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nyheder2019juli17

The Lancet: Big Sugar and neglect by global health community fuel oral health crisis

Oral health has been isolated from traditional healthcare and health policy for too long, despite the major global public health burden of oral diseases, according to a Lancet Series on Oral Health, published today in The Lancet. Failure of the global health community to prioritize the global burden of oral health has led to calls from Lancet Series authors for the radical reform of dental care, t

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Salt regulations linked to 9,900 cases of cardiovascular disease and 1,500 cancer cases

A relaxation of UK industry regulation of salt content in food has been linked with 9,900 additional cases of cardiovascular disease, and 1,500 cases of stomach cancer.

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Nations with strong women's rights likely to have better population health and faster growth

Nations with strong women's rights are more likely to have better health and faster growth than those who don't promote and protect these values, finds research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

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Music may offer alternative to preoperative drug routinely used to calm nerves

Music may offer an alternative to the use of a drug routinely used to calm the nerves before the use of regional anaesthesia (peripheral nerve block), suggest the results of a clinical trial, published online in the journal Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine.

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Voluntary pact with food industry to curb salt content in England linked to thousands of extra heart

Since the introduction of the voluntary pact the UK government made with the food industry in 2011 to curb the salt content of food, the reduction in dietary salt intake in England has slowed significantly, reveals the first study of its kind, published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Heat Waves in the Age of Climate Change: Longer, More Frequent and More Dangerous

The average number of heat waves in 50 major American cities has tripled since the 1960s.

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'Crystal clocks' used to time magma storage before volcanic eruptions

The molten rock that feeds volcanoes can be stored in the Earth's crust for as long as a thousand years, a result which may help with volcanic hazard management and better forecasting of when eruptions might occur.

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New low-cost thermoelectric material works at room temperature

The widespread adoption of thermoelectric devices that can directly convert electricity into thermal energy for cooling and heating has been hindered, in part, by the lack of materials that are both inexpensive and highly efficient at room temperature. Now researchers have reported the discovery of a new material that works efficiently at room temperature while requiring almost no costly tellurium

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Jurassic fossil shows how early mammals could swallow like their modern descendants

The 165-million-year-old fossil of Microdocodon gracilis, a tiny, shrew-like animal, shows the earliest example of modern hyoid bones in mammal evolution.

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Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) can increase men's risk of stroke and heart attack

Aging men with low testosterone levels who take testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) are at a slightly greater risk of experiencing an ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), or myocardial infarction, especially during the first two years of use, reports a new study. The findings confirm concerns voiced by many health agencies about the potential risks associated with the treatment.

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The unpopular truth about biases toward people with disabilities

Needing to ride in a wheelchair can put the brakes on myriad opportunities — some less obvious than one might think. New research sheds light on the bias people have toward people with disabilities, known as 'ableism,' and how it shifts over time.

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Greater prevalence of congenital heart defects in high intensity oil and gas areas

Mothers living near more intense oil and gas development activity have a 40-70% higher chance of having children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) compared to those living in areas of less intense activity, according to a new study.

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Improving the signal-to-noise ratio in quantum chromodynamics simulations

A study describes a new technique for simulating particle ensembles that are 'large' (at least by the standards of particle physics). The technique improves the signal-to-noise ratio and thus the precision of the simulation; crucially, it can also be used to model ensembles of baryons: a category of elementary particles that includes the protons and neutrons that make up atomic nuclei.

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Cracks in the skin of eczema patients promote allergic diseases

Many babies with eczema go on to develop food allergies, asthma and hay fever, and researchers say it's not a coincidence. The cracks caused by eczema weaken the skin barrier, allowing allergens to penetrate the skin and cause a sequence of allergic diseases, what experts call the 'atopic march.'

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Diabetes increases the risk of heart failure; more so in women than men

A global study of 12 million people has found diabetes increases the risk of heart failure and this increase is greater for women than men.

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Diabetes increases the risk of heart failure more in women than men

Diabetes confers a greater excess risk of heart failure in women than men, according to new research in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes). Type 1 diabetes is associated with a 47% excess risk of heart failure in women compared to men, whilst type 2 diabetes has a 9% excess risk of heart failure for women than men.

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Diabetes increases the risk of heart failure; more so in women than men

A global study of 12 million people has found diabetes increases the risk of heart failure and this increase is greater for women than men.

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The Unexplained Noise 2 Percent of People Can Hear

Some describe it as sounding like an engine idling just outside the house. Others report hearing a low-frequency rumble. But almost everyone who can hear it— 2 percent of the population, by some estimates—agrees on one thing: “ the hum ,” as it has come to be called, is a persistent, maddening noise for which the scientific world has no known explanation. Since it was first reported in Bristol, E

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘It Makes Us Want to Support Him More’

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, July 18. ‣ The House passed legislation that would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour —though there’s little chance the measure will be taken up by the Senate. Here’s what else we’re watching: A crowd of Tr

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Researchers use Twitter and AI to see who is hitting the gym

A new study used machine learning to find and comb through exercise-related tweets from across the United States, unpacking regional and gender differences in exercise types and intensity levels.

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Link found between gut bacteria, successful joint replacement

Having healthy gut flora — the trillions of bacteria housed in our intestines — could lower the risk of infection following knee and hip replacement surgeries, while an unhealthy intestinal flora may increase the risk of infection.

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Study finds key metabolic changes in patients with chemotherapy-associated cardiotoxicity

Researchers embarked on a study to investigate whether early changes in energy-related metabolites in the blood — measured shortly after chemotherapy — could be used to identify patients who developed heart toxicity at a later time.

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New research identifies gene that hides cancer cells from immunotherapy

A team has identified a gene that could make immunotherapy treatments, specifically checkpoint inhibitors, work for a wider variety of cancer patients. The study found that when the DUX4 gene is expressed in cancer cells, it can prevent the cancer from being recognized and destroyed by the immune system.

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Over-claiming knowledge predicts anti-establishment voting

People who think they know more than they actually do are more likely to vote against the establishment, shows new research.

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Biochemistry: Versatile recycling in the cell

Ribosomes need regenerating. This process is important for the quality of the proteins produced and thus for the whole cell homeostasis as well as for developmental and biological processes. Biochemists and biophysicists have now watched one of the most important enzymes for ribosome recycling at work — ABCE1 — and shown that it is unexpectedly versatile in terms of structure.

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Simulations fix the cracks in magnetic mirrors

Physicists show that 'magnetic mirrors' plasma leaks can be minimized if specific conditions are met. The insights gathered could solve a decades-old problem of low plasma confinement times and high loss rates in magnetic mirrors.

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Group calls on international community to prevent dementia by preventing stroke

The risk factors for stroke and dementia are the same, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates that preventing stroke can also prevent some dementias. Now, a group of experts is calling on the global community to come together to take action on preventing dementia by preventing stroke.

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Genetic differences between strains of Epstein-Barr virus can alter its activity

Researchers have identified how differences in the genetic sequence of the two main strains of the cancer-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can alter the way the virus behaves when it infects white blood cells.

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Profit soars for Microsoft fueled by cloud, business services

Microsoft on Thursday posted quarterly earnings that trounced expectations, citing growth in partnerships with companies on technology and cloud computing services.

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While Washington Talks Antitrust, Europe Takes Action

The European Commission fined chipmaker Qualcomm €242 million for luring Chinese phone makers with low prices, forcing a British rival out of the market.

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China Gives GPS-Tracking Wristwatches to 17,000 Kids

Kid Trackers Last week, 17,000 elementary schoolchildren in the Chinese city Guangzhou got a bizarre gift from the local government: a GPS-enabled smartwatch that tracks their location in what officials are calling a new safety initiative. The distribution, first reported by the Chinese news outlet Guangzhou Daily , is the first step of a voluntary program to help parents keep track of their kids

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Alzheimer's gene may impact cognitive health before adulthood

A psychologist asserts that those carrying the APOE4 gene score lower on IQ tests during childhood and adolescence. And the effect was stronger in girls than in boys. APOE4 carriers are up to three times more likely to develop late-onset Alzheimer's disease, which occurs in people 65 and older.

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Kids And Grownups Alike Wowed By Rocket Projected On The Washington Monument

In Washington, D.C., the Smithsonian is treating visitors to exhibits celebrating the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. After dark an image of the rocket is projected on the Washington Monument.

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Here's what makes ADX Florence the country's most secure prison

ADX Florence has been called the most secure jail in the world. (Wikimedia/) Off Colorado’s Highway 67, the U.S.’s highest-security “supermax” prison, ADX Florence sits in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, which owns and operates the facility, opened the “control unit” in 1994 for male prisoners deemed unusually violent or likely to escape from other facilities. Th

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Maternal race not a factor for children experiencing a 'language gap'

Researchers have discovered that race plays no role in the amount and quality of the words mothers use with their children, or with the language skills their children later develop.

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Toward molecular computers: First measurement of single-molecule heat transfer

Heat transfer through a single molecule has been measured for the first time by an international team of researchers.

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Study examines differences over time in home dialysis initiation by race and ethnicity

Among US patients who started dialysis in 2005 to 2013, racial/ethnic differences in initiating home dialysis decreased over time, although in the most recent era, Blacks were still less likely to use home dialysis as the initial modality than other groups. Racial/ethnic differences in transfer from home dialysis to hemodialysis performed in dialysis facilities did not change over time. Minority p

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Higher kidney function at dialysis start linked with greater risk of death in children

In an analysis of information on children with kidney failure who began dialysis in the United States between 1995 and 2015, the risk of death was 1.36 times higher among children with higher kidney function at dialysis initiation. The risk of death was even greater for children with higher kidney function who initiated treatment with hemodialysis rather than peritoneal dialysis. In more recent ye

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China’s Tiangong-2 Space Station Will Fall Out of the Sky Friday

Death Throes On Friday, China’s space station Tiangong-2 will be formally decommissioned — in brutal fashion. Tiangong-2 will fire up its thrusters and aim itself straight at an isolated patch of the Pacific Ocean, New Scientist reports , marking the end of the prototype space station’s three-year journey in orbit. Planned Obsolescence China always planned to decommission Tiangong-2. All of the r

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Huge sand dune designed to prevent major gas terminal falling into sea

In a UK first, a 7m high barrier of sand is being created to help stop the coastline from crumbling.

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WHO Declares Ebola Outbreak a Global Health Emergency

The current outbreak in Democratic Republic of Congo has been going on for nearly a year, and the new status could bring in more funding and assistance.

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Toward molecular computers: First measurement of single-molecule heat transfer

Heat transfer through a single molecule has been measured for the first time by an international team of researchers.

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Tensions With Iran Reach the Point of Inevitability

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET Something like this was bound to happen. The U.S. Navy destroyed an Iranian drone over the Strait of Hormuz after President Donald Trump said it came within “threatening” range and ignored “multiple calls to stand down.” Trump said the action taken by the USS Boxer, a Wasp-class amphibious assault ship, was “defensive.” “This is the latest of many provocative and hostile a

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Red Wine Compound Could Keep Astronauts Strong on Mars

Drink Up The hurdles to colonizing Mars aren’t limited to the arduous journey to the Red Planet — once we get there, we’ll also need to find a way to cope with the detrimental health effects of too much radiation and not enough gravity . Now, a new Harvard University study , published on Thursday in the journal Frontiers in Physiology , suggests the solution to some of our Red Planet health woes

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Last Month Was the Hottest June on Earth Ever Recorded

Do you feel hot? Because it's been really, really hot.

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These 6 Accidents Nearly Derailed Apollo 11's Mission to the Moon

The Apollo 11 mission to the moon was one of humanity's most incredible feats, but it almost didn't happen.

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An Astronomer's Old Photos Reveal Hidden Wonders of the Night Sky

An Astronomer's Old Photos Reveal Hidden Wonders of the Night Sky Using a simple film camera, astronomer Bill Livingston photographed satellites that hover above the equator. StarStreaks_topNteaser.jpg Star streaks in a long exposure photo. In front, Mount Teide in the Canary Islands. Taken in early October of 1996. Image credits: William Livingston Space Thursday, July 18, 2019 – 16:30 Rodrigo P

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What can be done to prevent a data-driven dystopian future? China is already well on its way with their surveillance state in Xinjiang. Who will stand up to them? If there are no consequences, other countries will surely follow their lead.

Footage from inside the city shows a completely government controlled police state with cameras every few feet, a lot of which have facial recognition software. They are taking people (mostly Uyghurs) off the street and putting them in “re-education” camps which they aren’t allowed to leave. Everything they do or say is closely monitored. How can it be stopped? submitted by /u/silverspaceships [l

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This Farmer Thinks Kelp Will Help Save the World

submitted by /u/addpulp [link] [comments]

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Scientists discover pathway to skin regeneration

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Strong storms also play big role in Antarctic ice shelf collapse

Warming temperatures and changes in ocean circulation and salinity are driving the breakup of ice sheets in Antarctica, but a new study suggests that intense storms may help push the system over the edge.

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Sperm may offer the uterus a 'secret handshake'

Why does it take 200 million sperm to fertilize a single egg? Part of the reason is bombardment by the female immune system, which very few sperm survive. Researchers have discovered a molecular handshake between sperm and uterine cells that may help sperm evade this attack — or may help the immune system target the weakest sperm.

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Lionfish ear-bones reveal a more mobile invasion

Researchers have little information about how grown lionfish might invade or move to new waters because tracking small marine organisms poses difficulties. One way to investigate their movements, though, is to study stable isotopes in their ear-bones.

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So, About Your Internet Porn Habits

You might want some privacy when consuming porn online, whether that’s going in incognito mode, locking the door, putting in headphones, or all of the above. And while this certainly conceals …

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Resveratrol, Compound in Red Wine, Could Help Astronauts Walk on Mars

(Credit: HappyRichStudio/Shutterstock) The same stuff that’s been linked to red wine’s heart-health benefits could also someday help astronauts walk on Mars. In a new study published in the journal Frontiers in Physiology, researchers say that resveratrol, a compound found in wines, could lessen muscle loss on the long trip to Mars. The Trouble With Traveling to Mars Currently, a one-way trip to M

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BU researchers use Twitter and AI to see who is hitting the gym

A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers and published in BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine used machine learning to find and comb through exercise-related tweets from across the United States, unpacking regional and gender differences in exercise types and intensity levels.

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Metal oxide-infused membranes could offer low-energy alternative for chemical separations

Researchers are working on membranes that could separate chemicals without using energy-intensive distillation processes.

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Physicists use mathematics to trace neuro transitions

Unique in its application of a mathematical model to understand how the brain transitions from consciousness to unconscious behavior, a study may have just advanced neuroscience appreciably. The findings, surprisingly by physicists, suggest that the subliminal state is the most robust part of the conscious network.

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Update: Twins who were face of controversial rare disease treatment have died

Treatment for fatal Niemann-Pick type C entangled in legal battle

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Bad News: A Banana-Killing Fungus Has Likely Reached the Americas

Second Banana In the 1960s, Panama disease ravaged the world’s banana crops, forcing growers to trade in the widely cultivated Gros Miche banana variety for the disease-resistant — and some say, less tasty — Cavendish. Now, a new story in the magazine Science finds that Colombian authorities have quarantined four banana plantations after noticing symptoms of fusarium wilt tropical race 4 (TR4), a

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E.P.A. Won’t Ban Chlorpyrifos, Pesticide Tied to Children’s Health Problems

The decision not to prohibit the pesticide, which has been linked to developmental disabilities, comes after years of legal wrangling.

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Mitchell Feigenbaum, Physicist, Dies at 74; He Made Sense of Chaos

His discovery of what seemed at first a mathematical curiosity led to what is known as the Feigenbaum constant, a pattern of chaos found in nature.

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Where Do Supermassive Black Holes Come From?

Born shortly after the Big Bang, these cosmic monsters have perplexed astronomers for years. A new study may shed light on their origins.

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Teen sexting is an overblown moral panic, according to a new study

While parents and media freak out about sexting teens, one study says it and “sextortion” fears are inflated.

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Diagonalizing the Psalms

Mathematics-inspired manipulations of scripture — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Physicists use mathematics to trace neuro transitions

Unique in its application of a mathematical model to understand how the brain transitions from consciousness to unconscious behavior, a study may have just advanced neuroscience appreciably. The findings, surprisingly by physicists, suggest that the subliminal state is the most robust part of the conscious network.

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Archaic TB test for cows could finally be put out to pasture

Nature, Published online: 17 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02202-6 An updated method could enable tuberculosis vaccination in low-income nations.

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Norwegian Firm Plans Offshore Remote-Controlled Salmon Farm

Remote-Controlled Fish Pen Norwegian company Arctic Offshore Farming has developed a new remote-controlled fish pen that could both reduce the cost of feed and minimize salmon dying from sea lice. The company is planning to test out the first pen off the Norwegian coast in 2020. The demand for salmon is booming: the industry is expected to grow four-fold by 2050. And as IEEE Spectrum points out ,

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The best books about the moon

Reads about the moon (David Dibert via Unsplash/) Earthlings have been staring up at the moon since it first appeared. It provides a nightlight (admittedly through reflection, not its own luminescence), new frontier, and, perhaps most importantly, company. There a million books about its rocky surface, but here, we’ve compiled a shortlist of great books about our nearest neighbor. In this bestsel

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Alzheimer's gene may impact cognitive health before adulthood

In the journal Neurobiology of Aging, UC Riverside psychology Chandra Reynolds asserts that those carrying the APOE4 gene score lower on IQ tests during childhood and adolescence. And the effect was stronger in girls than in boys. APOE4 carriers are up to three times more likely to develop late-onset Alzheimer's disease, which occurs in people 65 and older.

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Many of the deadliest cancers receive the least amount of research funding

Many of the deadliest or most common cancers get the least amount of nonprofit research funding, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. 'Embarrassing' or stigmatized cancers, like lung and liver, are underfunded. Colon, endometrial, liver and bile duct, cervical, ovarian, pancreatic and lung cancers were all poorly funded compared to how common they are and how many deaths they cause, the stud

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These Vibration-Powered Microbots Are Almost Too Small to See

Small Wonders Researchers from Georgia Tech have created microbots so tiny, they make a penny look massive — and they could one day attack diseases in your body. According to the team’s paper , which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering , each of the 3D-printed microbots weighs just five milligrams, slightly more than a grain of sand . The team design

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Metal oxide-infused membranes could offer low-energy alternative for chemical separations

Researchers are working on membranes that could separate chemicals without using energy-intensive distillation processes.

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Low doses of radiation promote cancer-capable cells

New research finds that low doses of radiation equivalent to three CT scans, which are considered safe, give cancer-capable cells a competitive advantage over normal cells.

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New laws of attraction: Scientists print magnetic liquid droplets

Scientists have made a new material that is both liquid and magnetic, opening the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter. The new material could lead to a revolutionary class of printable liquid devices for a variety of applications from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots that can change their shape to adapt to their surroundings.

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How low oxygen builds a bigger, stronger alligator heart

Researchers are beginning to understand why some alligators develop stronger hearts after enduring low oxygen during early development in the egg.

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You might soon be travelling without a passport – this is how

The future of air travel is… paperless. Or will be, under an initiative introduced by the World Economic Forum. The Known Traveller Digital Identity (KTDI) programme will allow people to fly document-free between international destinations. Testing for the scheme is underway, and passengers enrolled in the pilot project will be able to travel between Canada and the Netherlands using their mobile

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Chinese space station Tiangong-2 is about to fall from space

The Chinese space agency is getting ready to bring its small space station, Tiangong-2, down from orbit to splash down in the Pacific Ocean on 19 July

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How Scientists Are Using Eggshells to Grow New Bone

People with bones damaged by accidents, cancer or aging could one day benefit from bone grafts strengthened with chicken eggshells

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Scientists stimulate neurons to induce particular perceptions in mice's minds

Hallucinations are spooky and, fortunately, fairly rare. But, a new study suggests, the real question isn't so much why some people occasionally experience them. It's why all of us aren't hallucinating all the time.

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Study finds maternal race not a factor for children experiencing a 'language gap'

Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute have discovered that race plays no role in the amount and quality of the words mothers use with their children, or with the language skills their children later develop.

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Strong storms also play big role in Antarctic ice shelf collapse

Warming temperatures and changes in ocean circulation and salinity are driving the breakup of ice sheets in Antarctica, but a new study suggests that intense storms may help push the system over the edge.

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The Truth About Trump’s Love-Hate Relationship With Big Tech

The president and social media companies pantomime conflict while quietly helping each other.

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New laws of attraction: Scientists print magnetic liquid droplets

Scientists have made a new material that is both liquid and magnetic, opening the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter. The new material could lead to a revolutionary class of printable liquid devices for a variety of applications from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots that can change their shape to adapt to their surroundings.

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Strong storms also play big role in Antarctic ice shelf collapse

Warming temperatures and changes in ocean circulation and salinity are driving the breakup of ice sheets in Antarctica, but a new study suggests that intense storms may help push the system over the edge.

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Pre-results review: Taking transparency in economics research to the next level

A fundamental norm of science is that its findings are common property of the scientific community and that scientific progress relies on open communication and sharing. Yet all too often, journal editors and reviewers reject papers that have posed important questions and used appropriate methods, but whose results are not statistically significant or are deemed unsurprising or "uninteresting". Th

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Heat wave forecast prompts Chicago public housing checks

Public housing officials in Chicago were planning wellbeing checks on residents as the heat and humidity are expected to mount to dangerous levels as part of a wave of sweltering weather covering a substantial portion of the U.S.

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Sorry, You Won’t Be Hovering Over Paris Anytime Soon

Though the sky is ripe for disruption with jetpacks and flying cars, we are stuck on the ground partly because we want to be.

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Depth of Field: The Hollow Poetry of the Eric Garner Decision

The force of Drew Angerer's photo is in what it names: It tells us what the US Department of Justice did about Eric Garner's death.

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Kevin Spacey Is Not Vindicated

Help me. Among the text messages sent by a then–18-year-old busboy on the night in 2016 when he alleges Kevin Spacey sexually assaulted him, that one sentiment—a plea for rescue—recurred at least five times. At a Nantucket bar, the man had been talking with Spacey, who bought him a number of drinks and, according to the accuser, pulled down the man’s zipper and started fondling him. The man texte

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Researchers confirm the validity of xenographic models for studies of methylation

Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), published today in Molecular Cancer Research a study where they identify methylation patterns associated with different subtypes of breast cancer, and a subclassification of the group of 'triple negatives,' a breast cancer type typically associated with poor prognosis. In addition, researchers identified changes in DNA methylati

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TGen-led study finds link between gene and severe liver damage

Researchers have found that a gene known as AEBP1 may play a central role in the development, severity and potential treatment of liver disease, according to a study by Temple University, the Geisinger Obesity Institute and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope. One of the study's major findings is that AEBP1 regulates the expression of a network of at

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'Florida really tops the charts' of states climate change will heat up, report says

Miamians are already used to stifling heat waves that leave them sprinting from air-conditioned cars to air-conditioned buildings or flocking to the beach to cool off. Or so they think.

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Danish study finds 95 percent of dead petrels ingested plastic

More than 90 percent of northern petrels found dead off the Danish coast had plastic in their stomachs, a study by Denmark's environmental protection agency said Thursday.

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The heat goes on: June toastiest on record, July may follow

The heat goes on: Earth sizzled to its hottest June on record as the climate keeps going to extremes.

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DNASTAR® announced the release of Lasergene 16 Software

DNASTAR® announced the release of Lasergene 16 today, which includes a broad range of improvements in for analysis of DNA, RNA and protein sequence data, as well as new advancements for predicting and analyzing protein structures.

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DARPA’s “Squad X” Teams Up Soldiers With Scout Robots

Human-Cyborg Relations A new military hit squad uses both human and robot soldiers to scout out and storm a battlefield. The so-called “Squad X,” an experimental team assembled by the Pentagon’s research division, DARPA, uses scouting robots to gather intel about an area before human infantry move in, according to The Verge . The human-machine symbiosis could indicate a shift in military strategy

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Experience Apollo 11 through a dozen historical photos

Apollo 11 launched on July 16, 1969, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, and Michael Collins to the moon. (NASA/) Buzz Aldrin prepares to touch down on the moon in the Apollo 11 Lunar Module on July 20, 1969. (NASA/) The Lunar Module, Eagle, prepares to land. The rods protruding from the landing pads sense the moon’s surface and send word to the crew to shut off the descent e

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These six big moon mysteries remain unsolved

Our Apollo missions created more questions than answers. (NASA/) Saturday will mark the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 landing on the moon, which was the first time in history humans set foot on an extraterrestrial world. But Earth’s only natural satellite is still a very unfamiliar place to us half a century later, and its history and geology are still puzzling—largely because we haven’t been bac

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Would your mobile phone be powerful enough to get you to the moon?

Many people who are old enough to have experienced the first moon landing will vividly remember what it was like watching Neil Armstrong utter his famous quote: “ That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind. " Half a century later, the event is still one of the top achievements of humankind. Despite the rapid technological advances since then, astronauts haven't actually been back

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Why Are These Mice Hallucinating? Scientists Are in Their Heads

New laser technology appeared to trigger particular images in the brains of lab mice.

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Manmade ruin adds 7,000 species to endangered 'Red List'

Mankind's destruction of nature is driving species to the brink of extinction at an "unprecedented" rate, the leading wildlife conservation body warned Thursday as it added more than 7,000 animals, fish and plants to its endangered "Red List".

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Manmade ruin adds 7,000 species to endangered 'Red List'

Mankind's destruction of nature is driving species to the brink of extinction at an "unprecedented" rate, the leading wildlife conservation body warned Thursday as it added more than 7,000 animals, fish and plants to its endangered "Red List".

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Arbor Biosciences Partners with Curio Genomics for Analysis of IWGSC Wheat Exome

Arbor Biosciences, a division of Chiral Technologies, Inc and worldwide leader in next generation sequencing (NGS) target enrichment, announces a partnership with Curio Genomics for bioinformatics analysis of the wheat genome.

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Sperm may offer the uterus a 'secret handshake'

Why does it take 200 million sperm to fertilize a single egg?

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Toward molecular computers: First measurement of single-molecule heat transfer

Heat transfer through a single molecule has been measured for the first time by an international team of researchers led by the University of Michigan.

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The top five strangest poisons that can kill you

There are some crazy poisons in this world of ours, and they're often found in things you'd least expect. In this week's episode of Reactions, we break down our top five strangest poisons.

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Hawaii telescope protest shuts down 13 observatories on Mauna Kea

Nature, Published online: 18 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02222-2 Construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope was supposed to start on 15 July.

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Sperm may offer the uterus a 'secret handshake'

Why does it take 200 million sperm to fertilize a single egg?

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Simulation explores how insects glean compass direction from skylight

A computational simulation suggests that insects may be capable of using the properties of light from the sky to determine their compass direction with an error of less than two degrees. Evripidis Gkanias of the University of Edinburgh, U.K., and colleagues present their findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Diversity on teams leads to positive outcomes, but not for all

Individuals on teams of diverse people working together can have better outcomes than those on teams with similar individuals, research as shown.

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10 technologies that could combat climate change as food demand soars

A new study from the World Bank and UN finds we’ll need ways to boost yields faster than ever before to prevent agricultural emissions from soaring.

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Simulation explores how insects glean compass direction from skylight

A computational simulation suggests that insects may be capable of using the properties of light from the sky to determine their compass direction with an error of less than two degrees. Evripidis Gkanias of the University of Edinburgh, U.K., and colleagues present their findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Sperm may offer the uterus a 'secret handshake'

Why does it take 200 million sperm to fertilize a single egg? Part of the reason is bombardment by the female immune system, which very few sperm survive. Researchers have discovered a molecular handshake between sperm and uterine cells that may help sperm evade this attack –or may help the immune system target the weakest sperm.

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Metal oxide-infused membranes could offer low-energy alternative for chemical separations

Chemical manufacturers consume a massive amount of energy each year separating and refining feedstocks to make a wide variety of products including gasoline, plastics and food.

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Coaching scientists to play well together

When scientists from different disciplines collaborate—as is increasingly necessary to confront the complexity of challenging research problems—interpersonal tussles often arise. One scientist may accuse another of stealing her ideas. Or, a researcher may feel he is not getting credit for his work or doesn't have access to important data.

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Conjoined Twins Fused at the Head Now Separated After More Than 50 Hours of Surgery

Twin girls who were born joined at the head have been successfully separated after a months-long medical endeavor.

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Europe’s Galileo Satellite Outage Serves as a Warning

The dramatic EU Galileo incident underscores the threat of satellite timing and navigation system failures.

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NASA's Webb Telescope shines with American ingenuity

To send humans to the Moon 50 years ago, an entire nation rose to the challenge. Surmounting countless hurdles, inventing new technologies while staring into the face of the unknown, NASA successfully pioneered multiple lunar landings. NASA demonstrated to the world the importance of partnerships and what a unified country can achieve.

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Cleaning our water with groundbreaking 'bioinspired' chemistry

The 20th and 21st centuries have seen an explosion in the use of synthetic chemicals worldwide, including pesticides, medications and household cleaners—many of which end up in our waterways. Even in small amounts these substances can affect wildlife, plants and humans, and a number of them have shown resistance to normal water treatment methods, leaving them to build up in the environment uncheck

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How the women of NASA made their mark on the space program

The Civil Rights Act had just passed and the slide rule was giving way to computers when Frances "Poppy" Northcutt arrived at NASA's Houston campus in 1965, eager to join the space race. But her job title stunned her: "computress."

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Canada's high school curricula not giving students full picture of climate change

Canada's high school students may not be getting enough information on the negative impacts of climate change, scientific consensus behind human-caused warming or climate solutions, according to new research from the University of British Columbia and Lund University.

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The WHO Finally Sounds Its Loudest Alarm Over Ebola in the Congo

Almost a year after the second-worst Ebola outbreak in history began in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the World Health Organization finally declared the crisis a “ public health emergency of international concern ” (or PHEIC for short)—a label that it has only used four times before. The decision was made at an emergency meeting yesterday, on the recommendations of a panel of independent expe

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Weird new type of magnetic liquid could be used to control soft robots

A strange liquid magnet full of iron nanoparticles can change its shape in a magnetic field, and it may eventually be used to make wireless, moving soft robots

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Hvilken skraldespand skal spisepinde i? Ny app skal løse Kinas affaldsproblemer

I Kina kan du få en bøde, hvis du ikke sorterer skraldet. Men ny app genkender skraldet for dig.

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Who Owns the Moon?

A space lawyer answers this apparently common question.

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Tongues untied

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Toward molecular computers: First measurement of single-molecule heat transfer

Heat transfer through a single molecule has been measured for the first time by an international team of researchers led by the University of Michigan.

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Simulation explores how insects glean compass direction from skylight

A computational simulation suggests that insects may be capable of using the properties of light from the sky to determine their compass direction with an error of less than two degrees. Evripidis Gkanias of the University of Edinburgh, U.K., and colleagues present their findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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New low-cost thermoelectric material works at room temperature

The widespread adoption of thermoelectric devices that can directly convert electricity into thermal energy for cooling and heating has been hindered, in part, by the lack of materials that are both inexpensive and highly efficient at room temperature. Now researchers from the University of Houston and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have reported the discovery of a new material that wor

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Diversity on teams leads to positive outcomes, but not for all

Individuals on teams of diverse people working together can have better outcomes than those on teams with similar individuals, research as shown.

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China's plans to solve the mysteries of the moon

China, in collaboration with several countries, is now at the forefront of lunar exploration. In an article published on July 18 in Science, researchers laid out what the China Lunar Exploration Program (CLEP) has accomplished since their launch in 2007 and their plans into the next three decades.

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Canada's high school curricula not giving students full picture of climate change

Canada's high school students may not be getting enough information on the negative impacts of climate change, scientific consensus behind human-caused warming or climate solutions, according to new research from the University of British Columbia and Lund University.

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Access to contraception not 'silver bullet' to stem population growth in Africa

The population of sub-Saharan Africa is set to double by 2050, yet a new study challenges a common misconception that this is caused solely by inadequate family planning.

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'Crystal clocks' used to time magma storage before volcanic eruptions

The molten rock that feeds volcanoes can be stored in the Earth's crust for as long as a thousand years, a result which may help with volcanic hazard management and better forecasting of when eruptions might occur.

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Metal oxide-infused membranes could offer low-energy alternative for chemical separations

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are working on membranes that could separate chemicals without using energy-intensive distillation processes.

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Stanford team stimulates neurons to induce particular perceptions in mice's minds

Hallucinations are spooky and, fortunately, fairly rare. But, a new study suggests, the real question isn't so much why some people occasionally experience them. It's why all of us aren't hallucinating all the time.

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Stimulating life-like perceptual experiences in brains of mice

Using a new and improved optogenetic technique, researchers report the ability to control — and even create — novel visual experiences in the brains of living mice, even in the absence of natural sensory input, according to a new study.

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How sex affects gene expression in mammals

Researchers report the discovery of genome-wide variations in gene expression between mammalian females and males and offer new insights into the molecular origins and evolution of sexual dimorphism in mammal species, according to a new study.

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Early mammal fossil reveals the evolutionary origins of having a loose tongue

Our highly mobile mammalian tongues, which allow us to swallow chewed food and suckle milk as babies, may have evolutionary origins in some of our most early mammalioform ancestors, according to a new study, which finds remarkably complex and modern mammal-like hyoid bones in a newly discovered 165-million-year-old mammaliaform species.

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Special issue: 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing

Fifty years ago, in July 1969, the Apollo 11 lunar module landed on the Moon and humans left their first mark on the surface of another world. In this special issue of Science, a Review, Policy Forum, Feature from Science's news department and an Editorial by Science Editor-In-Chief, Jeremy Berg, celebrate the semicentennial anniversary of the landing, its scientific impact and explore the potenti

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Ultra-soft, liquid magnetic droplets could vault technology forward

Most magnets are rigid but have made great contributions to society and to modern industry, says Thomas Russell of UMass Amherst. But this award-winning innovator dreamed of more — what if magnets could be soft and flowable as liquid to conform to a limited space? In Science this week, he and Xubo Liu from Beijing University of Chemical Technology, others at Berkeley National Lab and UC Berkeley,

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New laws of attraction: Scientists print magnetic liquid droplets

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have made a new material that is both liquid and magnetic, opening the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter. The new material could lead to a revolutionary class of printable liquid devices for a variety of applications from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots that can change their shape to adapt to their sur

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Jurassic fossil shows how early mammals could swallow like their modern descendants

The 165-million-year-old fossil of Microdocodon gracilis, a tiny, shrew-like animal, shows the earliest example of modern hyoid bones in mammal evolution.

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Researchers compare visceral leishmaniasis diagnostic tests

Accurate and timely diagnosis of the tropic disease visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is one of the pillars for reducing VL deaths. Currently available serological tests for diagnosing VL vary widely in their performance and may, as a whole, be inadequate for VL diagnosis, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

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The FASEB Journal: SIRT6 over-expression may prevent progression of diabetes, study finds

Targeting obesity through exercise and calorie restriction is often the first line of approach to treat diabetes and related cardiovascular disorders, such as cardiomyopathy. A recent animal study published in The FASEB Journal explored an alternative sirtuin-based therapy to block the development of obesity and cardiomyopathy under conditions of excess nutrition, when diet restriction and regular

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This New Liquid Is Magnetic, and Mesmerizing

Scientists have created “soft” magnets that can flow and change shape, and that could be a boon to medicine and robotics.

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France Nudges Europe Into Space Race, Where It Lags Behind

Fifty years after the Apollo 11 mission, a new French plan for a space command must overcome the reluctance of its European allies to weaponize space.

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'They nailed it': how a little dish in Australia broadcast the moon landing to the world

Live TV images of Neil Armstrong’s first step came via Honeysuckle Creek, near Canberra, originally meant only as a backup Around the world more than 600 million people were glued to TV screens. Coordinated by Tom Reid, tracking stations at Australia’s Honeysuckle Creek, Tidbinbilla and Parkes, and their combined staff of almost 200, would be responsible for maintaining all communications with Ap

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How live images of the Apollo 11 moon landing came via Australia – video

When Neil Armstrong took his first step on the moon in 1969, more than 600 million people around the world tuned in to watch it live. Australia played a key role in getting those images from the moon to Earth. Glen Nagle, from the Canberra Deep Space Communications Complex, explains how tracking stations at Tidbinbilla, Honeysuckle Creek and Parkes brought the first pictures to the world Continue

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Quantum leap from Australian research promises super-fast computing power

‘Ruthlessly systematic’ research achieves qubit communication 200 times faster than ever before An Australian research team led by the renowned quantum physicist Prof Michelle Simmons has announced a major breakthrough in quantum computing, which researchers hope could lead to much greater computing power within a decade. Simmons, a former Australian of the Year, and her team at the University of

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Parents’ emotional trauma may change their children’s biology. Studies in mice show how

Suffering triggers changes in gene expression that last for generations

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Trump Knew Exactly What He Was Doing

Republican politicians saw what happened at President Donald Trump’s rally last night in Greenville, North Carolina, where a crowd chanted “Send her back!” about Representative Ilhan Omar, the Minnesota Democrat and U.S. citizen born in Somalia. They didn’t like it. And they know who to blame: anyone but Donald Trump. “The chants were offensive and very unfortunate,” Senator Mitt Romney said . “I

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Why Donald Trump’s Racist Language Isn’t Debatable

Last night, while President Donald Trump was keeping up his attacks on four Democratic congresswomen of color at a rally in North Carolina, Merriam-Webster tweeted out that the most searched term in its online dictionary at that time was racism . It’s been that kind of week—though hardly the first of its nature in the Trump era—when bigoted comments from the president have dominated the national

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Jurassic fossil shows how early mammals could swallow like their modern descendants

The 165-million-year-old fossil of Microdocodon gracilis, a tiny, shrew-like animal, shows the earliest example of modern hyoid bones in mammal evolution.

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New low-cost thermoelectric material works at room temperature

Has your steering wheel been too hot to touch this summer? A new thermoelectric material reported in the journal Science could offer relief.

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China's plans to solve the mysteries of the moon

Fifty years ago, on July 20, 1969, the world watched as Neil Armstrong walked on the Moon. Since then, space agencies around the globe have sent rovers to Mars, probes to the furthest reaches of our galaxy and beyond, yet humanity's curiosity and fascination with the Moon has never abated.

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New laws of attraction: Scientists print magnetic liquid droplets

Inventors of centuries past and scientists of today have found ingenious ways to make our lives better with magnets—from the magnetic needle on a compass to magnetic data storage devices and even MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) body scan machines.

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'Crystal clocks' used to time magma storage before volcanic eruptions

The molten rock that feeds volcanoes can be stored in the Earth's crust for as long as a thousand years, a result which may help with volcanic hazard management and better forecasting of when eruptions might occur.

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How to make a magnet out of liquid

It works like a solid but flows like a fluid. Phil Dooley reports.

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Why don’t we hallucinate more often?

In mice, at least, it seems pretty easy to do, researchers discover.

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Could humanity’s return to the moon spark a new age of lunar telescopes?

Nearly 50 years after NASA put a small telescope on the Moon, astronomers are dusting off plans for new lunar observatories

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Laser holograms stimulate brain cells in mice to probe roots of perception and hallucination

Triggering a handful of neurons may be enough to conjure a visual experience

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Optogenetic Manipulations Create Perception Without Sensory Input

Advanced single-cell optogenetic tools have enabled researchers to induce a learned behavior in mice without the associated visual cue.

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Hallucinations implanted in mouse brains using light

Nature, Published online: 18 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02220-4 Behavioural evidence suggests that targeting just 20 neurons prompted animals to ‘see’ an image.

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A flexible bone that helps mammals chew dates back to the Jurassic Period

A flexible bone that helps with chewing may have helped give rise to the Age of Mammals, a new fossil shows.

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Manipulating nerve cells makes mice ‘see’ something that’s not there

Using optogenetics to stimulate about 20 nerve cells causes mice to perceive nonexistent vertical or horizontal lines.

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Permanent liquid magnets have now been created in the lab

Magnets that generate persistent magnetic fields are usually solid. But new little bar magnets have the mechanical properties of liquids.

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Adding a polymer stabilizes collapsing metal-organic frameworks

Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have many applications like carbon capture and water-cleaning. However, MOFs with large pores tend to collapse. Chemists and chemical engineers have now solved the problem by adding small amounts of a polymer into the MOF pores, an act that impedes pore collapse.

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Strong family relationships may help with asthma outcomes for children

Positive family relationships might help youth to maintain good asthma management behaviors even in the face of difficult neighborhood conditions, according to a new study.

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Biomaterial-delivered chemotherapy leads to long-term survival in brain cancer

A combination of chemotherapy drugs during brain cancer surgery using a biodegradable paste, leads to long-term survival, researchers have discovered.

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Carbon catenation

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Early suckler?

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Thermal intolerance

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Re-skilling the brain

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String patterns in the doped Hubbard model

Understanding strongly correlated quantum many-body states is one of the most difficult challenges in modern physics. For example, there remain fundamental open questions on the phase diagram of the Hubbard model, which describes strongly correlated electrons in solids. In this work, we realize the Hubbard Hamiltonian and search for specific patterns within the individual images of many realizati

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Temporal color mixing and dynamic beam shaping with silicon metasurfaces

Metasurfaces offer the possibility to shape optical wavefronts with an ultracompact, planar form factor. However, most metasurfaces are static, and their optical functions are fixed after the fabrication process. Many modern optical systems require dynamic manipulation of light, and this is now driving the development of electrically reconfigurable metasurfaces. We can realize metasurfaces with f

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Millennial storage of near-Moho magma

The lower crust plays a critical role in the processing of mantle melts and the triggering of volcanic eruptions by supply of magma from greater depth. Our understanding of the deeper parts of magmatic systems is obscured by overprinting of deep signals by shallow processes. We provide a direct estimate of magma residence time in basaltic systems of the deep crust by studying ultramafic nodules f

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Reconfigurable ferromagnetic liquid droplets

Solid ferromagnetic materials are rigid in shape and cannot be reconfigured. Ferrofluids, although reconfigurable, are paramagnetic at room temperature and lose their magnetization when the applied magnetic field is removed. Here, we show a reversible paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic transformation of ferrofluid droplets by the jamming of a monolayer of magnetic nanoparticles assembled at the water-

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Quantum scale anomaly and spatial coherence in a 2D Fermi superfluid

Quantum anomalies are violations of classical scaling symmetries caused by divergences that appear in the quantization of certain classical theories. Although they play a prominent role in the quantum field theoretical description of many-body systems, their influence on experimental observables is difficult to discern. In this study, we discovered a distinctive manifestation of a quantum anomaly

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Topological molecular nanocarbons: All-benzene catenane and trefoil knot

The generation of topologically complex nanocarbons can spur developments in science and technology. However, conventional synthetic routes to interlocked molecules require heteroatoms. We report the synthesis of catenanes and a molecular trefoil knot consisting solely of para -connected benzene rings. Characteristic fluorescence of a heterocatenane associated with fast energy transfer between tw

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New Jurassic mammaliaform sheds light on early evolution of mammal-like hyoid bones

We report a new Jurassic docodontan mammaliaform found in China that is preserved with the hyoid bones. Its basihyal, ceratohyal, epihyal, and thyrohyal bones have mobile joints and are arranged in a saddle-shaped configuration, as in the mobile linkage of the hyoid apparatus of extant mammals. These are fundamentally different from the simple hyoid rods of nonmammaliaform cynodonts, which were l

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Use of a scaffold peptide in the biosynthesis of amino acid-derived natural products

Genome sequencing of environmental bacteria allows identification of biosynthetic gene clusters encoding unusual combinations of enzymes that produce unknown natural products. We identified a pathway in which a ribosomally synthesized small peptide serves as a scaffold for nonribosomal peptide extension and chemical modification. Amino acids are transferred to the carboxyl terminus of the peptide

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Seasonal to multiannual marine ecosystem prediction with a global Earth system model

Climate variations have a profound impact on marine ecosystems and the communities that depend upon them. Anticipating ecosystem shifts using global Earth system models (ESMs) could enable communities to adapt to climate fluctuations and contribute to long-term ecosystem resilience. We show that newly developed ESM-based marine biogeochemical predictions can skillfully predict satellite-derived s

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New Products

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Livestreaming science

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IRE1{alpha}-XBP1 signaling in leukocytes controls prostaglandin biosynthesis and pain

Inositol-requiring enzyme 1[α] (IRE1[α])–X-box binding protein spliced (XBP1) signaling maintains endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis while controlling immunometabolic processes. Yet, the physiological consequences of IRE1α–XBP1 activation in leukocytes remain unexplored. We found that induction of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 ( Ptgs2 /Cox-2) and prostaglandin E synthase ( Ptges /mPGE

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Conservation, acquisition, and functional impact of sex-biased gene expression in mammals

Sex differences abound in human health and disease, as they do in other mammals used as models. The extent to which sex differences are conserved at the molecular level across species and tissues is unknown. We surveyed sex differences in gene expression in human, macaque, mouse, rat, and dog, across 12 tissues. In each tissue, we identified hundreds of genes with conserved sex-biased expression—

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Comment on "Earth and Moon impact flux increased at the end of the Paleozoic"

Mazrouei et al . (Reports, 18 January 2019, p. 253) found a nonuniform distribution of crater ages on Earth and the Moon, concluding that the impact flux increased about 290 million years ago. We show that the apparent increase on Earth can be explained by erosion, whereas that on the Moon may be an artifact of their calibration method.

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Amyloid {beta} oligomers constrict human capillaries in Alzheimers disease via signaling to pericytes

Cerebral blood flow is reduced early in the onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Because most of the vascular resistance within the brain is in capillaries, this could reflect dysfunction of contractile pericytes on capillary walls. We used live and rapidly fixed biopsied human tissue to establish disease relevance, and rodent experiments to define mechanism. We found that in humans with cognitive

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A child of Apollo

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News at a glance

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A painful legacy

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Tongues untied

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Apollo, in context

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The ethics of opioids

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Shooting for the Moon

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Moon gazing

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Chinas present and future lunar exploration program

Since the beginning of the 21st century, the pace of lunar exploration has accelerated, with more than a dozen probes having undertaken scientific exploration of the Moon. Prominent among these have been the robotic "Chang’E" (CE) missions of the China Lunar Exploration Program (CLEP). We discuss technological and scientific goals and achievements for the four completed, and four planned, CE miss

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Analysis of lunar samples: Implications for planet formation and evolution

The analysis of lunar samples returned to Earth by the Apollo and Luna missions changed our view of the processes involved in planet formation. The data obtained on lunar samples brought to light the importance during planet growth of highly energetic collisions that lead to global-scale melting. This violent birth determines the initial structure and long-term evolution of planets. Once past its

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A quantum breakdown

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Growing independently

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Drinking red wine on the red planet

BIDMC researchers report that a daily moderate dose of resveratrol significantly preserved muscle function and mitigated muscle atrophy in an animal model mimicking Mars' partial gravity. Novel model innovated by BIDMC researchers will help scientists fill in the blanks about the little understood physiological consequences of partial gravity.

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Cleaning our water with groundbreaking 'bioinspired' chemistry

Synthetic chemicals, including pesticides, medications and household cleaners, often end up in our waterways. Even in small amounts these substances can affect wildlife, plants and humans, and a number of them have shown resistance to normal water treatment methods. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University blazed the trail for a new field of sustainable chemistry by unveiling powerful, safe and i

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Carbon catenation

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Early suckler?

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A quantum breakdown

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Growing independently

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FaceApp: Is this Russian startup misusing user data?

FaceApp is a popular smartphone app that can take your selfie and make you look older. Recently, some have claimed that FaceApp – created by a Russian company – could be misusing user data. On Wednesday, the Democratic National Committee sent out a security alert about the app to 2020 presidential campaigns. None Some are concerned that FaceApp – the popular smartphone app that alters users' self

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Hispanic people experiencing largest homeownership gains in America

After a 50-year low, Hispanics have seen the largest homeownership gains for any ethnic demographic. The uptick likely results from a bevy of gains Hispanics have seen in recent years. This rise in homeownership is part of an increasingly diverse United States. None Homeownership is seen as a keystone to the American Dream. The two have become so entwined that President George W. Bush proclaimed

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New frog species discovered

UCF student Veronica Urgiles has helped describe two new frog species discovered in Ecuador, and she named one of them after one of her professors.

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Netflix’s U.S. Subscriber Numbers Are Slipping

The last time Netflix lost subscribers in the United States, it was 2011, and the company was embroiled in a controversy over a price hike and an abortive plan to spin off its disc-rental service into a brand named Qwikster . That was also the last time Netflix seemed vulnerable, at the dawn of the streaming era, when more of its revenue started to come from online viewing rather than DVDs sent b

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New frog species discovered

UCF student Veronica Urgiles has helped describe two new frog species discovered in Ecuador, and she named one of them after one of her professors.

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Microsoft’s Tech Can Make Your Hologram Speak Another Language

Now You See Me You no longer need to speak another language to look like you’re fluent in it — to anyone, anywhere. On Wednesday, Microsoft executive Julia White took the stage at the company’s Inspire partner conference to demonstrate how it’s now possible to not only create an incredibly life-like hologram of a person, but to then make the hologram speak another language in the person’s own voi

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NASA's Aqua satellite finds Tropical Storm Danas over Ryuku Islands

NASA's Aqua satellite found Tropical Storm Danas moving over Japan's Ryuku island chain in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

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Even in competitive markets, shareholders bear burden of corruption

A new paper co-written by a University of Illinois expert in the use of financial information in capital markets examines the relationship between political corruption and firm value in the U.S., and what prevailing forces potentially constrain or exacerbate the effects of corruption.

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Researchers explain muscle loss with menopause

New research has shown that estrogen is essential to maintaining muscle stem cell health.

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Body and mind need care in mental illness

The 18-year life expectancy gap between people with mental illness and the general population can only be bridged by protecting patients' physical and mental health.

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Emotion-detection applications built on outdated science, report warns

Software that purportedly reads emotions in faces is being deployed or tested for a variety of purposes, including surveillance, hiring, clinical diagnosis, and market research. But a new scientific report finds that facial movements are an inexact gauge of a person's feelings, behaviors or intentions.

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'Trojan horse' anticancer drug disguises itself as fat

A stealthy new drug-delivery system disguises chemotherapeutics as fat in order to outsmart, penetrate and destroy tumors. Thinking the drugs are tasty fats, tumors invite the drug inside. Once there, the targeted drug activates, immediately suppressing tumor growth.

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AI radar system that can spot miniature drones 3 kilometers away

Engineers have made a Small AESA radar system with a super-resolution algorithm.

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Rising CO2, climate change projected to reduce availability of nutrients worldwide

The most comprehensive synthesis of climate change impacts on the global availability of nutrients to date finds that, over the next 30 years, climate change and higher CO2 could significantly reduce the availability of critical nutrients, representing another challenge to global development and the fight to end undernutrition.

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Should obesity be recognized as a disease?

With obesity now affecting almost a third (29%) of the population in England, and expected to rise to 35% by 2030, should we now recognize it as a disease? Experts debate the issue.

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Around one in 20 patients are affected by preventable harm

Around one in 20 (6%) of patients are affected by preventable harm in medical care, of which around 12% causes permanent disability or death, finds a new study.

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Adding a polymer stabilizes collapsing metal-organic frameworks

Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have many applications like carbon capture and water-cleaning. However, MOFs with large pores tend to collapse. Chemists and chemical engineers have now solved the problem by adding small amounts of a polymer into the MOF pores, an act that impedes pore collapse.

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'Trojan horse' anticancer drug disguises itself as fat

A stealthy new drug-delivery system disguises chemotherapeutics as fat in order to outsmart, penetrate and destroy tumors. Thinking the drugs are tasty fats, tumors invite the drug inside. Once there, the targeted drug activates, immediately suppressing tumor growth.

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Researchers wirelessly hack 'boss' gene, a step toward reprogramming the human genome

A new study describes how researchers wirelessly controlled FGFR1 — a gene that plays a key role in how humans grow from embryos to adults — in lab-grown brain tissue. The ability to manipulate the gene, the study's authors say, could lead to new cancer treatments, and ways to prevent and treat mental disorders such as schizophrenia.

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Study reveals zebrafish make an unexpected decision when faced with conflicting opportunities

When making decisions that are important to the species' survival, zebrafish choose mating over fleeing from a threat. This decision, different compared to that of some other species, appears to be controlled by specific brain regions that respond to pheromone cues.

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Spread-changing orders and deletions affect stock prices

The first rule on the stock market is to buy low and sell high. Economists are well aware of how this behaviour changes the prices of stocks, but in reality, trades alone don't tell the whole story. Parties like banks and insurance companies rarely trade stocks themselves; instead, they place orders for traders to do so on their behalf, which can be canceled at any time if they are no longer inter

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Waking up sleeping bacteria to fight infections

Researchers in the group of Jan Michiels (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology) identified a mechanism of how sleepy bacteria wake up. This finding is important, as sleepy cells are often responsible for the stubbornness of chronic infections. Findings published in Molecular Cell reveal new perspectives on how to treat chronic infections, for example by forcing bacteria to wake up.

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How to make your own laundry detergent

Warning: you might get sucked into actually liking doing laundry. (Pixabay/) Everyone wears clothes, everybody’s clothes get dirty, and even though you hate it, everyone needs to do laundry. And unless you’re fortunate enough to have a washer and dryer at home, washing your clothes may be more than annoying—it can also be expensive. If this is your situation, or you simply enjoy making things fro

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Climate Change Will Strain Federal Finances

Climate-related disasters are happening more frequently and affecting a broad cross-section of the economy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study reveals zebrafish make an unexpected decision when faced with conflicting opportunities

When making decisions that are important to the species' survival, zebrafish choose mating over fleeing from a threat. This decision, different compared to that of some other species, appears to be controlled by specific brain regions that respond to pheromone cues.

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Waking up sleeping bacteria to fight infections

Researchers in the group of Jan Michiels (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology) identified a mechanism of how sleepy bacteria wake up. This finding is important, as sleepy cells are often responsible for the stubbornness of chronic infections. Findings published in Molecular Cell reveal new perspectives on how to treat chronic infections, for example by forcing bacteria to wake up.

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Apollo 11 Anniversary: Everything You Need to Read on the Moon Landing

The New York Times has been covering the anniversary of the moon landing, looking back at the event’s meaning and forward to humankind’s next giant leaps in space.

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‘It Makes Us Want to Support Him More’

GREENVILLE, N.C.—Before the rally began, I wanted to know why they’d come. In the heavy, humid hours, I walked up and down the line winding through a parking lot at East Carolina University to interview some two dozen people who wanted to see the president. Many didn’t make it inside. About 90 minutes before Donald Trump took the stage, police announced that the 8,000-person basketball arena was

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Elon Musk’s Next Wild Promise

Elon Musk has a predilection for grandeur. The billionaire tech provocateur made his fortune as a founder of the revolutionary online-payments company PayPal, and since then, he has announced his intention to revolutionize cars, trains, space travel, intercontinental flight , and city driving . SpaceX, his aerospace company, has begun work on the infrastructure to beam internet access down to Ear

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“Digital Fur Technology” Will Turn Taylor Swift Into a Cat

Fuzzy Picture When the star-studded cinematic remake of the Broadway show “Cats” drops its first trailer on Friday, we’ll get a glimpse at some bizarrely-hyped special effects technology. That’s according to Slate , which reports that something called “digital fur technology” will transform stars like Taylor Swift and Judi Dench into the show’s signature human-feline hybrids. CGI Fursuit The spec

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Scientists discover group of genes connected to longer life in fruit flies

E(z) longer life: New insights on genes linked to longer life and higher fertility.

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Simulations fix the cracks in magnetic mirrors

When ring-shaped electromagnets are set up in linear arrangements, they can produce magnetic fields resembling a tube with a cone at each end—a structure that repels charged particles entering one cone back along their path of approach. Referred to as 'magnetic mirrors', these devices have been known to be a relatively easy way to confine plasma since the 1950s, but they have also proven to be inh

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Improving the signal-to-noise ratio in quantum chromodynamics simulations

Over the last few decades, the exponential increase in computer power and accompanying increase in the quality of algorithms has enabled theoretical and particle physicists to perform more complex and precise simulations of fundamental particles and their interactions. If you increase the number of lattice points in a simulation, it becomes harder to tell the difference between the observed result

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Instagram Will Now Let You Know If Your Account Is Close to Being Yanked

Instagram’s recent rollouts of updates to its platform continues this week with two more changes around post and account take-downs, as well as a new process for appealing content deletion that …

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Lionfish ear-bones reveal a more mobile invasion

Just as lions are apex predators on land, lionfish in Florida are an underwater force to be reckoned with. The biggest threat they pose, however, is not their venomous spines. It is the alarming speed and ferocity with which they invade new waters, eating prey that have not evolved to recognize them as a predator, stealing food from important commercial fish like snapper and grouper, and spawning

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Homo naledi and Australopithecus sediba to be exhibited in Perot Museum

The University of Witwatersrand (Wits University), the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in the U.S. and the National Geographic Society have partnered to bring the rare fossils of two recently discovered ancient human relatives (Australopithecus sediba and Homo naledi) to the U.S. for the first, and likely only, time to be featured in the limited-run exhibition—ORIGINS: FOSSILS FROM THE CRADLE O

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Lionfish ear-bones reveal a more mobile invasion

Just as lions are apex predators on land, lionfish in Florida are an underwater force to be reckoned with. The biggest threat they pose, however, is not their venomous spines. It is the alarming speed and ferocity with which they invade new waters, eating prey that have not evolved to recognize them as a predator, stealing food from important commercial fish like snapper and grouper, and spawning

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New computational technique resolves compressed X-ray data

Argonne develops novel method to more clearly see complex materials physics in difficult-to-access environments.

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How mammals' brains evolved to distinguish odors is nothing to sniff at

The world is filled with millions upon millions of distinct smells, but how mammals' brains evolved to tell them apart is something of a mystery.

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2019 Audubon Photography Awards

The winners of the the tenth annual Audubon Photography Awards competition have just been announced. Photographers entered images in four categories: professional, amateur, youth, and plants for birds. More than 8,000 images depicting birdlife from all 50 states and 10 Canadian provinces were judged. The National Audubon Society was again kind enough to share some of this year’s winners and runne

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Leaks Are Changing How Diplomats Talk

“Every one is agreed that he is a man of his word,” the British diplomatic telegram reads, referring to the American president, “and the only man who counts in the Administration,” before going on to outline how the White House has “by its own mistakes, got itself into a difficult position” and that if London could “do any thing to help the President, he will be most appreciative.” The message is

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The fight over Facebook’s digital currency could change the face of banking

This week, Facebook tussled with lawmakers in Washington about Libra, whose potential repercussions for the global financial system are still poorly understood.

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NASA's Aqua satellite finds Tropical Storm Danas over Ryuku Islands

NASA's Aqua satellite found Tropical Storm Danas moving over Japan's Ryuku island chain in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

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How mammals' brains evolved to distinguish odors is nothing to sniff at

The world is filled with millions upon millions of distinct smells, but how mammals' brains evolved to tell them apart is something of a mystery.

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Ebola Outbreak Declared an International Public Health Emergency

The World Health Organization’s action could increase the resources available to fight a year-old outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New pathways for sensory learning in the brain

Researchers have developed an automated, robotic training device that allows mice to learn at their leisure. The technology stands to further neuroscience research by allowing researchers to train animals under more natural conditions and identify mechanisms of circuit rewiring that occur during learning.

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A sharper focus: New computational technique resolves compressed X-ray data

With high-energy X-rays, such as those that will be produced by the upgrade to Argonne's Advanced Photon Source comes a potential hitch — the more penetrating the X-rays are, the higher a likelihood that researchers could run into problems with the image data. In a new study, researchers have found a novel way to combat this image degradation.

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Scientists discover how mosquito brains integrate diverse sensory cues to find a host

A team has discovered how the female mosquito brain integrates visual and olfactory signals to identify, track and hone in on a potential host for her next blood meal. They discovered that, after the mosquito's olfactory system detects certain chemical cues, the mosquito uses her visual system to scan her surroundings for certain shapes and fly toward them, presumably associating those shapes with

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Waking up sleeping bacteria to fight infections

Researchers have identified a mechanism of how sleepy bacteria wake up. This finding is important, as sleepy cells are often responsible for the stubbornness of chronic infections. Findings reveal new perspectives on how to treat chronic infections, for example by forcing bacteria to wake up.

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Toys “R” Us Returns This Holiday Season as ‘Interactive’ Experience

Tru Kids and b8ta will reimagine Toys "R" Us stores this holiday season (via Tru Kids Brands/b8ta) Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the …

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‘Space Is the New Black’

The Apollo 11 anniversary is going to spur another wave of intergalactic fashion. But this time, we’re on the dark side of the moon.

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Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) can increase men's risk of stroke and heart attack

Aging men with low testosterone levels who take testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) are at a slightly greater risk of experiencing an ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), or myocardial infarction, especially during the first two years of use, reports a study appearing in The American Journal of Medicine, published by Elsevier. The findings confirm concerns voiced by many health age

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Link found between gut bacteria, successful joint replacement

Having healthy gut flora — the trillions of bacteria housed in our intestines — could lower the risk of infection following knee and hip replacement surgeries, while an unhealthy intestinal flora may increase the risk of infection.

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Exclusive: Russian site says it has brokered authorships for more than 10,000 researchers

Want to be a first author on a scholarly paper? A Russian company has you covered — starting at about $500. The company claims to have added the names of more than 10,000 researchers to more than 2,000 published articles in scholarly journals over the past three years. Think eBay — or perhaps StubHub — … Continue reading Exclusive: Russian site says it has brokered authorships for more than 10,000

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Adding more bioethanol to petrol is no way to go green

Making “greener” fuels by adding bioethanol to petrol will wreck the environment, not save it. We need to focus on making electric cars work, says Michael Le Page

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"Metronome" Neurons Act like Timekeepers in Mouse Brains

Brain cells that tick at regular intervals may coordinate neural activity like the conductor of an orchestra — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What Amazon Thinks You’re Worth

The owner of a coffee shop approaches you with a $10 bill in hand. It’s yours if you submit to a battery of questions: How did you hear about the shop? How did you get here? Did you walk or take an Uber? They’re simple-enough questions with simple-enough answers. Of course you take the money. Repeat this same thought experiment again, online: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos approaches you while you browse,

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What Americans Do Now Will Define Us Forever

The conservative intelligentsia flocked to the Ritz-Carlton in Washington, D.C., this week for the National Conservatism Conference, an opportunity for people who may never have punched a time clock to declare their eternal enmity toward elites and to attempt to offer contemporary conservative nationalism the intellectual framework that has so far proved elusive. Yoram Hazony, the Israeli scholar

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"Metronome" Neurons Act like Timekeepers in Mouse Brains

Brain cells that tick at regular intervals may coordinate neural activity like the conductor of an orchestra — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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"Metronome" Neurons Act like Timekeepers in Mouse Brains

Brain cells that tick at regular intervals may coordinate neural activity like the conductor of an orchestra — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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To Fix the Reproducibility Crisis, Rethink How We Do Experiments

Scientists are taught to vary one factor at a time, but a so-called multifactorial approach could be more reliable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Coaching scientists to play well together

When scientists from different disciplines collaborate — as is increasingly necessary to confront the complexity of challenging research problems — interpersonal tussles often arise. One scientist may accuse another of stealing her ideas. Or, a researcher may feel he is not getting credit for his work or doesn't have access to important data. A free, online training tool, teamscience.net, has be

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Climate change to blame for displacement of 55 species in UK

A total of 55 animal species in the UK have been displaced from their natural ranges or enabled to arrive for the first time on UK shores because of climate change over the last 10 years (2008-2018) — as revealed in a new study.

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Carnegie Mellon research identifies new pathways for sensory learning in the brain

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an automated, robotic training device that allows mice to learn at their leisure. The technology stands to further neuroscience research by allowing researchers to train animals under more natural conditions and identify mechanisms of circuit rewiring that occur during learning.

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Lionfish ear-bones reveal a more mobile invasion

Researchers have little information about how grown lionfish might invade or move to new waters because tracking small marine organisms poses difficulties. One way to investigate their movements, though, is to study stable isotopes in their ear-bones.

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Coaching scientists to play well together

When scientists from different disciplines collaborate — as is increasingly necessary to confront the complexity of challenging research problems — interpersonal tussles often arise. One scientist may accuse another of stealing her ideas. Or, a researcher may feel he is not getting credit for his work or doesn't have access to important data. A free, online training tool developed by Northwester

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Facebook And Google Know All Your Kinks

Voyeurism There are not many things for which Mark Zuckerberg is owed an apology. But still, I feel compelled to say sorry for the things Facebook has learned about me. That’s because porn sites are chock-full of third-party tracking tools — Facebook and Google are intimately aware of the porn we’re all watching, according to research shared on the preprint server ArXiv that will soon be publishe

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Google “Terminated” Its Chinese Search Engine Plans

Project Dragonfly Google has reportedly decided to halt plans for a censored search engine in China. “We have terminated Project Dragonfly,” Google executive Karan Bhatia told the US Senate Judiciary Committee, answering questions about Google’s business relationship with China. I Spy Google was reportedly planning to link users’ searches to their personal phone numbers for the scrapped search en

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Daily briefing: The Universe is expanding — but how fast?

Nature, Published online: 18 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02224-0 Cosmologists just got more confused, a plan to data-mine millions of paywalled papers and the Ebola outbreak is an international emergency.

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AI is Coming Closer to Deciphering Lost Languages

Researchers had a lucky break that helped them crack the code of Egyptian hieroglyphics, like the ones shown on this artifact. But many lost languages remain undeciphered, with no Rosetta Stone to point the way. (Credit: Zoran Karapancev/shutterstock) Since the invention of writing several thousands of years ago, humans have come up with myriad scripts that turn the phonetic sounds of spoken langu

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Algae-killing viruses spur nutrient recycling in oceans

Scientists have confirmed that viruses can kill marine algae called diatoms and that diatom die-offs near the ocean surface may provide nutrients and organic matter for recycling by other algae, according to a new study.

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What makes some people more receptive to the idea of being vaccinated against infectious disease?

Fear, trust, and the likelihood of exposure are three leading factors that influence whether people are willing to be vaccinated against a virulent disease.

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How mammals' brains evolved to distinguish odors is nothing to sniff at

Neuroscientists have discovered that at least six types of mammals — from mice to cats — distinguish odors in roughly the same way, using circuitry in the brain that's evolutionarily preserved across species.

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Genetic control for major agricultural weeds?

Waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, two aggressive weeds that threaten the food supply in North America, are increasingly hard to kill with commercially available herbicides. A novel approach known as genetic control could one day reduce the need for these chemicals. Now, scientists are one step closer.

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Tornadoes, windstorms pave way for lasting plant invasions

When tornadoes touch down, we brace for news of property damage, injuries, and loss of life, but the high-speed wind storms wreak environmental havoc, too. They can cut through massive swaths of forest, destroying trees and wildlife habitat, and opening up opportunities for invasive species to gain ground.

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New frog species discovered

An international team of researchers have identified and described two new frog species.

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New e-skin innovation gives robots and prosthetics an exceptional sense of touch

Researchers have developed an ultra responsive and robust artificial nervous system for e-skins.

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Neuroscientists discover neuron type that acts as brain's metronome

By measuring the fast electrical spikes of individual neurons in the touch region of the brain, neuroscientists have discovered a new type of cell that keeps time so regularly that it may serve as the brain's long-hypothesized clock or metronome.

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Red wine's resveratrol could help Mars explorers stay strong

Mars is about 9 months from Earth with today's tech, NASA reckons. As the new space race hurtles forward, researchers are asking: how do we make sure the winners can still stand when they reach the finish line? A new study shows that resveratrol substantially preserves muscle mass and strength in rats exposed to the wasting effects of simulated Mars gravity.

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Jumbo squid mystery solved

New research identifies a perfect storm of warming waters and reduced food to blame in the collapse of the once lucrative jumbo squid fishery off Baja California.

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New e-skin innovation gives robots and prosthetics an exceptional sense of touch

Researchers have developed an ultra responsive and robust artificial nervous system for e-skins.

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Quantum computing builds on Turing’s legacy

Scientists are mining mathematics for ‘hard problems’ from which to concoct new algorithms

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Watch a lightweight glove allow users to ‘feel’ objects in virtual reality

Technology could be used in games and virtual training simulations

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Island trees can't run from climate change

Maui, Hawaii. (Pixabay/) Kyle Rosenblad was hiking a steep mountain on the island of Maui in the summer of 2015 when he noticed a ruggedly beautiful tree species scattered around the landscape. Curious, and wondering what they were, he took some photographs and showed them to a friend. They were Bermuda cedars, a species native to the island of Bermuda, first planted on Maui in the early 1900s. "

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Depression researchers rethink popular mouse swim tests

Nature, Published online: 18 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02133-2 Animal-rights group’s campaign to end forced-swim tests comes amid debate over whether method is overused.

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Scientists wiped out mosquitoes on two islands using new method.

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Electric Vehicle charge points to be installed in every new UK home

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How Deep Fakes Can Contribute To Disinformation.

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Climate Change Is Very Real. But So Much of It Is Uncertain

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CCNY physicists use mathematics to trace neuro transitions

Unique in its application of a mathematical model to understand how the brain transitions from consciousness to unconscious behavior, a study at The City College of New York's Benjamin Levich Institute for Physico-Chemical Hydrodynamics may have just advanced neuroscience appreciably. The findings, surprisingly by physicists, suggest that the subliminal state is the most robust part of the conscio

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To Fix the Reproducibility Crisis, Rethink How We Do Experiments

Scientists are taught to vary one factor at a time, but a so-called multifactorial approach could be more reliable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tiny vibration-powered robots are the size of the world's smallest ant

Researchers have created a new type of tiny 3D-printed robot that moves by harnessing vibration from piezoelectric actuators, ultrasound sources or even tiny speakers. Swarms of these 'micro-bristle-bots' might work together to sense environmental changes, move materials — or perhaps one day repair injuries inside the human body.

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Women now seen as equally as or more competent than men

Women have come a long way in the United States over the last 70 years, to the point where they are now seen as being as competent as men, if not more so, according to new research.

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New species of flying squirrel from Southwest China added to the rarest and 'most wanted'

Described in 1981, the genus Biswamoyopterus is regarded as the most mysterious and rarest amongst all flying squirrels. It comprises two species, each known from a single specimen. Recent research described a third species found to inhabit low-altitude forests in Yunnan Province, China.

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Tattooing and the art of sensing within the skin

The art of tattooing may have found a diagnostic twist. A team of scientists in Germany have developed permanent dermal sensors that can be applied as artistic tattoos. A colorimetric analytic formulation was injected into the skin instead of tattoo ink. The pigmented skin areas varied their color when blood pH or other health indicators changed.

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Why orthopedic shoes may not really be good for our feet

New research into how calluses work for our feet and balance suggests that thick-soled shoes, such as orthopedic shoes, may do us more harm than good.

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Gorgeous, Freaky Sunset Photo Looks Split Down the Middle

Though it looks unnatural, this photo wasn't created with filters or Photoshop.

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China Is Obsessed With Facebook’s Cryptocurrency

Peaked Interest People in China are obsessed with Facebook’s recently announced cryptocurrency, Libra — which is striking, because both Facebook and cryptocurrency are banned in China. As Coindesk reports , search trends for “Libra” soared — even a full month after Facebook’s announcement — on China’s biggest web platform Weibo. It currently ranks as the number one nation in the world for “Facebo

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How Long Would It Take to Bicycle to the Moon?

To follow in Apollo 11’s footsteps, all you need is a space bike, 240,000 miles of cable, and a whole lot of sandwiches.

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Study finds key metabolic changes in patients with chemotherapy-associated cardiotoxicity

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center embarked on a study to investigate whether early changes in energy-related metabolites in the blood — measured shortly after chemotherapy — could be used to identify patients who developed heart toxicity at a later time.

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A sharper focus: New computational technique resolves compressed X-ray data

With high-energy X-rays, such as those that will be produced by the upgrade to Argonne's Advanced Photon Source comes a potential hitch — the more penetrating the X-rays are, the higher a likelihood that researchers could run into problems with the image data. In a new study, researchers at Argonne have found a novel way to combat this image degradation.

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U of Guelph researchers learn how low oxygen builds a bigger, stronger alligator heart

University of Guelph researchers are beginning to understand why some alligators develop stronger hearts after enduring low oxygen during early development in the egg.

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What’s new and what isn’t about Elon Musk’s brain-computer interface

It’s state of the art, but Neuralink still has a long way to go

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Elon Musk: We Could Land on the Moon In “Less Than Two Years”

Keeping Positive Potentially fatal cracks are already showing in NASA’s plans to return humans to the Moon by 2024, but Elon Musk remains unfazed. In an expansive new interview with TIME , the SpaceX CEO shared his prediction for humanity’s next Moon visit — and calling it ambitious would be an understatement. “Well, this is gonna sound pretty crazy,” Musk told TIME , “but I think we could land o

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Universal Desire: Men and Women Respond Identically to Erotic Images

The result is not the final word, as findings will likely turn up the heat on questions of divergent sexual arousal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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I Wasn’t a Fan of BTS. And Then I Was.

I was already yawning when I sat down to watch Saturday Night Live one evening this past April. The host that night was Emma Stone, and the musical guest was BTS. I knew little about the seven-member South Korean supergroup—even though they had millions of fans worldwide, released multiple Billboard 200 chart-toppers , and recently delivered a speech at the United Nations. On Twitter, I saw plent

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I’m Emptying My Bank Account to Go to Columbia

The good news came first: I had been admitted to Columbia University’s MFA writing program. I danced in celebration. The bad news came later: The school would provide no financial aid—at least this was the news at first. I was devastated, but told myself, Anena, this is Columbia, you can’t let it go . I put up a GoFundMe where I am presently begging the world to contribute to my approximately $10

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Universal Desire: Men and Women Respond Identically to Erotic Images

The result is not the final word, as findings will likely turn up the heat on questions of divergent sexual arousal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Universal Desire: Men and Women Respond Identically to Erotic Images

The result is not the final word, as findings will likely turn up the heat on questions of divergent sexual arousal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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YouTube’s Autocomplete Feature Has a Huge Spoiler Problem

Warning: intense spoilers follow for “Avengers: Endgame,” “Star Wars,” “Game of Thrones,” “Harry Potter,” and “The Lion King.” Imagine that you’re about to watch the blockbuster “Avengers: Endgame” for the first time. You need a refresher on what Iron Man has been up to for the last few Marvel Cinematic Universe movies, so you head over to YouTube for an explainer. The only problem: as soon as yo

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Greater prevalence of congenital heart defects in high intensity oil and gas areas

Mothers living near more intense oil and gas development activity have a 40-70% higher chance of having children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) compared to those living in areas of less intense activity, according to a new study from researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health.

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A dynamic genetic code based on DNA shape

Under physiological conditions, only certain sequences within the genome, called flipons, are capable of dynamically forming either right- or left-handed DNA. When a flipon is left-handed, genes change the transcripts they produce, affecting how cells respond to their environment. The outcomes depend on both the shape and sequence of a gene's DNA, each feature encoding a different subset of geneti

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How mammals' brains evolved to distinguish odors is nothing to sniff at

Neuroscientists from the Salk Institute and UC San Diego have discovered that at least six types of mammals–from mice to cats–distinguish odors in roughly the same way, using circuitry in the brain that's evolutionarily preserved across species.

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Women report skipping scientific conferences because of child care

Many women find themselves skipping scientific conferences because of family obligations, a new study finds. Women were less likely than men to attend scientific meetings, although both genders noted that conferences were important to career advancement.

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Waking up sleeping bacteria to fight infections

Researchers in the group of Jan Michiels (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology) identified a mechanism of how sleepy bacteria wake up. This finding is important, as sleepy cells are often responsible for the stubbornness of chronic infections. Findings published in Molecular Cell reveal new perspectives on how to treat chronic infections, for example by forcing bacteria to wake up.

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Survival of the zebrafish: Mate, or flee?

Researchers have found that when making decisions that are important to the species' survival, zebrafish choose to mate rather than to flee from a threat.The researchers identified specific brain regions associated with such decisions.Understanding this basic biology is important when using zebrafish as a lab model for psychiatric diseases.

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Discovery shows how difficult-to-treat prostate cancer evades immune system

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered how an aggressive form of prostate cancer called double-negative prostate cancer (DNPC) metastasizes by evading the the immune system. The investigators also reported on the pre-clinical development of a new therapy, which, when given in combination with existing immunotherapies, appears to stop and even reverse metas

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Low doses of radiation promote cancer-capable cells

Low doses of radiation equivalent to three CT scans, which are considered safe, give cancer-capable cells a competitive advantage over normal cells. Researchers studied the effects of low doses of radiation in mice and found it increases the number of cells with mutations in p53, a well-known genetic change associated with cancer. However, giving the mice an antioxidant before radiation promoted t

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Scientists discover how mosquito brains integrate diverse sensory cues to find a host

A team, led by researchers at the University of Washington, has discovered how the female mosquito brain integrates visual and olfactory signals to identify, track and hone in on a potential host for her next blood meal. They discovered that, after the mosquito's olfactory system detects certain chemical cues, the mosquito uses her visual system to scan her surroundings for certain shapes and fly

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Brown neuroscientists discover neuron type that acts as brain's metronome

By measuring the fast electrical spikes of individual neurons in the touch region of the brain, Brown University neuroscientists have discovered a new type of cell that keeps time so regularly that it may serve as the brain's long-hypothesized clock or metronome.

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New research identifies gene that hides cancer cells from immunotherapy

A team at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has identified a gene that could make immunotherapy treatments, specifically checkpoint inhibitors, work for a wider variety of cancer patients. The study, published today in Developmental Cell, found that when the DUX4 gene is expressed in cancer cells, it can prevent the cancer from being recognized and destroyed by the immune system.

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Sports participation gap exists between youth from lower-income and middle-income families

Lower-income parents are less likely than their higher-income counterparts to involve their children in youth sports because of obstacles such as rising costs of these extracurricular activities, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

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Climate crisis: extremely hot days could double in US, study shows

Amid widespread US heatwave, experts predict dangerous extremes in summer temperatures will only get worse As the climate crisis progresses, the number of extremely hot days around the US could more than double, according to a peer-reviewed study and report from the Union of Concerned Scientists. By mid-century, an average of 36 days a year could feel like 100F (37.7C) or hotter. Toward the end o

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Slack is resetting thousands of passwords after 2015 hack

Slack has reset the passwords of thousands of accounts after receiving new information about a hack that took place in March 2015.

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'Thor 4' Is Coming—and Taika Waititi Is Directing

Chris Hemsworth will reportedly return for the new movie.

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Harness the Power of Calm

In the fast-paced workplaces and productivity-focused societies many of us inhabit today, it is easy to burnout. Emma Seppälä, a Stanford researcher on human happiness, recommends tapping into the parasympathetic nervous system instead—"rest and digest"rather than "fight or flight." Aiming for energy management rather than time management will give you the resilience you need to excel at the thin

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Great apes found to bond when watching videos together

A pair of researchers affiliated with Duke University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has found that great apes tend to bond with one another when they watch a video together. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Wouter Wolf and Michael Tomasello describe their work involving studying chimpanzees and bonobos as they watched videos together and

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Tornadoes, windstorms pave way for lasting plant invasions

When tornadoes touch down, we brace for news of property damage, injuries, and loss of life, but the high-speed wind storms wreak environmental havoc, too. They can cut through massive swaths of forest, destroying trees and wildlife habitat, and opening up opportunities for invasive species to gain ground.

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Quantum Supremacy Is Coming: Here’s What You Should Know

Quantum computers will never fully replace “classical” ones like the device you’re reading this article on. They won’t run web browsers, help with your taxes, or stream the latest video from Netflix. What they will do — what’s long been hoped for, at least — will be to offer a fundamentally different way of performing certain calculations. They’ll be able to solve problems that would take a fast

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Great apes found to bond when watching videos together

A pair of researchers affiliated with Duke University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has found that great apes tend to bond with one another when they watch a video together. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Wouter Wolf and Michael Tomasello describe their work involving studying chimpanzees and bonobos as they watched videos together and

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Tornadoes, windstorms pave way for lasting plant invasions

When tornadoes touch down, we brace for news of property damage, injuries, and loss of life, but the high-speed wind storms wreak environmental havoc, too. They can cut through massive swaths of forest, destroying trees and wildlife habitat, and opening up opportunities for invasive species to gain ground.

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Strong family relationships may help with asthma outcomes for children

Positive family relationships might help youth to maintain good asthma management behaviors even in the face of difficult neighborhood conditions, according to a new Northwestern University study.

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Biomaterial-delivered chemotherapy leads to long-term survival in brain cancer

A combination of chemotherapy drugs during brain cancer surgery using a biodegradable paste, leads to long-term survival, researchers at the University of Nottingham have discovered.

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UMN Medical School researchers explain muscle loss with menopause

New University of Minnesota Medical School research is the first to show that estrogen is essential to maintaining muscle stem cell health.

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1 gene may stymy promising Alzheimer’s drugs

A human gene present in 75 percent of the population is a key reason why a class of drugs for Alzheimer’s disease seemed promising in animal studies but failed in human studies. While a previous study investigated the function of the gene in tissue culture, this is the first time that researchers have clinically shown the drugs’ effect based on a patients’ genotype. The researchers caution that t

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KAL’s cartoon

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Business this week

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How we can improve maternal healthcare — before, during and after pregnancy | Elizabeth Howell

Shocking, but true: the United States has the highest rate of deaths for new mothers of any developed country — and 60 percent of them are preventable. With clarity and urgency, physician Elizabeth Howell explains the causes of maternal mortality and shares ways for hospitals and doctors to make pregnancy safer for women before, during and after childbirth.

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Scientists discover how and when a subterranean ocean emerged

"The mechanism which caused the crust that had been altered by seawater to sink into the mantle functioned over 3.3 billion years ago. This means that a global cycle of matter, which underpins modern plate tectonics, was established within the first billion years of the Earth's existence, and the excess water in the transition zone of the mantle came from the ancient ocean on the planet's surface,

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Mass estimated for two binary pulsars

By performing timing observations, an international group of astronomers has measured the mass of two binary millisecond pulsars designated PSR J1949+3106 and PSR J1950+2414. The results could be essential in order to unveil the evolutionary status of these two objects. The research is detailed in a paper published July 11 on arXiv.org.

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UCF team discovers, names new frog species

An international team of researchers have identified and described two new frog species and have named one of them after a University of Central Florida professor.

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What makes some people more receptive to the idea of being vaccinated against infectious disease?

Fear, trust, and the likelihood of exposure are three leading factors that influence whether people are willing to be vaccinated against a virulent disease, according to a new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier.

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Study: Even in competitive markets, shareholders bear burden of corruption

While the US traditionally ranks low on worldwide corruption indices, domestic political corruption still imposes substantial costs on US shareholders, according to new research co-written by Gies College of Business accounting professor Nerissa Brown.

1d

Tornadoes, windstorms pave way for lasting plant invasions

When tornadoes touch down, we brace for news of property damage, injuries, and loss of life, but the high-speed wind storms wreak environmental havoc, too. They can cut through massive swaths of forest, destroying trees and wildlife habitat, and opening up opportunities for invasive species to gain ground.

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Depressed by Facebook and the like

Great holiday, fantastic party, adorable children, incredible food: everyone shows their life in the best light on social networks. Those who take a look around on such sites can find that their self-esteem takes a hit as it seems as though everyone is better than them. Users who use social networks passively, i.e. do not post themselves, and tend to compare themselves with others are in danger of

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London gender clinic reports rising number of non-binary attendees

A gender identity clinic for under-18s says the rise in young people seeking help may be levelling off, and that an increasing proportion identify as non-binary

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Nordsjællands affaldsforbrænding lukket igen efter få dage: Stadig for meget dioxin i røgen

Norfors lukker efter kun en uge den ovn, som adskillige gange de seneste tre år har udledt for meget dioxin. En prøvemåling har vist, at den stadig er gal.

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New species of flying squirrel from Southwest China added to the rarest and 'most wanted'

Described in 1981, the genus Biswamoyopterus is regarded as the most mysterious and rarest amongst all flying squirrels. It comprises two large (1.4-1.8 kg) species endemic to southern Asia: the Namdapha flying squirrel (India) and the Laotian giant flying squirrel (Lao PDR). Each is only known from a single specimen discovered in 1981 and 2013, respectively.

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New species of flying squirrel from Southwest China added to the rarest and 'most wanted'

Described in 1981, the genus Biswamoyopterus is regarded as the most mysterious and rarest amongst all flying squirrels. It comprises two large (1.4-1.8 kg) species endemic to southern Asia: the Namdapha flying squirrel (India) and the Laotian giant flying squirrel (Lao PDR). Each is only known from a single specimen discovered in 1981 and 2013, respectively.

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The Truth about Anti-White Discrimination

Many white Americans feel that discrimination against whites is on the rise. Experiments suggests otherwise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The top five strangest poisons that can kill you (video)

There are some crazy poisons in this world of ours, and they're often found in things you'd least expect. In this week's episode of Reactions, we break down our top five.

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The unpopular truth about biases toward people with disabilities

Needing to ride in a wheelchair can put the brakes on myriad opportunities — some less obvious than one might think. New research from Michigan State University sheds light on the bias people have toward people with disabilities, known as 'ableism,' and how it shifts over time.

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Adding a polymer stabilizes collapsing metal-organic frameworks

Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have many applications like carbon capture and water-cleaning. However, MOFs with large pores tend to collapse. Chemists and chemical engineers at EPFL have now solved the problem by adding small amounts of a polymer into the MOF pores, an act that impedes pore collapse.

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Diabetes medications masking surgical complication

A new class of diabetes medications is masking the potentially dangerous condition of ketoacidosis at the time of surgery. Testing for acid load in the blood of diabetes sufferers who are taking gliflozin medications is needed in order to avoid complications associated with ketoacidosis – a potentially lethal build-up of acid in the blood.

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A better avenue for neurosurgery to improve outcomes

Changing the route of entry for minimally invasive neurosurgery provides better outcomes for a wide range of interventions, and is preferred by patients.

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Deciphering brain somatic mutations associated with Alzheimer's disease

KAIST researchers have identified somatic mutations in the brain that could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

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Algae-killing viruses spur nutrient recycling in oceans

Scientists have confirmed that viruses can kill marine algae called diatoms and that diatom die-offs near the ocean surface may provide nutrients and organic matter for recycling by other algae, according to a Rutgers-led study.

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Biochemistry: Versatile recycling in the cell

Ribosomes need regenerating. This process is important for the quality of the proteins produced and thus for the whole cell homeostasis as well as for developmental and biological processes. Biochemists from Goethe University Frankfurt together with biophysicists at LMU Munich have now watched one of the most important enzymes for ribosome recycling at work — ABCE1 — and shown that it is unexpec

1d

Scientists discover how and when a subterranean ocean emerged

An international scientific team led by Russian geochemists have established that the huge reserves of water present in the Earth's mantle, which exceed the weight of the world ocean, emerged over 3.3 billion years ago due to the immersion of seawater-rich oceanic crust into the depth of the Earth's interior. The results were published in Nature.

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Genetic differences between strains of Epstein-Barr virus can alter its activity

Researchers at the University of Sussex have identified how differences in the genetic sequence of the two main strains of the cancer-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can alter the way the virus behaves when it infects white blood cells.

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Tiger, rhinos flee to higher ground in India's flood-hit Assam

A tiger escaped from a wildlife park in India's flood-ravaged Assam and stretched out on a shophouse bed Thursday, startling residents and shining a spotlight on the plight of animals caught up in the deluge.

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Acronym Fever. We Need an Acronym For That.

The Wall Street Journal published a provocative article the other day, entitled “Don’t Understand Moronic Bromides?” about the proliferation over the years of acronyms in science.(Note the old-fashioned usage of “bromide” derived from the early sleeping pills). And while it’s a cranky piece, it’s not wrong. That’s going to get me some irritated glances from several areas, but complaints have been

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Scientists hope genetic research will lead to new breakthroughs in weed control

An article featured in the journal Weed Science sheds important new light on the genetics and potential control of Palmer amaranth and waterhemp—two troublesome Amaranthus species weeds that are resistant to multiple herbicides.

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More than 28,000 species are officially threatened, with more likely to come

More than 28,000 species around the world are threatened, according to the Red List of Threatened Species compiled by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The list, updated on Thursday night, has assessed the extinction risk of almost 106,000 species and found more than a quarter are in trouble.

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What Does a Medical Nihilist Do When He Gets Sick?

Philosopher Jacob Stegenga, author of a scathing critique of medicine, discusses vaccines and his own health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Truth about Anti-White Discrimination

Many white Americans feel that discrimination against whites is on the rise. Experiments suggests otherwise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists hope genetic research will lead to new breakthroughs in weed control

An article featured in the journal Weed Science sheds important new light on the genetics and potential control of Palmer amaranth and waterhemp—two troublesome Amaranthus species weeds that are resistant to multiple herbicides.

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More than 28,000 species are officially threatened, with more likely to come

More than 28,000 species around the world are threatened, according to the Red List of Threatened Species compiled by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The list, updated on Thursday night, has assessed the extinction risk of almost 106,000 species and found more than a quarter are in trouble.

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Birds on Twitter

Social media users track species movement linked to climate change.

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‘Micro-bristle bot’ is so small it’s hard to see

Swarms of “micro-bristle-bots” could one day work together to sense environmental changes, move materials, or perhaps one day repair injuries inside the human body. This new type of tiny 3D-printed robot moves by harnessing vibration from piezoelectric actuators, ultrasound sources, or even tiny speakers. The prototype robots respond to different vibration frequencies depending on their configura

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The Microbiome and Your Health

From bone health to food allergies, researchers are finding links between our resident microbes and our bodies—in sickness and in health.

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The First Complete Brain Wiring Diagram of Any Species Is Here

For a humble, microscopic worm with only 302 neurons, C. elegans has had a lot of firsts. It was the first multicellular animal to have its whole genome sequenced . It was also the spark that lit the connectome fire—the revolutionary idea that mapping the entirety of connections among neurons will unveil secrets of our minds, memory, and consciousness. And if the connectomists are to be believed,

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Two-headed turtle born in Malaysia

A two-headed baby turtle has been born in Malaysia, captivating conversationists, but it only survived a few days after being discovered.

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This New Virtual Reality Glove Lets You Grab Digital Objects

The VR glove in action.(Credit: Song et al, Scientific Reports, (2019) 9:8988) Our squishy human brains are notoriously easy to fool. Whether it’s optical illusions or more advanced trickery, it doesn’t take much to exploit our mind’s weaknesses. But, that’s also what enables virtual reality (VR) systems, where technology can effectively transport us to a digital world. And thanks to a newly devel

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Shifting stereotypes favour women – but not if they want to be leaders

Study looks back at 72 years of public opinion. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Exiled moons may explain astronomical mysteries

Australian and South American researchers suggest ‘ploonets’ are unseen actors in distant solar systems.

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Boeing engineer encourages Indigenous people to enter STEM careers

Award-winning systems engineer Taylah Griffin is passionate about her work in Boeing and her outreach to young people as a Gangulu woman.

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Hydrogen, as you’ve never seen it

Finding the art in the Periodic Table.

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Two-headed turtle born in Malaysia

A two-headed baby turtle has been born in Malaysia, captivating conversationists, but it only survived a few days after being discovered.

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Polling data suggest gender stereotypes have significantly changed since 1940s

Women have come a long way in the United States over the last 70 years, to the point where they are now seen as being as competent as men, if not more so, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Internetgiganter som Google kigger med, når du søger på porno

Ni ud af ti pornotjenester videregiver oplysninger om brugeradfærd til tredjeparter, herunder Google. Det viser en omfattende undersøgelse fra et kendt amerikansk universitet.

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Study: Social diversity is initially threatening, but people do adapt over time

The ethnic and religious composition of many modern societies has been dramatically changed by global modernization. These demographic changes are having a major impact across many spheres of life, including the workplace, neighborhood environments, schools and nations. More than ever before, our communities are changing in terms of their ethnic and religious composition. Societies and individuals

2d

Using El Niño and Antarctic Oscillation data to predict air pollution levels in northern India

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and the U.S. has found that data from El Niño and Antarctic Oscillation events can be used to predict air pollution levels in northern India. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the historical impact of El Niño and Antarctic Oscillation events on weather in northern India an

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Mathematics is about wonder, creativity and fun, so let's teach it that way

Alice in Wonderland enthusiasts recently celebrated the story's anniversary with creative events like playing with puzzles and time—and future Alice exhibits are in the works. The original 1865 children's book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, sprung from a mathematician's imagination, continues to inspire exploration and fun.

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Europe's Galileo GPS system back after six-day outage

Europe's Galileo satellite navigation system, a rival of the American GPS network, is back in service after a six-day outage, its oversight agency said on Thursday.

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The Moon: a Celebration of Our Celestial Neighbour – in pictures

Marking the 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong’s ‘small step’ and published to coincide with Royal Museums Greenwich’s exhibition at the National Maritime Museum, a new book, The Moon: a Celebration of Our Celestial Neighbour explores people’s fascination with Earth’s only natural satellite Continue reading…

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'We had 15 seconds of fuel left': Buzz Aldrin on the nervy moon landing

Astronaut’s newly released video interview describes final moments before ‘the Eagle’ landed on the moon Time was running out. The Apollo 11 lunar module was on its historic descent to the moon’s crater-pocked surface on 20 July 1969 when a fuel light blinked on. Still 100ft (30 metres) above the ground, it was not what the astronauts needed. The Eagle’s tank was nearly dry. In a new video interv

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Scientists hope genetic research will lead to new breakthroughs in weed control

An article featured in the journal Weed Science sheds important new light on the genetics and potential control of Palmer amaranth and waterhemp — two troublesome Amaranthus species weeds that are resistant to multiple herbicides.

2d

Improving the signal-to-noise ratio in quantum chromodynamics simulations

A study by Marco Ce, a physicist based at the Helmholtz-Institut Mainz in Germany, and recently published in EPJ Plus describes a new technique for simulating particle ensembles that are 'large' (at least by the standards of particle physics). The technique improves the signal-to-noise ratio and thus the precision of the simulation; crucially, it can also be used to model ensembles of baryons: a c

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New e-skin innovation by NUS researchers gives robots and prosthetics an exceptional sense of touch

NUS researchers have developed an ultra responsive and robust artificial nervous system for e-skins.

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The art of sensing within the skin

The art of tattooing may have found a diagnostic twist. A team of scientists in Germany have developed permanent dermal sensors that can be applied as artistic tattoos. As detailed in the journal Angewandte Chemie, a colorimetric analytic formulation was injected into the skin instead of tattoo ink. The pigmented skin areas varied their color when blood pH or other health indicators changed.

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Identification of autophagy gene regulation mechanism related to dementia and Lou Gehrig's disease

An international Research Team led by Dr. Jeong Yoon-ha at Korea Brain Research Institute has published the results of its research in 'Autophagy'. Expected to develop the treatment for neurodegenerative disease utilizing TDP-43 protein.

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New species of flying squirrel from Southwest China added to the rarest and 'most wanted'

Described in 1981, the genus Biswamoyopterus is regarded as the most mysterious and rarest amongst all flying squirrels. It comprises two species, each known from a single specimen. Recent research by Chinese and Australian scientists described a third species found to inhabit low-altitude forests in Yunnan Province, China. By publishing their discovery in the open-access journal ZooKeys, the rese

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India reschedules launch of its moon mission for Monday

India's space agency said it will launch a spacecraft to the south pole of the moon on Monday after an aborted effort this week.

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All hail London’s urban jungle as it becomes first national park city

With impressive biodiversity and ecosystems, London should set a trend for metropolises everywhere as it becomes the first National Park City in the world

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Russia's Sirius Moon project leaves crew hungry for steak

Four Russians and two Nasa engineers emerge from four months in a Moscow "spacecraft".

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This network boosts confidence at home after stroke

Returning home after a stroke may go better with a support network involving social work case managers and online resources, research finds. As reported in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes , researchers developed the Michigan Stroke Transitions Trial and tested three different support strategies involving 265 recovering stroke patients and 169 caregivers to see which worked best f

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From bugs to drugs

A new study led by Prof Shoumo Bhattacharya has decoded the structure of unique proteins found in tick saliva and created new ones not found in nature, paving the way for a new generation of "Swiss-army knife' anti-inflammatory drugs, with customized extensions to block different inflammatory pathways.

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From bugs to drugs

A new study led by Prof Shoumo Bhattacharya has decoded the structure of unique proteins found in tick saliva and created new ones not found in nature, paving the way for a new generation of "Swiss-army knife' anti-inflammatory drugs, with customized extensions to block different inflammatory pathways.

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Three Big Lessons From One Small Town

Here is another look at the far-southern-Virginia town of Danville: once a thriving tobacco-and-textile center, now trying to figure out what to do after all the mills have shut down. In keeping with the previously announced intention to keep drawing connections, parallel themes, and lessons from the communities we visit, here are three aspects of Danville’s story worth noticing elsewhere, as boi

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Group calls on international community to prevent dementia by preventing stroke

The risk factors for stroke and dementia are the same, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates that preventing stroke can also prevent some dementias. Now, a group of experts led by Western University Professor, Dr. Vladimir Hachinski and international collaborators Matthias Endres, Martin Dichgans and Zaven Khachaturian are calling on the global community to come together to take action on pr

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Simulations fix the cracks in magnetic mirrors

In a study published in EPJ D, physicists led by Wen-Shan Duan at Northwest Normal University, and Lei Yang at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, China, show that 'magnetic mirrors' plasma leaks can be minimised if specific conditions are met. The insights gathered by Duan and Yang's team could solve a decades-old problem of low plasma confinement times and high loss rates in magnetic mirrors.

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Spread-changing orders and deletions affect stock prices

In a new study published in EPJ B, Stephan Grimm and Thomas Guhr from Duisburg-Essen University in Germany compare the influences that three price-changing events have on these spread changes. Their work sheds new light on the intricate inner workings of the stock market.

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Women now seen as equally as or more competent than men

Women have come a long way in the United States over the last 70 years, to the point where they are now seen as being as competent as men, if not more so, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Women no longer regarded as less competent than men but still seen as less ambitious

Good news for women — they are no longer regarded as less competent than men on average, according to a nationally representative study of gender stereotypes in the United States. Less positive, however, is that women's gains in perceived competence have not propelled them to the top of hierarchies.

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Illinois study advances possibility of genetic control for major agricultural weeds

Waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, two aggressive weeds that threaten the food supply in North America, are increasingly hard to kill with commercially available herbicides. A novel approach known as genetic control could one day reduce the need for these chemicals. Now, scientists are one step closer.

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An age of uncertain work: Americans miss stability and a shared sense of purpose in their jobs

On the surface, the well-being of the American worker seems rosy.

2d

The Story of 8 Unforgettable Words About Apollo 11

John Noble Wilford recounts some of what went into writing the story of humanity’s giant leap for the July 21, 1969, edition of The New York Times.

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EU fines chipmaker Qualcomm for 'predatory pricing'

In yet another European Union move against a U.S. tech giant, the bloc's antitrust chief on Thursday fined chipmaker Qualcomm $271 million, accusing it of "predatory pricing" to drive a competitor …

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Miljøstyrelsen finder skadeligt bor og phthalater i slimlegetøj og plastfigurer

Otte typer slimlegetøj afgiver for høje mængder af det sundhedsskadelige stof bor, mens tre typer plastfigurer fra den kinesiske webshop Wish indeholder så høje koncentrationer af phthalater, at de kan udgøre en alvorlig sundhedsrisiko for små børn.

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Apollo 11 Lunar Module Timeline Book Could Fetch $9 Million at Auction

There will never be another "first book annotated by hand on the moon."

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Making fish farming in eastern Africa's Lake Victoria sustainable

Overfishing, water shortages and pollution—these are just some of the environmental problems Lake Victoria has been facing over the last few decades. Bordered by Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, the world's second largest freshwater lake provides the main source of income for the populations living around the Lake Victoria basin. However, the environmental pressures put on the lake have seriously compr

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The internet is surprisingly fragile, crashes thousands of times a year, and no one is making it stronger

How could a small internet service provider (ISP) in Pennsylvania cause millions of websites worldwide to go offline? That's what happened on June 24, 2019 when users across the world were left unable to access a large fraction of the web. The root cause was an outage suffered by Cloudflare, one of the internet's leading content hosts on which the affected websites relied.

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How to make development funds go further

Nature, Published online: 18 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02172-9 International grants for low-income countries should be matched by local sources.

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