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nyheder2019juli15

Britain makes Alan Turing, the father of AI, the face of its 50-pound note

In 2021, the Bank of England will release new 50 pound polymer banknotes honoring Alan Turing. (Courtesy of the Bank of England/) When Isaac Newton died , his pallbearers included two dukes and three earls. Upon Charles Darwin's death, the dean of Westminster Abbey "did not hestitate" to admit him for burial in the prestigious London church, despite the evolutionary theorist's troubling agnostici

36min

Flood prediction model developed

The duration of floods can be determined by river flow, precipitation and atmospheric blocking. Now an international team of researchers is offering a novel physically based Bayesian network model for inference and prediction of flood duration. The model also accurately examines the timescales of flooding.

15min

Two things raise women’s risk of vulvodynia

Tight-fitting pants and hair removal increase the risk of vulvodynia, research shows. Although vulvodynia, or chronic, debilitating vulvar pain, affects an estimated 16 percent of women over their lifetimes, very little is known about the condition or what might cause it. New research offers some clues, finding that wearing tight-fitting jeans or pants or by removing hair from the mons pubis (the

18min

Meteors explain differences between Earth and moon elements

Millions of recreated meteor impacts may resolve the difference in ‘iron-loving’ elements on the Earth and the moon. As our solar system was forming nearly four and a half billion years ago, a planet-sized object struck the early Earth, leading to the formation of the moon, possibly from a hot, spinning cloud of rock vapor called a synestia. But after the Earth and moon had condensed from the vap

4min

Homeless people are denied basic health care, research finds

A study led by the University of Birmingham, UK, has painted a shaming picture of neglect and discrimination shown towards the homeless when accessing UK health services.

10min

‘Digital alchemy’ reverse-engineers useful crystals

Computer simulations make it possible to design a crystal and work backward to the particle shape that will self-assemble to create it. It could lead to a new class of materials, such as crystal coatings that produce colors that never fade. “These results turn materials design and our understanding of entropy on their heads,” says Sharon Glotzer, department chair of chemical engineering at the Un

11min

Curbing indoor air pollution in India

Clean cooking energy transitions are extremely challenging to achieve, but they offer enormous potential health, environmental, and societal benefits. A study provides new insights about an Indian program that aims to solve one of the most difficult developmental challenges of the 21st century — smoky kitchens.

15min

Comprehensive review of the future of CRISPR technology in crops

CRISPR is thought of as 'molecular scissors' used to cut and edit DNA, but researchers are now looking far beyond these applications. In a new comprehensive review, they explore the current state of CRISPR in crops, and how scientists can enhance traditional breeding techniques in nontraditional ways to a growing population in the face of climate change, diseases, and pests.

15min

How WeChat censors private conversations, automatically in real-time

The super app instantly blocks even the images for over 1 billion users and growing.

22min

‘Behind-the-counter’ meds could safely treat opioid addiction

Making opioid use disorder medication more accessible as a behind-the-counter drug could save lives, researchers say. As of now, the Food and Drug Administration has approved only three medications to treat opioid use disorder: Methadone, naltrexone, and buprenorphine. But the opioid-based medications require a prescription for use, which can make them difficult to obtain for people who urgently

25min

SpaceX Aims to Test Starhopper This Week

An artist's illustration shows the eventual Starship, SpaceX's future passenger vehicle, launching above the clouds. (Credit: SpaceX) Exploring space on your next family vacation is still a few years in the future. But Elon Musk now says that Starhopper, the prototype for SpaceX’s future passenger spacecraft, could be tested as soon as July 16 at the company’s facility near Brownsville, Texas. Tha

36min

Aerogels Could Be Used to Build Terraforming Domes on Mars

(Credit: Discover; Pavel Chagochkin/Shutterstock) (Inside Science) — Shields made of a material so light it is sometimes called "frozen smoke" could help make areas on Mars livable, a new study suggests. Currently, the surface of Mars is too cold for water to stay liquid, often thought of as a key prerequisite for life as we know it. Moreover, its atmosphere is too thin to shield against hostile

36min

First Ebola case in African border metropolis could be a ‘game-changer,’ WHO leader warns

Democratic Republic of the Congo rejects deployment of a second, experimental vaccine

50min

Yeti Hopper Cooler Deal: $90 Off for Amazon Prime Day

Yeti's tough, durable coolers rarely go on sale. If you're in the market, you may want to snatch the Hopper Flip 18 up.

53min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Trump Tends to His Core Voters

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, July 15. ‣ The Trump administration issued a new rule that would significantly limit asylum protections for most Central American migrants. It’s almost certain to face a legal challenge. Here’s what else we’re w

57min

Hawaii Protesters Block Access Road To Stop Construction Of Massive Telescope

Native Hawaiians chained themselves to a grate in a road to stop work on the controversial Mauna Kea project on what they say is sacred land. Development is scheduled to begin this week. (Image credit: AP)

58min

Effectiveness of using natural enemies to combat pests depends on surroundings

A new study of cabbage crops in New York — a state industry worth close to $60 million in 2017, according to the USDA — reports for the first time that the effectiveness of releasing natural enemies to combat pests depends on the landscape surrounding the field.

1h

Wearing hearing aid may help protect brain in later life

A new study has concluded that people who wear a hearing aid for age-related hearing problems maintain better brain function over time than those who do not.

1h

U.S. Air Force warns UFO enthusiasts against storming Area 51

Facebook joke event to "raid Area 51" has already gained 1,000,000 "going" attendees. The U.S. Air Force has issued an official warning to potential "raiders." If anyone actually tries to storm an American military base, the use of deadly force is authorized. Conspiracy theorists, Ufologists, and, more importantly, internet satirists' most favorite target of scorn and alien memes, Area 51, has ga

1h

Author Correction: Genomic characterization of metastatic breast cancers

Nature, Published online: 16 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1380-3 Author Correction: Genomic characterization of metastatic breast cancers

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Author Correction: Resonantly hybridized excitons in moiré superlattices in van der Waals heterostructures

Nature, Published online: 16 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1412-z Author Correction: Resonantly hybridized excitons in moiré superlattices in van der Waals heterostructures

1h

Paleontology: New light on cichlid evolution in Africa

A collaborative research project has developed an integrative approach to the classification of fossil cichlids, and identified the oldest known member of the Tribe Oreochromini.

1h

New study on citrus greening disease

A new study investigates the thermal suitability for transmission of citrus greening with implications for surveillance and prevention.

1h

New analysis reveals challenges for drought management in Oregon's Willamette River Basin

In Oregon's fertile Willamette River Basin, where two-thirds of the state's population lives, managing water scarcity would be more effective if conservation measures were introduced in advance and upstream from the locations where droughts are likely to cause shortages.

1h

Why urban planners should pay attention to restaurant-review sites

Apartment seekers in big cities often use the presence of restaurants to determine if a neighborhood would be a good place to live. It turns out there is a lot to this rule of thumb: urban studies scholars have now found that in China, restaurant data can be used to predict key socioeconomic attributes of neighborhoods.

1h

Myth-busting study reveals that gamblers can't detect slot machine payout percentages

It's a common sight on casino floors: patrons jumping from slot machine to slot machine before eventually hunkering down at a game that's due for the next big payout. But can players — even the regulars who frequent a particular property — really tell the difference between the house edge on one game from that of another? Nope. At least not according to a series of recent studies led by a colleg

1h

Physicists find first possible 3D quantum spin liquid

There's no known way to prove a three-dimensional 'quantum spin liquid' exists, so physicists did the next best thing: They showed their crystals of cerium zirconium pyrochlore had the right stuff to qualify as the first possible 3D version of the long-sought state of matter.

1h

Cholesterol-lowering drugs under-prescribed for prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

Statins, the most commonly used effective lipid-lowering drugs, are significantly underutilized to treat lipid abnormalities in patients with and at risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), according to a retrospective study of more than 280,000 patients in Alberta, Canada. Investigators report that only two-thirds of these patients were receiving moderate/high-intensity statins, a

1h

How expectation influences perception

Neuroscientists have identified distinctive patterns of neural activity that encode prior beliefs and help the brain make sense of uncertain signals coming from the outside world. For the first time, they showed that prior beliefs exert their effect on behavior by warping the representation of sensory events in the brain.

1h

Combined breast and gynecologic surgery: Study says not so fast

A new study argues against combined approach: Patients undergoing coordinated breast and gynecologic procedures had a significantly longer length of hospital stay, and higher complication, readmission, and reoperation rates compared with patients who underwent single site surgery.

1h

New 'Majorana photons' identified

Scientists have discovered a new super class of photons dubbed 'Majorana photons.' They could lead to enhanced information on quantum-level transition and imaging of the brain and its working.

1h

One man's idea for the 'greatest PTSD healing curriculum' in America

Roy Arce is a U.S. veteran with PTSD whose traumatic experiences with police led him to draft a proposal for how communities and police can work better together. A new kind of police response team – made up of at least one police officer and a trained community peace representative – would be part of what Arce calls "the greatest PTSD healing curriculum" in the U.S. This civilian proposal would a

1h

First Ebola case in African border metropolis heightens worries, elevates Ebola concerns

Democratic Republic of the Congo rejects deployment of a second, experimental vaccine

1h

Genetic study reveals metabolic origins of anorexia

A global study suggests that anorexia nervosa is at least partly a metabolic disorder, and not purely psychiatric as previously thought.

2h

Thirty years of unique data reveal what's really killing coral reefs

Coral bleaching is not just due to a warming planet, but also a planet that is simultaneously being enriched with reactive nitrogen from sources like improperly treated sewage, and fertilizers. Nitrogen loading from the Florida Keys and greater Everglades ecosystem caused by humans is the primary driver of coral reef degradation in Looe Key. These coral reefs were dying off long before they were i

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Dietary quality influences microbiome composition in human colonic mucosa

Studying the association between diet quality and microbiome composition in human colonic mucosa revealed that a high-quality diet is linked to more potentially beneficial bacteria, while a low-quality diet is associated with an increase in potentially harmful bacteria.

2h

New 'Majorana photons' identified

Scientists have discovered a new super class of photons dubbed 'Majorana photons.' They could lead to enhanced information on quantum-level transition and imaging of the brain and its working.

2h

Widespread global implementation of WHO's 'Treat All' HIV recommendation

A new study shows that the World Health Organization's (WHO) 2015 recommendation for immediate treatment of all people living with HIV has become the standard of care across HIV clinics in countries around the world. While most countries have adopted the WHO's "Treat All" recommendation, the extent to which these guidelines had been translated into practice at HIV clinics around the world was pr

2h

Deep learning algorithm solves Rubik's Cube faster than any human

A deep reinforcement learning algorithm can solve the Rubik's Cube puzzle in a fraction of a second. The work is a step toward making AI systems that can think, reason, plan and make decisions.

2h

Investigation into fungal infection reveals genetic vulnerability in Hmong people

A new study has identified a specific genetic vulnerability among Hmong people that renders them more susceptible to the disease-causing fungus.

2h

A Leaky Component Caused the SpaceX Crew Dragon Explosion

The company still hopes to send two astronauts to the International Space Station this year but says the goal will be “increasingly difficult” to reach.

2h

Fluorine speeds up two-dimensional materials growth

By spatially confining fluorine, scientists could activate feeding gases while disabling its harmful effects. To put this rate in perspective, this new approach reduces the time of growing a 10 cm2 graphene from 10 minutes with previous methods, now down to only 3 minutes.

2h

The Best of Amazon Prime Day, Twitter's Redesign, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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What Is the Ionosphere? (And Who Is Steve?)

A concentration of plasma in the Earth's atmosphere, called the ionosphere, interacts with solar winds, ultraviolet radiation and radio waves.

2h

Effectiveness of using natural enemies to combat pests depends on surroundings

A new study of cabbage crops in New York — a state industry worth close to $60 million in 2017, according to the USDA — reports for the first time that the effectiveness of releasing natural enemies to combat pests depends on the landscape surrounding the field.

2h

UK Releases Plan to Put Electric Car Chargers in All New Homes

Plugging In Lawmakers in the U.K. just announced new draft legislation that would require every new home to include a built-in electric car charging port. The plans, first announced last year, were released on Monday by England’s Department for Transport, according to CNBC . The proposals are currently available online for public consultation before the government votes on then. If enacted, the l

2h

Agriculture and Climate Shape Biodiversity on Mount Kilimanjaro

A six-year study across the Tanzanian mountain's slopes hints at how land-use practices will interact with a changing climate to influence ecosystems around the world.

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T Cell Proliferation Linked to CAR T Responses

Comparing the cells of cancer patients who did and did not respond to the immunotherapy could reveal biomarkers to predict who should receive it in the first place.

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Air Force “Stands Ready” to Defend Area 51 From Facebook Event

An Unlikely Meeting A tongue-in-cheek Facebook event called “Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us” is planning to amass a volunteer army to storm the highly secretive Air Force base in the Nevada desert. But there’s bad news: the Air Force is willing to stand its ground if it were to actually ever come to, you know, a bunch of rowdy teens ignoring their curfew and trying to infiltrate a milit

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Twitter says Trump’s tweet didn’t violate its rules against racism but won’t say why

Twitter’s new policy for holding powerful leaders to account for engaging in hate speech and harassment received its first major test this weekend when President Trump called on several Democratic …

2h

NASA releases stunning image of ISS crossing in front of the sun

The photo shows the International Space Station as it orbits the Earth, as it does every 90 minutes. The photo is remarkable because it offers a glimpse of the star at a time when there were no sunspots. In November, astronauts aboard the ISS plan to grow Española chili pepper plants . None NASA published a stunning photo showing the International Space Station cross in front of the sun. Regardin

2h

Dietary quality influences microbiome composition in human colonic mucosa

Studying the association between diet quality and microbiome composition in human colonic mucosa revealed that a high-quality diet is linked to more potentially beneficial bacteria, while a low-quality diet is associated with an increase in potentially harmful bacteria.

2h

Persistent HIV in central nervous system linked to cognitive impairment

Many people with HIV on antiretroviral therapy (ART) have viral genetic material in the cells of their cerebrospinal fluid, and these individuals are more likely to experience memory and concentration problems, according to a NIAID-funded study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The findings suggest that HIV can persist in the nervous system even when the virus is suppressed in a

2h

Ochre Engraving On Bones From China Oldest Symbolic Use

Ochre engraving on a rib fragment from China is the oldest evidence for the material's symbolic usage, say researchers behind the find (top: photograph; bottom: illustration). (Credit: Francesco d’Errico and Luc Doyon) Two pieces of animal bones with ochre engraving, found in central China, are the latest evidence that members of the human family used the material to express abstract ideas much ea

2h

Tobacco Plants Made To Produce Useful Compounds

A proof-of-concept study got transgenic tobacco plants to make a useful enzyme in their chloroplasts, not nuclei, minimizing chances for transfer to other organisms.

2h

Silica Blankets Could Make Mars Habitable

Thin layers of lightweight aerogel might be the main ingredient for making regions of the Red Planet more Earth-like — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bank of England to honor Alan Turing on £50 note

The late British mathematician and theoretical computer scientist Alan Turing will appear on Britain's 50-pound note starting in 2021. Turing is best known for helping to crack the Nazis' Enigma machine, a feat that's estimated to have cut World War II short by two years. The British government, which chemically castrated Turing in 1952 for "homosexual acts," officially apologized to Turing in 20

3h

Maternal secrets of our earliest ancestors unlocked

New research brings to light for the first time the evolution of maternal roles and parenting responsibilities in one of our oldest evolutionary ancestors. Australopithecus africanus mothers breastfed their infants for the first 12 months after birth, and continued to supplement their diets with breastmilk during periods of food shortage. Tooth chemistry analyses enable scientists to 'read' more t

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Robert Alfano team identifies new 'Majorana Photons'

Hailed as a pioneer by Photonics Media for his previous discoveries of supercontinuum and Cr tunable lasers, City College of New York Distinguished Professor of Science and Engineering Robert R. Alfano and his research team are claiming another breakthrough with a new super class of photons dubbed 'Majorana photons.' They could lead to enhanced information on quantum-level transition and imaging o

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New biomarker-guided strategy has potential for liver cancer treatment

A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center discovered a cellular pathway tied to cancer that may be beneficial in reducing side effects and extending duration of immunotherapy in some patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common form of liver cancer.

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HIV may affect the brain despite ongoing antiretroviral therapy

HIV-positive patients are living longer thanks to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but the virus can remain in some tissues, preventing a total cure. The results of a clinical study published this week in the JCI reveal that HIV can be detected in the central nervous system of patients treated with long-term cART. Its presence is associated with poorer cognitive performance, highlighting

3h

Despite long-term treatment, HIV persists in spinal fluid, linked to cognition problems

Even after nearly a decade of strict HIV treatment, cells sheltering the virus could be found in the cerebrospinal fluid of half of participants in a national clinical trial of people living with HIV. Moreover, those participants had higher likelihood of cognitive deficits than their peers without cells harboring HIV in their spinal fluid.

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Microsoft pulls Window 10 May update from some Surface Book 2 devices over GPU issues

Microsoft is putting a compatibility hold on its Windows 10 May 2019 update for some of its Surface Book 2 laptops due to an issue where the discrete Nvidia GPU can vanish from the …

3h

Revenge of the Power Grid

Infrastructure is everything you don’t think about. The roads you drive on. The rigs and refineries that turn fossil fuel into the gas that makes your car go. The electricity that powers the streetlights and lamps that guide your way. All these technologies vanish into the oblivion of normalcy. Until they break. Then everyone notices. That’s what happened Saturday night in New York City when a po

3h

Myth-busting study reveals that gamblers can't detect slot machine payout percentages

It's a common sight on casino floors: patrons jumping from slot machine to slot machine before eventually hunkering down at a game that's due for the next big payout. But can players—even the regulars who frequent a particular property—really tell the difference between the house edge on one game from that of another?

3h

Tobacco Plants Made To Produce Useful Compounds

A proof-of-concept study got transgenic tobacco plants to make a useful enzyme in their chloroplasts, not nuclei, minimizing chances for transfer to other organisms. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Insurance companies: Want to steal your competitors' customers?

Researchers from the United States published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science (Editor's note: The source of this research is INFORMS), which sheds light on just how much it may take for the companies to profitably "steal" customers from their competitors. Frequently, the managers focus on customer acquisition cost when deciding if to poach customers from the competitor. To tha

3h

NASA creates a flood proxy map of areas affected by tropical storm Barry

Even before Tropical Storm Barry made landfall in Louisiana on Saturday, July 13, it had already dropped a lot of rain on the state. Using satellite data, NASA created a map that shows areas that are likely flooded.

3h

Tobacco Plants Made To Produce Useful Compounds

A proof-of-concept study got transgenic tobacco plants to make a useful enzyme in their chloroplasts, not nuclei, minimizing chances for transfer to other organisms. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Egypt's 'Bent Pyramid' Opens for First Time in More Than 50 Years

For the first time since 1965, two pyramids built by the ancient Egyptians, including the unique "Bent Pyramid," are being opened to the public, according to the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities.

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EPA approves use of bee-killing pesticide

Just days after another federal agency suspended its periodical study of honey bee populations, the EPA greenlighted the wider use of a pesticide that environmental activists warn could further decimate the pollinators.

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EPA approves use of bee-killing pesticide

Just days after another federal agency suspended its periodical study of honey bee populations, the EPA greenlighted the wider use of a pesticide that environmental activists warn could further decimate the pollinators.

3h

Insurance companies: Want to steal your competitors' customers?

Researchers from the United States published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science (Editor's note: The source of this research is INFORMS), which sheds light on just how much it may take for the companies to profitably 'steal' customers from their competitors.

3h

NASA creates a flood proxy map of areas affected by tropical storm Barry

Even before Tropical Storm Barry made landfall in Louisiana on Saturday, July 13, 2019 it had already dropped a lot of rain on the state. Using satellite data, NASA created a map that shows areas that are likely flooded.

3h

Researchers describe new ALS biomarkers, potential new drug targets

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have described unique populations of neurons and associated cells in the spinal cords of patients who died of ALS.

3h

New study highlights peculiar reproductive strategies of tiny plankton

Flourishing in spectacular numbers in lakes and ponds around the world, tiny creatures known as Daphnia play an essential role in freshwater ecology. Daphnia, a type of planktonic crustacean, are the primary consumers of algae and are an important food source for fish and other aquatic life.

3h

First Human Drug Developed Solely by AI Is a Vaccine

Faster Finds Researchers often spend billions of dollars and countless hours developing new drugs, only for the vast majority to fail long before they reach human trials. In recent years, some of those developers have started exploring ways to use artificial intelligence to help them discover new drugs. And now, one of those AIs has managed to develop a promising new flu vaccine — all by itself .

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India Calls Off Moon Mission One Hour Before Launch

“Technical Snag” India officially called off the launch of its first mission to the Moon on Sunday a mere hour before launch. “A technical snag was observed in launch vehicle system at one hour before the launch,” the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) tweeted early Monday morning local time. “As a measure of abundant precaution, Chandrayaan 2 launch has been called off for today. Revised

3h

New study highlights peculiar reproductive strategies of tiny plankton

Flourishing in spectacular numbers in lakes and ponds around the world, tiny creatures known as Daphnia play an essential role in freshwater ecology. Daphnia, a type of planktonic crustacean, are the primary consumers of algae and are an important food source for fish and other aquatic life.

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All About That Base

A day after President Donald Trump tweeted that four women of color in Congress should go back to the countries “from which they came,” a reporter asked him today if he’s troubled at all that his comments have been called racist, and that white nationalists have found “common cause” with him “on that point.” “It doesn’t concern me,” the president replied, “because many people agree with me.” It’s

3h

Were the Vikings Smoking Pot While Exploring Newfoundland?

The discovery of cannabis pollen near a Viking settlement in Newfoundland raises the question of whether the Vikings were smoking or eating pot while exploring North America.

3h

Facebook needs 'very high standard' for Libra coin: US Treasury

Facebook will need to meet "a very high standard" before it moves ahead with its planned digital currency Libra, US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Monday.

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Want to do something about global warming? Talk about it with your family and friends

There's the old saying that you should never discuss politics or religion in polite company. Nowadays, it seems climate change has joined that list.

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Genetic Study Points to Metabolic Roots of Anorexia Nervosa

Some variants implicated in the disease are also linked to other psychiatric disorders.

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Twenty People Who Made Apollo Happen

Learn about the people whose work helped make the Apollo missions possible

3h

Thousands of palm trees are dying from a new disease

The section of Tampa's Bayshore Boulevard that winds around the Hillsborough Bay is lined on either side by one of Florida's most iconic plants, the palm tree.

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Helping transplanted stem cells stick around and do their jobs

Delivering mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) along with therapeutic stem cells has the potential to reduce host-vs-graft disease and transplant rejection, but MSCs have been plagued by high clearance from the body and immune attack. A new hydrogel-based encapsulation method developed at the Wyss Institute not only protects MSCs from immune attack and clearance, but dramatically improved the success

3h

Myth-busting study reveals that gamblers can't detect slot machine payout percentages

It's a common sight on casino floors: patrons jumping from slot machine to slot machine before eventually hunkering down at a game that's due for the next big payout. But can players — even the regulars who frequent a particular property — really tell the difference between the house edge on one game from that of another? Nope. At least not according to a series of recent studies led by Anthony

3h

Sex, lies and crustaceans: New study highlights peculiar reproductive strategies of Daphnia

ponds around the world, tiny creatures known as Daphnia play an essential role in freshwater ecology. Daphnia, a type of planktonic crustacean, are the primary consumers of algae and are an important food source for fish and other aquatic life.

3h

City College-led experts develop flood prediction model

The duration of floods can be determined by river flow, precipitation and atmospheric blocking. Now an international team of researchers led by Nasser Najibi and Naresh Devineni at The City College of New York is offering a novel physically based Bayesian network model for inference and prediction of flood duration. The model also accurately examines the timescales of flooding.

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Sexual images are just as arousing for women as they are for men

It was thought that male brains respond more to pornographic images than female brains – but a large review finds there is no significant difference

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Legendary, Persecuted Code-Breaker Alan Turing Finally Recognized for His Achievements

The code breaker hastened the end of World War II and laid the foundations for modern computer science.

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Scientists Capture First-Ever Image of Quantum Entanglement

Candid Scientists just managed to snap an image of two photons linked by quantum entanglement, marking the first time that the bizarre phenomenon has been captured with a camera. The image shows two photons that have been linked through quantum entanglement, which means that they instantly respond to changes that occur in each other, even if they’re separated by a vast physical distance, accordin

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The Snapdragon 855+ Is an Overclocked Snapdragon 855

The aptly named 855+ is a Snapdragon 855 with just a little more horsepower. The post The Snapdragon 855+ Is an Overclocked Snapdragon 855 appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Huawei says it plans to invest $3.1 billion in Italy

Chinese tech giant Huawei said Monday it plans to invest $3.1 billion (2.75 billion euros) in Italy over three years, as the firm looks to strengthen its foothold in Europe after the US labelled it a major security risk.

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Facebook needs 'very high standard' for Libra coin: US Treasury

Facebook must meet "a very high standard" before it moves ahead with its planned digital currency Libra, US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Monday.

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Trump Tells America What Kind of Nationalist He Is

When President Donald Trump declared himself a “nationalist,” he was telling the truth, but he was inadequately specific. On Sunday morning, the president told four members of Congress to “go back” to the countries “from which they came.” The remark, a racist taunt with a historic pedigree, inspired a flurry of fact-checking from mainstream journalists who were quick to note that Rashida Tlaib, A

3h

Researchers develop flood prediction model

The duration of floods can be determined by river flow, precipitation and atmospheric blocking. Now an international team of researchers led by Nasser Najibi and Naresh Devineni at The City College of New York is offering a novel physically based Bayesian network model for inference and prediction of flood duration. The model also accurately examines the timescales of flooding.

4h

Lyme isn’t the half of it: here are 8 more tick-borne illnesses to watch out for

There’s a short window between when a tick bites and when it passes on bacteria or virus. (MSU Ag Communications, Courtesy Dr. Tina Nations, CC BY-ND/) When it comes to problems caused by ticks, Lyme disease hogs a lot of the limelight. But various tick species carry and transmit a collection of other pathogens, some of which cause serious, even fatal, conditions. In fact, the number of tick-born

4h

Why urban planners should pay attention to restaurant-review sites

Apartment seekers in big cities often use the presence of restaurants to determine if a neighborhood would be a good place to live. It turns out there is a lot to this rule of thumb: MIT urban studies scholars have now found that in China, restaurant data can be used to predict key socioeconomic attributes of neighborhoods.

4h

Unlocking chemo-resistance in cancer

Associate Professor Hamsa Puthalakath's explanation of why some cancers don't respond to treatment with one of the most effective chemotherapy drugs: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has the potential to lead to: a lab test to check for 5-FU resistance, which would reduce unnecessary chemotherapy treatments; a new drug to turn off 5-FU in resistance; and he finds 5-FU resistance is linked to a the protein 'B

4h

How bacteria translate proteins from structurally blocked mRNAs — using standby

Bacterial ribosomes need a single-stranded ribosome binding site (RBS) to initiate protein synthesis, whereas stable RNA structure blocks initiation. Paradoxically, structured mRNAs can nevertheless be efficiently translated. Researchers at Uppsala University have now elucidated the anatomy of a 'standby' site and its requirements, to overcome RNA structure problems for translation.

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Women as likely to be turned on by sexual images as men – study

Neural analysis finds the brains of both sexes respond the same way to pornography The belief that men are more likely to get turned on by sexual images than women may be something of a fantasy, according to a study suggesting brains respond to such images the same way regardless of biological sex. The idea that, when it comes to sex, men are more “visual creatures” than women has often been used

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Scientists Are Terrified of SETI Research

Anti-SETI Stigma against research into extraterrestrial lifeforms could be pushing some of the sharpest minds out of the field. That’s according to scientists who spoke to Undark about how SETI research is dismissed and associated with conspiracy theories, especially after recent high-profile stories about the interstellar space rock ‘Oumuamua , thought by some to be a spacecraft, or the newly-re

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Google AI Could Challenge Big Pharma in Drug Discovery

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Intel Scales Neuromorphic Loihi to 64 Chips, 8 Million Neurons

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Ribosome standby: How bacteria translate proteins from structurally blocked mRNAs

Bacterial ribosomes need a single-stranded ribosome binding site (RBS) to initiate protein synthesis, whereas stable RNA structure blocks initiation. Paradoxically, structured mRNAs can nevertheless be efficiently translated. Researchers at Uppsala University have now elucidated the anatomy of a "standby" site and its requirements, to overcome RNA structure problems for translation.

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Ribosome standby: How bacteria translate proteins from structurally blocked mRNAs

Bacterial ribosomes need a single-stranded ribosome binding site (RBS) to initiate protein synthesis, whereas stable RNA structure blocks initiation. Paradoxically, structured mRNAs can nevertheless be efficiently translated. Researchers at Uppsala University have now elucidated the anatomy of a "standby" site and its requirements, to overcome RNA structure problems for translation.

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The best gadgets for using Amazon apps and services

Worthwhile Amazon products (Glenn Carstens-Peters via Unsplash/) More and more, our gadgets are windows to connected services to accomplish tasks like streaming video, downloading audio books, talking to Alexa, and even listening to our favorite music. Amazon’s arsenal of apps does all of that and more, but you’ll need a device to access all of it. Here’s a short list of devices to get you starte

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If Algae Clings to Snow on This Volcano, Can It Grow on Other Desolate Worlds?

Scientists were surprised to find something living on the sterile heights of this Chilean volcano.

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‘Toxic Stew’ Stirred Up by Disasters Poses Long-Term Danger, New Findings Show

Wildfires and hurricanes are pushing chemicals into the environment, with health effects that scientists are just beginning to understand.

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E.P.A. Broke Rules in Shake-Up of Science Panels, Federal Watchdog Says

The Government Accountability Office found that the administration “did not consistently ensure” that appointees to E.P.A. advisory boards met federal ethics requirements.

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Living in California Is Living on the Edge

To live in California is to make a wary peace with an existential dichotomy: breathtaking weather, astounding natural beauty, bounteous food and wine, stimulating multiculturalism and … the possibility of imminent, unpredictable disaster. Depending on where we live, Californians are just one spark, one mudslide, or, yes, one earthquake away from severe destruction—a reality that can be met with f

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Anorexia May Be Linked to Metabolism, a Genetic Analysis Suggests

A large, correlation-based study identifies eight genome regions associated with the eating disorder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NASA Organizes Huge Effort to Study Alien Life in Titan’s Ocean

Waterworld It’s been almost 15 years since NASA’s Cassini-Huygens spacecraft sent a module to the surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan — and much of what we’ve learned about the mysterious ocean world stems from that mission. But NASA is planning to change that. A NASA Astrobiology Institute-funded project, led by researchers from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, will be trying to find if life could

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Humans May Be Accidentally Geoengineering the Oceans

Iron particles released by industrial activities are falling into the seas in greater quantities than previously thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What Is Homeostasis?

Organisms employ a suite of physiological and behavioral responses to maintain homeostasis.

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These Unsung Heroes of the Apollo 11 Mission Made the First Steps on the Moon Possible

The first humans to land on the Moon, and the team that got them there, get all the glory. But before them came the unglamorous work by astronomers to find a flat landing spot.

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Anorexia May Be Linked to Metabolism, a Genetic Analysis Suggests

A large, correlation-based study identifies eight genome regions associated with the eating disorder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Amazon staff stage strikes in Germany on big sale day

Amazon employees went on strike at seven locations in Germany on Monday, demanding better wages as the US online retail giant launched its two-day global shopping discount extravaganza called Prime Day.

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NASA's aqua satellite documents the brief life of tropical depression 4E

The Eastern Pacific Ocean generated the fourth tropical cyclone of the hurricane season on July 13 and by the next day, it had already weakened into a remnant low pressure area.

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High blood pressure, cholesterol in young adults associated with later heart disease

Elevated blood pressure and cholesterol levels in young adulthood may lead to an increased risk of heart disease later in life, regardless of later in life exposure to these risk factors, according to research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Thirty years of unique data reveal what's really killing coral reefs

Coral bleaching is not just due to a warming planet, but also a planet that is simultaneously being enriched with reactive nitrogen from sources like improperly treated sewage, and fertilizers. Nitrogen loading from the Florida Keys and greater Everglades ecosystem caused by humans is the primary driver of coral reef degradation in Looe Key. These coral reefs were dying off long before they were i

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Thirty years of unique data reveal what's really killing coral reefs

Coral reefs are considered one of the most threatened ecosystems on the planet and are dying at alarming rates around the world. Scientists attribute coral bleaching and ultimately massive coral death to a number of environmental stressors, in particular, warming water temperatures due to climate change.

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Lunar eclipse marks Moon landing's 50th anniversary

Fifty years to the day since mankind launched the first mission to set foot on it, the Moon is set to treat Earthlings to a partial lunar eclipse on Tuesday.

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Anorexia May Be Linked to Metabolism, a Genetic Analysis Suggests

A large, correlation-based study identifies eight genome regions associated with the eating disorder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Anorexia May Be Linked to Metabolism, a Genetic Analysis Suggests

A large, correlation-based study identifies eight genome regions associated with the eating disorder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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One in five US Twitter users follows Trump: survey

Nineteen percent of US Twitter users follow President Donald Trump on the social platform, and a majority of those people approve of his job performance, a survey showed Monday.

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Neural Implant Sends Camera Feed Into Blind People’s Brains

Seeing Without Eyes When a person becomes blind — as opposed to being born that way — their brain’s visual cortex is typically undamaged. However, it’s also fairly useless since it’s not receiving any information from the eyes. In an extraordinary medical trial, six blind people have now had their vision partially restored thanks to Orion, a new device that feeds images from a camera directly int

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Peter Thiel: Investigate Google For “Treasonous” Ties With China

Tech Infighting Silicon Valley tech executive and venture capitalist Peter Thiel went on the offensive against Google during his speech at the National Conservatism conference this Sunday. Thiel suggested that the FBI and CIA should investigate Google over its “seemingly treasonous” ties with the Chinese government, according to Bloomberg . Amidst the call for an investigation, the theme of Thiel

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Futurism’s 2019 Prime Day Picks: Our Favorite Deals From Amazon’s Annual Summer Sale

Amazon Prime Day is Amazon’s attempt to turn a randomly selected day in the middle of the summer into a shopping day on par with Black Friday or the panicked night before Mother’s Day. And to do it they’re not just rolling out an avalanche of epic deals exclusively for subscribers to Amazon Prime, but unveiling a star-studded Prime Day Concert fronted by Taylor Swift as well. We’re more concerned

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It’s not just temperature damaging coral reefs

US study points the finger at nitrogen – and people. Nick Carne reports.

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World hunger on the rise as 820m at risk, UN report finds

Eliminating hunger by 2030 is an immense challenge, say heads of UN agencies More than 820 million people worldwide are still going hungry, according to a UN report that says reaching the target of zero hunger by 2030 is “an immense challenge”. The number of people with not enough to eat has risen for the third year in a row as the population increases, after a decade when real progress was made.

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NASA's aqua satellite documents the brief life of tropical depression 4E

The Eastern Pacific Ocean generated the fourth tropical cyclone of the hurricane season on July 13 and by the next day, it had already weakened into a remnant low pressure area.

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The best apps for festival season

Lose yourself in the music, but try not to lose your phone. (Krists Luhaers via Unsplash/) Heading out to a music festival is more like stepping into a battlefield than quietly sitting on a couch with your headphones on. But the difference between defeat and the time of your life can be made with just one tool—your phone. Equipped with the right apps, your phone can boost your festival experience

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Bound for the Moon: Apollo 11 Preparation in Photos

Building on years of work with Project Mercury and Project Gemini in the early 1960s, NASA’s Apollo program dedicated itself to putting Americans safely on the lunar surface before 1970, fulfilling a national goal set by President John F. Kennedy. The systems, materials, and techniques necessary to do this were nearly all brand new, and required extensive testing and research before they were sen

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Veronica Mars Has a Bitter New Edge

In the canon of 2000s teen TV protagonists, Kristen Bell’s plucky private eye Veronica Mars carved out a category all her own. She was “ the patron saint of teenage misfits ,” as Nolan Feeney once wrote for The Atlantic , a hero who stood up for the outsiders and who, despite her somewhat improbable side hustle, felt real. When the series began, she was at her lowest point, as a former member of

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Scientists Capture Photographic Proof of Quantum Entanglement

One of the strangest features of physics is quantum entanglement, and scientists from the University of Glasgow have just captured the first photo demonstrating the effect. The post Scientists Capture Photographic Proof of Quantum Entanglement appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Polio Cases Surge in Pakistan and Afghanistan

False rumors that children are fainting or dying have led parents to turn away vaccinators, threatening the campaign to eradicate the disease.

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Storm Area 51? It’s a Joke, but the Air Force Is Concerned

A Facebook event invited U.F.O. enthusiasts to swarm the secretive Nevada base on Sept. 20. The Air Force warned that would be dangerous.

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Defective potassium channels cause headache, not body pain

Defective potassium channels involved in pain detection can increase the chance of developing a headache and could be implicated in migraines, according to research in mice published in eNeuro.

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Reducing seizures by removing newborn neurons

Removing new neurons born after a brain injury reduces seizures in mice, according to new research in JNeurosci. This approach could potentially help prevent post-injury epilepsy.

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Twitter desktop redesign adopts some of its mobile app’s best features

Twitter is rolling out a new desktop design today that adds more customization options and a completely rearranged navigation experience. The redesign has been open to testers for …

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Facebook to testify its cryptocurrency will not go ahead without full government approval

Facebook executive David Marcus says he agrees with Federal Reserve Chair Jerome H. Powell that the Libra digital currency needs a patient and thorough review process.

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How the quest for a scalable quantum computer is helping fight cancer

Today, someone with breast cancer may undergo several rounds of chemotherapy and spend months in limbo before medical scans can show if that particular cocktail of toxic drugs is shrinking the tumor.

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Qatar Responds: Don’t Cancel the 2022 World Cup

Cancel Qatar Last week, the United States won the 2019 Women’s World Cup championship. The tournament, Franklin Foer wrote , was “an exhibition of excellence, a noble step in the struggle for gender equity.” In contrast, he argued, the 2022 Men’s World Cup, set to take place in Qatar, “will be an authoritarian regime’s vulgar vanity project, allegedly made possible by massive corruption .” The mo

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L.A.-based ice cream man Joe Nicchi charges 'influencers' double for cones

Los Angeles truck, CVT Soft Serve, charges people asking for free ice cream $8 for per cone instead of $4. The truck's founder, Joe Nicchi, highlights the message in the hashtag, #WeLoveMostOfOurCustomers. Nicchi does not appreciate "influencers" asking for free food when he has a business to run. None Food trucks are essential to Los Angeles. It's difficult to drive a few blocks without stumblin

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The Inside Story of Twitter's New Redesign

The social network launched a complete visual overhaul of its website Monday. But will a fresh design be enough to save Twitter?

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‘Sunny day’ high tide floods are on the rise along U.S. coasts

Sea level rise led to record-breaking tidal flooding in cities along the U.S. East Coast, a NOAA report found.

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Ancient Mongolian nests show that dinosaurs protected their eggs

Nature, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02174-7 The fossils provide the first clear example of group nesting activities in dinosaurs.

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How much water do snowpacks hold? A better way to answer the question

Oregon State University researchers have developed a new computer model for calculating the water content of snowpacks, providing an important tool for water resource managers and avalanche forecasters as well as scientists.

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NIST's quantum logic clock returns to top performance

The quantum logic clock—perhaps best known for showing you age faster if you stand on a stool—has climbed back to the leading performance echelons of the world's experimental atomic clocks.

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Researchers publish new study on citrus greening disease

Orange juice is a staple on many breakfast tables, but the future availability of citrus products is threatened by the global spread of huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease.

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New analysis reveals challenges for drought management in Oregon's Willamette River Basin

In Oregon's fertile Willamette River Basin, where two-thirds of the state's population lives, managing water scarcity would be more effective if conservation measures were introduced in advance and upstream from the locations where droughts are likely to cause shortages, according to a new study.

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Physicists find first possible 3-D quantum spin liquid

There's no known way to prove a three-dimensional "quantum spin liquid" exists, so Rice University physicists and their collaborators did the next best thing: They showed their single crystals of cerium zirconium pyrochlore had the right stuff to qualify as the first possible 3-D version of the long-sought state of matter.

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Researchers publish new study on citrus greening disease

Orange juice is a staple on many breakfast tables, but the future availability of citrus products is threatened by the global spread of huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease.

6h

The plan to build mega wind farms and artificial islands in North Sea

A radical plan to build artificial islands in the North Sea that act as hubs for mega wind farms has received a boost after an analysis said it was feasible

6h

Ebola Outbreak Reaches Major City in Congo, Renewing Calls for Emergency Order

The year-old outbreak has now reached Goma, a heavily populated city near the border with Rwanda. The W.H.O. will ask experts again to decide whether to issue a declaration that could increase funding to fight the disease spread.

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NASA-NOAA satellite tracking Barry through Louisiana, Arkansas

Barry, now a tropical depression, continues moving slowly north through Arkansas and rainfall and flooding remains a concern. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the south central United States yesterday, July 14 and captured a visible image of then Tropical Storm Barry.

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Paleontology: New light on cichlid evolution in Africa

A collaborative research project carried out under the auspices of the GeoBio-Center at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich has developed an integrative approach to the classification of fossil cichlids, and identified the oldest known member of the Tribe Oreochromini.

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Maternal secrets of our earliest ancestors unlocked

Extended parental care is considered one of the hallmarks of human evolution. A stunning new research result published today in Nature reveals for the first time the parenting habits of one of our earliest extinct ancestors.

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India calls off lunar mission in blow to space ambitions

Technical glitch halts planned quest to land on Moon’s unexplored south pole

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10 things a committed U.S. President and Congress could do about climate change

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Craig K. Chandler The federal government has available to it, should it choose to use them, a wide range of potential climate change management tools, going well beyond the traditional pollution control regulatory options. And, in some cases (not all), without new legislative authorization. There’s a big “if” behind that remark: It will take an e

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Anorexia stems from body as well as mind – study

The eating disorder charity Beat said the findings were groundbreaking.

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Quantum logic clock returns to top performance

The quantum logic clock — perhaps best known for showing you age faster if you stand on a stool — has climbed back to the leading performance echelons of the world's experimental atomic clocks.

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Study documents impacts of selective logging on Congo's intact forest landscapes

A new study says that the tropical forests of Western Equatorial Africa (WEA) – which include significant stands of Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) – are increasingly coming under pressure from logging, poaching, and associated disturbances.

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Study documents impacts of selective logging on Congo's intact forest landscapes

A new study says that the tropical forests of Western Equatorial Africa (WEA) – which include significant stands of Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) – are increasingly coming under pressure from logging, poaching, and associated disturbances.

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Coupled exploration of light and matter

n quasiparticles known as polaritons, states of light and matter are strongly coupled. The group of Prof. Ataç İmamoğlu has now developed a new approach to study nonlinear optical properties of polaritons in strongly correlated electronic states. In doing so, they opened up fresh perspectives for exploring both ingredients of the polariton: novel functionalities for photonic devices and fundamenta

7h

E-cigarette restrictions keep pregnant teens smoking

Minimal legal sale age laws regulating the purchase of e-cigarettes among teens may increase prenatal cigarette use among teen smokers, according to a new study. Earlier studies have shown passage of minimal legal sale age (MLSA) laws succeeded in reducing e-cigarette use among teens, but may have unintentionally increased cigarette use by teen smokers. The new research in the Journal of Health E

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New analysis reveals challenges for drought management in Oregon's Willamette River Basin

In Oregon's fertile Willamette River Basin, where two-thirds of the state's population lives, managing water scarcity would be more effective if conservation measures were introduced in advance and upstream from the locations where droughts are likely to cause shortages.

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Investigation into fungal infection reveals genetic vulnerability in Hmong

A new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers Caitlin Pepperell and Bruce Klein has identified a specific genetic vulnerability among Hmong people that renders them more susceptible to the disease-causing fungus.

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Child psychiatry telephone programs help increase mental health services for children

More than half of the children in the US with mental health problems do not receive needed treatment, often because there are too few child mental health specialists to provide the services needed. A new study finds that telephone hotlines that allow primary care doctors to immediately consult with a child psychiatrist about urgent patient problems appears to increase the number of children who re

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Physicists find first possible 3D quantum spin liquid

There's no known way to prove a three-dimensional 'quantum spin liquid' exists, so Rice University physicists and their collaborators did the next best thing: They showed their crystals of cerium zirconium pyrochlore had the right stuff to qualify as the first possible 3D version of the long-sought state of matter.

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Terraforming Mars with strange silica blanket could let plants thrive

Mars’s surface is not suitable for life because of its low temperatures and constant radiation bombardment, but just a few centimetres of aerogel could fix that

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Nasa Moon mission: Open University partners with space agency

It is hoped a new instrument will help scientists understand the sources and movement of water on the Moon.

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Blood samples from the zoo help predict diseases in humans

The zoos of Saarbrücken and Neunkirchen are home to penguins, Asian elephants and many other species. Since they come from different continents, blood samples are regularly taken from the animals to check their health. These blood samples have now been used by bioinformaticians and human geneticists at the University of Saarland to search for biomarkers that can be used to detect diseases at an ea

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Daily briefing: Alan Turing is the new face of the fifty

Nature, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02183-6 Computer scientist will grace the Bank of England’s largest denomination note, drug researchers target the microbiome and China’s plan to halt rogue CFC emissions.

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Blood samples from the zoo help predict diseases in humans

The zoos of Saarbrücken and Neunkirchen are home to penguins, Asian elephants and many other species. Since they come from different continents, blood samples are regularly taken from the animals to check their health. These blood samples have now been used by bioinformaticians and human geneticists at the University of Saarland to search for biomarkers that can be used to detect diseases at an ea

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Mathematician Eric Weinstein launches a new podcast, The Portal

Mathematician Eric Weinstein wants to put the mystery back into the world with his new podcast, The Portal . The managing director of Thiel Capital announced his new project last week on the Joe Rogan Experience. Weinstein says the recurring narrative is important during childhood, yet we often lose touch with it in adulthood. None Toru Okada is having trouble finding his missing cat, so his wife

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Featherlight Material Could Help Make Mars More Habitable

Featherlight Material Could Help Make Mars More Habitable Researchers suggest that flexible blankets or domes made of silica aerogel could protect crops on the red planet. Aerogel_topNteaser.jpg An aerogel tile used in the experiment. Image credits: Robin Wordsworth/Harvard Space Monday, July 15, 2019 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Shields made of a material so light it

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NASA Approves Plan to 3D Print Giant Spaceship Parts in Orbit

Made in Space Launching large man-made structures into orbit poses extraordinary challenges. But cutting-edge 3D-printing technology could make space manufacturing far more practical — by moving the manufacturing process into the near-zero gravity environment of outer space. NASA just awarded Made In Space a $73.3 million contract to demonstrate 3D-printing spacecraft parts while in orbit using a

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Someone Carrying a Rifle Just Flew Over Paris on a Hoverboard

Hit Parade You expect to see inflatable floats in the sky above a parade. What you don’t expect to see is a man on a Green Goblin-style flying hoverboard wielding a rifle. Thankfully, French inventor Franky Zapata was a planned addition to Sunday’s Bastille Day festivities in Paris , and he wasn’t carrying the rifle because he hoped to harm any of the world leaders in attendance. Instead, the wea

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Trump Goes All In on Racism

If you’re surprised today that Donald Trump is a racist, you haven’t been paying attention. Since he entered politics, he has proved it repeatedly. In fact, as I reported with several colleagues in The Atlantic recently , bigotry has been a part of Trump’s public persona since he’s had a public persona. Yet Trump’s racist Twitter attacks on Democratic congresswomen over the weekend still managed

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Did you solve it? Cheese cube nibbles

The solutions to today’s problems – with cheesy pics! Earlier today I set you the following four puzzles: 1. You have a cube of cheese that measures 3 x 3 x 3 inches, and you want to slice it into 27 smaller 1 x 1 x 1 inch cubes, as shown below. If you have a straight knife, what’s the minimum number of slices you need to do it? You are allowed to rearrange the pieces after each slice. Continue r

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The wrong kind of sleep could keep you dwelling on bad memories

The study methods sound like a nightmare. (DepositPhotos/) Most of us have had a night of poor sleep now and again. Often, we can power through the next sleepy day and then make up for it with an early night. But for people who have psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, or PTSD, the aftermath of a night of poor sleep can be serious. A new study published in the journal Current Biolog

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Advantages for stress urinary incontinence surgery

One of the most commonly performed surgeries to treat stress urinary incontinence in women may have better long-term results than another common surgical technique, according to a new study. The retrospective study of more than 1,800 cases at Mayo Clinic from 2002 to 2012 found that the need for additional surgery was twice as high after a transobturator sling surgery compared with a retropubic sl

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Impacts of selective logging on Congo's intact forest landscapes

A new study says that the tropical forests of Western Equatorial Africa (WEA) — which include significant stands of Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) — are increasingly coming under pressure from logging, poaching, and associated disturbances.

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Stress reduction benefits from petting dogs, cats

Just 10 minutes of interacting with cats and dogs produced a significant reduction in students' cortisol, a major stress hormone.

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A material way to make Mars habitable

New research suggest that regions of the Martian surface could be made habitable with a material — silica aerogel — that mimics Earth's atmospheric greenhouse effect. Through modeling and experiments, the researchers show that a 2- to 3-centimeter-thick shield of silica aerogel could transmit enough visible light for photosynthesis, block hazardous ultraviolet radiation, and raise temperatures u

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This Eagle-Nosed, Shovel-Chinned Dinosaur May Be the Weirdest Thing You See Today

What was the purpose of the bump in the middle of this dinosaur's face? No one nose.

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Lower than expected risk of bone density decline with Truvada PrEP

Researchers have shown that among users of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent against AIDS that includes tenofovir (Truvada), those with daily use — very high adherence — had only about a 1% average decrease in bone mineral density in the spine and a 0.5% decline in the hip.

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Biocompound from Atlantic Rainforest combats leishmaniasis and Chagas disease

Researchers find that substances synthesized from plant species endemic to the biodiversity hotspot can kill the parasites that cause these neglected diseases.

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Can videogames promote emotional intelligence in teenagers?

A new study has shown that videogames, when used as part of an emotional intelligence training program, can help teenagers evaluate, express, and manage their own emotions immediately after the training.

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UCI researchers' deep learning algorithm solves Rubik's Cube faster than any human

A deep reinforcement learning algorithm developed by computer scientists at the University of California, Irvine can solve the Rubik's Cube puzzle in a fraction of a second. The work is a step toward making AI systems that can think, reason, plan and make decisions.

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Why Doctors Are Drowning in Medical School Debt

A resident physician investigates the causes of skyrocketing tuition — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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*Storyboards*, Marvel's *Parts Unknown*, Is Coming to Disney+

The series, hosted by Marvel's chief creative officer Joe Quesada, will ask everyone from Hugh Jackman to Johnny Weir how they tell stories.

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'Spider-Man: Far From Home' Continues to Rule the Box Office

It's now in the top spot for the second straight week.

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Why Doctors Are Drowning in Medical School Debt

A resident physician investigates the causes of skyrocketing tuition — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Sun Will Be With You Shortly

Exactly when you see a sunrise or sunset depends on local factors that scientists can’t always include in their calculations.

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The Moment That Made Neil Armstrong’s Heart Rate Spike

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reflecting on the Apollo 11 mission, 50 years later. Two men were about to land on the moon, and Mission Control in Houston was thrumming with tension. In the science-operations room, Gerald Schaber, a geologist, needed something to do while he waited for the lunar module to touch down. Schaber had come from northern Arizona, where engineers had war

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Invasive parrots have varying impacts on European biodiversity, citizens and economy

Non-native parrots can cause substantial agricultural damage and threaten native biodiversity, although impacts vary strongly depending on where these parrots have been introduced. Brought to Europe as pets, escaped or released parrots have established numerous wild populations across Europe. Tens of thousands of ring-necked and monk parakeets make up the bulk of Europe's parrots, but several more

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Amazon staff stage strikes in Germany on big sale day

Amazon employees went on strike at seven locations in Germany on Monday, demanding better wages as the US online retail giant launched its two-day global shopping discount extravaganza called …

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Invasive parrots have varying impacts on European biodiversity, citizens and economy

Non-native parrots can cause substantial agricultural damage and threaten native biodiversity, although impacts vary strongly depending on where these parrots have been introduced. Brought to Europe as pets, escaped or released parrots have established numerous wild populations across Europe. Tens of thousands of ring-necked and monk parakeets make up the bulk of Europe's parrots, but several more

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Smallholder agriculture is threatening the western Amazon

A verdant, nearly roadless place, the Western Amazon in South America may be the most biologically diverse place in the world. There, many people live in near isolation, with goods coming in either by river or air. Turning to crops for profit or sustenance, farmers operate small family plots to make a living.

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Smallholder agriculture is threatening the western Amazon

A verdant, nearly roadless place, the Western Amazon in South America may be the most biologically diverse place in the world. There, many people live in near isolation, with goods coming in either by river or air. Turning to crops for profit or sustenance, farmers operate small family plots to make a living.

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Researchers publish new study on citrus greening disease

A new study published by researchers at Virginia Tech with a team of international researchers in Journal of Applied Ecology investigates the thermal suitability for transmission of citrus greening with implications for surveillance and prevention.

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Cholesterol-lowering drugs under-prescribed for prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

Statins, the most commonly used effective lipid-lowering drugs, are significantly underutilized to treat lipid abnormalities in patients with and at risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), according to a retrospective study of more than 280,000 patients in Alberta, Canada. Investigators report in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology that only two-thirds of these patients were receiv

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Can magnetic stem cells improve cartilage repair?

Cells equipped with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) can be directed to a specific location by an external magnetic field, which is beneficial for tissue repair. Researchers have now taken the important step of evaluating the safety and efficacy of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for use in repairing cartilage defects.

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NIST's quantum logic clock returns to top performance

The quantum logic clock — perhaps best known for showing you age faster if you stand on a stool — has climbed back to the leading performance echelons of the world's experimental atomic clocks.

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Study shows advantages for stress urinary incontinence surgery

One of the most commonly performed surgeries to treat stress urinary incontinence in women may have better long-term results than another common surgical technique, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic researchers.The retrospective study of more than 1,800 cases at Mayo Clinic from 2002 to 2012 found that the need for additional surgery was twice as high after a transobturator sling surgery com

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NASA-NOAA satellite tracking Barry through Louisiana, Arkansas

Barry, now a tropical depression, continues moving slowly north through Arkansas and rainfall and flooding remains a concern. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the south central United States yesterday, July 14 and captured a visible image of then Tropical Storm Barry.

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Study demonstrates stress reduction benefits from petting dogs, cats

Just 10 minutes of interacting with cats and dogs produced a significant reduction in students' cortisol, a major stress hormone.

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Study shows widespread global implementation of WHO's 'Treat All' HIV recommendation

A new study published in the Journal of the International AIDS Society shows that the World Health Organization's (WHO) 2015 recommendation for immediate treatment of all people living with HIV has become the standard of care across HIV clinics in countries around the world. While most countries have adopted the WHO's "Treat All" recommendation, the extent to which these guidelines had been transl

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Are crickets and other creepy crawlies the new superfood?

Researchers now show that crickets and other insects pack a very high antioxidant content, which could make them top contenders as super-nutritious foods.

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Biden Stops Playing It Safe

If Joe Biden revives his flagging presidential campaign, journalists may record that the revival began this weekend in New Hampshire. In a series of speeches , Biden finally did what he needed to do weeks ago: He attacked his rivals on health care. He defended the Affordable Care Act, and argued that Democrats should build on it—presumably with some form of public option—rather than embrace a Med

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'Racist police officer' stereotype may become a self-fulfilling prophecy

Belief in the "racist police officer" stereotype may become a self-fulfilling prophecy for law enforcement officers and lead to increased support for forceful or threatening policing tactics, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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8BitDo's latest controller has fully customizable buttons

The latest controller from the minds of 8BitDo is fully customizable, allowing you to adjust button configurations and sensitivity levels for the joysticks, triggers and vibrations. …

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The genes that make squid eyes also make your legs

Finding helps explain how complex vision arose in these invertebrates

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Elephants help forests store more carbon by destroying smaller plants

By trampling and grazing on small plants, elephants in central African rainforests favour the growth of large trees that store more carbon

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There aren’t enough space explosions to explain strange radio bursts

Weird flashes of radio waves from space could in theory be coming from huge explosions, but now we know the radio bursts occur too often for that idea to work

8h

Anorexia is a metabolic disorder as well as a psychiatric one

An analysis of nearly 17,000 people with anorexia has found that those with the condition may be genetically prone to weight loss and high physical activity

8h

You're less empathetic when you've been drinking heavily

A drinking experiment found that people seem to become less empathetic when they have a high blood-alcohol level, but that this doesn't affect moral judgements

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Deep hydrous mantle reservoir provides evidence for crustal recycling before 3.3 billion years ago

Nature, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1399-5 Hydrogen isotopes and compositions of melt inclusions in olivine in komatiites indicate a hydrous source produced by recycling of seawater-altered crust into the deep mantle over 3.3 billion years ago.

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Elemental signatures of Australopithecus africanus teeth reveal seasonal dietary stress

Nature, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1370-5 Trace-element analysis of teeth from the hominin Australopithecus africanus, dated to 2.6–2.1 million years ago, sheds light on the weaning sequence of this species and its responses to seasonal food scarcity

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This breastfeeding research could lead to a new theory of human evolution

How scientists "read" two-million-year-old teeth and uncovered the hidden breastfeeding patterns of our ancient ancestors.

8h

New study on the immune system of plants: It works differently than expected

What happens at the molecular level when plants defend against invading pathogens? Previously it was assumed that the processes were roughly the same in all plants. However, this is not true, as a team of biologists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has demonstrated in a new study published in the scientific journal The Plant Cell. The researchers investigated defence processes

8h

Off the hook: Manta ray asks divers for helping hand

A giant manta ray with several fishing hooks caught below its eye appeared to ask two nearby divers for help in removing them, and then waited patiently for them to do so.

8h

The real midlife crisis confronting many Americans

The way my mom imagined it, midlife was going to be great: counting down days until retirement, spending winters in Florida and checking off destinations on her bucket list. But it hasn't turned out that way.

8h

Improving heat recycling with the thermodiffusion effect

Absorption heat transformers can effectively reuse the waste heat generated in various industries. In these devices, specialised liquids form thin films as they flow downward due to gravity. These liquid films can absorb vapour, and the heat is then extracted by a coolant so that it can be used in future processes. So far, however, there has been little research into how the performance of these f

8h

Study documents impacts of selective logging on Congo's intact forest landscapes

A new study says that the tropical forests of Western Equatorial Africa (WEA) — which include significant stands of Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) — are increasingly coming under pressure from logging, poaching, and associated disturbances.

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Combined breast and gynecologic surgery: Study says not so fast

University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in Breast Journal argues against combined approach: Patients undergoing coordinated breast and gynecologic procedures had a significantly longer length of hospital stay, and higher complication, readmission, and reoperation rates compared with patients who underwent single site surgery.

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Discovered a new therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

A study led by researchers of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and published in the journal Nature Neuroscience has identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The results of the work reveal that, in human samples from Alzheimer's patients, the levels of the protein SFRP1 are abnormally elevated and continue to increase with the progress of the disease

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Maternal secrets of our earliest ancestors unlocked

New research brings to light for the first time the evolution of maternal roles and parenting responsibilities in one of our oldest evolutionary ancestors. Australopithecus africanus mothers breastfed their infants for the first 12 months after birth, and continued to supplement their diets with breastmilk during periods of food shortage. Tooth chemistry analyses enable scientists to 'read' more t

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Fluorine speeds up two-dimensional materials growth

By spatially confining fluorine, scientists could activate feeding gases while disabling its harmful effects. To put this rate in perspective, this new approach reduces the time of growing a 10 cm2 graphene from 10 minutes with previous methods, now down to only 3 minutes.

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New UCI-led study uncovers weakness in C. diff toxin

A new study, led by researchers from the University of California, Irvine (UCI), uncovers the long-sought-after, three-dimensional structure of a toxin primarily responsible for devastating Clostridium difficile infection (CDI).

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Stripping down bacterial armor: A new way to fight anthrax

A new study led by Dr. Antonella Fioravanti in the lab of Prof. Han Remaut (VIB-VUB Center for Structural Biology) has shown that removing the armor of the bacterium that causes anthrax slows its growth and negatively affects its ability to cause disease. This work will be published in the prestigious journal Nature Microbiology can lead the way to new, effective ways of fighting anthrax and vario

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Cannabis treatment counters addiction: First study of its kind

An Australian study has demonstrated that cannabis-based medication helps tackle dependency on cannabis, one of the most widely used drugs globally. A paper about the University of Sydney and NSW Health clinical trial provides the first strong evidence that cannabis replacement therapy could reduce the rate of relapse. The principles are similar to nicotine replacement in that the patient is provi

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A material way to make Mars habitable

New research suggest that regions of the Martian surface could be made habitable with a material — silica aerogel — that mimics Earth's atmospheric greenhouse effect. Through modeling and experiments, the researchers show that a 2 to 3-centimeter-thick shield of silica aerogel could transmit enough visible light for photosynthesis, block hazardous ultraviolet radiation, and raise temperatures un

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Association of blood extracellular vesicle biomarkers with Alzheimer's disease

Blood samples taken over several years from cognitively normal study participants who developed Alzheimer disease were analyzed along with samples from individuals who did not develop the disease to evaluate whether there is an association between neuronal-enriched extracellular vesicle biomarkers (particles shed by all cells and found in blood) and Alzheimer's disease.

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Study of smokers, former smokers in France examines electronic cigarette use association with smoking reduction, relapse

An observational study based on a group of smokers and former smokers in France looked at whether electronic cigarette use was associated with changes in the number of cigarettes smoked, with smoking cessation rates among smokers, and with smoking relapse among former smokers.

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Is obesity associated with risk of pediatric MS?

A single-center study of 453 children in Germany with multiple sclerosis (MS) investigated the association of obesity with pediatric MS risk and with the response of first-line therapy in children with MS.

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Children in foster care removed from homes for parental drug use

A research letter analyzed federally mandated data on children in foster care in the United States to examine how many children entered foster care because of parental drug use during the 2000 to 2017 fiscal years. There were nearly 5 million foster care entries during this period, of which nearly 1.2 million (about 23%) were home removals because of parental drug use.

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UMD releases comprehensive review of the future of CRISPR technology in crops

CRISPR is thought of as 'molecular scissors' used to cut and edit DNA, but Yiping Qi, assistant professor at the University of Maryland, is looking far beyond these applications in his new publication in Nature Plants. In this comprehensive review, Qi explores the current state of CRISPR in crops, and how scientists can enhance traditional breeding techniques in nontraditional ways to a growing po

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Curbing indoor air pollution in India

Clean cooking energy transitions are extremely challenging to achieve, but they offer enormous potential health, environmental, and societal benefits. A study by researchers from IIASA, the University of British Columbia, and the Stockholm Environment Institute provides new insights about an Indian program that aims to solve one of the most difficult developmental challenges of the 21st century —

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Researchers find anorexia genetic variants, redefine it as metabolic and psychiatric

The large-scale genome-wide association study, led by UNC's Cynthia M. Bulik, Ph.D., FAED, founding director of the UNC Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders, and Gerome Breen, Ph.D., of King's College London suggests that the origins of the eating disorder include a combination of metabolic and psychiatric components.

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HIV: Holes in the immune system left unrepaired despite drug therapy

If they don't receive antiretroviral therapy (ART), most HIV patients see a progressive weakening of their immune system. But a very small percentage of patients — 0.3% — spontaneously control the virus themselves, without ART. Could an explanation lay partly in the sets of genes expressed by scarce white blood cells that recognize HIV? Yes, according to a study published in Nature Immunology an

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Increases in social media use and television viewing associated with increases in teen depression

A new study published in JAMA Pediatrics has revealed that social media use and television viewing are linked to increases in adolescent depressive symptoms.

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How expectation influences perception

MIT neuroscientists have identified distinctive patterns of neural activity that encode prior beliefs and help the brain make sense of uncertain signals coming from the outside world. For the first time, they showed that prior beliefs exert their effect on behavior by warping the representation of sensory events in the brain.

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Extinct human species likely breast fed for a year after birth, NIH-funded study suggests

Infants of the extinct human species Australopithecus africanus likely breast fed for up to a year after birth, similar to modern humans but of shorter duration than modern day great apes, according to an analysis of fossil teeth funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The findings provide insight into how breast feeding evolved among humans and may inform strategies to improve modern

8h

Genetic study reveals metabolic origins of anorexia

A global study, led by researchers at King's College London and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, suggests that anorexia nervosa is at least partly a metabolic disorder, and not purely psychiatric as previously thought.

8h

Does rearranging chromosomes affect their function?

Molecular biologists long thought that domains in the genome's 3D organization control how genes are expressed. After studying highly rearranged chromosomes in fruit flies, EMBL researchers now reveal that while this is the case for some genes, their results challenge the generality of this for many others. Their results, published in Nature Genetics on July 15, 2019, reveal an uncoupling between

8h

Scientists create predictive model for hydrogen-nanovoid interaction in metals

Chinese scientists from Hefei Institute of Physical Science and Canadian scientists have produced a theoretical model via computer simulation to predict properties of hydrogen nanobubbles in metal.

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Early human species' teeth provide insight into evolution of breastfeeding

Mount Sinai researchers working as part of an international team have discovered previously unknown breastfeeding patterns of an extinct early human species by studying their 2-million-year-old teeth, providing insights into the evolution of human breastfeeding practices, according to a study published in Nature in July.

8h

World's island conifers threatened with extinction from climate change

By estimating climate conditions in which conifer species could thrive if they needed to, a new study identifies which species are at extinction risk due to climate change.

8h

Coupled exploration of light and matter

In quasiparticles known as polaritons, states of light and matter are strongly coupled. Scientists have now developed a new approach to study nonlinear optical properties of polaritons in strongly correlated electronic states. In doing so, they opened up fresh perspectives for exploring both ingredients of the polariton: novel functionalities for photonic devices and fundamental insight into exoti

8h

Lion Bones Are Profitable for Breeders, and Poachers

An American ban on trophies may have contributed to a growing trade in lion skeletons.

8h

New study on the immune system of plants: It works differently than expected

What happens at the molecular level when plants defend against invading pathogens? Previously it was assumed that the processes were roughly the same in all plants. However, this is not true, as a team of biologists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has demonstrated in a new study published in the scientific journal The Plant Cell. The researchers investigated defence processes

8h

Off the hook: Manta ray asks divers for helping hand

A giant manta ray with several fishing hooks caught below its eye appeared to ask two nearby divers for help in removing them, and then waited patiently for them to do so.

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Government must do more to plan for rise of automation, unions warn

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Scientists using AI to design metamaterials for invisibility cloak

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The habitability of Titan and its ocean

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Juul CEO: “I’m Sorry” for Teen Vaping Epidemic

Oops Juul Labs CEO Kevin Burns just apologized to the parents of teens who have become addicted to nicotine through his company’s e-cigarettes. “First of all, I’d tell them that I’m sorry that their child’s using the product,” Burns told CNBC during an interview for an upcoming documentary on the rise of vaping in the U.S. “It’s not intended for them. I hope there was nothing that we did that mad

8h

Study bolsters case that climate change is driving many California wildfires

Against a backdrop of long-term rises in temperature in recent decades, California has seen ever higher spikes in seasonal wildfires, and, in the last two years, a string of disastrous, record-setting blazes. This has led scientists, politicians and media to ponder: what role might warming climate be playing here? A new study combs through the many factors that can promote wildfire, and concludes

8h

Next generation metagenomics: Exploring the opportunities and challenges

A new expert review highlights the opportunities and methodological challenges at this critical juncture in the growth of the field of metagenomics. With important implications and applications in clinical medicine, public health, biology, and ecology, metagenomics is benefitting from advances in high-throughput techniques and technology, while facing the challenges of big data storage and analysi

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Next generation metagenomics: Exploring the opportunities and challenges

A new expert review highlights the opportunities and methodological challenges at this critical juncture in the growth of the field of metagenomics. With important implications and applications in clinical medicine, public health, biology, and ecology, metagenomics is benefitting from advances in high-throughput techniques and technology, while facing the challenges of big data storage and analysi

8h

Scientists work out way to make Mars surface fit for farming

Aerogel sheet mimics Earth’s greenhouse effect and could help to create fertile oases For future astronauts bound for Mars it will surely rank as a positive: when they sit down to dinner on the barren red planet, they should at least have plenty of greens. The harsh environment on Mars has always made growing food a daunting prospect, but scientists believe they have cracked the problem with shee

8h

Anorexia not just a psychiatric problem, scientists find

Discovery of metabolic causes opens door to new treatments for dangerous eating disorder Scientists have found that the devastating eating disorder anorexia nervosa is not purely a psychiatric condition but is also driven by problems with metabolism. The finding may help to explain doctors’ poor record in treating the illness and pave the way for radical new approaches to predict and treat those

8h

Hungry elephants fight climate change one mouthful at a time

The megamunchers change forest ecosystems to store more carbon over hundreds of years

8h

Telescope foes tie together, block road to Hawaii summit

Hundreds of demonstrators are gathered at the base of Hawaii's tallest mountain to protest the construction of a giant telescope on land that some Native Hawaiians consider sacred.

8h

Mapping the moon for Apollo

At an International Astronomical Union meeting in 1955, noted astronomer Gerard Kuiper asked for suggestions and collaborators on a project to make a map of the moon. At the time, the best lunar atlases had hand-drawn images, and Kuiper wanted to use state-of-the-art telescopes to make a photographic atlas.

8h

A legal framework for vector-borne diseases and land use

Vector-borne diseases — caused by parasites, viruses, and bacteria transmitted by insects and animals — account for more than 17% of all infectious diseases on Earth. While many emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are preventable through informed protective measures, the way that humans alter our landscape — such as for farming and urban growth — is making this task more difficult.

8h

More farmers, more problems: How smallholder agriculture is threatening the western Amazon

Small-scale farmers are posing serious threats to biodiversity in northeastern Peru — and the problem will likely only get worse.

8h

Turbo chip for drug development

In spite of increasing demand, the number of newly developed drugs decreased continuously in the past decades. The search for new active substances, their production, characterization, and screening for biological effectiveness are very complex and costly. One of the reasons is that all three steps have been carried out separately so far. Scientists have now succeeded in combining these processes

8h

Improving heat recycling with thermodiffusion effect

Researchers find that the absorption of water vapor within industrial heat recycling devices is directly tied to a physical process known as the thermodiffusion effect.

8h

Game-theory research better allocates military resources, fight cancer

A game-theory research using artificial intelligence may help treat cancer and other diseases, improve cybersecurity, deploy Soldiers and assets more efficiently and even win a poker game.

8h

'Artificial intelligence' fit to monitor volcanoes

More than half of the world's active volcanoes are not monitored instrumentally. Hence, even eruptions that could have rung an alarm can occur without people at risk having a clue of the upcoming disaster. A research project has led to a volcano monitoring platform which analyzes satellite images using – amongst other methods – 'artificial intelligence' (AI) for the monitoring of volcanoes.

8h

Alternative material for superconducting radio-frequency cavity

In modern synchrotron sources and free-electron lasers, superconducting radio-frequency cavity resonators are able to supply electron bunches with extremely high energy. These resonators are currently constructed of pure niobium. Now an international collaboration has investigated the potential advantages a niobium-tin coating might offer in comparison to pure niobium.

8h

Science of microdosing psychedelics remains patchy and anecdotal, say researchers

The practice of taking small, regular doses of psychedelic drugs to enhance mood, creativity, or productivity lacks robust scientific evidence, say scientists.

8h

New study on the immune system of plants: It works differently than expected

What happens at the molecular level when plants defend against invading pathogens? Previously it was assumed that the processes were roughly the same in all plants. This is not true, as a team of biologists shows in a new study. The researchers investigated defense processes in the wild tobacco plant N. benthamiana and found that the processes work quite differently than previously thought.

8h

Coupled exploration of light and matter

In quasiparticles known as polaritons, states of light and matter are strongly coupled. Scientists have now developed a new approach to study nonlinear optical properties of polaritons in strongly correlated electronic states. In doing so, they opened up fresh perspectives for exploring both ingredients of the polariton: novel functionalities for photonic devices and fundamental insight into exoti

8h

Blood samples from the zoo help predict diseases in humans

Penguins, Asian elephants and many other animal species live in the zoos of Saarbrücken and Neunkirchen. As they come from different continents, blood is regularly taken from the animals to check their health. These blood samples have now been used by bioinformaticians and human geneticists to search for biomarkers with which diseases can be detected at an early stage.

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Genetic insight into anorexia nervosa

Study tests links to other disorders. Paul Biegler reports.

8h

Mars could be habitable beneath a thin layer of gel

Harvard researchers suggest a cheap and easy alternative to terraforming. Barry Keily reports.

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Headed to Mars? Pack Some Aerogel—You Know, for Terraforming

Armed with the right materials, Martian colonizers could unlock frozen carbon dioxide beneath its surface, making the Red Planet warm enough to support life.

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We might grow plants on Mars by warming the ice caps with “frozen smoke”

Using silica aerogel to trap heat and create liquid water sounds far-fetched, but it could one day be used to help us grow food on the planet’s surface.

8h

World's island conifers threatened with extinction from climate change

A new study finds that climate change will put many conifer species native to small islands around the world on the road to extinction by 2070, even after allowing for some realistic wiggle room in the range of climate conditions those species might be able to withstand.

8h

Nature plants review explores the current state and future of CRISPR technology in crops

CRISPR is often thought of as "molecular scissors" used for precision breeding to cut DNA so that a certain trait can be removed, replaced, or edited, but Yiping Qi, assistant professor in Plant Science & Landscape Architecture at the University of Maryland, is looking far beyond these traditional applications in his latest publication in Nature Plants. In this comprehensive review, Qi and coautho

8h

Does rearranging chromosomes affect their function?

Molecular biologists have long thought that domains in the genome's 3-D organization control how genes are expressed. After studying highly rearranged chromosomes in fruit flies, EMBL researchers now reveal that while this is the case for some genes, their results challenge the generality of this for many others. Their results, published in Nature Genetics on 15 July, reveal an uncoupling between

8h

The fascinating places scientists aren't exploring | Ella Al-Shamahi

We're not doing frontline exploratory science in a huge portion of the world — the places governments deem too hostile or disputed. What might we be missing because we're not looking? In this fearless, unexpectedly funny talk, paleoanthropologist Ella Al-Shamahi takes us on an expedition to the Yemeni island of Socotra — one of the most biodiverse places on earth — and makes the case for scient

8h

Ancient ancestors cared about their kids

Mothers breastfed toddlers when food was scarce. Dyani Lewis reports.

8h

A legal framework for vector-borne diseases and land use

Vector-borne diseases — caused by parasites, viruses, and bacteria transmitted by insects and animals — account for more than 17% of all infectious diseases on Earth. While many emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are preventable through informed protective measures, the way that humans alter our landscape — such as for farming and urban growth — is making this task more difficult.

8h

Silica aerogel could make Mars habitable

People have long dreamed of re-shaping the Martian climate to make it livable for humans. Carl Sagan was the first outside of the realm of science fiction to propose terraforming. In a 1971 paper, Sagan suggested that vaporizing the northern polar ice caps would "yield ~10 s g cm-2 of atmosphere over the planet, higher global temperatures through the greenhouse effect, and a greatly increased like

8h

Extinct human species likely breast fed for a year after birth, study suggests

Infants of the extinct human species Australopithecus africanus likely breast fed for up to a year after birth, similar to modern humans but of shorter duration than modern day great apes, according to an analysis of fossil teeth funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The findings provide insight into how breast feeding evolved among humans and may inform strategies to improve modern

8h

World's island conifers threatened with extinction from climate change

A new study finds that climate change will put many conifer species native to small islands around the world on the road to extinction by 2070, even after allowing for some realistic wiggle room in the range of climate conditions those species might be able to withstand.

8h

Nature plants review explores the current state and future of CRISPR technology in crops

CRISPR is often thought of as "molecular scissors" used for precision breeding to cut DNA so that a certain trait can be removed, replaced, or edited, but Yiping Qi, assistant professor in Plant Science & Landscape Architecture at the University of Maryland, is looking far beyond these traditional applications in his latest publication in Nature Plants. In this comprehensive review, Qi and coautho

8h

Does rearranging chromosomes affect their function?

Molecular biologists have long thought that domains in the genome's 3-D organization control how genes are expressed. After studying highly rearranged chromosomes in fruit flies, EMBL researchers now reveal that while this is the case for some genes, their results challenge the generality of this for many others. Their results, published in Nature Genetics on 15 July, reveal an uncoupling between

8h

India assesses technical snag that aborted moon mission

India's space organization is examining the technical snag that led to the aborting of the launch Monday of a spacecraft intended to land on the far side of the moon, an official said.

8h

Scientists create predictive model for hydrogen-nanovoid interaction in metals

A five-year collaborative study by Chinese and Canadian scientists has produced a theoretical model via computer simulation to predict properties of hydrogen nanobubbles in metal.

8h

Image: Wildfire sparks in sugarcane fields on the island of Maui

A massive wildfire on the island of Maui, Hawaii began mid-morning on Thursday, July 11, 2019. The cause of the fire remains unknown. Over 10,000 acres of old sugar cane fields and dry vegetation burned quickly and the fire grew so swiftly that thousands of residents near the fire were evacuated. Winds blowing at 20 mph caused the fire to spread and fanned flames crossed into fallow fields.

8h

Invasive parrots have varying impacts on European biodiversity, citizens and economy

Non-native parrots can cause substantial agricultural damage and threaten native biodiversity. While substantial evidence of negative impact in Europe is currently lacking, there are numerous already established wild populations. A pan-European team of researchers, conservationists, wildlife managers and policy-makers worked together as part of an EU COST Action: ParrotNet, to conclude that measur

8h

Loose RNA molecules rejuvenate skin

Want to smooth out your wrinkles, erase scars and sunspots, and look years younger? Millions of Americans a year turn to lasers and prescription drugs to rejuvenate their skin, but exactly how that rejuvenation works has never been fully explained. Now, researchers have discovered that laser treatments and the drug retinoic acid share a common molecular pathway.

8h

An inflammatory diet correlates with colorectal cancer risk

This new study correlates a proinflamatory diet with the risk of developing colorectal cancer among the Spanish population.

8h

2D perovskite materials found to have unique, conductive edge states

A new class of 2D perovskite materials with edges that are conductive like metals and cores that are insulating was found by researchers who said these unique properties have applications in solar cells and nanoelectronics.

8h

Green light for a new generation of dynamic materials

Researchers have pioneered a novel, dynamic, reprogrammable material — by using green LED light and, remarkably, darkness as the switches to change the material's polymer structure, and using only two inexpensive chemical compounds.

8h

Algae as a resource: Chemical tricks from the sea

The chemical process by which bacteria break down algae into an energy source for the marine food chain, has been unknown – until now. For the first time, is has been possible to clarify the biochemical function of the multitude of enzymes involved in this process. Now it becomes possible to use algae as a resource: they can be used for fermentations, to produce valuable types of sugar or, in the

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How 5G got tied up in a trade war between Trump and China – CNET

President Trump’s ban of Huawei and the ongoing trade war with China could have big implications for the future of 5G.

8h

Stonehenge may have been built using lard

Pig fat could have been used to grease the sledges used to transport the massive stones of Stonehenge into position, new analysis by archaeologists at Newcastle University has suggested.

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Ancient Roman port history unveiled

Researchers successfully reconstructed anthropic influences on sedimentation, including dredging and canal gates use, in the ancient harbour of Portus—a complex of harbour basins and canals that formed the hub of commerce in the capital of the Roman Empire.

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NASA examines Tropical Storm Barry post-landfall

Tropical Storm Barry made landfall mid-day on July 13, but infrared satellite imagery from NASA early on July 14 continued to show the heaviest rainmaking storms were still off-shore. NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed cloud top temperatures in the storm which gave an indication of the storm's strength.

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Image: Hubble peers at galactic cherry blossoms

The galaxy NGC 1156 resembles a delicate cherry blossom tree flowering in springtime in this Hubble image. The many bright "blooms" within the galaxy are in fact stellar nurseries—regions where new stars are springing to life. Energetic light emitted by newborn stars in these regions streams outwards and encounters nearby pockets of hydrogen gas, causing the gas to glow with a characteristic pink

8h

Green light for a new generation of dynamic materials

Researchers have pioneered a novel, dynamic, reprogrammable material — by using green LED light and, remarkably, darkness as the switches to change the material's polymer structure, and using only two inexpensive chemical compounds.

8h

New study provides clarity on the recognition and signs of canine chiari associated pain

A recent study from Fitzpatrick Referrals and the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Surrey, has found that canine chiari-like malformation can cause significant pain and impact on activity, temperament and sleep in dogs.

8h

Flooding: Britain's coastal towns and villages face a design challenge to cope with climate emergency

As an island nation, Britain has vulnerable communities that must be prepared for the impact of the climate emergency. And while much has been said about homes at risk from the sea in coastal regions, or those inland subject to river flooding, the UK Committee on Climate Change's new progress report for 2019 has laid bare the challenge facing them.

8h

Improving heat recycling with the thermodiffusion effect

In a study recently published in EPJ E, researchers find that the absorption of water vapour within industrial heat recycling devices is directly tied to a physical process known as the thermodiffusion effect.

8h

Turbo chip for drug development

In spite of increasing demand, the number of newly developed drugs decreased continuously in the past decades. The search for new active substances, their production, characterization, and screening for biological effectiveness are very complex and costly. One of the reasons is that all three steps have been carried out separately so far. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have

8h

More farmers, more problems: How smallholder agriculture is threatening the western Amazon

Small-scale farmers are posing serious threats to biodiversity in northeastern Peru — and the problem will likely only get worse.

8h

Invasive parrots have varying impacts on European biodiversity, citizens and economy

Non-native parrots can cause substantial agricultural damage and threaten native biodiversity. While substantial evidence of negative impact in Europe is currently lacking, there are numerous already established wild populations. A pan-European team of researchers, conservationists, wildlife managers and policy-makers worked together as part of an EU COST Action: ParrotNet, to conclude that measur

8h

Loose RNA molecules rejuvenate skin, researchers discover

Want to smooth out your wrinkles, erase scars and sunspots, and look years younger? Millions of Americans a year turn to lasers and prescription drugs to rejuvenate their skin, but exactly how that rejuvenation works has never been fully explained. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that laser treatments and the drug retinoic acid share a common molecular pathway.

8h

New study provides clarity on the recognition and signs of canine chiari associated pain

A recent study from Fitzpatrick Referrals and the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Surrey, has found that canine chiari-like malformation can cause significant pain and impact on activity, temperament and sleep in dogs.

8h

Alternative material for superconducting radio-frequency cavity

In modern synchrotron sources and free-electron lasers, superconducting radio-frequency cavity resonators are able to supply electron bunches with extremely high energy. These resonators are currently constructed of pure niobium. Now an international collaboration has investigated the potential advantages a niobium-tin coating might offer in comparison to pure niobium.

8h

Compassion makes all the difference for HIV treatment

People with HIV who think their primary care doctor lacks sympathy or is unwilling to include them in making decisions are at greater risk of quitting treatment—or not starting it at all—a new study shows. The findings show that the complexity of the illness, treatment regimen, and overall healthcare system frequently overwhelm patients and fear of stigma often prevents them from beginning or con

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Anti-vaxxers distract from a more serious threat

Many parents aren’t afraid of social media trolls but simply can’t access or afford vaccines

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India’s moon mission Chandrayaan 2 delayed just before launch

Just before the intended launch of India’s Chandrayaan 2 mission to the moon’s south pole, a “technical snag” with the rocket caused it to be called off for now

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Using building materials to monitor for high enriched uranium

A new article details how small samples of ubiquitous building materials, such as tile or brick, can be used to test whether a facility has ever stored high enriched uranium, which can be used to create nuclear weapons. The technique could serve as a valuable forensic tool for national or international efforts related to nuclear nonproliferation and security.

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High-performance sodium ion batteries using copper sulfide

Researchers presented a new strategy for extending sodium ion batteries' cyclability using copper sulfide as the electrode material. This strategy has led to high-performance conversion reactions and is expected to advance the commercialization of sodium ion batteries as they emerge as an alternative to lithium ion batteries.

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Scientists explore blood flow bump that happens when our neurons are significantly activated

When a group of our neurons get activated by thinking hard about a math problem or the vibrant colors of an exotic flower, within a single second blood flow to those brain cells increases a bit.

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Differences in MS patients' cerebrospinal fluid may be key to drugs that halt progression

Effective therapies exist for managing relapsing/remitting MS, but treatment for progressive MS has proved more challenging. Now, a new article has identified potential mechanisms that may inform the development of therapies that effectively manage progressive MS.

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How much water do snowpacks hold? A better way to answer the question

Researchers have developed a new computer model for calculating the water content of snowpacks, providing an important tool for water resource managers and avalanche forecasters as well as scientists.

8h

Warming climate intensifes summer drought in parts of US

Researchers using climate data from before and after the Industrial Revolution found that in regions with low soil moisture, higher temperatures brought about by climate change led to a 'coupling' of land and atmosphere, which increased the severity of heatwaves.

8h

DNA replication machinery captured at atom-level detail

Life depends on double-stranded DNA unwinding and separating into single strands that can be copied for cell division. Scientists have determined at atomic resolution the structure of machinery that drives the process.

8h

Surgery before pregnancy linked to higher risk of opioid withdrawal in babies

Babies whose mothers underwent surgery before pregnancy have an increased risk of opioid withdrawal symptoms at birth, according to a new study.

8h

Sudden cardiac arrest in athletes: Prevention and management

It's marathon season, and every so often a news report will focus on an athlete who has collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest. Although uncommon, these events get attention. A new review looks at recent evidence to help physicians prevent and manage the risk of sudden cardiac arrest in competitive athletes.

8h

Political support, strong public health systems key to eliminating measles outbreaks worldwide

Strong political support and strong public health systems are necessary to combat measles outbreaks, which are growing in frequency around the world, argue public health experts.

8h

Green light for a new generation of dynamic materials

Developing synthetic materials that are as dynamic as those found in nature, with reversibly changing properties and which could be used in manufacturing, recycling and other applications, is a strong focus for scientists.

8h

Recycled mortars for building construction

A study carried out by researchers from the School of Building at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) has shown how mineral wool waste can be a suitable alternative to the reinforced fibers currently used in building materials.

8h

Ramanujan machine automatically generates conjectures for fundamental constants

A team of researchers at the Israel Institute of Technology has built what they describe as a Ramanujan machine—a device that automatically generates conjectures (mathematical statements that are proposed as true statements) for fundamental constants. They have written a paper describing their device and have uploaded it to the arXiv preprint server. They have also created a webpage for people who

8h

Voice evidence in trials: Can a criminal suspect be identified just by the sound of his voice?

A few months ago, I received a call from a barrister who asked me if I could evaluate whether voice identification testimony submitted in a criminal case against an Indigenous man was based on appropriate analysis.

8h

Environment, not evolution, might underlie some human-ape differences

Apes' abilities have been unfairly measured, throwing into doubt the assumed belief that human infants are superior to adult chimpanzees, according to a new study by leaders in the field of ape cognition.

9h

Machine-Mining the Literature

We’ve made it to the point – a while back, actually – where people who actually know the subject roll their eyes a bit when the term “artificial intelligence” is used without some acknowledgment that it’s not very useful. I think that’s a real sign that it’s becoming useful. Things are to the point where you have to say, implicitly, “You know that phrase that everyone’s used for years? That’s nev

9h

Environment, not evolution, might underlie some human-ape differences

Apes' abilities have been unfairly measured, throwing into doubt the assumed belief that human infants are superior to adult chimpanzees, according to a new study by leaders in the field of ape cognition.

9h

Super volcanic eruptions interrupt ozone recovery

Since the Antarctic ozone hole was detected in 1985, depletion of the ozone layer—the "big umbrella" that protects all life on Earth—has raised considerable concern. The efforts of international communities led to the success of the "Montreal Protocol on Substances that Destroy the Ozone Layer," signed in 1987, which banned global production and usage of chlorofluorocarbons, the leading cause of t

9h

Model development is crucial in understanding climate change

Numerical models are a key tool for climate scientists in understanding the past, present and future climate change arising from natural, unforced variability or in response to changes, according to Dr. Qing Bao, Research Fellow at the State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP), Chinese Academy o

9h

Successful launch for eROSITA X-ray telescope

The Russian-German Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) space mission successfully lifted off from the Baikonur cosmodrome on Saturday, July 13 at 14:31. Onboard is the eROSITA X-ray telescope, which was developed and built by a consortium of German institutes supported by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) and led by the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE). Astronomers f

9h

Stonehenge may have been built using lard

Pig fat could have been used to grease the sledges used to transport the massive stones of Stonehenge into position, new analysis by archaeologists at Newcastle University has suggested.

9h

Back-to-back heatwaves kill more than two-thirds of coral

By comparing reefs before and after two extreme heatwaves only 12 months apart, a collaborative team of researchers including scientists from Bangor's School of Ocean Sciences found that living hard corals in the central Indian Ocean reduced by 70 percent. Despite this, their results suggest that some coral species are more resilient to rising temperatures, which offers hope for these vital habita

9h

Want an Amazon Smart Plug for $5? Tell Alexa to order it for you – CNET

Normally $25, the Wi-Fi plug adds voice control to any outlet.

9h

The rush to air conditioning in Europe pushed by urbanization and climate change

A new study published in Environmental Science and Policy shows that without adequate and focused policies, many households will rely on air conditioners to adapt to climate change, thus generating even more greenhouse gas emissions.

9h

Coupled exploration of light and matter

In quasiparticles known as polaritons, states of light and matter are strongly coupled. The group of Prof. Ataç ?mamo?lu at ETH Zurich has now developed a new approach to study nonlinear optical properties of polaritons in strongly correlated electronic states. In doing so, they opened up fresh perspectives for exploring both ingredients of the polariton: novel functionalities for photonic devices

9h

Army game-theory research better allocates military resources, fight cancer

US Army game-theory research using artificial intelligence may help treat cancer and other diseases, improve cybersecurity, deploy Soldiers and assets more efficiently and even win a poker game.

9h

Alternative material for superconducting radio-frequency cavity

In modern synchrotron sources and free-electron lasers, superconducting radio-frequency cavity resonators are able to supply electron bunches with extremely high energy. These resonators are currently constructed of pure niobium. Now an international collaboration has investigated the potential advantages a niobium-tin coating might offer in comparison to pure niobium.

9h

Next generation metagenomics: Exploring the opportunities and challenges

A new expert review highlights the opportunities and methodological challenges at this critical juncture in the growth of the field of metagenomics.

9h

Blood samples from the zoo help predict diseases in humans

Penguins, Asian elephants and many other animal species live in the zoos of Saarbrücken and Neunkirchen. As they come from different continents, blood is regularly taken from the animals to check their health. These blood samples have now been used by bioinformaticians and human geneticists at Saarland University to search for biomarkers with which diseases can be detected at an early stage.

9h

New study on the immune system of plants: It works differently than expected

What happens at the molecular level when plants defend against invading pathogens? Previously it was assumed that the processes were roughly the same in all plants. This is not true, as a team of biologists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) shows in a new study in "The Plant Cell". The researchers investigated defence processes in the wild tobacco plant N. benthamiana and found

9h

Study bolsters case that climate change is driving many California wildfires

A new study combs through the many factors that can promote wildfire in California, and concludes that in many, though not all, cases, warming climate is the decisive driver.

9h

SwRI, UTSA researchers create innovative model for sCO2 power generation

Southwest Research Institute and The University of Texas at San Antonio are collaborating to acquire data for a computational model for supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) energy generation. The work, led by Jacob Delimont of SwRI's Mechanical Engineering Division and Christopher Combs of UTSA's College of Engineering, is supported by a $125,000 grant from the Connecting through Research Partnersh

9h

Back-to-back heatwaves kill more than two-thirds of coral

By comparing reefs before and after two extreme heatwaves only 12 months apart, a collaborative team of researchers including scientists from Bangor's School of Ocean Sciences found that living hard corals in the central Indian Ocean reduced by 70 percent. Despite this, their results suggest that some coral species are more resilient to rising temperatures, which offers hope for these vital habita

9h

Varmesøgende droner skal redde rålam fra at blive skåret i småstykker af mejetærskere

Hvert år dræbes tusinder af nyfødte råkid, når landmænd høster græsmarker. Nu har en gruppe landmænd ved har i samarbejde med Sydvestjysk Brandvæsen bevist, at droner kan spotte de spæde kid i det høje græs.

9h

Alan Turing udvalgt blandt 12 videnskabsfolk til at pryde pengeseddel i Storbritannien

Bank of England oplyser, at den britiske matematiker Alan Turing skal pryde 50 punds-sedlen.

9h

Whole-tree harvesting could boost biomass production

Making the shift to renewable energy sources requires biomass, too.

9h

Researcher sees potential for ancient life on Martian surface

Photos taken by the Mars Curiosity rover may show a desolate rocky landscape to some, but to Penn State researcher Christopher House, the photos show potential for ancient life.

9h

2-D perovskite materials found to have unique, conductive edge states

A new class of 2-D perovskite materials with edges that are conductive like metals and cores that are insulating was found by researchers who said these unique properties have applications in solar cells and nanoelectronics.

9h

Moon dust is not to be sneezed at

When the astronauts of the Apollo 11 mission returned to Earth, they had almost 22 kilograms of rock from the surface of the moon in their baggage. Josef Zähringer from the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg was one of the first researchers allowed to analyze the material in the US. Two months later, Heinrich Wänke's team at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz also

9h

Gut bacteria linked to recovery from undernutrition

Researchers create a diet that restores healthy activity. Biplab Das reports.

9h

Determining gene function will help understanding of processes of life

Scientists have developed a new method of determining gene function in a breakthrough that could have major implications for our understanding of the processes of life.

9h

Cancer tissue-freezing approach may help more breast cancer patients in lower income countries

A new reusable device can help women with breast cancer in lower income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

9h

Early and ongoing experiences of weight stigma linked to self-directed weight shaming

Researchers surveyed more than 18,000 adults enrolled in the commercial weight management program WW International, and found that participants who internalized weight bias the most tended to be younger, female, have a higher body mass index (BMI), and have an earlier onset of their weight struggle.

9h

The Poker-Playing AI That Beat the World’s Best Players

Poker is a powerful combination of strategy and intuition, something that’s made it the most iconic of card games and devilishly difficult for machines to master. No w an AI built by Facebook and Carnegie Mellon University has managed to beat top professionals in a multiplayer version of the game for the first time. Games have proven a popular test-bed for AI in recent years, and when Google’s Al

9h

Greenland’s Superfast ‘Ice Slides’ Could Be Bad News for Climate Change

Greenland's ice sheet is sliding way more than previously thought, making it more vulnerable to a warming climate, according to a new study.

9h

Image: Earth and an eclipsed moon

SMART-1, ESA's first mission to the moon, captured this series of unique images of our home planet Earth and the moon during a total lunar eclipse.

9h

Why broccoli and cabbage are so bitter

Researchers have mapped the crystal structure of a key protein that makes the metabolites responsible for the bitter taste in Brassica vegetables like mustards, broccolis, and cabbages. Vegetables in the genus Brassica share a distinct and bitter taste. Some consider the flavor of cruciferous plants their strongest attribute. But even in India and China, where these “brassicas” have been cultivat

9h

Self-managed teams come with a serious warning

Pay inequity “is likely to be a significant problem”—especially for women—on self-managed teams, research finds. The study finds that women “consistently receive bargaining outcomes below their productivity level, while men are consistently overcompensated.” Women in the study made one-fourth less than their male counterparts. Zappos, Google, Facebook, and others have adopted self-managed teams,

9h

What John F. Kennedy’s Moon Speech Means 50 Years Later

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reflecting on the Apollo 11 mission, 50 years later. Fifty years after Neil Armstrong took that first step, the moon landing sticks in the public imagination as one of the most important moments in human history. But as is often the case with collective memory, its meaning splits in more than one direction. It was a beautiful adventure that inspired

9h

Reptilian street smarts

Baby blue-tongue lizards match their elders, because they need to.

9h

'Artificial intelligence' fit to monitor volcanoes

More than half of the world's active volcanoes are not monitored instrumentally. Hence, even eruptions that could have rung an alarm can occur without people at risk having a clue of the upcoming disaster. A research project by the Technical University of Berlin and the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences led to a volcano monitoring platform which analyses satellite images using – amongst o

9h

Science of microdosing psychedelics remains patchy and anecdotal, say researchers

The practice of taking small, regular doses of psychedelic drugs to enhance mood, creativity, or productivity lacks robust scientific evidence, say scientists.

9h

NASA examines Tropical Storm Barry post-landfall

Tropical Storm Barry made landfall mid-day on July 13, 2019, but infrared satellite imagery from NASA early on July 14 continued to show the heaviest rainmaking storms were still off-shore. NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed cloud top temperatures in the storm which gave an indication of the storm's strength.

9h

Mastering a prickly problem in ferrofluids

Computer simulation accurately captures the beguiling motion of a liquid magnetic material.

9h

9h

How (Relatively) Simple Symmetries Underlie Our Expanding Universe

Isaac Newton and other premodern physicists saw space and time as separate, absolute entities — the rigid backdrops against which we move. On the surface, this made the mathematics behind Newton’s 1687 laws of motion look simple. He defined the relationship between force, mass and acceleration, for example, as $latex \vec{F} = m \vec{a}$. In contrast, when Albert Einstein revealed that space and

9h

Intel’s Neuromorphic System Hits 8 Million Neurons, 100 Million Coming by 2020

Researchers can use the 64-chip Pohoiki Beach system to make systems that learn and see the world more like humans

9h

Is It Time to Play With Spaceships Again?

After 50 years of Apollo nostalgia, we have yet to fully answer the central question: Why send humans into space?

9h

High-performance sodium ion batteries using copper sulfide

Researchers presented a new strategy for extending sodium ion batteries' cyclability using copper sulfide as the electrode material. This strategy has led to high-performance conversion reactions and is expected to advance the commercialization of sodium ion batteries as they emerge as an alternative to lithium ion batteries.

9h

NASA sees heavy rainfall potential in strengthening Tropical Storm Barry

Tropical Storm Barry continued to linger in the Gulf of Mexico, generating a lot of heavy rainfall on Saturday, July 13, 2019. Barry was just under the threshold of being classified a Category 1 hurricane and is expected to become one before landfall. NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed cloud top temperatures in the storm which gave an indication of the storm's strength.

9h

Super volcanic eruptions interrupt ozone recovery

Strong volcanic eruptions, especially when a super volcano erupts, will have a strong impact on ozone, and might interrupt the ozone recovery processes.

9h

An inflammatory diet correlates with colorectal cancer risk

This new study correlates a proinflamatory diet with the risk of developing colorectal cancer among the Spanish population.

9h

Out of Africa and into an archaic human melting pot

Genetic analysis has revealed that the ancestors of modern humans interbred with at least five different archaic human groups as they moved out of Africa and across Eurasia.

9h

Persistent HIV DNA in spinal fluid may be associated with cognitive challenges

HIV DNA remained in the cerebrospinal fluid of half of participants with well-managed HIV (virologic suppression in the plasma), confirming that the central nervous system (CNS) is a major reservoir for latent HIV. Individuals who harbored HIV DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid were more likely than other study participants to experience cognitive deficits on neurocognitive testing.

9h

Environment, not evolution, might underlie some human-ape differences

Apes' abilities have been unfairly measured, throwing into doubt the assumed belief that human infants are superior to adult chimpanzees, according to a new study by leaders in the field of ape cognition.

9h

Using building materials to monitor for high enriched uranium

A new paper details how small samples of ubiquitous building materials, such as tile or brick, can be used to test whether a facility has ever stored high enriched uranium, which can be used to create nuclear weapons. The technique could serve as a valuable forensic tool for national or international efforts related to nuclear nonproliferation and security.

9h

Model development is crucial in understanding climate change

Preliminary evaluation suggests that FGOALS-f3-L can capture the basic patterns of atmospheric circulation and precipitation well, and these datasets could contribute to the benchmark of current model behaviors for the desired continuity of CMIP. Analysis of these datasets will also be helpful in understanding the sources of model biases and be of benefit to the development of climate forecast sys

9h

Algae as a resource: Chemical tricks from the sea

The chemical process by which bacteria break down algae into an energy source for the marine food chain, has been unknown – until now. For the first time, is has been possible to clarify the biochemical function of the multitude of enzymes involved in this process. Now it becomes possible to use algae as a resource: they can be used for fermentations, to produce valuable types of sugar or, in the

9h

Wearing hearing aid may help protect brain in later life

A new study has concluded that people who wear a hearing aid for age-related hearing problems maintain better brain function over time than those who do not.

9h

Stall in vaccination rates putting children at risk, says Unicef

Agency blames war, inequality and complacency for 20 million children missing immunisation A dangerous stagnation in vaccination rates is putting children at risk of preventable diseases around the world, the UN children’s agency has warned, blaming conflict, inequality and complacency. One in 10 children, totalling 20 million globally, missed out on basic immunisation against the life-threatenin

9h

What Will the Moon Landing Mean to the Future?

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reflecting on the Apollo 11 mission, 50 years later. Shortly before his death in 1963, the writer and theologian C. S. Lewis wrote a speculative essay about the spiritual consequences of Project Apollo, the just-commenced mission to land human beings on the moon. In the common telling, Project Apollo is a pure triumph, its ambitions and execution fr

9h

Rise of the Know-Nothing Judge

If you’ve heard anything about the Texas lawsuit seeking to blow up the Affordable Care Act, you’ve heard that it involves yet another constitutional challenge to the individual mandate. That’s true—but it’s also profoundly misleading. The parties in Texas v. United States don’t actually disagree about what the Constitution means. What they’re fighting about, instead, is what Congress meant to do

9h

Better river basins network to protect biodiversity in Spain

The European eel (Anguilla anguilla), the freshwater blenny (Salaria fluviatilis), the freshwater pearl mussel (Margaritifera auricularia) and the pronged clubtail (Gomphus graslini) are some of the vulnerable species that are not represented enough in the biodiversity catalogue of the Natural River Basins (RNF) in Spain.

10h

'Racist police officer' stereotype may become a self-fulfilling prophecy

Belief in the 'racist police officer' stereotype may become a self-fulfilling prophecy for law enforcement officers and lead to increased support for forceful or threatening policing tactics, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

10h

Differences in MS patients' cerebrospinal fluid may be key to drugs that halt progression

Effective therapies exist for managing relapsing/remitting MS, but treatment for progressive MS has proved more challenging. Now, a new paper published in the journal Brain from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center, CUNY and Friedman Brain Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has identified potential mechanisms that may inform the de

10h

Waze Toll Pricing helps you find the cheapest route – Roadshow

Google's popular navigation app now crowdsources tollbooth price info.

10h

Amazon Prime Day 2019: Best deals on 400GB SanDisk memory cards, microSD cards and more – CNET

Load your phone, laptop, camera, drone and game console with more storage on little cards.

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Amazon Prime Day 2019: Best deals on SSDs, hard drives and flash drives by SanDisk, WD, Seagate, LaCie – CNET

Need to speed up your laptop, backup your desktop or quickly transfer files to and from computers, phones and tablets? Save up to 65% on storage.

10h

No technical reason to exclude Huawei as 5G supplier, says UK committee

A UK parliamentary committee has concluded there are no technical grounds for excluding Chinese network kit vendor Huawei from the country’s 5G networks. In a letter from the chair of …

10h

After Delay of Chandrayaan-2 Launch, Indians Are Disappointed but Confident

The country had been watching, eager for India to seize its place in space with a lunar landing. Scientists say the mission is still on — they just don’t know when.

10h

Confirmed: In space no one can hear you scream

The old tagline "in space no one can hear you scream" has been confirmed by a South African mother loudly shouting for her children to tidy their room from 33,000 meters above the ground. Or not so loudly, as the case appears to be.

10h

Targeting mitochondria in neurons may help relieve severe forms of MS

Altering the composition of a peron's spinal fluid may provide a new approach for alleviating symptoms of progressive multiple sclerosis

10h

Regulating e-cigarette flavours may prompt some people to smoke more

The results of a survey suggest that regulating the flavours and nicotine levels of e-cigarettes could prompt some younger people to increase their tobacco use

10h

Spraying bats with ‘good’ bacteria may combat deadly white nose syndrome

Nearly half of bats infected with white nose syndrome survived through winter after being spritzed with antifungal bacteria, a small study finds.

10h

Star Wars News: 'Rise of Skywalker' Reshoots Are Happening, Apparently

Don't worry, though. This is unlikely to be some kind of 'Rogue One' situation.

10h

Researchers develop computer model of ferrofluid motion

Ferrofluids, with their mesmeric display of shape-shifting spikes, are a favorite exhibit in science shows. These eye-catching examples of magnetic fields in action could become even more dramatic through computational work that captures their motion.

10h

Southeast Asia was crowded with archaic human groups long before we turned up

Around 55,000-50,000 years ago, a population of modern humans left Africa and started on the long trek that would lead them around the world. After rapidly crossing Eurasia and Southeast Asia, they traveled through the islands of Indonesia, and eventually as far as the continent of Sahul—modern-day Australia and New Guinea.

10h

Taking charge: Researchers team up to make better batteries

A Florida State University and Cornell University research team found that batteries built from inexpensive and safe components can deliver three to four times the punch of batteries built with today's state-of-the-art lithium ion technology.

10h

Green light for a new generation of dynamic materials

Researchers from Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Ghent University (UGent) and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have pioneered a novel, dynamic, reprogrammable material — by using green LED light and, remarkably, darkness as the switches to change the material's polymer structure, and using only two inexpensive chemical compounds.

10h

How much water do snowpacks hold? A better way to answer the question

Researchers have developed a new computer model for calculating the water content of snowpacks, providing an important tool for water resource managers and avalanche forecasters as well as scientists.

10h

Ancient Roman port history unveiled

A team of international researchers led by La Trobe University and the University of Melbourne have, for the first time worldwide, applied marine geology techniques at an ancient harbour archaeological site to uncover ancient harbour technologies of the first centuries AD.

10h

Artificial intelligence (AI) designs metamaterials used in the invisibility cloak

The research group of Prof. Junsuk Rho, Sunae So and Jungho Mun of Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Chemical Engineering at POSTECH developed a design with a higher degree of freedom which allows to choose materials and to design photonic structures arbitrarily by using Deep Learning.

10h

Greek coroner says biologist found dead during conference was suffocated

Nature, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02173-8 Scientists have paid tribute to Suzanne Eaton, whose body was discovered in a cave in Crete last week.

10h

Climate change: A slow-burn existential threat

There are islands in the Chesapeake Bay that have already succumbed to sea level rise, one of them is Holland Island. Even in a best case scenario, the consensus is that we'll get at least two feet of sea level rise by the year 2100. One big question is: What will happen when flooding gets worse and worse and people decide there's no hope for them anymore to live in their respective towns. The Ic

10h

Study examines diversity, social mistrust

Some researchers have argued for years that high rates of ethnic diversity in a community can eat away at social capital, the interconnectedness among neighbors that helps give rise to a functioning society. A new study led by a Georgia Institute of Technology economist has found new data-based evidence for that theory that also may help explain why it happens.

10h

Fossil of smallest Old World monkey species discovered in Kenya

Researchers from the National Museums of Kenya, University of Arkansas, University of Missouri and Duke University have announced the discovery of a tiny monkey that lived in Kenya 4.2 million …

10h

The habitability of Titan and its ocean

Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is a hotbed of organic molecules, harboring a soup of complex hydrocarbons similar to that thought to have existed over four billion years ago on the primordial Earth. Titan's surface, however, is in a deep freeze at –179 degrees Celsius (–290 degrees Fahrenheit, or 94 kelvin). Life as we know it cannot exist on the moon's frigid surface.

10h

Special food boosts gut microbiomes of malnourished children

A type of therapeutic food, specifically designed to repair the gut microbiomes of malnourished children, is superior to standard therapy, according to a clinical trial in Bangladesh. The new approach to addressing the pressing global health problem of childhood malnutrition focuses on selectively boosting key growth-promoting gut microbes using ingredients present in affordable, culturally accep

10h

Study reveals how topography influences emplacement of small-volume pyroclastic flows

The emplacement of small-volume ( less than 0,1km3) pyroclastic flow is strongly controlled by topography, according to a new study by researchers of the Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera of the Spanish National Research Council (ICTJA-CSIC) and the University of Barcelona. The paper has been published in the journal Sedimentology.

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Armyworms on the march post-Tropical Storm Barry

Fall armyworms could follow rainfall delivered by Tropical Storm Barry, warns a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

10h

Armyworms on the march post-Tropical Storm Barry

Fall armyworms could follow rainfall delivered by Tropical Storm Barry, warns a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

10h

Spain's natural river basins network should expand to protect biodiversity in rivers

The European eel (Anguilla anguilla), the freshwater blenny (Salaria fluviatilis), the freshwater pearl mussel (Margaritifera auricularia) and the pronged clubtail (Gomphus graslini) are some of the vulnerable species that are not sufficiently represented in the biodiversity catalog of the Natural River Basins (RNF) in Spain, according to a new article published in the journal Aquatic Conservation

10h

Spain's natural river basins network should expand to protect biodiversity in rivers

The European eel (Anguilla anguilla), the freshwater blenny (Salaria fluviatilis), the freshwater pearl mussel (Margaritifera auricularia) and the pronged clubtail (Gomphus graslini) are some of the vulnerable species that are not sufficiently represented in the biodiversity catalog of the Natural River Basins (RNF) in Spain, according to a new article published in the journal Aquatic Conservation

10h

Reversible electro-optical detector for environmental sensing of pollutants

Increasing emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their resulting impact on air and water quality has become one of the major environmental concerns of our age, especially in industrialized societies. Some VOCs are identified as highly toxic or carcinogenic, and may impact human health as well as on the natural ecosystem. VOCs are emitted from the use of many everyday household product

10h

Shape-encoded dynamic assembly of mobile micromachines

Field-directed and self-propelled colloidal assembly can be used to build micromachines to perform complex motions and functions, although their integration as heterogenous components with specified structures, dynamics and functions within micromachines is challenging. In a recent study on Nature Materials, Yunus Alapan and co-workers at the departments of physical intelligence and complex materi

10h

Datatilsynet siger god for at dataprofilere ledige ved at samkøre registre

Det er i orden i forhold til persondataretten, at jobcentrene profilerer ledige med et dataværktøj for at afklare risikoen for langtidsledighed, lyder det i nyt høringssvar fra Datatilsynet.

10h

Krise for briternes militære transportfly: Til tider står 18 af 20 på landjorden

Airbus A400M er ramt af dårligere motorer og gearkasser, propeller med fejl og massive vibrationsproblemer.

10h

Francine Shapiro obituary

American psychologist who devised the therapy EMDR – eye movement desensitisation reprocessing – for use in the treatment of trauma The American psychologist Francine Shapiro, who has died aged 71, devised the form of therapy known as eye movement desensitisation reprocessing (EMDR). Having started out as an English teacher, she summed up her life’s work with William Blake’s line: “For the eye alt

11h

2D perovskite materials found to have unique, conductive edge states

A new class of 2D perovskite materials with edges that are conductive like metals and cores that are insulating was found by researchers who said these unique properties have applications in solar cells and nanoelectronics.

11h

Fossil of smallest old world monkey species discovered in Kenya

Researchers from the National Museums of Kenya, University of Arkansas, University of Missouri and Duke University have announced the discovery of a tiny monkey that lived in Kenya 4.2 million years ago.

11h

New e-cigarette laws could drive some users to smoke more cigarettes

Efforts by the FDA and some cities to limit the availability and appeal of e-cigarettes to young users could drive some existing users to smoke more tobacco cigarettes to get their fix, according to new research from Duke Health, scheduled to be published July 15, 2019 in the journal Substance Use & Misuse.

11h

Recursion raises $121m to map how disease affects cells

Latest fundraising comes as investors bet that AI will change drug discovery

11h

Trump Is Baiting Democrats

Don’t impeach Donald Trump. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi reached that decision early, and she reached it firmly. The Senate will not remove him, so the impeachment drive will end in failure. In the aftermath of a failed impeachment, holding President Trump to account will become even more difficult than it is now. He’ll think, Why comply with subpoenas? What will they do—impeach me? They already dr

11h

Steel Magnolias Is a Beloved Weepy With a Dark Side

Since its release three decades ago, Steel Magnolias has been hailed as a celebration of women . In his 1989 review of the film, Roger Ebert raved about the dialogue and camaraderie of the ensemble, which includes Dolly Parton, Julia Roberts, and Sally Field. “There may be no movie that better epitomizes the bond of female friendship,” HuffPost declared in 2014. “Mothers share the film with their

11h

Clouds and Climate Change

A paper is making the rounds on climate denial sites that claims to debunk human-caused climate change in a single stroke. Predictably, the paper does nothing of the sort, but it does raise a complex issue regarding climate change that is worth reviewing. But first let’s get to the paper itself. The paper, by J. Kauppinen and P. Malmi, is a pre-publication paper on the Arxiv. This means it is not

11h

Genome study reveals extent, diversity of Roman-era pandemic

New research on one of history's most devastating plagues shows that it spread farther than previously believed, reaching post–Roman Britain, and provides new information about the plague bacteria's evolution during a pandemic that lasted more than 200 years.

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Image of the Day: Digital Adaptation

A bird leg with one super-long toe is something paleontologists say they’ve never seen before.

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Codebreaker Alan Turing to be face of new British banknote

Codebreaker and computing pioneer Alan Turing has been chosen as the face of Britain's new 50 pound note, the Bank of England announced Monday.

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Female mammals kill the offspring of their competitors when resources are scarce

Dieter Lukas and Elise Huchard have now looked into infanticide by female mammals. In previous studies, males have been found to kill when females will not mate with them if they are still caring …

11h

Robots Alone Can't Solve Amazon's Labor Woes

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Got a Tesla? Elon Musk hints it could soon drive itself

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It's not easy to give a robot a sense of touch

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J Robot: Could Artificial Intelligence Actually Replace Reporters?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Revisiting the Role of the Science Journalist

Can the average reader articulate what makes a story published by Pulitzer Prize-winning InsideClimate News different from one published by a popular site like Massive Science, which is written by scientists themselves? And more potently: Does it matter if readers can't tell the difference?

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Månens dannelse er stadig et mysterium

Måneuge på ing.dk: Et sammenstød mellem Jorden og en protoplanet på størrelse med Mars førte til Månens dannelse, lyder standardforklaringen. Den er dog ikke uden problemer, så mange andre teorier er bragt på banen.

11h

EU-Kommissær: Nej, Danmark kan ikke forbyde diesel- og benzinbiler

EU-lovgivningen levner ingen åbninger for, at landene selv kan forbyde salg af biler, der drives af fossile brændstoffer, svarer kommissæren for det indre marked det danske Folketing. Men lad os tale om at ændre reglerne, opfordrer hun.

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Out of Africa and into an archaic human melting pot

Genetic analysis has revealed that the ancestors of modern humans interbred with at least five different archaic human groups as they moved out of Africa and across Eurasia.

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Female mammals kill the offspring of their competitors when resources are scarce

Dieter Lukas and Elise Huchard have now looked into infanticide by female mammals. In previous studies, males have been found to kill when females will not mate with them if they are still caring for an offspring sired by their previous partner. "Across mammals, females are more likely to commit infanticide when conditions are harsh and when having offspring is particularly costly to females," say

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Out of Africa and into an archaic human melting pot

Genetic analysis has revealed that the ancestors of modern humans interbred with at least five different archaic human groups as they moved out of Africa and across Eurasia.

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Female mammals kill the offspring of their competitors when resources are scarce

Dieter Lukas and Elise Huchard have now looked into infanticide by female mammals. In previous studies, males have been found to kill when females will not mate with them if they are still caring for an offspring sired by their previous partner. "Across mammals, females are more likely to commit infanticide when conditions are harsh and when having offspring is particularly costly to females," say

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Tiny bivalve found in Brazil sheds light on tropical Atlantic biogeography

For the first time, the bivalve mollusc Guyanella clenchi has been reported from Abrolhos Bank, Brazil. This almost unknown bivalve had previously been reported solely from the Caribbean region. Apart from being the southernmost record for the species, its presence also helps the experts to determine the way the marine fauna from the Caribbean interacts with its South American relatives.

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A Sunken Soviet Sub Is Raising the Radioactivity of the Norwegian Sea 800,000-Fold. But Don't Worry.

A Cold War Russian nuclear submarine is leaking radioactive material into the Norwegian Sea.

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New York Is Overrun by Rats, Yet We Know Almost Nothing About Their Underground Kingdom

If we can't beat them, humans perhaps should join rats in our shared ecosystem.

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Tiny bivalve found in Brazil sheds light on tropical Atlantic biogeography

For the first time, the bivalve mollusc Guyanella clenchi has been reported from Abrolhos Bank, Brazil. This almost unknown bivalve had previously been reported solely from the Caribbean region. Apart from being the southernmost record for the species, its presence also helps the experts to determine the way the marine fauna from the Caribbean interacts with its South American relatives.

12h

Fossil of smallest Old World monkey species discovered in Kenya

Researchers from the National Museums of Kenya, University of Arkansas, University of Missouri and Duke University have announced the discovery of a tiny monkey that lived in Kenya 4.2 million years ago.

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Detours, roadblocks, jams: the rough road to US car regulation

Nature, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02145-y Jack Stilgoe applauds an alarming history of how safety rules have developed with — and in spite of — the automotive industry.

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Don't Be Confused If This Starfish Makes Your Mouth Water

When a photo of Plinthaster dentatus went viral on Twitter last week, pasta-lovers did a double take — the sea star looked just like a piece of ravioli.

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Fossil of smallest Old World monkey species discovered in Kenya

Researchers from the National Museums of Kenya, University of Arkansas, University of Missouri and Duke University have announced the discovery of a tiny monkey that lived in Kenya 4.2 million years ago.

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Warming climate intensifies summer drought in parts of U.S., study finds

Climate change is amplifying the intensity and likelihood of heatwaves during severe droughts in the southern plains and southwest United States, according to a new study by a University of Arkansas researcher.

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Field experiment uses fake emails to measure gender and racial bias among startup investors

During his six years teaching a course on financing for startups, Ilya A. Strebulaev heard a common concern from students: Silicon Valley investors discriminate against women and people of color.

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NASA's orbiting Carbon Observatory-3 gets first data

NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-3 (OCO-3), the agency's newest carbon dioxide-measuring mission to launch into space, has seen the light. From its perch on the International Space Station, OCO-3 captured its first glimpses of sunlight reflected by Earth's surface on June 25, 2019. Just weeks later, the OCO-3 team was able to make its first determinations of carbon dioxide and solar-induced fluo

12h

Scientists use technology to examine questions around climate, biodiversity

A clam shell may be a familiar find on the beach, but its intricate curves and markings tell a rich tale. For centuries, biologists have collected, drawn, measured and compared the shells of bivalve species, pursuing knowledge about how the environment and behavior shape biodiversity.

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Image: HiRISE spots Curiosity rover at Mars' Woodland Bay

A dramatic Martian landscape can be seen in a new image taken from space, showing NASA's Curiosity rover examining a location called "Woodland Bay." It's just one of many stops the rover has made in an area referred to as the "clay-bearing unit" on the side of Mount Sharp, a 3-mile-tall (5-kilometer-tall) mountain inside of Gale Crater.

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NASA's AIRS images Tropical Storm Barry before landfall

NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), aboard the Aqua satellite, captured imagery of Tropical Storm Barry in the Gulf of Mexico at about 2 p.m. local time on Friday afternoon. According to the National Hurricane Center, Barry is expected to make landfall over the Louisiana coast on Saturday, likely as a hurricane.

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Huawei reportedly plans massive US layoffs – CNET

The US blacklisting may cost Americans their jobs, according to the Wall Street Journal.

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Scientists use technology to examine questions around climate, biodiversity

A clam shell may be a familiar find on the beach, but its intricate curves and markings tell a rich tale. For centuries, biologists have collected, drawn, measured and compared the shells of bivalve species, pursuing knowledge about how the environment and behavior shape biodiversity.

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Video: Friend or foe? Fun facts about sharks

Sharks often get a bad rap, even though most species are harmless to humans, says Katherine Maslenikov, manager of the UW Fish Collection at the Burke Museum.

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New face of the Bank of England's £50 note is revealed as Alan Turing

The note – once called the currency of corrupt elites – gets a makeover with the image of a computer pioneer.

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Dear Therapist: I Don’t Understand Why My Girlfriend Dumped Me

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, Nearly two months ago, my girlfriend broke up with me. It was quite shocking at the moment, especially considering that we had just spent a lovely weekend out of town visiting her sister and brother-in-law. Sh

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Video: Friend or foe? Fun facts about sharks

Sharks often get a bad rap, even though most species are harmless to humans, says Katherine Maslenikov, manager of the UW Fish Collection at the Burke Museum.

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How NASA has kept Apollo moon rocks safe from contamination for 50 years

NASA wouldn’t let our reporter touch the Apollo moon rocks. Here’s why that’s a good thing.

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Ancient people may have used pig fat to build Stonehenge

Pottery covered in lard could have stored grease to help move the megaliths on sledges

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Robots Alone Can't Solve Amazon's Labor Woes

This Prime Day, some Amazon workers are striking. But the company can't just automate its labor problems away.

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Amazon Prime Day 2019: The 27 Best Home and Outdoors Deals

We scrolled until our eyes burned to bring you the best Prime Day deals on fitness watches, Instant Pots, and more.

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Britain’s £50 Note Will Honor Computing Pioneer Alan Turing

During his lifetime, the mathematician and computer pioneer’s reputation was overshadowed by a conviction under Britain’s Victorian laws against homosexuality, and his war work remained a secret until decades later.

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Why the 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11 Is So Special to Me

My dad worked for NASA, recruited John Glenn and knew Neil Armstrong — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why the 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11 Is So Special to Me

My dad worked for NASA, recruited John Glenn and knew Neil Armstrong — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to Stop Prisons from Laying the Groundwork for a Fatal Overdose

A Rhode Island program to prevent ex-inmate relapses and deaths is working — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to Stop Prisons from Laying the Groundwork for a Fatal Overdose

A Rhode Island program to prevent ex-inmate relapses and deaths is working — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to Stop Prisons from Laying the Groundwork for a Fatal Overdose

A Rhode Island program to prevent ex-inmate relapses and deaths is working — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Questionable activities of UK company Celixir, by Patricia Murray

Patricia Murray uncovers the business secrets of the Nobelist Martin Evans and his partner Ajan Reginald. It seems the magic iMP cells used to treat patients in Greece were drawn from the blood of patients in Swansea, for the purpose of a secret PhD thesis. There is no serious science behind it, only serious investor money and a fraudulent patent.

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Alan Turing to be the new face of the £50 note

Computer scientist who was key to breaking the Enigma code is to be celebrated

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Alan Turing to feature on new £50 note

Mathematician who cracked Enigma code was persecuted for his homosexuality in 1950s The father of modern computing: Alan Turing’s legacy Alan Turing, the scientist known for helping crack the Enigma code during the second world war and pioneering the modern computer , has been chosen to appear on the new £50 note. The mathematician was selected from a list of almost 1,000 scientists in a decision

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Warming climate intensifes summer drought in parts of US, study finds

Researchers using climate data from before and after the Industrial Revolution found that in regions with low soil moisture, higher temperatures brought about by climate change led to a 'coupling' of land and atmosphere, which increased the severity of heatwaves.

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The Campus Rapist Hiding in Plain Sight

He was blond and handsome and charismatic, and in his first two years at the University of Minnesota, Daniel Drill-Mellum had become a frequent and boisterous presence at frat parties. Laura, a rising sophomore, became friends with Dan her freshman year. She knew he had a reputation for being “touchy” with girls, but she was sure he was harmless. Laura trusted Dan. When she crashed on a couch in

13h

An Epidemic of Disbelief

This article is part of our project “ The Presence of Justice ,” which is supported by a grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge. Robert Spada walked into the decrepit warehouse in Detroit and surveyed the chaos: Thousands of cardboard boxes and large plastic bags were piled haphazardly throughout the cavernous space. The air inside was hot and

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Report: How hackers can alter your WhatsApp files before the receiver opens the message

On Monday, researchers found that WhatsApp has a vulnerability that allows hackers to intercept and alter messages sent between users with malware.

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Apollo astronauts left trash, mementos and experiments on the moon

Here’s what planetary scientists are learning from the remains of Apollo outposts, and how archeologists hope to preserve it.

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Blood pulls deceased star oncologist’s paper after Stanford inquiry

Blood has retracted a 2011 article by a now-deceased Stanford researcher, Holbrook Kohrt, who earlier this month lost two other papers over concerns about the whereabouts of the data. The journal’s move comes about a week after Retraction Watch posted a story on the previous retractions, in the Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI), of Kohrt’s … Continue reading Blood pulls deceased star oncolog

13h

EU's prestigesatellitter slået ud af fejl i italiensk tidsserver

Det system, som leverer de nøjagtige tidssignaler til det europæiske positioneringssystem Galileo, er ramt af en alvorlig fejl. Foreløbig har systemet været nede i fire dage.

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Astronomers detect new massive stars in the young cluster VVV CL074

Using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), an international team of astronomers has investigated a population of massive stars in the young cluster VVV CL074. The observations resulted in disclosing fundamental properties of 25 stars, out of which 19 were identified for the first time. The findings were presented in a paper published July 4 on arXiv.org.

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Giant jellyfish spotted off Cornwall coast

The huge barrel jellyfish, as big as a human, was seen off the coast of Cornwall.

13h

A Brief Guide to the Current CRISPR Landscape

Hundreds of CRISPR patents have been granted around the world, and the number of applications continues to grow at a rapid pace.

13h

Determining gene function will help understanding of processes of life

Scientists at the University of Kent have developed a new method of determining gene function in a breakthrough that could have major implications for our understanding of the processes of life.

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Determining gene function will help understanding of processes of life

Scientists at the University of Kent have developed a new method of determining gene function in a breakthrough that could have major implications for our understanding of the processes of life.

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DNA replication machinery captured at atom-level detail

July 15, 2019) Life depends on double-stranded DNA unwinding and separating into single strands that can be copied for cell division. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have determined at atomic resolution the structure of machinery that drives the process. The research appears today in the journal Nature Communications.

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DNA replication machinery captured at atom-level detail

July 15, 2019) Life depends on double-stranded DNA unwinding and separating into single strands that can be copied for cell division. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have determined at atomic resolution the structure of machinery that drives the process. The research appears today in the journal Nature Communications.

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Environmental conditions shape the nature of a minimal bacterial genome

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10837-2 Minimal bacterial genomes still contain hundreds of genes of unknown function. Here the authors use in silico annotation methods and identify the environmental factors shaping a minimal genome.

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Reward signaling in a recurrent circuit of dopaminergic neurons and peptidergic Kenyon cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11092-1 Olfactory information from Kenyon cells in the mushroom body and reward information from pPAM dopaminergic neurons is required for appetitive olfactory learning and memory. Here, the authors report evidence for a feedback circuit mechanism between Kenyon cells and pPAM neurons for reward memory that involves sho

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Landscape of transcriptomic interactions between breast cancer and its microenvironment

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10929-z The transcriptomic profile of tumour-adjacent cells provides important information about tumour context but its clinical utility is unclear. Here, in breast cancer, Fox et al. show that the mRNA abundances of tumour and tumour-adjacent cells hold prognostic information.

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Mutation bias and GC content shape antimutator invasions

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11217-6 Mutators are expected to re-evolve low mutation rates to reduce deleterious load, but empirical evidence is mixed. Here, the authors show that load can vary across mutators and genetic backgrounds, which their simulations suggest can substantially alter antimutator dynamics.

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Sticky collisions of ultracold RbCs molecules

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11033-y Ultracold polar molecules are an excellent platform for quantum science but experiments so far see fast trap losses that are poorly understood. Here the authors investigate collisional losses of nonreactive RbCs, and show they are consistent with the sticky collision hypothesis, but are slower than the universal

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Weakly supervised classification of aortic valve malformations using unlabeled cardiac MRI sequences

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11012-3 The availability of labelled training data is one of the practical obstacles towards wide application of machine learning models in medicine. Here the authors develop a weakly supervised deep learning model for the classification of aortic malformations using unlabelled cardiac MRI sequences from the UK biobank.

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SHB1 and CCA1 interaction desensitizes light responses and enhances thermomorphogenesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11071-6 The PIF4 transcription factor promotes adaptation to elevated temperature but is degraded under red light to trigger photomorphogenesis. Here Sun et al. show that the core circadian component CCA1 recruits SHB1 to sustain PIF4 expression after dawn to balance thermomorphogenesis and light responses.

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Fourier ring correlation simplifies image restoration in fluorescence microscopy

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11024-z Fourier ring correlation (FRC) analysis is commonly used in fluorescence microscopy to measure effective image resolution. Here, the authors demonstrate that FRC can also be leveraged in blind image restoration methods, such as image deconvolution.

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DNA replication machinery captured at atom-level detail

Life depends on double-stranded DNA unwinding and separating into single strands that can be copied for cell division. St. Jude scientists have determined at atomic resolution the structure of machinery that drives the process.

14h

Determining gene function will help understanding of processes of life

Scientists at the University of Kent have developed a new method of determining gene function in a breakthrough that could have major implications for our understanding of the processes of life.

14h

Metasurface Antennas: New Models, Applications and Realizations

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46522-z Metasurface Antennas: New Models, Applications and Realizations

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Sperm transfer through hyper-elongated beetle penises – morphology and theoretical approaches

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46211-x Sperm transfer through hyper-elongated beetle penises – morphology and theoretical approaches

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Decreased sound tolerance associated with blast exposure

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46626-6 Decreased sound tolerance associated with blast exposure

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A Multidrug Resistance Plasmid pIMP26, Carrying blaIMP-26, fosA5, blaDHA-1, and qnrB4 in Enterobacter cloacae

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46777-6 A Multidrug Resistance Plasmid pIMP26, Carrying bla IMP-26 , fosA5 , bla DHA-1 , and qnrB 4 in Enterobacter cloacae

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Nicotinamide Augments the Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Resveratrol through PARP1 Activation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46678-8 Nicotinamide Augments the Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Resveratrol through PARP1 Activation

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Đakrông virus, a novel mobatvirus (Hantaviridae) harbored by the Stoliczka’s Asian trident bat (Aselliscus stoliczkanus) in Vietnam

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46697-5 Đakrông virus, a novel mobatvirus ( Hantaviridae ) harbored by the Stoliczka’s Asian trident bat ( Aselliscus stoliczkanus ) in Vietnam

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Revealing epilepsy type using a computational analysis of interictal EEG

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46633-7 Revealing epilepsy type using a computational analysis of interictal EEG

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SDHC epi-mutation testing in gastrointestinal stromal tumours and related tumours in clinical practice

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46124-9 SDHC epi-mutation testing in gastrointestinal stromal tumours and related tumours in clinical practice

14h

Democrats Have Found Their Battle Cry

U.S. presidential elections used to be about which candidate would best lead the free world. Now Democrats are advancing an unprecedented argument in modern American politics: Elect one of them to lead the free world; otherwise, Donald Trump will irreparably unravel it. By cozying up to dictators and casting aside democratic allies abroad, and mimicking strongmen while undermining institutions at

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WHO urges ban on high levels of sugar from fruit puree in baby food

High sugar content may be threat to first teeth and affect food preferences in adulthood Commercial baby foods contain too much sugar – even when they are labelled as savoury meals, says the World Health Organization, which is seeking a ban on added sugars in foods for children under 36 months old . WHO Europe is calling for a crackdown on the high levels of sugar in the diet of babies fed on com

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Queen's message to the moon on show to mark 50 years since Apollo 11

National Archive documents reveal Buckingham Palace thought messages ‘a gimmick’ While the world awaited the historic launch of Apollo 11 half a century ago this week, Nasa invited many heads of state and government, including the Queen, to send messages to the moon. Buckingham Palace may not have been immediately enthusiastic, however, apparently thinking that any such message could be “a gimmic

14h

Sushi Restaurant Fires Linked to Deep-Fried Tempura Flakes

The crunchy mixture can spontaneously combust, fire officials say, and should be handled properly.

14h

‘Mundos Alternos,’ Where Other Worlds Come to Life

Science fiction illuminates reality by imagining the unreal in a mind-bending show at the Queens Museum.

14h

19 Best Prime Day Deals on Amazon Devices: Kindle, Echo, Fire

Get your Alexa on with these Amazon Device deals on Fire Tablets, Kindles, Ring Doorbells, and more.

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Techtopia #114: Musikinstrumentet, der blev til spionudstyr

Podcast: Denne uge sætter vi spot på thereminen, det mystiske instrument, som i år kan fejre 100-års fødselsdag.

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Researchers release the first vaccine fully developed by AI program

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Spatial Computing education app for kids in Finland

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Can Emotion Be Automated?

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Blockchain Document Verification using Blocktick SaaS

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What are some theoretical things Quantum computer may be able to do ?

For example get in contact with the multiverse : P by solving a problem that requires more matter than in this universe submitted by /u/rolling_pandas_2212 [link] [comments]

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'Whitey's on the moon': why Apollo 11 looked so different to black America

The civil rights leader Ralph Abernathy called Nasa’s moonshot ‘an inhuman priority’ while poor children went hungry The date was 15 July 1969. As the Saturn V rocket towered over the launchpad, about to send the first men to the moon, two dozen black families from poor parts of the south, accompanied by mules and wagons emblematic of the civil rights movement, marched to the fence of Cape Kenned

15h

Ovarian cancer treatment boosts GSK

UK drugmaker has been under pressure to produce new money-spinning medicines

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Folketinget dropper evaluering af hullet valgsystem: »Kritisabelt og tåbeligt«

Systemet til håndtering af vælgererklæringer blev misbrugt at to partier forud for valget. Alligevel skal det ikke evalueres, har et flertal nu besluttet.

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Forskere sår tvivl om antidepressiv medicin

Flere end 400.000 mennesker tager ifølge Sundhedsdatastyrelsen minimum en type antidepressiv medicin.

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Empty nets as overfishing and climate change sap Lake Malawi

On the shores of Lake Malawi, a crowd eagerly awaits the arrival of a white and yellow cedarwood boat carrying its haul.

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Empty nets as overfishing and climate change sap Lake Malawi

On the shores of Lake Malawi, a crowd eagerly awaits the arrival of a white and yellow cedarwood boat carrying its haul.

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Barry weakens, but US officials warn of heavy rains, floods, tornadoes

Barry weakened further on Sunday as the storm churned across the US state of Louisiana, bringing along heavy rains and the possibility of flooding and tornadoes.

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India scrubs Moon mission launch one hour before liftoff

India on Monday postponed the launch of a lunar probe less than an hour before blast-off because of a technical problem, delaying its bid to become only the fourth nation to land a spacecraft on the Moon.

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Amazon Prime Day 2019: The Absolute Best Tech Deals Online

We scoured Amazon's labyrinth of discounts to bring you the best Prime Day deals.

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Bad Documentary Review: Family Shots

Amazon removed a number of anti-vax documentaries in March but a few still remain unfortunately. Family Shots is a anti-vax propaganda film pretending to be a documentary about a father trying to find out if vaccines are safe. It also got government funding to be made. Yeah…

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Redaktionens favoritter: Har de selvstyrende kamprobotter allerede vundet krigen?

Nogle historier lever et alt for kort liv. Derfor har vi bedt et udpluk af Ingeniørens redaktører og journalister anbefale egne og andres historier. Her er, hvad de fandt frem.

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Can you solve it? Cheese cube nibbles

The party snack is perfect brain food UPDATE: To read the answers click here Today’s puzzles all concern cubes of cheese. You’ll need to be as sharp as a cocktail stick to skewer them. 1. You have a cube of cheese that measures 3 x 3 x 3 inches, and you want to slice it into 27 smaller 1 x 1 x 1 inch cubes, as shown below. If you have a straight knife, what’s the minimum number of slices you need

17h

Strange new species of duck-billed dinosaur identified

The most complete skull of a duck-billed dinosaur from Big Bend National Park, Texas, is revealed in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology as a new genus and species, Aquilarhinus palimentus. …

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Grasshoppers and silkworms have antioxidant capacity similar to fresh orange juice, says study

For the first time, a study has measured antioxidant levels in commercially available edible insects.

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Grasshoppers and silkworms have antioxidant capacity similar to fresh orange juice, says study

For the first time, a study has measured antioxidant levels in commercially available edible insects.

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Australian research finds little lizards learn very quickly

Young Australian eastern blue-tongue lizards (Tiliqua scincoides) are every bit as clever as adults, researchers have found.

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Strange new species of duck-billed dinosaur identified

The most complete skull of a duck-billed dinosaur from Big Bend National Park, Texas, is revealed in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology as a new genus and species, Aquilarhinus palimentus. This dinosaur has been named for its aquiline nose and wide lower jaw, shaped like two trowels laid side by side.

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Australian research finds little lizards learn very quickly

Young Australian eastern blue-tongue lizards (Tiliqua scincoides) are every bit as clever as adults, researchers have found.

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Advokat og patient-direktør: Det skal være endnu lettere at få adgang til borgernes sundhedsdata

Danmark er blandt de lande i verden, hvor forskerne har lettest adgang til borgeres sundhedsdata. Alligevel mener både advokat fra Bech-Bruun og direktør i interesseorganisationen Danske Patienter, at adgangen skal gøres nemmere.

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Improved Technique Provides Major Lift to Biomedical Genomics Research

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Two new antibiotics are effective against resistance

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Malta’s Fledgling Movement for Abortion Rights

VALETTA, Malta—Maria Borg stood with five other women outside the prime minister’s office here on a recent day, holding a banner that read: Welcome to Malta, where women and girls are just incubators . The women, part of an abortion-rights collective called Voice for Choice , were welcoming European leaders, including France’s Emmanuel Macron and Spain’s Pedro Sánchez, who were attending a Southe

18h

Universitet ansætter kun kvinder: 'Man retter op på et system, der ikke er fair'

Kønskvoter er super effektive, siger professor om hollandsk idé. Danske universiteter er imod.

18h

Early and ongoing experiences of weight stigma linked to self-directed weight shaming

In a new study published today in Obesity Science and Practice, researchers at Penn Medicine and the University of Connecticut Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity surveyed more than 18,000 adults enrolled in the commercial weight management program WW International, and found that participants who internalized weight bias the most tended to be younger, female, have a higher body mass index (BM

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Strange new species of duck-billed dinosaur identified

The most complete skull of a duck-billed dinosaur from Big Bend National Park, Texas, is revealed in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology as a new genus and species, Aquilarhinus palimentus. This dinosaur has been named for its aquiline nose and wide lower jaw, shaped like two trowels laid side by side.

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Cancer tissue-freezing approach may help more breast cancer patients in lower income countries

A new reusable device created by the Johns Hopkins University can help women with breast cancer in lower income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

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Baby blue-tongues are born smart

Young Australian eastern blue-tongue lizards (Tiliqua scincoides) are every bit as clever as adults, researchers have found. Life is hard for baby blue-tongues. As soon as they are born, they are on their own, with neither parental support nor protection. Adults of the species can grow to 600 millimetres long and enjoy the benefits of thick scales and a powerful bite, but the young are much smalle

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Tiny habitant from Abrolhos bank (Brazil) sheds light on tropical Atlantic biogeography

For the first time, the bivalve mollusc Guyanella clenchi has been reported from Abrolhos Bank, Brazil. This small and almost unknown bivalve had previously been reported solely from the Caribbean region. Apart from being the southernmost record for the species, its presence also helps the experts to determine the way the marine fauna from the Caribbean interacts with its South American relatives.

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Meet the six-legged superfoods: Grasshoppers top insect antioxidant-rich list

For the first time, a study has measured antioxidant levels in commercially available edible insects. For open-minded health freaks, it's good news: crickets pack 75% the antioxidant power of fresh OJ, and silkworm fat twice that of olive oil. And while even ladybirds fart, insects have a tiny land, water and carbon footprint compared with livestock — so anything that encourages insect eating is

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Surgery before pregnancy linked to higher risk of opioid withdrawal in babies

Babies whose mothers underwent surgery before pregnancy have an increased risk of opioid withdrawal symptoms at birth, according to a new study done by Dr. Nathalie Auger, researcher at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM), and published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

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Sudden cardiac arrest in athletes: Prevention and management

It's marathon season, and every so often a news report will focus on an athlete who has collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest. Although uncommon, these events get attention. A new review in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) looks at recent evidence to help physicians prevent and manage the risk of sudden cardiac arrest in competitive athletes.

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Political support, strong public health systems key to eliminating measles outbreaks worldwide

Strong political support and strong public health systems are necessary to combat measles outbreaks, which are growing in frequency around the world, argue public health experts in a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

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Surgery before pregnancy linked to increased risk of opioid withdrawal in babies

Babies whose mothers underwent surgery before pregnancy had an increased risk of opioid withdrawal symptoms at birth, found a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

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Strict state laws and universal background checks linked to lower pediatric firearm-related deaths

States with stricter firearms laws had lower firearm-related deaths among children and adolescents, finds research led by faculty at Children's National in Washington, D.C. Furthermore, state laws that had been in place for more than five years requiring universal background checks for firearm purchases were associated with a 35% lower firearm-related death rate among children.

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Smart Pills Help Monitor Cancer Patients' Therapy

Sensors encapsulated with oral chemotherapy drugs help patients and physicians keep track of treatments.

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Contributors

Meet some of the people featured in the July/August 2019 issue of The Scientist.

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Opinion: Applying AI to Clinical Care Is Key to Individualized Medicine

Not only can artificial intelligence revolutionize healthcare, it could help restore the doctor-patient relationship.

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