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nyheder2019juli13

Scientists unveil the first-ever image of quantum entanglement

For the first time ever, physicists have managed to take a photo of a strong form of quantum entanglement called Bell entanglement—capturing visual evidence of an elusive phenomenon which a baffled Albert Einstein once called 'spooky action at a distance'.

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Som barn legede jeg med computere. Nu er jeg familiens tech-support. Hvordan slipper jeg væk?

Jeg har spurgt videnskaben, hvordan jeg lærer de gamle at fikse deres computerproblemer selv.

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Urinary Tract Infections Affect Millions. The Cures Are Faltering.

As the infections become increasingly resistant to antibiotics, some standard treatments no longer work for an ailment that was once easily cured.

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There’s No Understanding Donald Trump

It’s been barely two weeks since Donald Trump became the first American president to step onto North Korean soil, with all attendant theorizing about what the move meant, or didn’t. Was it the “ biggest moment of the Trump presidency so far ” and “ already a political win ,” as some media figures claimed? Was it, on the contrary, another sign of Trump’s “dictator envy” and “authoritarian buffoone

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Sloths Climb a New Evolutionary Tree

Analysis of ancient genes changes what researchers expected about giant sloth evolution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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680K+ sign up to participate in Area 51 raid to "see them aliens"

By mid-day Saturday, more than 680,000 people had signed up to attend a Facebook event titled, “Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us” and another 627,000 registered as “interested.”

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All Hail The Mighty Translatotron! (20 Jun 2019)

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Vanderbilt creates artificial kidney!!!!

submitted by /u/TN90Hood [link] [comments]

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A guide to eco-friendly travel

Stay green, even as you jet off into the wild blue yonder. (Kaotaru via Unsplash/) Travel has a lot of benefits. It breaks up our routine, makes us more physically active, and encourages us to try new things. In fact, a 2014 study found that experiences such as traveling make us happier than just buying stuff. The downside? Carbon emissions related to tourism have been on the rise in the past few

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The Camera That Went To The Moon And Changed How We See It

Astronaut Walter Schirra's decision to bring a Swedish-made Hasselblad on his Mercury spaceflight set the course for NASA's choice of the camera for the Apollo lunar program. (Image credit: Charles Conrad Jr./NASA)

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Barry Becomes a Hurricane, Barrels Toward Louisiana Coast

Barry is now packing winds of 75 mph. Life-threatening flash flooding will become increasingly likely later today and tonight as Barry moves inland.

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #28

A chronological listing of news articles posted on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, July 7 through Sat, July 13, 2019 Editor's Pick Climate Change Fills Storms With More Rain, Analysis Shows A flooded street in New Orleans on Wednesday. Credit Ryan Pasternak When a tropical storm is approaching, its intensity or wind speed often gets the bulk of the attention.

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Disappearing sea ice is changing the whole ecosystem of the Arctic Ocean

Graham J. C. Underwood , Professor of Marine and Freshwater Biology, University of Essex This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article . I drafted this while looking north over the frozen Lincoln Sea, at the northernmost tip of Ellesmere Island in Canada. I was at Alert, a Canadian Forces Station which, at 82°N, is the most northerly

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Over-conditioning kills: Non-traumatic fatalities in football is preventable

Most non-traumatic fatalities among high school and college football athletes do not occur while playing the game of football, but rather during conditioning sessions which are often associated with overexertion or punishment drills required by coaches and team staff, according to new research.

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Sheaths drive powerful new artificial muscles

Over the last 15 years, researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and their international colleagues have invented several types of strong, powerful artificial muscles using materials ranging from high-tech carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to ordinary fishing line. In a new study published July 12, 2019 in the journal Science, the researchers describe their latest advance, called sheath-run artifici

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Outcomes of non-operatively treated elbow ulnar in professional baseball players

Professional baseball players with a low-grade elbow injury that occurs on the humeral side of the elbow have a better chance of returning to throw and returning to play, and a lower risk of ulnar collateral ligament surgery than players who suffered more severe injuries on the ulnar side of the elbow.

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Coping strategy therapy for family dementia carers works long-term

A program of therapy and coping strategies for people who care for family members with dementia successfully improves the carers' mental health for at least a six-year follow-up, finds a new study.

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Salt intake in China among highest in the world for the past 4 decades

Salt intake in China is confirmed to be among the highest in the world, with adults over the past four decades consistently consuming on average above 10g of salt a day, which is more than twice the recommended limit, according to new research.

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Pairing targeted drugs for breast and lung cancer could overcome treatment resistance

Targeted drugs for breast and lung cancer could be used together to overcome resistance to treatment in several different tumour types, a new study shows. Scientists discovered that when the breast cancer drug palbociclib was combined with the lung cancer drug crizotinib, the two-drug combination was significantly more effective against cancer cells in the laboratory than either drug used on its o

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Wildfires disrupt important pollination processes by moths and increase extinction risks

Researchers have shown for the first time the detrimental effect of wildfires on moths and the ecological benefits they provide by transporting pollen, making interacting plant and insect communities more vulnerable to local extinctions.

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Ancient genomics pinpoint origin and rapid turnover of cattle in the Fertile Crescent

Ancient DNA has revealed how the prehistory of the Near East's largest domestic animal, the cow, chimes with the emergence of the first complex economies, cities and the rise and fall of the world earliest human empires.

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Patterns in DNA reveal hundreds of unknown protein pairings

Researchers have now found a new way to extract useful information out of sequenced DNA. By cataloging subtle evolutionary signatures shared between pairs of genes in bacteria, the team discovered hundreds of previously unknown protein interactions. This method is now being applied to the human genome to seek new insights into how our proteins interact.

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Margaret Hamilton: ‘They worried that the men might rebel. They didn’t’

The trailblazing computer scientist talks about being in charge of the software for the 1969 Apollo moon landing Computer pioneer Margaret Hamilton was critical to landing astronauts on the moon for the first time on 20 July 1969 and returning them safely a few days later. The young Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) computer programmer and working mother led the team that created the on

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Climate Change Fuels Wetter Storms — Storms Like Barry

The water in the Gulf of Mexico is hot and the Mississippi River is high. That could spell disaster for Louisiana. (Image credit: Matthew Hinton/AP)

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Simona Halep’s Dazzling Wimbledon Victory

Throughout her professional career, Simona Halep has enjoyed a reputation as a classic counterpuncher , a player with superb defensive skills and the instinct to patiently extend rallies until an ideal moment to strike reveals itself. Prior to her straight-sets (6–2, 6–2) upset of Serena Williams in the women’s singles final at Wimbledon today, Halep’s only Grand Slam singles title had come on th

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1,000 Years of Congruent Numbers

These integers have inspired one of the most important unsolved problems in mathematics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Russia launches space telescope

Russia launched a space telescope Saturday from the cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, a joint project with Germany intended to replace one it lost in January.

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New vaccine strategy boosts T-cell therapy

Super-charging a treatment for leukemia also makes it effective on solid tumors.

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Area of brain linked to spatial awareness and planning also plays role in decision making

Neuroscientists show that the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), an area of the brain often associated with planning movements and spatial awareness, also plays a crucial role in making decisions about images in the field of view.

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For malnourished children, new therapeutic food boosts gut microbes, healthy development

A new type of therapeutic food, specifically designed to repair the gut microbiomes of malnourished children, is superior to standard therapy in an initial clinical trial conducted in Bangladesh. Researchers have undertaken a new approach for addressing the pressing global health problem of childhood malnutrition. Their approach focuses on selectively boosting key growth-promoting gut microbes usi

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High-risk pregnancy: The interferon effect

Scientists have identified a new cellular mechanism that alters placental development, potentially causing serious complications during pregnancy. The mechanism is linked with the production of interferon, a molecule produced in response to infection, especially viral infection.

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Top university split in row over erasing ‘racist’ science pioneers from the campus

University College London may rename buildings to cut links to promoters of eugenics They were some of Britain’s greatest scientific pioneers. Based at University College London, they developed the first fingerprinting methods, the use of statistics in health and genetics research, early birth-control science and many other key technologies of the Victorian and Edwardian eras. But now these trailb

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Space Photos of the Week: A Tribute to Voyager’s Twin Trippers

These two missions fundamentally changed our understanding of the solar system. See how in this entrancing photo gallery.

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The Cruelty of Aunt Lydia

This story contains spoilers for Season 3 of The Handmaid’s Tale. Ann Dowd is one of the most gifted character actors of this TV age, and yet I’ve always struggled with Aunt Lydia, the authoritarian, Bible-passage-spewing antagonist she plays on The Handmaid’s Tale . Bruce Miller’s Hulu series loves, above all things, to humanize its most horrific characters, and so Dowd’s Aunt Lydia—much like Yv

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What you might have missed

AI conquering poker, the oldest modern human in Europe and a caving mission before Mars – here are some highlights from a week in science.

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This Week’s Awesome Stories From Around the Web (Through July 13)

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ‘Superhuman’ AI Crushes Pros at Six-Player Texas Hold’em George Dvorsky | Gizmodo “[Roman Yampolskiy] said, ‘Poker in particular has been an early sandbox for AI, and to show such a level of dominance in an unrestricted version of poker with many players has been a holy grail of research since the early days of AI.’ i ” CRYPTOCURRENCY Why Governments Around the World Are A

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Zimbabwean Communities Keep Fields Watered Via Solar

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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For Climbing Robots, the Sky's the Limit

submitted by /u/Galileos_grandson [link] [comments]

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Wearable Wings With Jets Engines

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Weekend reads: Researcher resigns following questions about ties to China; grad student’s suicide sparks misconduct investigation; study of chronic fatigue syndrome corrected

Before we present this week’s Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured retractions and expressions of concern for a prominent cancer researcher; … Continue reading Weekend reads: Researcher resig

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Hubble Spots a Black Hole That Shouldn’t Exist

This galaxy might bend the rules a bit, but it offers an opportunity to study how the theory of relativity applies in the real world. The post Hubble Spots a Black Hole That Shouldn’t Exist appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Why New Zealanders Love DIY Coffins

T here are coffins, and then there is the Batesville Z94, better known as the Promethean. This bronze sarcophagus weighs 310 pounds; trimmings include gold-plated hardware, “Rumba Red” velvet upholstery, and a finish so shiny that pallbearers will be able to see their reflections. Price: up to $45,000, depending on the retailer. Remember Aretha Franklin’s golden casket ? That was a Promethean. No

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor udnytter man ikke tidevand og bølger til energi?

Flere læsere er interesserede i bølgeenergi og vil høre, hvorfor der ikke er mere gang i den forretning. Det svarer lektor fra AAU samt den britiske energivirksomhed Simec på.

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The Toxic Potential of YouTube’s Feedback Loop

Opinion: I worked on AI for YouTube’s "recommended for you" feature. We underestimated how the algorithms could go terribly wrong.

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Palantir Manual Shows How Law Enforcement Tracks Families

An Apple Watch bug, a hackable hair straightener, and more security news this week.

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Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Tabletop RPGs

Shannon Appelcline's 'Designers and Dragons' books offer a detailed look at the history of tabletop roleplaying games.

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Has the Earth Ever Been This Hot Before?

Was the planet ever as hot as it is today, when every month the globe seems to be breaking one high-temperature record after another?

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11,898 Solar Eclipses in 5,000 Years

Precisely when and where eclipses occur is a complicated business — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Spektr-RG: Powerful X-ray telescope launches to map cosmos

One of the most important Russian space science missions in the post-Soviet era lifts off from Baikonur.

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Has Your Doctor Talked To You About Climate Change?

Some physicians say connecting environmental effects of climate change — heat waves, more pollen and longer allergy seasons — to the health consequences helps them better care for patients. (Image credit: Jesse Costa/WBUR)

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Elif Shafak – the story no one hears

"To say that there are two stories to the same issue…doesn't mean [they] have the same power. Sometimes one of those stories will be the story that no one hears….that is suppressed and erased and forgotten and pushed to the margins." "I think faith is way too important to leave it to the religious. Just like politics is way too important to leave it to career politicians. And I've started to beli

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Machine learning: a roadmap for clinical validation

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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First image of Einstein's 'spooky' particle action

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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What kind of things that are currently considered within the realms of "science fiction", do you think will become a reality within the next 20 years?

I'm talking technology, medical advances, ideas that seem outlandish now or virtually impossible but will be realised within the next 10-20 years as time marches on. submitted by /u/infin8ty [link] [comments]

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Prime Day 2019: What You Should Know About Amazon

Ahead of Amazon’s official shopping holiday, we pulled together the best of our shopping tips and stories. Learn how star ratings work and how to avoid shady products.

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Måneuge på ing.dk: Apollo 11 er klar til afgang

Vi sætter fokus på Apollo 11 i denne uge op til 50 års-dagen for den legendariske månelanding. Vi lægger ud med et kig i arkiverne.

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Two Magical Places That Sent Apollo 11 to the Moon and Back

They’ve nearly vanished, but hubs in Southern California and on Long Island played key roles in the lunar race.

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A Burning Lava Lake Concealed by a Volcano’s Glacial Ice

Persistent pools of lava are quite rare on Earth, and it took years of satellite images to find this one.

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Outcomes of non-operatively treated elbow ulnar in professional baseball players

Professional baseball players with a low-grade elbow injury that occurs on the humeral side of the elbow have a better chance of returning to throw and returning to play, and a lower risk of ulnar collateral ligament surgery than players who suffered more severe injuries on the ulnar side of the elbow. The research was presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Me

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Over-conditioning kills: Non-traumatic fatalities in football is preventable

Most non-traumatic fatalities among high school and college football athletes do not occur while playing the game of football, but rather during conditioning sessions which are often associated with overexertion or punishment drills required by coaches and team staff, according to research presented today at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. The research was prese

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At Least 30 Migrant Children Have Been Separated From Their Parents for More Than a Year

A startling pair of statistics are tucked into the opening “Executive Summary” section of the House Oversight Committee’s new report on child separation at the U.S.-Mexico border. First, the report specifies that: the Committee has now obtained new information about at least 2,648 children who were separated from their parents by the Trump Administration. Many of these children were brought by th

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Trump’s Malarkey Only Goes So Far

The shortest way of describing what happened with Donald Trump’s census fiasco is that mendacity met the rule of law and, for now, the rule of law won. Trump tried to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census, but the Supreme Court stopped him because the rationale his administration offered for the change was demonstrably false. The fallback plan he hinted at—of adding the question via execu

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Robert Mueller Must Finish the Job

Much drama surrounds former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s upcoming testimony—on July 17, or perhaps on July 24—before two committees of the House of Representatives. It flows in no small part from Mueller’s character, as a man out of time , whose extraordinary commitment to values uncommon in today’s world have made him both an icon and a curiosity. I know of his long-standing commitment to th

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Eternally stinky city? Rome garbage crisis sparks health fears

Landfills in flames and rats feasting on waste in the streets have sparked health fears in Rome, as doctors warn families to steer clear of disease-ridden curbside garbage and locals launch a disgusting dumpster contest online.

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Amazon 'Prime Day' becomes phenomenon as rivals jump in

It started as a simple sales promotion, but Amazon's Prime Day has now morphed into a major phenomenon joined by scores of retailers jockeying with the US colossus for a bigger slice of the e-commerce pie.

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In Paris, cars forced to make way for the two-wheel revolution

With the wind rushing through their hair, they zip past on bikes, electric scooters and mono-wheels, effortlessly passing lines of hot-and-bothered drivers stuck in the endless Paris traffic.

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Let's talk about gay penguins: Munich zoo joins Pride week

Organisers of this year's Gay Pride week in Munich have a group of rather wild partners—penguins, giraffes and lions at the city zoo where tours are being run about same-sex love in the animal kingdom.

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It’s a Precarious Time for Any Official in Trump’s Orbit

It’s a moment in Donald Trump’s presidency that has become all too familiar: another round of bloodletting. Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta had gambled that his news conference on Wednesday would appease an audience of one: Trump. But Acosta’s defense of how, as U.S. attorney in Florida, he handled a sex-crimes case against the financier Jeffrey Epstein failed to dampen accusations that he had g

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To Survive in a Wetter World, Raise Ducks, Not Chickens

DHAKA, Bangladesh—Here at Binni, a slightly run-down restaurant in one of Dhaka’s trendier neighborhoods, beef, chicken, and mutton dishes are slapped down on the table with a mere murmur. But when the waiter brings Hash Bhuna to the table, he announces it to the whole room, laying down the plate and pulling off the ceramic lid with a theatrical hand flick. Coated in a thick layer of spicy sauce,

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Tropical storm, river flooding hammer Gulf environment

Tropical Storm Barry could affect the environment of the Gulf coast and Lower Mississippi Valley in numerous ways, from accelerating runoff of farmland nutrients to toppling trees and damaging wildlife habitat and fisheries, scientists say.

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New election systems use vulnerable software

Pennsylvania's message was clear: The state was taking a big step to keep its elections from being hacked in 2020. Last April, its top election official told counties they had to update their systems. So far, nearly 60% have taken action, with $14.15 million of mostly federal funds helping counties buy brand-new electoral systems.

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Let's talk about gay penguins: Munich zoo joins Pride week

Organisers of this year's Gay Pride week in Munich have a group of rather wild partners—penguins, giraffes and lions at the city zoo where tours are being run about same-sex love in the animal kingdom.

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The compliment sandwich doesn’t work, but the “complaint sandwich” does — this is why

As a means of giving constructive feedback, the compliment sandwich has come under fire. The idea is to start with a compliment about something someone does well, then deliver the negative feedback, and end on another compliment, so as not to offend the person on the receiving end. More often than not, what ends up happening is that feedback gets sugarcoated and lost in unrelated compliments, rat

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Breaching a “carbon threshold” could lead to mass extinction

In the brain, when neurons fire off electrical signals to their neighbors, this happens through an "all-or-none" response. The signal only happens once conditions in the cell breach a certain threshold. Now an MIT researcher has observed a similar phenomenon in a completely different system: Earth's carbon cycle. Daniel Rothman, professor of geophysics and co-director of the Lorenz Center in MIT'

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Gitte har bygget et digitalt hønsehus: Mit barnebarn følger kyllingernes liv fra New York

Nu vil den 76-årige pensionist lære at programmere og 3D-printe.

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Brain implant restores partial vision to blind people

Medical experts hail ‘paradigm shift’ of implant that transmits video images directly to the visual cortex, bypassing the eye and optic nerve Partial sight has been restored to six blind people via an implant that transmits video images directly to the brain. Some vision was made possible – with the participants’ eyes bypassed – by a video camera attached to glasses which sent footage to electrod

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Danske universiteter med til at bygge Europas største supercomputer

Med en ydelse på op til 200 petaflops bliver den nye LUMI-supercomputer i Finland blandt verdens største. Og så har den et negativt CO2-aftryk på grund af 100 procent vedvarende energi og genanvendelse af overskudsvarme

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Storskalig trädplantering kan ta bort 20 års koldioxidutsläpp

Plantering av träd är ett effektivt sätt att lagra koldioxid från atmosfären. Och vi kan plantera många fler än vad man tidigare trott, enligt en ny studie där forskarna analyserat över 80 000 satellitbilder över jordens yta.

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Colonizing space will require gear that doesn't exist yet. But they're in the works.

Our best bet for frolicking among the stars will come from building O'Neill space colonies. Landing on and terraforming distant worlds such as Mars is fraught with greater technical and biological difficulties. Advances in radiation shielding, space construction and propulsion are needed for any sort of space colonization effort. Humanity has been openly flirting with cosmic destiny for centuries

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Our best defense against space weather has been offline for weeks

DISCOVR's EPIC camera took this shot of Earth in 2015. (NASA/) The Deep Space Climate Observatory—DSCOVR for short—is an underrated gem in Earth's orbit. This satellite, a joint effort between NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is basically the most powerful tool we have for monitoring space weather. In addition to keeping tabs on the solar wind and ultra-energiz

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Last week in tech: Twitter's outage, Facebook's $5 billion fine, and Nintendo's new Switch

The Switch Lite doesn't connect to a TV. (Nintendo/) When your daily routine includes staring at a computer for long stretches, it's easy to develop your own browsing habits. Many of those rituals involve checking in on social media, thanks to its unending stream of content that ranges from delightful to horrendous. This week, however, Twitter had a massive outage that affected users all around t

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Facebook's Libra and the Future of Money

On this episode of Gadget Lab, WIRED writer Greg Barber explains the intricacies of Facebook’s ambitious plan to and how Libra is poised to rattle the future of crypto.

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Using hominin introgression to trace modern human dispersals [Perspectives]

The dispersal of anatomically modern human populations out of Africa and across much of the rest of the world around 55 to 50 thousand years before present (ka) is recorded genetically by the multiple hominin groups they met and interbred with along the way, including the Neandertals and Denisovans. The…

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CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene knockout in intestinal tumor organoids provides functional validation for colorectal cancer driver genes [Medical Sciences]

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Several genome sequencing studies have provided comprehensive CRC genomic datasets. Likewise, in our previous study, we performed genome-wide Sleeping Beauty transposon-based mutagenesis screening in mice and provided comprehensive datasets of candidate CRC driver genes. However, functional validation for…

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Cardiomyocyte orientation modulated by the Numb family proteins-N-cadherin axis is essential for ventricular wall morphogenesis [Developmental Biology]

The roles of cellular orientation during trabecular and ventricular wall morphogenesis are unknown, and so are the underlying mechanisms that regulate cellular orientation. Myocardial-specific Numb and Numblike double-knockout (MDKO) hearts display a variety of defects, including in cellular orientation, patterns of mitotic spindle orientation, trabeculation, and ventricular compaction. Furthermor

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A dramatic view of Tropical Storm Barry unlike any you may have seen before

An animation of GOES-16 satellite imagery acquired in the infrared reveals the evolution of Tropical Storm Barry on Friday, July 12, 2019. The crackling white and blue areas are indicative of lightning activity. (Source: RAMMB/CIRA GOES-16/17 Loop of the Day) Tropical Storm Barry is now expected to make landfall as a hurricane. As I'm writing this Thursday afternoon, July 12, Barry is churning slo

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This Era Breeds a Certain Kind of Conspiracy Theorist

It’s Friday, July 12. In today’s issue: the anatomy of a conspiracy , the R. Kelly saga, the internet’s hottest new club , and more. What We’re Following This is how the conspiracy cookie about the American elite crumbles. The sex offender and financier Jeffrey Epstein’s alleged abuses read as if they were forged directly from the online conspiracy fever swamp. “From the creepily decorated mansio

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Tropical Storm Barry's biggest threat is already on the ground

Tropical storm Barry is nearing the Louisiana coastline. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/) Gulf Coast officials are warning residents to wrap up their preparations for Tropical Storm Barry. It’s almost here. On Thursday, Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards declared a state of emergency for the region and ordered 3,000 National Guard members to be deployed for rescue and recovery oper

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Tropical Storm Barry Pits New Orleans Against Water—Again

In the forever war between the Big Easy and the deluge, engineering keeps coming up short. Climate change is making it worse.

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Fruit juice may raise cancer risk, study finds. Here's why.

The study monitored the health of more than 100,000 adults over a five-year period. During this time, some 2,200 people developed cancer, the majority of whom regularly consumed sugary drinks. Still, the researchers said the results don't prove that sugar causes cancer. None A new study found that drinking sugary beverages such as soda and fruit juice may increase your risk of developing cancer.

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Homemade dog food can actually deprive pets of essential nutrients

healthy These pups will be happy with whatever you feed them, but it's your responsibility to make sure they're also healthy . (Deposit Photos/) Dogs are too good for us—this much we know . So it makes sense that many of us want to treat our pups like the angels they are by giving them the best of everything . For some people, that means feeding their canine pals home-prepared meals replete with

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New technology improves atrial fibrillation detection after stroke

It's important to determine whether stroke patients also experience atrial fibrillation (Afib). Monitoring technology could make the process easier and more accurate.

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Small horned dinosaur from China, a Triceratops relative, walked on two feet

Auroraceratops, a bipedal dinosaur that lived roughly 115 million years ago, has been newly described by paleontologists. More than 80 individuals of this species have been found in China's Gansu Province.

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Maintaining large-scale satellite constellations using logistics approach

Researchers have identified a critical hidden challenge about replacing the broken satellites in megaconstellations and proposed a unique solution with inventory control methods.

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Even in svelte adults, cutting about 300 calories daily protects the heart

In adults already at a healthy weight or carrying just a few extra pounds, cutting around 300 calories a day significantly improved already good levels of cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar and other markers.

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How Dogs Help Cancer Research, an Amazon Email Scam, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Fernando Corbató, a Father of Your Computer (and Your Password), Dies at 93

In a breakthrough in the 1960s, he showed that computers could be used interactively with quick results, and also made secure from others’ using them.

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E.P.A. Plans to Curtail the Ability of Communities to Oppose Pollution Permits

The agency is preparing to weaken rules that, for a quarter-century, have given communities a voice in deciding how much industrial pollution may legally be released nearby.

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The future of FireFighting is all electric

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India to Attempt First Moon Landing

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Fight facial-recognition technology with Phantom glasses

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Automation to hit rural areas hardest, study finds

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'Humans are the new natural resource' Surveillance Capitalism and how it impacts YOU: Q&A with Harvard expert Shoshana Zuboff.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/technology/2019/jan/20/shoshana-zuboff-age-of-surveillance-capitalism-google-facebook An interesting and informative read about how capitalism is evolving and why it is important to understand the dynamics behind the revolution. submitted by /u/PastelPreacher [link] [comments]

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New Dark Energy Data Emerges from Misshapen, Distorted, Ancient Voids

There are voids in the universe, and we can't see them properly. But the good news is that astronomers just got much better at not seeing them properly.

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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