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nyheder2019juli21

Sisters improve chances of reproduction in Asian elephants

Researchers at the University of Turku found that the presence of a maternal sister was positively and significantly associated with annual female reproduction in a population of working elephants in Myanmar. In addition, an age-specific effect was found: young females were more sensitive to the presence of sisters and even more likely to reproduce when living near a sister.

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How black holes shape galaxies

Data from ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray observatory has revealed how supermassive black holes shape their host galaxies with powerful winds that sweep away interstellar matter.

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New experimental insights allow researchers to probe protein-DNA interactions with greater precision

A single-molecule imaging technique, called protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE), has gained traction in recent years as a popular tool for observing DNA–protein interactions with nanometer precision. Yet, according to a new KAUST study, research laboratories have not been using the technique to its fullest potential.

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Sisters improve chances of reproduction in Asian elephants

Researchers at the University of Turku found that the presence of a maternal sister was positively and significantly associated with annual female reproduction in a population of working elephants in Myanmar. In addition, an age-specific effect was found: young females were more sensitive to the presence of sisters and even more likely to reproduce when living near a sister.

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How nature builds hydrogen-producing enzymes

A team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University of Oxford has discovered how hydrogen-producing enzymes, called hydrogenases, are activated during their biosynthesis. They showed how the cofactor—part of the active centre and also the heart of the enzyme—is introduced inside.

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An apple carries about 100 million bacteria — good luck washing them off

A new study shows that organic apples harbor a more diverse and balanced bacterial community — which could make them healthier and tastier than conventional apples, as well as better for the environment.

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Screen time no child's play

Experts are urging parents to brush up on national guidelines following a rapid rise in screen time on electronic devices for children under 2.

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Pilot study of 5-hour molecular test accurately distinguishes malignant and benign breast tumors

A team of investigators reports that a new laboratory test they developed to identify chemical changes to a group of cancer-related genes can accurately detect which breast tumors are cancerous or benign, and do it in far less time than gold-standard tests on biopsied breast tissue.

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Motor proteins and membrane dynamics

Membranes composed of a lipid bilayer define the outer surface of nucleated cells (the plasma membrane) and delimit the vital organelles within these cells, such as mitochondria and nuclei. The membrane curvature determines the three-dimensional form of these structures, and is therefore a key factor in their respective functions. Furthermore, the ability to actively deform membranes is indispensa

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Scientists report a new clue to understanding of bacterial evolution

Scientists at the University of Glasgow have found a new paradigm in the understanding of bacterial evolution—an important element in the wider context of antibiotic resistance.

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The VR illusion that makes you think you have a spider’s body

Psychologists have long toyed with an illusion that lets you feel “ownership” of a different a body—even one that is not human. It could revolutionize gaming.

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Misunderstood storm surge threat can be every bit as deadly as a tsunami

One of the most powerful tropical storms ever recorded, Typhoon Haiyan, rampaged across the central Philippines in 2013, causing the deaths of more than 7,000 people. The devastating consequences were not simply the result of a 7.5 metre "storm surge" but also down to the fact that few people actually knew what it meant when there were warnings of the phenomenon, and the threat it posed to the pop

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Resource depletion is a serious problem, but 'footprint' estimates don't tell us much about it

Experts widely agree that human activities are harming the global environment. Since the Industrial Revolution, the world economy has grown dramatically. Overall this is a success story, since rising incomes have lifted millions of people out of poverty. But it has been fueled by population growth and increasing consumption of natural resources.

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Research could protect cities in active earthquake zones

A study from the University of Toronto Mississauga reveals new clues about an earthquake that rocked Argentina's San Juan province in the 1950s. The results add important data about one of the Earth's most active thrust zones and could help to protect cities in the region from earthquake damage in the future.

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Motor proteins and membrane dynamics

Membranes composed of a lipid bilayer define the outer surface of nucleated cells (the plasma membrane) and delimit the vital organelles within these cells, such as mitochondria and nuclei. The membrane curvature determines the three-dimensional form of these structures, and is therefore a key factor in their respective functions. Furthermore, the ability to actively deform membranes is indispensa

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Ultrathin transistors for faster computer chips

For decades, the transistors on our microchips have become smaller, faster and cheaper. Approximately every two years the number of transistors on commercial chips has doubled—this phenomenon became known as "Moore's Law." But for several years now, Moore's law does not hold any more. The miniaturization has reached a natural limit, as completely new problems arise when a length scale of only a fe

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Individual telescope of the Square Kilometre Array can also be used to study cosmic background radiation

The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is set to become the largest radio telescope on Earth. Scientists of Bielefeld University and the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) with international partners have now examined the SKA-MPG telescope—a prototype for the part of the SKA that receives signals in the mid-frequency range. The study, published today (24 July) in the journal Monthly Notice

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Scientists report a new clue to understanding of bacterial evolution

Scientists at the University of Glasgow have found a new paradigm in the understanding of bacterial evolution—an important element in the wider context of antibiotic resistance.

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New technique could help engineer polluted water filter, human tissues

Scientists can turn proteins into never-ending patterns that look like flowers, trees or snowflakes, a technique that could help engineer a filter for tainted water and human tissues.

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Sisters improve chances of reproduction in Asian elephants

Researchers at the University of Turku found that the presence of a maternal sister was positively and significantly associated with annual female reproduction in a population of working elephants in Myanmar. In addition, an age-specific effect was found: young females were more sensitive to the presence of sisters and even more likely to reproduce when living near a sister.

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Valleytronics core theory for future high-efficiency semiconductor technology

Professor Jae Dong Lee's team developed anomalous current and suggested a control mechanism by forming valley domain. Valley domain will become new killer contents of 2D semiconductor technology.

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Pottery related to unknown culture was found in Ecuador

Archaeologists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Institute of Archeology and Ethnography SB RAS (Russia), Escuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral (ESPOL) (Ecuador), and Tohoku University (Japan) found shards of ceramic vessels referred to the cultural sediments of early periods of Real Alto site. Findings date back to 4640 – 4460 BC, this period borders with Valdivia, one of the oldest po

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Genes underscore five psychiatric disorders

A group of international doctors has uncovered the genes that contribute to the development of ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, major depression and schizophrenia.

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New treatment program offers hope for controlling wombat mange

New research from the University of Tasmania is offering hope that the deadly mange disease affecting Tasmanian wombats could eventually be brought under control for wild individuals and populations.

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Study highlights the benefits of a US salt reduction strategy to US food industry

New research, published in The Milbank Quarterly, highlights the potential health and economic impact of the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) proposed voluntary salt policy on workers in the US food industry.

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One dose of HPV vaccine may be enough, Australian research finds

One dose of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has comparable effectiveness to 2 or 3 doses for preventing cervical pre-cancer, according to a new study.

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Consuming 60 grams of nuts a day improves sexual function

Researchers from the Human Nutrition Unit of the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Tarragona/Spain) have conducted the first nutritional intervention study with healthy participants of reproductive age in order to determine if regular consumption of nuts has any effect on sexual function. The analysis forms part of the FERTINUTS project, which has been created to assess the effects of regularly consum

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Half of young drinkers are unaware of health messages on alcohol packaging

Just half of 11-19 year old drinkers recall seeing health messages or warnings on alcohol packaging — despite being an important target market for this information, according to new research.

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Accidental infant deaths in bed tripled from 1999 to 2016 in the US

Although sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has been on the decline, a new study shows that infant deaths from accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed have more than tripled between 1999 and 2016 in the US with increases in racial inequalities. Results reveal similar risk factor profiles for non-Hispanic black infants and non-Hispanic white infants, though in every instance, non-Hispanic

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Pilot study of 5-hour molecular test accurately distinguishes malignant and benign breast tumors

A team led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators reports that a new laboratory test they developed to identify chemical changes to a group of cancer-related genes can accurately detect which breast tumors are cancerous or benign, and do it in far less time than gold-standard tests on biopsied breast tissue.

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Screen time no child's play

Experts are urging parents to brush up on national guidelines following a rapid rise in screen time on electronic devices for children under 2.

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30,000+ US lives could be saved by reducing air pollution levels below current standard

Research findings from the Center for Air Quality, Climate, and Energy Solutions (CACES) at Carnegie Mellon University show significant human health benefits when air quality is better than the current national ambient air quality standard. The estimate of lives that could be saved by further reduction of air pollution levels is more than thirty thousand, which is similar to the number of deaths f

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Monarch butterflies rely on temperature-sensitive internal timer while overwintering

The fact that millions of North American monarch butterflies fly thousands of miles each fall and somehow manage to find the same overwintering sites in central Mexican forests and along the California coast, year after year, is pretty mind-blowing.

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High blood sugar increases pancreatic cancer rate

High blood sugar may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Rising CO2 levels could boost wheat yield but slightly reduce nutritional quality

Levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are rising, which experts predict could produce more droughts and hotter temperatures. Although these weather changes would negatively impact many plants' growth, the increased CO2 availability might actually be advantageous because plants use the greenhouse gas to make food by photosynthesis. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and

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Changes in human diet shed light on human evolution

A shift in diet has long been seen as one of the critical adaptations that distinguishes our own genus Homo from earlier human ancestors. The timing and context of this dietary shift, however, has been hotly debated. A recent study by Columbian College of Arts and Sciences researchers finds that this change in the human diet reflects a behavioral shift approximately 1.65 million years ago.

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Rising CO2 levels could boost wheat yield but slightly reduce nutritional quality

Levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are rising, which experts predict could produce more droughts and hotter temperatures. Although these weather changes would negatively impact many plants' growth, the increased CO2 availability might actually be advantageous because plants use the greenhouse gas to make food by photosynthesis. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and

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First of two Van Allen Probes spacecraft ceases operations

On July 19, 2019, at 1:27 p.m. EDT, mission operators sent a shutdown command to one of two Van Allen Probes spacecraft, known as spacecraft B, from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab, or APL, in Laurel, Maryland.

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New technique could help engineer polluted water filter, human tissues

Scientists can turn proteins into never-ending patterns that look like flowers, trees or snowflakes, a technique that could help engineer a filter for tainted water and human tissues.

8h

Changes in human diet shed light on human evolution

A shift in diet has long been seen as one of the critical adaptations that distinguishes our own genus Homo from earlier human ancestors. The timing and context of this dietary shift, however, has been hotly debated. A recent study by Columbian College of Arts and Sciences researchers finds that this change in the human diet reflects a behavioral shift approximately 1.65 million years ago.

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Following the food trail to help right whales

Scientists are gathering data on a flea-sized, fat-rich organism that could be key to predicting where North Atlantic right whales venture in their search for food in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

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New 'safety tool' could help managers make workplaces safer

Managers who introduce strategies that aim to help employees focus on risks, stay vigilant, and be more creative about safety are more likely to improve safety behaviour in the workplace, new research involving Curtin University has found.

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Following the food trail to help right whales

Scientists are gathering data on a flea-sized, fat-rich organism that could be key to predicting where North Atlantic right whales venture in their search for food in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

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Scientists report revolutionary sensors capable of detecting carcinogenic foods

Specialists at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI and institutional collaborators have proposed a concept of hypersensitive sensory transducers (Fourier nano transducers) that could drastically revolutionise ultrasensitive control in biomedicine and a whole range of other spheres. The results are published in Advanced Functional Materials.

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HIV meds for mom don’t harm baby’s brain

HIV therapies have little effect on a baby’s brain development, according to a new study of women who took antiretroviral therapies for HIV while pregnant or nursing. An almost certain death sentence 30 years ago, having HIV today has lost its fatal sting. In just over 20 years, the development of antiretroviral therapies, or ART, has ensured that deadly outcomes for HIV-positive adults and child

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Researchers develop phage-assisted continuous evolution of base editors system

A team of researchers from the Broad Institute, Harvard and Boston's Children's Hospital has developed a new way to improve the editing efficiency of base editors using a system called "phage assisted continuous evolution of base editors," or BE-PACE. In their paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the group describes their new system and how well it worked.

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Researchers develop phage-assisted continuous evolution of base editors system

A team of researchers from the Broad Institute, Harvard and Boston's Children's Hospital has developed a new way to improve the editing efficiency of base editors using a system called "phage assisted continuous evolution of base editors," or BE-PACE. In their paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the group describes their new system and how well it worked.

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A New Law Makes Bots Identify Themselves—That's the Problem

California's so-called 'bot bill,' which aims to protect users from automated bots on Twitter and other platforms, is noble, flashy, intriguing…and inept.

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BioLegend: Sandwich ELISA Protocol

Sensitive, precise, and reliable ELISA detection and quantification is within your grasp.

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Chimpanzees' working memory similar to ours

Some scientists argue that working memory is particularly developed in humans. But how do chimpanzees, one of our closest relatives, compare? Researchers set out to answer this question.

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'Terminators' on the Sun trigger plasma tsunamis and the start of new solar cycles

In a pair of new papers, scientists paint a picture of how solar cycles suddenly die, potentially causing tsunamis of plasma to race through the Sun's interior and trigger the birth of the next sunspot cycle only a few short weeks later.

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Study shows stimulation of the ear can help manage Parkinson's symptoms

This study shows stimulation of the ear can help manage Parkinson's symptoms.

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Pupil dilation and heart rate, analyzed by AI, may help spot autism early

Autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders often aren't diagnosed until a child is a few years of age, when behavioral interventions and speech/occupational therapy become less effective. But new research this week in PNAS suggests that two simple, quantifiable measures — spontaneous fluctuations in pupil dilation or heart rate — could enable much earlier diagnosis of Rett syndrome and possib

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Atrial fibrillation: New marker for atrial damage discovered

Atrial fibrillation is a common abnormal heart rhythm. It is treated either with medications or by applying heat or extreme cold to destroy small specific tissue areas in the atrium. This inevitably causes small wounds. A team at the Cardiac and Vascular Surgery Unit of the German Heart Center Munich (DHM) of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered a blood-borne marker that qui

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Ultrathin transistors for faster computer chips

The next big miniaturization step in microelectronics could soon become possible — with so-called two-dimensional materials. With the help of a novel insulator made of calcium fluoride, scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have created an ultra-thin transistor, which has excellent electrical properties and, in contrast to previous technologies, can be miniaturized to an extremely small size.

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Read Robert Mueller’s Opening Statement to Congress

After staying silent following his appointment as special counsel in 2017, Robert Mueller made his first public comments on his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election just less than two months ago . Now, even though his tenure as special counsel has officially ended, Mueller begrudgingly finds himself compelled to speak yet again , thanks to a congressional subpoena calling

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Can women have it all? Working and mothering in Indonesia's capital Jakarta

Working in Indonesia's capital, Jakarta, is hard. Besides long working hours, Jakartan workers have to face the notorious long commuting times and traffic jams, known as some of the worst in the world.

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Trains slowed down as temperature records tumble in Europe

Trains were slowed down and holidaymakers flocked to swimming pools, beaches and lakes in western Europe on Wednesday as another heatwave set new temperature records.

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Public health authorities need to reassess how they market to racialized groups

Have you ever seen an HIV awareness advertisement featuring Black or Latino models? These ads are widespread in both print and social media. However, our research shows that these ads may not be as effective as public health authorities assume.

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Now There’s an Event to Storm Loch Ness: ‘Find Dat Big Boi’

A Facebook invitation, apparently inspired by a call to storm Area 51 in Nevada, attracted more than 22,000 pledges to seek out the fabled monster.

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GM’s Cruise Rolls Back Its Target for Self-Driving Cars

The automaker’s unit has raised billions from Softbank, Honda and others and has 1,500 employees. What it doesn’t have yet is service on the streets.

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Fish tanks: Jordan sinks military hardware for underwater museum

Sunken tanks, a troop carrier and a submerged helicopter: Jordan on Wednesday opened its first underwater military museum off its Red Sea coast.

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Study of data from 1988 Shroud of Turin testing suggests mistakes

A team of researchers from France and Italy has found evidence that suggests testing of the Shroud of Turin back in 1988 was flawed. In their paper published in Oxford University's Archaeometry, the group describes their reanalysis of the data used in the prior study, and what they found.

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What's causing the heatwave? And is climate change to blame?

Weather experts say a shift in the position of the jet stream is behind Europe's high temperatures.

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Here's the Best Way to Pet a Cat, According to Science

The key to success is to focus on providing the cat with as much choice and control during interactions as possible.

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Shaping Opinions About Science and Medicine

Responding to a commentary with all the usual anti-science tropes.

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Feeling fond of robots makes for better teams

We develop attachments to the robots we work with and those emotions can affect team performance, report researchers. Soldiers develop attachments to the robots that help them diffuse bombs in the field. Despite numerous warnings about privacy, millions of us trust smart speakers like Alexa to listen into our daily lives. Some of us name our cars and even shed tears when we trade them in for shin

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Watch here live: Special Counsel Robert Mueller's testimony to Congress – CNET

Mueller is discussing his report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, as well as his investigation into whether President Donald Trump obstructed justice.

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Rising CO2 levels could boost wheat yield but slightly reduce nutritional quality

Levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are rising, which experts predict could produce more droughts and hotter temperatures. Although these weather changes would negatively impact many plants' growth, the increased CO2 availability might actually be advantageous because plants use the greenhouse gas to make food by photosynthesis. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and

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Why is Portugal so prone to wildfires?

Poor forest management and firefighting techniques make Portugal especially vulnerable to wildfires as climate change makes hotter, longer summers more likely, experts warned as the latest blazes struck this week.

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Don't Worry About the 'Great Pyramid-Sized' Asteroid Due to Zip Past the Earth Today

Flying space rocks like 2019 OD get lots of attention, but there's aThese news stories get lots of attention, but there's a morbid reason why you really shouldn't worry about them.

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There's a simple way to drought-proof a town: Build more water storage

The federal parliament has voted to funnel A$200 million to drought-stricken areas. What exactly this money will be spent on is still under consideration, but the majority will go to rural, inland communities.

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How we know they have faces

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02278-0 More than a cosmetic fix.

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Southampton to Shanghai by train: One climate change researcher's quest to avoid flying

Academics travel a lot. Whether for fieldwork or conferences, we're often encouraged to do it. Often internationally, invariably by aeroplane. But while globetrotting might make us feel important, a recent study suggests there's no connection between academic air-miles and career advancement.

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Newcomers and Canadian high school students are friendly, but not friends

As international migration continues to grow in scope, complexity and impact, social integration of newcomers has become an issue of global concern. It's particularly a salient issue for Canada, a country with one of the highest global rates of immigration.

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Climate and mortality rates in Kenya, Mali, and Malawi

African countries are hit by far fewer natural disasters compared to the rest of the world. But they suffer much more. For instance, in 2016 African countries were hit by 17% of natural disasters compared to other regions of the world, but ranked third in the number of people who died or were displaced (31.8 million).

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Production sites of stars are rare

Astronomers using the Nobeyama Radio Obeservatory (NRO) 45-meter telescope found that high-density gas, the material for stars, accounts for only 3 percent of the total mass of gas distributed in the Milky Way. This result provides key information for understanding the unexpectedly low production rate of stars.

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Can Earth life survive on Mars?

Is there life on Mars, and can life from Earth survive there—or on other space bodies? The international BIOMEX research team, which includes researchers from many countries and space organizations, including Natuschka Lee at Umeå University, Sweden, has made biological experiments under space conditions. An overview of their results has now been published.

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Image of the Day: Smell Circuits

The brain wiring behind scent processing seems to scale across mammalian species.

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A vaunted program for boosting the diversity of U.S. academic scientists is starting to spread

Until recently, few universities tried to replicate the Meyerhoff Scholars Program. But that’s changing

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Sony WF-1000XM3 Review: The Perfect Travel Companion

The new premium earbuds from Sony have multiple noise-canceling modes, and it switches between them automatically depending on your environment.

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Migrants who adapt to Australian culture say they're happier than those who don't

In a multicultural country like Australia, it's easy for migrants to keep their heritage culture alive. But our recent research that surveyed more than 300 migrants found those who adapt to Australian society, called "Australian acculturation," have greater personal well-being than those who don't.

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Study examines how gentrifiers' race affects retail development

How is the racial composition of gentrifiers associated with retail development in gentrifying neighborhoods?

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Americans' tolerance for racist speech declines

Focusing on the First Amendment, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) went to court in 2017 to argue in favor of white nationalists' right to rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. But in the tragic aftermath of the rally, which led to the death of a counter-demonstrator, the ACLU decided to modify its approach to free speech controversies.

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Inuit group in Canada’s Arctic are genetically distinct

An Inuit population in Canada’s Arctic are genetically distinct from any known group, according to new research. Certain genetic variants within the population are correlated with brain aneurysm, the study also finds. Geographically isolated populations often develop unique genetic traits that result from their successful adaptation to specific environments. Unfortunately, these adaptations somet

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How the kava plant produces its pain-relieving and anti-anxiety molecules

Kava (Piper methysticum) is a plant native to the Polynesian islands that people there have used in a calming drink of the same name in religious and cultural rituals for thousands of years. The tradition of cultivating kava and drinking it during important gatherings is a cultural cornerstone shared throughout much of Polynesia, although the specific customs—and the strains of kava—vary from isla

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How the kava plant produces its pain-relieving and anti-anxiety molecules

Kava (Piper methysticum) is a plant native to the Polynesian islands that people there have used in a calming drink of the same name in religious and cultural rituals for thousands of years. The tradition of cultivating kava and drinking it during important gatherings is a cultural cornerstone shared throughout much of Polynesia, although the specific customs—and the strains of kava—vary from isla

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The Planetary Society Deploys Solar Sail Spacecraft

To get somewhere in space, you’ll need engines and fuel, but maybe that won’t be the case for much longer. The Planetary Society has just reached a critical milestone in the development of its solar sail technology. The LightSail 2 spacecraft has just deployed its mylar sail in orbit, allowing it to use sunlight to move through space. The Planetary Society advocates for space exploration under th

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De bedste sommeropfindelser: Elektrisk unicykel

Førhen hørte den til i cirkus og blandt jonglører på gågaderne. Så blev der sat strøm til og sædet fjernet. Nu har vi endnu en variant af urbane eldrevne transportmidler på cykelstierne.

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Atomic details of protein ‘droplets’ may shed light on ALS

Researchers have determined the atomic interactions that stabilize the liquid yet “condensed” phase of FUS, an important phase-changing protein linked to severe cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and a certain type of dementia. Most of the well-studied proteins in our bodies are like metal; some can change shape easily, like aluminum foil, and others are rigid, like steel beams, but they typi

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Scientists complete first assessment of blood abnormalities in Antarctic penguin colony

Scientists have completed the first study of immune and genetic stability among a colony of penguins living in a remote corner of southern Antarctica.

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Scientists complete first assessment of blood abnormalities in Antarctic penguin colony

Scientists have completed the first study of immune and genetic stability among a colony of penguins living in a remote corner of southern Antarctica.

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Chimpanzees' working memory similar to ours

Previous studies have showed that chimpanzees have excellent long-term memory abilities. However, little is known so far about their working memory abilities. To explore this subject, the researchers presented chimpanzees with a task in which they could search for food in a number of small, opaque boxes. The chimpanzees first watched as pieces of food were hidden in the boxes. Then they searched f

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Aussie drug offers hope for stamping out wombat-killing disease

A disease that has ravaged wombats in southern Australia could be brought under control using a treatment commonly applied by pet owners on cats and dogs, researchers said Wednesday.

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Protect ocean against 'irreversible' changes: Experts call for eight urgent measures

A new scientific paper co-authored by the University of Plymouth has said that eight urgent, simultaneous actions are needed to head off potential ecological disaster in the global ocean, amid signs of steeper and faster changes than even recent models predicted.

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Second laser boosts Aeolus power

ESA's Aeolus satellite, which carries the world's first space Doppler wind lidar, has been delivering high-quality global measurements of Earth's wind since it was launched almost a year ago. However, part of the instrument, the laser transmitter, has been slowly losing energy. As a result, ESA decided to switch over to the instrument's second laser—and the mission is now back on top form.

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NASA delivers hardware for ESA dark energy mission

The European Space Agency's Euclid mission, set to launch in 2022, will investigate two of the biggest mysteries in modern astronomy: dark matter and dark energy. A team of NASA engineers recently delivered critical hardware for one of the instruments that will fly on Euclid and probe these cosmic puzzles.

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Chimpanzees' working memory similar to ours

Previous studies have showed that chimpanzees have excellent long-term memory abilities. However, little is known so far about their working memory abilities. To explore this subject, the researchers presented chimpanzees with a task in which they could search for food in a number of small, opaque boxes. The chimpanzees first watched as pieces of food were hidden in the boxes. Then they searched f

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Team develops new material for wearable devices able to restore conductivity

The research team of researcher Hyunseon Seo and senior researcher Dr. Donghee Son of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology's Biomedical Research Institute, postdoctoral candidate Dr. Jiheong Kang and Professor Zhenan Bao of Stanford University (chemical engineering) announced a new material with high stretchability and high electrical conductivity, with the ability to self-heal even after

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Aussie drug offers hope for stamping out wombat-killing disease

A disease that has ravaged wombats in southern Australia could be brought under control using a treatment commonly applied by pet owners on cats and dogs, researchers said Wednesday.

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Need a Mental Health Day? Some States Give Students the Option

An expert called the laws in both Utah and Oregon a “win” and said students who are “quietly suffering” from mental illness will benefit most.

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It's Time the U.S. Had a Psychologist General

The country is in a mental health crisis, and nobody is really in charge — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Disinformation’s spread: bots, trolls and all of us

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02235-x Misconceptions about disinformation leave us vulnerable to manipulation online, says Kate Starbird.

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A frog study may point to where parenting begins in the brain

Two brain regions, including one active in mammal parents, lit up with activity in both male and female poison frogs when caring for their tadpoles.

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High Drama: Cannabis Biotech Firm Phylos Roils Small Growers

Science and technology are about to revolutionize cannabis, but longtime players fear they’ll get snuffed out in the process.

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Facebook Knows More About You Than the CIA

Facebook hired Yael Eisenstat, a CIA veteran, to help it address election meddling. Now she's deeply worried about the company's sway over our lives.

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This May Be the Face of a Pictish Chieftain Who Was Brutally Murdered 1,400 Years Ago

A Pictish man with a rugged face who was brutally murdered 1,400 years ago may have been royalty, new research finds.

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It's Time the U.S. Had a Psychologist General

The country is in a mental health crisis, and nobody is really in charge — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Magnet and Neuron Model Also Predicts Arctic Sea Ice Melt

The Ising model, now almost a century old, shows how natural systems can behave in related ways — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Greta Thunberg speech: French MPs boycott teen ‘apocalypse guru’

The teen activist is ridiculed by some French MPs ahead of her speech to parliament.

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Car parts from weeds: The future of green motoring?

The motor industry is trying to reduce its carbon footprint in a number of innovative ways.

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Magnet and Neuron Model Also Predicts Arctic Sea Ice Melt

The Ising model, now almost a century old, shows how natural systems can behave in related ways — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The horrific consequences of rubber's toxic past

The appalling treatment of Congo's rubber workers led to the world's first photographic human rights campaign.

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Smadret vogn sætter konkurrenter til vægs under hyperloop-ræs

Årets hyperloop-konkurrence ved Los Angeles blev vundet af et hold fra Technische Universität München – de satte både hastighedsrekord og fik deres vogn smadret under vinderløbet.

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Did Facebook data help Trump? 'Great Hack' explores scandal

The new documentary "The Great Hack" captures how Facebook's cavalier handling of user data in the Cambridge Analytica scandal posed a threat to democracy.

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New technique could help engineer polluted water filter, human tissues

Scientists can turn proteins into never-ending patterns that look like flowers, trees or snowflakes, a technique that could help engineer a filter for tainted water and human tissues. Their study, led by researchers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, appears in the journal Nature Chemistry.

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A century of psychiatry, the realities of migration, and Greenland’s ticking ice clock: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02245-9 Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

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Have you accidentally offended someone? Here’s advice for you and them.

In a diverse world, we run the risk of accidentally saying something that will offend someone. That does not mean you should automatically be disqualified from continuing in the discussion. We cannot have a 'one strike you're out' reaction, says Allison Stanger. If you offend someone inadvertently, it's extremely important that you apologize and say 'That was not my intention.' Apologizing is the

12h

Hedebølge lukker atomreaktorer i Frankrig

Det er ikke første gang, en atomkraftreaktor må lukkes på grund af varmt vejr. Alligevel maner atomkraftforeninger til ro.

12h

Pumping Milk and Nursing Are Not the Same

The number seems small, but gets larger and larger as you contemplate it: 6 percent. That is the estimated share of breastfeeding mothers who exclusively pump and bottle their milk for their infants, never directly nursing. It is a number that was functionally zero less than a generation ago. And it is a subset of a much larger figure, the 85 percent of breastfeeding mothers who use a pump at lea

12h

Quentin Tarantino Has Made His Best Movie in a Decade

Rick Dalton is good at playing cowboys. At the start of Quentin Tarantino’s new film, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood , the viewer sees Dalton (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) in action, starring as Jake Cahill in a black-and-white TV series called Bounty Law , where he dispenses justice in the Old West. The show is a throwback to the late-’50s, when TV programs such as Rawhide and Bonanza ruled the a

12h

Racist Is a Tough Little Word

“They dated.” What does that mean? Date is one of the more ambiguous words in American English. It can refer to anything from two people going to a movie one time to two people having a years-long sexual relationship and everything in between. Its meaning is so multifarious as to challenge any attempt to tell a foreigner what it actually refers to. Racist has become a similarly protean term. Many

12h

‘Not biologically plausible’: questions about survey data earn fluorosis paper a flag

A recent article that offered a stark warning about the risks to children of fluoride in the nation’s water has been tagged with an expression of concern after the publication of a new paper which undermines the reliability of the original data. The article, “Dental fluorosis trends in US oral health surveys: 1986 to 2012,” … Continue reading ‘Not biologically plausible’: questions about survey da

12h

Chasing Opal and Fossils in the Australian Outback

Some of the fossils unearthed at Lightning Ridge represent animal species found nowhere else. They are packed with information from the Cretaceous Period — the tail end of the age of the dinosaurs. Scientists say these specimens, some smaller than a fingernail, are part of Australia's cultural heritage.

12h

Former NFL players may face higher risk of atrial fibrillation

Former National Football League (NFL) players were nearly 6 times more likely to have atrial fibrillation (AF), a type of irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke.Former NFL athletes had lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, and had lower resting heart rates compared to the control group, yet the incidence of atrial fibrillation was st

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Precise and systematic survey of the efficacy of multicomponent drugs against functional dyspepsia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47300-7 Precise and systematic survey of the efficacy of multicomponent drugs against functional dyspepsia

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Soluble and membrane-bound protein carrier mediate direct copper transport to the ethylene receptor family

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47185-6 Soluble and membrane-bound protein carrier mediate direct copper transport to the ethylene receptor family

12h

The Existence of Airborne Mercury Nanoparticles

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47086-8 The Existence of Airborne Mercury Nanoparticles

12h

Response of Chloris truncata to moisture stress, elevated carbon dioxide and herbicide application

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47237-x Response of Chloris truncata to moisture stress, elevated carbon dioxide and herbicide application

12h

Comparative Genomics Analysis in Grass Species Reveals Two Distinct Evolutionary Strategies Adopted by R Genes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47121-8 Comparative Genomics Analysis in Grass Species Reveals Two Distinct Evolutionary Strategies Adopted by R Genes

12h

Indomethacin reduces rates of aortic dissection and rupture of the abdominal aorta by inhibiting monocyte/macrophage accumulation in a murine model

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46673-z Indomethacin reduces rates of aortic dissection and rupture of the abdominal aorta by inhibiting monocyte/macrophage accumulation in a murine model

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Normalization of glycosaminoglycan-derived disaccharides detected by tandem mass spectrometry assay for the diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46829-x Normalization of glycosaminoglycan-derived disaccharides detected by tandem mass spectrometry assay for the diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis

12h

Accuracy of standard clinical 3T prostate MRI for pelvic lymph node staging: Comparison to 68Ga-PSMA PET-CT

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46386-3 Accuracy of standard clinical 3T prostate MRI for pelvic lymph node staging: Comparison to 68 Ga-PSMA PET-CT

12h

Write rules for deep-sea mining before it’s too late

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02276-2 The International Seabed Authority must commit the mining industry to a sustainable future.

12h

Seabed mining is coming — bringing mineral riches and fears of epic extinctions

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02242-y Plans are advancing to harvest precious ores from the ocean floor, but scientists say that companies have not tested them enough to avoid devastating damage.

12h

The White House Is Preparing for a ‘Dud’ or a ‘Dumpster Fire’

Updated at 9:15 a.m. ET on July 24, 2019. Speaking to reporters in the Oval Office on Monday, President Donald Trump was coy about whether he planned to watch Robert Mueller’s testimony before Congress today. First, he said he wouldn’t tune in, before changing his mind in real time: “Maybe I’ll see a little bit of it.” Let’s put an end to the suspense: The first hearing began at 8:30 a.m. ET, sma

13h

Science and the rise of nationalism in India

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02243-x Srinath Perur on a study of how a political movement is co-opting science, myth and pseudoscience.

14h

Working Scientist podcast: Why physics is still a man’s world, and how to change it

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02281-5 Julie Gould hears how a technical university in the Netherlands took radical measures to boost the number of female academics.

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Why is no one talking about this?

I was talking to my mother, she's pretty updated with the technology, and she couldn't believe what I was saying about Neuralink and AGI. Does mainstream media avoid it or they just don't know the urgence of the situation? submitted by /u/Wi1lis996 [link] [comments]

14h

Study finds meal timing strategies appear to lower appetite, improve fat burning

Researchers have discovered that meal timing strategies such as intermittent fasting or eating earlier in the daytime appear to help people lose weight by lowering appetite rather than burning more calories, according to a report published online today in the journal Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society. The study is the first to show how meal timing affects 24-hour energy metaboli

14h

New data fills research gaps on weight loss experiences for minority groups

The use of intensive lifestyle interventions focused on altering dietary and physical activity habits using behavioral strategies can produce sustained weight loss among African-Americans and Hispanics who have type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a new study published online today in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society.

14h

Weatherwatch: perfect conditions for a Spanish plume

High temperatures and high moisture levels make for atmospheric instability Over the last few days, we have seen the arrival of hot and humid weather, with some thunderstorms. Various media outlets have associated these conditions with the arrival of what is termed a Spanish plume , which often leads to scorching temperatures and the risk of severe thunderstorms. This week we have had both in man

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Redaktionens favoritter: Mademballage af papir og pap er fyldt med miljøgift

Nogle historier lever et alt for kort liv. Derfor har vi bedt et udpluk af Ingeniørens redaktører og journalister anbefale egne og andres historier. Her er, hvad de fandt frem.

15h

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Insects replace pesticides in Spain's 'Sea of Plastic'

"They work for me night and day," smiles Antonio Zamora, standing in his greenhouse. His minuscule employees are bugs that feed on the parasites threatening his peppers.

15h

Insects replace pesticides in Spain's 'Sea of Plastic'

"They work for me night and day," smiles Antonio Zamora, standing in his greenhouse. His minuscule employees are bugs that feed on the parasites threatening his peppers.

15h

An apple carries about 100 million bacteria—good luck washing them off

To the heroes among you who eat the whole apple: besides extra fiber, flavonoids and flavor, you're also quaffing 10 times as many bacteria per fruit as your core-discarding counterparts.

15h

Washington's Potomac River hits record high temperature

The Potomac River, which flows through the US capital Washington, hit a record high temperature of 94 degrees Fahrenheit (34 degrees Celsius) over the weekend—as warm as bathwater—following a major heat wave.

15h

An apple carries about 100 million bacteria—good luck washing them off

To the heroes among you who eat the whole apple: besides extra fiber, flavonoids and flavor, you're also quaffing 10 times as many bacteria per fruit as your core-discarding counterparts.

15h

Hawaii governor visits those blocking telescope construction

The governor of Hawaii on Tuesday visited protesters blocking the construction of a giant telescope on the state's tallest mountain while acknowledging that their grievances were not just about a new observatory but also about the treatment of Native Hawaiians going back more than a century.

15h

Putting the brakes on lateral root development

There's no organ system in the body that does as much for humans as roots do for plants. Part anchor and part mouth, a plant's root system architecture is critical to its success. But the process of growing new roots is costly to a plant, and there can be diminishing returns.

16h

Putting the brakes on lateral root development

There's no organ system in the body that does as much for humans as roots do for plants. Part anchor and part mouth, a plant's root system architecture is critical to its success. But the process of growing new roots is costly to a plant, and there can be diminishing returns.

16h

Algae living inside fungi: How land plants first evolved

Scientists think that green algae are plants water-living ancestors, but we are not sure how the transition to land plants happened.

16h

Buying local? Higher price means higher quality in consumers' minds

Why are we willing to pay much more for a six pack of craft beer, a locally produced bottle of wine or a regional brand item, often choosing them over national brands?

16h

Algae living inside fungi: How land plants first evolved

Scientists think that green algae are plants water-living ancestors, but we are not sure how the transition to land plants happened.

16h

What motivates people to join—and stick with—citizen science projects?

From searching for extraterrestrial life to tracking rainfall, non-experts are increasingly helping to gather information to answer scientific questions. One of the most established hands-on, outdoor citizen science projects is the University of Washington-based Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team, COASST, which trains beachgoers along the West Coast, from California to Alaska, to monitor

16h

Harnessing the power of microbes for mining in space

For centuries, people have done the hard work of mining useful minerals and metals from solid rock. Then, scientists learned how to harness the power of tiny microbes to do some of this labor. This process, called biomining, has become common on Earth.

16h

How to restore a coral reef

New guidelines drafted by a consortium of concerned experts could enable corals to adapt to changing environments and help restore declining coral populations in the Caribbean. The guidelines provide a definitive plan for collecting, raising, and replanting corals that maximizes their potential for adaptation.

16h

Active pharmaceutical ingredients can persist in the environment

Homeowners who rely on private wells as their drinking water source can be vulnerable to bacteria, nitrates, and other contaminants that have known human health risks. Because they are not connected to a public drinking water supply, the homeowners are responsible for ensuring that their own drinking water is safe.

16h

What motivates people to join—and stick with—citizen science projects?

From searching for extraterrestrial life to tracking rainfall, non-experts are increasingly helping to gather information to answer scientific questions. One of the most established hands-on, outdoor citizen science projects is the University of Washington-based Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team, COASST, which trains beachgoers along the West Coast, from California to Alaska, to monitor

16h

Cane toad testes smaller at the invasion front

Understanding the dynamics of cane toad dispersal is vital information for scientists helping native animals survive the spread of the poisonous invasive species.

16h

Cane toad testes smaller at the invasion front

Understanding the dynamics of cane toad dispersal is vital information for scientists helping native animals survive the spread of the poisonous invasive species.

16h

Left eye? Right eye? American robins have preference when looking at decoy eggs

Just as humans are usually left- or right-handed, other species sometimes prefer one appendage, or eye, over the other. A new study reveals that American robins that preferentially use one eye significantly more than the other when looking at their own clutch of eggs are also more likely to detect, and reject, a foreign egg placed in their nest by another bird species—or by a devious scientist.

16h

Eyes on VENUS: ORNL to deliver unique US neutron imaging capability for science discovery

The ability to directly see the atomic fabric of materials provides pivotal information in accelerating the design and improving the performance of future technologies. Visualizing in real space the behaviors and dynamics of materials requires powerful probes and advanced instrumentation.

16h

Left eye? Right eye? American robins have preference when looking at decoy eggs

Just as humans are usually left- or right-handed, other species sometimes prefer one appendage, or eye, over the other. A new study reveals that American robins that preferentially use one eye significantly more than the other when looking at their own clutch of eggs are also more likely to detect, and reject, a foreign egg placed in their nest by another bird species—or by a devious scientist.

16h

GeoBits: Cascadia Edition

Fear and fascination haunts the Cascadia subduction zone in this collection of recent articles. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

Theresa May Called Three People to Talk About Life After Office

In the final weeks of her premiership, as she has considered life after Downing Street, Theresa May sought out the only people who could reasonably give her advice: her predecessors. The outgoing British Prime Minister reached out to David Cameron, Gordon Brown and Tony Blair to discuss life after office, officials told The Atlantic . The revelation sheds new light on the prime minister’s mind-se

16h

Gynækolog: Du kan sagtens udskyde menstruation, når du skal på ferie

Og i øvrigt kan du ikke være præmenstruel, når du tager p-piller.

17h

Active pharmaceutical ingredients can persist in the environment

A study finds trace levels of medicines in drinking water from private wells.

17h

An apple carries about 100 million bacteria — good luck washing them off

Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, a new study shows that organic apples harbor a more diverse and balanced bacterial community — which could make them healthier and tastier than conventional apples, as well as better for the environment.

17h

KIST-Stanford team develops new material for wearable devices able to restore conductivity

Development of nanocomposite material simultaneously possessing high stretchability, high conductivity, and self-healability. Investigation of self-boosting phenomenon that enables spontaneous increase in electrical conductivity (over 60 times greater than the initial value) when external tensile strain is applied.

17h

For Ants, the Sky's the Compass

Computer modeling revealed that insects with a celestial compass can likely determine direction down to just a couple degrees of error. Christopher Intagliata reports.

17h

Tokyo 2020: Meet the Olympic and Paralympic robots

With a year to go until the Olympics and Paralympics in Tokyo, meet the robots that will be used on site at the events.

17h

Why Silicon Valley is in two minds about Mars

Some tech bros can’t wait to get to the red planet. Others are focused on more immediate challenges

18h

The Weather Machine: How We See Into the Future — the highs and lows

Andrew Blum’s book tells the story of how science made John Ruskin’s dream of a global meteorological machine a reality

18h

Facebook’s latest profits show FTC fine is a blip

The record FTC settlement announced Wednesday raises questions about how the company will operate in the future.

18h

Experts propose a framework to promote mental health with greenery

Multi-level review supports links between nature and wellbeing. Natalie Parletta reports.

18h

For Ants, the Sky's the Compass

Computer modeling revealed that insects with a celestial compass can likely determine direction down to just a couple degrees of error. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

For Ants, the Sky's the Compass

Computer modeling revealed that insects with a celestial compass can likely determine direction down to just a couple degrees of error. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists are speaking out against the 'violence' required to build this new telescope

Mauna Kea is already home to several observatories, but the TMT has sparked tension. (DepositPhotos/) As protests in Hawaii shade into their second week , allies of Native Hawaiians acting to protect Mauna Kea are calling on the institutions backing the Thirty Meter Telescope project to take action to protect the protestors and, in some cases, to divest from the project altogether. "We are just i

19h

Compensatory strategies to disguise autism spectrum disorder may delay diagnosis

The first scientific study of compensatory strategies — techniques to camouflage autism — finds that they have positive and negative outcomes, increasing social integration, but possibly also resulting in poor mental health for autistic people, and could be a barrier to diagnosis.

20h

Brain protein mutation from child with autism causes autism-like behavioral change in mice

A de novo gene mutation that encodes a brain protein in a child with autism has been placed into the brains of mice. These mice then showed severe alterations of specific behaviors that closely resemble those seen in human autism spectrum disorder, or ASD.

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Before Mueller’s Testimony, Dems Demand More Election Security

Senate Democrats want to remind everyone that US elections are still at risk, and Congress could do more to protect them.

20h

Harnessing the power of microbes for mining in space

A new investigation on the International Space Station represents the first study of how microbes grow on and alter planetary rocks in microgravity and simulated Martian gravity.

20h

New moms may be vulnerable to 'sharenting'

Two related studies found evidence that women's feelings of vulnerability about being a mother are linked to their posting on social media — and those posts sometimes include their children's personally identifiable information, such as names, birthdates, and photographs. The researchers suggest the need for enhanced governmental guidance to protect children's online privacy from commercial entit

20h

Starbucks and UberEats are taking their delivery program nationwide – Roadshow

Soon you won't even have to go to the Starbucks around the corner to get your online order, it'll come to you.

20h

Impact factor impacts on early-career scientist careers [Editorials]

When I was named the new Editor-in-Chief of PNAS in October 2018, I received hearty congratulations from colleagues from a wide range of disciplines, befitting the intended audience of this venerable journal. The appointment is not my first experience serving as Editor-in-Chief; in 2017, I stepped down after 21 years…

20h

Daily e-cigarette use may help smokers quit regular cigarettes

A new study provides critical evidence demonstrating that using e-cigarettes daily helps U.S. smokers to quit traditional cigarettes.

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Loggers and poachers threaten wildlife in the Republic of Congo

The tropical forests of Western Equatorial Africa are increasingly coming under pressure from logging, poaching, and associated disturbances, a new study finds. Researchers found that logging road construction has accelerated over the past two decades and led to a dramatic decline of intact forest lands in the region. Increased human immigration and degradation of natural resources follows in the

21h

Ethics Office Examines Allegations That Interior Dept. Officials Violated Transparency Laws

The department’s internal ethics watchdog is examining whether top Trump appointees violated open-record laws by withholding or delaying the release of public files.

21h

Watch Live: SpaceX’s Dragon Set for Wednesday Resupply Mission

A SpaceX Dragon cargo craft on a resupply mission to the ISS. (Credit: NASA) Just days after the three newest crew members arrived on the International Space Station (ISS), SpaceX’s Dragon cargo capsule is set to launch on a resupply mission. At about 6:24 p.m. EDT on July 24, a Falcon 9 rocket with the attached Dragon capsule are scheduled to blast off from the Space Launch Complex at Cape Canave

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AI predicts long-term death risk from single chest X-ray

submitted by /u/luisoliverio [link] [comments]

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Stopping child marriage with solar lanterns

Girls in Ethiopia are being given solar lamps to help stop child marriage and keep them in school.

21h

Daniel Callahan, 88, Dies; Bioethics Pioneer Weighed ‘Human Finitude’

At the Hastings Center, which he co-founded, he explored ethical issues raised by medical advances and questioned the wisdom of prolonging life.

22h

Laugh tracks trick our brains into thinking dad jokes are funny

What does a dinosaur use to pay bills? Tyrannosaurus checks. (Deposit Photos/) Laughter may seem like a simple affair, but humans use it to communicate any number of emotions. We might laugh to show we sympathize with a friend or have the hots for a date. A chuckle can cover up our embarrassment and a giggle can help us get away with a lie. A snicker can add fuel to the flame of a spiteful fight,

22h

These immune cells are likely key to multiple sclerosis

Researchers report identifying the “fingerprint” of the immune cells that characterize multiple sclerosis. They say the discovery could lead to new ways to monitor and treat the disease. In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), dysregulated immune cells periodically infiltrate the brain, causing damage to neural transmission and neuronal loss. Without proper monitoring and treatment, the disease

22h

Women missing out on the best heart care

A mistaken belief that coronary heart disease (CHD) affects only middle-aged men could be the reason why both women and younger people with the disease are not receiving optimal care, say the authors of a new study into Australian general practice care.

22h

Garlic on broccoli: A smelly approach to repel a major pest

New study offers a novel framework to test strategies for managing invasive pests. Applying the framework to swede midge, a new invasive fly causing 100% crop losses for organic broccoli growers, the researchers uncover which odors are most effective at repelling the pest.

22h

People are more likely to try drugs for the first time during the summer

American teenagers and adults are more likely to try illegal or recreational drugs for the first time in the summer, a new study shows.

22h

Dark feathers give birds hot wings that may save energy during flight

Birds with dark wing feathers may fly more efficiently because of the way the wings heat up in sunlight and change the way air flows over the wing

22h

Light pollution's effects on birds may help to spread West Nile virus

Birds are the main host of West Nile virus, and outbreaks among infected sparrows are 41 per cent more likely if the birds are exposed to light pollution

22h

Chimpanzees' working memory similar to ours

Working memory is central to our mental lives; we use it to add up the cost of our shopping or to remember the beginning of this sentence at its end. Some scientists argue it is particularly developed in humans, but how do chimpanzees, one of our closest relatives, compare? Researchers from the University of St. Andrews, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, and the University of

22h

Cane toad testes smaller at the invasion front

Biological invasions impose novel evolutionary pressures. Individuals at an invasion front may allocate most of their resources to dispersing rather than reproducing. In the invasive cane toad in Australia, Professor Rick Shine and Dr. Chris Friesen report, invasion-front males have smaller testes (testicles) than do males in the range-core.

22h

Finding one's way in the rainforest

How do human foragers find food or the way home in rainforests, where heavy vegetation limits visibility, without a map, compass, or smartphone? Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, show that rainforest-dwelling Mbendjele BaYaka people from the Republic of Congo point to out-of-sight targets with high precision. Pointing accuracy was equally go

22h

Psychological support 'not available' to one in three cancer patients who need it

People with cancer have trouble accessing appropriate psychological support, a new global report by the All.Can international cancer initiative reveals.

22h

Left eye? Right eye? American robins have preference when looking at decoy eggs

Just as humans are usually left- or right-handed, other species sometimes prefer one appendage, or eye, over the other. A new study reveals that American robins that preferentially use one eye significantly more than the other when looking at their own clutch of eggs are also more likely to detect, and reject, a foreign egg placed in their nest by another bird species — or by a devious scientist.

22h

Finding one's way in the rainforest

Knowing which direction to go in order to reach food or home is important for many animal species, including humans. For human foragers who travel long distances every day for hunting and gathering, orientation skills are essential. Haneul Jang and her colleagues from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology set out to study how the Mbendjele BaYaka people in Republic of the Congo or

22h

Finding one's way in the rainforest

Knowing which direction to go in order to reach food or home is important for many animal species, including humans. For human foragers who travel long distances every day for hunting and gathering, orientation skills are essential. Haneul Jang and her colleagues from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology set out to study how the Mbendjele BaYaka people in Republic of the Congo or

22h

Is this worm gene the ‘missing link’ for puberty timing?

A newly discovered gene in the roundworm C. elegans could be the “missing link” that determines when it’s time for puberty to begin, report researchers. Two genes, LIN28 and MKRN3, are associated with precocious puberty in humans, in which children as young as six may start developing adult features. These genes are in all animals, including C. elegans , in which they also control the juvenile-to

22h

College money habits shape when we see ourselves as adults

How well you manage your money in college may determine when you’ll ultimately achieve “adult identity,” according to a new study. Researchers tracked a group of students from their fourth year of college to five years post-graduation. Researchers asked participants at three different points to self-report on financial behaviors such as spending, saving, budgeting, and borrowing. Those who had go

22h

Evolutionary gene loss may help explain why only humans are prone to heart attacks

Scientists say the loss of a single gene two to three million years ago in our ancestors may have resulted in a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease in all humans as a species, while also setting up a further risk for red meat-eating humans.

23h

Hit your head, lose your sense of smell

People who suffer even a mild concussion can find it difficult to identify smells in the day that follows, and have anxiety problems a year later, a new study finds.

23h

E. coli superbug strains can persist in healthy women's guts

A study of over 1,000 healthy women with no urinary tract infection symptoms showed nearly 9% carried multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli strains in their guts. Additional findings highlight likely reasons behind the pandemic of resistant E. coli strains. They show the value of checking a patients' carrier-status to predict resistant infections, and the need to re-think the clinical significance

23h

Finding alternatives to diamonds for drilling

Diamond is one of the only materials hard and tough enough for the job of constant grinding without significant wear, but diamonds are pricey. High costs drive the search for new hard and superhard materials. However, the experimental trial-and-error search is expensive. A simple, reliable way to predict new material properties is needed to facilitate modern technology development. Using a computa

23h

Rejected and unfilled prescriptions for new, more expensive cholesterol drugs tied to higher heart, stroke risk

Prescriptions for the newest – but more expensive — cholesterol-lowering drugs called PCSK9 inhibitors that are not covered by insurance companies or unfilled by patients are related to higher risk of cardiovascular problems for high risk patients. High co-payments may make patients less likely to fill prescriptions, even if insurers approve them. Prescriptions written for women, blacks and Hispa

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Researchers unveil experimental compound to block therapeutic target in blood cancer

Researchers have discovered a hyperactive cell signal that contributes to tumor growth in primary effusion lymphoma, an aggressive type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma caused by infection with the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus-8). They've developed an experimental therapeutic, UNC3810A, to block the signal and slow tumor growth.

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A toxic chemical in marine ecosystems turns out to play a beneficial role

Destructive free radicals — known as reactive oxygen species — are thought to degrade the cells of phytoplankton and other organisms. A new article, however, suggests that these molecules actually play a beneficial role, upending some conventional wisdom.

23h

9 self-actualized historical figures

In order to develop his model of self-actualization, Abraham Maslow interviewed friends, colleagues, students, and historical figures. These 9 historical figures demonstrate different aspects of self-actualization that Maslow believed all self-actualized individuals possessed to one degree or another. By studying these figures, we can come to a better understanding of what self-actualization real

23h

The Lancet Psychiatry: Compensatory strategies to disguise autism spectrum disorder may delay diagnosis

For the first time, compensatory strategies used by people with autism have been investigated and collated in a qualitative study using an online survey of 136 adults, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. The study finds that the use of compensatory strategies is associated with both positive and negative consequences. Compensation improves social relationships, increases independence and e

23h

Edith Irby Jones, Barrier-Breaking Doctor in the South, Dies at 91

Watching her sister die of typhoid inspired her to become a doctor focused on treating poor people. She blazed a trail along the way.

23h

Publisher Correction: Group 3 innate lymphoid cells mediate early protective immunity against tuberculosis

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1458-y Publisher Correction: Group 3 innate lymphoid cells mediate early protective immunity against tuberculosis

23h

Author Correction: Mapping the world’s free-flowing rivers

Nature, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1379-9 Author Correction: Mapping the world’s free-flowing rivers

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A Preview of Mueller's Testimony, an Electric Ford F-150, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

23h

Publisher Correction: Effect of statins on the association between high temperature and all-cause mortality in a socioeconomically disadvantaged population: a cohort study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46259-9 Publisher Correction: Effect of statins on the association between high temperature and all-cause mortality in a socioeconomically disadvantaged population: a cohort study

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Author Correction: Temperature Chaos, Memory Effect, and Domain Fluctuations in the Spiral Antiferromagnet Dy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46782-9 Author Correction: Temperature Chaos, Memory Effect, and Domain Fluctuations in the Spiral Antiferromagnet Dy

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Author Correction: Rice intermediate filament, OsIF, stabilizes photosynthetic machinery and yield under salinity and heat stress

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46780-x Author Correction: Rice intermediate filament, OsIF, stabilizes photosynthetic machinery and yield under salinity and heat stress

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Author Correction: Oleoylethanolamide treatment reduces neurobehavioral deficits and brain pathology in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46255-z Author Correction: Oleoylethanolamide treatment reduces neurobehavioral deficits and brain pathology in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness

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Laugh Tracks Do Actually Make Jokes Funnier

(Credit: fizkes/Shutterstock) Hey, what do you call a sleeping dinosaur? A dino-SNORE! What’s wrong, don’t find that funny? Well, what if I told you the exact same joke, but instead of crickets, uproarious laughter accompanied the punchline? According to a study today in Current Biology, you’d find it noticeably funnier. The researchers found that even if the laughter is fake — posed, and not actu

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Neil Armstrong’s Death, and a Stormy, Secret $6 Million Settlement

The astronaut’s sons contended that incompetent medical care had cost him his life, and threatened to go public. His widow says she wanted no part of the payout.

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When You Wear Sunscreen, You’re Taking Part in a Safety Study

But that doesn’t mean we should stop using it.

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Author Correction: Superconducting Diamond on Silicon Nitride for Device Applications

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46256-y Author Correction: Superconducting Diamond on Silicon Nitride for Device Applications

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: He’s Back

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Tuesday, July 23. ‣ The Senate confirmed Mark Esper as the next defense secretary, replacing Jim Mattis, who resigned in December. Here’s what else we’re watching: Next Stop: Impeachment Proceedings?: Former Special Cou

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Justice Department announces broad antitrust review of big tech

The DOJ did not name Apple, Amazon, Facebook or Google directly, but its inquiry could result in more scrutiny of them, as the government seeks to "assess the competitive conditions in the online …

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PrEP use high but wanes after three months among young African women

In a study of open-label Truvada as daily pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV among young African women and adolescent girls, 95% initiated PrEP, and most used PrEP for the first three months. However, PrEP use fell in this critical population during a year of follow-up clinic visits, although HIV incidence at 12 months was low. The preliminary results suggest that tailored strategies m

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First impressions and sample images from Sony's new 61-megapixel mirrorless camera

The Sony a7R IV is the first 35mm mirrorless camera to feature a , 61 megapixel sensor. (Jeanette D. Moses/) Sony's new a7R IV flagship camera is a monster on paper. It's new 61 megapixel sensor pumps out uncompressed RAW files that are 123.2 MB and Extra Fine JPEGs that are nearly 40MB, and it can do it at 10 fps with autofocus. It has eye-tracking in video mode, 547 AF points, and promises 15 s

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The Internet is Dead. Say Hello to the ‘Splinternet.’

submitted by /u/Blognoggl5 [link] [comments]

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Snap Back?

Snap Inc. has been slowly righting its ship recently, stymying its nose-diving stocks prices and exodus of users. The Snapchat creator’s Q2 2019 earnings imply that things are looking up.Read …

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UPS forms a new subsidiary for drone delivery and seeks FAA approval to fly

UPS has big plans for drone delivery, and it’s taking two key steps to put them into action. First, it’s building its own dedicated subsidiary focused entirely on drone delivery …

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Buying local? Higher price means higher quality in consumers' minds

Why are we willing to pay much more for a six pack of craft beer, a locally produced bottle of wine or a regional brand item, often choosing them over national brands? It's because when people prefer to 'buy local,' they more frequently base their decisions on price as a perception of quality, research shows.

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Cells required for development of a healthy uterus

A team led by investigators has uncovered insights on a type of a critical cell that to the formation of a functioning uterus.

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Algae living inside fungi: How land plants first evolved

New research presents evidence that algae could have piggybacked on fungi to leave the water and to colonize the land, over 500 million years ago.

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Drinking water: Water solutions without a grain of salt

Researchers have developed technology that can deliver clean water to thousands of communities worldwide.

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Protein-gene interactions involved in Alzheimer's disease

UC San Diego researchers have used the transcriptome — the sum of all messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules expressed from genes — to map protein-gene interactions involved in Alzheimer's disease.

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Putting the brakes on lateral root development

Biologists have discovered a cellular transporter that links two of the most powerful hormones in plant development — auxin and cytokinin — and shows how they regulate root initiation and progression. Understanding why and how plants make different types of root architectures can help develop plants that better cope with distinct soil conditions and environments.

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What motivates people to join — and stick with — citizen science projects?

After more than 20 years, the UW's Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team, or COASST, is itself the subject of scientific study. Social scientists are studying the program's success to extract lessons for all citizen science efforts.

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How to restore a coral reef

New guidelines drafted by a consortium of concerned experts could enable corals to adapt to changing environments and help restore declining populations in the Caribbean. The guidelines provide a definitive plan for collecting, raising, and replanting corals that maximizes their potential for adaptation.

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Our favorite weighted blankets for a better night's sleep

Heavy blankets to help you sleep (Quin Stevenson via Unsplash/) Whether it was from Instagram ads or friends online, there’s a good chance you’ve heard about weighted blankets in the past few years. They claim to help people relax, relieve stress, and improve overall sleep quality. As an overly stressed, sleep-deprived individual, I was curious if the blankets actually worked. To my surprise, I h

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E. coli superbug strains can persist in healthy women's guts

A study of over 1,000 healthy women with no urinary tract infection symptoms showed nearly 9% carried multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli strains in their guts. Additional findings highlight likely reasons behind the pandemic of resistant E. coli strains. They show the value of checking a patients' carrier-status to predict resistant infections, and the need to re-think the clinical significance

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Brain protein mutation from child with autism causes autism-like behavioral change in mice

A de novo gene mutation that encodes a brain protein in a child with autism has been placed into the brains of mice. These mice then showed severe alterations of specific behaviors that closely resemble those seen in human autism spectrum disorder, or ASD.

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Hit your head, lose your sense of smell

People who suffer even a mild concussion can find it difficult to identify smells in the day that follows, and have anxiety problems a year later, a Canadian study finds.

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Tourists' Photos May Help Wildlife Conservation Effort

Tourists' Photos May Help Wildlife Conservation Effort Study suggests tourists' photos can yield better, cheaper data than traditional methods for studying wildlife. Photograph-of-a-leopard-in-a-tree-CREDIT-Megan-Claase_cropped.jpg Image credits: Megan Claase Creature Tuesday, July 23, 2019 – 16:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — By sharing their pictures with scientists, tourists m

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New York privacy bill could ban selling phone location data – CNET

We’re sorry, the New Yorker you were trying to track could not be found.

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How to restore a coral reef

New guidelines drafted by a consortium of concerned experts could enable corals to adapt to changing environments and help restore declining populations in the Caribbean. The guidelines provide a definitive plan for collecting, raising, and replanting corals that maximizes their potential for adaptation.

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What motivates people to join — and stick with — citizen science projects?

After more than 20 years, the UW's Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team, or COASST, is itself the subject of scientific study. Social scientists are studying the program's success to extract lessons for all citizen science efforts.

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Airbus Debuts Wild Plane Concept Inspired by Birds of Prey

Better Nature Nature has long served as a source of inspiration for engineers — because living organisms have had countless years to evolve ideal solutions to the challenges of their environments, so they’re an excellent jumping-off point for designing machines to navigate those same environments. Now, aeronautics company Airbus has unveiled a new aircraft design inspired by birds of prey, such a

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Mexico’s new president shocks scientists with budget cuts and disparaging remarks

Austerity measures restrict travel and equipment maintenance

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What happens when a leader in the purity movement gets a divorce?

Former pastor, Joshua Harris, recently announced that he's divorcing his wife of twenty years. Harris's 1997 book, I Kissed Dating Goodbye , sold over a million copies and is credited for influencing the Christian purity movement. His work has harmed a lot of people, causing Harris to rethink his ideas two decades after its publication. None Let's start with a basic fact: relationships are hard.

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LightSail 2 unfurls solar sail and begins travelling through space

The Planetary Society’s LightSail 2 spacecraft has unfolded its silvery sails, which will be propelled by the force of sunlight to demonstrate solar sailing

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Putting the brakes on lateral root development

Biologists have discovered a cellular transporter that links two of the most powerful hormones in plant development — auxin and cytokinin — and shows how they regulate root initiation and progression. Understanding why and how plants make different types of root architectures can help develop plants that better cope with distinct soil conditions and environments.

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Researchers map protein-gene interactions involved in Alzheimer's disease

UC San Diego researchers have used the transcriptome — the sum of all messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules expressed from genes — to map protein-gene interactions involved in Alzheimer's disease.

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Study identifies cells required for the development of a healthy uterus

A team led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital has uncovered insights on a type of a critical cell that to the formation of a functioning uterus.

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Water solutions without a grain of salt

Monash University researchers have developed technology that can deliver clean water to thousands of communities worldwide.

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Algae living inside fungi: How land plants first evolved

New research from Michigan State University, and published in the journal eLife, presents evidence that algae could have piggybacked on fungi to leave the water and to colonize the land, over 500 million years ago.

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Buying local? Higher price means higher quality in consumers' minds

Why are we willing to pay much more for a six pack of craft beer, a locally produced bottle of wine or a regional brand item, often choosing them over national brands? It's because when people prefer to 'buy local,' they more frequently base their decisions on price as a perception of quality, research shows.

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Physicist: Maybe We Don’t Need an Expensive New Collider

On Second Thought The argument for building the Future Circular Collider, the massive particle collider planned for construction at CERN, is based more on selling a sense of wonder than on concrete benefits to physicists. At least, that’s according to an op-ed that Sabine Hossenfelder, a prominent theoretical physicist at Germany’s Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, published in Scientific

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"Anonymous" Data Won't Protect Your Identity

A new study demonstrates it is surprisingly easy to ID an individual within a supposedly incognito data set — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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"Anonymous" Data Won't Protect Your Identity

A new study demonstrates it is surprisingly easy to ID an individual within a supposedly incognito data set — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study: Fat cells play key role in dangerous transformation of melanoma

Tel Aviv University reseachers have found that fat cells play a key role in the dangerous transformation of melanoma.

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Zhang group identifies gene that may make TNBC cells vulnerable to existing

A new study by University of Notre Dame researcher Siyuan Zhang and collaborators, published in Nature Communications, shows that an existing, FDA-approved drug that treats other types of breast cancer may work for TNBC.

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Folic acid reduces risk of neural tube defects linked to HIV drug dolutegravir

HIV drug doluteglavir interferes with the binding of folate to its receptor, thus promoting neural tube defects. Folic acid supplementation can mitigate the risk of the medication in an animal model.

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University of Guelph researchers unlock access to pain relief potential of cannabis

University of Guelph researchers have uncovered how the cannabis plant creates pain-relieving molecules that are 30 times more powerful at reducing inflammation than Aspirin.The discovery unlocks the potential to create a naturally derived pain treatment.

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Most women use vaginal ring for HIV prevention in open-label study

In an open-label study of women in southern and eastern Africa, a vaginal ring that is inserted once a month and slowly releases an antiviral drug was estimated to reduce the risk of HIV by 39%, according to statistical modeling. In addition, the study found that participants appeared to use the ring more in the open-label study than in a previous clinical trial.

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Hints of Previously Unknown Asteroid Impact Found in Florida Clam Fossils

The tiny spheres, evidence of a long-ago asteroid strike, are smaller than grains of salt. (Credit: Mike Meyer/Meteoritics and Planetary Science) In 2006, an undergraduate student from the University of South Florida named Mike Meyer spent his summer collecting fossils from the walls of a quarry. In typical intern glory, his job was to pry open fossilized clams and wash away sediment, looking for

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Solar Sailing Success: Planetary Society Deploys LightSail 2

The spacecraft is set to harness the power of sunlight alone to alter its orbit around Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Solar Sailing Success: Planetary Society Deploys LightSail 2

The spacecraft is set to harness the power of sunlight alone to alter its orbit around Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Scheduling Woes of Adult Friendship

Earlier this year, I set out to make scheduling time with my friends more seamless—or as I, perhaps grandiosely, termed it, “to revolutionize my friend group.” Ten of my friends and I already had a group-text-message thread, which we used as our main form of communication, but even though we talked all day every day, sending one another dumb, meta jokes we saw online about group chats and checkin

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Who Needs a Valet? Cars in This Garage Can Park Themselves

Daimler and Bosch say they’ve gained approval for cars to park—no safety drivers needed—at the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart.

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Watch Robert Mueller's Testimony Live Right Here

Robert Mueller will testify before Congress Wednesday in two separate hearings. You can watch it right here, but first make sure to manage your expectations.

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Unhatched Gulls Shake Their Shells to Warn Siblings of Danger

The unborn chicks translate auditory alarms from adult birds into quaking vibrations.

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Gene Mutation Could Explain Humans' High Risk of Heart Attack

Mutating a gene called CMAH in mice so it's nonfunctional, as in humans, upped the animals' chances of developing heart disease, a study finds.

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Arizona city watches, worries as mountain area burns

Anxious residents packed up prized possessions Tuesday as hundreds of firefighters worked to keep a wildfire in a forested Arizona city away from homes and hoped the weather might bring some relief.

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Official: Research satellite appears to unfurl solar sails

Mission officials say a tiny spacecraft orbiting Earth appears to have successfully unfurled its solar sails to test the potential of using sunlight for propulsion.

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Scientists Simulate Marsquakes With Data From InSight Lander

If you’ve ever wondered how different marsquakes are from earthquakes, we now have the answer thanks to NASA and Swiss research university ETH Zurich. NASA delivered the first-ever seismometer to the red planet aboard the InSight lander last year, and it’s now deployed and sending back data. Researchers from ETH Zurich have used that data to reconstruct a marsquake here on Earth, and it’s not wha

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MicroRNAs from human fat cells can impair macrophage ability to eliminate cholesterol

A multi-institutional team led by research faculty at Children's National in Washington, DC, finds that extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from kids' fat can play a pivotal role in ratcheting up risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease well before any worrisome symptoms become visible.

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Open-label study of a vaginal ring for HIV prevention suggests women want and will use it

Results of an open-label study of vaginal ring intended to be used for a month at a time found the majority of participants wanted the ring being offered, with measures of adherence also indicating they are willing to use it to protect themselves against HIV. Researchers from the National Institutes of Health-funded Microbicide Trials Network reported their findings today at the 10th IAS Conferenc

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Your Data Were ‘Anonymized’? These Scientists Can Still Identify You

Computer scientists have developed an algorithm that can pick out almost any American in databases supposedly stripped of personal information.

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Slower walking speed may predict future mobility problems

Until now, there has been no ideal way for healthcare providers to measure walking ability, since it involves more than just walking speed. It also is about how you deal with your environment (such as uneven pavement) and demands on your attention (such as traffic, other pedestrians, and street crossings). In a new study, researchers assessed ways to measure complex walking tasks to learn more abo

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Developing a novel HIV vaccine: DNA and recombinant proteins

Researchers have developed a novel vaccine consisting of DNA and recombinant proteins — proteins composed of a portion of an HIV protein and another unrelated protein.

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Big Black Holes Found in the Smallest Galaxies

Even little galaxies have enormous black holes. That’s the takeaway from a new study of so-called dwarf galaxies — galaxies that are so small and dim that astronomers only know about the ones relatively nearby. What’s more, these black holes are somewhat explosive — engines powering strong jets of gas and radiation that stifle the galaxies’ growth. “This is one of those things you’re hoping to fi

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Hidden world of stream biodiversity revealed through water sampling for environmental DNA

For the first time, researchers have used a novel genomics-based method to detect the simultaneous presence of hundreds of organisms in a stream.

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Microfluidics device helps diagnose sepsis in minutes

A novel sensor designed by MIT researchers could dramatically accelerate the process of diagnosing sepsis, a leading cause of death in US hospitals that kills nearly 250,000 patients annually.

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Survey finds physicians struggle with their own self-care

Despite believing that self-care is a vitally important part of health and overall well-being, many physicians overlook their own self-care, according to a new survey released today, conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs. Lack of time, job demands, family demands, being too tired and burnout are the most common reasons for not practicing their desired amount

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Many Dallas-Fort Worth area faults have the potential to host earthquakes, new study finds

A study has found that the majority of faults underlying the Fort Worth Basin are as sensitive to changes in stress that could cause them to slip as those that have generated earthquakes in recent years.

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Researchers get a handle on how to control blood sugar after stroke

Hyperglycemia, or high levels of glucose, is common in patients with acute ischemic stroke and is associated with worse outcomes compared to normal blood sugar levels. Animal studies also pointed to an effect of high blood sugar in worsening stroke injury. Stroke experts have debated whether intensive glucose management after acute ischemic stroke leads to better outcomes but a new study finds tha

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Wavelength-encoded laser particles for massively multiplexed cell tagging

Researchers describe a new class of biocompatible probes, laser particles that can be inserted inside living cells.

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Great Synagogue of Vilna, Ravaged by Foes, Yields Treasures and a Priceless Hebrew Inscription

Inside the buried remains of the Great Synagogue of Vilna in Lithuania, archaeologists have found a priceless inscription, colorful floors, piles of coins and parts of the bimah.

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Something’s Missing in This Stunning Photo of Space Station Passing in Front of the Midday Sun

The International Space Station glides in front of the sun in this fiery photo — but where are all the sunspots?

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Americans reported hearing torturous sounds in Cuba—and now their brains seem changed

The new study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), used brain scans to look at three different aspects of brain function in 40 people who were clinically evaluated after reported exposure to the as-yet undetermined phenomenon. (Deposit Photos/) Beginning in late 2016, government officials from the United States and Canada stationed in Cuba started reporting cluste

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This smart tech gives plants feelings

A design team came up with a smart planter that can indicate 15 emotions. The emotions are derived from the sensors placed in the planter. The device is not in production yet but you can order it through a crowdfunding campaign. None If most plants you buy for your house tend to wither and die no matter how hard (or little) you try to take care of them, a technological solution may be in order. M

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Wavelength-encoded laser particles for massively multiplexed cell tagging

Researchers describe a new class of biocompatible probes, laser particles that can be inserted inside living cells.

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Mediterranean diet during pregnancy reduces gestational diabetes and weight gain

A simple Mediterranean-style diet in pregnancy does not reduce the overall risk of adverse maternal and offspring complications, but has the potential to reduce weight gain in pregnancy and the risk of gestational diabetes, according to a clinical trial.

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Air pollution in US associated with over 30,000 deaths and reduced life expectancy

Air quality in the US may be linked with increased mortality and reduced life expectancy according to research from Imperial College London and the Center for Air, Climate and Energy Solutions at Carnegie Mellon University.

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Climate changes faster than animals adapt

Although animals do commonly respond to climate change, such responses are in general insufficient to cope with the rapid pace of rising temperatures and sometimes go in wrong directions.

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Ozone threat from climate change

We know the recent extreme heat is something that we can expect more of as a result of increasing temperatures due to climate change. But a new study warns that there's another impact — worsened air quality due to an increase in the number and intensity of 'ozone alert' days.

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'Legacy' mercury pollution still a problem in New Jersey meadowlands waters, US

'Legacy' mercury pollution from decades ago and miles away is an important source of contamination in New Jersey Meadowlands waterways, according to a new study that could help guide cleanup efforts.

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Novel powdered milk method yields better frothing agent

A novel method of processing — using high-pressure jets to spray milk and then quickly drying the spray — yields skim milk powders with enhanced properties and functionality, according to researchers, who say the discovery may lead to 'cleaner' labels on foods.

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What Happens When Queer Eye’s Experts Get Personal

When Netflix’s Queer Eye premiered in February 2018 , its cuddly-fun makeovers came laced with a strange amount of tension: The threat of culture clash always loomed. The first episode opened with the Fab Five introducing themselves to the camera and heading from Gay Street—the New York City landmark in the original series’s title sequence —to Georgia. As the confident cosmopolitan quintet entere

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Can Mueller Persuade America to Impeach?

It’s been nearly two months—a lifetime in the world of U.S. politics in 2019—since America first heard from former Special Counsel Robert Mueller , and since a number of Democrats, as a result, professed their newfound support for impeaching Donald Trump. In the past seven weeks, the national conversation has largely shifted away from the Russia investigation to the humanitarian crisis on the sou

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Slower walking speed may predict future mobility problems

Until now, there has been no ideal way for healthcare providers to measure walking ability, since it involves more than just walking speed. It also is about how you deal with your environment (such as uneven pavement) and demands on your attention (such as traffic, other pedestrians, and street crossings). In a new study, researchers assessed ways to measure complex walking tasks to learn more abo

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How Loon's Balloons Find Their Way to Deliver the Internet

Computer programs can direct Alphabet's high-altitude balloons to tack against the wind, and move in figure eights, where humans might plot a circle.

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Unconventional phenomena triggered by acoustic waves in 2D materials

Researchers have reported a novel phenomenon, called Valley Acoustoelectric Effect, which takes place in 2D materials, similar to graphene.

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100 days, 100 nights: Sensor network reveals telltale patterns in neighborhood air quality

Black carbon — a contributor to global warming and a pollutant of concern to residents in urban areas — can be difficult to track. To address this problem, researchers generated a technology that didn't exist. With more than 100 custom-built sensors installed for 100 days, the team created the largest black carbon monitoring network to be deployed in a single city, setting a foundation for the f

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Monsoon rains have become more intense in the southwest in recent decades

Monsoon rain storms have become more intense in the southwestern United States in recent decades, according to a recent study. Monsoon rains — highly localized bursts of rain — have become stronger since the 1970s, meaning the same amount of rain falls in a shorter amount of time — by 6 to 11 percent. In addition, the number of rainfall events per year increased on average 15 percent during the

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Study: There’s Way More Water on the Moon Than We Thought

Moon Water A team of researchers at the University of California says that there could be way more ice water on the surface of the Moon than previously believed — and that could be a huge deal for future missions to the Moon. By comparing shaded areas that are protected from the Sun on the surface of Mercury with similar shadowed craters on the Moon, they concluded that ice deposits, sometimes se

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Sailing Through Space on Solar Wind? LightSail 2 Will Try

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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Watch an electric Ford F-150 tow over a million pounds

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Custom 3D-printed heart valves fit patients perfectly

submitted by /u/section43 [link] [comments]

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Deadly fungal disease may be linked to climate change, study suggests

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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House Democrats Offer an Alternative to the Green New Deal

The influential group of lawmakers is calling for net-zero emissions in the United States by 2050. Supporters of the Green New Deal say that's not enough.

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Wildfires Rage in Central Portugal

Over the past few days in Portugal’s Castelo Branco region, strong winds and temperatures greater than 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius) have driven devastating wildfires through several villages, destroying structures and injuring 39 people. Nearly 2,000 firefighters worked to bring the three major fires largely under control, but authorities warned that hot and dry conditions could le

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Mediterranean diet during pregnancy reduces gestational diabetes and weight gain

A simple Mediterranean-style diet in pregnancy does not reduce the overall risk of adverse maternal and offspring complications, but has the potential to reduce weight gain in pregnancy and the risk of gestational diabetes, according to a clinical trial led by Queen Mary University of London and the University of Warwick.

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Air pollution in US associated with over 30,000 deaths and reduced life expectancy

Air quality in the US may be linked with increased mortality and reduced life expectancy according to research from Imperial College London and the Center for Air, Climate and Energy Solutions at Carnegie Mellon University.

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Air pollution in US is associated with mortality and lower life expectancy

Current concentrations of fine particulate matter pollution, which mostly meet the national ambient air quality standard, are still associated with mortality and loss of life expectancy in the US, with larger impacts in poorer counties, according to a study published July 23 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by an international team of researchers from the Center for Air, Climate, and Energ

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Researchers study effect of Mediterranean diet on pregnancy outcomes

A Mediterranean-style diet in pregnancy does not reduce the risk of overall adverse maternal and offspring complications, but may reduce weight gain during pregnancy and the risk of gestational diabetes, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Shakila Thangaratinam of Queen Mary University of London, UK, and colleagues.

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These deadly cancers miss out on research funding

Many of the deadliest or most common cancers get the least amount of nonprofit research funding, a new study reports. Colon, endometrial, liver and bile duct, cervical, ovarian, pancreatic, and lung cancers are all poorly funded compared to how many people have them and how many people die, according to the study in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network . In contrast, breast ca

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Stem cell therapy furthers research for infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome

A phase I clinical trial is the first research monitored by the Food and Drug Administration that demonstrates the potential of regenerative therapy for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) through collecting, processing and injecting an infant's own stem cells directly into the heart at the time of surgery.

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Five Women Who Made the Moon Landing Possible

That “giant leap for mankind” happened thanks to plenty of women.

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Ocean acidification could boost shell growth in snails and sea urchins

More marine carbon dioxide makes algae more nutritious and shells stronger

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I Found the Key to the Kingdom of Sleep

In order to fall asleep at night, I must run a gantlet of bedtime rituals. I must be marinating in overnight-skin-care products from head to toe. One (but only one) of my legs must be hooked around the side of my covers, poised to alert me to the presence of monsters. I must be lying on my stomach, with one arm folded under my head between me and my pillow. Not only must the air in the room be fr

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Effectiveness of UV-Light Emitting Diodes for Inactivating Biomolecules and Microorganisms

Download this white paper to explore why UV LED technology should be considered by research labs and manufacturing facilities for inactivating biological molecules and microorganisms.

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Fossil Frog Had a Salamander Lunch

A fossil found in China reveals a Cretaceous amphibian's last meal. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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IBM Just Made its Cancer-Fighting AI Projects Open-Source

Public Access IBM recently developed three artificial intelligence tools that could help medical researchers fight cancer. Now, the company has decided to make all three tools open-source, meaning scientists will be able to use them in their research whenever they please, according to ZDNet . The tools are designed to streamline the cancer drug development process and help scientists stay on top

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Restoring the American chestnut by researching its genome

At the turn of the 20th century, the American chestnut accounted for a quarter of the hardwood trees in some parts of Appalachia. The large tree was a crucial food source, producing nuts that were a staple in the diets of white-tailed deer, wild turkeys, and bears.

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Scholars weigh in on new ideas about autism

A new paper that challenges widely held ideas about autism has attracted comments from more than 30 scholars across the disciplines of psychology, anthropology, education, and neuroscience.

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Anonymizing personal data 'not enough to protect privacy,' shows new study

Current methods for anonymizing data leave individuals at risk of being re-identified, according to new research.

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University of Adelaide Investigates Ancient DNA Lab

An external consultant will review the work environment of the institution’s Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, led by evolutionary molecular biologist Alan Cooper.

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Loss of gut barrier integrity triggers activation of islet-reactive T cells and autoimmune diabetes [Immunology and Inflammation]

Low-grade intestinal inflammation and alterations of gut barrier integrity are found in patients affected by extraintestinal autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D), but a direct causal link between enteropathy and triggering of autoimmunity is yet to be established. Here, we found that onset of autoimmunity in preclinical models…

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The orphan nuclear receptor NR4A3 controls the differentiation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells following microbial stimulation [Immunology and Inflammation]

In response to microbial stimulation, monocytes can differentiate into macrophages or monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) but the molecular requirements guiding these possible fates are poorly understood. In addition, the physiological importance of MoDCs in the host cellular and immune responses to microbes remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the nuclear…

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Adaptation by naive CD4+ T cells to self-antigen-dependent TCR signaling induces functional heterogeneity and tolerance [Immunology and Inflammation]

Naïve CD4+ T cells experience weak T cell receptor (TCR) signals induced by self-peptides presented by MHC II. To investigate how these “basal” TCR signals influence responses to agonist TCR ligand stimulation, we analyzed naïve CD4+ cells expressing varying amounts of CD5, Ly6C, and Nur77-GFP, markers that reflect the strength…

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Caspase-8 restricts antiviral CD8 T cell hyperaccumulation [Immunology and Inflammation]

The magnitude of CD8 T cell responses against viruses is checked by the balance of proliferation and death. Caspase-8 (CASP8) has the potential to influence response characteristics through initiation of apoptosis, suppression of necroptosis, and modulation of cell death-independent signal transduction. Mice deficient in CASP8 and RIPK3 (Casp8−/−Ripk3−/−) mount enhanced…

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YIPF6 controls sorting of FGF21 into COPII vesicles and promotes obesity [Medical Sciences]

Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an endocrine hormone that regulates glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis. While gene expression of FGF21 is regulated by the nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in the fasted state, little is known about the regulation of trafficking and secretion of FGF21. We show…

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Global-level population genomics reveals differential effects of geography and phylogeny on horizontal gene transfer in soil bacteria [Microbiology]

Although microorganisms are known to dominate Earth’s biospheres and drive biogeochemical cycling, little is known about the geographic distributions of microbial populations or the environmental factors that pattern those distributions. We used a global-level hierarchical sampling scheme to comprehensively characterize the evolutionary relationships and distributional limitations of the nitrogen-

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pHERV-W envelope protein fuels microglial cell-dependent damage of myelinated axons in multiple sclerosis [Neuroscience]

Axonal degeneration is central to clinical disability and disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Myeloid cells such as brain-resident microglia and blood-borne monocytes are thought to be critically involved in this degenerative process. However, the exact underlying mechanisms have still not been clarified. We have previously demonstrated that human endogenous…

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{alpha}-synuclein-lipoprotein interactions and elevated ApoE level in cerebrospinal fluid from Parkinson's disease patients [Neuroscience]

The progressive accumulation, aggregation, and spread of α-synuclein (αSN) are common hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease (PD) pathology. Moreover, numerous proteins interact with αSN species, influencing its toxicity in the brain. In the present study, we extended analyses of αSN-interacting proteins to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Using coimmunoprecipitation, followed by mass spectrometry,…

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Trpc5 deficiency causes hypoprolactinemia and altered function of oscillatory dopamine neurons in the arcuate nucleus [Neuroscience]

Dopamine neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) tonically inhibit the release of the protein hormone prolactin from lactotropic cells in the anterior pituitary gland and thus play a central role in prolactin homeostasis of the body. Prolactin, in turn, orchestrates numerous important biological functions such as maternal behavior, reproduction,…

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Dendritic computations captured by an effective point neuron model [Neuroscience]

Complex dendrites in general present formidable challenges to understanding neuronal information processing. To circumvent the difficulty, a prevalent viewpoint simplifies the neuronal morphology as a point representing the soma, and the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents originated from the dendrites are treated as linearly summed at the soma. Despite its…

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White matter volume and white/gray matter ratio in mammalian species as a consequence of the universal scaling of cortical folding [Neuroscience]

Because the white matter of the cerebral cortex contains axons that connect distant neurons in the cortical gray matter, the relationship between the volumes of the 2 cortical compartments is key for information transmission in the brain. It has been suggested that the volume of the white matter scales universally…

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ANK2 autism mutation targeting giant ankyrin-B promotes axon branching and ectopic connectivity [Neuroscience]

Giant ankyrin-B (ankB) is a neurospecific alternatively spliced variant of ANK2, a high-confidence autism spectrum disorder (ASD) gene. We report that a mouse model for human ASD mutation of giant ankB exhibits increased axonal branching in cultured neurons with ectopic CNS axon connectivity, as well as with a transient increase…

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The role of the optic tectum for visually evoked orienting and evasive movements [Neuroscience]

As animals forage for food and water or evade predators, they must rapidly decide what visual features in the environment deserve attention. In vertebrates, this visuomotor computation is implemented within the neural circuits of the optic tectum (superior colliculus in mammals). However, the mechanisms by which tectum decides whether to…

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A SWI/SNF subunit regulates chromosomal dissociation of structural maintenance complex 5 during DNA repair in plant cells [Plant Biology]

DNA damage decreases genome stability and alters genetic information in all organisms. Conserved protein complexes have been evolved for DNA repair in eukaryotes, such as the structural maintenance complex 5/6 (SMC5/6), a chromosomal ATPase involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Several factors have been identified for recruitment of SMC5/6…

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The plastidial pentose phosphate pathway is essential for postglobular embryo development in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

Large numbers of genes essential for embryogenesis in Arabidopsis encode enzymes of plastidial metabolism. Disruption of many of these genes results in embryo arrest at the globular stage of development. However, the cause of lethality is obscure. We examined the role of the plastidial oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in…

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Nbn-Mre11 interaction is required for tumor suppression and genomic integrity [Medical Sciences]

We derived a mouse model in which a mutant form of Nbn/Nbs1mid8 (hereafter Nbnmid8) exhibits severely impaired binding to the Mre11−Rad50 core of the Mre11 complex. The Nbnmid8 allele was expressed exclusively in hematopoietic lineages (in Nbn−/mid8vav mice). Unlike Nbnflox/floxvav mice with Nbn deficiency in the bone marrow, Nbn−/mid8vav mice…

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Antibody-dependent enhancement of influenza disease promoted by increase in hemagglutinin stem flexibility and virus fusion kinetics [Microbiology]

Several next-generation (universal) influenza vaccines and broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) are in clinical development. Some of these mediate inhibitions of virus replication at the postentry stage or use Fc-dependent mechanisms. Nonneutralizing antibodies have the potential to mediate enhancement of viral infection or disease. In the current study, two monoclonal antibodies…

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New neural activity patterns emerge with long-term learning [Neuroscience]

Learning has been associated with changes in the brain at every level of organization. However, it remains difficult to establish a causal link between specific changes in the brain and new behavioral abilities. We establish that new neural activity patterns emerge with learning. We demonstrate that these new neural activity…

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Conflicting functional effects of xylem pit structure relate to the growth-longevity trade-off in a conifer species [Plant Biology]

Consistent with a ubiquitous life history trade-off, trees exhibit a negative relationship between growth and longevity both among and within species. However, the mechanistic basis of this life history trade-off is not well understood. In addition to resource allocation conflicts among multiple traits, functional conflicts arising from individual morphological traits…

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