut down Ridgecrest Regional Hospital throughout the July 4 holiday weekend while the tiny town of Ridgecrest assessed the damages. A new optical sensor developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) could speed up the time it takes to evaluate whether critical buildings like these are safe to occupy shortly after a major eart

5h

Why Did This Extinct Bird Have Such a Weird, Long Toe?

The Cretaceous Period flyer, trapped in amber 99 million years ago, had features unlike any bird living today.

5h

Mystery behind striped barley solved

Plants with green leaves and stems are a common sight and are one of the most natural things on earth. But when considering that this colouring is achieved by small chlorophyll-filled organelles called chloroplasts, distributed within plant cells, where they utilise their green pigmentation to convert solar energy into chemical energy, this green colouration no longer seems to be such a trivial th

5h

Insects feel chronic pain after injury

Associate Professor Greg Neely and his team of pain researchers in the Charles Perkins Centre have found compelling evidence that insects feel persistent pain after injury.

5h

No new males: Climate change threat to Cape Verde turtles

Rising temperatures could mean no male loggerhead turtles hatch at a key breeding ground by the end of this century, new research suggests.

5h

Successful T cell engineering with gene scissors

The idea of genetically modifying a patient's own immune cells and deploying them against infections and tumors has been around since the 1980s. But to this day modified T cells are still not as effective as natural T cells and have been only been of limited clinical value. Using the new CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing tool, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now engineered T cells th

5h

30 shades of steel: Scientists develop 'cheat sheet' for the creation of new steels

Researchers from the National University of Science and Technology "MISIS" developed a database that will help create new grades of steels. This will speed up the process of creating innovative steel grades with specified strength and ductility at least 10 times, which will allow manufacturing car bodies of the most complex shapes. Article on the research is published in Calphad.

5h

Mystery behind striped barley solved

Plants with green leaves and stems are a common sight and are one of the most natural things on earth. But when considering that this colouring is achieved by small chlorophyll-filled organelles called chloroplasts, distributed within plant cells, where they utilise their green pigmentation to convert solar energy into chemical energy, this green colouration no longer seems to be such a trivial th

5h

Designed for space travel, new device can collect, analyze liquid as it passes by planets

A chemist at The University of Texas at Arlington has engineered a device capable of collecting drops of liquid as it travels through space and analyzing their content for conditions that support life.

5h

Organic porous structures on 2-D defect networks

NUS scientists have developed a method for self-assembly of hexagonal organic porous structures on molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) film to create ordered nanostructures.

5h

Insects feel chronic pain after injury

Associate Professor Greg Neely and his team of pain researchers in the Charles Perkins Centre have found compelling evidence that insects feel persistent pain after injury.

5h

No new males: Climate change threat to Cape Verde turtles

Rising temperatures could mean no male loggerhead turtles hatch at a key breeding ground by the end of this century, new research suggests.

5h

Successful T cell engineering with gene scissors

The idea of genetically modifying a patient's own immune cells and deploying them against infections and tumors has been around since the 1980s. But to this day modified T cells are still not as effective as natural T cells and have been only been of limited clinical value. Using the new CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing tool, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now engineered T cells th

5h

Experimental mini-accelerator achieves record energy

Scientists at DESY have achieved a new world record for an experimental type of miniature particle accelerator: For the first time, a terahertz powered accelerator more than doubled the energy of the injected electrons. At the same time, the setup significantly improved the electron beam quality compared to earlier experiments with the technique, as Dongfang Zhang and his colleagues from the Cente

5h

A crystal clear step closer to commerical solar cells

A synthetic approach developed by KAUST researchers generates homogeneous and defect-free crystals that could fast-track the commercialization of perovskite solar cells.

5h

In a first, a Japanese spacecraft appears to have collected samples from inside an asteroid

Hayabusa2’s second touchdown on asteroid Ryugu went well, engineers say

5h

How we're honoring people overlooked by history | Amy Padnani

Since its founding in 1851, the "New York Times" has published thousands of obituaries — for heads of state, famous celebrities, even the inventor of the sock puppet. But only a small percentage of them chronicle the lives of women and people of color. In this insightful talk, "Times" editor Amy Padnani shares the story behind "Overlooked," the project she's leading to recognize people from histo

5h

Fossil of 99m-year-old bird with unusually long toes found

Ancient bird’s foot is so distinctive palaeontologists declare it a new species The fossilised remains of a bizarre, ancient bird that had middle toes longer than its lower legs have been found in a lump of amber from Myanmar. The elongated toe resembles those seen on lemurs and tree-climbing lizards, and suggests an unusual lifestyle for some of the earliest birds that lived alongside the dinosa

5h

The discovery of a more effective method to estimate polluting emissions from nitrogen fertilizers

Agriculture contributes to 70% of total emissions by humans of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent polluting gas and the one to blame for the hole in the ozone layer. The root of this issue is in the widespread use of chemical fertilizers, such as urea and ammonium nitrate. Once these products have been used in soil for crops, a portion of them are lost in the form of N2O, which goes directly into the a

5h

This ancient bird sported a ginormous toe

Elektorornis ’s third digit was longer than its lower leg

5h

Gene determines how far down roots go

New finding could help plants adapt to a changing climate, researchers say. Nick Carne reports.

5h

Ancient defense strategy continues to protect plants from pathogens

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have uncovered striking similarities in how two distantly related plants defend themselves against pathogens despite splitting from their common ancestor more than 400 million years ago.

5h

Whispering southern right whale mums and calves seek refuge in surf

Most mammalian new mums are fiercely protective of their precious offspring; even 5-8 m long southern right whale calves are vulnerable to attack by voracious killer whales. Mia Nielsen from Aarhus University, Denmark, explains that whale mothers and calves often try to hide from predators by gravitating to cloudy water. But the loss of visual contact could force mothers and their young to call to

5h

Gene identified that will help develop plants to fight climate change

Hidden underground networks of plant roots snake through the earth foraging for nutrients and water, similar to a worm searching for food. Yet, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that govern which parts of the soil roots explore remain largely unknown. Now, Salk Institute researchers have discovered a gene that determines whether roots grow deep or shallow in the soil.

5h

Southern right whale moms and calves may whisper to evade orcas

Mother-calf whale pairs call to each other quietly to stay in touch while avoiding attracting the attention of predators, a study suggests.

5h

An ancient bird found encased in amber had a bizarrely long toe

A 99-million-year-old fossil holds a bird with an oddly long toe, which might have helped the critter hook hard-to-reach dinners.

5h

Ancient defense strategy continues to protect plants from pathogens

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have uncovered striking similarities in how two distantly related plants defend themselves against pathogens despite splitting from their common ancestor more than 400 million years ago.

5h

Whispering southern right whale mums and calves seek refuge in surf

Most mammalian new mums are fiercely protective of their precious offspring; even 5-8 m long southern right whale calves are vulnerable to attack by voracious killer whales. Mia Nielsen from Aarhus University, Denmark, explains that whale mothers and calves often try to hide from predators by gravitating to cloudy water. But the loss of visual contact could force mothers and their young to call to

5h

Bird with unusually long toes found fossilized in amber

Meet the ancient bird that had toes longer than its lower legs. Researchers have discovered a bird foot from 99 million years ago preserved in amber that had a hyper-elongated third toe. The study, published in the journal Current Biology on July 11, suggests that this bird might have used its toes to hook food out of tree trucks. This is the first time such a foot structure has been observed in b

5h

New species of lizard found in stomach of Cretaceous microraptor

A team of paleontologists led by Prof. Jingmai O"Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with researchers from the Shandong Tianyu Museum of Nature, have discovered a new specimen of the volant dromaeosaurid Microraptor zhaoianus with the remains of a nearly complete lizard preserved in its stomach. Their findin

5h

Gene identified that will help develop plants to fight climate change

Hidden underground networks of plant roots snake through the earth foraging for nutrients and water, similar to a worm searching for food. Yet, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that govern which parts of the soil roots explore remain largely unknown. Now, Salk Institute researchers have discovered a gene that determines whether roots grow deep or shallow in the soil.

5h

Mosquito surveillance uncovers new information about malaria transmission in madagascar

Riley Tedrow, Ph.D., a medical entomologist at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, has uncovered new findings about malaria transmission in Madagascar. In a recent study published in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, he also describes real-world application of an effective mosquito surveillance strategy using low cost traps and a recently reported tool that simultaneously tests eac

5h

Scientists discover a novel perception mechanism regulating important plant processes

Writing in 'Nature', scientists from Cologne (Germany) and Zurich (Switzerland) report on a discovery will lead to a better understanding of multiple processes in cells.

5h

Scientists opening the door to a new era of medicinal chemistry

A new molecular descriptor estimates molecular complexity and defines the evolution of small molecules in medicinal chemistry.

5h

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KAL’s cartoon

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A team of chemists are searching for a new red pigment

Ten years ago they found the first new blue for two centuries

5h

Contrary to the fears of some, penguins and people do mix

At least, that is what an analysis of their guano suggests

5h

A new type of engine for electric cars

Putting motors in wheels lightens vehicles and shrinks batteries

5h

Curious About Consciousness? Ask the Self-Aware Machines

“I want to meet, in my lifetime, an alien species,” said Hod Lipson , a roboticist who runs the Creative Machines Lab at Columbia University. “I want to meet something that is intelligent and not human.” But instead of waiting for such beings to arrive, Lipson wants to build them himself — in the form of self-aware machines. To that end, Lipson openly confronts a slippery concept — consciousness

6h

Hayabusa2 may have just snagged bits of asteroid Ryugu’s insides

In its second sampling attempt, Hayabusa2 became the first spacecraft to try to pick up some of an asteroid’s guts.

6h

NASA Just Released an Incredible Map of All Known Exoplanets

Exoplanet Map NASA just dropped an astonishingly elaborate map of more than 4,000 exoplanets known to exist outside our Solar System, which takes the form of a video that shows how many exoplanets we’ve discovered each year since 1991. Exoplanets are not only interesting to us because they orbit a different star, but also because they have the potential to harbor life. It’s an impressive visualiz

6h

30 shades of steel: Scientists develop 'cheat sheet' for the creation of new steels

Researchers from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' developed a database that will help create new grades of steels. This will speed up the process of creating innovative steel grades with specified strength and ductility allow at least 10 times, which will allow manufacturing car bodies of the most complex shapes. Article on the research is published in 'Calphad'.

6h

NIH scientists identify spasm in women with endometriosis-associated chronic pelvic pain

Pelvic pain associated with endometriosis often becomes chronic and can persist (or recur) following surgical and hormonal interventions. According to results published in Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine, treating pelvic floor muscle spasm with botulinum toxin may relieve pain and improve quality of life. The study was conducted by scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders

6h

An 'EpiPen' for spinal cord injuries

An injection of nanoparticles can prevent the body's immune system from overreacting to trauma, potentially preventing some spinal cord injuries from resulting in paralysis.

6h

A crystal clear step closer to commerical solar cells

Record-breaking, high-efficiency single crystals bring perovskite solar cells closer to market.

6h

Amazon Pledges $700 Million to Teach Its Workers to Code

The tech giant wants to position itself as a positive force for US workers, but it's not clear whether retraining will be effective.

6h

Radio Atlantic: Trump Diplomacy

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) This week, the British ambassador to the United States resigned after private cables leaked with his frank assessment of the White House and its occupant. Kim Darroch described the administration as “clumsy” and “inept,” and said that President Donald Trump “radiates insecurity.” In response, the president called

6h

Life in a City Without Water: Anxious, Exhausting and Sweaty

A weak monsoon and years of draining groundwater have parched Chennai, a city of nearly five million people on the southeastern coast of India.

6h

The world's oldest autograph by a Christian is in Basel

A letter in the Basel papyrus collection describes day-to-day family matters, and yet is unique in its own way: It provides valuable insights into the world of the first Christians in the Roman Empire, which is not recorded in any other historical source. The letter has been dated to the 230s AD, and is thus older than all previously known Christian documentary evidence from Roman Egypt.

6h

By Dying, 'MAD Magazine' Gets Its Best Shot at a Second Life

Repackaging the humor magazine's classic material may prove to be a boon for a budding generation of smart-asses.

6h

Värmeböljor växande problem i norr

2018 inträffade en lång värmebölja ibland annat Sverige, Finland och Estland, men även 2014 och 2010 hade markanta värmeböljor. Forskare från Umeå universitet och Tartu universitet i Estland samlade nyligen hälsoforskare, meteorologer och representanter för folkhälsomyndigheter till ett möte i Tallinn, för att analysera hur stort problem de allt vanligare och mer intensiva värmeböljorna har blivi

6h

Dresden physicists use nanostructures to free photons for highly efficient white OLEDs

Thanks to intensive research in the past three decades, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been steadily conquering the electronics market — from OLED mobile phone displays to roll-out television screens, the list of applications is long.Current OLED research focuses in particular on improving the performance of white OLEDs for lighting elements such as ceiling or car interior lighting. T

6h

Oldest completely preserved lily discovered

This is the conclusion of an international team of researchers led by Clement Coiffard, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin. The team reported in Nature Plants on the oldest completely preserved lily, Cratolirion bognerianum, which was discovered in present-day Brazil. With 3D computer tomography at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, hidden details of the fossilised plant could also be analysed. The results r

6h

Coral skeleton crystals record ocean acidification

The acidification of the oceans is recorded in the crystals of the coral skeleton. This is a new tool for studying past environmental changes and combating climate change. Such is the main conclusion of a study led by the Spanish scientist Ismael Coronado Vila, from the Institute of Paleobiology in Warsaw (Poland).

6h

More support needed for young carers of parents with mental illness

New research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) says there is a 'clear need' for more support for young carers of parents with a mental illness as they move into adulthood. The study argues that services need to be flexible, combining both practical support, such as the provision of additional support to the parent as they manage the transition of their child — and carer — leaving home, an

6h

Successful T cell engineering with gene scissors

The idea of genetically modifying a patient's own immune cells and deploying them against infections and tumors has been around since the 1980s. But to this day modified T cells are still not as effective as natural T cells and have been only been of limited clinical value. Using the new CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing tool, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now engineered T cells th

6h

No new males: Climate change threat to Cape Verde turtles

Rising temperatures could mean no male loggerhead turtles hatch at a key breeding ground by the end of this century, new research suggests.

6h

First step to induce self-repair in the central nervous system

Injured axons instruct Schwann cells to build specialized actin spheres to break down and remove axon fragments, thereby starting the regeneration process.

6h

Early benefit assessment reveals weaknesses in the development of new drugs

In the British Medical Journal, IQWiG researchers analyse the first 216 AMNOG assessments of new drugs and derive proposals for more targeted drug development.

6h

Between 16 and 18% of preadolescents have ideas of suicide

Thinking of taking one's own life (ideation), planning it, threatening to do it or even attempting to do it is regarded as suicidal behaviour. Committing suicide has occurred to 16-18% of the preadolescent boys and girls who took part in a study carried out by the research group Nutrition and Mental Health (Nutrisam) of the URV, who aimed to assess the frequency with which this occurred and the ma

6h

Molecular 'clutch' puts infection-fighting cells into gear

Two proteins that act as a 'clutch' in cells to put them in gear and drive our immune response have been identified for the first time.

6h

Graphene and germ combo paves way for futuristic tech

Researchers have created a method to produce graphene materials using a novel technique: mixing oxidized graphite with bacteria. In order to create new and more efficient computers, medical devices, and other advanced technologies, researchers are turning to nanomaterials: materials manipulated on the scale of atoms or molecules that exhibit unique properties. Graphene—a flake of carbon as thin a

6h

The battle between virus and host cell

When viruses enter the body, such as during an influenza or a gastrointestinal infection, the processes within the infected cells change: In the worst case, the virus takes the helm and reprograms the cell to its advantage. It then produces viral components on a massive scale allowing the intruder to multiply exponentially.

6h

Mobile cinemas in China are a lens on society

Mobile cinemas appeared in China in the 1950s as a means for the government to educate people and spread communist messages to the countryside. The roving cinemas ran until the late '80s, but their popularity waned as TV became widely accessible.

6h

The battle between virus and host cell

When viruses enter the body, such as during an influenza or a gastrointestinal infection, the processes within the infected cells change: In the worst case, the virus takes the helm and reprograms the cell to its advantage. It then produces viral components on a massive scale allowing the intruder to multiply exponentially.

6h

Exploring a desert portal to other worlds

Ali Bramson clutched her neon pink umbrella as she trekked across the frozen lava that spilled from Amboy Crater in California's Mojave Desert. She and her fellow University of Arizona graduate students were tasked with identifying the boundaries of different eruptions of the extinct volcano, then unfurling their bright umbrellas to mark the spot. From an airplane overhead, her professor and anoth

6h

Astronomers find evidence of atmosphere-like envelopes around galaxies

A new study by researchers at the University of Hertfordshire, published today in journal Astronomy and Astrophysics, has found evidence that the gaseous envelopes around larger galaxies are similar to the state of Earth's atmosphere.

6h

City dwellers can have an outsized impact on curbing global warming

It's no secret that city folk like to eat, shop and travel. But all that consumption adds up to a hefty climate bill.

6h

India is about to launch a lander and rover to the moon’s south pole

India is launching its second mission to the moon, called Chandrayaan 2, on 14 July. It will land near the lunar south pole, a promising site for human exploration

6h

Vintage Muscle Cars Take Flight in an Homage to Chase Scenes

With model cars, real-life backgrounds, and some deft Photoshop, photographer Matthew Porter conjures the visual excitement of classic car-chase cinema.

6h

Global farming trends ‘a threat to food security’

Study finds too little diversity and too great a dependence on pollinators. Natalie Parletta reports.

6h

Smart materials a step towards the artificial heart

Italian researchers report success with polymers that can change shape. Gabriella Bernardi reports.

6h

An engaging piece of space art

Image brings together 17 years of X-ray sources.

6h

Wildlife service withdraws request for approval to dump rat poison on Farallon Islands

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Wednesday withdrew its request that the California Coastal Commission sanction its controversial mouse eradication proposal on the Farallon Islands.

6h

Malicious apps infect 25 million Android devices with 'Agent Smith' malware

Malicious apps from a campaign called "Agent Smith" have been downloaded to 25 million Android devices, according to new research by cyber-security firm Check Point.

6h

Wildlife service withdraws request for approval to dump rat poison on Farallon Islands

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Wednesday withdrew its request that the California Coastal Commission sanction its controversial mouse eradication proposal on the Farallon Islands.

6h

Ammonia from agriculture influences cloud formation over Asia

The Asian tropopause aerosol layer (ATAL) is located at twelve to 18 kilometers height above the Middle East and Asia. This accumulation of aerosols in the Asian monsoon was discovered first in 2011. Its composition and effect, however, have been unknown so far. A European consortium of scientists has now found at this layer consists of crystalline ammonium nitrate. In the AIDA cloud chamber, clim

6h

Experimental mini-accelerator achieves record energy

Scientists at DESY have achieved a new world record for an experimental type of miniature particle accelerator: For the first time, a terahertz powered accelerator more than doubled the energy of the injected electrons. At the same time, the setup significantly improved the electron beam quality compared to earlier experiments with the technique, as Dongfang Zhang and his colleagues from the Cente

6h

How procrastinators and doers differ genetically

Some people tend to postpone actions. In women, this trait is associated with a genetic predisposition towards a higher level of dopamine in the brain. This is what researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the Technical University of Dresden discovered using genetic analyses and questionnaires. They were unable to identify this correlation in men.

6h

Endometriosis: Immune cell discovery could provide relief for women with 'hidden' pain disorder

A key cause for the pelvic pain experienced by women with endometriosis has been uncovered, potentially opening new opportunities for pain relief for the condition.

6h

Engineers revolutionize molecular microscopy

Engineers of the University of Magdeburg have developed a method for measuring the electrical potentials of molecules and molecular surfaces with previously unattainable precision and speed. They have, for the first time, succeeded in creating high resolution maps of molecular electrical potentials, i.e. the electric fields that surround all matter, within just a few minutes.The research results h

6h

Finger-prick blood test could safely reduce antibiotic use in patients with COPD

A simple finger-prick blood test could help prevent unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics for people with the lung condition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study by researchers from Cardiff University, University of Oxford and King's College London.

6h

The discovery of a more effective method to estimate polluting emissions from nitrogen fertilizers

The discovery of a more effective method to estimate polluting emissions from nitrogen fertilizers.

6h

The Pentagon’s New Laser-Based Tool Uses Your Heartbeat to Track You

The government’s hefty arsenal of surveillance tools just welcomed a powerful new member. Rather than monitoring an external device—a bug or a smartphone—or even the exterior features of your face, the new tech aims straight for your heart. Literally. First reported by MIT Technology Review , the US Pentagon is developing an infrared laser that captures a person’s unique “cardiac signature” from

6h

'Missing' Interstellar Iron May Just Be Good at Hiding

Interstellar space should be filled with gaseous iron. But until now, astronomers couldn't find it.

6h

Osteoblastic lysosome plays a central role in mineralization

Mineralization is mediated by osteoblasts, which secrete mineral precursors through matrix vesicles (MVs) as a fundamental process in vertebrates. The vesicles are calcium and phosphate rich, containing organic materials such as acidic proteins. In a new study now published in Science Advances, Tomoaki Iwayama and colleagues at the departments of periodontology, biomedical research, oral science,

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OLED-skærme på vej til at blive printet i et enkelt lag

Tyske forskere har udviklet en prototype af en organisk lysdiode med kun et organisk-halvleder-lag. Den nye metode kan skubbe på udviklingen mod printbare OLED-skærme.

6h

Fair-weather flooding to spike as sea levels rise, NOAA says

Seawater could spill into streets more often in the coming year as the ocean continues to rise at an accelerating rate.

6h

Osteoblastic lysosome plays a central role in mineralization

Mineralization is mediated by osteoblasts, which secrete mineral precursors through matrix vesicles (MVs) as a fundamental process in vertebrates. The vesicles are calcium and phosphate rich, containing organic materials such as acidic proteins. In a new study now published in Science Advances, Tomoaki Iwayama and colleagues at the departments of periodontology, biomedical research, oral science,

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6h

For climbing robots, the sky's the limit

Robots can drive on the plains and craters ofMars, but what if we could explore cliffs, polar caps and other hard-to-reach places on the Red Planet and beyond? Designed by engineers at NASA's …

6h

New Solar Panels Use Waste Heat to Purify Water

A new type of solar power setup developed at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia could address both of those issues. These panels leverage waste heat from solar panels to distill and purify water. The post New Solar Panels Use Waste Heat to Purify Water appeared first on ExtremeTech .

7h

In the remote Cambodian jungles, we made sure rare Siamese crocodiles would have enough food

For nine hours, my colleague Michael Shackleton and I held onto our scooters for dear life while being slapped in the face by spiked jungle plants in the mountains of Cambodia. We only disembarked either to help push a scooter up a slippery jungle path or to stop it from sliding down one.

7h

The explosive birth of a celestial ‘Cow’

Nature, Published online: 11 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02125-2 Evidence points to a supernova as the source of a dazzling object that telescopes spotted in 2018.

7h

The Digital Revolution: Opportunities and challenges for sustainable development

The Digital Revolution has brought about rapid technological change, transforming the way societies function and how humanity impacts the Earth. A new report describes how digitalization can transform the world and how these changes can be planned for as we move towards 2030 and beyond.

7h

Mystery behind striped barley solved

Albostrians barley is a model plant displaying variegation in form of green-white striping. The gene causing the albostrians-specific phenotype of variegation has now been identified as the CCT-domain gene HvAST.

7h

New developments with Chinese satellites over the past decade

To date, 17 Chinese self-developed FengYun (FY) meteorological satellites have been launched, which are widely applied in weather analysis, numerical weather forecasting and climate prediction, as well as environment and disaster monitoring. Currently, seven satellites are in operation.

7h

NTU Singapore scientists develop probes to detect acute kidney failure early

Scientists from NTU Singapore have developed a type of molecular renal probe that 'lights up' upon detecting the molecular changes caused by the onset of acute kidney failure. These probes could potentially be used in test strips for urine samples, making it a non-invasive method of detecting acute kidney failure.

7h

More glucose could improve mobility for people with ALS

Increased glucose, transformed into energy, could give people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, improved mobility and a longer life, according to new research. Physicians have long known that people with ALS experience changes in their metabolism that often lead to rapid weight loss in a process called hypermetabolism. According to the study’s lead author Ernesto Manzo, a postdoctoral r

7h

In the remote Cambodian jungles, we made sure rare Siamese crocodiles would have enough food

For nine hours, my colleague Michael Shackleton and I held onto our scooters for dear life while being slapped in the face by spiked jungle plants in the mountains of Cambodia. We only disembarked either to help push a scooter up a slippery jungle path or to stop it from sliding down one.

7h

Living with rats involves understanding the city as an ecosystem

Rats! They eat our food, chew through our property and spread all sorts of nasty diseases. And they are gross (right?), with those naked tails and quick, unpredictable movements. Rats invade our homes—our castles!—the one place where we should be safe and in control.

7h

Understanding dog personalities can prevent attacks

The news of a fatal dog-bite incident in Melbourne last night has shocked dog lovers around the country.

7h

Living with rats involves understanding the city as an ecosystem

Rats! They eat our food, chew through our property and spread all sorts of nasty diseases. And they are gross (right?), with those naked tails and quick, unpredictable movements. Rats invade our homes—our castles!—the one place where we should be safe and in control.

7h

Coupling qubits to sound in a multimode cavity

In a recent study, researchers at the University of Colorado have resolved phonon Fock states in the spectrum of a superconducting qubit coupled to a multimode acoustic cavity. Fock states (or number states) are quantum states with a clearly defined number of particles. These states play a crucial part in the second quantization formulation of quantum mechanics.

7h

Understanding dog personalities can prevent attacks

The news of a fatal dog-bite incident in Melbourne last night has shocked dog lovers around the country.

7h

Midge swarms show mechanical properties, behave as a viscoelastic material

A team of researchers from Stanford University and Rothamsted Research, has found that midge swarms have some types of mechanical properties and also respond to a stimulus at times as a viscoelastic. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of swarm behavior in a species of midges and what they found.

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Sydkorea vil opføre verdens største park med flydende vindmøller

Norske Equinor går sammen med to sydkoreanske selskaber om at opføre en flydende havmøllepark på 200 MW.

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New sensor could shake up earthquake response efforts

An optical sensor developed at Berkeley Lab could speed up the time it takes to evaluate whether buildings are safe to occupy after a major earthquake. After four years of extensive peer-reviewed research and simulative testing, the Discrete Diode Position Sensor (DDPS) will be deployed for the first time this summer in a multi-story building at Berkeley Lab — which sits adjacent to the Hayward F

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Alternating currents cause Jupiter's aurora

An international research team has measured the system of currents that generates Jupiter's aurora. The scientists found out that sulphur dioxide gas from the gas giant's Moon Io is the cause of the system of currents.

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How DNA outside cells can be targeted to prevent the spread of cancer

Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is DNA found in trace amounts in blood, which has escaped degradation by enzymes. Scientists from Tokyo University of Science, led by Prof Ryushin Mizuta, have now discovered exactly how cfDNA is generated. They also talk about the applications of DNase1L3–the enzyme mainly responsible for generating cfDNA–as a novel molecule to prevent the spread of tumors. Prof Mizuta say

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Team approach to cardiac care increases chance of surviving heart attack complications

When multidisciplinary health care teams were engaged in caring for patients suffering from refractory cardiogenic shock, a severe condition that can occur after a heart attack, the likelihood of survival increased significantly, by approximately 50 percent. The study was published online in the July issue of Circulation.

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Study finds nearly half of shared e-scooters being ridden illegally

A QUT observational study of electric scooter riding in central Brisbane has found nearly half of shared e-scooters were being ridden illegally.

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Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers identify health conditions likely to be misdiagnosed

For a patient, a diagnostic error can mean the difference between life and death. While estimates vary, likely more than 100,000 Americans die or are permanently disabled each year due to medical diagnoses that initially miss conditions or are wrong or delayed.

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Wakanda forever! Scientists describe new species of 'twilight zone' fish from Africa

Deep-diving scientists from the California Academy of Sciences spotted dazzling fairy wrasses — previously unknown to science — in the dimly lit mesophotic coral reefs of eastern Zanzibar. The multicolored wrasses sport deep purple scales so pigmented, they even retain their color (which is typically lost) when preserved for research. The scientists name this 'twilight zone' reef-dweller Cirrhil

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Sounds of intense emotion may be universal language across species, study shows

People can tell how other people are feeling by the sounds they make and now, new research from the University of Alberta shows that may also apply to different animals.

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Sounds of intense emotion may be universal language across species, study shows

People can tell how other people are feeling by the sounds they make and now, new research from the University of Alberta shows that may also apply to different animals.

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In a New York City garden, students grow their community roots and critical consciousness

Iris, a high school student in New York City, took a course aimed at preparing public school students for college. As part of the course, she visited the Park Slope Food Coop, among the oldest member-owned businesses in the United States. Members work monthly shifts in return for access to affordable, ethically sourced food and goods. Students enrolled in the course—called Community Roots—investig

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Solar power system that works at night a renewable energy game-changer

An innovative thermal battery being developed by Curtin University researchers will be key to a solar power system capable of producing electricity overnight, rivaling fossil fuels as a viable source of power for commercial and heavy industries around the world, including mining operations.

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Startup Thinks Its Modular Car Design Is the Future of EVs

Reinventing the Wheel Today’s electric vehicles aren’t terribly different, design-wise, from their combustion engine counterparts — with rare exception, you’re likely to find the motor, transmission, and other drive components all under the hood. Israeli startup REE, however, decided to take a completely different approach to designing EVs — putting everything typically found under the hood of a

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The value of vegetation

The day Brazil's voters chose Jair Bolsonaro as their new President wasn't a good day for efforts to mitigate climate change. During the election campaign, the declared populist and would-be strongman vowed to end the "environmental activism" of his predecessors. Previous Brazilian governments were not exactly zealous supporters of measures to combat climate change. But what Bolsonaro has promised

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What Love Island can tell us about the history of love

Last summer, the apparently scandalous statistic that more young people applied for the reality TV series Love Island than applied for Oxbridge rippled through the commentariat, eventually featuring in Prime Minister's Questions and that hotbed of middle-class moral panics, Question Time.

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Most people think playing chess makes you 'smarter', but the evidence isn't clear on that

Chess has long been an important part of school culture. Many people believe chess has a range of cognitive benefits including improved memory, IQ, problem solving skills and concentration.

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Solar weather has real, material effects on Earth

On Sep. 1, 1859, solar astronomer Richard Carrington witnessed sunspots that suddenly and briefly flashed brightly before they disappeared. Just before dawn the next day, auroras erupted over most of the Earth, reaching as far south as the Caribbean and Hawaii while southern lights were seen as far north as Chile. The event produced not only a visible light show in areas where they do not typicall

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The Death of a Patient and the Future of Fecal Transplants

Poop transplants work so well against some infections that they’re becoming a first line of defense. But two bad incidents raise questions about what's next.

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Boosted Rev Review: It Makes Scootering Less Silly

The electric mobility company proves that scooters aren’t just for kids and tourists.

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'Blitzscaling' Is Choking Innovation—and Wasting Money

Opinion: VCs are making bigger bets on fewer startups. It's this unconsidered, money-slinging strategy that led to Uber's and Lyft’s dud IPOs.

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Breaking Bonds With A Gentle Tug

Organic chemists are used to breaking and forming all sorts of chemical bonds; it’s what we do. But to do that we have to mess around with the energetics, because many (most!) of these processes don’t happen fast enough or selectively enough on their own. (In fact, the fundamental idea of “click” reactions, as introduced by Sharpless, was the search for the relatively few reactions that actually

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Viking History Is Melting Away in Greenland

Climate change is already rotting archaeological sites in the Arctic, and Norse Viking-era settlements are at high risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why Yesterday Made Me Cry

This article contains spoilers for Yesterday. “Are you crying ?” asked my son, 17, with ions of distaste pinging off him in the theater’s half-darkness. We were watching the silliest scene in the very silly Yesterday , and I was indeed snuffling. I was sentimentally seeping. I was crying. Why? Because—in the universe proposed by the movie—John Lennon did not get assassinated in December 1980. He

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‘1 Million Americans Will Be Shot in the Next Decade’

“I see more gunshot wounds as a trauma surgeon here in the United States per week than I did when I was serving in Kandahar, Afghanistan,” says Dr. Mallory Williams, chief of the Division of Trauma and Critical Care at Howard University Hospital. “There’s no question about it.” In a new Atlantic short documentary, American Trauma: How the NRA Sparked a Medical Rebellion , Dr. Williams and other e

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Trump Withdraws Plan to Eliminate Drug Price Rebates

The proposal would have lowered costs under Medicare for consumers needing expensive drugs, but would have raised Medicare premiums.

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Rediscovering Saskatchewan's scientific heritage

Gathered together from every corner of the University of Saskatchewan (USask) Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, the unique collection of scientific artifacts fills two rooms in the Physics Building.

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HSC16aay is a Type IIn supernova, study suggests

New research presented by an international team of astronomers suggests that a recently detected transient, designated HSC16aay, is a Type IIn supernova. A research paper reporting the discovery and detailing the finding, was published July 2 on the arXiv pre-print server.

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A taxonomic approach to understanding emerging blockchain identity management systems

Traditional identity management has typically involved the storing of user credentials (e.g., passwords) by organizations and third parties, which often results in concerns over interoperability, security, and privacy. However, a possible solution has emerged through the use of blockchain technology to create novel identity management approaches with built-in control and consent mechanisms. This c

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Finding of STEMIN (stem cell inducing factor) for feasible reprogramming in plants

Researchers in Japan found that induction of the transcription factor stem cell inducing factor 1 (STEMIN1) in leaves directly changes leaf cells into stem cells in the moss Physcomitrella patens. This discovery of a direct stem cell inducing factor will facilitate the further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying stem cell formation in land plants.

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Viking History Is Melting Away in Greenland

Climate change is already rotting archaeological sites in the Arctic, and Norse Viking-era settlements are at high risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Jennifer Doudna on gene editing

The biochemist talks to the FT’s Richard Waters

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Unraveling complicated issues of inequality in workplaces, communities

African American health care workers are there for a reason.

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Amazon to train third of US workforce with technical skills

Amazon will spend more than $700 million to provide additional training to about one-third of its U.S. workforce.

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Oldest human skull outside Africa identified as 210,000 years old

A 210,000-year-old human skull could provide new evidence that our species left Africa much earlier than previously thought. A new study published in Nature of two fossils found in Greece in the 1970s shows that one of them is the oldest Homo sapiens specimen ever found outside Africa by more than 50,000 years.

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Harnessing big data and machine learning to forecast wildfires in the western U.S.

The area burned by wildfires each year across the Western United States has increased by more than 300 percent over the past three decades, and much of this increase is due to human-caused warming. Warmer air holds more moisture, and the thirsty air sucks this from plants, trees, and soil, leaving forest vegetation and ground debris drier and easier to ignite. Future climate change, accompanied by

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Nanohaloarchaeota cultures reveal they are symbionts and not free-living organisms

Researchers employed multiple microbiology and omics techniques to experimentally determine that Nanohaloarchaeota are symbionts, rather than free-living organisms as had been originally thought.

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The anthropology of climate change and glacier retreat

Ben Orlove, an anthropologist, has conducted field work in the Peruvian Andes, East Africa, the Italian Alps and Aboriginal Australia. His early work focused on agriculture, fisheries and rangelands. More recently he has studied climate change and glacier retreat, with an emphasis on water, natural hazards and the loss of iconic landscapes. In addition to his numerous academic articles and books,

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Moon landings footage would have been impossible to fake – a film expert explains why

It's been half a century since the magnificent Apollo 11 moon landing , yet many people still don't believe it actually happened. Conspiracy theories about the event dating back to the 1970s are in fact more popular than ever. A common theory is that film director Stanley Kubrick helped NASA fake the historic footage of its six successful moon landings. But would it really have been possible to d

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Nanohaloarchaeota cultures reveal they are symbionts and not free-living organisms

Researchers employed multiple microbiology and omics techniques to experimentally determine that Nanohaloarchaeota are symbionts, rather than free-living organisms as had been originally thought.

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Most adults have never heard of TikTok. That's by design

TikTok is one of the fastest growing social media platforms on the planet, with more than 500 million active users. Only YouTube, Facebook and Instagram boast more.

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Frontiers and Robert-Jan Smits emails reveal how Plan S was conceived

The emails published here prove that EU Special Envoy for OA, Robert Jan Smits, received constant counselling from Frontiers CEO Kamila Markram when designing Plan S. It seems, Frontiers and Smits share exactly same vision for the future of scholarly publishing.

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CBD Oil: The new miracle cure

CBD oil is hyped as a miracle product to treat virtually everything. What is the evidence to support this?

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Amazon to train third of US workforce with technical skills

Amazon will spend more than $700 million to provide additional training to about one-third of its U.S. workforce.

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Biologists design a plug-and-play controller for gene expression

Researchers from two University of Texas System institutions have engineered biological components that can rewire genetic response pathways, creating a template for designing new cellular behaviors with wide-ranging potential applications.

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Ammonia from agriculture influences cloud formation over Asia

The Asian tropopause aerosol layer (ATAL) is located at twelve to 18 kilometers height above the Middle East and Asia. This accumulation of aerosols in the Asian monsoon was discovered first in 2011. Its composition and effect, however, have been unknown so far. A European consortium of scientists has now found at this layer consists of crystalline ammonium nitrate. In the AIDA cloud chamber, clim

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Biologists design a plug-and-play controller for gene expression

Researchers from two University of Texas System institutions have engineered biological components that can rewire genetic response pathways, creating a template for designing new cellular behaviors with wide-ranging potential applications.

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New data on ctDNA as a biomarker for detecting cancer progression presented at ASCO

Scientists at the 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting presented research that relied on Droplet Digital PCR to explore the strengths and limitations of using circulating tumor DNA as a biomarker for predicting outcomes and guiding treatment for patients with cancer.

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French healthcare will stop paying for homeopathic treatment in 2021

After another study found that homeopathic medicines had no proven benefit, the French government announced it will end reimbursements for these treatments in 2021

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Why Men Thought Women Weren’t Made to Vote

Editor’s Note: Read more stories in our series about women and political power. William T. Sedgwick believed that no good could come of letting women vote. “It would mean a degeneration and a degradation of human fiber which would turn back the hands of time a thousand years,” Sedgwick said in 1914. “Hence it will probably never come, for mankind will not lightly abandon at the call of a few fana

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Molecular 'clutch' puts infection-fighting cells into gear

Two proteins that act as a 'clutch' in cells to put them in gear and drive our immune response have been identified for the first time.

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Molecular 'clutch' puts infection-fighting cells into gear

Two proteins that act as a 'clutch' in cells to put them in gear and drive our immune response have been identified for the first time.

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Scientists develop probes to detect acute kidney failure early

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a type of imaging probe that allows for earlier detection of acute kidney failure, a rapidly-developing condition that can be fatal.

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Novel reusable hydrogel could harvest clean, desalinated water from humid air above sea surfaces

Huge amounts of water evaporate from water surfaces such as reservoirs and the open sea each day. To address this issue, especially in water scarce areas, researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) found an innovative way to harvest water from the humid air above water surfaces.

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Nest app will no longer work on the Apple Watch and Wear OS

Nest app on the Apple Watch and Google's Wear OS smartwatches sound like a rather nifty idea to manage the smart thermostat. Controlling temperature, viewing notifications and setting Home/Away …

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The nose of E. coli zips open and closed

With ice-cold electron microscopy microbiologists from Leiden gain more insight into how bacteria respond to their environment. Publication in mBio.

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Artificial intelligence may be used to reveal secrets behind traditional folk music dating back thousands of years

The secrets behind traditional folk music from across the globe and dating back thousands of years are likely to be revealed by using artificial intelligence, according to a leading academic expert.

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Airbnb cedes to EU pressure on price offers

Airbnb has successfully fended off Brussels regulators in time for the summer holidays by agreeing to change how it presents rental prices to consumers, the EU said on Wednesday.

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The nose of E. coli zips open and closed

With ice-cold electron microscopy microbiologists from Leiden gain more insight into how bacteria respond to their environment. Publication in mBio.

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Saltvatten räddning när grundvattnet sinar

Bevattningsförbud, larmrapporter och kampanjer för att spara vatten. På flera håll i landet har man fått vänja sig vid detta under de senaste åren. Gotland har varit särskilt utsatt med nästan helt tömda reserver. Öns berggrund håller inte kvar nederbörden och mycket av regnet som faller fortsätter ut i havet. Detta i kombination med flera torra år har gjort situationen kritisk och regionen tog f

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HBO's 'Years and Years' Unlocks Sci-Fi's Ultimate Potential

At its core, science fiction is a tool for building thought experiment machines. That's the game Russell T Davies' new show is playing so beautifully.

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New Designs Could Boost Solar Cells Beyond Their Limits

A material that effectively splits a photon in two is one way scientists are trying to increase solar cells’ efficiency beyond what they’d thought possible.

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Is the Western mind too WEIRD to study?

Psychologist says research relies on too many participants from Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic societies

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The Snakes That Ate Florida

Bounty hunters and biologists wade deep into the Everglades to wrestle with the invasion of giant pythons threatening the state's wetlands

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Many College Students Are Too Poor to Eat

A recent federal watchdog report about the breadth of food insecurity on America’s college campuses came with a caveat: “Nationally representative survey data that would support direct estimates of the prevalence of food insecurity among college students do not exist,” the Government Accountability Office wrote in the report to lawmakers. There is a growing body of research saying that college st

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The Metamorphosis

Geoffroy de Crécy Humanity is at the edge of a revolution driven by artificial intelligence. It has the potential to be one of the most significant and far-reaching revolutions in history, yet it has developed out of disparate efforts to solve specific practical problems rather than a comprehensive plan. Ironically, the ultimate effect of this case-by-case problem solving may be the transformatio

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Image of the Day: On the Attack

This caterpillar secretes acid to get past the defenses of the plant on which it preys.

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Light may increase magnetic memory speeds 1000 times, decrease electricity consumption

Internet searches, decade-old emails and on-demand video offerings help contribute to electricity consumption by America's server farms and data centers amounting to more than 2 percent of the country's annual total.

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Island cores unravel mysteries of ancient Maltese civilisation

The mysteries of an ancient civilisation that survived for more than a millennium on the island of Malta—and then collapsed within two generations—have been unravelled by archaeologists who analysed pollen buried deep within the earth and ancient DNA from skulls and bones.

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The Geopolitics of Artificial Intelligence

As the U.S. and China vie for global influence, AI will be central to the balance of power — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Streaming online pornography produces as much CO2 as Belgium

Streaming online videos generates 300 million tonnes of CO2 a year – nearly 1 per cent of global emissions – with pornography alone generating 80 million tonnes

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For climbing robots, the sky's the limit

Robots can drive on the plains and craters ofMars, but what if we could explore cliffs, polar caps and other hard-to-reach places on the Red Planet and beyond? Designed by engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, a four-limbed robot named LEMUR (Limbed Excursion Mechanical Utility Robot) can scale rock walls, gripping with hundreds of tiny fishhooks in each of its 16

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France passes law taxing digital giants in defiance of US anger

France on Thursday became the first major economy to impose a tax on digital giants, with parliament passing the legislation in defiance of a probe ordered by President Donald Trump that could trigger reprisal tariffs.

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Book traces the history of urbanism through an archaeological lens

The only thing a person really needs to be an archaeologist is a good sense of observation, UCLA professor of anthropology Monica Smith proclaims in her most recent book, Cities: The First 6,000 Years.

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Datacentres nødstrømsanlæg skal fylde hullerne i elnettet

PLUS. Nødstrømsanlæg i datacentre kan gå fra at være en tung udgiftspost til at gavne både datacentrenes økonomi og forsyningssikkerheden i Danmark.

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Six Degrees of Separation at Burning Man – Issue 74: Networks

Today the alkaline desert is quiet. The roar of techno music and flamethrowers has been replaced with the soft clink of rakes and trash cans. Thousands of people put aside their hangovers to methodically clean the desert. After a dedicated communal cleaning, Burning Man, one of the largest arts events in the world, spanning seven days and involving over 70,000 participants, leaves not a single wr

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It Takes a Village to Raise a Meerkat – Issue 74: Networks

Living in the flat, arid landscape of the Kalahari, meerkats are one of the most cooperative species of mammal on the planet. The scarcity of food and few places to hide from predators has led them to live in groups where they share the tasks of foraging and keeping watch. But these diminutive animals also cooperate in ways that are rare among mammals. Meerkats live in large families of up to 50

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The Computer Maverick Who Modeled the Evolution of Life – Issue 74: Networks

In 1953, at the dawn of modern computing, Nils Aall Barricelli played God. Clutching a deck of playing cards in one hand and a stack of punched cards in the other, Barricelli hovered over one of the world’s earliest and most influential computers, the IAS machine, at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. During the day the computer was used to make weather forecasting calcula

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Goats get emotional? Humans shouldn't be surprised – all mammals are amazing | Jules Howard

Research showing goats can communicate emotion by bleating should help us build empathy with our fellow animals Wicksteed Park in Kettering is not known for its miracles, but on that day, it was if a holy statue was weeping blood. Within minutes of the incredible event beginning, a great crowd coalesced. The elderly and infirm got out of their chairs. Children were put on shoulders. There were ga

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Major shuffle at NASA in rush to meet Trump's moon deadline

NASA has replaced the head of its human space exploration directorate in a major shake-up, US media reported Wednesday, as the agency scrambles to meet President Donald Trump's ambitious deadline to return astronauts to the moon by 2024.

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The Strange Saga of the Butt Plug Turned Research Device

How one scientist started with a butt plug from Amazon and ended up inventing an “anal pneumatic base” to measure orgasms.

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AI's Latest Job? Designing Cool T-Shirts

That attractive design on your T-shirt wasn't made by some hipster artist. It was produced by a neural network.

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Twitter and Instagram Unveil New Ways to Combat Hate—Again

The social media giants just released new policies to cut down on bullying and hate speech. It's not clear they'll be any more successful this time around.

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Google and Nest Device Deals: Early Prime Day Sales

To combat Amazon's Prime Day, Google is discounting its best devices.

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The Hard-Luck Texas Town That Bet on Bitcoin—and Lost

China's Bitmain said it would build the world's largest bitcoin mine in Rockdale, Texas. Then the price of bitcoin plunged, taking with it the town's hopes for a revival.

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The Slackification of the American Home

When Tonya Parker, a mom in Illinois, wanted to better organize her family life a little over a year ago, the first thing she did was set her kids up on Trello, a web-based project-management tool. Parker’s four children, ages 9 to 18, now use Trello, which is more typically used at work, to keep up with chores, to-do lists, shopping, and homework. “I use it every day to keep track of what school

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The Geopolitics of Artificial Intelligence

As the U.S. and China vie for global influence, AI will be central to the balance of power — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pakistan's 'Earthquake Island' Has Vanished

A mud-volcano island that burst from the waters off the coast of Pakistan during a deadly earthquake in 2013 has disappeared beneath the waves.

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We Are Very Close to Completely Eliminating Male Embryos (in Mice)

The catch is that it requires genetically altering the parents, too.

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A Common Cold Virus Wiped Away Bladder Cancer in One Patient

A simple cold virus can effectively treat a form of bladder cancer, a new study suggests.

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Meet the Ploonets! Runaway Moons with Delusions of Planethood Get Astronomy's Cutest Name Ever

Moons orbiting distant worlds have a new nickname, and it's even cuter than "moonmoon."

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Cancer specialists in Mexico earn third retraction following questions about their data

A group of cancer researchers in Mexico has lost their third paper over concerns about the integrity of their data. Neither the new retraction, in the journal Hematology, nor the previous two, cite misconduct as the reason for the removals. However, the statements do refer to lack of reliability of results, “ambiguities and inconsistencies” in … Continue reading Cancer specialists in Mexico earn t

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Neuralink meeting, San Francisco and live stream.

submitted by /u/TotalMegaCool [link] [comments]

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