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50 years ago, humanity's first steps on another world

Fifty years ago on Saturday, American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans in history to set foot on the Moon, an event watched on television by half a billion people.

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Det var ikke et episk fupnummer: Her er fem beviser på månelandingen

Der findes utroligt nok stadig mennesker, der betvivler, at vi har besøgt Månen.

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This Week’s Awesome Stories From Around the Web (Through July 20)

ROBOTICS Boston Dynamics’ Robots Are Preparing to Leave the Lab—Is the World Ready? James Vincent | The Verge “After decades of kicking machines in parking lots, the company is set to launch its first ever commercial bot later this year: the quadrupedal Spot. It’s a crucial test for a company that’s spent decades pursuing long-sighted R&D. And more importantly, the success—or failure—of Spot will

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Weekend reads: A vaping study gets muddied; the “F-word” in science; prof quits following allegations of cocaine bacchanals

Before we present this week’s Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured an exclusive about a Russian company that claims to have … Continue reading Weekend reads: A vaping study gets muddied; the

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Just Before the Eagle Landed, an Alien Arrived in Our Living Room

Until the Apollo 11 mission, my family didn’t have a television. Then, for one weekend, we joined the rest of Planet Earth.

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The Apollo 11 Mission Inspired Pink Floyd’s Most Overlooked Song

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reflecting on the Apollo 11 mission, 50 years later. For seven and a half minutes on the night of July 20, 1969, Pink Floyd took thousands of BBC viewers to the moon. Of course, two men were already there: Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, the Apollo 11 astronauts who became the first human beings to set foot on the lunar surface. However, the members

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Israel spyware firm can mine data from social media

An Israeli spyware firm thought to have hacked WhatsApp in the past has told clients it can scoop user data from the world's top social media, the Financial Times reported Friday.

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The Temptation of the Sorting Hat

Because sometimes tools designed to help us assess performance and potential just don’t — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Måneraketten Saturn V slog alle rekorder – og er stadig den største

Saturn V har været raketternes konge siden 1967.

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Can Sci-Fi Writers Prepare Us for an Uncertain Future?

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Browser Extensions Scraped Data From Millions of People

Slack passwords, NSO spyware, and more of the week's top security news.

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Are Humans the Meanest Species in the Universe?

Melinda Snodgrass' novel *The High Ground* examines human cruelty in an alien first-contact scenario.

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The Temptation of the Sorting Hat

Because sometimes tools designed to help us assess performance and potential just don’t — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Space Spinoffs: The Technology To Reach The Moon Was Put To Use Back On Earth

Project Apollo spurred on a technological revolution — everything from advances in food packaging to computers. Fifty years later, we are still reaping the rewards. (Image credit: Lily Padula For NPR)

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Apollo 11 Astronaut Michael Collins on the Past and Future of Space Exploration

Fifty years after humans landed on the moon, the command module pilot of the mission discusses the purpose of exploring the unknown

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identity, intolerance, and change in the American heartland – with Jeanine and Catherine Butler

Oklahoma is "either your past or your future…it's a microcosm of America…the issues around racism, politics, the blurring of church and state…" Come for the cultural politics…stick around for the unlikely connections to LSD, mushrooms, and the Salem Witch Trials… None In spite of all the weird ways the word has been abused since the 2016 elections, I think of myself as a liberal. As a basic value

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Apollo 11 Moon Landing Showed That Aliens Might Be More Than Science Fiction

The moon may be dead, but the Apollo 11 astronauts still managed to bring extraterrestrial life back to Earth. Astronomer/alien hunter Seth Shostak explains.

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Sometimes Even Newspapers Need Poetry

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reflecting on the Apollo 11 mission, 50 years later. It is difficult to imagine a more daunting task for a newspaper editor than planning the next day’s front page when the world has just witnessed humanity’s crowning achievement: the successful landing of two of its kind on an alien world. The headlines you write, the photos you place, the prose yo

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Sony RX 100 VI Review: It Does What Your Phone Camera Can't

It's small, lightweight, and has an impressive zoom. But that comes with a hefty price tag.

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How Formula E Racing Makes Electric Cars Faster, Smarter, Funner

For automakers like BMW, Audi, and Jaguar, making EVs for the track is a natural way to hone EVs for the streets.

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Betoningarna avslöjar vad Armstrong egentligen sa

I Neil Armstrongs berömda citat fattas ett litet ord som helt förändrar betydelsen av vad han sa när han tog det första steget på månen. Men om man lyssnar på hur han betonar orden förstår man vad han egentligen menar. Titta och lyssna på klippet ovan och bedöm själv.

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Se seks nye elbiler, der følger Tesla-opskriften

PLUS. Mens de etablerede bilproducenter kæmper med at omstille produktionen fra forbrændingsmotorer til el, sendes enorme beløb i retning af startups, som håber at gøre Tesla kunsten efter.

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Space Photos of the Week: This Apollo Went to 11

The space race was the ultimate demonstration of US prowess. There was more to it than winning, though.

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CEOs Diverge on Moore's Law

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Apollo 11 Moon Landing: Photos From 50 Years Ago

On July 20, 1969, astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first human being to walk on another world, famously marking the moment with the phrase: “That’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind.” After months of preparation , preceded by years of development and testing, the crew of NASA’s Apollo 11 lifted off from Florida on July 16, arriving at the moon on July 19. While Command Mod

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The Woman at the Center of Trump’s Iran Policy

This summer, tankers are exploding, disappearing, or getting seized near the Gulf; drones are getting destroyed in tit-for-tat attacks; and a war of words and tweets is erupting between Donald Trump and Iran’s supreme leader. That’s where all the drama is, but in fact most of America’s punitive actions against Iran are taking place in a world not physical but financial. Sanctions are the key tool

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FaceApp Makes Today’s Privacy Laws Look Antiquated

Americans give billions of dollars a year to industries that promise to make them look younger. FaceApp became wildly popular, seemingly overnight, for doing the exact opposite. Applying a filter powered by artificial intelligence, the photo-editing app modifies photos of its users’ faces to show them what they might look like when they’re much older. The resulting images aren’t the only thing ab

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‘He Said Yes!’

As public figures have often been known to do in the age of social media , Elizabeth Warren commemorated her wedding anniversary this past weekend by expressing her appreciation for her partner on Twitter . Warren shared a story that also appears in her 2014 memoir A Fighting Chance , about the day she realized she’d be with Bruce Mann, now her husband of 39 years, for the rest of their lives. “O

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The Origins of the ‘Acting White’ Charge

Classroom integration wasn’t an entirely positive development for black educational prospects. That argument, entirely out of vogue, needs airing amid our reacquaintance with the busing controversy of 50 years ago. When Senator Kamala Harris exposed Vice President Joe Biden’s opposition to federally mandated busing in the early 1970s, progressives congratulated her—and that’s understandable. Busi

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Equifax close to $700m settlement for data breach: report

US credit agency Equifax is close to a $700 million settlement agreement with authorities over the theft of sensitive personal data of nearly 150 million customers, the Wall Street Journal reported.

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US bracing for extreme heat as weekend temperatures soar

The United States is bracing for a weekend of extremely hot weather, with major cities including New York and Washington expecting temperatures close to or exceeding 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius).

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The Apollo 11 moon landing was everything Trump's nationalism is not | David Smith

The president couldn’t resist remarking it was the anniversary of planting an American flag on the moon – but it was a human achievement Buzz Aldrin has described the “magnificent desolation” of the moon. On Friday he got more desolation, but it wasn’t so magnificent. Aged 89, the second man on the moon hovered awkwardly at one end of the Resolute desk in the Oval Office. Michael Collins, 88, Apo

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Polluted, bike-hostile Brussels to slam on the brakes

Brussels has made its choice: to reduce emissions and encourage greener, two-wheeled transport options, the road speed limit will have to come down.

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The problem with problem solving? It isn’t ridiculous enough.

To get really innovative solutions to complex problems, you need to abandon logic, says Dan Seewald. Asking provocative and ridiculous 'what if?' questions pushes us down lateral paths of thinking versus the vertical or logical path. The latter approach is practical but it doesn't break new ground. Breaking with tradition through lateral thinking allows us to solve really serious problems, from c

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Yes, There Is a Bathtub in Netflix's The Witcher

Eagle-eyed viewers might have noticed Geralt (Henry Cavill) and Yennefer at what appears a masquerade sex party in Netflix’s first The Witcher trailer. But apparently, that’s not going to be …

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Where were you when man first landed on the Moon?

Fifty years on, the 03:56 AM TV moment that was out of this world.

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Neil Armstrong's son talks about the Moon landing

Mark Armstrong talks about his father, and the first ever Moon landing 50 years ago.

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Apollo 11 and Beyond: Doing Geology on the Moon

Happy 50th anniversary, Apollo 11! Look at all the lunar geology the mission kicked off: — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The U.S.’s Toxic Agent Orange Legacy

KAMPOUT TUK, Cambodia—Paris Dauk’s left arm lies close to her chest, reminiscent of how a bird bears a broken wing. She’s talkative and has a propensity to fill her face, itself marked by abnormal growths, with a toothy grin. Yet while the bird’s wing may eventually heal, Dauk’s limb will not, remaining forever crumpled, underdeveloped, and, ultimately, deformed. Dauk, 24, is among several people

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Jessica Meir om att bli första svenskan i rymden ”Snart är det jag som är försökskaninen”

Den 25 september skjuts Jessica Meir, Nasa-astronauten med både svenskt och amerikanskt medborgarskap, upp till den internationella rymdstationen ISS. Det är första gången en svensk kvinna vistas i rymden. SVT fick tag i henne under träningen i Star City utanför Moskva.

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Universets længste golfslag? Astronaut spillede golf på Månen i 1971

Amerikanske Alan Shepard tog golfudstyr med på Apollo 14. Se, hvor langt en kugle vil flyve på Månen i vores grafik.

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8 ways to halt a global food crisis

There are serious challenges to global food supply everywhere we look. Intensive use of fertilisers in the US Midwest is causing nutrients to run off into rivers and streams, degrading the water quality and causing a Connecticut-size dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. Chocolate production will soon be challenged in West Africa – home to over half of global production. A variety of nutritional impac

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Købmand opdagede fosfor i et forsøg på at lave guld af urin

En købmand Brandt i Hamburg havde kastet sig over guldmageriet i et forsøg på at ophjælpe sine forstyrrede pengeforhold. I stedet opdagede han fosforet, som faktisk gik hen og blev en guldåre for ham. Opfindelsernes bog fra 1880 fortæller om grundstoffets fremstilling, egenskaber og anvendelse.

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How Apollo 11 brought humanity together

An endeavour which was born out of conflict ended by bringing the entire world together, at least for a moment.

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Strange illusion makes people forget where their teeth are

An illusion can trick people into thinking their teeth are closer to their neck than in reality, showing that our bodily perceptions are easily influenced

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Redaktionens favoritter: En flok amatører blæste liv i vindkraften

Nogle historier lever et alt for kort liv. Derfor har vi bedt et udpluk af Ingeniørens redaktører og journalister anbefale egne og andres historier. Her er, hvad de fandt frem.

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Let's get humans back on the moon

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We Went to the Moon. Why Can’t We Solve Climate Change?

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Fra arkivet: Christian Rovsing fortæller om sin tid som Apollo-kommentator

Måneuge på ing.dk: Christian Rovsing var Danmarks Radios kommentator under månerejserne. Den 33-årige civilingeniør var bekymret for astronauternes helbred, da Apollo-æraen tog fart, og tror heller ikke i dag, at vi vil klare de lange rumrejser.

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From Ted Hughes to HG Wells: Jeanette Winterson picks the best books about the moon

Fifty years since Apollo 11 landed, the novelist shares her favourite books and poems about Earth’s mysterious satellite There she is, 239,000 miles from Earth . A lover’s moon, a poet’s moon, a painted moon, made of green cheese, home to the Man in the Moon , visible above the lights of Moscow and Manhattan, Tokyo and London. Hanging as the silent guardian of rivers and woods. Symbol of the myst

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To return to the Moon, astronauts need new spacesuits

Space engineer Pablo de Leon has designed two spacesuit prototypes for the Moon and for Mars, and knows how long development takes.

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Thai farmers on the cash trail with snail slime

Giant snails inch across a plate of pumpkin and cucumber in central Thailand, an "organic" diet to tease the prized collagen-rich mucus from the molluscs, which to some cosmetic firms are now more valuable than gold.

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Thai farmers on the cash trail with snail slime

Giant snails inch across a plate of pumpkin and cucumber in central Thailand, an "organic" diet to tease the prized collagen-rich mucus from the molluscs, which to some cosmetic firms are now more valuable than gold.

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Technology, temporary help keeps farmers on job longer

At 79 years old, Art McManus says he's still able to hop on the tractor and maintain the 160 acres of cherry trees at his orchard in Traverse City, Michigan.

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The exploration of space in 10 key dates

From the Soviet Union's pioneering satellite to the first man on the Moon 50 years ago, here are 10 key dates in space exploration.

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Physicist studying how extreme weather in space affects satellites

A physicist at The University of Texas at Arlington is developing a new scale to measure weather storms in space that could lead to a better understanding of how those storms impact Earth.

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The moon was once a frontier. But new worlds now beckon | Martin Rees

Fifty years ago, Nasa’s moon landing enthralled my generation. But the cosmos holds other secrets that space exploration could unlock My favourite childhood reading in the 1950s included the Eagle comic, especially the adventures of Dan Dare, Pilot of the Future – where the brilliant artwork depicted orbiting cities, jet packs and alien invaders. When spaceflight became real, the suits worn by the

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Avengers: Endgame writers, Russo brothers spill secrets at Comic-Con 2019 – CNET

Heads up: Thanos was going to de-CAPitate Captain America.

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'We will return to the Moon': why Apollo's mission was just the beginning

'The Martian' author Andy Weir says building a long term lunar base is all about economics

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The Quantum Internet | PBS Space Time

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Equifax close to $700m settlement for data breach: report

US credit agency Equifax is close to a $700 million settlement agreement with authorities over the theft of sensitive personal data of nearly 150 million customers, the Wall Street Journal reported.

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'Game of Thrones' Goes on a Victory Lap—and an Apology Tour

The show's farewell panel at Comic-Con was a one-sided goodbye.

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Medications could affect how you react to a heatwave

If you're thirsty, you're already dehydrated. (DepositPhotos/) A dangerous heat wave will broil two-thirds of the U.S. in the coming days, shooting temperatures above 100 degrees in cities from Dallas to St. Louis, Chicago, Detroit, D.C., New York, and Boston. The National Weather Service expects between 20 and 30 new record highs will be set today and Saturday, from the Rockies to the East Coast

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The final 13 minutes before the Moon landing

The minutes before landing were tense, as fuel was feared to be low and connections were lost between the lunar module and mission control.

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11 super-nerdy photography facts about the cameras we took to the moon

This camera never went to the moon, but it's the same model and it lives in the Kodak camera archive. (Stan Horaczek/) NASA sent lunar probes out to photograph the landing sites A satellite called Ranger 7 sent the first images from the moon back to Earth via radio signal in 1964. Soon after transmitting the images, it crashed into the surface and broke for good. Several more probes followed in s

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Exposing the inadequacy of redox formalisms by resolving redox inequivalence within isovalent clusters [Chemistry]

In this report we examine a family of trinuclear iron complexes by multiple-wavelength, anomalous diffraction (MAD) to explore the redox load distribution within cluster materials by the free refinement of atomic scattering factors. Several effects were explored that can impact atomic scattering factors within clusters, including 1) metal atom primary…

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The allosteric mechanism of substrate-specific transport in SLC6 is mediated by a volumetric sensor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) in the SLC6 family terminate neurotransmission by coupling the thermodynamically favorable transport of ions to the thermodynamically unfavorable transport of neurotransmitter back into presynaptic neurons. Results from many structural, functional, and computational studies on LeuT, a bacterial NSS homolog, have provided critical insight into the mechanism

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The flowering hormone florigen accelerates secondary cell wall biogenesis to harmonize vascular maturation with reproductive development [Plant Biology]

Florigen, a proteinaceous hormone, functions as a universal long-range promoter of flowering and concurrently as a generic growth-attenuating hormone across leaf and stem meristems. In flowering plants, the transition from the vegetative phase to the reproductive phase entails the orchestration of new growth coordinates and a global redistribution of resources,…

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Patronus is the elusive plant securin, preventing chromosome separation by antagonizing separase [Genetics]

Chromosome distribution at anaphase of mitosis and meiosis is triggered by separase, an evolutionarily conserved protease. Separase must be tightly regulated to prevent the untimely release of chromatid cohesion and disastrous chromosome distribution defects. Securin is the key inhibitor of separase in animals and fungi, but has not been identified…

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Label-free chemical imaging flow cytometry by high-speed multicolor stimulated Raman scattering [Engineering]

Combining the strength of flow cytometry with fluorescence imaging and digital image analysis, imaging flow cytometry is a powerful tool in diverse fields including cancer biology, immunology, drug discovery, microbiology, and metabolic engineering. It enables measurements and statistical analyses of chemical, structural, and morphological phenotypes of numerous living cells to…

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One Small Scoop, One Giant Impact for Mankind

Just before Neil Armstrong climbed back into the lunar module, he scooped up a few last-minute soil samples–which upturned our understanding of planetary formation. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Lunar samples from Apollo 11 still influence research

On this day in 1969, astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin took the first steps on the moon’s surface, collecting lunar rocks and bringing them back to Earth. The samples they gathered still inform research today, including the research of Miki Nakajima, an assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester. Nakajima studies the formation and evolution of t

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The App Creeping on Your IG Location, Jakarta’s Insurance Crisis, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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From the moon to deep beyond: Australia’s future in space exploration

What Australia’s fledgling space agency lacks in size it hopes to make up for with a smart operating strategy and a bold vision On 20 July 1969, when Neil Armstrong first stepped onto the surface of the moon, the footage was relayed to 600 million viewers – about one-fifth of humanity in 1969 – from Nasa’s Honeysuckle Creek tracking station on the outskirts of Canberra. It was a big achievement f

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Algae bio-curtains: Architects' radical solution to capture carbon

Scientists and architects in London have developed 'bio-curtains' to act as an alternative to urban trees.

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Netflix’s 'The Witcher' Makes a Play to Be the Next 'Game of Thrones'

The streaming service might have the new fantasy crossover hit.

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Lifeboat of Titanic Survivors Were Guided by One Woman's 'Flashlight' Cane

A "flashlight" cane that lighted the way for Titanic survivors is hitting the auction block.

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3,271 Pill Bottles, a Town of 2,831: Court Filings Say Corporations Fed Opioid Epidemic

Cities and counties are suing major drugstore chains and Walmart, contending they distributed billions of painkillers that devastated communities.

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Fake resumes root out real hiring bias

A new way to study hiring called incentivized resume rating has uncovered evidence of how bias seeps into the hiring process of some of the world’s top firms. Research has shown how easy it is for an employer’s conscious and unconscious biases to creep in when reviewing resumes, creating an uneven playing field that disproportionally hurts women and minority job candidates. One example of the bia

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One Small Scoop, One Giant Impact for Mankind

Just before Neil Armstrong climbed back into the lunar module, he scooped up a few last-minute soil samples–which upturned our understanding of planetary formation. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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140 Years Young: The Future of Aging

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China #1 in quantum entanglement, teleports object 300 miles.

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Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future In Monaco

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How to print giant wall-worthy images yourself

We spiced the PopSci offices up a bit in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission. (John Kennedy/) Today, I’m going to show you how to blow up the moon. Ok, wow, wait, let’s rephrase. I’m going to show you how to enlarge the moon. A topographic map of the moon. And put it on your wall. Gosh, I almost oversold that one, didn’t I? It doesn't have to be a moon map, either—the fol

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Nasaveteranen som fortfarande är aktiv

Femtio år efter människans första besök på månen lever fortfarande fyra av de 12 amerikaner som gått på månens yta. Men hela Apollo-projektet krävde ungefär 400 000 medarbetare i USA. Bland dem finns många kvar som minns.

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Så här såg Apollo-programmet ut

Sex flygningar gick till månen 1969-72. Tolv amerikaner gick på månens yta, ytterligare sex fanns kvar i Apollo-kapseln i omloppsbana runt månen. Här är alla Apollo-uppdragen.

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Radio Atlantic: How to Cover Racist Tweets

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) On Sunday, President Donald Trump told four members of Congress to “go back” to the countries “from which they came.” Journalists have spent the week working through how to discuss what is a textbook racist statement aimed at four congresswomen who—besides all being American citizens—are all women of color. Newsro

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Buzz Aldrin sloshed around in pee on the moon (and 11 other Apollo facts)

There was probably pee inside the boot that made this print. (NASA/) On July 20, 1969 our species took its first steps on an alien world. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, here are a few facts you might not find in a history textbook. If you like these weird facts, check out our hit podcast The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week for loads more. Buzz Aldrin did his m

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Glitches, bandwidth plagued a now defunct pilot of Amazon's facial recognition software in Orlando

The Orlando Police department ended its trial of the technology, called Rekognition, after 15 months of glitches and concerns over whether the technology was actually working.

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Take a bath 90 minutes before bedtime to get better sleep

Biomedical engineers have found a way for people to get better shuteye. Systematic review protocols allowed researchers to analyze thousands of studies linking water-based passive body heating, or bathing and showering with warm/hot water, with improved sleep quality.

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Biologist leads pioneering study on stress

A biologist conducted a pioneering research study that could help us to better understand the role of dopamine in stress resilience in humans through analyzing wild songbirds. This study could lead to increased prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders.

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More women using cannabis daily before and during pregnancy, research finds

The number of women using cannabis in the year before they get pregnant and early in their pregnancies is increasing, and their frequency of use is also rising, according to new data.

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Nations with strong women's rights likely to have better population health and faster growth

Nations with strong women's rights are more likely to have better health and faster growth than those who don't promote and protect these values.

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Discovering how diabetes leads to vascular disease

A team scientists and physicians has identified a cellular connection between diabetes and one of its major complications — blood vessel narrowing that increases risks of several serious health conditions, including heart disease and stroke.

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Amazon Warns Customers: Those Supplements Might Be Fake

The company confirmed that it had notified users earlier this week that the Align supplements they purchased were likely counterfeits.

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Biologist leads pioneering study on stress

A biologist at Louisiana State University conducted a pioneering research study that could help us to better understand the role of dopamine in stress resilience in humans through analyzing wild songbirds. This study could lead to increased prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders.

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Elon Musk Confirms SpaceX's Starhopper Survived Recent Fireball

An artist rendition of Starship on a future flight in space. (Credit: SpaceX) In a series of Twitter responses, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk confirmed Starhopper, the prototype for the company’s next generation of spacecraft, survived what appeared to be an explosion during a recent test. On Tuesday, July 16, Starhopper had undergone a “static fire test” to check recently added Raptor engines on a testing

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A Finnish company is making food out of thin air

The company's protein powder, "Solein," is similar in form and taste to wheat flour. Based on a concept developed by NASA, the product has wide potential as a carbon-neutral source of protein. The man-made "meat" industry just got even more interesting. None It's not like you can make food out of thin air. Well…it turns out you can. A company from Finland, Solar Foods , is planning to bring to ma

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Getting Heated (Again)

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, July 19. ‣ Iran says it seized a British oil tanker in the Strait of Hormuz. Here’s what else we’re watching: (Rachel Jessen) What Trump’s Attacks Mean for 2020: New evidence provided exclusively to The Atlantic

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Polaris built a lunar rover replica that can drive 60 miles per hour here on Earth

The rover on the moon couldn't support nearly this much weight here in the full gravity of earth. (Polaris/) The original NASA Lunar Roving Vehicle wouldn't be very much fun to drive here on Earth. Its speed topped out at a paltry 8 mph and, because it was built for the moon's reduced gravity, it would collapse under the weight of a normal human. Polaris and the US Space and Rocket Center museum,

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Discovering how diabetes leads to vascular disease

A team of UC Davis Health scientists and physicians has identified a cellular connection between diabetes and one of its major complications — blood vessel narrowing that increases risks of several serious health conditions, including heart disease and stroke.

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Take a bath 90 minutes before bedtime to get better sleep

Biomedical engineers at UT Austin have found a way for people to get better shuteye. Systematic review protocols allowed researchers to analyze thousands of studies linking water-based passive body heating, or bathing and showering with warm/hot water, with improved sleep quality.

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Parrot reportedly grounds its toy drones – CNET

The French company will instead focus on its Anafi camera drone line, according to a report.

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Boosting the discovery of new drugs to treat spinal cord injuries using zebrafish

A research team led by Leonor Saúde, Principal Investigator at Instituto de Medicina Molecular, in partnership with the company Technophage, SA, has designed a simple and efficient platform that uses zebrafish to discover and identify new drugs to treat spinal cord lesions. This study is the proof-of-concept for the use of this zebrafish platform that, combined with drug repurposing, has the poten

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Twitter’s Major Design Overhaul

Twitter has launched its first major redesign in several years. The question is whether it’s enough to make a dent in the hate and harassment.

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What not to do in graduate school

Nature, Published online: 19 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02255-7 Six limiting maxims PhD students should avoid.

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Eco-friendly composite catalyst and ultrasound removes pollutants from water

Scientists have developed a wastewater treatment process that uses a common agricultural byproduct to effectively remove pollutants and environmental hormones, which are known to be endocrine disruptors.

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Geoscientists discover mechanisms controlling Greenland ice sheet collapse

New radar technology allowed geoscientists to look at Greenland's dynamic ice-ocean interface that drives sea level rise.

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Newly discovered neural pathway processes acute light to affect sleep

Either to check the time or waste time, people often look at their smartphones after waking in the middle of the night. While this acute burst of light does make it more difficult to fall back to sleep, a new study reports that it won't interfere with the body's overall circadian rhythms.

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Genetic similarities of osteosarcoma between dogs and children

A bone cancer known as osteosarcoma is genetically similar in dogs and human children, according to the results of a new study. The findings could help break the logjam in the treatment of this deadly disease, which hasn't seen a significant medical breakthrough in nearly three decades.

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Hawaiian Activists Protest Construction Of World's Largest Telescope In State

Native Hawaiian activists are protesting to prevent the construction of the world's largest telescope on Hawaii's tallest mountain. Now, authorities appear poised to break up the protests.

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Money, shoes, poop, and other highlights from the 796 items we’ve left on the moon

Humans have a bad habit of leaving a trace wherever they go. The moon is no exception. Sure, we left some ceremonial flags held aloft by wire in lieu of a brisk wind to blow them, but the most telling things we've left aren't what you see in commemorative photos. The official NASA Catalogue of Manmade Material on the Moon lists 796 items, 765 of which are from American missions. Some as small as

17h

EPA Will Not Ban Pesticide Linked to Neurological Issues

The agency argues that chlorpyrifos is one of few "cost-effective options" for controlling certain farm pests.

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Should universities be held accountable for student debt?

On his new podcast, The Portal, Eric Weinstein dives into student debt and the function of universities with Peter Thiel. Weinstein floats the idea of a college equivalence degree (CED) through an online testing system. Thiel notes that if you don't pay off your student debt by age 65, the government garnishes your social security checks. None The last recession took many Americans by surprise. U

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Mystery surrounds ouster of Chinese researchers from Canadian laboratory

Officials will only say it involves a “policy breach”

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Smart irrigation model predicts rainfall to conserve water

A predictive model combining information about plant physiology, real-time soil conditions and weather forecasts can help make more informed decisions about when and how much to irrigate. This could save 40 percent of the water consumed by more traditional methods, according to new research.

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Atomically precise models improve understanding of fuel cells

Simulations from researchers in Japan provide new insights into the reactions occurring in solid-oxide fuel cells by using realistic atomic-scale models of the electrode active site based on microscope observations instead of the simplified and idealized atomic structures employed in previous studies. This better understanding of how the structures in the cells affect the reactions could give clue

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Bridging the nanoscale gap: A deep look inside atomic switches

A team of researchers has gained unprecedented insight into the inner workings of an atomic switch. By investigating the composition of the tiny metal 'bridge' that forms inside the switch, their findings may spur the design of atomic switches with improved performance.

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2016 US election linked to increase in preterm births among US Latinas

A significant jump in preterm births to Latina mothers living in the U.S. occurred in the nine months following the November 8, 2016 election of President Donald Trump, according to a new study.

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Air pollution linked to increase in newborn intensive care admissions

Infants born to women exposed to high levels of air pollution in the week before delivery are more likely to be admitted to a newborn intensive care unit (NICU), suggests a new analysis.

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Smart irrigation model predicts rainfall to conserve water

A predictive model combining information about plant physiology, real-time soil conditions and weather forecasts can help make more informed decisions about when and how much to irrigate. This could save 40 percent of the water consumed by more traditional methods, according to new research.

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Offering children a wide variety and large quantities of snack food encourages them to eat more

Offering children a wide variety and large quantities of snack food encourages them to eat more – and may contribute to weight problems, a new study has found. The research also found that how snacks are presented (in a large or small container) has little influence on how much children snack.

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Atomically precise models improve understanding of fuel cells

Simulations from researchers in Japan provide new insights into the reactions occurring in solid-oxide fuel cells by using realistic atomic-scale models of the electrode active site based on microscope observations instead of the simplified and idealized atomic structures employed in previous studies. This better understanding of how the structures in the cells affect the reactions could give clue

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Flexible user interface distribution for ubiquitous multi-device interaction

Researchers have developed mobile software platform technology that allows a mobile application (app) to be executed simultaneously and more dynamically on multiple smart devices. Its high flexibility and broad applicability can help accelerate a shift from the current single-device paradigm to a multiple one, which enables users to utilize mobile apps in ways previously unthinkable.

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Earlier Versions of FaceApp Were Incredibly Racist

Old App, New Tricks If you’ve spent any amount of time on social media this week, you’ve probably noticed all your friends, family members, and followers suddenly look a lot older . That’s thanks to FaceApp, a smartphone app that uses artificial intelligence to show what a person might look like around the time they’re ready to apply for an AARP card. The thing is, FaceApp isn’t actually new. It’

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Sustainable land management key to reducing Amazon wildfires

The unrelenting deforestation of the Amazon region could lead to a dramatic increase to the risk of destructive wildfire outbreaks, research has shown.

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Shedding light on darker parts of our genetic heritage

More than half of our genome consists of transposons, DNA sequences that are reminiscent of ancient, extinct viruses. Transposons are normally silenced by a process known as DNA methylation, but their activation can lead to serious diseases. Very little is known about transposons but researchers in an international collaboration project have now succeeded for the first time in studying what happen

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Study shows relationship between type of delivery and twins' psychological development

A research team has analyzed for the first time the effect of the type of delivery on twins' psychological development and intelligence, demonstrating that cesarean section carries an independent risk in these multiple births.

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Hearing loss tied with mental, physical, and social ailments in older people

Hearing loss has a profound impact on older people, as it can lead to anxiety, restricted activity, and perhaps even cognitive decline and dementia. Research has examined associations of hearing loss with outdoor activity limitations, psychological distress, and memory loss in people aged 65 and over. All three conditions were significantly worse when there was hearing loss. The findings support e

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Successful application of machine learning in the discovery of new polymers

As a powerful example of how artificial intelligence (AI) can accelerate the discovery of new materials, scientists in Japan have designed and verified polymers with high thermal conductivity — a property that would be the key to heat management, for example, in the fifth-generation (5G) mobile communication technologies. Their study highlights the great advantages of machine learning methods ove

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Understanding the mode of action of the primaquine: New insights into a 70 year old puzzle

Researchers have taken significant steps in understanding the way that the anti-malarial drug primaquine (PQ) works, which they hope will lead to the development of new, safer and more effective treatments for malaria.

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Unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darien forest

Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project in the Darien forest of Panama, scientists and a team of trained indigenous technicians found that, even in disturbed areas, it maintained the same tree species richness and a disproportionately high capacity to sequester carbon.

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3q29 deletion survey: Distinct social profile, high ASD risk

3q29 deletion syndrome is a strong risk factor for both schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder. People with the rare condition have a distinct neuropsychiatric profile, researchers found.

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How long does a surgery take? Researchers create model

For years, surgeons have estimated how long a surgery will take. Now, researchers have created a model using data from more than 45k surgeries over four years.

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Experts Say “Emotion Recognition” Lacks Scientific Foundation

submitted by /u/MyNameIsGriffon [link] [comments]

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South Korean government announces 2.1 GW floating PV project

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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This jellyfish makes glowing proteins previously unknown to science

Discovery could help researchers create a new generation of fluorescent probes

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New research finds private practice physicians less likely to maintain electronic records

The research led by Jordan Everson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Health Policy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), finds striking differences in use of electronic health records (EHRs) among more than 291,000 physicians included in the study.

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Teacher treatment of students factors into racial gap in school suspensions

An analysis led by Brown sociologist Jayanti Owens found that different treatment of black and white students accounted for half of the racial gap in school suspensions and expulsions among 5- to 9-year-old children.

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Teacher treatment of students factors into racial gap in school suspensions

Elementary schools tend to discipline black students more harshly than white students, leading to a considerable racial gap in expulsion and suspension. That's among the findings of a new data analysis led by researchers at Brown and Princeton universities.

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Watch a Chinese Space Station Burn up in Earth’s Atmosphere

Re-Entry On Friday, the Chinese space station Tiangong-2 was spectacularly decommissioned — it was set on a crash course with a remote patch of the Pacific Ocean called the “ Spacecraft Cemetery .” Tiangong-2 is no more, but we can re-live its final moments. The state-owned China Global Television Network posted a YouTube video of the space station as it begins to incinerate while re-entering the

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Neuroscientist Rahul Desikan Dies

He developed an MRI-based map of the human cortex, discovered genetic risk factors for neurodegenerative diseases, and wrote about his struggles with ALS.

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This deep neural network fights deepfakes

Researchers have developed a deep neural network architecture that can identify manipulated images at the pixel level with high precision by studying the boundaries of objects in the image.

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Newly discovered biosynthetic pathway in bacteria recipe for drug discovery and production

Researchers have described a novel biochemical strategy used by bacteria to synthesize natural products.

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X-ray mapping enhances potential of lightweight magnesium

Engineers have discovered a technique for creating stronger, lightweight magnesium alloys. This finding could be of significant benefit to the automobile and aerospace industries.

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Top Moon Conspiracy Theories and Why They Are Stupid

Sorry guys, these moon conspiracy theories are just wrong.

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Tagged whale shark part of ongoing study by NSU's guy harvey research institute

When it comes to finding one's way, Garmin, Tom-Tom and Google Maps have got nothing on Mother Nature.

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Tagged whale shark part of ongoing study by NSU's guy harvey research institute

When it comes to finding one's way, Garmin, Tom-Tom and Google Maps have got nothing on Mother Nature.

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Debate intensifies over speed of expanding universe

New methods of measuring Hubble constant are suggesting a “crisis” in cosmology

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Smart Glove Lets You Grip Virtual Objects

The Feelies A new high-tech glove helps make virtual reality more tangible. The glove not only turns your hand into a sort of controller for VR experiences, but it also provides tactile feedback to trick your brain into thinking you’re actually grabbing whatever it is that your VR headset is showing you, according to research published in the journal Nature on Thursday. Though it’s not nearly con

19h

Why Do Mosquitos Love Biting Some People More Than Others?

Mosquitos are an annoyance to all — but some people seem to attract them far more than others. (Credit: mycteria/Shutterstock) As I slept unaware beneath the stars one night in early July, what I can only assume to be a legion of mosquitoes declared war against my forehead. I’ve been a mosquito magnet as long as I can remember, so I should have foreseen the itchy misery they would deliver upon my

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Why That 13 Reasons Why Scene Took Two Years to Cut

If you are having thoughts of suicide, please know that you are not alone. If you are in danger of acting on suicidal thoughts, call 911. For support and resources, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 or text 741-741 for the Crisis Text Line. When the first season of the Netflix teen drama 13 Reasons Why was released, in March 2017, the instantaneous clamor of viewers re

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The Blind Spot of Beyoncé’s Lion King Soundtrack

On Tuesday night, Beyoncé made a bold, sentimental dedication. Speaking with ABC News’s Robin Roberts during a special program that aired ahead of the new Lion King ’s release, the singer explained the motivations behind the compilation album she executive-produced as an accompaniment to the film. “This soundtrack is a love letter to Africa, and I wanted to make sure we found the best talent from

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The Apollo moon rocks continue to reveal secrets of the cosmos

A solid souvenir delivered to us by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin from their 1969 trip to the moon. (NASA/) Toward the end of their two-hour moon trek, Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin hurried to gather about 48 pounds of lunar rocks and dust in 20 minutes. Some 240,000 miles below, earthbound researchers waited on a soon-to-be fulfilled fantasy: the opportunity to subject lunar sample

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Major U.S. cities are leaking methane at twice the rate previously believed

New York City, Boston, other East Coast cities annually emit 890,000 tons of the greenhouse gas

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An Imagined Future Speaks In 'Talking To Robots'

If you want to see what that future might look like, David Ewing Duncan's book is a fun place to start; he envisions various bots based on interviews with scientists and engineers, among others. (Image credit: Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61)

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Is Climate Change Our No. 1 National Security Threat?

The president has called climate change a hoax, but many in the military consider it a threat we must fight.

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Turkestan cockroach selling online is a companion of the common household cockroach

The Turkestan cockroach (commonly known as the red runner roach or rusty red roach), which is popular as food for pet reptiles, has an interneuron extremely sensitive to sex pheromones emitted by American cockroaches, providing evidence that the Turkestan cockroach is phylogenetically close to the American cockroach and the smoky brown cockroach belonging to the genus Periplaneta.

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Largest genomic study on type 2 diabetes in sub-Saharan African populations

Researchers have performed the largest GWAS study on type 2 diabetes in the sub-Saharan African populations, revealing an association between the disease and previously unlinked ZRANB3 gene. By using animal models, their results show that dysfunction of the ZRANB3 gene has major repercussions on insulin production. This link may hold key answers to the treatment of type 2 diabetes in all populatio

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Astronauts less likely to faint on Earth if they exercise in space; findings may help others with fainting issues

Up to two hours of endurance and resistance exercises daily during a long space flight mission, combined with IV fluid replacement after landing, helps astronauts prevent dizziness and fainting during normal activity when they return to Earth. The study findings also have implications for a variety of people with health conditions that cause them to faint when standing up, and people on bed rest f

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Transfer of oncogene in colon cancer cells demonstrated

For years, doctors and scientists have known very little about why patients can receive drugs successfully for months, or even years, before developing a drug resistance. Now researchers propose that there is a cellular as well as molecular cause to this phenomenon in colon cancer, with potential application to other similarly aggressive cancers as well.

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Many of the deadliest cancers receive the least amount of research funding

Many of the deadliest or most common cancers get the least amount of nonprofit research funding, reports a new study. 'Embarrassing' or stigmatized cancers, like lung and liver, are underfunded. Colon, endometrial, liver and bile duct, cervical, ovarian, pancreatic and lung cancers were all poorly funded compared to how common they are and how many deaths they cause, the study found. In contrast,

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Why AIs Have No Idea What’s In These Mundane Pictures

Wrong Again Image recognition software powered by artificial intelligence has come a long way. But it’s not foolproof: a team of researchers found that about two percent of the time, machine vision systems will have no idea what they’re looking at, even if it’s blatantly obvious to a human. The researchers discovered 7,500 unmodified photographs of objects that are able to completely throw AIs fo

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The Earth’s Core Is Leaking, Baffling Scientists

Sprung A Leak Remember that model of the Earth’s layers — a big orb with clean divisions throughout — you learned about in high school? It turns out the reality of the situation is a whole lot messier. The Earth’s core has been leaking into other layers of the planet for the past 2.5 billion years, reports Live Science . It turns out that tungsten from the core has been filtering out into the man

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How to Make a Mouse Hallucinate

A real-time capture of brain-circuit activity shows how simple it is to change what an animal sees — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to Make a Mouse Hallucinate

A real-time capture of brain-circuit activity shows how simple it is to change what an animal sees — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to Make a Mouse Hallucinate

A real-time capture of brain-circuit activity shows how simple it is to change what an animal sees — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Routine blood tests could predict diabetes

A study that looked at data on more than 900,000 VA patients showed that elevated blood glucose levels detected in routine outpatient tests, though well below diagnostic thresholds, predicted diabetes within 5 years.

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Quantum interference in service of information technology

Scientists from the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, in collaboration with the University of Oxford and the NIST agency, have shown that quantum interference enables processing of large sets of data faster and more accurately than with standard methods. Their studies may boost applications of quantum technologies in e.g. artificial intelligence, robotics and medical diagnostics. The resul

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Scientists Made Mice Hallucinate by Shining Light Into Their Brains

Seeing Things Unless you suffer from a neurological disorder, such as schizophrenia — or like to dabble in psychedelics — chances are you don’t spend much time worrying about seeing things that aren’t there. But now, a team lead by researchers from Stanford University believes it’s found a way to make mice hallucinate without feeding them LSD or magic mushrooms — and the discovery has left them w

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This App Lets Your Instagram Followers Track Your Location

By aggregating data from geotagged posts and stories, Who's in Town can paint a detailed picture of the habits and haunts of anyone with a Instagram account.

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Quantum interference enables constant-time quantum information processing

It is an open question how fast information processing can be performed and whether quantum effects can speed up the best existing solutions. Signal extraction, analysis, and compression in diagnostics, astronomy, chemistry, and broadcasting build on the discrete Fourier transform. It is implemented with the fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm that assumes a periodic input of specific lengths,

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Ultrafast chemical imaging by widefield photothermal sensing of infrared absorption

Infrared (IR) imaging has become a viable tool for visualizing various chemical bonds in a specimen. The performance, however, is limited in terms of spatial resolution and imaging speed. Here, instead of measuring the loss of the IR beam, we use a pulsed visible light for high-throughput, widefield sensing of the transient photothermal effect induced by absorption of single mid-IR pulses. To ext

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Variation of the giant intrinsic spin Hall conductivity of Pt with carrier lifetime

More than a decade after the first theoretical and experimental studies of the spin Hall conductivity (SHC) of Pt, both its dominant origin and amplitude remain in dispute. We report the experimental determination of the rapid variation of the intrinsic SHC of Pt with the carrier lifetime () in the dirty-metal regime by incorporating finely dispersed MgO intersite impurities into the Pt, while ma

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Programmable dynamic steady states in ATP-driven nonequilibrium DNA systems

Inspired by the dynamics of the dissipative self-assembly of microtubules, chemically fueled synthetic systems with transient lifetimes are emerging for nonequilibrium materials design. However, realizing programmable or even adaptive structural dynamics has proven challenging because it requires synchronization of energy uptake and dissipation events within true steady states, which remains diff

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Giant gate-tunable bandgap renormalization and excitonic effects in a 2D semiconductor

Understanding the remarkable excitonic effects and controlling the exciton binding energies in two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors are crucial in unlocking their full potential for use in future photonic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we demonstrate large excitonic effects and gate-tunable exciton binding energies in single-layer rhenium diselenide (ReSe 2 ) on a back-gated graphene device. We

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Ultrathin conformal polycyclosiloxane films to improve silicon cycling stability

Electrochemical reduction of lithium ion battery electrolyte on Si anodes was mitigated by synthesizing nanoscale, conformal polymer films as artificial solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layers. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was used to deposit poly(1,3,5,7-tetravinyl-1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane) (pV4D4) onto silicon thin film electrodes. pV4D4 films (25 nm) on Si electrode

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Quantum mechanical MRI simulations: Solving the matrix dimension problem

We propose a solution to the matrix dimension problem in quantum mechanical simulations of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) experiments on complex molecules. This problem is very old; it arises when Kronecker products of spin operators and spatial dynamics generators are taken—the resulting matrices are far too large for any current or future computer. However, spin and spatial operators individu

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Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as a photocatalyst

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) is a key redox compound in all living cells responsible for energy transduction, genomic integrity, life-span extension, and neuromodulation. Here, we report a new function of NAD + as a molecular photocatalyst in addition to the biological roles. Our spectroscopic and electrochemical analyses reveal light absorption and electronic properties of two -con

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Large negative thermo-optic coefficients of a lead halide perovskite

Lead halide perovskites are promising semiconductors for high-performance photonic devices. Because the refractive index determines the optimal design and performance limit of the semiconductor devices, the refractive index and its change upon external modulations are the most critical properties for advanced photonic applications. Here, we report that the refractive index of halide perovskite CH

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Cyborgs: Elon Musk and the new era of neuroscience

Many labs are trying to connect thought to computers but Neuralink wants to merge AI with the brain

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Leading, Just Not by Example

It was supposed to be one of those rare, heartwarming moments in Washington: Two officials—one appointed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the other by President Donald Trump—sitting together on a panel, agreeing to agree. This week, the State Department convened its largest-ever gathering dedicated to human rights, the Ministerial to Advance Religious Freedom. Two members of the bipartisan United S

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The First Month of Trump’s Campaign Has Been a Doozy

One month ago—exactly 31 days—Donald Trump announced in Florida that he was launching his campaign for president. The launch was something of a sham, as I wrote at the time : He’d been periodically launching the campaign, and its slogan—“Keep America Great”—since even before his inauguration. Nonetheless, the one-month mark provides a good perspective for considering the president’s reelection ca

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The Apollo Engineer Who Almost Wasn’t Allowed in the Control Room

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reflecting on the Apollo 11 mission, 50 years later. With seconds left in the countdown, JoAnn Morgan knew there was no turning back. Oh, we’re really going to do it , she thought to herself. We’re really going . The United States was about to launch three men to the moon, and Morgan, an instrumentation controller at NASA, had a front-row seat: the

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Weird Gadget Uses Your Knee Motion to Charge Your Phone

Pumping Up A new lightweight knee brace could extract energy from a person’s person’s gait to charge medical devices, wearables, or even potentially a phone. The 0.7-pound device, described in research published Tuesday in the journal Applied Physics Letters , reportedly doesn’t make it noticeably harder for people to bend or straighten their knees, meaning it could help people capitalize on thei

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Teen Had a Shard of Glass Stuck in His Face for a Month Without Knowing It

A teenage boy had a knife-like shard of glass stuck in his face for weeks after he fainted into a window.

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Værre end Tjernobyl: Sønderbombet Stillehavs-paradis lider under kraftig stråling

Marshalløerne er stadig hårdt plaget af radioaktiv stråling fra USA's atomprøvesprængninger.

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Quantum interference in the service of information technology

Scientists from the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, in collaboration with the University of Oxford and NIST, have shown that quantum interference enables processing of large sets of data faster and more accurately than with standard methods. Their studies may boost applications of quantum technologies in artificial intelligence, robotics and medical diagnostics, for example. The results

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'Fresh Air' Commemorates The 50th Anniversary Of Apollo 11's Moon Landing

We listen to archival interviews with Michael Collins, of Apollo 11; Alan Shepard, the first American in space; Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield; and Chuck Yeager, who first broke the sound barrier.

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The Guardian view on moon landings: a new race for space | Editorial

The Apollo 11 mission inspired the world. What has happened in the ensuing half-century? When Neil Armstrong stepped on to the moon 50 years ago, it was down to a giant leap of political and scientific imagination. His footprints on the powdery lunar surface changed the way we saw ourselves, confirming that humanity could escape its earthly coils. The mission unleashed a dream of what we as a spec

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Jazz Generated by a Neural Network Is Absolutely Terrifying

Free Jazz A pair of musicians-turned-programmers used a John Coltrane record to train a neural network. The result is a provocative glimpse of what it sounds like when an algorithm deconstructs a piece of human art — and reassembles it into something a human would never create. Really Experimental The music the algorithm produces, which is streamed live 24 hours a day, is uncanny. For a few minut

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How to efficiently charge your devices

You can just use the charger that came with your device. Or you can do better. Your call. (Steve Johnson via Unsplash/) Back in the good old days of the early 2000s, every device had one charger. Some gadgets were a little more practical and used one of a variety of USB connections, but it almost felt like there were as many standards as manufacturers. Almost 20 years later, most of the industry

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Marvel's Games Are Starting to Feel a Lot Like Its Movies

They're not all telling the same story, but they're telling their own stories *consistently*—a recipe for a new kind of success.

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KIST uesed eco-friendly composite catalyst and ultrasound to remove pollutants from water

Developed eco-friendly, low-cost, and high-efficiency wastewater processing catalyst made from agricultural byproduct, and High efficiency and removal rate achieved through application of ultrasound stimulation, leading to high expectation for the development of an environmental hormone removal system.

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As Temperatures Soar During Heat Wave, So Will CO2

Greenhouse gas emissions will spike as grid operators fire up more power plants — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Spectacular P. T. Barnum

Armando Veve There’s no getting your arms around P. T. Barnum, no safe space in the cultural imagination for this guy. With his jolly bulb of a nose and his limitless energy—that demonic, write-two-lectures-before-breakfast 19th-century energy, historically entitled and unimpeded by neurosis—the great showman grows trickier and more tricksterish with every passing year. He was a great galumphing

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Chinese Space Station Tiangong-2 Destroyed in Fiery Re-Entry Over Pacific Ocean

A Chinese space station fell out of the sky today (July 19). But unlike the last time this happened, China was in control the whole time.

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'Fallout 76' Desperately Needs to Test-Play Its Patches More

This week's game news: update troubles for 'Fallout 76,' Nintendo Switch's possessed joysticks, and the bizarre trailer for 'PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds.'

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The Environmental Benefits of Making Gin from Peas

The Environmental Benefits of Making Gin from Peas New distilling technique creates a new, refreshing use for mashed peas. pea-gin_illo2.jpg Image credits: Photo Collage by Abigail Malate, with images from A uckland Museum (CC BY 4.0) and Pixabay ( 1 , 2 , 3 ) Culture Friday, July 19, 2019 – 11:15 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) — A cold gin and tonic on a hot afternoon can really hit

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NASA sees Tropical Storm Danas track through the East China Sea

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Danas moving through the East China Sea on July 19, 2019.

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Geoscientists discover mechanisms controlling Greenland ice sheet collapse

Greenland's more than 860,000 square miles are largely covered with ice and glaciers, and its melting fuels as much as one-third of the sea level rise in Florida. That's why a team of University of South Florida geoscientists' new discovery of one of the mechanisms that allows Greenland's glaciers to collapse into the sea has special significance for the Sunshine State.

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Study reveals unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darien forest

Forests in Darien, an eastern province of Panama, are crucial for carbon storage, biodiversity conservation and the livelihoods of indigenous groups, yet they are under threat due to illegal logging. Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project, scientists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), McGill University and the National Research Council of Canada uncovered so

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Coal-dependent Poland to compensate industry for carbon costs

Poland's parliament on Friday adopted measures to compensate its industry struggling to cope with surging electricity bills triggered by higher EU carbon emission costs.

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Driverless Bus Collides with Pedestrian in Vienna

Low Speed Collision A driverless bus collided with a 30-year-old woman in Vienna on Thursday while traveling at 7.5 mph, according to Bloomberg . The self-driving shuttle trial that had been operating since June in the European capital was put on hold in light of the accident. A statement by NAVYA — the French autonomous vehicle company behind the trial — received by The Verge revealed that the p

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Climate Change Poised to Eradicate Over 7,000 More Species

Death Toll As humanity continues to devastate the planet , the death toll continues to rise. Now, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has added over 7,000 species including “iconic” primates, rays, fish, and trees to its endangered species “Red List,” according to Agence France-Presse . It’s a disturbing sign of just how much destruction is being wrought by human-caused

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NASA: Last month was the warmest June on record. Will July turn out to be the warmest month ever observed?

Satellite image of a wildfire blazing in in the Qeqqata Kommunia of western Greenland. The image consists of data acquired by a Sentinel satellite on July 14th, 2019 in the infrared and visible parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. (Source: Copernicus Sentinel Data processed by Pierre Markuse) Last month has gone into the books as the warmest June on record, beating out 2016 by a comfortable marg

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This AI Solves The Rubik’s Cube Way Better Than You

(Credit: rcherem/shutterstock) In 1974, an architecture professor named Erno Rubik built a movable piece of art to help his students understand three-dimensional problems. Though his own creation took him more than a month to solve, it soon became an iconic puzzle game, the Rubik’s cube. The goal of the game is to re-arrange the faces of a cube decorated with 54 multi-colored squares so that each

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USF geoscientists discover mechanisms controlling Greenland ice sheet collapse

New radar technology allowed USF geoscientists to look at Greenland's dynamic ice-ocean interface that drives sea level rise.

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Smart irrigation model predicts rainfall to conserve water

A predictive model combining information about plant physiology, real-time soil conditions and weather forecasts can help make more informed decisions about when and how much to irrigate. This could save 40 percent of the water consumed by more traditional methods, according to new Cornell University research.

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Virgin Orbit in launch deal with UK's Royal Air Force

Virgin Orbit says it has been selected by the United Kingdom's Royal Air Force to provide launches of small satellites on short notice.

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Bridging the nanoscale gap: A deep look inside atomic switches

A team of researchers from Tokyo Institute of Technology has gained unprecedented insight into the inner workings of an atomic switch. By investigating the composition of the tiny metal 'bridge' that forms inside the switch, their findings may spur the design of atomic switches with improved performance.

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How Deepfakes and Other Reality-Distorting AI Can Actually Help Us

Digital Human Brain Covered with Networks We’re not far from the day when artificial intelligence will provide us with a paintbrush for reality. As the foundations we’ve relied upon lose their integrity, many people find themselves afraid of what’s to come. But we’ve always lived in a world where our senses misrepresent reality. New technologies will help us get closer to the truth by showing us

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Moon landing in 1969 was one small step for scrapbooking kids | Brief letters

Neil Armstrong | KLM | Boris Johnson | Jeffrey Epstein and Donald Trump | Phoebe Waller-Bridge | Ed Sheeran Perhaps some of the poignancy identified in Suzanne Moore’s piece ( G2 , 16 July) can be attributed to the fact that those of us who added Neil Armstrong to our book of explorers as children didn’t expect him to be on the last page, but the first page of a new and much bigger book. Christoph

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NASA sees Tropical Storm Danas track through the East China Sea

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Danas moving through the East China Sea on July 19, 2019.

21h

NIH study links air pollution to increase in newborn intensive care admissions

Infants born to women exposed to high levels of air pollution in the week before delivery are more likely to be admitted to a newborn intensive care unit (NICU), suggests an analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

21h

Imagining a World Where Soviets and Americans Joined Hands on the Moon

Before he was assassinated, JFK spoke of a cooperative effort in space

21h

The Books Briefing: One Small Step That Opened a Lifetime of Wonder

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, which revealed a new visual perspective of humans’ home planet, set in the deep suspension of a newly documented outer space. The fiction writer Don DeLillo incorporated that image into a short story, in which one character aboard an orbiting space station becomes transfixed by the look of Earth at a distance. The astronaut Chris

21h

How Poetry Can Help Communicate Science

It can break down the barriers that separate experts from the rest of us — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

Atomically precise models improve understanding of fuel cells

Simulations from researchers in Japan provide new insights into the reactions occurring in solid-oxide fuel cells by using realistic atomic-scale models of the active site at the electrode based on microscope observations as the starting point. This better understanding could give clues on ways to improve performance and durability in future devices.

21h

OSU cancer researcher Carlo Croce loses appeal of New York Times libel suit

Carlo Croce, a prolific cancer researcher at The Ohio State University (OSU) in Columbus who was the subject of a 2017 front page story in The New York Times about allegations of misconduct against him, has lost a libel suit that he filed against the newspaper. As first reported by Courthouse News Service earlier this … Continue reading OSU cancer researcher Carlo Croce loses appeal of New York Ti

21h

Mød Månen: Uden den ville du slet ikke eksistere

Vores måne er unik i solsystemet – og måske årsagen til livets opståen.

22h

Congress Is Pissed at Facebook and the FTC

But lawmakers appear too divided still to do anything meaningful about it.

22h

Did we mishear Neil Armstrong’s famous first words on the Moon?

It’s the case of the missing ‘a.’ (Nick Lehr/The Conversation via NASA, CC BY-SA/) On July 20, 1969, an estimated 650 million people watched in suspense as Neil Armstrong descended a ladder towards the surface of the Moon. As he took his first steps, he uttered words that would be written into history books for generations to come: “That’s one small step for man. One giant leap for mankind.” Or a

22h

How Poetry Can Help Communicate Science

It can break down the barriers that separate experts from the rest of us — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

X-ray laser sight reveals drug targets

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have published a review on serial femtosecond crystallography, one of the most promising methods for analyzing the tertiary structure of proteins. This technique has rapidly evolved over the past decade, opening new prospects for the rational design of drugs targeting proteins previously inaccessible to structural analysis. The articl

22h

Newly discovered biosynthetic pathway in bacteria recipe for drug discovery and production

Microbes are master chefs of the biomolecular world; collectively, they harbor the ability to produce a vast array of unknown substances, some of which may have therapeutic or other useful properties. In searching for useful products, a team of chemists at Illinois have discovered a whole new class of microbial recipes.

22h

Successful application of machine learning in the discovery of new polymers

A joint research group including Ryo Yoshida (Professor and Director of the Data Science Center for Creative Design and Manufacturing at the Institute of Statistical Mathematics [ISM], Research Organization of Information and Systems), Junko Morikawa (Professor at the School of Materials and Chemical Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology [Tokyo Tech]), and Yibin Xu (Group Leader of Thermal Man

22h

X-ray laser sight reveals drug targets

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have published a review on serial femtosecond crystallography, one of the most promising methods for analyzing the tertiary structure of proteins. This technique has rapidly evolved over the past decade, opening new prospects for the rational design of drugs targeting proteins previously inaccessible to structural analysis. The articl

22h

Newly discovered biosynthetic pathway in bacteria recipe for drug discovery and production

Microbes are master chefs of the biomolecular world; collectively, they harbor the ability to produce a vast array of unknown substances, some of which may have therapeutic or other useful properties. In searching for useful products, a team of chemists at Illinois have discovered a whole new class of microbial recipes.

22h

Tesla May Test “Hovering” Roadster in Late 2020

Mark Your Calendars If Elon Musk is joking about Tesla’s plans to create a hovering Roadster, he still isn’t ready to come clean about it. For more than a year, Musk has been touting plans to add an optional “SpaceX package” to an upcoming version of Tesla’s Roadster. This package would replace the vehicle’s backseats with cold air thrusters to “dramatically improve acceleration, top speed, braki

22h

Baseball Coach Ejected for Fighting With Robot Umpire

You’re Out! In the war of man versus machine, it was a heroic Atlantic League baseball coach who dealt the first blow. Frank Viola, pitching coach for the High Point Rockers, got himself kicked out of a game at York, Pennsylvaniaafter just one inning after he took issue with the automated strike zone dictated by the so-called robot umpire, according to CBS Sports . Viola took issue with a call ma

22h

An air-stable and waterproof lithium metal anode

Lithium metal anode offers a promising pathway to upgrade the energy density of lithium ion batteries for its high specific capacity (3800 mAh g-1) and low voltage (-3.04 V vs. Li/Li+). But the safety issues caused by dendrite growth and instability in air caused by its high chemical activity limit its large-scale use as an electrode material. Lithium metal is highly sensitive to moisture and oxid

22h

How moon maps made the lunar landing possible

Before NASA sent Americans to the moon, researchers had to image and map the lunar surface. The maps allowed them to understand the moon’s geology and let NASA choose landing sites for future robotic and Apollo missions. Gerard Kuiper, the father of modern-day planetary sciences, led the team that published two atlases. The Rectified Lunar Atlas (1963) gave people a first look at what features on

22h

2016 election linked to increase in preterm births among US Latinas

A significant jump in preterm births to Latina mothers living in the U.S. occurred in the nine months following the November 8, 2016 election of President Donald Trump, according to a study led by a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

22h

Taking out the protein garbage becomes more difficult as neurons age

As cells age, their ability to shed harmful refuse declines. New research suggests that the deterioration of autophagy in aged neurons could be a risk factor for a suite of neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's.

22h

Study reveals genetic similarities of osteosarcoma between dogs and children

A bone cancer known as osteosarcoma is genetically similar in dogs and human children, according to the results of a study published today by Tufts University and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope. The findings could help break the logjam in the treatment of this deadly disease, which hasn't seen a significant medical breakthrough in nearly three de

22h

Bridging the nanoscale gap: A deep look inside atomic switches

A team of researchers from Tokyo Institute of Technology has gained unprecedented insight into the inner workings of an atomic switch. By investigating the composition of the tiny metal 'bridge' that forms inside the switch, their findings may spur the design of atomic switches with improved performance.

22h

The Quiet Cruelty of When Harry Met Sally

There’s a scene midway through When Harry Met Sally that finds the rom-com’s title couple, one evening, in bed—separate beds, each in their respective apartments, shown on a split screen . The will-they-or-won’t-they best friends, currently in the won’t-they stage of things, are talking on the phone as they watch Casablanca on TV. “Ingrid Bergman,” Harry muses. “Now she’s low-maintenance.” “Low-m

22h

Elon Musk: Starhopper Survived Massive Fireball, Will Fly Again Soon

Massive Fireball SpaceX’s prototype for its gigantic Starship rocket erupted into a massive fireball on Wednesday. But according to CEO Elon Musk, the miniaturized “Starhopper” survived the unexpected event without breaking a sweat. When asked on Twitter if Starhopper was okay, Musk responded “yeah, big advantage of being made of high strength stainless steel: not bothered by a little heat!” “Pos

22h

Rogue Weedkiller Vapors Are Threatening Soybean Science

Scientists at four leading universities have seen their soybean experiments injured by a stealthy vandal: drifting fumes from a weedkiller called dicamba, now popular among farmers. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

22h

River Stour runs dry in drought in Constable Country

The Environment Agency takes steps to refill a river featured in some of the UK's best-loved paintings.

22h

Book Excerpt from Deep Medicine

In Chapter 10, “Deep Discovery,” author Eric Topol considers the marriage of omics and AI.

22h

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