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nyheder2019juli20

Stretch-sensing glove captures interactive hand poses accurately

Capturing interactive hand poses in real time and with realistic results is a well-examined problem in computing, particularly human-centered computing and motion capture technology. A global team of computer scientists from ETH Zurich and New York University have further advanced this area of research by developing a user-friendly, stretch-sensing data glove to capture real-time, interactive hand

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Danskeres kroppe forgiftet af dobbelt så meget dioxin som EU anbefaler

EU har sat nye, lavere anbefalinger for indtag af giftstofferne dioxiner og dioxinlignende PCB. Det danske optag er næsten dobbelt så højt som EU’s anbefalinger, og det er skidt nyt for folkesundheden.

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Kvinder er ikke bygget til at få menstruation hver måned

Månedlig menstruation er 'unaturlig' og øger risikoen for brystkræft, mener forsker.

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Moody’s Buys Climate Data Firm, Signaling New Scrutiny of Climate Risks

The bond-rating agency's purchase of Four Twenty Seven suggests that governments and companies that ignore climate threats could be penalized.

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The Politics Daily: Sticking to the Script

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Wednesday, July 24. ‣ The Senate passed legislation ensuring that a compensation fund for victims of the September 11 attacks will not run out of money. The president is expected to sign it. ‣ Puerto Rico’s legislature

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Tesla loss shows perils of lower-priced Model 3

The electric car maker delivered a record 95,200 vehicles in the second quarter.

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India debates a nationwide tenure system

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02296-y Academic staff disagree on the merits, and the downsides, of scrapping a common year-long probation scheme.

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This Tiny Implant Could Prevent HIV for an Entire Year

Ounce of Prevention Today, people at a high risk of contracting HIV can choose to take a daily medication called pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). This can prevent them from catching the virus — not entirely unlike how the daily birth control pill can prevent pregnancy. But just like some people have trouble remembering to take their birth control pill every day, there’s a chance a person might fo

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Frog in your throat? Stress might be to blame for vocal issues

A researcher from the University of Missouri has found that there is more to vocal issues than just feeling nervous and that stress-induced brain activations might be to blame.

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Targeted therapy erdafitinib effective for patients with advanced bladder cancer and specific gene mutations

A Phase II clinical trial led by MD Anderson found that treatment with the FGFR inhibitor erdafitinib was effective in 40% of patients with metastatic bladder cancers marked by FGFR3 mutations. The trial results led to FDA approval of the drug.

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Robert Mueller Kept His Promise

Democrats can’t say Robert Mueller didn’t warn them. For months, the former special counsel told them in every way he could—in private negotiations, in his sole public statement on his investigation, through letters from the Justice Department —that he did not want to testify before Congress, and that if he did, his appearance would be a dud. Today, Mueller fully delivered on that promise. Over t

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Rutger Hauer, ‘Blade Runner’ Co-Star, Dies at 75

Rutger Hauer, co-star of the iconic 1982 film 'Blade Runner,' has died at the age of 75. (Photo Credit: Warner Bros.) Rutger Hauer, the actor who played …

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Remembering Rutger Hauer, Black-Armored Knight of the Genre

His monologue in Blade Runner turned Hauer—who died this week at the age of 75—into a go-to actor for lending gravitas to genre for the next four decades.

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New York's Revenge Porn Law Is a Flawed Step Forward

All but four states in the US now have a revenge porn law on the books. But advocates say precious few get it right.

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A space ‘ruler’ measures distance with picometre precision

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02261-9 Lasers take ultra-accurate measurements of the gap between twin satellites more than 200 kilometres apart.

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Scientists doing basic studies of human brain win longer reprieve from clinical trials reporting rule

The National Institutes of Health acknowledges studies of behavior and cognition don’t always fit the mold of a trial

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Scientists: Harming the Environment Should Be a War Crime

Earth Crisis A team of 24 scientists just co-signed a letter calling on the United Nations to classify military damage to the environment as a war crime. The letter , published Tuesday in the journal Nature , calls on world governments to better protect biodiversity and the environment during times of conflict. The scientists, most of whom hail from Europe and Africa, requested a Fifth Geneva Con

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Alaska's Shishaldin Sports a New Lava Lake

The lava lake at the summit of Shishaldin in Alaska, seen on July 23, 2019. Image by David Fee, UAFGI/AVO. It has been over a year since a volcano in the United States was host to a lava lake. At the beginning of 2018, Hawaii's Kīlauea was home to one at the summit and one on the East Rift Zone at Pu'u O'o. However, when the lower Puna eruption struck last May, both lava lakes drained. Well, the w

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3D printed pill samples gut microbiome to aid diagnosis and treatment

A research team led by Tufts University engineers has developed a 3D printed pill that samples bacteria found in the gut — known as the microbiome — as it passes through the gastrointestinal tract (GI). The ability to profile bacterial species throughout the GI tract could have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and conditions that are affected by the microbiome.

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America's packaged food supply is ultra-processed

Americans are overexposed to products that are high in energy, saturated fat, sugar and salt, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study that reports the United States packaged food and beverage supply in 2018 was ultra-processed and generally unhealthy. Since about 80% of Americans' total calorie consumption comes from store-bought foods and beverages (packaged and unpackaged), the food and b

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Microrobots show promise for treating tumors

A pair of researchers in Caltech's Division of Engineering and Applied Science are working on an entirely new form of treatment –microrobots that can deliver drugs to specific spots inside the body while being monitored and controlled from outside the body.

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Netflix's *The Great Hack* Brings Our Data Nightmare to Life

The new documentary about Cambridge Analytica uses thoughtful narration and compelling visuals to create a dystopian horror movie for our times.

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Closing the terahertz gap: Tiny laser is an important step toward new sensors

In a major step toward developing portable scanners that can rapidly measure molecules in pharmaceuticals or classify tissue in patients' skin, researchers have created an imaging system that uses lasers small and efficient enough to fit on a microchip.

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Volcanoes shaped the climate before humankind

Five large volcanic eruptions occurred in the early 19th century. They caused cooling and — as a new study shows — to drying in the monsoon regions and glaciers growing in the Alps. The study shows that the pre-industrial climate was not constant: if one takes this cold period as the starting point for current global warming, the climate has already warmed up more than assumed in the current dis

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How random tweaks in timing can lead to new game theory strategies

Most game theory models don't reflect the relentlessly random timing of the real world. In a new article, two economists and a physicist model what happens when players receive information or act at random times, which could make a big difference in decision-making.

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Apocalypse How-To? Better Science Fiction Stories About Threats to Humanity

Apocalypse How-To? Better Science Fiction Stories About Threats to Humanity While plenty of apocalypses occur in science fiction, the risks could be shown more realistically, experts argue. Asteroid-Collision.jpg Image credits: muratart/ Shutterstock Culture Wednesday, July 24, 2019 – 16:30 Ramin Skibba, Contributor (Inside Science) — Which science fiction movies, TV shows, and comic books give

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Microsoft accidentally leaks internal build of Windows 10 with redesigned Start menu

Microsoft unintentionally pushed an internal-only version of windows 10 to Insider testers this morning that had a couple of never before seen features. The Verge notes build 18947 was meant …

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Neil Armstrong's Family Received $6 Million in a Secret Wrongful-Death Settlement: Report

The settlement, made in 2014, has come to light following the Apollo 11 anniversary.

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Immune therapy takes a 'BiTE' out of brain cancer

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have created a new method that could make immune therapy more effective again brain tumors and expand its use against other types of solid tumors.

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Coping skills program helps social service workers reduce stress, trauma after disasters

University of Illinois social work professors Tara Powell and Kate Wegmann found that a mental health intervention called Caregivers Journey of Hope can bolster social service workers' emotional resilience and ability to cope with the stress and trauma associated with disasters such as Superstorm Sandy.

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The FTC Wants More Privacy, Less Zuckerberg, at Facebook

As part of a $5 billion settlement, Facebook agreed to potentially sweeping changes in how it manages privacy. But some doubt they'll alter the company's culture.

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How to make water flow uphill

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02268-2 Water droplets skitter across a surface ‘printed’ with patterns of negative charge.

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This Is the Most Elaborate Warrior Tomb Ever Discovered in England

An Iron Age warrior who likely fought Julius Caesar's legionnaires has been unearthed in the United Kingdom, according to news sources.

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Extra weight in 60s may be linked to brain thinning years later

Having a bigger waistline and a high body mass index (BMI) in your 60s may be linked with greater signs of brain aging years later, according to a new study. The study suggests that these factors may accelerate brain aging by at least a decade.

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Worrisome increase in some medical scans during pregnancy

Use of medical imaging during pregnancy increased significantly in the United States, a new study has found, with nearly a four-fold rise over the last two decades in the number of women undergoing computed tomography (CT) scans, which expose mothers and fetuses to radiation. Pregnant women are warned to minimize radiation exposure.

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Closing the terahertz gap: Tiny laser is an important step toward new sensors

In a major step toward developing portable scanners that can rapidly measure molecules in pharmaceuticals or classify tissue in patients' skin, researchers have created an imaging system that uses lasers small and efficient enough to fit on a microchip.

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What do dragonflies teach us about missile defense?

Research is examining whether dragonfly-inspired computing could improve missile defense systems, which have the similar task of intercepting an object in flight, by making on-board computers smaller without sacrificing speed or accuracy.

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Picky pathogens help non-native tree species invade

Trees have many natural enemies, including pathogens that have evolved to attack certain tree species. Invasive tree species — even ones that are very closely related to native trees — are often not attacked by these pathogens and can thrive.

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'LADL' uses light to serve up on-demand genome folding

The way in which that linear sequence of genes are packed into the nucleus determines which genes come into physical contact with each other, which in turn influences gene expression. Engineers have now demonstrated a new technique for quickly creating specific folding patterns on demand, using light as a trigger.

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New Footage Shows Uncontacted Amazon Tribesman from the World’s 'Most Threatened' Tribe

A bare-chested Amazonian tribesman sniffs a machete, looks toward the camera and then disappears into the foliage.

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Opioid prescribing rates higher in US compared with other countries

Physicians in the United States may prescribe opioids more frequently to patients during hospitalization and at discharge when compared to their physician peers in other countries, according to a recently published study led by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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Mouse, not just tick: New genome heralds change in Lyme disease fight

As Lyme disease increases, researchers have taken a significant step toward finding new ways to prevent its transmission. The experts, who include a pioneer in Lyme disease discovery, have sequenced the genome of the animal carrying the bacteria that causes the illness. The advance by researchers at the University of California, Irvine and colleagues provides a launching pad for fresh approaches t

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Study shows extra weight in 60s may be linked to brain thinning years later

Having a bigger waistline and a high body mass index (BMI) in your 60s may be linked with greater signs of brain aging years later, according to a study published by a leading University of Miami neurologist researcher in the July 24, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study suggests that these factors may accelerate brain aging by at le

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Extra weight in 60s may be linked to brain thinning years later

Having a bigger waistline and a high body mass index (BMI) in your 60s may be linked with greater signs of brain aging years later, according to a study published in the July 24, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study suggests that these factors may accelerate brain aging by at least a decade.

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DoorDash boss says company will change contentious tipping model

The informal announcement comes on the heels of an exposé published in The New York Times over the weekend that showed how tips from DoorDash customers seemed to evaporate under its current …

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Most People With This Rare Cancer Got a Specific Breast Implant

Recall Notice The US Food and Drug Administration just announced a recall of a particular breast implant that the agency linked with a rare cancer called anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Of the 573 worldwide cases of the cancer, 481 have been attributed to breast implants manufactured by the company Allergan, according to an FDA press release published Wednesday. Specifically, The New York Times r

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Hackers steal 7.5 terabytes of data from Russian security agency

The data included information about several ongoing Russian projects, including operations to deanonymize Tor and scrape data from social media users. Little is know about the hacker group, which goes by the name 0v1ru$. Earlier this year, Russia briefly disconnected itself from global internet serves. None A group of hackers stole 7.5 terabytes of data from SyTech, a contractor of Russia's main

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30K lives could be saved by reducing air pollution levels below current standard

Research findings from the Center for Air Quality, Climate, and Energy Solutions (CACES) at Carnegie Mellon University show significant human health benefits when air quality is better than the current national ambient air quality standard. The estimate of lives that could be saved by further reduction of air pollution levels is more than thirty thousand, which is similar to the number of deaths f

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Smaller class size means more success for women in STEM

A new study demonstrates that increasing class size has the largest negative impact on female participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) classrooms, and offers insights on ways to change the trend.

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Feeling hot? It can make you a more competitive buyer, study reveals

Can the temperature of a room affect a buyer's eagerness to buy an item—or haggle for a good deal? Yes, according to a new study from Florida International University's College of Business (FIU Business).

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Europe heat wave breaks Belgian record, mercury to rise more

Europeans cooled off in public fountains Wednesday as a new heat wave spread across parts of the continent and is already breaking records.

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Smaller class size means more success for women in STEM

A new study demonstrates that increasing class size has the largest negative impact on female participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) classrooms, and offers insights on ways to change the trend.

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Viral HIV vaccine gives durable protection against 'death star' strain

Efforts to develop an effective HIV vaccine have repeatedly stumbled on one tough research strain, SIVmac239. Nicknamed the 'death star' strain, it has defeated multiple anti-HIV vaccine and antibody candidates, until now. The Farzan lab at Scripps Research in Florida has just beaten the 'death star' with a gene-therapy-style, nontraditional vaccine that prompts muscle cells to manufacture protect

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OsMTOPVIB is required for meiotic bipolar spindle assembly [Cell Biology]

The organization of microtubules into a bipolar spindle is essential for chromosome segregation. Both centrosome and chromatin-dependent spindle assembly mechanisms are well studied in mouse, Drosophila melanogaster, and Xenopus oocytes; however, the mechanism of bipolar spindle assembly in plant meiosis remains elusive. According to our observations of microtubule assembly in…

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Homotypic cooperativity and collective binding are determinants of bHLH specificity and function [Systems Biology]

Eukaryotic cells express transcription factor (TF) paralogues that bind to nearly identical DNA sequences in vitro but bind at different genomic loci and perform different functions in vivo. Predicting how 2 paralogous TFs bind in vivo using DNA sequence alone is an important open problem. Here, we analyzed 2 yeast…

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Genomics reveals alga-associated cyanobacteria hiding in plain sight [Commentaries]

Cyanobacteria occupy a special place in the pantheon of prokaryotic life. It is in the ancestors of these ubiquitous microbes that oxygenic photosynthesis first evolved more than 2 billion y ago (1), and it is from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria that the plastids (chloroplasts) of plants and algae are derived (2). Modern-day…

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Intrinsic expression of viperin regulates thermogenesis in adipose tissues [Immunology and Inflammation]

Viperin is an interferon (IFN)-inducible multifunctional protein. Recent evidence from high-throughput analyses indicates that most IFN-inducible proteins, including viperin, are intrinsically expressed in specific tissues; however, the respective intrinsic functions are unknown. Here we show that the intrinsic expression of viperin regulates adipose tissue thermogenesis, which is known to counter

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Insights into the origin of the high energy-conversion efficiency of F1-ATPase [Chemistry]

Our understanding of the rotary-coupling mechanism of F1-ATPase has been greatly enhanced in the last decade by advances in X-ray crystallography, single-molecular imaging, and theoretical models. Recently, Volkán-Kacsó and Marcus [S. Volkán-Kacsó, R. A. Marcus, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 112, 14230 (2015)] presented an insightful thermodynamic model based on…

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Genome editing using the endogenous type I CRISPR-Cas system in Lactobacillus crispatus [Microbiology]

CRISPR-Cas systems are now widely used for genome editing and transcriptional regulation in diverse organisms. The compact and portable nature of class 2 single effector nucleases, such as Cas9 or Cas12, has facilitated directed genome modifications in plants, animals, and microbes. However, most CRISPR-Cas systems belong to the more prevalent…

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Remote sensing and signaling in kidney proximal tubules stimulates gut microbiome-derived organic anion secretion [Physiology]

Membrane transporters and receptors are responsible for balancing nutrient and metabolite levels to aid body homeostasis. Here, we report that proximal tubule cells in kidneys sense elevated endogenous, gut microbiome-derived, metabolite levels through EGF receptors and downstream signaling to induce their secretion by up-regulating the organic anion transporter-1 (OAT1). Remote…

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Assembling multidomain protein structures through analogous global structural alignments [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Most proteins exist with multiple domains in cells for cooperative functionality. However, structural biology and protein folding methods are often optimized for single-domain structures, resulting in a rapidly growing gap between the improved capability for tertiary structure determination and high demand for multidomain structure models. We have developed a pipeline,…

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Identification of evolutionary and kinetic drivers of NAD-dependent signaling [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) provides an important link between metabolism and signal transduction and has emerged as central hub between bioenergetics and all major cellular events. NAD-dependent signaling (e.g., by sirtuins and poly–adenosine diphosphate [ADP] ribose polymerases [PARPs]) consumes considerable amounts of NAD. To maintain physiological functions, NAD consumption and…

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Epstein-Barr virus reprograms human B lymphocytes immediately in the prelatent phase of infection [Microbiology]

Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a human tumor virus and a model of herpesviral latency. The virus efficiently infects resting human B lymphocytes and induces their continuous proliferation in vitro, which mimics certain aspects of EBV’s oncogenic potential in vivo. How lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) evolve from the infected lymphocytes is…

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Reconciling modern machine-learning practice and the classical bias-variance trade-off [Statistics]

Breakthroughs in machine learning are rapidly changing science and society, yet our fundamental understanding of this technology has lagged far behind. Indeed, one of the central tenets of the field, the bias–variance trade-off, appears to be at odds with the observed behavior of methods used in modern machine-learning practice. The…

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Temporal evolution of beta bursts in the parkinsonian cortical and basal ganglia network [Neuroscience]

Beta frequency oscillations (15 to 35 Hz) in cortical and basal ganglia circuits become abnormally synchronized in Parkinson’s disease (PD). How excessive beta oscillations emerge in these circuits is unclear. We addressed this issue by defining the firing properties of basal ganglia neurons around the emergence of cortical beta bursts…

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Transsynaptic Fish-lips signaling prevents misconnections between nonsynaptic partner olfactory neurons [Neuroscience]

Our understanding of the mechanisms of neural circuit assembly is far from complete. Identification of wiring molecules with novel mechanisms of action will provide insights into how complex and heterogeneous neural circuits assemble during development. In the Drosophila olfactory system, 50 classes of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) make precise synaptic…

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Mapping hole hopping escape routes in proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

A recently proposed oxidative damage protection mechanism in proteins relies on hole hopping escape routes formed by redox-active amino acids. We present a computational tool to identify the dominant charge hopping pathways through these residues based on the mean residence times of the transferring charge along these hopping pathways. The…

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A new framework to study congenital heart defects

Researchers reveal for the first time the full spectrum of cells that come together to make a heart at the earliest stages of embryo formation. They also uncovered how the cells are controlled, and how a mutation in just one gene can have catastrophic consequences by affecting a tiny group of cells that make up the organ.

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Causes of multidecadal climate changes

A new reconstruction of global average surface temperature change over the past 2,000 years has identified the main causes for decade-scale climate changes. The new temperature reconstruction also largely agrees with climate model simulations of the same time period. This suggests that current climate models accurately represent the contributions of various influences on global climate change — a

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'LADL' uses light to serve up on-demand genome folding

The way in which that linear sequence of genes are packed into the nucleus determines which genes come into physical contact with each other, which in turn influences gene expression. Engineers have now demonstrated a new technique for quickly creating specific folding patterns on demand, using light as a trigger.

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Modern Climate Change Is the Only Worldwide Warming Event of the Past 2,000 Years

New research finds that previous periods of warming and cooling driven by natural causes were regional shifts in temperature rather than global events

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Seeing clearly: Revised computer code accurately models an instability in fusion plasmas

Subatomic particles zip around ring-shaped fusion machines known as tokamaks and sometimes merge, releasing large amounts of energy. But these particles—a soup of charged electrons and atomic nuclei, or ions, collectively known as plasma—can sometimes leak out of the magnetic fields that confine them inside tokamaks. The leakage cools the plasma, reducing the efficiency of the fusion reactions and

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Clues on how soils may respond to climate change found

Rock core samples from a period of warming millions of years ago indicate soils contributed to a rapid rise in atmospheric greenhouse gas and suggest modern climate models may overestimate Earth's ability to mitigate future warming, according to an international team of scientists.

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Professor: US Surveillance State Is a Lot Like China’s

Disturbing Similarities Between its social credit system , car-tracking chips , and widespread use of facial recognition tech , China has earned a reputation as a surveillance state the likes of which previously only existed in dystopian fiction . But in a scathing new piece for Quartz , David Carroll, an associate professor of media design at Parsons School of Design, argues that the United Stat

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Scientists Are Getting Better at Predicting Killer Heat Waves

And not a moment too soon. As the world warms, they’re becoming a lot more common.

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Clues on how soils may respond to climate change found

Rock core samples from a period of warming millions of years ago indicate soils contributed to a rapid rise in atmospheric greenhouse gas and suggest modern climate models may overestimate Earth's ability to mitigate future warming, according to an international team of scientists.

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In a Lab Accident, Scientists Create the First-Ever Permanently Magnetic Liquid

These liquid droplets can morph into various shapes and be externally manipulated to move around.

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The Tragedy of the Congress

Late in Robert Mueller’s testimony before the House Judiciary Committee this morning, there was a head-scratching exchange between the former special counsel and Representative Veronica Escobar, a Texas Democrat, who tried to get Mueller to answer a seemingly simple question about something he had said. “Director Mueller, at your May 29, 2019, press conference you explained that, quote, ‘the opin

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Advancing quantum materials, efficient communication networks

A new project exploring novel applications of superconducting resonators has discovered these systems may be used to simulate quantum materials impossible to otherwise fabricate. Additionally, they may provide insights to open and fundamental questions in quantum mechanics and gravity.

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To understand a childhood brain tumor, researchers turn to single-cell analysis

Investigators have revealed the cells of origin for specific subtypes of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. The work also has implications for how medulloblastoma is classified, which may eventually shape clinical care.

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Newly identified meningeal lymphatic vessels answers key questions about brain clearance

Meningeal lymphatic vessels at the skull base are found to be the major route for brain clearance. Reporting to see their integrity is impaired with aging, the latest findings provide further insights into the role of impaired brain clearance in the development of age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

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What happens when a deadly disease is eradicated? Scientists sequence and destroy

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02098-2 Researchers squeeze genomic information from the world’s last lab stocks of the devastating livestock virus rinderpest.

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Tiny drug-filled capsules motor around the body to target cancer cells

Tiny self-propelled capsules that shed their outer shells have been shown to linger long enough in mice intestines to deliver drugs directly to tumour cells

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India takes leap towards fusion power to produce world's largest cryostat

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The Cheapest Way to Save the Planet Grows Like a Weed

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Study: Humans' racial biases extend even to black and white robots

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Seeing clearly: Revised computer code accurately models an instability in fusion plasmas

Subatomic particles zip around fusion machines known as tokamaks and sometimes merge, releasing large amounts of energy. Now, physicists have confirmed that an updated computer code could help to predict and ultimately prevent the particles from leaking from the magnetic fields confining them.

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Too much caffeine during pregnancy may damage baby's liver

Having too much caffeine during pregnancy may impair baby's liver development and increase the risk of liver disease in adulthood, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology. Pregnant rats given caffeine had offspring with lower birth weights, altered growth and stress hormone levels and impaired liver development.

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Opening Day at Disneyland: Photos From 1955

During the week of July 17, 1955, Walt Disney’s new theme park, named “Disneyland,” opened to the public in Anaheim, California. The 17th, a Sunday, was intended to be an “international press preview,” limited to selected invitees who could ride the attractions, witness the parades, and take part in the televised dedication of the park. However, many counterfeit invitations were distributed, and

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California stem-cell agency’s supporters reveal plan for $5.5-billion ballot initiative

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02267-3 The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine is running out of money — but it could soon get a second wind.

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2020 Olympic Medals Will Be Made Out of Recycled Smartphones

Reclaimed Gold The Tokyo 2020 Olympics organizing committee announced that the metal found in the gold, silver, and bronze medals for next year’s Olympic Games will be reclaimed from old smartphones and gadgets. The Olympic committee has been gathering donated gizmos ever since 2017, according to The Verge , amassing 78,895 tons of discarded phones, tablets, and other devices from which they took

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World's Largest Nuclear Fusion Experiment Clears Milestone

The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor is set to launch operations in 2025 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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World Bank dedicates $300 million to Ebola response

One week after international public health emergency declared, financial institution quadruples its funding

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This Solar Eclipse Photograph Took Two Years to Capture

A rare near-horizon eclipse took place earlier this month in South America. Here’s how photographer Reuben Wu and his team made sure they were ready.

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Improved Prosthetic Hand Has A Lighter Touch And Easy Grip

There's still much research to be done before the device is routinely useful. But one man was able to use it to gently grasp his wife's hand and feel her touch — an emotional moment, he says. (Image credit: Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering)

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Two Kids. Two Undiagnosed Disabilities.

Colbie, age 8, and Lleyton, 5, have normal brains. At least according to the numerous MRI scans they’ve undergone throughout their short lives. No one can explain why neither child can walk, or why neither child has ever been able to speak a word. Heath and Mariel Krakowiak, Colbie and Lleyton’s parents, have had them evaluated by countless specialists. The kids have been through the National Ins

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Barr’s call for encryption backdoors has reawakened a years-old debate

Attorney General William Barr’s speech on Tuesday reignited a dispute that’s more relevant than ever.

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Brain Scans Show Abnormalities in Cuban “Sonic Weapon” Attack Survivors

Starting in late 2016, a number of U.S. government personnel stationed in Havana, Cuba started reporting something strange: they heard intensely loud sounds emanating from a single direction. The source of those sounds is still a complete mystery to this day. Even stranger: the strange sounds seemed to make the staffers physically ill — with reported symptoms ranging from hearing loss and dizzine

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US fine on Facebook puts CEO Zuckerberg on the hook

A record $5 billion fine slapped on Facebook by US regulators on Wednesday came with conditions that included putting chief executive Mark Zuckerberg on the hook for future privacy violations.

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One dose of HPV vaccine may be enough

One dose of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has comparable effectiveness to 2 or 3 doses for preventing cervical pre-cancer, according to a new study.

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Safe Or Out? The Umpire Is Probably Right

Safe Or Out? The Umpire Is Probably Right Baseball fans are quick to think the player is safe, but they're often wrong. Safe Or Out? The Umpire Is Probably Right Video of Safe Or Out? The Umpire Is Probably Right Sports Wednesday, July 24, 2019 – 14:30 Sofie Bates, Contributor (Inside Science) – Because the speed of sound travels slower than the speed of light, baseball fans up in the stands tend

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New Clues to Alzheimer's Cause Found in How Fluid Leaves the Brain

(Credit: SubstanceTproductions/Shutterstock) Some five ounces of clear fluid fills the spaces between your brain and your skull. This brain juice, or cerebrospinal fluid, cushions against injury, supplies nutrients and clears away waste. Your body can make as much as a pint of fresh stuff every day to replace the old. But for 150 years, scientists have puzzled over how the used cerebrospinal fluid

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Unlike Modern Climate Change, the Biggest Swings in Recorded History Were Just Regional Patterns

Skaters enjoy a frozen canal in Rotterdam during the so-called Little Ice Age in Germany. A new analysis shows the temperature swings of the past 2,000 years were all regional in nature, unlike modern climate change. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Painting by Bartholomeus Johannes van Hove, Circa 1825) Today's climate change is unlike any seen in the last 2,000 years, scientists report Wednesday in th

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R.I.P: Islændinge og forskere opstiller mindesmærke for død gletsjer

Klimaforandringerne kostede i 2014 den første islandske gletsjer livet. Nu bliver den hyldet.

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Accuracy of Genotyping Chips Called into Question

Chips used by some direct-to-consumer genetic testing firms display a false positive rate of upwards of 85 percent when screening for rare variants, a new study finds.

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Indonesia’s strict new biopiracy rules could stifle international research

Scientists who take samples out of the country illegally face prison time and hefty fines

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This embryo-inspired bandage is 17 times stickier than a Band-Aid

Material draws broken skin together like a purse string

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BU researchers say special “mapping” brain cells could inspire smarter self-driving vehicles

BU neuroscientists say special 'mapping' brain cells could inspire the design of smarter self-driving vehicles.

3h

Disrupting immune cell behavior may contribute to heart disease and failure, study shows

A new study, led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, provides evidence that when circulating anti-inflammatory white blood cells known as monocytes fail to properly differentiate into macrophages — the cells that engulf and digest cellular debris, bacteria and viruses — certain forms of heart disease may result.

3h

University of Toronto researchers show kids widely exposed to smoking in movies

More than half of the top-grossing movies in Ontario in the past 16 years featured smoking, according to University of Toronto researchers with the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit — and most of these films were rated as acceptable for youth.

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Unlocking therapies for hard-to-treat lung cancers

Around 85 percent of lung cancers are classified as non-small-cell lung cancers, or NSCLCs. Some patients with these cancers can be treated with targeted genetic therapies, and some benefit from immunotherapies — but the vast majority of NSCLC patients have no treatment options except for chemotherapy.

3h

Climate change could revive medieval megadroughts in US Southwest

A study published in Science Advances provides the first comprehensive theory for why there were clusters of megadroughts in the American Southwest during Medieval times. The authors found that ocean temperature conditions plus high radiative forcing — when Earth absorbs more sunlight than it radiates back into space — play important roles in triggering megadroughts. The study suggests an increa

3h

Amoeba builds barriers for protection against bacteria

Dictyostelium discoideum, the soil-dwelling single-celled amoeba that feeds on bacteria, builds a barrier around its colonies that counteracts bacterial attempts to penetrate them, facilitates amoebal feeding and protects them from oxidative stress.

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Box-sized sensor brings portable, noninvasive fluid monitoring to the bedside

Lina Colucci and colleagues have created a portable device that within 45 seconds accurately detected excess fluid buildup in the legs of seven participants with end-stage kidney failure.

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Hydration sensor could improve dialysis

Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have now developed a portable sensor that can accurately measure patients' hydration levels using a technique known as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry.

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Time heals all wounds, but this adhesive can help

What if your Band-Aid® actually helped close your cuts and scrapes faster? A new hydrogel-based adhesive from the Wyss Institute and Harvard SEAS contracts when it's exposed to body temperature, drawing the edges of a wound together to help close it.

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Reach out and touch someone

A team of University of Utah biomedical engineers are helping develop a prosthetic arm for amputees that can move with the person's thoughts and feel the sensation of touch via an array of electrodes implanted in the muscles of the patient.

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How to consider nature's impact on mental health in city plans

An international team led by the University of Washington and Stanford University has created a framework for how city planners and municipalities around the world can start to measure the mental health benefits of nature and incorporate those into plans and policies for cities and their residents.

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Cellular soldiers designed to kill cancer cells that get loose during surgery

Biomedical engineers at Vanderbilt University have discovered a method to track down and kill escaping cancer cells during tumor removal surgeries. The method, which uses the body's own defenses in the form of modified lipid nanoparticles adhered to white blood cells, could preventing metastasis and save lives.

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How today’s global warming is unlike the last 2,000 years of climate shifts

Temperatures at the end of the 20th century were hotter almost everywhere on the planet than in the previous two millennia.

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'At last I can feel again': robotic hand gives user a sense of touch

Man whose arm was amputated after accident can hold delicate objects such as grapes and eggs A man who lost his hand 17 years ago has been given the sense of touch through a brain-controlled robotic prosthetic. Keven Walgamott, whose arm was amputated below the elbow after an accident, can now feel 119 different touch sensations through the prosthetic as if it were his own limb. Continue reading.

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Boris Johnson’s Plan to Solve Brexit: Believe Harder

What has stopped Britain from leaving the European Union, three years after it voted to do so? Is it the difficult negotiations over the Irish border? The cold facts of parliamentary arithmetic? Or is it the nebulous nature of Brexit itself, wherein 52 percent of Britons delivered a vague mandate to Leave and left it to politicians to fill in the details? No, according to Boris Johnson, Britain’s

3h

Wind moves huge wildfire away from nuke facilities in Idaho

The largest wildfire at the nation's primary nuclear research facility in recent history had been burning close to buildings containing nuclear fuel and other radioactive material but a change in wind direction Wednesday was pushing the flames into open range at the sprawling site in Idaho, officials said.

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Barr’s call for encryption backdoors has reawakened a years-old debate

Attorney General William Barr’s speech on Tuesday reignited a dispute that’s more relevant than ever.

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Barr’s call for encryption backdoors has reawakened a years-old debate

Attorney General William Barr led the charge to reignite a debate that’s more poignant than ever.

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Aspartame Still Hasn’t Been Proven Safe to Eat, Say Scientists

Too much sugar is bad for your health — but the world’s most popular alternative might not be any better. For decades, experts have questioned the safety of artificial sweetener aspartame — also known as NutraSweet — with some studies concluding that the sugar substitute can cause a host of health problems , from brain damage to cancer. To put the issue to rest, the European Food Safety Authority

3h

The Guy Who Invented the Retweet Is Filled With Regret

“RT: Oops” Chris Wetherell, the guy who built Twitter’s “retweet” function, wishes he hadn’t. Before 2009, people had to manually repost other people’s tweets onto their own accounts, something that required at least some amount of conscious effort and thought. So Twitter hired Wetherell to streamline the process, a move that Buzzfeed News reports has led to an explosion of disinformation online.

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Forecasting US economic and demographic shifts at higher resolution

A new approach to predicting changes in population and income at the level of individual U.S. counties could improve predictions of the effects of climate change. David Wear and Jeffrey Prestemon of the USDA Forest Service in North Carolina present their novel strategy in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on July 24, 2019.

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Top universities fail to achieve many measures of institutionalized diversity outreach

Top universities around the world appear still to be in the very early stages of institutionalizing diversity outreach, according to research published in the open access journal PLOS ONE on July 24, by Mariana Buenestado-Fernández and colleagues at the University of Cordoba, Spain.

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You can train yourself to enjoy bitter foods

Eating bitter foods more often can change how they taste, according to a new study. What sounds at first like a culinary parlor trick is actually a scientific matter based on specific proteins in saliva. These proteins affect the sense of taste, and diet composition, at least in part, determines those proteins. Saliva is a complex fluid containing around 1,000 specific proteins. Identifying all t

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Recent warming ‘unmatched in the past 2000 years’

Events are happening globally and simultaneously, research shows. Richard A Lovett reports.

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If You Don’t Take Control of Your Online Data With a VPN, Someone Else Will

Everyone likes to talk about how people can post on the Internet anonymously, but true anonymity is increasingly hard to come by. Advertisers, spammers, hackers, and any other number of bad actors — not to mention your own social media accounts — are interested in tracking where you go on the web, and what you do while you’re there. Some kind of VPN service is necessary for anyone who wants to ac

3h

From Sleep to Anxiety to Inflammation, Mellowment Has The Right CBD for Your Specific Needs

Some studies indicate, as does a mountain of anecdotal evidence, that cannabidiol, or CBD , may be effective in relieving discomfort caused by pain, inflammation, insomnia, stress, and anxiety. The trick is figuring out the most effective way to get CBD into your system to help with your specific issue. And luckily the folks at Mellowment have done just that by creating a wide variety of CBD prod

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Extracellular vesicles derived from ODN-stimulated macrophages transfer and activate Cdc42 in recipient cells and thereby increase cellular permissiveness to EV uptake

Endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) mediate intracellular innate immunity via the recognition of DNA and RNA sequences. Recent work has reported a role for extracellular vesicles (EVs), known to transfer various nucleic acids, in uptake of TLR-activating molecules, raising speculation about possible roles of EVs in innate immune surveillance. Whether EV-mediated uptake is a general mechanism, ho

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Social amoebae establish a protective interface with their bacterial associates by lectin agglutination

Both animals and amoebae use phagocytosis and DNA-based extracellular traps as anti-bacterial defense mechanisms. Whether, like animals, amoebae also use tissue-level barriers to reduce direct contact with bacteria has remained unclear. We have explored this question in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum , which forms plaques on lawns of bacteria that expand as amoebae divide and bacteria

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Large sulfur isotope fractionation by bacterial sulfide oxidation

A sulfide-oxidizing microorganism, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus (DA), generates a consistent enrichment of sulfur-34 ( 34 S ) in the produced sulfate of +12.5 per mil or greater. This observation challenges the general consensus that the microbial oxidation of sulfide does not result in large 34 S enrichments and suggests that sedimentary sulfides and sulfates may be influenced by metabolic activ

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Clockophagy is a novel selective autophagy process favoring ferroptosis

Ferroptosis is a form of nonapoptotic regulated cell death driven by iron-dependent lipid peroxidation. Autophagy involves a lysosomal degradation pathway that can either promote or impede cell death. A high level of autophagy has been associated with ferroptosis, but the mechanisms underpinning this relationship are largely elusive. We characterize the contribution of autophagy to ferroptosis in

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Bioinspired mechanically active adhesive dressings to accelerate wound closure

Inspired by embryonic wound closure, we present mechanically active dressings to accelerate wound healing. Conventional dressings passively aid healing by maintaining moisture at wound sites. Recent developments have focused on drug and cell delivery to drive a healing process, but these methods are often complicated by drug side effects, sophisticated fabrication, and high cost. Here, we present

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Minimal dosing of leukocyte targeting TRAIL decreases triple-negative breast cancer metastasis following tumor resection

Surgical removal of the primary tumor is a common practice in breast cancer treatment. However, postsurgical metastasis poses an immense setback in cancer therapy. Considering that 90% of cancer-related deaths are due to metastasis, antimetastatic therapeutic strategies that can target disseminating tumor cells in the circulation before they can form secondary tumors hold preclinical and clinical

4h

Emotion schemas are embedded in the human visual system

Theorists have suggested that emotions are canonical responses to situations ancestrally linked to survival. If so, then emotions may be afforded by features of the sensory environment. However, few computational models describe how combinations of stimulus features evoke different emotions. Here, we develop a convolutional neural network that accurately decodes images into 11 distinct emotion ca

4h

The genome of Peromyscus leucopus, natural host for Lyme disease and other emerging infections

The rodent Peromyscus leucopus is the natural reservoir of several tick-borne infections, including Lyme disease. To expand the knowledge base for this key species in life cycles of several pathogens, we assembled and scaffolded the P. leucopus genome. The resulting assembly was 2.45 Gb in total length, with 24 chromosome-length scaffolds harboring 97% of predicted genes. RNA sequencing following

4h

The CREB coactivator CRTC2 promotes oncogenesis in LKB1-mutant non-small cell lung cancer

The LKB1 tumor suppressor is often mutationally inactivated in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). LKB1 phosphorylates and activates members of the AMPK family of Ser/Thr kinases. Within this family, the salt-inducible kinases (SIKs) modulate gene expression in part via the inhibitory phosphorylation of the CRTCs, coactivators for CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein). The loss of LKB1 cau

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Cell sensing and decision-making in confinement: The role of TRPM7 in a tug of war between hydraulic pressure and cross-sectional area

How cells sense hydraulic pressure and make directional choices in confinement remains elusive. Using trifurcating -like microchannels of different hydraulic resistances and cross-sectional areas, we discovered that the TRPM7 ion channel is the critical mechanosensor, which directs decision-making of blebbing cells toward channels of lower hydraulic resistance irrespective of their cross-sectiona

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Cryo-EM structure of TRPC5 at 2.8-A resolution reveals unique and conserved structural elements essential for channel function

The transient receptor potential canonical subfamily member 5 (TRPC5), one of seven mammalian TRPC members, is a nonselective calcium-permeant cation channel. TRPC5 is of considerable interest as a drug target in the treatment of progressive kidney disease, depression, and anxiety. Here, we present the 2.8-Å resolution cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the mouse TRPC5 (mTRPC5) homot

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Oceanic and radiative forcing of medieval megadroughts in the American Southwest

Multidecadal "megadroughts" were a notable feature of the climate of the American Southwest over the Common era, yet we still lack a comprehensive theory for what caused these megadroughts and why they curiously only occurred before about 1600 CE. Here, we use the Paleo Hydrodynamics Data Assimilation product, in conjunction with radiative forcing estimates, to demonstrate that megadroughts in th

4h

Nature and mental health: An ecosystem service perspective

A growing body of empirical evidence is revealing the value of nature experience for mental health. With rapid urbanization and declines in human contact with nature globally, crucial decisions must be made about how to preserve and enhance opportunities for nature experience. Here, we first provide points of consensus across the natural, social, and health sciences on the impacts of nature exper

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{Omega}76: A designed antimicrobial peptide to combat carbapenem- and tigecycline-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

Drug resistance is a public health concern that threatens to undermine decades of medical progress. ESKAPE pathogens cause most nosocomial infections, and are frequently resistant to carbapenem antibiotics, usually leaving tigecycline and colistin as the last treatment options. However, increasing tigecycline resistance and colistin’s nephrotoxicity severely restrict use of these antibiotics. We

4h

The Real Difference Between Smoking and Eating Marijuana

A decade ago, I finished my first year of grad school in Los Angeles, and my boyfriend and I went on a short getaway to celebrate. He recommended Ojai, a New Agey town a couple of hours’ north, because some famous person he liked had lived there. After an afternoon of hiking among the orange trees, we returned to our motel room to get ready for our fancy dinner, the kind of white-tablecloth place

4h

Amoeba builds barriers for protection against bacteria

In some respects, animals and amoebae are not that different. For instance, both are at risk of potentially deadly attacks by bacteria and have evolved ways to prevent them. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine report in the journal Science Advances that Dictyostelium discoideum, the soil-dwelling single-celled amoeba that feeds on bacteria, builds a barrier around its colonies that counterac

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Some Pacific salmon populations are especially at risk from climate change

Four population groups of Pacific salmon in California, Oregon, and Idaho are especially vulnerable to climate change, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Lisa Crozier of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and colleagues. The results will be useful for prioritizing protection efforts for salmon populations along the entire west coast of the United State

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Climate change could revive medieval megadroughts in US Southwest

About a dozen megadroughts struck the American Southwest during the 9th through the 15th centuries, but then they mysteriously ceased around the year 1600. What caused this clustering of megadroughts—that is, severe droughts that last for decades—and why do they happen at all?

4h

Amoeba builds barriers for protection against bacteria

In some respects, animals and amoebae are not that different. For instance, both are at risk of potentially deadly attacks by bacteria and have evolved ways to prevent them. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine report in the journal Science Advances that Dictyostelium discoideum, the soil-dwelling single-celled amoeba that feeds on bacteria, builds a barrier around its colonies that counterac

4h

Some Pacific salmon populations are especially at risk from climate change

Four population groups of Pacific salmon in California, Oregon, and Idaho are especially vulnerable to climate change, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Lisa Crozier of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and colleagues. The results will be useful for prioritizing protection efforts for salmon populations along the entire west coast of the United State

4h

The road to Scandinavia's bronze age: Trade routes, metal provenance, and mixing

The geographic origins of the metals in Scandinavian mixed-metal artifacts reveal a crucial dependency on British and continental European trading sources during the beginnings of the Nordic Bronze Age, according to a study published July 24, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Heide W. Nørgaard from Aarhus University, Denmark, and colleagues.

4h

A Robot Hand Helps Amputees "Feel" Again

With the new system, a prosthetic wearer can do delicate tasks, such as pluck grapes from the stem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

A Robot Hand Helps Amputees "Feel" Again

With the new system, a prosthetic wearer can do delicate tasks, such as pluck grapes from the stem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Climate is warming faster than it has in the last 2,000 years

In contrast to pre-industrial climate fluctuations, current, anthropogenic climate change is occurring across the whole world at the same time, according to new studies. In addition, the speed of global warming is higher than it has been in at least 2,000 years.

4h

Fastest eclipsing binary, a valuable target for gravitational wave studies

Observations made with a new instrument developed for use at the 2.1-meter telescope at the National Science Foundation's Kitt Peak National Observatory have led to the discovery of the fastest eclipsing white dwarf binary yet known.

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Seismologists monitor ridgecrest aftershocks using novel fiber optic network

Seismologists from Caltech are using fiber optic cables to monitor and record the aftershocks from the 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence in greater detail than previously possible. Thousands of tiny aftershocks are occurring throughout the region each day, an unprecedented number of which will now be able to be tracked and studied.

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Mind-Bending New VR Makes People Feel Like They’re Spiders

Parlor Tricks A new virtual reality illusion can trick users’ brains into thinking they inhabit a non-human body — like a bat or a spider. The VR, built by scientists from Germany’s University of Duisberg-Essen, is a new high-tech twist on the classic rubber hand illusion, according to MIT Technology Review , in which people are fooled into feeling as though an inanimate object is part of their b

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Light pollution may be increasing West Nile virus spillover from wild birds

We're in the midst of summertime mosquito bite season and cities across the country are reporting a heightened number of West Nile Virus (WNV) cases. The house sparrow is one of the most common carriers of WNV in urban areas. Mosquitos feed off the infected birds and spread the virus to humans. New research finds house sparrows exposed to artificial light at night, such as what's used in parking l

4h

Light pollution may be increasing West Nile virus spillover from wild birds

We're in the midst of summertime mosquito bite season and cities across the country are reporting a heightened number of West Nile Virus (WNV) cases. The house sparrow is one of the most common carriers of WNV in urban areas. Mosquitos feed off the infected birds and spread the virus to humans. New research finds house sparrows exposed to artificial light at night, such as what's used in parking l

4h

Mueller testimony raises disagreement over ‘collusion’ and ‘conspiracy’

In a tense exchange between former special counsel Robert S. Mueller III and Rep. Douglas A. Collins, Mueller seemed to contradict himself on what these two words mean. The Mueller report states that, as defined in legal dictionaries, conspiracy and collusion are largely synonymous. Mueller is also scheduled to testify before the House Intelligence Committee later on Wednesday. None Former specia

4h

Amazing Photos Reveal the Hidden Light of Undersea Life

Photographer Louise Murray dips into the dark ocean to capture the spectacle of marine fluorescence

4h

Foodborne Parasite Sickens 100 in Massachusetts. No Source Has Been Found.

Cases of an intestinal parasite have surged in Massachusetts in recent months, according to health officials.

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This Iron-Shelled Snail Is Totally Metal … And Now It’s Endangered

Iron scales may not be enough to protect the scaly-foot snail from extinction.

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Exploring genetic 'dark matter,' researchers gain new insights into autism and stroke

For the brain to function smoothly, its cells must carefully regulate which proteins are produced and when. By studying gene regulation, researchers are now shedding light on complex brain conditions like autism and stroke.

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Army project may advance quantum materials, efficient communication networks

A US Army project exploring novel applications of superconducting resonators has discovered these systems may be used to simulate quantum materials impossible to otherwise fabricate. Additionally, they may provide insights to open and fundamental questions in quantum mechanics and gravity.

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Ford shutters French transmission plant

A Ford plant that produced transmissions in southwestern France shut down for good on Wednesday after the carmaker brushed aside efforts save some operations at the facility that had employed up to 3,600 people.

4h

Developing technologies that run on light

Researchers are designing a nanoscale photon diode — a necessary component that could bring us closer to faster, more energy-efficient computers and communications that replace electricity with light.

4h

Cold, dry planets could have a lot of hurricanes

Study overturns conventional wisdom that water is needed to create cyclones.

4h

Climate change: Current warming 'unparalleled' in 2,000 years

The speed and extent of global warming exceeds any similar event in the past two millennia, researchers say.

4h

Protect your accounts with two-factor authentication

Use the same password for everything? Two-factor authentication is just what you need. (Youssef Sarhan via Unsplash/) Online security has never been more important, and if you think keeping all your accounts safe and secure is a big challenge, you're definitely not alone. But even if you feel comfortable with your passwords and you’ve managed to think of a different one for every account—an impre

4h

50 Years Later: The Apollo 11 Moon Landing And How We Got There (Rebroadcast)

This week marks the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11's landing on the Moon. (Image credit: NASA/AFP/Getty Images)

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Science under fire: Ebola researchers fight to test drugs and vaccines in a war zone

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02258-4 Violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has interrupted clinical trials and forced scientists to change how they immunize people.

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Rome tests recycling bottles for transit cash

Travelers in Rome have a new way to earn cash towards public transportation tickets: recycling plastic bottles.

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New heat wave in Europe starts to breaks records

Europeans cooled off in public fountains Wednesday as a new heat wave spread across parts of the continent and is already breaking records.

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20th-century warming 'unmatched' in 2,000 years

World temperatures rose faster in the late 20th century than at any other time in the last 2,000 years, according to research released Wednesday which experts said undermines climate deniers questioning of mankind's role in global warming.

4h

How random tweaks in timing can lead to new game theory strategies

Most game theory models don't reflect the relentlessly random timing of the real world. In some models, players may receive information at the same time, and they act simultaneously. Others may include randomness in terms of sharing information or acting, but that randomness occurs at discrete steps.

4h

Designed protein switch allows unprecedented control over living cells

Scientists have created the first completely artificial protein switch that can work inside living cells to modify—or even commandeer—the cell's complex internal circuitry.

4h

Closing the terahertz gap: Tiny laser is an important step toward new sensors

In a major step toward developing portable scanners that can rapidly measure molecules in pharmaceuticals or classify tissue in patients' skin, researchers have created an imaging system that uses lasers small and efficient enough to fit on a microchip.

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New study explains a secret to more efficient learning

A new study could hold the key to learning languages, teaching children colors or even studying complex theories.

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Podcast: The history of climate change, and making vaccines mandatory

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02284-2 Listen to the latest science news, with Nick Howe and Shamini Bundell.

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Parallel entangling operations on a universal ion-trap quantum computer

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1427-5 Parallel two-qubit entangling gates are realized in an array of fully connected trapped-ion qubits, achieving a full-adder operation on a quantum processor with an average fidelity of 83.3 per cent.

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Single-cell analysis of cardiogenesis reveals basis for organ-level developmental defects

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1414-x Single-cell RNA-sequencing analysis reveals functions of lineage-specifying transcription factors underlying congenital defects in heart development.

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Resolving medulloblastoma cellular architecture by single-cell genomics

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1434-6 Characterization of medulloblastoma tissues using single-cell transcriptomics shows that the different molecular subtypes consist of distinct developmental phenotypes.

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Soil nematode abundance and functional group composition at a global scale

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1418-6 High-resolution spatial maps of the global abundance of soil nematodes and the composition of functional groups show that soil nematodes are found in higher abundances in sub-Arctic regions, than in temperate or tropical regions.

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H+ transport is an integral function of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1400-3 The mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier mediates the proton leak in mitochondria from all tissues that lack UCP1, thereby linking coupled (ATP production) and uncoupled (thermogenesis) energy conversion.

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Modular and tunable biological feedback control using a de novo protein switch

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1425-7 DegronLOCKR designer-protein technology is used to implement synthetic positive- and negative-feedback systems in the yeast mating pathway as well as feedback control of a synthetic gene circuit.

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Global spatial risk assessment of sharks under the footprint of fisheries

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1444-4 Global spatial risk assessment of sharks under the footprint of fisheries

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Family experience influences diabetes risk, management for African Americans

African American families not only share a higher risk for Type 2 diabetes, but many myths and misconceptions about the disease are often passed on from one generation to the next. A new Iowa State University examines how family interactions and communication influence risk, prevention and management of the disease.

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How random tweaks in timing can lead to new game theory strategies

Most game theory models don't reflect the relentlessly random timing of the real world. In a new paper, two economists and a physicist model what happens when players receive information or act at random times, which could make a big difference in decision-making.

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Volcanoes shaped the climate before humankind

Five large volcanic eruptions occurred in the early 19th century. They caused cooling and — as a study led by the University of Bern shows — to drying in the monsoon regions and glaciers growing in the Alps. The study shows that the pre-industrial climate was not constant: if one takes this cold period as the starting point for current global warming, the climate has already warmed up more than

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The climate is warming faster than it has in the last 2,000 years

In contrast to pre-industrial climate fluctuations, current, anthropogenic climate change is occurring across the whole world at the same time. In addition, the speed of global warming is higher than it has been in at least 2,000 years. That's according to two studies from the University of Bern.

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Newly identified meningeal lymphatic vessels answers key questions about brain clearance

Meningeal lymphatic vessels at the skull base are found to be the major route for brain clearance. Reporting to see their integrity is impaired with aging, the latest findings provide further insights into the role of impaired brain clearance in the development of age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

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To understand a childhood brain tumor, researchers turn to single-cell analysis

Investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital, alongside others, have revealed the cells of origin for specific subtypes of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. The work also has implications for how medulloblastoma is classified, which may eventually shape clinical care. The work appears as an advance online publication toda

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New study identifies causes of multidecadal climate changes

A new reconstruction of global average surface temperature change over the past 2,000 years has identified the main causes for decade-scale climate changes. The new temperature reconstruction also largely agrees with climate model simulations of the same time period. This suggests that current climate models accurately represent the contributions of various influences on global climate change — a

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A new framework to study congenital heart defects

In a new study published in the scientific journal Nature, a team of researchers at the Gladstone Institutes, in collaboration with the University of Luxembourg, reveal for the first time the full spectrum of cells that come together to make a heart at the earliest stages of embryo formation. They also uncovered how the cells are controlled, and how a mutation in just one gene can have catastrophi

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Found: Fastest eclipsing binary, a valuable target for gravitational wave studies

Observations made with a new instrument developed for use at the 2.1-meter telescope at the National Science Foundation's Kitt Peak National Observatory have led to the discovery of the fastest eclipsing white dwarf binary yet known.

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Designed protein switch allows unprecedented control over living cells

Scientists have created the first completely artificial protein switch that can work inside living cells to modify or even commandeer the cell's complex internal circuitry. The switch is dubbed LOCKR, for Latching, Orthogonal Cage/Key pRotein. LOCKR can be programmed to modify gene expression, redirect cellular traffic, degrade specific proteins, and initiate cellular self-destruction. LOCKR can a

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Outcompeting cancer

Suppressing the capacity of tumors to destroy the healthy tissue that surrounds them is essential for fighting cancer-induced morbidity and mortality. Now, a new study in human-derived tumors reveals a potential way of doing just that. The study reveals a competition mechanism used by human cancer cells for killing their neighbors and demonstrates that combining substances that block this mechanis

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The brain's drain: how our brains flush out their waste and toxins

We now know a major route for flushing toxins out of the brain – a finding that could one day help us treat neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's

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Two incredibly fast-orbiting stars seem to be the wrong temperature

A pair of distant stars orbit one another in a fast-paced system that would fit inside Saturn, and neither star seems to be the temperature that we’d expect

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Today's global warming is unparalleled in the past 2000 years

We now know that past periods when the Earth cooled and warmed were only regional. The finding rebuffs the myth that today's planet-wide warming is a natural blip

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Tinder's new alert warns LGTBQ users when they visit discriminatory countries – CNET

The Traveler Alert is aimed at keeping LGBTQ+ users safe.

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Facebook Fined $5 Billion Over Cambridge Analytica Scandal

The Cambridge Analytica data misuse scandal has ended up costing Facebook $5 billion. The Federal Trade Commission formally announced a $5 billion settlement with Facebook today, ending the …

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Barr warns time's running out for companies to open encryption

Attorney General William Barr issued a sharp warning that time may be running out for Facebook Inc. and other technology companies to come to a voluntary agreement providing law enforcement officials with access to the encrypted communications of their users.

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Fungal compound deodorizes skunk smell

Being sprayed by a skunk is no fun for people or their pets, and the strong, stinky secretions can serve as a nasty reminder of the wildlife encounter for days or weeks. Available "de-skunking" formulas often either don't work well or can irritate the skin and eyes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Natural Products have identified a compound from fungi that safely and effectively neut

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Suomi NPP satellite sees Tropical Depression Dalila fading

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of weakening Tropical Depression Dalila in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

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Accidental infant deaths in bed tripled from 1999 to 2016 in the US

Although sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has been on the decline, a new study shows that infant deaths from accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed have more than tripled between 1999 and 2016 in the US with increases in racial inequalities. Results reveal similar risk factor profiles for non-Hispanic black infants and non-Hispanic white infants, though in every instance, non-Hispanic

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30,000-plus U.S. lives could be saved by reducing air pollution levels below current standard

Research findings show significant human health benefits when air quality is better than the current national ambient air quality standard. The estimate of lives that could be saved by further reduction of air pollution levels is more than thirty thousand, which is similar to the number of deaths from car accidents each year.

4h

New treatment program offers hope for controlling wombat mange

New research is offering hope that the deadly mange disease affecting Tasmanian wombats could eventually be brought under control for wild individuals and populations.

4h

Ancient global climate events rippled unevenly across the globe

But since the mid–19th century, the planet has heated up almost everywhere at once

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Meningeal lymphatic vessels at the skull base drain cerebrospinal fluid

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1419-5 Clearance of macromolecules from the cerebrospinal fluid in mice takes place via meningeal lymphatic vessels at the base of the skull; both drainage and the integrity of these vessels deteriorate with age.

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No evidence for globally coherent warm and cold periods over the preindustrial Common Era

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1401-2 Warm and cold periods over the past 2,000 years have not occurred at the same time in all geographical locations, with the exception of the twentieth century, during which warming has occurred almost everywhere.

4h

Resolving the energy levels of a nanomechanical oscillator

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1386-x A hybrid platform comprising a microwave superconducting qubit and a nanomechanical piezoelectric oscillator is used to resolve the phonon number states of the oscillator.

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Intercellular interaction dictates cancer cell ferroptosis via NF2–YAP signalling

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1426-6 Ferroptosis in cancer cells can be regulated by cadherin-mediated intercellular contacts, NF2–Hippo signalling, and activity of the YAP transcription co-activator.

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Flower isoforms promote competitive growth in cancer

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1429-3 A cell competition mechanism based on the differential expression of isoforms of Flower proteins is found in humans as well as Drosophila, and promotes tumorigenesis.

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Advances in epigenetics link genetics to the environment and disease

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1411-0 The authors review recent advances and current debates in epigenetics, including how epigenetic mechanisms interact with genetic variation, ageing, disease and the environment.

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Global maps of soil-dwelling nematode worms

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02197-0 Accurate estimates of the biodiversity of soil animals are essential for conservation efforts and to understand the animals’ role in carbon cycles. Such information is now available on a global scale for nematode worms.

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Flower power as human cancer cells compete with normal cells

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02161-y Cells compete for survival during development. It emerges that mammalian cells on a path to form a tumour express specific versions of the protein Flower when they vie for survival with surrounding normal cells.

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Sharks squeezed out by longline fishing vessels

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02265-5 One-quarter of animals’ ocean habitats is disrupted by fisheries.

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Lymphatic vessels at the base of the mouse brain provide direct drainage to the periphery

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02166-7 A set of lymphatic vessels that wrap around the base of the mouse brain have been shown to drain fluid from the brain into the peripheral lymphatic system, and to exhibit a decline in function with ageing.

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Cancer-cell death ironed out

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02218-y Ferroptosis is a form of cell death. The finding that cells that have certain mutations in the Hippo signalling pathway are susceptible to ferroptosis might offer a way to treat a cancer called mesothelioma.

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A mutation-independent approach for muscular dystrophy via upregulation of a modifier gene

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1430-x When Lama1 was upregulated using CRISPR and a catalytically inactive Cas9 in a mouse model of congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A, apparent hindlimb paralysis, muscle fibrosis and nerve myelination defects were ameliorated in symptomatic mice.

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A strongly inhomogeneous superfluid in an iron-based superconductor

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1408-8 Atomic-resolution imaging of a strongly inhomogeneous superfluid in an iron-based superconductor shows spatial correlation between superfluid density variations and the strength of quasiparticle character.

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The aberrant global synchrony of present-day warming

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02179-2 Were extended warm or cold periods in the past worldwide, or only regional? Efforts to reconstruct Earth’s climate history suggest that the near-global extent of ongoing warming is unparalleled over the past 2,000 years.

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De novo design of bioactive protein switches

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1432-8 A technique for the de novo design of switchable protein systems controlled by induced conformational change is demonstrated for three functional motifs, in vitro and in yeast and mammalian cells.

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General relativistic orbital decay in a seven-minute-orbital-period eclipsing binary system

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1403-0 Observations of an eclipsing double-white-dwarf binary with an orbital period of 6.91 minutes that is decaying as predicted by general relativity are reported; once launched, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) should swiftly detect this binary.

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Space station re-entry, Moon tapes and Ebola emergency

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02240-0 The week in science: 19–25 July 2019.

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Global entangling gates on arbitrary ion qubits

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1428-4 Multi-qubit entangling gates are realized by simultaneously driving multiple motional modes of a linear chain of trapped ions with modulated external fields, achieving a fidelity of about 93 per cent with four qubits.

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Counting grains of sound

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02233-z Sound and vibration come in discrete units called phonons, in the same way that light exists as photons. A superconducting device that can count phonons could lead to advances in quantum-information processing.

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Scientific consensus on humans causing global warming passes 99%

Extensive historical data shows recent extreme warming is unprecedented in past 2,000 years The scientific consensus that humans are causing global warming is likely to have passed 99%, according to the lead author of the most authoritative study on the subject, and could rise further after separate research that clears up some of the remaining doubts. Three studies published in Nature and Nature

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Sharks Have Few Places To Hide From Fishing, Study Shows

Many shark species tend to congregate in the same areas as industrial fishing ships, a study finds. As a result, tens of millions of sharks in the open ocean end up caught either as food or bycatch. (Image credit: Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images)

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Researchers use light to serve up on-demand genome folding

Every cell in your body has a copy of your genome, tightly coiled and packed into its nucleus. Since every copy is effectively identical, the difference between cell types and their biological functions comes down to which, how and when the individual genes in the genome are expressed, or translated into proteins.

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Scientists develop a novel method to fine-tune the properties of carbon nanotubes

Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) have developed a novel method to fine-tune the optoelectrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by applying an aerosolized dopant solution on their surface, thus opening up new avenues for SWCNT application in optoelectronics. The results of their study were published in The Journal of Physical Chemis

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Researchers use light to serve up on-demand genome folding

Every cell in your body has a copy of your genome, tightly coiled and packed into its nucleus. Since every copy is effectively identical, the difference between cell types and their biological functions comes down to which, how and when the individual genes in the genome are expressed, or translated into proteins.

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Brain's Fluid Drains via Lymphatic Vessels at the Base of the Skull

Detailed imaging of the rodent central nervous system reveals new information about the route cerebrospinal fluid takes to leave the brain.

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These Are the Fastest-Orbiting Stars Ever Discovered, and They're Spiraling to Their Deaths

The whole whirling system is smaller than the planet Saturn, and it's blinking at Earth faster than you can microwave a lasagna.

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Sharks ‘threatened by global fisheries’

Technology reveals the extent of the problem, but could also help address it, researchers suggest. Nick Carne reports.

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Freenome raises $160m for early detection cancer tests

US biotech preparing large scale trials of its liquid biopsies for bowel disease

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Picky pathogens help non-native tree species invade

Walk into a forest comprising only native trees, and you probably notice many different tree species around you, with no one species dominating the ecosystem. Such biodiversity—the variety of life and species in the forest—ensures that each species gets a role to play in the ecosystem, boosting forest health and productivity. However, when non-native trees invade, they form dense groups of a singl

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NASA's Terra sees the end of Atlantic Tropical Depression 3

The third tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season didn't last long. NASA's Terra satellite provided an image of the system's remnant clouds on July 23, 2019.

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New grant-funded educator misconduct database used as research and prevention tool

A researcher and an alumna at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) have teamed up to document a disturbing phenomenon in Texas, the seemingly increasing number of investigations into allegations of educator misconduct that make headlines across the state.

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Designed protein switch allows unprecedented control over living cells

Scientists have created the first completely artificial protein switch that can work inside living cells to modify—or even commandeer—the cell's complex internal circuitry.

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Fastest eclipsing binary, a valuable target for gravitational wave studies

Observations made with a new instrument developed for use at the 2.1-meter (84-inch) telescope at the National Science Foundation's Kitt Peak National Observatory have led to the discovery of the fastest eclipsing white dwarf binary yet known. Clocking in with an orbital period of only 6.91 minutes, the rapidly orbiting stars are expected to be one of the strongest sources of gravitational waves d

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New study identifies causes of multidecadal climate changes

A new reconstruction of global average surface temperature change over the past 2,000 years has identified the main causes for decade-scale climate changes. The analysis suggests that Earth's current warming rate, caused by human greenhouse gas emissions, is higher than any warming rate observed previously. The researchers also found that airborne particles from volcanic eruptions were primarily r

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Picky pathogens help non-native tree species invade

Walk into a forest comprising only native trees, and you probably notice many different tree species around you, with no one species dominating the ecosystem. Such biodiversity—the variety of life and species in the forest—ensures that each species gets a role to play in the ecosystem, boosting forest health and productivity. However, when non-native trees invade, they form dense groups of a singl

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Closing the terahertz gap: Tiny laser is an important step toward new sensors

In a major step toward developing portable scanners that can rapidly measure molecules in pharmaceuticals or classify tissue in patients' skin, researchers have created an imaging system that uses lasers small and efficient enough to fit on a microchip.

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Developing technologies that run on light

Researchers are designing a nanoscale photon diode — a necessary component that could bring us closer to faster, more energy-efficient computers and communications that replace electricity with light.

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What do dragonflies teach us about missile defense?

Research at Sandia National Laboratories is examining whether dragonfly-inspired computing could improve missile defense systems, which have the similar task of intercepting an object in flight, by making on-board computers smaller without sacrificing speed or accuracy.

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Daily briefing: The hard-won comeback of the California condor

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02291-3 Captive breeding leads to 1,000th chick, what brain imaging reveals about the Cuban ‘sonic attack’ and a deep dive into the repercussions of deep-sea mining.

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No Climate Event in 2,000 Years Compares to What’s Happening Now

From the planet’s perspective, one of the most significant events of the past 2,000 years occurred on April 5, 1815, when the Indonesian volcano Mount Tambora began to erupt. “The noise was, in the first instance, almost universally attributed to a distant cannon,” wrote a British statesman stationed hundreds of miles away on Java. Soon “the sun became obscured” with ash, and by the next week, fo

5h

Republicans Take Their Shot at Mueller—And Narrowly Miss

The House Republicans just couldn’t resist a rant. They had been hammering Robert Mueller from afar for the better part of two years, accusing the former special counsel of politically motivated bias, of “a witch hunt,” of needlessly dragging President Donald Trump through the mud despite deciding not to charge him with a crime. And for more than three hours this morning, GOP members of the House

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A $3M collaborative research project on 'Rules of Life'

The University of Rhode Island is leading a team that has been awarded a $3 million 5-year collaborative research grant from the National Science Foundation as part of its investment in 10 Big Ideas to serve the nation's future. Funded through NSF's Understanding the Rules of Life: Epigenetics program, researchers will work to better understand how changes in nutrition and energy through symbiosis

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A $3M collaborative research project on 'Rules of Life'

The University of Rhode Island is leading a team that has been awarded a $3 million 5-year collaborative research grant from the National Science Foundation as part of its investment in 10 Big Ideas to serve the nation's future. Funded through NSF's Understanding the Rules of Life: Epigenetics program, researchers will work to better understand how changes in nutrition and energy through symbiosis

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Cold, dry planets could have a lot of hurricanes

Nearly every atmospheric science textbook ever written will say that hurricanes are an inherently wet phenomenon—they use warm, moist air for fuel. But according to new simulations, the storms can also form in very cold, dry climates.

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This is the first fungus known to host complex algae inside its cells

In the lab, an alga and a fungus teamed up to exchange food, similar to lichens. But instead of staying outside, the alga moved into the fungal cells.

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Alzheimer's protein is likely held together with many weak chemical interactions

The chemical interactions that give proteins their shape may be weaker and more numerous than previously recognized. Chemists modeled the building blocks of the protein structure that causes Alzheimer's disease, amyloid beta sheets. Their calculations revealed that some atoms too far apart to bond were still in each other's 'electron neighborhoods.'

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Genes underscore five psychiatric disorders

A group of international doctors has uncovered the genes that contribute to the development of ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, major depression and schizophrenia.

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Benefits of US salt reduction strategy to US food industry

New research highlights the potential health and economic impact of the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) proposed voluntary salt policy on workers in the US food industry.

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Suomi NPP satellite sees Tropical Depression Dalila fading

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of weakening Tropical Depression Dalila in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

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ADVANCE study provides evidence for shift to dolutegravir-containing ART in SA

The Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute and partners have presented evidence for a shift to dolutegravir-containing antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.

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Penn engineers' 'LADL' uses light to serve up on-demand genome folding

The way in which that linear sequence of genes are packed into the nucleus determines which genes come into physical contact with each other, which in turn influences gene expression. Penn Engineers have now demonstrated a new technique for quickly creating specific folding patterns on demand, using light as a trigger.

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Worrisome increase in some medical scans during pregnancy

Use of medical imaging during pregnancy increased significantly in the United States, a new study has found, with nearly a four-fold rise over the last two decades in the number of women undergoing computed tomography (CT) scans, which expose mothers and fetuses to radiation. Pregnant women are warned to minimize radiation exposure.

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Physician experience and practice area affects decision-making for endovascular treatment

A new study presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 16th Annual Meeting found significant differences in decision-making for endovascular treatment (EVT) when the physician's experience with EVT use and practice area were taken into consideration.

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10 new things we’ve learned about cancer

Cancer is a leading cause of death among Americans, second only to heart disease. Researchers are unearthing cancer's genetic secrets and, with it, potential new treatments. Their efforts have seen the cancer death rate for men, women, and children fall year after year between 1999 and 2016. None The 21 st century has been, and will continue to be, shaped by cancer. Although heart disease remains

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How to keep your house cool in the heatwave

Should you open your windows or close them? Can plants help, and should you get air conditioning? This is your guide to staying cool at home during a heatwave

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Tiny pebbles may be the reason most planets spin in the same direction

We thought planets are built as huge boulders smash together. But if it is pebbles instead, that better explains why planets all spin the same way

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Monarch butterflies rely on temperature-sensitive internal timer while overwintering

The fact that millions of North American monarch butterflies fly thousands of miles each fall and somehow manage to find the same overwintering sites in central Mexican forests and along the California coast, year after year, is pretty mind-blowing.

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Monarch butterflies rely on temperature-sensitive internal timer while overwintering

The fact that millions of North American monarch butterflies fly thousands of miles each fall and somehow manage to find the same overwintering sites in central Mexican forests and along the California coast, year after year, is pretty mind-blowing.

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'Terminators' on the Sun trigger plasma tsunamis and the start of new solar cycles

In a pair of new papers, scientists paint a picture of how solar cycles suddenly die, potentially causing tsunamis of plasma to race through the Sun's interior and trigger the birth of the next sunspot cycle only a few short weeks later.

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Valleytronics core theory for future high-efficiency semiconductor technology

A DGIST research team discovered a theory that can expand the development of valleytronics technology, which has been drawing attention as a next generation semiconductor technology. This is expected to advance the development of valleytronics technology one level further, with next generation magnetic technology that surpasses existing data processing speed.

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To prevent another world war, researcher suggests changing how we think

Is another world war inevitable? A U.S. Army researcher studying complex phenomena says yes, unless people stop thinking in terms of either/or outcomes.

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How climate change disrupts relationships

Higher mean temperatures as associated with climate change can have a severe impact on plants and animals by disrupting their mutually beneficial relationship: The pasque flower (Pulsatilla vulgaris), for example, is very sensitive to rising temperatures by flowering earlier each year, whereas one of its major pollinators, a solitary bee species, does not quite keep pace by hatching earlier. In th

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Half of young drinkers are unaware of health messages on alcohol packaging

Just half of 11-19 year old drinkers recall seeing health messages or warnings on alcohol packaging — despite being an important target market for this information, according to new research.

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Stimulation of the ear can help manage Parkinson's symptoms

This study shows stimulation of the ear can help manage Parkinson's symptoms.

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Ultrathin transistors for faster computer chips

The next big miniaturization step in microelectronics could soon become possible — with so-called two-dimensional materials. With the help of a novel insulator made of calcium fluoride, scientists have created an ultra-thin transistor, which has excellent electrical properties and, in contrast to previous technologies, can be miniaturized to an extremely small size.

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Genome research shows that the body controls the integrity of heritable genomes

Scientists have presented new findings that challenge established concepts of genetic inheritance. They have demonstrated that somatic cells of the roundworm C. elegans influence heredity.

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Decoding the causes of motor neuron disease: A new study shows the impact of genetics

Researchers have conducted the largest ever study involving 1117 people diagnosed with motor neuron disease to address the question of "nature versus nurture" in the causes of MND. The team found that one in 347 men and one in 436 women can be expected to develop motor neuron disease (MND) during their lifetime.

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Does one size does fit all? A new model for organic semiconductors

A team including researchers has used a single rubrene crystal to investigate the room temperature behavior of organic single crystals, and in so doing have dispelled previously-held assumptions based on inorganic semiconductor behavior. It is hoped that these insights into the specific behavior of organic conducting materials will accelerate the development of flexible conducting devices with hig

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LightSail 2 Spacecraft Officially Unfurls Massive Solar Sail

Solar Sailing The Planetary Society’s LightSail 2 satellite successfully unfurled its boxing ring-sized solar sail on Tuesday and is getting ready to absorb solar rays as its only energy source for propulsion. It could soon represent the first time a spacecraft has traveled through space using only sunlight. The unusual spacecraft is investigating an exciting form of locomotion in the far reaches

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Pottery related to unknown culture found in Ecuador

Archaeologists from the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Institute of Archeology and Ethnography SB RAS (Russia); Escuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral (ESPOL, Ecuador); and Tohoku University (Japan) found shards of ceramic vessels related to the cultural sediments of early periods of Real Alto site. Findings date back to 4640—4460 BC, this period borders on Valdivia, one of the oldest po

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How climate change disrupts relationships

Higher mean temperatures as associated with climate change can have a severe impact on plants and animals by disrupting their mutually beneficial relationship: The pasque flower (Pulsatilla vulgaris), for example, is very sensitive to rising temperatures by flowering earlier each year, whereas one of its major pollinators, a solitary bee species, does not quite keep pace by hatching earlier. In th

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Skoltech scientists developed a novel method to fine-tune the properties of carbon nanotubes

Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) have developed a novel method to fine-tune the optoelectrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by applying an aerosolized dopant solution on their surface, thus opening up new avenues for SWCNT application in optoelectronics. The results of their study were published in The Journal of Physical Chemis

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NASA's Terra sees the end of Atlantic Tropical Depression 3

The third tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season didn't last long. NASA's Terra satellite provided an image of the system's remnant clouds on July 23, 2019.

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Artificial intelligence solution improves clinical trial recruitment

Clinical trials are a critical tool for getting new treatments to people who need them, but research shows that difficulty finding the right volunteer subjects can undermine the effectiveness of these studies. Researchers at Cincinnati Children's designed and tested a new computerized solution that used artificial intelligence (AI) to effectively identify eligible subjects from Electronic Health R

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High blood pressure treatment and nursing home residents

A team of researchers designed a study to learn more about the best high blood pressure treatments for older adults who live in nursing homes. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Independent, private firms pollute less than public firms, study shows

Private, independent firms are less likely to pollute and incur EPA penalties than public and private equity-owned firms, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.

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New study explains a secret to more efficient learning

A new study could hold the key to learning languages, teaching children colors or even studying complex theories.

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Programmable coupled oscillators for synchronized locomotion

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11198-6 Designing alternative paradigms for bio-inspired analog computing that harnesses collective dynamics remains a challenge. Here, the authors exploit the synchronization dynamics of coupled vanadium dioxide-based insulator-to-metal phase-transition nano-oscillators for adaptive locomotion control.

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Mendelian randomization integrating GWAS and eQTL data reveals genetic determinants of complex and clinical traits

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10936-0 Many genetic variants identified in genome-wide association studies are associated with gene expression. Here, Porcu et al. propose a transcriptome-wide summary statistics-based Mendelian randomization approach (TWMR) that, applied to 43 human traits, uncovers hundreds of previously unreported gene–trait associa

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EOMES interacts with RUNX3 and BRG1 to promote innate memory cell formation through epigenetic reprogramming

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11233-6 T box transcription factor Eomesodermin (EOMES) is induced when naïve T cells are converted to innate memory T cells in response to cytokines. Here the authors show that EOMES is recruited to RUNX3-bound enhancers and interacts with BRG1 during innate memory T cell formation.

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Structural insights into E1 recognition and the ubiquitin-conjugating activity of the E2 enzyme Cdc34

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11061-8 The E2 enzyme Cdc34 plays a critical role in cell cycle progression but the structural bases for its activities are unknown. Here, the authors present crystal structures of Cdc34 alone, in complex with E1, and in complex with Ub that provide insights into the mechanism of Cdc34 activity in the cell.

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Nanoscale nonreciprocity via photon-spin-polarized stimulated Raman scattering

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11175-z Here, the authors introduce and study theoretically and numerically a scheme for breaking time-reversal symmetry and achieving nonreciprocity on the nanoscale, using spin-selective stimulated Raman scattering. These results could pave the way for compact nonreciprocal communication and computing technologies.

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A safe and non-flammable sodium metal battery based on an ionic liquid electrolyte

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11102-2 Na metal batteries offer compelling merits; however, the safety issue remains to be overcome. Here, the authors report an ionic liquid electrolyte based on NaCl-buffered AlCl3/[EMIm]Cl with two additives including EtAlCl2 and [EMIm]FSI which serve to stabilize SEI for reversible Na plating/stripping.

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ERAP1 promotes Hedgehog-dependent tumorigenesis by controlling USP47-mediated degradation of βTrCP

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11093-0 ERAP1 is an endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase that trims MHC Class-I peptides for antigen presentation. Here, the authors show that ERAP1 enhances Hedgehog signalling by sequestering USP47 from βTrCP and promoting tumorigenesis through βTrCP degradation and increased Gli protein stability.

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The tetraspanin CD9 controls migration and proliferation of parietal epithelial cells and glomerular disease progression

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11013-2 In both focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN), kidney injury is characterised by the invasion of glomerular tufts by parietal epithelial cells (PECs). Here Lazareth et al. identify the tetraspanin CD9 as a key regulator of PEC migration, and find its upregulation in FS

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The Y chromosome is disappearing – so what will happen to men?

The Y chromosome may be a symbol of masculinity, but it is becoming increasingly clear that it is anything but strong and enduring. Although it carries the “master switch" gene, SRY, that determines whether an embryo will develop as male (XY) or female (XX), it contains very few other genes and is the only chromosome not necessary for life. Women, after all, manage just fine without one. What's m

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No E.T. Life Yet?

That might be a warning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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John McAfee’s Manager Threatens to Release Secret Data “Payloads”

Gone Fishing Hey, America. The man who wants to be your next president is missing — and there’ll be hell to pay if he doesn’t turn up soon. That’s the gist of a series of recent tweets sent from the Twitter account of eccentric tech millionaire-turned-2020 presidential candidate John McAfee , who’s been running his campaign in exile since January to avoid charges of tax fraud in the U.S. Twitter

5h

The Y chromosome is disappearing – so what will happen to men?

The Y chromosome may be a symbol of masculinity, but it is becoming increasingly clear that it is anything but strong and enduring. Although it carries the “master switch" gene, SRY, that determines whether an embryo will develop as male (XY) or female (XX), it contains very few other genes and is the only chromosome not necessary for life. Women, after all, manage just fine without one. What's m

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His Artificial Intelligence Sees Inside Living Cells

Your high school biology textbook was wrong about cells. The prototypical human cell — say, a pluripotent stem cell, capable of differentiating into anything from muscle to nerve to skin — isn’t a neat translucent sphere. Nor are its internal parts sitting still and conveniently far apart, like chunks of pineapple suspended in gelatin. In reality , a cell looks more like a pound of half-melted je

5h

Corsair Buys Boutique Gaming PC Manufacturer Origin

Corsair, the PC gaming peripheral manufacturer, has bought Origin, the boutique gaming PC builder company. The purchase price has not been disclosed. According …

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T-Mobile-Sprint Merger Reportedly Gains Seal Of Approval From US DOJ

Sprint and T-Mobile announced that they intended to merge with T-Mobile CEO John Legere leading the newly merged company last year. Today, a report is going around that the U.S. Department …

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AT&T Aims To Offer Live Sports And News Through HBO Max

AT&T is detailing its plans for HBO Max, its upcoming standalone streaming service, which include a live TV element for the service. The company’s CEO revealed during a call with …

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Two Professors Leave Johns Hopkins over Misconduct

The university investigated faculty members from the Department of Anthropology and the School of Medicine for sexual harassment, firing one and recommending another be fired.

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Dystopian Startup Wants to Hang Your Furniture From The Ceiling

In what feels more like a cruel prank than a revolutionary innovation, a Silicon Valley startup says it’s developed tech to suspend furniture from the ceiling to make tiny apartments feel slightly more spacious. Bumblebee Spaces manages a small-but-growing number of apartments in which beds, dressers, and other furniture can be raised and lowered on cables via a tablet, according to 1843 Magazine

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Scientists pinpoint new mechanism that impacts HIV infection

Scientists have published results of a study that pinpointed a long noncoding RNA molecule which influences a key receptor involved in HIV infection and progression of the disease. This newly-identified mechanism could open up a new avenue for control of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

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Potential for 'unpacking' complex simultaneous emotions in adolescence

Shows for the first time that complex, mixed simultaneous emotions in adolescents could be assessed using an Analogue Emotion Scale. Potential to supplement traditional emotional assessments where emotions are complex and people 'may not have the words'. Next step: trials to test the findings in practice.

5h

Light pollution may be increasing West Nile virus spillover from wild birds

House sparrows infected with West Nile virus (WNV) that live in light polluted conditions remain infectious for two days longer than those who do not, increasing the potential for a WNV outbreak by about 41%.

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Sisters improve chances of reproduction in Asian elephants

Researchers at the University of Turku found that the presence of a maternal sister was positively and significantly associated with annual female reproduction in a population of working elephants in Myanmar. In addition, an age-specific effect was found: young females were more sensitive to the presence of sisters and even more likely to reproduce when living near a sister.

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Scientists complete first assessment of blood abnormalities in Antarctic penguin colony

Through blood tests conducted on 19 adult Adélie penguins breeding at Edmonson Point in Antarctica, researchers found quantities of cell types associated with future cell death, genomic instability or cancer development.

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The weirdest things we learned this week: College students swallowed guppies for sport and chickens wore glasses

This story is a tough one to swallow. (DepositPhotos/) What's the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you'll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci's hit podcast . The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week hits Apple , Anchor , and everywhere else you listen to podcasts every Wednesday morning. It's your new favorite source for the strangest science-ad

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Mediterranean diet during pregnancy associated with improved maternal health outcomes

A new clinical trial found women who followed a Mediterranean-style diet during pregnancy, including a daily portion of tree nuts (half being walnuts) and extra virgin olive oil, had a 35 percent lower risk of gestational diabetes and on average, gained 2.75 pounds less, compared to women who received standard prenatal care.

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Magnetic eyelashes: A new source of MRI artifacts

American Journal of Roentgenology researchers used a phantom to show that magnetic eyelashes worn during MRI can cause substantial artifact and that detachment of the eyelashes from the phantom can occur.

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Picky pathogens help non-native tree species invade

Trees have many natural enemies, including pathogens that have evolved to attack certain tree species. Invasive tree species — even ones that are very closely related to native trees — are often not attacked by these pathogens and can thrive.

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South Florida partnership using data to guide stroke triage decisions

A progressive Emergency Medical Services (EMS)-driven partnership in South Florida has expedited access to lifesaving care for stroke patients. This groundbreaking effort to optimize the likelihood of recovery from a 'brain attack' was showcased this week at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 16th Annual Meeting.

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What If They're Not Coming for the Jews This Time?

It’s becoming almost a daily occurrence: President Donald Trump denouncing anti-Semitism and expressing solidarity with the state of Israel. Gone are the days when Trump tweeted out a Star of David atop stacks of money. The Trump White House has purged itself of oddballs with troubling backgrounds and even more troubling friends. The larger MAGA universe may still pulse with anti-Semitic animus.

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Därför luktar olika personer olika mycket svett

Sommar och sol klingar fint i många öron, men med värmen stiger också kroppstemperaturen och vår svettproduktion kan öka. Även svettlukten är olika bland oss människor. – Vissa är varmare och andra är kallare. Svett är till först och främst för att svalka och kyla ner kroppen genom de så kallade eccrina körtlarna, säger Johan Lundström, docent i neuropsykologi vid Karolinska institutet.

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No E.T. Life Yet?

That might be a warning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The way children draw human figures has changed since the 1970s, reflecting modern society's attitudes to gender — German study

Over the last half century Western European countries have enjoyed a large increase in gender equality. There is a long way to go, but some statistics are striking: for instance, in Germany the employment rate for women has increased from 48 per cent in 1980 to 73 per cent in 2014. Psychologists are interested in whether, and how, these kind of societal-level changes filter down and affect childr

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Scientists use phone movement to predict personality types

Researchers have used data from mobile phone accelerometers — the tiny sensors tracking phone movement for step-counting and other apps — to predict people's personalities.

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Meal timing strategies appear to lower appetite, improve fat burning

Researchers have discovered that meal timing strategies such as intermittent fasting or eating earlier in the daytime appear to help people lose weight by lowering appetite rather than burning more calories, according to a report. The study is the first to show how meal timing affects 24-hour energy metabolism when food intake and meal frequency are matched.

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New data fills research gaps on weight loss experiences for minority groups

The use of intensive lifestyle interventions focused on altering dietary and physical activity habits using behavioral strategies can produce sustained weight loss among African-Americans and Hispanics who have type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a new study.

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Former NFL players may face higher risk of atrial fibrillation

Former National Football League (NFL) players were nearly 6 times more likely to have atrial fibrillation (AF), a type of irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke. Former NFL athletes had lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, and had lower resting heart rates compared to the control group, yet the incidence of atrial fibrillation was s

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New technique could help engineer polluted water filter, human tissues

Scientists can turn proteins into never-ending patterns that look like flowers, trees or snowflakes, a technique that could help engineer a filter for tainted water and human tissues.

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Safety of many sunscreen ingredients is in doubt – should we worry?

The US body that regulates sunscreen has declared that 12 of the 16 popular active ingredients might not actually be safe. Here's what you need to know

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GM's Cruise delays launch of robo-taxis

General Motors' autonomous car division Cruise said Wednesday it will take longer than expected for it to hit the streets with self-driving taxis.

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Commensal Bacterium Reduces ALS Symptoms in Mice

Boosting the levels of Akkermansia muciniphila in mouse guts slowed the progression of an ALS-like disease, while two other microbiome members were associated with more severe symptoms.

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Millennial Farmers Make More Money on YouTube Than From Farming

Farming YouTube A number of millennial farmers in the U.S. are making more money talking about farming on their YouTube channels than from farming itself. Farmer Zach Johnson, owner of the YouTube channel MN Millennial Farmer, told Bloomberg that he and his wife made five times more on YouTube in 2018 than from his family farm. Johnson also sells merch on the side, speaks at public events, and fe

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The Most Revealing Exchange of the Mueller Hearing

Updated on July 24 at 1:41 p.m. ET There’s a logical disconnect in volume 2 of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report that is unmissable to any careful reader. As Mueller explains in the report, a charge of obstruction of justice requires three elements: an obstructive act, a nexus with an official proceeding, and corrupt intent. And in the report, Mueller’s team laid out several cases where Pre

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New research has potential for 'unpacking' complex simultaneous emotions in adolescence

Shows for the first time that complex, mixed simultaneous emotions in adolescents could be assessed using an Analogue Emotion Scale. Potential to supplement traditional emotional assessments where emotions are complex and people 'may not have the words'. Next step: trials to test the findings in practice.

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Artificial throat could someday help mute people 'speak'

Most people take speech for granted, but it's actually a complex process that involves both motions of the mouth and vibrations of folded tissues, called vocal cords, within the throat. If the vocal cords sustain injuries or other lesions, a person can lose the ability to speak. Now, researchers have developed a wearable artificial throat that, when attached to the neck like a temporary tattoo, ca

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New technique could help engineer polluted water filter, human tissues

Scientists can turn proteins into never-ending patterns that look like flowers, trees or snowflakes, a technique that could help engineer a filter for tainted water and human tissues.

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Rising CO2 levels could boost wheat yield but slightly reduce nutritional quality

Levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are rising, which experts predict could produce more droughts and hotter temperatures. Although these weather changes would negatively impact many plants' growth, the increased CO2 availability might actually be advantageous because plants use the greenhouse gas to make food by photosynthesis. Now, researchers say that a much higher CO2 level could increa

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Finding one's way in the rainforest

How do human foragers find food or the way home in rainforests, where heavy vegetation limits visibility, without a map, compass, or smartphone? Researchers show that rainforest-dwelling Mbendjele BaYaka people from the Republic of Congo point to out-of-sight targets with high precision. Pointing accuracy was equally good in men and women; children's performance improved when the sun was clearly v

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Breast Implants Linked to Rare Cancer Are Recalled Worldwide

Under pressure from the Food and Drug Administration, Allergan will stop selling textured implants. Thirty-three deaths have been tied to the devices.

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Depression and the Solace of 'Grinding' in Online Games

The imitation of forward movement in games like 'Destiny 2' is catnip to a mind stuck in neutral.

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KDD teams tap advanced data science to tackle societal challenges

KDD 2019, the premier interdisciplinary data science conference, announced KDD Cup 2019, the 23rd annual data mining and knowledge discovery competition organized by the ACM Special Interest Group on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining. For the first time, this year's competition will feature 3 distinct competition tracks, each presenting a real-world challenge that participants look to solve usin

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Scientists pinpoint new mechanism that impacts HIV infection

A team of scientists led by Texas Biomed's Assistant Professor Smita Kulkarni, Ph.D. and Mary Carrington, Ph.D., at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, published results of a study that pinpointed a long noncoding RNA molecule which influences a key receptor involved in HIV infection and progression of the disease. This newly-identified mechanism could open up a new avenue for c

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Waist size is a forgotten factor in defining obesity

A new study from the University of Iowa published in the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that some people considered to be a normal weight could unknowingly be at high risk for obesity-related health issues.

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Medical imaging rates during pregnancy

Researchers looked at rates of medical imaging (CT, MRI, conventional x-rays, angiography, fluoroscopy and nuclear medicine) during pregnancy in this observational study that included nearly 3.5 million pregnant women in the United States and Canada from 1996 to 2016.

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Private equity-backed acquisitions of dermatology practices

This observational study describes the scope of private equity-backed acquisitions of dermatology practices in the United States.

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Risk of death among postmenopausal women with normal weight and high abdominal fat

Postmenopausal women with normal weight (body mass index 18.5 to 24.9) and central obesity (waist circumference greater than 88 cm) are at higher risk of death compared to women with normal weight and no central obesity. Obesity prevention commonly focuses on BMI, which can't distinguish body shape or body fat distribution. The high abdominal fat distribution that is central obesity is common in t

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Researchers find evidence a cancer drug may be extended to many more patients

Drugs currently used to treat less than 10% of breast cancer patients could have broader effectiveness in treating all cancers, including ovarian and prostate cancers.

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Can Psychiatry Heal Itself?

Harvard historian urges psychiatrists to focus less on making money and more on helping patients. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hummingbirds show how to predict genetic changes

Multiple hummingbird species—such as the giant hummingbird, Patogona gigas —have adapted to high altitudes in the Andes Mountains through genetic mutations that affect the same biochemical pathways. research finds. This suggests it may be possible to predict the genetic changes necessary for evolving and adapting to new environments at the molecular level. Creatures that transition from low to hi

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New telescope gives peek at the birth of the universe

The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is set to become the largest radio telescope on Earth. Researchers have now examined the SKA-MPG telescope — a prototype for the part of the SKA that receives signals in the mid-frequency range.

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How climate change disrupts plant-animal relationships

Plants rely on bees for pollination; bees need plants to supply nectar and pollen. Scientists have studied how climate change affects these mutualistic interactions.

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Fungal compound deodorizes skunk smell

Being sprayed by a skunk is no fun for people or their pets, and the strong, stinky secretions can serve as a nasty reminder of the wildlife encounter for days or weeks. Available 'de-skunking' formulas often either don't work well or can irritate the skin and eyes. Now, researchers have identified a compound from fungi that safely and effectively neutralizes skunk spray odor.

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Monarch butterflies rely on temperature-sensitive internal timer while overwintering

The fact that millions of North American monarch butterflies fly thousands of miles each fall and somehow manage to find the same overwintering sites in central Mexican forests and along the California coast, year after year, is pretty mind-blowing.

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San Francisco Plans “Safe” Parking for People Living in Vehicles

A Pound Of Cure San Francisco has among the highest rental costs of any U.S. city. Without access to affordable housing, many people end up living inside their vehicles or on the street. But don’t worry — the city is cooking up a dystopian solution. Picture this: a parking lot. What, you want more? CBC reports that in San Francisco, a city notoriously hostile to homeless people, living in a vehic

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When in life are you most likely to succeed? | Albert-László Barabási

Backed by mathematical analysis, network theorist Albert-László Barabási explores the hidden mechanisms that drive success — no matter your field — and uncovers an intriguing connection between your age and your chance of making it big.

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Simpler HIV treatment and prevention strategies take center stage

Implants, injections, and friendlier pill regimens all show promise

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Three Ways Mueller Says Trump Is Lying

Testifying to the House Judiciary Committee this morning, former Special Counsel Robert Mueller reiterated that his investigation did not “totally exonerate” Donald Trump, as the president has stated. Further contradicting Trump, Mueller also said he did not find that the president did not obstruct justice. Both statements came in response to questions from Chairman Jerry Nadler, a New York Democ

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Is deadly Candida auris a product of global warming?

A drug-resistant fungus species called Candida auris, which was first identified 10 years ago and has since caused hundreds of deadly outbreaks in hospitals around the world, may have become a human pathogen in part due to global warming, according to three scientists led by a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Hair could be the key to better mental-illness diagnosis in teens

It's possible that a lock of hair could one day aid in the diagnosis of depression and in efforts to monitor the effects of treatment, said the author of a new study examining cortisol levels in the hair of teens.

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Cold, dry planets could have a lot of hurricanes

Study overturns conventional wisdom that water is needed to create cyclones.

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With bitter foods, what you eat determines what you like to eat

Introducing plant-based foods to a diet is a common-sense approach to healthy eating, but many people don't like the taste of vegetables, bitter greens, in particular. But give that broccoli a chance. Doing so won't just change your mind; it will actually change the taste of those foods, according to a new UB study.

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Fracking activities may contribute to anxiety and depression during pregnancy

A new study led by a researcher at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health identifies a link between proximity to hydraulic fracking activities and mental health issues during pregnancy. Results appear in the journal Environmental Research.

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Visits to the dentist decline in old age, especially among minorities

Visits to the dentist drop significantly after adults turn 80, finds a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa.

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Light pollution may be increasing West Nile virus spillover from wild birds

House sparrows infected with West Nile virus (WNV) that live in light polluted conditions remain infectious for two days longer than those who do not, increasing the potential for a WNV outbreak by about 41%.

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Were These 3,500-Year-Old Carvings of Nude Women Used As Ancient Fertility Drug?

An inscribed ancient Egyptian scarab and five clay tablets with carvings of naked women have been found in Rehob, a 3,500-year-old city in Israel.

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RED Blames Chinese ODM for Hydrogen One Flop, Begins Work on Hydrogen Two

Camera maker RED's Hydrogen One phone turned out to be an overpriced and underperforming mess in spite of the "revolutionary" 3D screen. RED founder Jim Jannard …

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How nature builds hydrogen-producing enzymes

A team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University of Oxford has discovered how hydrogen-producing enzymes, called hydrogenases, are activated during their biosynthesis. They showed how the cofactor — part of the active centre and also the heart of the enzyme — is introduced inside.

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Findings from CARE Consortium added to global repository for brain injury data

Data from the CARE Consortium, the world's most comprehensive concussion study is now publicly available in a repository aimed at providing traumatic brain injury researchers access to a wealth of new knowledge.

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Scientists complete first assessment of blood abnormalities in Antarctic penguin colony

Through blood tests conducted on 19 adult Adélie penguins breeding at Edmonson Point in Antarctica, researchers found quantities of cell types associated with future cell death, genomic instability or cancer development.

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A peek at the birth of the universe

The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is set to become the largest radio telescope on Earth. Bielefeld University researchers together with the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) and international partners have now examined the SKA-MPG telescope–a prototype for the part of the SKA that receives signals in the mid-frequency range.

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The Secrets of Moondust

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reflecting on the Apollo 11 mission, 50 years later. There are a few rules for handling pieces of the moon collected by Apollo astronauts. Keep the samples locked in a safe. Don’t blab to everyone that you have some. Don’t destroy them, unless you’ve been given permission; sometimes, in the name of science, the samples must be dissolved in acid. And

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Seismic air guns found to harm balance organ in rock lobsters

A team of researchers with the University of Tasmania and Curtin University has found that seismic air guns used for oil and gas exploration can damage a sensory organ in rock lobsters called the statocyst, which provides balance and orientation. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes tests they conducted with lobsters in their lab and what they found.

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Genome research shows that the body controls the integrity of heritable genomes

Scientists at the CECAD Cluster of Excellence in Aging Research of the University of Cologne have discovered that body cells which are in direct contact with the germ cells in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are responsible for controlling the stability of the genome in primordial germ cells (PGCs). All germ cells, including sperm and eggs, originate from primordial germ cells that form during

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Seismic air guns found to harm balance organ in rock lobsters

A team of researchers with the University of Tasmania and Curtin University has found that seismic air guns used for oil and gas exploration can damage a sensory organ in rock lobsters called the statocyst, which provides balance and orientation. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes tests they conducted with lobsters in their lab and what they found.

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Genome research shows that the body controls the integrity of heritable genomes

Scientists at the CECAD Cluster of Excellence in Aging Research of the University of Cologne have discovered that body cells which are in direct contact with the germ cells in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are responsible for controlling the stability of the genome in primordial germ cells (PGCs). All germ cells, including sperm and eggs, originate from primordial germ cells that form during

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India: Renewable Energy Dominates 1st Half Of 2019 With 58%

submitted by /u/CowboyAndIndian [link] [comments]

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Three Ways Engineers Are Improving the Planet

submitted by /u/pmz [link] [comments]

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New Jersey’s aid-in-dying law prompts ethical questions

On August 1, New Jersey will allow terminally ill adult residents to request prescriptions from their doctors for medication to end their lives, but questions remain. Here, Paul Duberstein and Elissa Kozlov, both palliative care experts at the Rutgers University School of Public Health, discuss the ethics involved and what New Jersey can learn from the seven other US jurisdictions with similar la

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Does one size does fit all? A new model for organic semiconductors

Organic materials that can conduct charge have the potential to be used in a vast array of exciting applications, including flexible electronic devices and low-cost solar cells. However, to date, only organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have made a commercial impact owing to gaps in the understanding of organic semiconductors that have limited improvements to charge carrier mobility. Now an inte

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Despite Dangers, Millions of Americans Are Still Taking Daily Aspirin

Aspirin, commonly held to help heart health, also poses dangers for some people. (Credit: fizkes/Shutterstock) Many Americans have seen the television commercials from a leading Aspirin manufacturer saying their drug “can help prevent another heart attack.” The claims behind the commercials, which have been airing for decades, are based on research showing that taking low doses of Aspirin daily ca

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Molecule reduces accumulation of toxic protein in Parkinson's disease model

The discovery supports GM1 ganglioside as a potential target for Parkinson's therapy.

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How climate change disrupts relationships

Plants rely on bees for pollination; bees need plants to supply nectar and pollen. Scientists from the University of Würzburg have studied how climate change affects these mutualistic interactions.

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Fungal compound deodorizes skunk smell

Being sprayed by a skunk is no fun for people or their pets, and the strong, stinky secretions can serve as a nasty reminder of the wildlife encounter for days or weeks. Available 'de-skunking' formulas often either don't work well or can irritate the skin and eyes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Natural Products have identified a compound from fungi that safely and effectively neut

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Surprising insight into Legionnaires' disease

In order to control cellular processes and thwart the immune system, the bacterium Legionella pneumophilia, the cause of the notorious Legionnaires' disease, releases hundreds of enzymes. Biochemists at Goethe University have now elucidated important details in the interaction of bacterial effectors. They discovered how the regulatory enzyme SidJ keeps other dangerous virulence factors in check.

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Multiple concurrent central lines increases risk for bloodstream infection

A study by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America demonstrates the relationship between multiple concurrent central lines and the increased risk for bloodstream infections.

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Hospital-acquired C. diff associated with substantial costs

A study by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America determines the cost and length of stay attributed to hospital-acquired Clostridioides difficile infections.

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An apple, and a few bacteria, a day

Organic gives you a better batch, research shows. Amelia Nichele reports.

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FTC also sues Cambridge Analytica, settles with former CEO and app developer

As part of the investigation against Facebook’s privacy lapses, the FTC announced today that it is suing Cambridge Analytica. The agency has already agreed to settlement with former Cambridge …

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Google to Delete Private Data Captured by Street View Cars

Mass Surveillance It used to be that while Google’s “Street View” cars zipped around roads and took photos to add into Google Maps, they also gathered data from private WiFi networks as they drove. Google just settled in a decade-old class-action lawsuit about the practice, according to Gizmodo . The search giant agreed to pay a minor $13 million fine — and to delete the treasure trove of informa

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Quality Control in the Nucleolus

I’ve written here about phase-separated condensates inside cells, and the publications on these continue to show up all over the literature. I found this recent one in Science to be particularly interesting, on several levels. One thing the condensate idea has given a framework to is the variety of small cellular structures that have been observed and named over the years, but without (in many ca

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How AI and neuroscience drive each other forwards

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02212-4 Bringing together artificial intelligence and neuroscience promises to yield benefits for both fields.

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How to map the brain

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02208-0 As efforts to chart the brain’s neurons gather pace, researchers must find a way to make the accumulating masses of data useful.

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Neanderthal clues to brain evolution in humans

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02210-6 Studies of Neanderthal brain development could provide insights into the evolution and inner workings of the human brain.

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The brain

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02206-2 This supremely complex organ is slowly giving up its valuable secrets.

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Exploring the human brain with virtual reality

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02154-x Virtual-reality mazes are helping to unlock the complexity of the brain.

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A more human approach to artificial intelligence

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02213-3 Philosopher Andy Clark reflects on what it will take for artificially intelligent agents to become more capable.

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How to organize a conference that’s open to everyone

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02253-9 Thinking about the needs of all participants is key to a successful event.

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The four biggest challenges in brain simulation

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02209-z Simulating the human brain is one of the most ambitious scientific endeavours ever undertaken, and daunting technical obstacles lie ahead.

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The forgotten part of memory

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02211-5 Long thought to be a glitch of memory, researchers are coming to realize that the ability to forget is crucial to how the brain works.

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Decoding the neuroscience of consciousness

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02207-1 A growing understanding of consciousness could lead to fresh treatments for brain injuries and phobias.

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The ethics of brain–computer interfaces

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02214-2 As technologies that integrate the brain with computers become more complex, so too do the ethical issues that surround their use.

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Mind-Bending “Quantum Darwinism” Theory Passes Experimental Tests

When it comes to our physical world, scientific research indicates that size really does matter. While “big” objects, anything from a grain of sand to a galaxy, abide by one set of rules — classical physics — tiny objects, such as atoms and particles, abide by an entirely different set, a discovery that gave birth to quantum physics around 1900. Scientists have been on the hunt for a way to recon

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NASA Really, Really Needs a New Spacesuit for 2024 Moon Mission

Astronauts don’t just need a rocket to walk on the surface of the Moon — they need a spacesuit that keeps them safe as well. NASA’s recently announced plans to reach the Moon by 2024 is turning up the pressure to find a replacement for NASA’s previous Moon spacesuit — an outfit that dates back to the Apollo missions from the 70s. So far, NASA has yet to sign any contract or set a deadline to find

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Mystery solved: astronomers find missing gas in distant galaxy

MeerKAT telescope reveals two tell-tale tails.

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An apple, and a few bacteria, a day

Organic gives you a better batch, research shows. Amelia Nichele reports.

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The dark, cold and wet side of the Moon

But even here water isn’t locked away, NASA has found.

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Puerto Rico’s Governor Confirmed His People’s Worst Suspicions

Ricardo Rosselló’s governorship of Puerto Rico was doomed as soon as a critical mass of citizens took to the streets of San Juan, expressing their indignation at him for disrespecting them and their loved ones. Protests in recent days are widely believed to be the largest in the island’s history. At midday Monday, the crowd filled the eight-lane main artery into the capital city, and in so doing,

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Artificial throat could someday help mute people 'speak'

Most people take speech for granted, but it's actually a complex process that involves both motions of the mouth and vibrations of folded tissues, called vocal cords, within the throat. If the vocal cords sustain injuries or other lesions, a person can lose the ability to speak. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a wearable artificial throat that, when attached to the neck like

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Editing RNA Expands CRISPR’s Use Far Beyond Genetic Diseases

CRISPR advances have been coming so frequently that it’s hard to keep track. In just a few years, it’s evolved from a nifty genome word editor to a full-on biological Swiss army knife. There’s the classic shutdown-that-faulty-gene version. There’s the change-and-replace-single-DNA-letters version. There are even spinoffs that let you add a gene , edit a bunch of genes , or irreversibly alter the

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How to build a moon base

Half a century after humans first walked on the moon, a number of private companies and nations are planning to build permanent bases on the lunar surface. Despite the technological progress since the Apollo era, this will be extremely challenging. So how should you get started?

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New experimental insights allow researchers to probe protein-DNA interactions with greater precision

A single-molecule imaging technique, called protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE), has gained traction in recent years as a popular tool for observing DNA–protein interactions with nanometer precision. Yet, according to a new KAUST study, research laboratories have not been using the technique to its fullest potential.

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Sustainable Urban Living Isn’t Just Necessary – It’s a Giant Opportunity

Last Thursday was a rainy night in New York City, but that didn’t stop a crowd of curious and innovative thinkers from packing into MoMA’s PS1 for a night of lively conversation on the topic no city dweller can afford to ignore – sustainable urban living. Speakers ranging from United Nations officials to green startup founders stressed the urgency of creating cities better able to sustainably hou

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Gallery Go Is A Powerful, Lightweight Google Photos Android App For Offline Use

Are you looking for a quick and easy way to organize your smartphone photos? Google may have a solution for you, as it has just introduced Gallery Go, a photo gallery that is intended to work …

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Rare rhinos among more than 200 animals killed by India floods

Devastating floods have killed more than 200 wild animals—including 17 threatened one-horned rhinos—in one of India's best-known national parks, officials said Wednesday.

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Rare rhinos among more than 200 animals killed by India floods

Devastating floods have killed more than 200 wild animals—including 17 threatened one-horned rhinos—in one of India's best-known national parks, officials said Wednesday.

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AI's current hype and hysteria could set the technology back by decades

Most discussions about artificial intelligence (AI) are characterised by hyperbole and hysteria. Though some of the world's most prominent and successful thinkers regularly forecast that AI will either solve all our problems or destroy us or our society, and the press frequently report on how AI will threaten jobs and raise inequality, there's actually very little evidence to support these ideas.

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Alzheimer's protein is likely held together with many weak chemical interactions

The chemical interactions that give proteins their shape may be weaker and more numerous than previously recognized. Chemists at the University of Tokyo modeled the building blocks of the protein structure that causes Alzheimer's disease, amyloid beta sheets. Their calculations revealed that some atoms too far apart to bond were still in each other's 'electron neighborhoods.'

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Genome research shows that the body controls the integrity of heritable genomes

Writing in Developmental Cell, scientists at the University of Cologne presented new findings that challenge established concepts of genetic inheritance. They have proven that somatic cells of the roundworm C. elegans influence heredity.

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Decoding the causes of motor neuron disease: A new study shows the impact of genetics

Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have conducted the largest ever study involving 1117 people diagnosed with motor neurone disease to address the question of "nature versus nurture" in the causes of MND. The team from the Trinity MND Research Group found that one in 347 men and one in 436 women can be expected to develop motor neurone disease (MND) during their lifetime. Their research has b

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Antimalarial treatments less effective in severely malnourished children

Researchers have found that severe malnutrition is associated with lower exposure to the antimalarial drug lumefantrine in children treated with artemether-lumefantrine, the most common treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria. The study, which is the first to specifically address this, has been published in Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. It calls urgently for further research into

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Does one size does fit all? A new model for organic semiconductors

A team including researchers from Osaka University has used a single rubrene crystal to investigate the room temperature behavior of organic single crystals, and in so doing have dispelled previously-held assumptions based on inorganic semiconductor behavior. It is hoped that these insights into the specific behavior of organic conducting materials will accelerate the development of flexible condu

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Springer Nature publishes study for a CERN next generation circular collider

Back in January, CERN released a conceptual report outlining preliminary designs for a Future Circular Collider (FCC), which if built, would have the potential to be the most powerful particle collider the world over. Earlier this month attendees of the 2019 FCC week in Brussels got the first look at what this could look like with the release of the four volume FCC study conceptual design report (

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Quenching scientific curiosity with single-molecule imaging

New experimental insights allow researchers to probe protein-DNA interactions with greater precision.

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Scientists use phone movement to predict personality types

RMIT University researchers have used data from mobile phone accelerometers — the tiny sensors tracking phone movement for step-counting and other apps — to predict people's personalities.

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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