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nyheder2019juli12

Thwack! Insects feel chronic pain after injury

Scientists have known insects experience something like pain since 2003, but new research published today from Associate Professor Greg Neely and colleagues at the University of Sydney proves for the first time that insects also experience chronic pain that lasts long after an initial injury has healed.

8h

Insects feel persistent pain after injury, evidence suggests

Scientists have known insects experience something like pain, but new research provides compelling evidence suggesting that insects also experience chronic pain that lasts long after an initial injury has healed.

1h

Plastindustrien tabte: EU-domstol kalder Bisphenol A »et yderst bekymrende stof«

Det hormonforstyrrende stof Bisphenol A, der findes i kasseboner, skal blive på EU´s kandidatliste over skadelige stoffer, lyder det fra EU-domstolen, efter at plastlobbyen har tabt den første af tre sager.

7h

Mediterranean sharks risk 'disappearing': conservationists

Sharks—the sea's top predators for millions of years—are at risk of disappearing from the Mediterranean as overfishing and plastic pollution choke populations of the endangered hunters, conservationists warned Friday.

6min

Montana energy storage project lines up financial partner

Construction on a $1 billion energy storage system in central Montana could start as soon as next year after its sponsors said Friday they reached a financing agreement with a Danish firm that invests in renewable energy.

6min

Mediterranean sharks risk 'disappearing': conservationists

Sharks—the sea's top predators for millions of years—are at risk of disappearing from the Mediterranean as overfishing and plastic pollution choke populations of the endangered hunters, conservationists warned Friday.

11min

EPA restores broad use of pesticide opposed by beekeepers

The Environmental Protection Agency will allow farmers to resume broad use of a pesticide over objections from beekeepers, citing private chemical industry studies that the agency says show the product does only lower-level harm to bees and wildlife.

11min

EPA restores broad use of pesticide opposed by beekeepers

The Environmental Protection Agency will allow farmers to resume broad use of a pesticide over objections from beekeepers, citing private chemical industry studies that the agency says show the product does only lower-level harm to bees and wildlife.

12min

Sudden turbulence that injured dozens is hard to predict

Passengers on a flight from Canada to Australia said they had no warning about turbulence that suddenly slammed people into the ceiling of the plane and injured more than three dozen—a phenomenon that experts say can be nearly impossible for pilots to see coming.

12min

Maintaining large-scale satellite constellations using logistics approach

Today, large-scale communication satellite constellations, also known as megaconstellations, have been more and more popular. OneWeb launched the first batch of satellites of an initial 650-satellite constellation in February 2019, and SpaceX also launched the first batch of its 12,000-satellite constellation in May 2019. On July 8, Amazon also filed an application with the FCC for its planned sat

12min

The Stories From Room 140

Many undocumented immigrants who are released from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention centers have nowhere to go. When this happens near Oakland, California, Pastor Gomez gets notified through the small community of Guatemalan immigrants that has formed around the church that he leads. Gomez, who moonlights as a local motel manager, rents a room for the migrants at the motel at hi

17min

FTC Reportedly Hits Facebook With Record $5 Billion Settlement

The devil's going to be in the details, but for now Facebook owes big for its privacy violations.

18min

Scientists deepen understanding of magnetic fields surrounding Earth and other planets

Vast rings of electrically charged particles encircle the Earth and other planets. Now, a team of scientists has completed research into waves that travel through this magnetic, electrically charged environment, known as the magnetosphere, deepening understanding of the region and its interaction with our own planet, and opening up new ways to study other planets across the galaxy.

18min

Shifts to renewable energy can drive up energy poverty, study finds

Efforts to shift away from fossil fuels and replace oil and coal with renewable energy sources can help reduce carbon emissions but do so at the expense of increased inequality, according to a new Portland State University study.

18min

North Carolina Is Eyeing a Hyperloop One System for the Research Triangle

North Carolina is the latest state to throw its hat into the Hyperloop One ring. Today, Virgin Hyperloop One announced that North Carolina’s Regional Transportation Alliance (RTA) was launching …

19min

$5 bn US fine set for Facebook on privacy probe: report

US regulators have approved a $5 billion penalty to be levied on Facebook to settle a probe into the social network's privacy and data protection lapses, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

19min

Scientists Gene Edit Plants to be Better at Carbon Capture

Plant Power It’s not enough for humans to pump less carbon into the atmosphere. To address climate change, many experts say we’re going to need to find a way to remove some of the emissions already polluting our air. While some scientists are focusing on mechanical solutions to carbon capture, researchers at the Salk Institute’s Harnessing Plants Initiative are taking a more organic approach, by

21min

The World's Largest Iceberg Is 2 Years Old Today, and Already Drifting Toward Its Doom

The world's largest iceberg turned 2 years old today (July 12) and has already drifted more than 150 miles from its Antarctic home.

22min

Maintaining large-scale satellite constellations using logistics approach

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign identified a critical hidden challenge about replacing the broken satellites in megaconstellations and proposed a unique solution with inventory control methods.

23min

Small horned dinosaur from China, a Triceratops relative, walked on two feet

Auroraceratops, a bipedal dinosaur that lived roughly 115 million years ago, has been newly described by an international team of researchers led by paleontologist Peter Dodson of the University of Pennsylvania and former student Eric Morschhauser, now of Indiana University of Pennsylvania. More than 80 individuals of this species have been found in China's Gansu Province.

23min

An itch to scratch: NCATS, NIDCR scientists identify potential approach to chronic problem

While scientists have some clues to the causes of troubling chronic itch, effective therapies have been elusive. Now, by sorting through more than 86,000 compounds at the same time, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences researchers and their colleagues report a new strategy that may eventually help alleviate chronic itch. They've shown that blocking a receptor, or docking station, f

23min

NRL tropical cyclone forecast updates go live

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's updated tropical cyclone prediction software becomes operational just before the first tropical system of the season to reach the U.S. makes landfall July 13.

24min

Small horned dinosaur from China, a Triceratops relative, walked on two feet

Many dinosaur species are known from scant remains, with some estimates suggesting 75% are known from five or fewer individuals. Auroraceratops rugosus was typical in this regard when it was named in 2005 based upon a single skull from the Gobi Desert in northwestern China. But that is no longer the case.

24min

The best Amazon Prime Day deals happening this year

All the best Amazon Prime Day deals. (Sergey Zolkin via Unsplash/) If you've been waiting to grab a pair of headphones , that air fryer your friend can't stop praising , or a new set of gardening tools , you may as well wait to see the deals offered during this year's Amazon's Prime Day . The "day"—now 48 hours!—promises some decent deals on electronics, home goods, personal care items, outdoor a

27min

Novel nanoparticles deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cell with much higher efficiency

A research collaboration between Tufts University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has led to the development of a significantly improved delivery mechanism for the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method in the liver, according to a study published recently in the journal Advanced Materials. The delivery uses biodegradable synthetic lipid nanoparticles that carry the molecular editing tools into the c

30min

Thousands flee as storm Barry menaces New Orleans, Louisiana coast

Evacuations ramped up Friday across coastal Louisiana as the southern US state—including its main city New Orleans—braced for a potentially disastrous deluge from Tropical Storm Barry, which threatens to strengthen into a hurricane.

30min

$5 bn US fine set for Facebook on privacy probe: report

US regulators have approved a $5 billion penalty to be levied on Facebook to settle a probe into the social network's privacy and data protection lapses, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

30min

Weyl fermions discovered in another class of materials

A particular kind of elementary particle, the Weyl fermions, were first discovered a few years ago. Their specialty: they move through a material in a well ordered manner that practically never lets them collide with each other and is thus very energy efficient. This opens up intriguing possibilities for the electronics of the future. Up to now, Weyl fermions had only been found in certain non-mag

30min

Novel nanoparticles deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cell with much higher efficiency

Researchers have developed a significantly improved delivery mechanism for the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method in the liver. The delivery uses biodegradable synthetic lipid nanoparticles that carry the molecular editing tools into the cell to precisely alter the cells' genetic code with as much as 90 percent efficiency. The nanoparticles could help overcome technical hurdles to enable gene editing

38min

The R. Kelly Federal Indictments Suggest a Conspiracy

In 1994, R. Kelly, then 27 years old, secretly married the 15-year-old pop star Aaliyah. In 1996, another singer, Tiffany Hawkins, said that he had sex with her when she was 15 , in the first of many lawsuits over the years from women alleging misconduct by Kelly. In 2000, The Chicago Sun-Times published its first investigation of Kelly’s alleged sex with minors. In 2002, he was indicted on 21 co

38min

Improving care quality for hospitalized socially at-risk patients

Nurses play a pivotal role in caring for hospitalized patients with social risk factors and preparing them for discharge. Now, a new study illustrates how certain health system constraints present barriers to effective care and impact outcomes for patients with high social risks.

40min

Novel nanoparticles deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cell with much higher efficiency

Researchers have developed a significantly improved delivery mechanism for the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method in the liver. The delivery uses biodegradable synthetic lipid nanoparticles that carry the molecular editing tools into the cell to precisely alter the cells' genetic code with as much as 90 percent efficiency. The nanoparticles could help overcome technical hurdles to enable gene editing

40min

Automated system generates robotic parts for novel tasks

An automated system designs and 3D prints complex robotic parts called actuators that are optimized according to an enormous number of specifications. In short, the system does automatically what is virtually impossible for humans to do by hand.

40min

How artificial intelligence can be used to more quickly and accurately diagnose breast cancer

Breast ultrasound elastography is an emerging imaging technique used by doctors to help diagnose breast cancer by evaluating a lesion's stiffness in a non-invasive way. Researchers identified the critical role machine learning can play in making this technique more efficient and accurate in diagnosis.

40min

Shifts to renewable energy can drive up energy poverty, study finds

Efforts to shift away from fossil fuels and replace oil and coal with renewable energy sources can help reduce carbon emissions but do so at the expense of increased inequality, according to a new study.

40min

Hulu 4K streaming is back for Apple TV, Chromecast Ultra – CNET

The company ended support for the feature last year.

48min

C. difficile resists hospital disinfectant, persists on hospital gowns, stainless steel

Surgical gowns and stainless steel remained contaminated with the pathogen Clostridium difficile even after being treated with the recommended disinfectant, according to new research.

56min

Rise in early onset colorectal cancer not aligned with screening trends

A new study finds that trends in colonoscopy rates did not fully align with the increase in colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger adults, adding to evidence that the rise in early onset CRC is not solely a result of more detection.

56min

The IRS Is Coming for Your Secret Crypto Stash

Training Guide According to a leaked internal training guide, the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) might begin issuing subpoenas to tech companies in order to find people’s secret cryptocurrency wallets. We recommend you thumb through the full guide , which was first shared online by CPA Laura Walter and which the IRS confirmed to CoinDesk was authentic , mostly because it looks like it was de

57min

How do you feel? Interoception- the new science of emotion

What happens when someone asks, “How do you feel?” Besides possibly uttering the rote response, “good, how are you”—what is the process of sensing how you’re really feeling in that moment? It seems to involve interoception—the sense of the physiological condition of the body. Interoception mediates many different sensations—pain, temperature, itch, hunger, sexual arousal, and … Continue reading Ho

1h

Rippling Rainbow Map Shows How California Earthquakes Moved The Earth

NASA has mapped changes in the ground's position caused by the recent earthquakes — and it happens to be look like beautiful, psychedelic art. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

1h

Scientists Made a Microbe-Boosting Diet to Help Malnourished Kids Grow

A malnourished child at a camp in Bangladesh. (Credit: Pahari Himu/Shutterstock) One in four children will never grow to a normal height. In developing countries, the number can be as high as one in three. The problem? Malnutrition. Now scientists have developed a diet that can boost key colonies of gut bacteria in malnourished kids. The finding is important because past research has shown these b

1h

What Are Intermediate-Mass Black Holes?

The hunt for intermediate-mass black holes (IMBH) has picked up over recent years, and there are now dozens of promising candidates. This artist's concept depicts a 2,200 solar mass IMBH suspected to reside in the heart of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, located some 15,000 light-years from Earth. (Credit: B. Kiziltan/T. Karacan) Black holes have long served as fodder for science fiction — and fo

1h

NASA Built Rock Climbing Robots to Scale Cliffs on Mars and Beyond

LEMUR can climb walls with special gripping feet, and is only one of a suite of climbing NASA robots. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech) NASA has built many adventurous robots that can fly in space, land on alien planets, roll across Martian and lunar terrain, and even fly helicopter-style across far-off worlds. But the next big challenge is climbing and clambering across rough or steep terrain, a common

1h

Are These Supermassive Black Holes on a Collision Course?

This galaxy, which sits about 2.5 billion light-years away, hosts two supermassive black holes (inset), visible because of the heated gas, dust, and stars around them. The two black holes are on a collision course, but astronomers still aren't sure whether they will – or can – merge. (Credit: A.D. Goulding et al./Astrophysical Journal Letters 2019) By now, merging black holes and the gravitational

1h

Viking Relics Will Disappear With Climate Change, Study Says

Archaeological sites in the Nuuk Region along Greenland's southern coast, shown here, are among those in the most danger from climate change. (Credit: XPixel/shutterstock) Hailing from Norway, Sweden and Denmark, the seafaring pirates best known as Vikings, or Norsemen, raided and colonized Europe from the ninth to eleventh centuries. They also established settlements throughout the Arctic includi

1h

New technology improves atrial fibrillation detection after stroke

It's important to determine whether stroke patients also experience atrial fibrillation (Afib). Monitoring technology invented at Michigan Medicine (University of Michigan) could make the process easier and more accurate.

1h

Preterm babies are less likely to form romantic relationships in adulthood

Adults who were born preterm (under 37 weeks gestation) are less likely to have a romantic relationship, a sexual partner and experience parenthood than those born full term. The meta-analysis with data from up to 4.4 million adult participants showed that those born preterm are 28% less likely to ever be in a romantic relationship.

1h

Fewer than half of US adults exposed to court-ordered anti-smoking advertisements

The tobacco industry's court-ordered anti-smoking advertisements reached just 40.6 percent of US adults and 50.5 percent of current smokers in 2018, according to new research. Exposure to the advertisements was even lower among certain ethnic and socioeconomic subgroups historically targeted by tobacco industry marketing.

1h

Super salty, subzero Arctic water provides peek at possible life on other planets

Researchers have discovered thriving communities of bacteria in Alaskan 'cryopegs,' trapped layers of sediment with water so salty that it remains liquid at below-freezing temperatures. The setting may be similar to environments on Mars, Saturn's moon Titan, or other bodies farther from the sun.

1h

AI beats professionals in six-player poker

An artificial intelligence program has defeated leading professionals in six-player no-limit Texas hold'em poker, the world's most popular form of poker.

1h

The Best Way to Get Fired by Trump

President Trump says he hates to see Alex Acosta go. That doesn’t mean he didn’t quickly accept the labor secretary’s resignation, though. Under fire for his involvement in sex offender Jeffrey Epstein’s light 2008 sentence, Acosta announced his resignation Friday morning, two days after a disastrous press conference in which he seemed to criticize Epstein’s victims for not coming forward. Trump

1h

Mini revival of the TurboGrafx-16 comes out March 2020 with 50 games

The TurboGrafx-16 Mini, a retro revival of the classic Japanese game console announced last month, is slated to release on March 19th, 2020, Konami announced today. The full game …

1h

Researchers Identify Gut Microbes to Help Malnourished Kids Recover

Calories aren’t enough to correct malnourishment, but eating foods that spur specific microbes to grow in the gut can.

1h

225 US Mayors Agree to Stop Paying Ransomware Hackers

Enough’s Enough Earlier this month, a coalition of 225 U.S. mayors signed a resolution vowing to stop paying ransoms to hackers who compromise their cities’ digital infrastructure. Twenty-two cities have been hit by these ransomware attacks in 2019 alone , and another 148 attacks have hit American cities since 2013 according to the resolution , which was signed at the 87th annual meeting of the U

1h

1h

Which is the perfect quantum theory?

For some phenomena in quantum many-body physics several competing theories exist. But which of them describes a quantum phenomenon best? Researchers have now successfully deployed artificial neural networks for image analysis of quantum systems.

1h

Shifts to renewable energy can drive up energy poverty, PSU study finds

Efforts to shift away from fossil fuels and replace oil and coal with renewable energy sources can help reduce carbon emissions but do so at the expense of increased inequality, according to a new Portland State University study

1h

Zebrafish could teach humans a lot about the science of sleep

Zebrafish share similar sleeping patterns to humans, which is helping researchers understand the origins of sleep. (Deposit Photos/) Coming up short on your recommended 7 hours of shut-eye? The consequences could be devastating. Not getting enough sleep can bust your metabolism and alter the behavior of your genes for years to come. Sleep deprivation is also directly related to some of America's

1h

Scientists deepen understanding of magnetic fields surrounding Earth and other planets

New research into waves that travel through Earth's magnetosphere deepen our understanding of the region and its interaction with our own planet, and open up new ways to study other planets across the galaxy.

1h

Hear them roar: How humans and chickadees understand each other

Is there something universal about the sounds we make that allows vocal learners — like songbirds — to figure out how we're feeling? Sounds like it, according to new research.

1h

Internet communities can teach amateurs to build personalized governments

Self-governing internet communities, in the form of games, social networks or informational websites, create their own rule systems that help groups of anonymous users work together.

1h

This Pharma Company Is Set to Begin HIV Vaccine Trials

HIV Vaccine There have been plenty of reports of HIV vaccines over the last decade. But now Johnson & Johnson, one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world, is entering the fray. According to Bloomberg , the pharma giant is set to begin human trials of an HIV vaccine in the U.S. and Europe. 3,800 men who have sex with men will be given the shot in a study that’s reportedly launching l

1h

Ford and VW Hitch Their Self-Driving Efforts Together

Volkswagen said it is investing $2.6 billion in Argo, a self-driving-car startup in which Ford has a big stake. The companies are jointly developing pickups and an EV.

2h

This Chrome Extension Calls Out Sponsored YouTube Videos

Researchers last year found that many YouTube influencers don't disclose ties to affiliate marketing. A new browser extension will show you the hidden connections.

2h

How good is your hospital?

Researchers have proposed a rating system that standardizes and combines data from five leading hospital rating systems into an easy-to-understand composite score of one to 10 that will help guide consumer's hospitals choice.

2h

TikTok Stars Are Preparing to Take Over the Internet

Anaheim , Calif.—Last night, YouTube hosted its annual VidCon party, in one of the Anaheim Convention Center’s large halls, and YouTube executives, top influencers, and industry professionals mingled about the cavernous space, sipping beer and eating vegetable skewers and salad in cups as a DJ on a large circular platform in the center blasted pop hits. The party felt like a generic corporate-spo

2h

Improving care quality for hospitalized socially at-risk patients

Nurses play a pivotal role in caring for hospitalized patients with social risk factors and preparing them for discharge. Now, a new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) illustrates how certain health system constraints present barriers to effective care and impact outcomes for patients with high social risks.

2h

Device channels heat into light

Engineers have shown how their carbon nanotube films can be used to create a device to recycle waste heat. The device could enhance solar cell output and increase the efficiency of industrial waste-heat recovery.

2h

When Ancient DNA Gets Politicized

What responsibility do archaeologists have when their research about prehistoric finds is appropriated to make 21st-century arguments about ethnicity?

2h

Tropical Storm Barry's Dangers Will Reach Far Inland

Rains from the system will prolong the already historic flooding along the Mississippi — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Tropical Storm Barry's Dangers Will Reach Far Inland

Rains from the system will prolong the already historic flooding along the Mississippi — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

'The way you move': Body structure brings coordinated movement

A computer model shows that a starfish-like animal can coordinate rhythmic motion based on body structure without the brain telling them to do so. This provides insights useful for physiology and robotics.

2h

Researchers show how AI can be used to more quickly and accurately diagnose breast cancer

Breast ultrasound elastography is an emerging imaging technique used by doctors to help diagnose breast cancer by evaluating a lesion's stiffness in a non-invasive way. USC researchers identified the critical role machine learning can play in making this technique more efficient and accurate in diagnosis.

2h

Taking opioids for pain may make it harder to find primary care, study finds

Finding a new doctor for health checkups and general care can pose a challenge to anyone. But for people who take prescription opioid pills for their chronic pain, it might be far harder, according to a new study. In fact, 40% of 194 primary care clinics contacted for the study said they wouldn't accept a new patient who takes Percocet daily for pain from a past injury, no matter what kind of insu

2h

Weyl fermions discovered in another class of materials

A particular kind of elementary particle, the Weyl fermions, were first discovered a few years ago. Their specialty: they move through a material in a well ordered manner that practically never lets them collide with each other and is thus very energy efficient. For the very first time, scientists at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have experimentally proved their existence in another type of mate

2h

Elegant antibody nanoparticles override immunological tolerance of tumors

Scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a tumor enzymatic microenvironment-activatable antibody nanoparticle for robust cancer immunotherapy.

2h

Automated system generates robotic parts for novel tasks

An automated system developed by MIT researchers designs and 3D prints complex robotic parts called actuators that are optimized according to an enormous number of specifications. In short, the system does automatically what is virtually impossible for humans to do by hand.

2h

Tightening the tumor-targeting abilities of checkpoint blockade immunotherapy

Seeking to improve upon existing checkpoint inhibitor therapies, scientists have developed a common checkpoint inhibitor (anti-PD-L1) in a nanoparticle formulation, which were activated specifically at tumor sites in mouse models of cancer.

2h

Woman Dies After Being Impaled by Reusable Metal Straw

A woman in England died after falling onto a reusable metal straw; and the tragic accident has renewed debate over bans on plastic straws.

2h

Elon Musk’s Brain-Computer Startup Neuralink Breaks Silence

Mark Your Calendar In 2017, Tesla/SpaceX/Boring Company CEO Elon Musk announced he was launching yet another company, this one focused on finding a way to directly link the human brain to computers . And that’s basically all we heard about Neuralink for two years, until Musk tweeted in April 2019 that an update from the startup was “coming soon” — and now we finally have an exact date for when th

2h

An electrically pumped phonon-polariton laser

We report a device that provides coherent emission of phonon polaritons, a mixed state between photons and optical phonons in an ionic crystal. An electrically pumped GaInAs/AlInAs quantum cascade structure provides intersubband gain into the polariton mode at = 26.3 μm, allowing self-oscillations close to the longitudinal optical phonon energy of AlAs. Because of the large computed phonon fracti

2h

Distinct conducting layer edge states in two-dimensional (2D) halide perovskite

Two-dimensional (2D) lead halide perovskite with a natural "multiple quantum well" (MQW) structure has shown great potential for optoelectronic applications. Continuing advancement requires a fundamental understanding of the charge and energy flow in these 2D heterolayers, particularly at the layer edges. Here, we report the distinct conducting feature at the layer edges between the insulating bu

2h

Tip-enhanced strong coupling spectroscopy, imaging, and control of a single quantum emitter

Optical cavities can enhance and control light-matter interactions. This level of control has recently been extended to the nanoscale with single emitter strong coupling even at room temperature using plasmonic nanostructures. However, emitters in static geometries, limit the ability to tune the coupling strength or to couple different emitters to the same cavity. Here, we present tip-enhanced st

2h

Topology optimization and 3D printing of multimaterial magnetic actuators and displays

Upcoming actuation systems will be required to perform multiple tightly coupled functions analogous to their natural counterparts; e.g., the ability to control displacements and high-resolution appearance simultaneously is necessary for mimicking the camouflage seen in cuttlefish. Creating integrated actuation systems is challenging owing to the combined complexity of generating high-dimensional

2h

Imaging Bell-type nonlocal behavior

The violation of a Bell inequality not only attests to the nonclassical nature of a system but also holds a very unique status within the quantum world. The amount by which the inequality is violated often provides a good benchmark on how a quantum protocol will perform. Acquiring images of such a fundamental quantum effect is a demonstration that images can capture and exploit the essence of the

2h

Spin fluctuation induced Weyl semimetal state in the paramagnetic phase of EuCd2As2

Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles can arise in Weyl semimetals (WSMs) in which the energy bands are nondegenerate, resulting from inversion or time-reversal symmetry breaking. Nevertheless, experimental evidence for magnetically induced WSMs is scarce. Here, using photoemission spectroscopy, we observe that the degeneracy of Bloch bands is already lifted in the paramagnetic phase of EuCd 2

2h

Optimal transport and colossal ionic mechano-conductance in graphene crown ethers

Biological ion channels balance electrostatic and dehydration effects to yield large ion selectivity alongside high transport rates. These macromolecular systems are often interrogated through point mutations of their pore domain, limiting the scope of mechanistic studies. In contrast, we demonstrate that graphene crown ether pores afford a simple platform to directly investigate optimal ion tran

2h

Universal quantized thermal conductance in graphene

The universal quantization of thermal conductance provides information on a state's topological order. Recent measurements revealed that the observed value of thermal conductance of the state is inconsistent with either Pfaffian or anti-Pfaffian model, motivating several theoretical articles. Analysis has been made complicated by the presence of counter-propagating edge channels arising from edge

2h

Leaf-inspired multiresponsive MXene-based actuator for programmable smart devices

Natural leaves, with elaborate architectures and functional components, harvest and convert solar energy into chemical fuels that can be converted into energy based on photosynthesis. The energy produced leads to work done that inspired many autonomous systems such as light-triggered motion. On the basis of this nature-inspired phenomenon, we report an unprecedented bilayer-structured actuator ba

2h

New gene linked to healthy aging in worms

Damage to gene causes impaired movement in adult worms.

2h

Dentistry: Root canal work not so bad after all

Root canal work is not as bad as people think when compared to other dental procedures. Self-reporting of their dental health suggests that patients find the procedure no worse than other dental work which overturns the popular belief that root canal work is the most unpleasant dental treatment.

2h

Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators

Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production.

2h

'The way you move': Body structure brings coordinated movement

A computer model shows that a starfish-like animal can coordinate rhythmic motion based on body structure without the brain telling them to do so. This provides insights useful for physiology and robotics.

2h

Better policies around toxic chemicals urged

Researchers contend that failures to protect human and environmental health from toxic chemicals result from flawed governance, and lay out a plan for improved policies.

2h

HIV: Reprogramming cells to control infection

Following research on cohorts, scientists have described the characteristics of CD8 immune cells in these 'HIV controller' subjects. The unique antiviral power of these immune cells can be attributed to an optimal metabolic program that confers persistence and the ability to react effectively against infected cells. Working ex vivo, the scientists successfully reprogrammed cells from infected non-

2h

Seeing greenery linked to less intense and frequent unhealthy cravings

New research shows that being able to see green spaces from your home is associated with reduced cravings for alcohol, cigarettes and harmful foods.

2h

The brain's pathways to imagination may hold the key to altruistic behavior

Researchers used neuroimaging to identify multiple neural pathways in the brain that explain the relationship between imagination and the willingness to help others.

2h

Try CuriosityStream Free for One Week, and Then Say Goodbye to Garbage TV Forever

If you’re a documentary junkie, you already know that your thirst for knowledge can’t ever be completely slaked. But, at least it can be temporarily subdued with the right documentary. Unfortunately, the modern cable TV and streaming landscape provides relatively few good, educational, yet entertaining programs. But luckily, there’s a relatively new streaming service in town that’s seeking to cha

3h

Recognizing kidney injury due to burns is improved by artificial intelligence

Many burn victims suffer acute kidney injury, but early recognition of the condition can be challenging. Now an Artificial Intelligence / Machine Learning model developed at UC Davis Health and reported in a new study can predict acute kidney injury quicker and more accurately than ever.

3h

In Hawaii, Rat Lungworm Disease Infects People but Eludes Researchers

A brain-invading parasite has made nearly 100 people sick in Hawaii in the last decade. How worried should health officials be?

3h

Sound mind: Detecting depression through voice

AI algorithms can now more accurately detect depressed mood using the sound of your voice, according to new research.

3h

Scientists Created Dairy-Free Ice Cream From GM Yeast

Secret Cow Level Dairy-free products company Perfect Day Foods just created a creamy ice cream using genetically modified yeast that produces whey proteins — meaning no cows were involved with its production. While the Bay Area-based startup claims its new invention is the “world’s first animal-free ice cream” on its website , it’s worth nothing that there are plenty of non-dairy and vegan ice cr

3h

New study highlights advantages of living-donor liver transplant over deceased donor

New research from UPMC and Pitt shows that living-donor liver transplant offers numerous advantages over deceased-donor transplant, including superior outcomes and less resource utilization.

3h

Novel nanoparticles deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cell with much higher efficiency

Researchers have developed a significantly improved delivery mechanism for the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method in the liver. The delivery uses biodegradable synthetic lipid nanoparticles that carry the molecular editing tools into the cell to precisely alter the cells' genetic code with as much as 90 percent efficiency. The nanoparticles could help overcome technical hurdles to enable gene editing

3h

Watch an MIT Robot Attempt the Bottle Cap Challenge — Sort Of

Challenge Accepted In the world of robotics, Baxter is something of a celebrity , and now, the bot is starting to act like one — by putting its own twist on the latest viral trend. In May, researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory demonstrated Baxter’s latest skill : mirroring a human operator’s arm movements by watching their bicep and tricep muscles. In a newl

3h

Anthrax-carrying flies follow monkeys through the forest

It turns out humans aren’t the only primates with an insect problem

3h

How to build a pocket toolkit you'll actually use

If you've got kids, make sure they learn about this stuff, too. (Deposit Photos/) We live in the golden age of pocket gadgets. Years ago, Grandpa had to make do with a knife that could open a wine bottle, but since then, computer-aided design (CAD) software, precision machining, and crowdfunding has led to an explosion of different tools. And as somebody who deeply loves these things, I’ve learne

3h

C. difficile resists hospital disinfectant, persists on hospital gowns, stainless steel

Surgical gowns and stainless steel remained contaminated with the pathogen Clostridium difficile even after being treated with the recommended disinfectant. The research is published July 12 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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Space Archaeology Is a Thing. And It Involves Lasers and Spy Satellites

High-orbiting satellites offer clues about what lies buried underground.

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Gene Therapy Restores Vision in Blind Mice

The Rain Has Gone Thanks to a new gene therapy targeting specific cells in the eye, blind mice have regained the ability to see. A team of neuroscientists developed a treatment that re-activated the Cngb1 gene, which when disabled causes light-detecting rod cells found in the retina to deteriorate, according to research recently published in the journal JNeurosci . The recovered rod cells not onl

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Immune cells are behind endometriosis pain

Scientists have uncovered a key cause for the pelvic pain associated with endometriosis. The discovery may open new opportunities for pain relief for the condition. The new study shows how cells in our immune system play a role in stimulating the growth and activity of nerve cells in the condition, which leads to increased sensitivity to pain in the pelvic region. Around 176 million women worldwi

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Daily briefing: Solar panel skin helps buildings keep their cool

Nature, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02168-5 Movable solar panels could substantially improve buildings’ energy efficiency, AI poker bot is first to beat the pros at six-player Texas hold’em and the seven best books about the Apollo Moon landings.

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The AI That Could Help Curb Youth Suicide

In suicide-prevention literature, “gatekeepers” are community members who may be able to offer help when someone expresses suicidal thoughts. It’s a loose designation, but it generally includes teachers, parents, coaches, and older co-workers—people with some form of authority and ability to intervene when they see anything troubling. Could it also include Google? When users search certain key ph

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Bone and the Microbiome Have a Brittle Relationship

Animal studies and a few small clinical trials show it's possible to get commensal microbes to protect against bone loss, rather than contribute to it.

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Hear them roar: How humans and chickadees understand each other

Is there something universal about the sounds we make that allows vocal learners — like songbirds — to figure out how we're feeling? Sounds like it, according to new research by University of Alberta scientists.

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Sound mind: Detecting depression through voice

AI algorithms can now more accurately detect depressed mood using the sound of your voice, according to new research by University of Alberta computing scientists.

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New drug relieves acute migraine in clinical trial

The results of a large phase III trial show that the novel drug rimegepant can relieve pain and other symptoms of acute migraine with minimal side effects.

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Manta ray in distress helped by divers

Deep-water divers Jake Wilton and Monty Halls formed an unlikely friendship with a manta ray after she appeared to ask them for help.

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Google: Ja, der sidder nogen og lytter på, hvad du siger til din smart-højttaler

Et medie har talt med ansatte, der har hørt private samtaler og endda voldsepisoder.

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Amazon reveals huge list of Prime Day device deals: $15 Fire TV Stick, $85 Kindle Paperwhite and more – CNET

Here's what you'll pay for Echo, Fire TV, Kindle, Ring and other Amazon-branded gear on Monday — plus what's available right now.

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Scientists deepen understanding of magnetic fields surrounding Earth and other planets

Now, a team of scientists has completed research into waves that travel through the magnetosphere, deepening understanding of the region and its interaction with our own planet, and opening up new ways to study other planets across the galaxy.

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A biotech startup is making cow-free ice cream. Would you eat it?

Perfect Day says it’s figured out how to make ice cream that’s creamy without any animal protein.

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This 23andMe DNA Test Lets You Take Control of Your Health and Wellness

Your DNA can’t tell you everything about yourself. It can’t tell you your favorite work of art. It can’t tell you why you love the people you love. It can’t tell you what you’ll make of yourself. However, it can tell you a lot of other stuff. For example, it can tell you where your family is from, what you look like, and what diseases and health issues you’re likely to encounter as you get older.

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5 Ways Singularity University is Exploring Artificial Intelligence at Global Summit This August

This is an issue many of us contemplate as our lives become increasingly intertwined with technology. AI is impacting nearly every major industry , which is why Singularity University focuses on AI in its programs, including this August’s Global Summit in San Francisco . The SU team is working at warp speed to ensure this year’s Global Summit is the best one yet, and is convening some of the fine

4h

Carbon nanotube device channels heat into light

The ever-more-humble carbon nanotube may be just the device to make solar panels—and anything else that loses energy through heat—far more efficient.

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Rush unveils quality composite rank

Rush University Medical Center researchers have proposed a rating system that standardizes and combines data from five leading hospital rating systems into an easy-to-understand composite score of one to 10 that will help guide consumer's hospitals choice.

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Minuscule microbes wield enormous power over the Great Lakes, but many species remain a mystery

Near the deepest spot in Lake Michigan, the crew aboard the research vessel Blue Heron lowers a device outfitted with a cluster of 8-liter bottles into the dark blue waters until it disappears from sight.

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Ketamine-like drug for depression could get UK licence within the year

Esketamine could initially become available through private clinics but potential side effects raise concerns A ketamine-like drug that could be licensed in the UK as soon as November could transform treatment for severe depression, one of the country’s leading psychiatrists has said. The drug, called esketamine, which is administered through a nasal spray, would be one of the first “rapid acting

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Minuscule microbes wield enormous power over the Great Lakes, but many species remain a mystery

Near the deepest spot in Lake Michigan, the crew aboard the research vessel Blue Heron lowers a device outfitted with a cluster of 8-liter bottles into the dark blue waters until it disappears from sight.

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Hydrogen-Powered Energy Servers Deliver Always-On Renewable Electricity

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Why Artificial Intelligence Helps—and Hurts Us

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Walmart Workers Rebel Against Retailer’s Automation Push in Chile

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Rising seas are turning Miami's high ground into hot property

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The Geopolitics of Artificial Intelligence

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The World’s 2-Billion-Ton Trash Problem Just Got More Alarming

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Intel: New chip materials will enable massive AI research gains

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How blockchain is empowering this refugee community in Lebanon

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Rene Favaloro, a Pioneering Surgeon, Is Honored in Today’s Google Doodle

Dr. Favaloro, a leader in heart-bypass surgery and a revered figure in Argentina, died in 2000.

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How to selfie responsibly, and other tips for not damaging wildlife on vacation

By all means, see the world’s wildlife – just make sure you’re respectful and responsible. (Maridav/Shutterstock/) Imagine walking through a lush tropical forest. You hear a rustle overhead, and a half-eaten fruit plops onto the trail. You lock eyes with a howler monkey, before he gives a soft grunt and moves higher into the trees. These magical, fleeting connections with a wild animal can be the

4h

The "Woodstock of Physics" Is Finally Living Up to Its Promise

A landmark meeting in 1987 promised that high-temperature superconductors would change the world. No one realized how long it would take — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rene Favaloro, a Pioneering Surgeon, Is Honored in Today’s Google Doodle

Dr. Favaloro, a leader in heart-bypass surgery and a revered figure in Argentina, died in 2000.

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Marathon-running molecule could speed up the race for new neurological treatments

Scientists have discovered a new process that sets the fastest molecular motor on its marathon-like runs through our neurons.

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Rene Favaloro, a Leader in Early Heart-Bypass Surgery, Died at 77

Dr. Favaloro, a pioneer in heart-bypass surgery and a revered figure in Argentina, died in 2000.

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Japanese Probe Returns to Site of Asteroid Bombing, Takes Pics

Repeat Offender Hayabusa-2, the Japanese space probe that spent the last several months visiting, harvesting, and bombing the crap out of a distant asteroid, just successfully touched down again to collect more samples. On Wednesday, Hayabusa-2 landed once more on the asteroid Ryugu to collect rock samples from a 10-meter crater that it had blasted out back in April and to snap some pictures, acc

5h

What a Time (For Girls) to Be Alive

Towner Magill’s older daughter, Weller, doesn’t usually watch sports with him—not when it’s baseball or basketball or the NFL, anyway. In part, that’s because she’s 6. “She doesn’t usually have the attention span to watch a whole game,” her dad, 37, says with a laugh. Several months ago, however, Weller walked in on Towner watching the U.S. Women’s National Team play soccer. Weller, who was the o

5h

Rice device channels heat into light

Rice University engineers use their carbon nanotube films to create a device to recycle waste heat. The device could enhance solar cell output and increase the efficiency of industrial waste-heat recovery.

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Targeting a key protein may keep ovarian cancer cells from spreading

Preventing a protein from doing its job may keep a certain type of ovarian cancer cell from growing and dividing uncontrollably in the lab, according to a new study.

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Air pollution, coronary atherosclerosis

Researchers found that long-term exposure to particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide, as well as proximity to vehicular traffic, were associated with severity of coronary artery calcium, or the buildup of plaque in the artery walls. The study was conducted on 8,867 Chinese adults aged 25 to 92.

5h

Which is the perfect quantum theory?

For some phenomena in quantum many-body physics several competing theories exist. But which of them describes a quantum phenomenon best? A team of researchers has now successfully deployed artificial neural networks for image analysis of quantum systems.

5h

Monsoon rains kill 17 in Nepal, 11 in India

At least 17 people have been killed across Nepal after torrential monsoon rains induced floods and landslides, officials said Friday.

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Maternal obesity may raise child’s cancer risk

Babies born to mothers who are obese are more likely to develop cancer in early childhood, a new study reports. Using Pennsylvania birth records, researchers found a correlation between pre-pregnancy body-mass index (BMI) in mothers and subsequent cancer diagnosis in their offspring, even after correcting for known risk factors, such as newborn size and maternal age. The study appears in the Amer

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Dartmouth study examines association between care management and outcomes in Medicare ACOs

New research from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice finds that Accountable Care Organization (ACO)-reported care management and coordination activities were not associated with improved outcomes or lower spending for patients with complex needs.

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HIV: Reprogramming cells to control infection

Following research on cohorts, scientists from the Institut Pasteur have described the characteristics of CD8 immune cells in these 'HIV controller' subjects. The unique antiviral power of these immune cells can be attributed to an optimal metabolic program that confers persistence and the ability to react effectively against infected cells. Working ex vivo, the scientists successfully reprogramme

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Fewer than half of US adults exposed to court-ordered anti-smoking advertisements

The tobacco industry's court-ordered anti-smoking advertisements reached just 40.6% of US adults and 50.5% of current smokers in 2018, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Exposure to the advertisements was even lower among certain ethnic and socioeconomic subgroups historically targeted by tobacco industry marketing.

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Preterm babies are less likely to form romantic relationships in adulthood

Adults who were born preterm (under 37 weeks gestation) are less likely to have a romantic relationship, a sexual partner and experience parenthood than those born full term. The meta-analysis by researchers at the University of Warwick with data from up to 4.4 million adult participants showed that those born preterm are 28% less likely to ever be in a romantic relationship.

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Is being born preterm, low-birth weight associated with adult social outcomes?

This study (called a systematic review and meta-analysis) combined the results of 21 studies to summarize the overall association between being born preterm or low birth weight and later social outcomes as adults, such as ever having a romantic partnership, having sex or becoming a parent, as well as the quality of romantic partnerships and friendships.

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Examining cognitive, motor development of children exposed prenatally to opioids

Called a systematic review and meta-analysis, this study combined the results of 26 studies to examine the cognitive and motor development of infants and children exposed to opioids prenatally.

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Google launches review after leak of audio conversations

Google said it was conducting an internal review after it discovered confidential audio had been leaked by a contractor of private conversations with its digital assistant.

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The AI technique that could imbue machines with the ability to reason

Yann LeCun, Facebook’s chief AI scientist, believes unsupervised learning will bring about the next AI revolution.

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Trump: Cryptocurrencies Are “Not Money,” “Based on Thin Air”

Crypto Criticism On Thursday, U.S. President Donald Trump took to Twitter to lash out at cryptocurrencies , the blockchain-based digital assets some believe will one day replace traditional money. “I am not a fan of Bitcoin and other Cryptocurrencies, which are not money, and whose value is highly volatile and based on thin air,” he tweeted. And Bitcoin wasn’t the only crypto he called out by nam

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Researchers reveal mechanisms for regulating temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition

The temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition, commonly referred to as Q10, is a key parameter in the terrestrial carbon cycle. It quantifies the increase in the rate of decomposition corresponding to a 10°C rise in temperature and can determine the sign and magnitude of terrestrial carbon-climate feedback.

6h

NASA finds an asymmetric Tropical Storm Barry

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite shows that Tropical Storm Barry doesn't look like a typical strong tropical cyclone. Imagery revealed that Barry is elongated and the strongest storms were south of it's stretched out center of circulation.

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Versatile virus hops between three primate species — including humans

Nature, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02122-5 No other emerging pathogen is known to have jumped so frequently from species to species.

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Wireless charging can mess up your phone’s battery

Wirelessly charging your phone, while highly convenient, risks depleting the life of devices using typical lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), report researchers. Consumers and manufacturers have ramped up their interest in this convenient charging technology, called inductive charging, abandoning fiddling with plugs and cables in a favor of just setting the phone directly on a charging base. Standardi

6h

The Books Briefing: The Dangerous, Enchanting Sea

Herman Melville, born 200 years ago next month, had some timeless advice: If the sweltering heat of July is giving you a damp, drizzly November in your soul, it is high time to get to sea, even if it’s just within the pages of a book. As Lena Lenček and Gideon Bosker write in their history of the beach, physicians of past centuries saw the ocean as healing and invigorating in part because of its

6h

The White Suburbs That Fought Busing Aren’t So White Anymore

One can see why Joe Biden wasn’t too worried about the busing issue. Sure, he had teamed up with segregationists in 1975 to cut the legs out from under federally mandated integration busing. Sure, he’d even called busing a “ domestic Vietnam .” But for decades, that choice was shielded by a durable political consensus: Busing was and always would be a political disaster, beyond any hope of resurr

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Targeting a key protein may keep ovarian cancer cells from spreading

Preventing a protein from doing its job may keep a certain type of ovarian cancer cell from growing and dividing uncontrollably in the lab, according to a new study from Penn State College of Medicine.

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NASA finds an asymmetric Tropical Storm Barry

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite shows that Tropical Storm Barry doesn't look like a typical strong tropical cyclone. Imagery revealed that Barry is elongated and the strongest storms were south of it's stretched out center of circulation.

6h

Study finds association between air pollution, coronary atherosclerosis

Researchers found that long-term exposure to particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide, as well as proximity to vehicular traffic, were associated with severity of coronary artery calcium, or the buildup of plaque in the artery walls. The study was conducted on 8,867 Chinese adults aged 25 to 92.

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Possibilities of the biosimilar principle of learning are shown for a memristor-based neural network

Lobachevsky University scientists together with their colleagues from the National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Moscow) and the National Research Center 'Demokritos' (Athens) are working on the hardware implementation of a spiking neural network based on memristors. The key elements of such a network, along with pulsed neurons, are artificial synaptic connections that can change the stre

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AGS commends bipartisan leaders on bringing training legislation closer to law

As members of the House Committee on Energy & Commerce move to debate, amend, and revise a host of important health proposals, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) again pledged enthusiastic support for one of the Committee's most important bills under consideration: The Educating Medical Professionals and Optimizing Workforce Efficiency and Readiness (EMPOWER) for Health Act of 2019 (H.R. 2781).

6h

Water express delivers emergency supplies to drought-hit Indian city

A special 50-wagon train carrying 2.5 million litres of water arrived in the Indian city of Chennai Friday, as the southern hub reels under one of its worst shortages in decades.

6h

The moon landing was a giant leap for movies, too

In 1964, Stanley Kubrick, on the recommendation of the science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke, bought a telescope.

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This “Artificial Muscle” is 60 Times Stronger Than a Human One

High Energy Fibers A team of scientists figured out a surprisingly simple way to create muscles that can lift 1,000 times their own weight : they tightly coiled-up commonly fibers from bamboo or silk. By applying or removing heat or electrochemically altering it, they found that they could contract and relax the artificial muscles, much like biological ones. The hope is to use these fiber muscles

6h

Calorie cuts benefit already healthy hearts

Adults already at a healthy weight or carrying just a few extra pounds, can benefit from cutting around 300 calories a day, new research shows. Cutting the calories significantly improved already good levels of cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar, and other markers, according to the study. The findings come from a randomized, controlled trial of 218 adults under age 50. The trial, part of an

6h

How film transforms the way we see the world | Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy

Film has the power to change the way we think about ourselves and our culture. Documentarian and TED Fellow Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy uses it to fight violence against women, turning her camera on the tradition of honor killings in Pakistan. In a stirring talk, she shares how she took her Oscar-winning film on the road in a mobile cinema, visiting small towns and villages across Pakistan — and shifti

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Amazon forges fellowship for 'Lord of the Rings' online video game

Amazon has landed a prime franchise on which to build an online game: the Lord of the Rings.

6h

How the Epstein Case Explains the Rise of Conspiracy Theorists

The more we learn about the allegations against the reclusive billionaire Jeffrey Epstein, the more he seems like a figment of the online fever swamps. The wealthy financier arrested last week for underage sex trafficking is accused of operating an international sex ring that could implicate high-powered men across business, politics, and Hollywood. Every nightmarish detail of his story—from the

6h

DDT contaminants in marine mammals may threaten California condor recovery

The California condor's dramatic recovery from near-extinction was aided by removal of toxic substances from the land, which accumulated in animals whose carrion they ate.

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Which is the perfect quantum theory?

For some phenomena in quantum many-body physics, several competing theories exist. But which of them describes a quantum phenomenon best? A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Harvard University in the United States has now successfully deployed artificial neural networks for image analysis of quantum systems.

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DDT contaminants in marine mammals may threaten California condor recovery

The California condor's dramatic recovery from near-extinction was aided by removal of toxic substances from the land, which accumulated in animals whose carrion they ate.

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The voice is key to making sense of the words in our brain

Scientists at the Basque research centre BCBL conclude that the voice is fundamental for mentally presenting the meaning of words in the brain. This finding implies a greater knowledge about how sound waves bring additional information to words.

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Former Employee Admits to Copying Tesla’s Autopilot Code

Deny, Deny, Deny In March, Tesla filed a lawsuit against Guangzhi Cao, a former employee who left the company in January. The lawsuit alleges that Cao uploaded full copies of Autopilot-related source code to his personal iCloud account prior to quitting — and then shared them with his new employer, Xiaopeng Motors, which is said to be working on a “Tesla clone.” In a pair of new court filings, Ca

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Trump warns Facebook over its plan to create a digital currency

President Donald Trump on Thursday night warned Facebook Inc. over its plan to create a digital currency, the Libra.

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Climate change surprise: It is helping grow more corn and soybeans in the Upper Midwest

The uneven impact of climate change is actually helping corn and soybean farmers in the Upper Midwest.

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Veravas Launches Product Portfolio to Mitigate Biotin Interference and Improve Diagnostic Assay Accuracy

Veravas, Inc., an emerging diagnostic company, launched a portfolio of products that can improve the accuracy of current diagnostic test results by helping laboratory professionals detect and manage biotin interference in patient samples with VeraTest Biotin and VeraPrep Biotin.

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People in China consume twice the recommended daily limit of salt

People in China consume 10 grams of salt each day on average – among the most of any country and twice the level recommended to avoid risks including stroke

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Europe: syphilis notifications up by 70% since 2010

The number of syphilis cases has been consistently going up across Europe since 2010, mostly affecting men who have sex with men living in urban areas. In 2017, notification rates reached an all-time high in the EU/EEA countries with more than 33 000 reported cases. An in-depth ECDC study describes the factors behind this increase and outlines the evidence-based options for public health control o

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Researchers reveal mechanisms for regulating temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decompos

Recently, a research team led by Prof. YANG Yuanhe from the Institute of Botany elucidated the mechanisms underlying vertical variations in Q 10 . Based on the natural gradient of soil profile in Tibetan alpine grasslands, the team collected soil samples at two soil depths and then conducted long-term incubation, SOM decomposition modeling and manipulative experiments.

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Rise in early onset colorectal cancer not aligned with screening trends

A new study finds that trends in colonoscopy rates did not fully align with the increase in colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger adults, adding to evidence that the rise in early onset CRC is not solely a result of more detection.

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Marathon-running molecule could speed up the race for new neurological treatments

Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered a new process that sets the fastest molecular motor on its marathon-like runs through our neurons.

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Which is the perfect quantum theory?

For some phenomena in quantum many-body physics several competing theories exist. But which of them describes a quantum phenomenon best? A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Harvard University in the United States has now successfully deployed artificial neural networks for image analysis of quantum systems.

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'Late Migrations' Essays Create A Jeweled Patchwork Of Nature And Culture

New York Times columnist Margaret Renkl astonishes with her essays, a woven tapestry that makes one of all the world's beings that strive to live — and, in one way or another, face mortality. (Image credit: Milkweed)

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Researchers push for better policies around toxic chemicals

From high levels of lead found in school drinking water to industry sites releasing toxic heavy metals into the air, over 40 years of regulations in the United States have failed to protect human and environmental health from toxic chemicals.

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The high cost of perfectionism

A little self-doubt at work can be a good thing, but like anything else—too much can be a bad thing.

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Internet communities can teach amateurs to build personalized governments

The internet has its perils with privacy breaches and fake news, but on the plus side, a whole generation of youth have been teaching themselves skills in leadership and community-building, according to a new University of California, Davis, study.

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As America Celebrates Apollo, A New Moon Race Is Underway

More nations than ever are racing to the moon. Their lunar ambitions are driven by advances in technology and a desire to prove themselves. (Image credit: R. Parthibhan/AP)

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The peopling of the Americas

New archaeological and genetic evidence is fleshing out the story. Dyani Lewis reports.

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‘Moon-forming’ disk found in distant star system

Discovery helps confirm theories of planet formation, astronomers say.

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Insects experience chronic pain

Genetic research reveals more about the fruit fly – and maybe us.

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It’s better seeing green

British study links it to less intense and frequent cravings.

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Duke-NUS researchers link ageing with changes in brain networks related to cognition

As people age, the way different areas of their brain communicate with one another change, affecting thought processes and attention span.

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The high cost of perfectionism

Professors from University of Houston-Clear Lake, University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee, and University of Houston research how feeling like a fake at work can lead to problems at home. They explored imposter phenomenon and how it's related to family and home satisfaction. They found employees experiencing imposter phenomenon are more likely to have conflict with work and family roles becau

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How to Win Friends With Influencer People

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two lifestyle bloggers and influencers—though they don’t necessarily love that word—about balancing work and friendship in an industry where your personal life is always on display. The Friends:

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The Plan to Fix Climate Change in the Senate

It will be almost another 18 months until Democrats can even think of passing climate legislation. In the 2020 election, they must defeat President Donald Trump, reclaim the Senate, and retain a majority in the House of Representatives. And then they have to find something to pass before members of Congress start getting cold feet about the 2022 election. Even in a best-case scenario, the moment

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Tiny glasses help reveal how praying mantises can see in 3-D

Newfound nerve cells in praying mantises help detect different views that each of the insects’ eyes sees, a mismatch that creates depth perception.

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So Far Cultured Meat Has Been Burgers—the Next Big Challenge Is Animal-Free Steaks

The meat you eat, if you’re a carnivore, comes from animal muscles. But animals are composed of a lot more than just muscle. They have organs and bones that most Americans do not consume. They require food, water, space, and social connections. They produce waste. Farmers spend a lot of energy and resources to grow complex organisms, creating waste in the process, only to focus on the profitable

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University of California Loses Access to New Content in Elsevier Journals

The university and the publisher have been trying to forge a new licensing agreement for the last year.

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Magnitude 4.9 aftershock of California quakes felt widely

A magnitude 4.9 aftershock of last week's Southern California earthquakes has been felt widely in the region.

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To help the environment, should you shop in-store or online?

Convenience and value aren’t the only variables in modern shopping, writes Fred Pearce.

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Best foot forward

Ancient bird had a giant toe.

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Gas Monkey’s Chase Scene from the Movie "Bullitt" | Fast N' Loud

Chad McQueen, Richard Rawlings and the monkeys recreate one of Hollywood's most famous movie car chase scenes. Stream the Full Episodes of Fast N' Loud: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/fast-n-loud/ Stream Full Episodes of Fast N' Loud: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/fast-n-loud/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FastNLoudTV h

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Amazon is developing a home robot called Vesta that stands waist-high as well as new Echo next year

It's unclear exactly what the intended purpose of the device would be, though speculation is that the bot would be a kind of mobile Echo, bringing the Alexa capabilities with users around their …

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Share your memories of the Apollo 11 moon landings

Do you remember where you were when man first landed on the moon? We’d like to hear from you It’s almost 50 years since US astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first person to set foot on the moon. As his words, “One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind” beamed from radios and television sets, feelings of hope and wonderment spread globally. Teams from around the planet, from ground cont

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Improving fire prevention through big data

New research, led by Dr. Dermot Breslin from the University of Sheffield's Management School, claims that domestic fires can be reduced through targeted home visits. The research is already being put into practice by South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service.

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Joy Division: 40 years on from 'Unknown Pleasures,' astronomers revisit the pulsar from the iconic album cover

The English rock band Joy Division released their debut studio album "Unknown Pleasures" 40 years ago. The front cover doesn't feature any words, only a now iconic black and white data graph showing 80 wiggly lines representing a signal from a pulsar in space. To mark the anniversary of the album, we recorded a signal from the same pulsar with a radio telescope in Jodrell Bank Observatory, only 14

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Plants under drought stress change their microbes through their roots

Plants that are under stress from drought can change the behavior of nearby fungi and bacteria, according to a new study led by Franciska de Vries, professor of Earth Surface Science at the University of Amsterdam. By changing the cocktail of carbohydrates that leak from their roots, the plants promote the activity of micro-organisms, with the probable effect of releasing more nutrients and promot

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Four ways blockchain could make the internet safer, fairer and more creative

The internet is unique in that it has no central control, administration or authority. It has given everyone with access to it a platform to express their views and exchange ideas with others instantaneously. But in recent years, internet services such as search engines and social media platforms have increasingly been provided by a small number of very large tech firms.

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Plants under drought stress change their microbes through their roots

Plants that are under stress from drought can change the behavior of nearby fungi and bacteria, according to a new study led by Franciska de Vries, professor of Earth Surface Science at the University of Amsterdam. By changing the cocktail of carbohydrates that leak from their roots, the plants promote the activity of micro-organisms, with the probable effect of releasing more nutrients and promot

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An entry to optically active oxazolidinones: The use of neutral phosphonium salt catalysts

Oxazolidinones are coveted in the field of pharmacology for their bioactive properties. Oxazolidinones have high potential to be building blocks for new drugs. A team of researchers at Shinshu University used a neutral phosphonium salt catalyst for the oxazolidinone synthesis. The neutral catalysis inhibited the undesired racemization to afford the product in high yields with high selectivities. W

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New gene linked to healthy aging in worms

Damage to gene causes impaired movement in adult worms.

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How multicellular cyanobacteria transport molecules

Researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Tübingen have taken a high-resolution look at the structure and function of cell-to-cell connections in filamentous, multicellular cyanobacteria. This enables them to explain how these microorganisms regulate the transport of various substances between the individual cells.

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Researchers push for better policies around toxic chemicals

Portland State University researchers contend that failures to protect human and environmental health from toxic chemicals result from flawed governance, and lay out a plan for improved policies.

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'The way you move': Body structure brings coordinated movement

A computer model shows that a starfish-like animal can coordinate rhythmic motion based on body structure without the brain telling them to do so. This provides insights useful for physiology and robotics.

7h

Facebook’s “Superhuman” Poker AI Out-Bluffs World’s Top Players

Pokerface AI An artificial intelligence called Pluribus, created by Facebook’s AI lab and researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, just beat a team of 12 of the world’s best human online poker players. The AI won an average of five bucks per hand, cashing in roughly a grand every hour. “It’s safe to say we’re at a superhuman level and that’s not going to change,” Noam Brown, a research scient

7h

Astronauts on the ISS Are About to Get Slimed — for Science

I Don’t Know Nickelodeon is trying to get kids excited about STEM — by sliming some astronauts . A batch of the green goo that first rose to fame on Nickelodeon’s “You Can’t Do That on Television” TV series back in the ’80s will head to the International Space Station aboard a SpaceX Dragon spacecraft expected to launch July 21. Once on board, the slime will serve as the basis for a series of fil

7h

Storm Barry is heading towards New Orleans – how big is the risk?

Almost 14 years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans faces disaster again. Massive rainfall and a storm surge from Storm Barry pose twin threats to the city

7h

KMD-nedbrud: Kommuner kører med nødprocedurer for hospitals-kommunikation

Flere systemer hos landets kommuner er lagt ned efter en planlagt ændring i diskstrukturerne hos KMD torsdag.

7h

Creating two-dimensional layered Zintl phase by dimensional manipulation of the crystal structure

The discovery of new families of two-dimensional (2-D) layered materials beyond graphene has always attracted great attention, but it remains challenging to artificially recreate the honeycomb atomic lattice structure with multi-components such as hexagonal boron nitride in the lab. In a new study now published on Science Advances, Junseong Song and colleagues at the departments of Energy Science,

7h

Exaggerating how much carbon dioxide can be absorbed by tree planting risks deterring crucial climate action

Planting almost a billion hectares of trees worldwide is the "biggest and cheapest tool" for tackling climate change, according to a new study. The researchers claimed that reforestation could remove 205 gigatons of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere—equivalent to about 20 years' worth of the world's current emissions. This has been criticized as an exaggeration. It could actually be dangero

7h

Why you shouldn't kill your friendly neighborhood spiders

When that itsy-bitsy spider climbs up the spout, resist the urge to stomp it out—even if it makes your skin crawl.

7h

Why you shouldn't kill your friendly neighborhood spiders

When that itsy-bitsy spider climbs up the spout, resist the urge to stomp it out—even if it makes your skin crawl.

7h

The secret to Mark Twain's friendship with Nikola Tesla

Samuel Clements (Mark Twain) and Nikola Tesla shared a friendship starting in 1890s. Tesla read a lot of early Twain when recovering from a serious illness. The two shared an interest in electricity. None Having famous friends can be both a blessing and a burden in our oversaturated media age. But about a hundred years ago, it could be quite fun to hang out with brilliant minds and discuss earth-

7h

Disasters Collide as Tropical Storm Barry Heads Ashore

Storm surge and torrential rains will bring flooding to Louisiana and potentially tax levees — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

#BeatEngland, beat sunburn

UV detection stickers trialled by Queensland University of Technology (QUT) researchers at the November 2017 Ashes Test at the Gabba in Brisbane, Australia, prompted 80% of cricket goers who used the stickers to reapply protective sunscreen. However, some in this group still reported receiving a mild or moderate sunburn at the game, indicating they may not have properly applied and reapplied sunsc

7h

Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators

Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production.

7h

Root canal work not so bad after all

Root canal work is not as bad as people think when compared to other dental procedures. Self-reporting of their dental health suggests that patients find the procedure no worse than other dental work which overturns the popular belief that root canal work is the most unpleasant dental treatment.

7h

Super salty, subzero Arctic water provides peek at possible life on other planets

A UW team has discovered thriving communities of bacteria in Alaskan 'cryopegs,' trapped layers of sediment with water so salty that it remains liquid at below-freezing temperatures. The setting may be similar to environments on Mars, Saturn's moon Titan, or other bodies farther from the sun.

7h

Internet communities can teach amateurs to build personalized governments

Self-governing internet communities, in the form of games, social networks or informational websites, create their own rule systems that help groups of anonymous users work together.

7h

How digital technologies can help Africa's smallholder farmers

digitization could change the game for agriculture in Africa. That's a key message in a report recently released by an international institution that enhances smallholder farming in African, Caribbean and Pacific countries.

7h

Food waste: using sustainable innovation to cut down what we throw away

Our appetite for food is a serious problem. The huge amount of energy, land and water used to fill our supermarket shelves mean that modern overproduction and excessive consumerism are rapidly depleting resources and damaging the planet.

7h

Revenues From New Drugs – And Thoughts on Chance

Here’s an interesting analysis of the industry from IDEA Pharma, via Endpoints . They’re looking at the revenues from the more recent drugs in the pipeline (approved in the last five years) and comparing that to each company’s total R&D spending. The list is all Big Pharma – the cutoff is companies that have at least five billion in revenues from such recent products. That makes sense, because ot

7h

China plans CFC-monitoring network to investigate rogue emissions

Nature, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02109-2 The move follows a recent study that attributed a spike in an ozone-depleting chemical to two Chinese provinces.

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Microscopic sensors reveal the brain’s chemical chatter

Nature, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02153-y Devices detect dopamine as it ripples from one neuron to others nearby.

8h

New Orleans Braces for Intense Floods As Tropical Storm Barry Rolls In

New Orleans is bracing for a tropical storm that is expected to hit tonight or tomorrow, bringing with it chances of intense flooding.

8h

Five Scientific Findings That Could Lead to New Inventions

From cat tongues to dandelions seeds, engineers often look in peculiar places for inspiration

8h

Artificial intelligence makes fishing more sustainable by tracking illegal activity

The world's fish stocks are in decline and our increasing demand for seafood may be one of the main drivers. But the true extent of the problem is hard to estimate, especially when fishing occurs in the high seas, which lie beyond national jurisdiction and are hard to monitor.

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Artificial intelligence makes fishing more sustainable by tracking illegal activity

The world's fish stocks are in decline and our increasing demand for seafood may be one of the main drivers. But the true extent of the problem is hard to estimate, especially when fishing occurs in the high seas, which lie beyond national jurisdiction and are hard to monitor.

8h

Amazon Is Making a 'Lord of the Rings' MMO Game

Soon anyone will be able to play in J.R.R. Tolkien's world.

8h

How Elite Tennis Players Crank Out Serves at 150 MPH

Serve speeds have been climbing for decades—topping out at 163.7 mph. Here’s how players store all that energy in their bodies to release it in a coordinated strike.

8h

Can Sci-Fi Writers Prepare Us for an Uncertain Future?

Businesses and public policy makers are tapping novelists to imagine the path forward. But how much stock should we put in the predictions of storytellers?

8h

An Amazon Phishing Scam Hits Just in Time For Prime Day

Some deals are too good to be true, even on the most made-up holiday of all.

8h

Nanotech ‘EpiPen’ may prevent paralysis after spinal cord injury

An injection of nanoparticles can prevent the body’s immune system from overreacting to trauma, which could potentially prevent paralysis following a spinal cord injury, according to a new study. As demonstrated with mice, the nanoparticles reprogram the aggressive immune cells to enhance healing. Researchers call it an “EpiPen” for trauma to the central nervous system, which includes the brain a

8h

Image: Mount Fuji, Japan

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Mount Fuji, Japan's highest mountain standing at 3776 metres tall. In this spring image, the mountain can be seen coated in pure white snow.

8h

Resource-efficient soft exoskeleton for people with walking impediments

A lot of people have lower limb mobility impairments, but there are few wearable technologies to enable them to walk normally while performing tasks of daily living. XoSoft, a European funded project, has brought together partners from all over Europe to develop a flexible, lightweight and resource-efficient soft exoskeleton prototype.

8h

Genetics-inspired approach could improve classroom analysis

To understand the disparity between the fields of education research and genomics, just consider how each might define the word "coding."

8h

New Orleans' levees face a hard test as storm bears down

Even as Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, the Mississippi River's levees held up when those in other parts of the city did not.

8h

Ford, Volkswagen join forces on the new frontier of electric autos

Volkswagen and Ford are teaming up on a massive $7 billion project to attack the new frontier in the global auto market: electric and self-driving vehicles, the companies announced Friday.

8h

On YouTube or Instagram? Here's what it takes to make money as social media 'influencer'

Even after all these years, the offer still sounds really enticing.

8h

Mini-model of Stonehenge reveals how voices would have carried in original ancient monument

A team of researchers at the University of Salford in the U.K. has revealed how voices would have sounded 4,000 years ago inside of the Stonehenge monument. The group made a recording of their efforts and posted the results on SoundCloud.

8h

New Data on Circulating Tumor DNA as a Biomarker for Detecting Cancer Progression Presented at 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting

Scientists presented more than 30 abstracts featuring Bio-Rad’s Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) technology at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago, May 31–June 4.

8h

China police bust bitcoin miners for stealing $3 mn in electricity

Police in eastern China have busted a ring of illicit bitcoin miners who stole nearly $3 million worth of electricity to generate the digital currency, prompting a local power company to tip off investigators, authorities said Friday.

8h

Researchers image molecules as they change charge states for first time

A team of researchers from IBM Research–Zurich, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company and Universidade de Santiago de Compostela has, for the first time, imaged molecules as they change charge states. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they created the images and what they saw.

8h

Apollo Engineers Discuss What It Took to Land on the Moon

The people who bent metal and built spaceships recall the culture and leadership that made it possible to send humans to the lunar surface

8h

DeepMind’s StarCraft II AI Will Play Public Matches on Battle.net

DeepMind first dominated the game of Go, and then it moved on to StarCraft II, beating some of the world's top players early this year. Now, you might have a chance to play against the AlphaStar AI, but you'll probably get wrecked. The post DeepMind’s StarCraft II AI Will Play Public Matches on Battle.net appeared first on ExtremeTech .

8h

Plastic poses a major environmental threat—but is it being overstated?

There is no doubt that plastic affects the environment badly. But a trend has developed in the reporting on the impact of plastics that's not only selective but also borders on panic mongering rather than impartial analysis of existing studies.

8h

Research team finds new adaptive trick used by Staphylococcus bacteria

In recently published research into the regulatory mechanisms of a disease bacterium often found in the human body, Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine Associate Professor of Bacteriology Erin Murphy, Ph.D., and her team didn't find what they went looking for. What they did find, however, opens more research pathways, suggesting science has more to learn about the tools differ

8h

Research team finds new adaptive trick used by Staphylococcus bacteria

In recently published research into the regulatory mechanisms of a disease bacterium often found in the human body, Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine Associate Professor of Bacteriology Erin Murphy, Ph.D., and her team didn't find what they went looking for. What they did find, however, opens more research pathways, suggesting science has more to learn about the tools differ

8h

Comment: lion and tiger farming may not be cause of increased poaching

It is never pleasant to see wild animals caged and abused. A new report by the NGO World Animal Protection suggests that captive-breeding operations for lions and tigers have expanded to meet an increasing demand for big cat products used in traditional Asian medicine. While this is clearly bad news for the captive cats themselves, confined in often horrible conditions, we are not convinced by the

8h

Comment: lion and tiger farming may not be cause of increased poaching

It is never pleasant to see wild animals caged and abused. A new report by the NGO World Animal Protection suggests that captive-breeding operations for lions and tigers have expanded to meet an increasing demand for big cat products used in traditional Asian medicine. While this is clearly bad news for the captive cats themselves, confined in often horrible conditions, we are not convinced by the

8h

Medical drones for accident and emergency

Remote or computer-controlled aircraft, commonly referred to as "drones" could revolutionize the way in which emergency medical supplies, such as bags of blood plasma, are delivered to areas hit by disaster, accidents or other life-threatening situations. Of course, drones are costly and require skilled operators. Writing in the International Journal of Business Continuity and Risk Management, a t

8h

Researchers improve AI that can tell from your voice if you're depressed

Artificial intelligence can now more accurately detect whether you're depressed by analyzing the sound of your voice, thanks to new research by University of Alberta computing scientists.

8h

'The way you move': Body structure brings coordinated movement

A computer model shows that a starfish-like animal can coordinate rhythmic motion based on body structure without the brain telling them to do so. This provides insights useful for physiology and robotics.

8h

As tundras warm, microbes could make climate change worse

Rising temperatures in the tundra of the Earth’s northern latitudes could affect microbial communities in ways likely to increase their production of greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide, a new study suggests. About half of the world’s total underground carbon is stored in the soils of these frigid, northern latitudes. That is more than twice the amount of carbon currently found in the atm

8h

'The way you move': Body structure brings coordinated movement

A computer model shows that a starfish-like animal can coordinate rhythmic motion based on body structure without the brain telling them to do so. This provides insights useful for physiology and robotics.

8h

Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators

Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production.

8h

New gene linked to healthy aging in worms

People with the same lifespan do not necessarily have the same quality of life. As we live longer, extending quality of life—"healthspan"—is gaining importance. Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have discovered a gene linked with healthy aging in the roundworm C. elegans, shedding light on the genetics of healthspan.

8h

5000 tons of plastic released into the environment every year

Overall, around 5,120 tons of the seven types of plastic are discharged into the environment each year. This is around 0.7% of the total amount of the seven plastics consumed in Switzerland each year (amounting to a total of around 710,000 tons). According to Empa's modelling, around 4,400 tons of macroplastic are deposited on soils every year. In addition, about 100 tons of macroplastic are emitt

8h

Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators

Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production.

8h

New gene linked to healthy aging in worms

People with the same lifespan do not necessarily have the same quality of life. As we live longer, extending quality of life—"healthspan"—is gaining importance. Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have discovered a gene linked with healthy aging in the roundworm C. elegans, shedding light on the genetics of healthspan.

8h

How your diet contributes to nutrient pollution and dead zones in lakes and bays

Every year in early summer, scientists at universities, research institutions and federal agencies release forecasts for the formation of "dead zones" and harmful algal blooms in the Gulf of Mexico, the Chesapeake Bay and Lake Erie. This year the outlook is not good.

8h

VW, Ford broaden alliance to autonomous, electric vehicles

Volkswagen will sink $2.6 billion into a Pittsburgh autonomous vehicle company that's mostly owned by Ford as part of a broader partnership on electric and self-driving vehicles, the companies confirmed Friday.

8h

This solar-powered device produces energy and cleans water at the same time

Someday, the two-for-one machine could help curb electricity and freshwater shortages.

9h

22 ancient amphoras found off Albanian coast

A joint Albanian-American underwater archaeology project says it has found amphoras that are at least 2,500 years old in the Ionian Sea off the Albanian coast, which might yield an ancient shipwreck.

9h

India prepares to land rover on moon in global space race

India is looking to take a giant leap in its space program and solidify its place among the world's spacefaring nations with its second unmanned mission to the moon, this one aimed at landing a rover near the unexplored south pole.

9h

A skin disease spreading in wild giraffes may be a parasitic attack

Besides their graceful long necks and legs, giraffes are most recognizable by their distinctive spots. Now, conservationists are concerned about a different sort of spots on giraffes, made up of dead tissue and crusty sores that ooze blood or pus.

9h

Ice-encased U.S. Air Force plane wreckage provides data for glacier ice flow

During the last few years, some of the wreckage of a U.S. Air Force plane that crashed on the Gauli Glacier in 1946 has been salvaged. Model calculations carried out by ETH researchers have now shown that it will probably take another 8 to 16 years for the aircraft's fuselage to resurface from the ice.

9h

If You Give a Cop an Uber

Time was, a movie like Stuber didn’t stand out as an utter anomaly in the Hollywood landscape. Michael Dowse’s buddy-cop comedy has a premise ripped straight from such classics as 48 Hrs. , but with references updated for the 21st century. Vic Manning (played by Dave Bautista), a loose-cannon detective on the trail of a drug lord, commandeers an Uber from a mild-mannered guy named Stu (Kumail Nan

9h

Gulf Fisheries Are Under Siege—Now Comes Tropical Storm Barry

Surges of polluted water have decimated crab, oyster, and shrimp populations and killed hundreds of dolphins. To fishermen, Tropical Storm Barry is very bad news.

9h

Why the Momo Challenge Film Might Beat the Meme Movie Curse

There's a good chance the movie featuring the taut-skinned, bulgy-eyed freak won't be the next 'Slender Man'.

9h

Logitech G Pro X Review: A Classy Gaming Headset

With professional build quality and robust sound, the G Pro X headset runs circles around many 3.5mm gaming headsets, especially on PC and Mac.

9h

London to be as hot as Barcelona by 2050? I research urban heat, and I'm sceptical

Barcelona just had a week of temperatures above 30℃. It's a few degrees hotter than the long-term average, but no heatwave. In winter, Spain's second largest city is typically a mild 15℃ or so. With its climate regulated by warm Mediterranean waters, temperatures rarely drop below freezing.

9h

How multicellular cyanobacteria transport molecules

Researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Tübingen have taken a high-resolution look at the structure and function of cell-to-cell connections in filamentous, multicellular cyanobacteria. This enables them to explain how these microorganisms regulate the transport of various substances between the individual cells.

9h

A skin disease spreading in wild giraffes may be a parasitic attack

Besides their graceful long necks and legs, giraffes are most recognizable by their distinctive spots. Now, conservationists are concerned about a different sort of spots on giraffes, made up of dead tissue and crusty sores that ooze blood or pus.

9h

How multicellular cyanobacteria transport molecules

Researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Tübingen have taken a high-resolution look at the structure and function of cell-to-cell connections in filamentous, multicellular cyanobacteria. This enables them to explain how these microorganisms regulate the transport of various substances between the individual cells.

9h

Image of the Day: Living Art

Swirls of bacteria form on an agar plate.

9h

We create 20m tons of construction industry waste each year. Here's how to stop it going to landfill

The Australian construction industry has grown significantly in the past two decades. Population growth has led to the need for extensive property development, better public transport and improved infrastructure. This means there has been a substantial increase in waste produced by construction and demolition.

9h

Philosophy classes can affect real-world behavior, study finds

College philosophy classes may open your mind to new ways of thinking. But can they really affect how you behave?

9h

Indiana Jones Meets 'Star Wars' in 'Archaeology From Space.' Enter to Win a Copy!

What's it like to uncover the mysteries of ancient civilizations…from space?

9h

Sahara was home to some of largest sea creatures, study finds

Scientists reconstruct extinct species using fossils found in northern Mali from ancient seaway Some of the biggest catfish and sea snakes to ever exist lived in what is today the Sahara desert, according to a new paper that contains the first reconstructions of extinct aquatic species from the ancient Trans-Saharan Seaway. The sea was 50 metres deep and once covered 3,000sq km of what is now the

9h

What delayed Earth's oxygenation?

Powering a massive biosphere on Earth, photosynthesis is the light-mediated reaction that converts carbon dioxide and water to carbohydrates and oxygen. About 2.3 billion years ago, this reaction led to a dramatic oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere.

9h

Nu slår kunstig intelligens også de bedste, menneskelige poker-spillere

En kunstig intelligens udviklet af Facebook har konsekvent vist sig i stand til at vinde penge i et spil Texas hold’em med fem professionelle pokerspillere.

9h

Geder bræger ikke tilfældigt

Hvis du nogensinde har haft geder – eller oplevet dem i Zoologisk Have – så har du måske…

9h

Researchers detail privacy-related legal, ethical challenges with satellite data

Satellite technology has been a boon for humanity, leading to faster, clearer communications, quicker emergency responses, accurate location information, and global financial transactions. Smart devices are almost always embedded with GPS satellite chips, enabling people around the world to know where they are; telling motorists whether they are traveling in the right direction for their summer va

9h

Super salty, subzero Arctic water provides peek at possible life on other planets

In recent years, the idea of life on other planets has become less far-fetched. NASA announced June 27 that it will send a vehicle to Saturn's icy moon Titan, a celestial body known to harbor surface lakes of methane and an ice-covered ocean of water, boosting its chance for supporting life.

9h

Ploonets: Exiled moons may explain astronomical mysteries

Moons ejected from orbits around gas giant exoplanets could explain several astronomical mysteries, an international team of astronomers suggests.

9h

Using satellite information to rebuild after a disaster

ESA and the Asian Development Bank have joined forces to help the Indonesian government use satellite information to guide the redevelopment following the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the provincial capital of Palu and surroundings last year.

9h

Remains of Napoleon's One-Legged General Found Under Russian Dance Floor

An excavation in a peculiar place — under the foundation of a dance floor in Russia — has uncovered the remains of one of Napoleon Bonaparte's favorite generals: a one-legged man who was killed by a cannonball more than 200 years ago, news sources report.

9h

'Chameleon Theory' Could Explain Why the Universe Is Blowing Up

Cosmic, cosmic, cosmic, cosmic, cosmic chameleon, you come and go.

9h

Fifty years after the Apollo 11 moon walk, a vexillologist looks at the challenge of planting the flag on the moon

When Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin planted the United States flag on the moon 50 years ago this month—July 20, 1969, to be exact—it was a team effort.

9h

Mystisk flimrende stjerne kan ikke forklares af videnskaben

Et af de mest uforklarlige fund i universet er gjort af en gruppe frivillige hobby-astronomer.

9h

Think You Know the Definition of a Black Hole? Think Again – Facts So Romantic

What might be more puzzling than the innards of a black hole is the trouble of defining one in the first place. Wikicommons When I was 12, I made the mistake of watching the Paul W. S. Anderson horror film, Event Horizon . It gave me nightmares for weeks: The movie’s title refers to an experimental spaceship that could create artificial black holes through which to travel, making interstellar tri

9h

Arctic ice loss is worrying, but the giant stirring in the South could be even worse

A record start to summer ice melt in Greenland this year has drawn attention to the northern ice sheet. We will have to wait to see if 2019 continues to break ice-melt records, but in the rapidly warming Arctic the long-term trends of ice loss are clear.

9h

Fuel surplus could cause another destructive wildfire season

Eight months after the Camp Fire consumed the Northern California town of Paradise and was pronounced the deadliest wildfire in state history, California is facing the potential in the coming months for more death and destruction.

9h

Researchers to investigate drought-tolerant vines

Wine researchers at the University of Adelaide are investigating drought-tolerant grape varieties from Cyprus for their suitability for Australian conditions.

9h

Image: Martian meteorite on Earth calibrates camera bound for Mars

Exhibit 0102.226 may look like just a rock, but this dark and patchy mass is actually a piece of Mars, ejected when an asteroid or comet struck the Red Planet and sent chunks flying towards Earth.

9h

Celebrating the Engineers behind the First Moon Landing

My father was one of those who worked feverishly behind the scenes 50 years ago to get astronauts safely to the moon and back — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Why Dogs Now Play a Big Role in Human Cancer Research

There’s a strong chance your aging dog will get cancer—but your pupper could also help humans survive it.

10h

On TikTok, Teens Meme Life360, the Safety App Ruining Their Summer

Parents can use Life360 to track their teen’s location in real time. The company can use that data to sell car insurance.

10h

Japanese startup gears up for its fourth rocket launch

Japanese startup Interstellar Technologies Inc. (IST) gears up to conduct another rocket launch on Saturday July 13, just about two months after it successfully sent the MOMO-F3 sounding rocket into space. The upcoming mission, designated MOMO-F4 is slated to take to the skies at 11:05 JPT (2:05 GMT) from a launch pad in Taiki, on the island of Hokkaido.

10h

Nanotechnology delivers hepatitis B vaccine

Brazilian and European researchers have demonstrated exactly how a nanotechnology-based compound delivers an oral vaccine against hepatitis B to the immune system. When particles containing silica and an antigen combine, even though they are different sizes, they reach the intestine without being destroyed by the acidity of the digestive system.

10h

Physicists have revealed new properties of Yakutia diamonds

TSU physicists, working with scientists from Novosibirsk, Krasnoyarsk, Germany and Korea, have discovered new nanomechanical properties of diamonds mined at the Skalnoe deposit of the Popigai astrobleme. Using a combination of experimental and theoretical methods, they proved that this kind of mineral is able to resist all-round compression more strongly than "ideal" specimens. The diamonds of the

10h

Red wine may hold the key to next-gen wearable technology

A team of scientists are seeking to kick-start a wearable technology revolution by creating flexible fibres and adding acids from red wine.

10h

A Canadian Journalist Calls Out Pediatric Chiropractic Again, and the Canadian Chiropractic Association Responds…Again

The National Post has published another quality article pointing out the absurdity of infant chiropractic care. The Canadian Chiropractic Association's attempt at a rebuttal falls flat.

10h

Celebrating the Engineers behind the First Moon Landing

My father was one of those who worked feverishly behind the scenes 50 years ago to get astronauts safely to the moon and back — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Nintendo to launch a Switch Lite console in September for $200

Nintendo will launch a version of its popular Switch console dedicated to players who really prefer gaming on the go.

10h

Norsk projekt i Sydkorea skal banke prisen på flydende havvind i bund

Equinor bruger flydende park på 200 MW til at samle erfaringer for at kunne konkurrere med bundfaste møller.

10h

What to Expect from India's Second Moon Mission

The Chandrayaan-2 orbiter, lander and rover will seek out water ice and other potentially valuable resources near the lunar south pole — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

What to Expect from India's Second Moon Mission

The Chandrayaan-2 orbiter, lander and rover will seek out water ice and other potentially valuable resources near the lunar south pole — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Manhattanhenge July 2019: When and Where to Watch

It got rained out in May, but you’ll get another chance to take “the best sunset picture of the year” in New York on Friday and Saturday.

10h

FCC Robocall Summit: Your guide to new SHAKEN/STIR caller verification

Today, a Robocall Summit hosted by the Federal Communications Commission will serve as a progress report on what major phone carriers are doing to protect you from those incessant robocalls interrupting your life.

10h

Purple fairy wrasse named Wakanda discovered on reef in twilight zone

Scuba divers have discovered a new fish – a vibrant purple fairy wrasse. They have named it Cirrhilabrus wakanda, after the fictional kingdom in Black Panther

10h

Neglected After Apollo, the Moon Comes Back Around

Something of a new lunar race is underway, but the motivations differ from what put men on the moon 50 years ago.

10h

Your Apollo 11-Inspired Guide to Eclipses, Supermoons and More Lunar Events

Eclipses, supermoons and other astronomical highlights to look forward to, years into the future.

10h

iPhone 11: What to expect and why waiting may be your best option

You might want to remain patient before buying your next iPhone.

10h

Double heatwave killed two-thirds of coral in central Indian Ocean

Back-to-back heatwaves in the central Indian Ocean killed more than two-thirds of corals in two years, but some corals appear to be more resilient

10h

Does autograft choice in ACL reconstruction affect recurrent ACL revision rates?

Young athletes who have anterior cruciate ligament surgery are more likely to need an additional surgery if they received a hamstring graft compared to a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft, according to research presented today at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. The research was conducted by group of clinicians led by Dr. Christopher C. Kaeding of Ohio State Univer

10h

Lateral extra-articular tenodesis reduces hamstring autograft

The addition of lateral extra-articular tenodesis to a hamstring autograft in knee surgery in young active patients significantly reduces graft failure and persistent anterolateral rotatory laxity at two years post operatively. The research, presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopedic Sports Medicine Society, received the O'Donoghue Sports Injury Award.

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The College That Became a Prison

As Yankton College’s only full-time employee, Jan Garrity knows how tough running a postsecondary institution can be. There are students to educate and degrees to confer; faculty and staff to hire and pay; a campus to maintain and a mission to uphold. But the college Garrity runs—in the once-booming , now-sleepy Missouri River town of Yankton, South Dakota—is different than most postsecondary ins

10h

The Overhyped Feud Between Nancy Pelosi and AOC

“With all due respect, the press likes to make a story that is more about Democrats divided than the fact that Mitch McConnell doesn’t care about the children,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi told Maureen Dowd in a recent interview . With all due respect, that’s not quite right. The newly reignited feud between the speaker and “the Squad,” as a quartet of young, female, liberal representatives are known, s

10h

Trump’s Iran Strategy Is Helping China

The Trump administration tends to view Iran in isolation or as a Middle Eastern problem—a regional nemesis with nuclear ambitions that threatens Israel and America’s Arab allies. This is a mistake. Iran sits at the critical cross section of the Middle East, Central and South Asia, and the vital trade routes cutting across the Asian continent. At the moment, though Donald Trump doesn’t seem to see

10h

The American Sense of Place

This dispatch is in the form of a newsletter update, on reactions from readers and significant developments around the country on the local-renewal fronts. It follows this Fourth of July post , about Eric Liu’s argument for a revival of “civic religion,” and this post by Deb Fallows, on our increasing effort to connect, compare, combine, and in other ways “biggify” the multiple, dispersed example

10h

How neuroscience shows the highs and lows of humanity

When humans think about other humans versus inanimate objects, that difference can be seen in activated brain regions on fMRI scans. Studies reveal that those brain regions don't light up equally when we look at all people – we tend to humanize some people and dehumanize others when we see things like homelessness, drug addiction, different ethnicities or someone in an outgroup. On the other hand

10h

3 questions seismologists are asking after the California earthquakes

After back-to-back quakes, scientists are scrambling to figure out which faults ruptured and what it means for future California quake activity.

11h

Trump’s ‘Environmental Leadership’ Speech Contradicted By Policy Record

While Trump listed “the very cleanest air and cleanest water,” and protecting public lands as top priorities for his administration, he has spent much of his time in office weakening and dismantling regulations on emissions, toxic waste disposal, water systems protection, and public lands use.

11h

What Seinfeld can teach us about science

From micro pigs to the doping dangers of a poppy seed bagel, life may be imitating the US sitcom When Jerry Seinfeld starts his UK tour , listen out for a science joke. From early on in his TV career, the comedian poked fun at science. In his 1981 HBO debut , he said of weather forecasts: “And then my favourite part, the satellite photo. This is really helpful. A photograph of the Earth from 10,0

11h

Sugar in fruit juice may raise risk of cancer, study finds

Excessive consumption of sugary drinks – including juice – associated with the disease Drinking large amounts of fruit juice may raise your risk of cancer, according to a big study which has found a link between the regular consumption of all kinds of sugary drinks and the likelihood of developing the disease. The study, carried out in France, is the first substantial piece of research to find a

11h

Forensics Friday: Notice anything odd about this image?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the eighth in a series, Forensics Friday. Take a look at the image below, and then take our poll. … Continue readin

11h

Russisk atomubåd lækker cæsium-137 i Barentshavet

En sunket atomubåd lækker radioaktivt materiale i Barentshavet, men udgør ingen umiddelbar trussel for dyrelivet, viser ny norsk inspektion.

11h

Consecutive heatwaves kill two-thirds of coral in central Indian Ocean

Back-to-back heatwaves in the central Indian Ocean killed more than two-thirds of corals in two years, but some corals appear to be more resilient

11h

Even Donald Trump is dumping on Facebook’s digital-currency dreams

Facebook has been dealing with criticism and scrutiny since it unveiled Libra. But the backlash shows that the project is a real wake-up call.

11h

Google Jumps Back Into Social Networking Fray With Shoelace

We all have that friend who is addicted to something, whether it is a love interest that does not reciprocate the affection, sports betting, chocolate, or even drugs. For Google, the addiction …

11h

One Family’s Ordeal With Schizophrenia

In chronicling her family's experience dealing with the harrowing effects of schizophrenia, Marin Sardy, in “The Edge of Every Day,” reveals what it means to love someone who is mentally ill and how hard it is to truly understand another person’s mind — as well as the importance of continuing to try.

11h

The Urgency of Agency

Our consciousness gets in the way of thinking about evolution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

YouTube looks to dilute nasty programming with curated educational playlists

YouTube, which has come under fire in the past year for allowing conspiracy and hate videos to surface to the top, is making another move to clean up its act.

11h

Long-term imaging of dorsal root ganglia in awake behaving mice

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11158-0 Imaging sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in awake animals is challenging due to motion artefacts and other technical issues. Here the authors develop an intervertebral fusion procedure which minimizes spinal movement thereby enabling chronic imaging of DRG neurons in awake, behaving mice.

11h

An exceptionally flexible hydrogen-bonded organic framework with large-scale void regulation and adaptive guest accommodation abilities

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10575-5 Flexible hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (FHOFs) are challenging in fabrication but promising materials for applications in separation and sensing. Here, the authors report a stimuli responsive and flexible HOF which can adapt to different guests by regulating the molecular conformation.

11h

Publisher Correction: Unusual 4H-phase twinned noble metal nanokites

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11273-y Publisher Correction: Unusual 4H-phase twinned noble metal nanokites

11h

Pore elimination mechanisms during 3D printing of metals

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10973-9 3D printing pore-free complex metal parts remains a challenge. Here, the authors combine in-situ imaging and simulations to show thermocapillary force can eliminate pores from the melt pool during a laser powder bed fusion process.

11h

Coral bacterial community structure responds to environmental change in a host-specific manner

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10969-5 The flexibility of corals to associate with different bacteria in different environments has not been systematically investigated. Here, the authors study bacterial community dynamics for two coral species and show that bacterial community structure responds to environmental changes in a host-specific manner.

11h

Author Correction: Infralimbic cortex is required for learning alternatives to prelimbic promoted associations through reciprocal connectivity

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11205-w Author Correction: Infralimbic cortex is required for learning alternatives to prelimbic promoted associations through reciprocal connectivity

11h

Molecular basis of egg coat cross-linking sheds light on ZP1-associated female infertility

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10931-5 Glycoprotein ZP1 is a component of the oocyte’s zona pellucida (ZP), and mutations in human ZP1 are linked to female infertility. Here, using structure-function analysis, the authors suggest that filament cross-linking by ZP1 is required to form a stable ZP in human, and infertility mutations interfere with cros

11h

AMPA receptor GluA2 subunit defects are a cause of neurodevelopmental disorders

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10910-w Genetic variants in ionotropic glutamate receptors have been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, the authors report heterozygous de novo mutations in the GRIA2 gene in 28 individuals with intellectual disability and neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with reduced Ca2+ transport and AMPAR c

11h

Peripheral Expression of Mutant Huntingtin is a Critical Determinant of Weight Loss and Metabolic Disturbances in Huntington’s Disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46470-8 Peripheral Expression of Mutant Huntingtin is a Critical Determinant of Weight Loss and Metabolic Disturbances in Huntington’s Disease

11h

The association between childbirth, breastfeeding, and uterine fibroids: an observational study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46513-0 The association between childbirth, breastfeeding, and uterine fibroids: an observational study

11h

Nanoscale modification of silicon and germanium surfaces exposed to low-energy helium plasma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46541-w Nanoscale modification of silicon and germanium surfaces exposed to low-energy helium plasma

11h

Fracture types affect clinical outcomes of patients managed within the fracture liaison and osteoporosis medication management services

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46315-4 Fracture types affect clinical outcomes of patients managed within the fracture liaison and osteoporosis medication management services

11h

Detection of replicative Kashmir Bee Virus and Black Queen Cell Virus in Asian hornet Vespa velutina (Lepelieter 1836) in Italy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46565-2 Detection of replicative Kashmir Bee Virus and Black Queen Cell Virus in Asian hornet Vespa velutina (Lepelieter 1836) in Italy

11h

Insulin resistance and metabonomics analysis of fatty liver haemorrhagic syndrome in laying hens induced by a high-energy low-protein diet

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46183-y Insulin resistance and metabonomics analysis of fatty liver haemorrhagic syndrome in laying hens induced by a high-energy low-protein diet

11h

Fish species composition, distribution and community structure in the lower reaches of Ganjiang River, Jiangxi, China

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46600-2 Fish species composition, distribution and community structure in the lower reaches of Ganjiang River, Jiangxi, China

11h

A meta-barcoding analysis of soil mycobiota of the upper Andean Colombian agro-environment

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46485-1 A meta-barcoding analysis of soil mycobiota of the upper Andean Colombian agro-environment

11h

Mitch McConnell’s (Un)certain Fate

It’s official: “ Cocaine Mitch ” has a 2020 challenger. The Democrat Amy McGrath, a former fighter pilot turned congressional candidate who starred in one of the most viral political ads of 2018 , will take on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for his Kentucky seat. Her campaign is only two days old, but already the outline of a strategy has emerged: On a few choice issues, McGrath plans to

12h

Dispensation er i hus: Skibakken oven på Amagers affaldsforbrænding åbner til oktober

En række nye vandtanke har fået Arbejdstilsynet til at godkende skibakken oven på forbrændingsanlægget Amager Bakke. Der mangler dog fortsat en række andre tilladelser før skiløberne kan suse ned af forbrændingsanlægget i hovedstaden.

12h

Researcher studies how individuals use technology to engage with their cultures

As the nation continues to get more diverse, it's common for immigrant populations in the United States to identify with two or more cultures at the same time.

12h

UTSA researcher studies how individuals use technology to engage with their cultures

As the nation continues to get more diverse, it's common for immigrant populations in the United States to identify with two or more cultures at the same time. In a new article published in Lingua, M. Sidury Christiansen argues for a redefinition of how we see transnationalism or the movement of people, ideas and capital across national borders. Through her research, she argues that technology use

12h

Explainer: What is post-quantum cryptography?

The race is on to create new ways to protect data and communications from the threat posed by super-powerful quantum computers.

12h

China's Fosun Group confirms Thomas Cook rescue bid

China's Fosun Group is considering nearly a billion dollar rescue of embattled British tour operator Thomas Cook, the Hong Kong-listed conglomerate confirmed Friday.

12h

Daimler slashes 2019 profit forecast after Q2 loss

German auto giant Daimler, maker of Mercedes-Benz, on Friday slashed its 2019 profit forecast for the second time in a few weeks, after booking a 1.6-billion-euro ($1.8-billion) operating loss in the second quarter.

13h

From the Oscars to the Nobel Prize, winners need to choose their friends wisely

Being friends with an award juror can increase a person's chance of being nominated but decrease their chances of being selected as the victor, according to new research published in the Academy of Management Journal.

13h

Wildfires disrupt important pollination processes by moths and increase extinction risks

Publishing their findings today (12 July) in the journal Functional Ecology, an international team of experts, studied the impact of a large wildfire in Portugal on flowers, moths and the complex ways in which they interact.

13h

School suspensions related to increases in subsequent offending

About 3.5 million students are suspended each year, and school punishment has been tied to a variety of negative outcomes. A new study took a longitudinal look at how school suspensions are related to offending behaviors that include assault, stealing, and selling drugs. It found that rather than decreasing subsequent offending, school suspensions increase this behavior.

13h

Wildfires disrupt important pollination processes by moths and increase extinction risks

Publishing their findings today (12 July) in the journal Functional Ecology, an international team of experts, studied the impact of a large wildfire in Portugal on flowers, moths and the complex ways in which they interact.

13h

Utah farmers and entrepreneurs compete to grow medical pot

The wide metal barn on the Utah alfalfa farm owned by Russell and Diane Jones will host their youngest son's wedding next month. By September, they hope the structure will be full of marijuana plants.

13h

Strange warping geometry helps to push scientific boundaries

Atomic interactions in everyday solids and liquids are so complex that some of these materials' properties continue to elude physicists' understanding. Solving the problems mathematically is beyond the capabilities of modern computers, so scientists at Princeton University have turned to an unusual branch of geometry instead.

13h

Utah farmers and entrepreneurs compete to grow medical pot

The wide metal barn on the Utah alfalfa farm owned by Russell and Diane Jones will host their youngest son's wedding next month. By September, they hope the structure will be full of marijuana plants.

13h

Japan firm says $32 mn missing in cryptocurrency hack

A Tokyo-based cryptocurrency exchange said Friday it had halted all services after losing cryptocurrency worth more than $32 million in the latest apparent hack involving virtual money.

13h

The machine that made the Moon missions possible

We've all been there: you're working on something important, your PC crashes, and you lose all your progress.

13h

Braced for Barry: New Orleans girds for 'extreme' storm

Tropical Storm Barry gathered strength Friday as it chugged toward water-logged New Orleans, which girded for heavy rains, storm surge and flooding that pose a threat reminiscent of 2005's deadly Hurricane Katrina.

13h

Head of Boeing's 737 MAX program to retire: company memo

The head of Boeing's embattled 737 MAX program plans to retire, the company said Thursday, just as it gears up to persuade regulators to return the plane to the skies after two deadly crashes.

13h

Ahead of 2nd moon shot, a timeline of India's space program

Amid a new global space race, India is preparing to launch a second mission to the moon. Here is a timeline of its space program:

13h

AI program beats pros in six-player poker—a first

Artificial intelligence programs have bested humans in checkers, chess, Go and two-player poker, but multi-player poker was always believed to be a bigger ask. Mission: accomplished.

13h

Huawei calls on US to lift export restrictions

The chairman of Huawei said Friday the Chinese tech giant has yet to see any benefit from President Donald Trump's promise to allow U.S. companies to sell some components to the company and called on Washington to remove it from a security blacklist.

13h

Low-cost Moon mission puts India among lunar pioneers

India will step up the international space race on Monday when it launches a low-cost mission to become only the fourth country to land a probe on the Moon.

13h

Climate change may thin high-altitude clouds and trigger more warming

The climate could warm more than models suggest, because as temperatures rise, high-altitude clouds will reflect less sunlight back into space

13h

A new type of engine for electric cars

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New CRISPR platform expands RNA editing capabilities

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I had to register my fingerprint to activate my new TV

Samsung btw. Honestly I have gotten desensitized to giving out my personal information to do basic funtions with technology. This is life now. submitted by /u/Kailee- [link] [comments]

13h

13h

Interview: Her er transportministers første bud på at sænke CO2-udslippet

PLUS. Benny Engelbrecht indtager Transportministeriet med et fokus på at gøre den danske transportsektor grøn. I første omgang vil han kigge på beskatning af firmabiler og sørge for, at gamle analyser bliver opdateret med et klima-perspektiv.

14h

Mainframen har for travlt til at dø

Leverandør af mainframe-teknologi ryddede selv teknisk gæld af vejen og hjælper nu andre med at modernisere mainframe-systemer.

15h

15h

Dark Patterns: the art of online deception – Science Weekly podcast

Have you ever been caught out online and subscribed to something you didn’t mean to? Ian Sample has and so he tasked Jordan Erica Webber with finding out how companies play on our psyches to pinch our pennies and what we can do about it Continue reading…

15h

15h

A Mysterious Universal Pattern in The Fossil Record Might Finally Be Explained

The stock market and biodiversity have a lot in common.

15h

Experts Are Proposing a New, Slightly Creepy Way of Burying Our Dead

Where do dead humans go when we run out of cemeteries?

15h

Dark Patterns: the art of online deception – Science Weekly podcast

Have you ever been caught out online and subscribed to something you didn’t mean to? Ian Sample has and so he tasked Jordan Erica Webber with finding out how companies play on our psyches to pinch our pennies and what we can do about it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

16h

The Chinese Influence Effort Hiding in Plain Sight

In centuries past, Prussian, Napoleonic, Nazi, and Allied soldiers all tramped the Strasse des 17. Juni, an east–west boulevard traversing Berlin’s leafy Tiergarten park, over which soars a winged, golden statue of the Roman goddess Victoria. More recently, in the auditorium of the Technische Universität Berlin , which lies along the thoroughfare, a thousand patriotic voices swelled in song for a

16h

Sjælden tigerunge og døde søheste: Kæmpe politi-aktion beslaglægger truede arter i 109 lande

Næsten 600 personer er anholdt efter en Interpol-aktion mod handel med truede dyr- og planter.

16h

Photos of the Week: Toxic Beauty, Giant Boots, Twilight Swimming

Hot birds in France, the Festival of the Trays in Portugal, kid “muggers” in Washington State, a giant Frida Kahlo in Mexico City, a sea-lion rescue in California, the Wimbledon tennis championships in London, earthquake damage in California, the World Roller Games in Barcelona, a Melania Trump monument in Slovenia, the Women’s World Cup final in France, bull festivals in Spain, and much more.

16h

The brain's pathways to imagination may hold the key to altruistic behavior

Boston College researchers used neuroimaging to identify multiple neural pathways in the brain that explain the relationship between imagination and the willingness to help others.

16h

From the Oscars to the Nobel Prize, winners need to choose their friends wisely

Being friends with an award juror can increase a person's chance of being nominated but decrease their chances of being selected as the victor, according to new research published in the Academy of Management Journal.

16h

Seeing greenery linked to less intense and frequent cravings

New research from the University of Plymouth shows that being able to see green spaces from your home is associated with reduced cravings for alcohol, cigarettes and harmful foods.

16h

School suspensions related to increases in subsequent offending

A new study took a longitudinal look at how school suspensions are related to offending behaviors that include assault, stealing, and selling drugs. It found that rather than decreasing subsequent offending, school suspensions increase this behavior.

16h

The "Woodstock of Physics" Is Finally Living Up to Its Promise

A landmark meeting in 1987 promised that high-temperature superconductors would change the world. No one realized how long it would take — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Byggeforskere trækker sig fra vindues-rapport: Vil ikke skrive under på, at to lag glas er bedre end tre

PLUS. To forskere fra Statens Byggeforskningsinstitut trækker deres navne fra en rapport, som konkluderede, at vinduer i bygninger fra før 1985 bør renoveres med tolags jernfattigt glas snarere end trelags energiglas. Nu erkender hovedforfatteren, at rapporten burde have haft en blødere konklusion.

17h

President Trump Is the Latest Critic of Facebook's Libra

In a series of tweets late Thursday, the president attacked cryptocurrencies and said Libra "will have little standing or dependability."

18h

Even Donald Trump is dumping on Facebook’s digital currency dreams

Facebook has been dealing with criticism and scrutiny since it unveiled Libra. But the backlash shows that the project is a real wakeup call.

18h

Artificial 'muscles' achieve powerful pulling force

As a cucumber plant grows, it sprouts tightly coiled tendrils that seek out supports in order to pull the plant upward. This ensures the plant receives as much sunlight exposure as possible. Now, researchers have found a way to imitate this coiling-and-pulling mechanism to produce contracting fibers that could be used as artificial muscles for robots, prosthetic limbs, or other mechanical and biom

18h

Artificial 'muscles' achieve powerful pulling force

As a cucumber plant grows, it sprouts tightly coiled tendrils that seek out supports in order to pull the plant upward. This ensures the plant receives as much sunlight exposure as possible. Now, researchers have found a way to imitate this coiling-and-pulling mechanism to produce contracting fibers that could be used as artificial muscles for robots, prosthetic limbs, or other mechanical and biom

18h

Growing up without a permanent home can negatively affect children's health

Having a stable, permanent home plays a crucial role in everyone's overall health. (Deposit Photos/) Over 10 percent of the children under the age of five living in the United States have special health care needs, including chronic physical conditions, like epilepsy, or behavioral ones, like autism. Those millions of children and their families are more at risk of housing instability than childr

18h

The United States is Headed for a Battery Breakthrough

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19h

Machine learning goes beyond theory to beat human poker champs

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The United States is headed for a battery breakthrough

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Bacteria recruited to produce graphene on the cheap

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Thank God it's Thursday: the four-day work-week some want to bring to the U.S.

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19h

The coal mine that ate Hambacher forest

Much of Germany's power is still made by burning coal. Activists have occupied a forest in protest.

19h

In killing citizenship question, Trump adopts Census Bureau’s preferred solution to a thorny problem

But president’s desire for a tally of “illegal aliens” appears out of reach

19h

Catalytic deficiency of O-GlcNAc transferase leads to X-linked intellectual disability [Biochemistry]

O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is an X-linked gene product that is essential for normal development of the vertebrate embryo. It catalyses the O-GlcNAc posttranslational modification of nucleocytoplasmic proteins and proteolytic maturation of the transcriptional coregulator Host cell factor 1 (HCF1). Recent studies have suggested that conservative missense mutations distal to the…

19h

Learning outside the box [Commentaries]

Learning a new skill, whether it is riding a bicycle or playing chess, usually requires at least several days of practice if not much more. Due to experimental limitations, however, most neuroscience studies that attempt to unveil the neural representations of skill learning explore tasks that can be learned within…

19h

The role of the optic tectum for visually evoked orienting and evasive movements [Neuroscience]

As animals forage for food and water or evade predators, they must rapidly decide what visual features in the environment deserve attention. In vertebrates, this visuomotor computation is implemented within the neural circuits of the optic tectum (superior colliculus in mammals). However, the mechanisms by which tectum decides whether to…

19h

The plastidial pentose phosphate pathway is essential for postglobular embryo development in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

Large numbers of genes essential for embryogenesis in Arabidopsis encode enzymes of plastidial metabolism. Disruption of many of these genes results in embryo arrest at the globular stage of development. However, the cause of lethality is obscure. We examined the role of the plastidial oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in…

19h

Antibody-dependent enhancement of influenza disease promoted by increase in hemagglutinin stem flexibility and virus fusion kinetics [Microbiology]

Several next-generation (universal) influenza vaccines and broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) are in clinical development. Some of these mediate inhibitions of virus replication at the postentry stage or use Fc-dependent mechanisms. Nonneutralizing antibodies have the potential to mediate enhancement of viral infection or disease. In the current study, two monoclonal antibodies…

19h

Meddling with myosin’s mechanobiology in cancer [Commentaries]

Nearly all cancers are diseases of uncontrolled cell growth coupled with dramatic changes in shape and motility. In fact, pathologists have used alterations in cellular and nuclear morphology to identify cancerous tissue for over a hundred years. These fundamental cellular processes—which in cancer also include invasion, dissemination, and secondary site…

19h

Functional divergence caused by mutations in an energetic hotspot in ERK2 [Biochemistry]

The most frequent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) mutation occurring in cancers is E322K (E-K). ERK2 E-K reverses a buried charge in the ERK2 common docking (CD) site, a region that binds activators, inhibitors, and substrates. Little is known about the cellular consequences associated with this mutation, other than apparent…

19h

Rhinos and Their Gamekeepers Benefit from AI

Starting in 2017, an artificial intelligence monitoring system at the Welgevonden Game Reserve in South Africa has been helping to protect rhinos and their caretakers.

19h

No evidence of added benefit for most new drugs entering German healthcare system

More than half of new drugs entering the German healthcare system have not been shown to add benefit, argue researchers.

20h

Rhinos and Their Gamekeepers Benefit from AI

Starting in 2017, an artificial intelligence monitoring system at the Welgevonden Game Reserve in South Africa has been helping to protect rhinos and their caretakers. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

India air pollution: Will Gujarat's 'cap and trade' programme work?

An Indian state has launched the world's first "cap and trading" programme to curb air pollution.

20h

We could cut atmospheric carbon by 25% by planting a forest the size of the United States

The right trees planted in the right place could have a major impact on climate change. The study identifies .09 billion hectares of available land for the necessary new forests. The new forests would capture 205 gigatons of carbon dioxide. None It would be no surprise to anyone to say that if we hadn't deforested so much of the Earth, we wouldn't be in so much trouble with climate change now. Ex

21h

Japan Just Landed a Spacecraft on an Asteroid, And The Photos Are Nuts

It's sampling material from below the surface.

21h

What’s the best straw?

What's the best way to slurp up this smoothie? (Deposit Photos/) Lifting liquids directly to your lips is so 5,000 years ago. We've got spoons now, baby, and straws galore. But in a world where personal convenience comes with serious consequences, hitting and quitting a single-use plastic straw doesn't always feel right. If you're in the market for your first reusable straw (and don't want to los

21h

YouTube looks to dilute nasty programming with curated educational playlists

YouTube, which has come under fire in the past year for allowing conspiracy and hate videos to surface to the top, is making another move to clean up its act.

21h

Traffic deaths have risen since ride-hailing apps launched

The arrival of ride-hailing is associated with an increase of approximately 3 percent in the number of motor vehicle fatalities and fatal accidents, according to new research. Researchers used the staggered roll-out dates from Uber and Lyft to review the eight quarters before and after ride-hailing adoption in large US cities from 2001 to 2016—analyzing traffic volume, transportation choices, and

21h

New 'Vegebot' Highlights Why Robots Won't Replace Vegetable Pickers Anytime Soon

Cambridge researchers have a new lettuce-picking robot. Its success underlines the challenges of automating vegetable picking. (Credit: leungchopan/shutterstock) A skilled human can pick a head of lettuce every 10 seconds. Just reach down, slice a mature head off its stalk, bag it, toss it in the cart. Easy, right? Tell that to wannabe veggie-picking robots. For them, it’s actually quite a challen

21h

Revealing the intrinsic nature of the mid-gap defects in amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10980-w The structural origin of the mid-gap states responsible for the time-dependent resistance drift in phase-change materials is still under debate. Here the authors use machine learning and density functional theory to identify the structural motifs of the mid-gap defects in the prototypical Ge2Sb2Te5 phase-change

21h

Highly atroposelective synthesis of nonbiaryl naphthalene-1,2-diamine N-C atropisomers through direct enantioselective C-H amination

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10858-x Atropisomers with a chiral C-N axis are useful for natural products synthesis and as ligands in asymmetric catalysis. Here, the authors reportt a π-π interaction and dual H-bond concerted control strategy in enantioselective C-H amination affording configurationally stable N-C atropisomers.

21h

Practical access to axially chiral sulfonamides and biaryl amino phenols via organocatalytic atroposelective N-alkylation

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10940-4 NOBINs and other axially chiral entities have received a great deal of interest in recent years. Here, the authors report the kinetic resolution of racemic amino phenols and the enantioselective preparation of axially chiral N-aryl sulfonamides with excellent level of enantiopurity and broad substrate scope.

21h

NF-Y controls fidelity of transcription initiation at gene promoters through maintenance of the nucleosome-depleted region

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10905-7 The mechanisms underlying specific TSS selection in mammals remain unclear. Here the authors show that the ubiquitously expressed transcription factor NF-Y regulate fidelity of transcription initiation at gene promoters, maintaining the region upstream of TSSs in a nucleosome-depleted state, while protecting thi

21h

Bio-inspired creation of heterogeneous reaction vessels via polymerization of supramolecular ion pair

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11080-5 Tuning the environment of catalytic active sites may improve the selectivity of heterogeneous catalysts. Here, the authors modify the outer-sphere environment of active sites in hydroformylation catalysts by encapsulating the active sites in nanovessels formed by ion pair-directed supramolecular assembly.

21h

Retraction Note: A switch in the poly(dC)/RmlB complex regulates bacterial persister formation

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11189-7 Retraction Note: A switch in the poly(dC)/RmlB complex regulates bacterial persister formation

21h

Structural basis for transcription antitermination at bacterial intrinsic terminator

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10955-x Bacteriophages reprogram the host transcriptional machinery. Here the authors provide insights into the mechanism of how bacteriophages regulate host transcription by determining the cryo-EM structures of two bacterial transcription elongation complexes bound with the bacteriophage master host-transcription regu

21h

Strain-level metagenomic assignment and compositional estimation for long reads with MetaMaps

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10934-2 Sequencing platforms, such as Oxford Nanopore or Pacific Biosciences generate long-read data that preserve long-range genomic information but have high error rates. Here, the authors develop MetaMaps, a computational tool for strain-level metagenomic assignment and compositional estimation using long reads.

21h

21h

People in China have more salt in their diet than anyone else in world

People in China consume 10 grams of salt each day on average – the most of any country and twice the level recommended to avoid risks including stroke

21h

Combining two cancer drugs could help slow growth of tumours

Breast tumours grow at a slower rate in mice if the animals are given one drug to block cancer cell division and another that prevents therapy resistance

21h

Coping strategy therapy for family dementia carers works long-term

A programme of therapy and coping strategies for people who care for family members with dementia successfully improves the carers' mental health for at least a six-year follow-up, finds a UCL study.

21h

Salt intake in China among highest in the world for the past 4 decades

Salt intake in China is confirmed to be among the highest in the world, with adults over the past four decades consistently consuming on average above 10g of salt a day, which is more than twice the recommended limit, according to new research led by Queen Mary University of London.

21h

Pairing targeted drugs for breast and lung cancer could overcome treatment resistance

Targeted drugs for breast and lung cancer could be used together to overcome resistance to treatment in several different tumour types, a new study shows. Scientists discovered that when the breast cancer drug palbociclib was combined with the lung cancer drug crizotinib, the two-drug combination was significantly more effective against cancer cells in the laboratory than either drug used on its o

21h

1 key brain region controls appetite

Researchers believe they have identified in mice models a brain region in the amygdala, the brain’s emotional hub, that regulates appetite suppression and activation. The team found the neurocircuitry controlling appetite loss, called anorexia, says Haijiang Cai, an assistant professor who is a member of the BIO5 Institute and heads up the neuroscience lab at the University of Arizona that ran th

21h

21h

9/11 stories show how ‘near misses’ can be traumatic

People who narrowly avoid disaster don’t necessarily escape unharmed, according to a new study that explores the effects of near-miss experiences linked to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The study shows how knowledge of the fate of victims shapes how survivors respond to traumatic events. “There is a misfortune to being fortunate,” says Michael Poulin, an associate professor of psychology at the Uni

21h

Prokaryotic vs. Eukaryotic Cells: What's the Difference?

Earth's first life forms consisted of simple prokaryotic cells. Over time, these evolved into the more complex eukaryotic cells with nuclei.

22h

E-cigarette bans may keep more people smoking tobacco

Measures to ban e-cigarettes, intended to prevent teen vaping, could make it tougher for tobacco smokers to quit, two experts argue. E-cigarettes have been at the center of a heated debate among policymakers, parents, and the public health community. San Francisco recently became the first US city to ban the sale of e-cigarettes. On one hand, research shows that e-cigarettes are substantially saf

22h

This 'chameleon theory' explains things about gravity that Einstein couldn’t

Computer generated images showing a disk galaxy from a modified gravity simulation. (Christian Arnold/Baojiu Li/Durham University/) More than 100 years after Albert Einstein first outlined his ideas on how gravity weaves into the fabric of space-time, we still don't have any other model that better defines how objects in the universe move and behave . General relativity isn't just a smoother expl

22h

Cutting Just 300 Calories Per Day May Keep Your Heart Healthy

That's the equivalent of about six standard Oreos. But this modest reduction in calories could have protective benefits for our hearts, a new study finds. (Image credit: Sian Irvine/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley)

22h

Artificial intelligence can now dominate at the poker table, and Facebook holds all the cards

Shall we play a game? (Photo by Michał Parzuchowski on Unsplash/) If you’ve ever thought about a competitive situation in life as like a chess game, you might consider poker as a better metaphor. Chess is just a two-player contest, and each player has access to all the same info—it’s known as a “perfect information” game. But real-life isn’t usually like that. Consider a common but complex scenar

22h

Potential Causes of Irreproducibility Revealed

Five independent groups got different results in a drug-response experiment, despite sharing protocols, reagents, and cell lines. The researchers identify technical variables that could be to blame.

22h

Even in svelte adults, cutting about 300 calories daily protects the heart

In adults already at a healthy weight or carrying just a few extra pounds, cutting around 300 calories a day significantly improved already good levels of cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar and other markers.

22h

The Best Medicine: Decoding The Hidden Meanings Of Laughter

This week, a scientific look at what makes us laugh. Here's a hint — a lot of it isn't funny. We talk to neuroscientist (and stand up comedian) Sophie Scott. (Image credit: Flashpop/Getty Images)

22h

Author Correction: L1 drives IFN in senescent cells and promotes age-associated inflammation

Nature, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1350-9 Author Correction: L1 drives IFN in senescent cells and promotes age-associated inflammation

22h

Author Correction: The bone marrow microenvironment at single-cell resolution

Nature, Published online: 12 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1394-x Author Correction: The bone marrow microenvironment at single-cell resolution

22h

Parallels and Perpendiculars in the Lives of Two Extraordinary Siblings

In her new book The Weil Conjectures, Karen Olsson ruminates on the trajectories of André and Simone Weil — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

Strange warping geometry helps to push scientific boundaries

Researchers have built an electronic array on a microchip that simulates particle interactions in a hyperbolic plane, a geometric surface in which space curves away from itself at every point.

23h

On 'Pose', the Past Is the Present

The most recent episode dealt with the deaths of black trans women—deaths still common today.

23h

This Common Sugar Substitute Can Be Deadly for Dogs, FDA Warns

A common sugar substitute found in everything from chewing gum to peanut butter can be deadly for man's best friend.

23h

This Might Be the Strangest Black Hole Yet

Big Boy 130 million light-years away, at the center of the galaxy NGC 3147, lurks a particularly bizarre supermassive black hole. The black hole, recently discovered by astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope, has a much larger disk of material orbiting around it than scientists expected given how sparse the galaxy is, according to a European Space Agency press release . Because the disk orb

23h

Strange warping geometry helps to push scientific boundaries

Researchers have built an electronic array on a microchip that simulates particle interactions in a hyperbolic plane, a geometric surface in which space curves away from itself at every point.

23h

Immune molecules found inside mycetoma lesions surveyed

Mycetoma is a common neglected disease caused by either fungi or bacteria which organize themselves into grains — areas of inflammation surrounded by a collagen capsule. Now, researchers have studied two immune molecules inside these grains and discovered patterns to where the molecules appear.

23h

Bird with unusually long toes found fossilized in amber

Meet the ancient bird that had toes longer than its lower legs. Researchers have discovered a bird foot from 99 million years ago preserved in amber that had a hyper-elongated third toe. The study suggests that this bird might have used its toes to hook food out of tree trucks. This is the first time such a foot structure has been observed in birds.

23h

Humans Fold: AI Conquers Poker's Final Milestone

A new program outperforms professionals in six-player games. Could business, political or military applications come next? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

An AI Bot Just Beat Poker Pros In Six-Player Texas Hold’em

(Credit: LightField Studios/Shutterstock) The best poker players in the world can cash in on millions of dollars in a game. Played in casinos, poker clubs, private homes and on the internet, the game demands skill and strategy. Now scientists have created an artificial intelligence (AI) bot that can best even the top human players. And this new AI won at six-player poker. Bots were already dominan

23h

Chronic kidney disease patients face continual, significant gaps in care

Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a high prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension and diabetes, as well as statin use below the recommended guidelines for cholesterol control, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

23h

Humans Fold: AI Conquers Poker's Final Milestone

A new program outperforms professionals in six-player games. Could business, political or military applications come next? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

Are the 'viral' agents of MS, ALS and schizophrenia buried in our genome?

What if the missing 'environmental' factor in some of our deadliest neurological diseases were really written in our genome? Researchers explain how viruses ended up in our DNA — and what puts them in the frame in unsolved diseases like multiple sclerosis.

23h

House mouse shapes Toxoplasma gondii distribution

The humble house mouse has dramatically shaped parasitic Toxoplasma gondii populations in West Africa and around the world, according to new research. As different strains affect their hosts differently, the research provides insights into which populations are infecting humans and animals and suggests mechanisms for their intercontinental spread.

23h

Amgen, Novartis abandon two Alzheimer’s drug studies

Move comes after some patients on the trials showed a worsening in cognitive function

23h

A $700 Million Amazon Pledge, Credit Card Hackers, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

23h

Strange warping geometry helps to push scientific boundaries

Princeton researchers have built an electronic array on a microchip that simulates particle interactions in a hyperbolic plane, a geometric surface in which space curves away from itself at every point.

1d

Clemson researchers tie metabolic enzyme to obesity and fatty liver disease

Researchers from Clemson University's Environmental Toxicology Program have published research connecting an enzyme associated with detoxification to obesity and fatty liver disease, especially in males.

1d

'Moon-forming' circumplanetary disk discovered in distant star system

Astronomers using ALMA have made the first-ever observations of a circumplanetary disk, the planet-girding belt of dust and gas that astronomers strongly theorize controls the formation of planets and gives rise to an entire system of moons, like those found around Jupiter.

1d

That Story About the Ancient Frozen Worms Might Be Bologna

Mr. Worm If you’ve been online recently, you probably read the news that 40,000-year-old worms trapped in permafrost wriggled back to life after they thawed out. Lots of news outlets, Futurism included , picked up the story — but a closer look at the research calls into question the real age of these supposedly-ancient nematodes. Taking to Twitter , University of Maine Ice Age ecologist Jacquelyn

1d

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