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nyheder2019juli26

3h

New method enables more extensive preclinical testing of heart drugs and therapies

A new biomimetic culture system mimics the environment of a living organ through continuous electrical stimulation and oxygenation, maintaining viability and functionality of heart slices for six days. Previous culture systems maintained functional heart slices for no more than 24 hours. The extended viability time will enable improved preclinical testing of drugs and gene therapies for effectiven

2h

Alt for meget sukker: Færdigmad til babyer bør kun udgøre en lille del af kosten

International undersøgelse viser, at sukkerindholdet i babymad ofte er alt for højt.

17h

FDA-ARGOS is a database with public quality-controlled reference genomes for diagnostic use and regulatory science

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11306-6 To be able to use infectious disease next generation sequencing as a diagnostic tool, appropriate reference datasets are required. Here, Sichtig et al. describe FDA-ARGOS, a reference database for high-quality microbial reference genomes, and demonstrate its utility on the example of two use cases.

12min

Single-crosslink microscopy in a biopolymer network dissects local elasticity from molecular fluctuations

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11313-7 The intrinsic inhomogeneity of polymer networks is masked by the usual ensemble-averaged measurements. Here the authors construct direct maps of crosslinks in an actin network by selective labeling the crosslinks with fluorescent markers and characterize the local elasticity and cross-correlation between crossli

12min

Non-coding variability at the APOE locus contributes to the Alzheimer’s risk

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10945-z Several studies show that APOE-ε4 coding variants are associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) risk. Here, Zhou et al. perform fine-mapping of the APOE region and find AD risk haplotypes with non-coding variants in the PVRL2 and APOC1 regions that are associated with relevant endophenotypes.

12min

Covalently-assembled single-chain protein nanostructures with ultra-high stability

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11285-8 De novo protein nanostructures are typically assembled via top-down approaches. Here, the authors developed a bottom-up approach, using split inteins to ligate multiple copies of a three-helix bundle to create 2D triangular and square-shaped structures with high stability.

12min

Artificial morphogen-mediated differentiation in synthetic protocells

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11316-4 The ability to mimic aspects of cellular process that rely on reaction-diffusion gradients could provide a step to building life-like systems capable of complex behaviour. Here the authors demonstrate morphological differentiation in coacervate micro-droplets.

12min

JMJD6 is a tumorigenic factor and therapeutic target in neuroblastoma

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11132-w Although the gain in chromosome 17q21-ter is commonly associated with neuroblastoma, it is not clear which gene of this region mediates tumorigenesis. Here, the authors are showing that JMJD6, which locates in that region, is a neuroblastoma tumorigenic factor.

12min

Three-dimensional character of the deformation twin in magnesium

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10573-7 Imaging deformation twins in three dimensions is difficult and they are usually viewed as two-dimensional ellipsoids. Here, the authors statistically analyze more than two hundred deformation twins in magnesium observed in three different views and show lateral twin expansion is faster than forward propagation.

12min

Lysosomal degradation of newly formed insulin granules contributes to β cell failure in diabetes

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11170-4 Impaired beta-cell insulin secretion is a key pathological feature of type 2 diabetes. Here, the authors describe metabolic stress induced lysosomal degradation of newly formed insulin granules, independent of macroautophagy, as a potential mechanism for beta-cell dysfunction.

12min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Optics Nerve

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, July 25. ‣ Attorney General William Barr ordered the federal death penalty to be reinstated for the first time in 16 years, clearing the execution of five inmates. Here’s what else we’re watching: Ignore the C

14min

How Samsung says it fixed its folding smartphone

The Galaxy Fold. (Samsung/) Come September, smartphone buyers with money to spare should finally be able to get their hands on a Galaxy Fold, the troubled device from Samsung that opens and closes like a book. Yesterday, the company announced that the hinged phone-meets-tablet would finally go on sale this fall, in the middle of iPhone season, following high-profile problems in April when the pho

15min

Neil Armstrong Died After Heart Surgery. That May Have Been Avoided.

Hundreds of thousands of Americans have coronary bypass surgery each year, and few die. Here’s what experts say happened to a national hero.

18min

How to Stay Cool During Europe’s Heat Wave

Temperatures are near or above 100 degrees in some places, and air-conditioning can be scarce. Here’s how to find relief in nine popular destinations.

18min

According to a Neural Network, Luke Skywalker Is a Surfing Baseball Player

Umpire Strikes Back Major “Star Wars” geeks like to obsess over minutiae , but even the most astute fans probably missed the brief glimpse of Luke Skywalker’s iconic surfboard and baseball bat while he was dueling with Kylo Ren in “The Last Jedi.” But a neural network spotted them both, revealing comical limitations in today’s best AI. Janelle Shane, the artificial intelligence expert who used AI

18min

Woman Contracts Horrifying Leg Infection from a Hot Tub

An Indiana woman's vacation took a grim turn when she developed a serious leg infection after spending time in the hotel's hot tub.

31min

Amazon's 2Q profits miss Wall Street expectations

Amazon is reporting that second quarter profits are below Wall Street estimates as increasing competition for faster delivery is putting pressure on the online leader's business.

39min

Decisions, Decisions: Some We Struggle To Make, Others We Can't Forget

This week on the Hidden Brain radio show, decision-making. We learn why we often stumble when trying to make ourselves happy, and why certain decisions leave us wondering "what if?" (Image credit: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

50min

Depth of Field: The Charged Uncertainty at the Tijuana Border

Omar Martinez's photograph captures the liminal space of migrants at the border, perpetually unsure of their fate.

1h

Nasa fast-tracks habitation module for planned moon landing

Nasa bypasses normal tender process to help meet White House directive of landing humans on moon by 2024 Nasa has decided that only the industrial corporation Northrop Grumman can supply it with an astronaut habitation module in time to meet the White House’s directive of landing humans on the moon again by 2024. The decision was made public in a Justification for Other than Full and Open Competi

1h

Sharks Like To Hang Out, But Their Spots Often Overlap With Commercial Fishers'

Many shark species tend to congregate in the same areas as industrial fishing ships, a study finds. As a result, tens of millions of sharks in the open ocean end up caught either as food or bycatch.

1h

‘Honeyland’ Review: The Sting and the Sweetness

A documentary about a Macedonian beekeeper’s conflict with her neighbors becomes a lyrical environmental fable.

1h

Biologists and mathematicians team up to explore tissue folding

Scientists have now discovered a key feature of embryonic tissue that helps explain how this process is carried out so faithfully each time. In a study of fruit flies, they found that the reproducibility of tissue folding is generated by a network of proteins that connect like a fishing net, creating many alternative pathways that tissues can use to fold the right way.

1h

To become, or not to become… a neuron

Researchers have unraveled a new mechanism controlling the switch between growth and differentiation of neural stem cells during brain development. They discovered a specific factor that makes stem cells 'deaf' to proliferative signals, which in turn causes them to differentiate into neurons and shape the marvelous complexity of our brain.

1h

Einstein's general relativity theory is questioned but still stands for now

In the most comprehensive test of general relativity near the monstrous black hole at the center of our galaxy, researchers report that Einstein's theory of general relativity holds up, at least for now.

1h

Decades after a good-behavior program in grade school, adults report healthier, more successful lives

Researchers have found that the 'good life' in adulthood can start in grade school, by teaching parents and teachers to build stronger bonds with their children, and to help children form greater attachments to family and school.

1h

These gut bacteria prevent mice from becoming obese — what could that mean for us?

A specific class of bacteria from the gut prevents mice from becoming obese, suggesting these same microbes may similarly control weight in people, a new study reports. The beneficial bacteria, called Clostridia, are part of the microbiome — collectively trillions of bacteria and other microorganisms that inhabit the intestine.

1h

Emergency medicine: Department-based intensive care unit improves patient survival rates

A new Michigan Medicine study found that implementing a dedicated emergency medicine department-based intensive care unit improved patient survival rates and lowered inpatient intensive care unit (ICU) admissions.

1h

Small but mighty: Mini satellite may launch new era in space exploration

A tiny satellite under construction at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) could open new horizons in space exploration. Princeton University students are building the device, called a cubic satellite, or CubeSat, as a testbed for a miniaturized rocket thruster with unique capabilities being developed at PPPL.

1h

Will Going Solar Save You Tons of Money? This Is the Simplest Way to Find Out.

Owning a home has never been cheap, and it’s certainly not getting any cheaper. The good news, however, is that there are ways your home can make you money that don’t involve moonlighting as a concierge. The most obvious example? Making the switch to solar energy . Not only is solar energy more affordable than ever, but there are actually companies out there that specialize in helping consumers t

1h

Why did whales beach themselves in Georgia? No answers yet

Examinations of the carcasses of three pilot whales yielded no immediate answers to why they swam ashore and died on a popular beach in Georgia, state wildlife officials said Thursday.

1h

Why did whales beach themselves in Georgia? No answers yet

Examinations of the carcasses of three pilot whales yielded no immediate answers to why they swam ashore and died on a popular beach in Georgia, state wildlife officials said Thursday.

1h

Computing: Stretch-sensing glove captures interactive hand poses accurately

Capturing interactive hand poses in real time and with realistic results is a well-examined problem in computing, particularly human-centered computing and motion capture technology. A global team of computer scientists have further advanced this area of research by developing a user-friendly, stretch-sensing data glove to capture real-time, interactive hand poses with much more precision.

1h

The best karaoke machines for a night out at home

Sing your heart out. (Bruno Cervera via Unsplash/) There's nothing more fun than making a fool out of yourself belting cheesy '80s tunes. Whether you've got a musical group of friends, love singing solo, or want to build up your confidence before stepping into a real karaoke bar, snag an at-home karaoke machine that'll keep you rocking all year round. Set up a fog machine, some lights, and record

1h

Pain and gain: Skin nerves anticipate and fight infection

A surprising new discovery in mouse models reveals a previously unknown role for pain in immunity and has implications for treating autoimmune diseases.

1h

How HIV infection may contribute to wide-ranging metabolic conditions

HIV-infected cells release vesicles that contain a viral protein called Nef, impairing cholesterol metabolism and triggering inflammation in uninfected bystander cells, according to a new study.

1h

Slowing metabolic rate can prevent detrimental effects of genetic mutations

In a new study, researchers slowed mutant fruit flies' metabolic rates by 50%, and the expected detrimental effects of many mutations never manifested. After experimentally testing fruit flies' many different genetic mutations, the researchers found the same result each time.

1h

Tweets show lingering fear after Hawaii’s false missile alert

For many people, the fear and anxiety they experienced during the 2018 false ballistic missile alert in Hawaii lingered for days after assurances the threat was not real, according to a new study. The study, the first to capture real-time psychological responses to a false alarm, used a big data approach involving the analysis of more than 1 million tweets posted by thousands of individuals likel

1h

Not sure what to do with your life? You're on a path to success.

Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World List Price: $28.00 New From: $16.40 in Stock Used From: $11.50 in Stock None If you're a young person who hasn't yet figured out what to do with your life, or the parent of one, you'll likely hear that the most important thing for a young person to do is to find at least one area of interest and practice it endlessly — think "Tiger Moms" like

1h

In France, ancient forests are resurging — growing bigger every year

Forests account for over 31% of France's land. While most of the world is losing woodland to farmland, France is gaining. France has both a public and private effort working on reforesting rural and urban areas. Deforestation plagues vast swathes of the world. As rainforests are decimated — an unthinkable amount of trees are destroyed every second. Yet, in Europe this trend seems to have reversed

1h

Researchers create model to predict risk of low blood sugar in people with diabetes

A new study by researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Merck identifies the risk factors that could help healthcare providers recognize patients being treated for diabetes who are most likely to have low blood sugar. Many patients with diabetes, especially those with recurring episodes of low blood sugar, are unaware when it occurs, despite the risk of serious adverse events including cognitive

1h

How and why resistance training is imperative for older adults

A new position statement issued by a global expert panel, and supported by the National Strength and Conditioning Association, highlights the importance of resistance training for older adults to empower healthy aging.

1h

Apple May Ditch Its Hated Butterfly Keyboards Later This Year

Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo says that a revised keyboard switch he didn't expect to see until 2020 is now on target for a late 2019 release. The post Apple …

1h

eBay's new 'Managed Delivery' aims to rival Amazon

Online retail giant eBay said Thursday it would create its own "Managed Delivery" for sellers on its platform to better compete with Amazon and boost its brand recognition.

1h

A tree stump that should be dead is still alive; here's why

Within a shrouded New Zealand forest, a tree stump keeps itself alive by holding onto the roots of its neighboring trees, exchanging water and resources through the grafted root system. New research details how surrounding trees keep tree stumps alive, possibly in exchange for access to larger root systems. The findings suggest a shift from the perception of trees as individuals towards understand

1h

Trapping female mosquitoes helps curb chikungunya virus

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently developed an Autocidal Gravid Ovitrap (AGP trap) that attracts and captures female mosquitoes looking for a site to lay eggs. Now, researchers report that AGO traps successfully protected people from infection with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in communities in Puerto Rico.

1h

When a fix for one vision problem causes another

Aging diminishes the ability of the eyes ability to focus up close. Research found that monovision, which uses lenses with different power in each eye, can cause dramatic misperceptions of distance and 3D direction for moving objects. This could have real implications for public health and public safety.

1h

In a world of “blind imagination”: The science of Aphantasia

Picture yourself in your childhood home. Imagine your bedroom – your bed, perhaps some posters on the wall, and whatever other salient features you can conjure with your mind’s eye. Do you see yourself in it, or are you seeing it as though through your own eyes…or do you not “see” anything at all? Aphantasia … Continue reading In a world of “blind imagination”: The science of Aphantasia

1h

Beyond Meat is Now Coming After Your Bacon

Fakin’ the Bacon Plant-based meat substitute company Beyond Meat has a new faux-meat product on the horizon: bacon. Arguably the king of animal product-based breakfast foods, fake bacon could eventually make its way into staple breakfast menu items such as breakfast sandwiches. While industry sources told Bloomberg that a recipe for plant-based bacon is in the works, the company has yet to announ

1h

Frog population explodes in region of Vermont

A wet spring has caused one frog population to explode in an area of Vermont where throngs of the amphibians have been hopping through fields and lawns, darting across roads and getting flattened by cars and tractors.

1h

Frog population explodes in region of Vermont

A wet spring has caused one frog population to explode in an area of Vermont where throngs of the amphibians have been hopping through fields and lawns, darting across roads and getting flattened by cars and tractors.

1h

Slovakia to cull livestock after first swine fever case

Slovakia on Thursday reported its first case of African swine fever, which is deadly to pigs but not humans, prompting the authorities to order a cull.

1h

Slovakia to cull livestock after first swine fever case

Slovakia on Thursday reported its first case of African swine fever, which is deadly to pigs but not humans, prompting the authorities to order a cull.

1h

Group medical visit innovations improve access & advance integrative heath equity

Group medical visits are exceptional methods delivering critical components of integrative health care for treating and reducing the risk of a wide variety of chronic diseases, particularly in underserved populations.

1h

Researchers call for industry regulation to stop 'photoshop' frenzy in advertising

In a newly published analysis of legal and regulatory strategies that may help combat rampant 'photoshopping' and the portrayal of unrealistic beauty standards in advertising, researchers from Harvard, Dickinson and Michigan State University College of Law are calling for industry regulation to curtail digital alteration of images in advertising.

1h

When should banks chase debts? New method could help them decide

Like Kenny Rogers' gambler, who has to "know when to hold 'em, know when to fold 'em," banks face financial risks and uncertainty when deciding when to chase consumers who default on their credit card payments and when to let them go.

1h

Every Movie Referenced by 'Stranger Things'

WIRED asked the Duffer Brothers to break down their inspirations. From 'Alien' to 'The Thing,' did you catch all of these?

2h

Stanford Built an “Internet Observatory” to Monitor Abuse

Hubble Of Hate Alex Stamos, the former head of security at Facebook, is building a new tool that will help researchers study online harassment and disinformation. Stamos compares his project, called the Stanford Internet Observatory, to the Hubble Space Telescope — he envisions a shared pool of resources that researchers can use instead of having to build their own, Wired reports . But it will ta

2h

Human artificial chromosomes bypass centromere roadblocks

Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) could be useful tools for both understanding how mammalian chromosomes function and creating synthetic biological systems, but for the last 20 years, they have been limited by an inefficient artificial centromere. Researchers announce that they have made progress on this key component.

2h

Mapping cells in the 'immortal' regenerating hydra

The tiny hydra, a freshwater invertebrate related to jellyfish and corals, has an amazing ability to renew its cells and regenerate damaged tissue. Cut a hydra in half, and it will regenerate its body and nervous system in a couple of days. Researchers have now traced the fate of hydra's cells, revealing how three lines of stem cells become nerves, muscles or other tissues.

2h

Underwater glacial melting is occurring at higher rates than modeling predicts

Researchers have developed a new method to allow for the first direct measurement of the submarine melt rate of a tidewater glacier, and, in doing so, they concluded that current theoretical models may be underestimating glacial melt by up to two orders of magnitude.

2h

The origin and future of spam and other online intrusions

What does the future of digital spam look like, what risks could it pose to our personal security and privacy, and what can we do to fight it?

2h

Multiple dosing of long-acting rilpivirine in a model of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis

A long-acting antiretroviral agent such as rilpivirine could further improve pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), already shown to be safe and effective at preventing AIDS in high risk populations, as it could overcome problems with poor medication adherence.

2h

When should banks chase debts? New method could help them decide

Banks face financial risks and uncertainty when deciding when to chase consumers who default on their credit card payments and when to let them go. A new study from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin analyzes delinquent credit card user behaviors and develops a predictive model for sorting them into categories based on whether they are more or less likely to pay ba

2h

Designer Protein Acts as a Switch for Cellular Circuitry

Unlike biotech tools adapted from nature, the invention was entirely conceived by humans and represents one of the few proteins made from scratch in the lab.

2h

With Galaxy Fold back on track, Galaxy Home needs its own comeback – CNET

Samsung’s foldable phone isn’t the only new device that's been delayed.

2h

Vanilla grown the old-fashioned way spices up plant life

Nature, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02286-0 Time-honoured methods of raising vanilla orchids are friendliest for native plants.

2h

Supermassive black hole puts Einstein’s theory to the test

Nature, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02274-4 Decades of data from the Milky Way’s black hole bear out predictions of general relativity.

2h

The FBI is Investigating Long Island Iced Tea’s Blockchain Pivot

Sweetening the Deal Beverage firm Long Island Iced Tea — now known as Long Blockchain — is being investigated by the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation for insider trading and securities fraud. Court records obtained by Quartz show that the FBI is investigating suspicious dealings that date back to December 2017 — around the time when the beverage company changed its name and shifted its “prima

2h

Shark hotspots under worldwide threat from overfishing

Over 150 scientists from 26 countries combined movement data from nearly 2,000 sharks tracked with satellite tags. Using this tracking information, researchers identified areas of the ocean that were important for multiple species, shark 'hot spots', that were located in ocean frontal zones, boundaries in the sea between different water masses that are highly productive and food-rich.

2h

New cause of cell aging discovered

New research could be key to our understanding of how the aging process works. The findings potentially pave the way for better cancer treatments and revolutionary new drugs that could vastly improve human health in the twilight years.

2h

Scientists find clue to 'maternal instinct'

Oxytocin is referred to as the love hormone and is important in the regulation of social and maternal behavior. The oxytocin system in the brain may be key to new treatments for many mental health disorders including postpartum depression. A biologist has discovered a group of cells that are activated by oxytocin in one area of female mouse brains that are not present in the same area in male mous

2h

The cuttlefish may be flashy, but its microbiome is super simple

Scientist have characterized the microbiome of the European common cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, an animal whose impressive camouflage skills and behavior have long been studied. They found its microbiome contains only two kinds of bacteria, Vibrionaceae and Piscirickettsiaceae.

2h

How the pufferfish got its wacky spines

Pufferfish are known for their strange and extreme skin ornaments, but how they came to possess the spiky skin structures known as spines has largely remained a mystery. Now, researchers have identified the genes responsible for the evolution and development of pufferfish spines. Turns out, the process is pretty similar to how other vertebrates get their hair or feathers.

2h

Clemson research suggests a practical use for regret, hindsight

Clemson University psychologist Robin Kowalski's recent research reveals that people think about the advice they would give their younger selves more often than many people might think, and for many this mental exercise is anything but futile. The findings have been truly revealing about the nature of regret, how people can use it to self-actualize and what areas people tend to fixate on in their

2h

Robert Mueller and the Tyranny of ‘Optics’

How did he look? (Old, halting, at times confused). What did he say? (Not enough). How did he say it? (Monosyllabically, whenever possible). The first stretch of Robert Mueller’s grueling marathon testimony had barely ended when the national commentariat concluded that he’d had just about his worst day since an AK-47 round pierced his thigh in Vietnam 50 years ago. “DAZED AND CONFUSED” was the Dr

2h

A Star Orbiting in the Extreme Gravity of a Black Hole Validates General Relativity

The star S0-2 gets so close to the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy that it can be used to test our fundamental understanding of gravity

2h

The cuttlefish may be flashy, but its microbiome is super simple, team reports

Animals have an intimate and important connection with the microbial populations (microbiomes) that live inside their bodies. This holds for the behaviorally sophisticated cuttlefish, whose microbiome, it turns out, contains only two different kinds of bacteria.

2h

The cuttlefish may be flashy, but its microbiome is super simple, team reports

Animals have an intimate and important connection with the microbial populations (microbiomes) that live inside their bodies. This holds for the behaviorally sophisticated cuttlefish, whose microbiome, it turns out, contains only two different kinds of bacteria.

2h

Two Dead Stars Are Orbiting Each Other’s Corpses Incredibly Fast

Every three nights, the California Institute of Technology’s Zwicky Transient Facility uses its massive 576-megapixel camera to scan the entire sky. Those efforts have led to the detection of hundreds of asteroids, comets, and supernovae. But the survey may have just made its strangest discovery yet: a binary white dwarf system called ZTF J1539+5027 . White dwarfs are stars that start out like ou

2h

Today's Climate Change Is Worse Than Anything Earth Has Experienced in the Past 2,000 Years

The global climate is changing more now than at any point in the plast 2,000 years. The Little Ice Age and the Medieval Warm Period were nothing like this.

2h

The cuttlefish may be flashy, but its microbiome is super simple, team reports

In a collaboration led by Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientist Jessica Mark Welch, scientists characterized the microbiome of the European common cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, an animal whose impressive camouflage skills and behavior have long been studied. They found its microbiome contains only two kinds of bacteria, Vibrionaceae and Piscirickettsiaceae.

2h

Shark hotspots under worldwide threat from overfishing

In a groundbreaking new study published in the journal Nature, an international team of over 150 scientists from 26 countries combined movement data from nearly 2,000 sharks tracked with satellite tags. Using this tracking information, researchers identified areas of the ocean that were important for multiple species, shark 'hot spots', that were located in ocean frontal zones, boundaries in the s

2h

Researchers discover new cause of cell aging

New research from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering could be key to our understanding of how the aging process works. These findings potentially pave the way for better cancer treatments and revolutionary new drugs that could vastly improve human health in the twilight years.

2h

Five or more hours of smartphone usage per day may increase obesity

As smartphones continue to be an inherent part of life and grow as a primary source of entertainment — particularly among young people — it leads to a decrease in physical activity. In a recent study presented at the ACC Latin America Conference 2019, university students who used their smartphones five or more hours a day had a 43% increased risk of obesity and were more likely to have other lif

2h

In Situ Vaccination: A Cancer Treatment a Century in the Making

Injecting immunostimulants directly into the tumor is not a new strategy to stimulate the immune system, but the approach has seen a surge of interest in recent years.

2h

Current Warming Is Unparalleled in Past 2,000 Years

Today’s climate change is unique in its global scale compared to other historic periods — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

This vampire stump’s lust for life hints at an arboreal superorganism

A living kauri tree stump found outside of Auckland, New Zealand. (Sebastian Leuzinger / iScience/) Humans fare poorly after having their heads chopped off, but for some trees losing their tops just means the opening of a second act. Foresters have long marveled at so-called living stumps, tree remnants that manage to stay hydrated and nourished despite losing their leaves, branches, and trunks.

2h

Jill Tarter Swears She’d Tell Us If She’d Seen an Alien

In a special extraterrestrial edition of WIRED’s Tech Support series, the legendary SETI astronomer takes questions from Twitter.

3h

International Neuroethics Society Annual Meeting in Chicago, Oct. 17-18

Guest blog by Elaine Snell, Chief Operating Officer of INS Mapping Neuroethics: An Expanded Vision is the theme for this year’s Annual Meeting of the International Neuroethics Society (INS) in Chicago, October 17-18. What do we mean by “expanded vision?” The term implies bringing in people from different cultures who have either not been part of the neuroethics discussion so far, or have not been

3h

76 Billion Pills, 6 Companies And An Opioid Trial For The Ages

A new investigative report sheds light on the facts and figures behind the opioid crisis. (Image credit: John Moore/Getty Images)

3h

Democratic dark horse Tulsi Gabbard files censorship lawsuit against Google

The New York Times notes that for a brief time following the debate, Gabbard was the most-searched candidate on Google. Her campaign, Tulsi Now Inc claims that had the ads not been pulled, her …

3h

Nope, Earth Isn't Cooling

Periodically, we receive queries asking if Earth is cooling. Although multiple lines of converging scientific evidence show conclusively that our climate is warming, stories sometimes appear in the media calling that into question. New studies are interpreted as contradicting previous research, or data are viewed to be in conflict with established scientific thinking. Last spring, for example, a

3h

Scientists find clue to 'maternal instinct'

Oxytocin is referred to as the love hormone and is important in the regulation of social and maternal behavior. The oxytocin system in the brain may be key to new treatments for many mental health disorders including postpartum depression. A Louisiana State University biologist has discovered a group of cells that are activated by oxytocin in one area of female mouse brains that are not present in

3h

Decades after a good-behavior program in grade school, adults report healthier, more successful lives

University of Washington researchers have found that that 'good life' in adulthood can start in grade school, by teaching parents and teachers to build stronger bonds with their children, and to help children form greater attachments to family and school.

3h

Current guides for starting infants on solid food may lead to overfeeding

Starting 6-month-old infants on solid food in the amounts recommended by standard feeding guides may lead to overfeeding, according to a study by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

3h

A tree stump that should be dead is still alive; here's why

Within a shrouded New Zealand forest, a tree stump keeps itself alive by holding onto the roots of its neighboring trees, exchanging water and resources through the grafted root system. New research, publishing July 25 in iScience, details how surrounding trees keep tree stumps alive, possibly in exchange for access to larger root systems. The findings suggest a shift from the perception of trees

3h

NASA's terra satellite finds tropical storm 07W's strength on the side

Wind shear can push clouds and thunderstorms away from the center of a tropical cyclone and that's exactly what infrared imagery from NASA's Terra satellite shows is happening in newly formed Tropical Storm 07W.

3h

NASA finds one burst of energy in weakening Depression Dalila

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite found just a small area of cold clouds in thunderstorms within weakening Tropical Depression Dalila, enough to maintain it as a tropical cyclone.

3h

High-performance flow batteries offer path to grid-level renewable energy storage

A low-cost, high-performance battery chemistry could one day lead to scalable grid-level storage for wind and solar energy that could help electrical utilities reduce their dependency on fossil fuels.

3h

Supervisors driven by bottom line fail to get top performance from employees

Supervisors driven by profits could actually be hurting their coveted bottom lines by losing the respect of their employees, who counter by withholding performance, according to a new study led by Baylor University.

3h

The Conservative Argument Over Paid Family Leave

In the only industrialized country without a national program providing paid maternity leave, the idea of establishing one is gaining purchase politically . Senators have introduced bills that would offer paid leave for new parents (not just mothers), President Donald Trump’s latest budget makes mention of doing the same, and several states have created their own programs in the absence of a fede

3h

Jennifer Lawrence to Play Real-Life Mobster

Also, speaking of crime families, there's new hope for a 'Sopranos' reboot.

3h

NASA's terra satellite finds tropical storm 07W's strength on the side

Wind shear can push clouds and thunderstorms away from the center of a tropical cyclone and that's exactly what infrared imagery from NASA's Terra satellite shows is happening in newly formed Tropical Storm 07W.

3h

Study reveals how HIV infection may contribute to metabolic conditions

A single viral factor released from HIV-infected cells may wreak havoc on the body and lead to the development of metabolic diseases. By explaining the mechanisms, it could pave the way for targeted treatment to help provide a longer and healthier life for the 36 million people globally living with HIV/AIDS.

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Underwater glacial melting occurring much faster than predicted

Underwater melting of tidewater glaciers is occurring much faster than previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at Rutgers and the University of Oregon.

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Underwater glacial melting is occurring at higher rates than modeling predicts

Researchers have developed a new method to allow for the first direct measurement of the submarine melt rate of a tidewater glacier, and, in doing so, they concluded that current theoretical models may be underestimating glacial melt by up to two orders of magnitude.

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Trapping female mosquitoes helps curb chikungunya virus

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently developed an Autocidal Gravid Ovitrap (AGP trap) that attracts and captures female mosquitoes looking for a site to lay eggs. Now, researchers writing in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases report that AGO traps successfully protected people from infection with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in communities in Puerto Rico.

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Newly identified rice gene confers multiple-herbicide resistance

A rice gene that renders the crop resistant to several widely used beta-triketone herbicides has been identified, researchers report, revealing the genetic cause of herbicide susceptibility that has been identified in some important rice varieties.

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T cells trim the fat and protect against obesity

Specialized immune cells protect against obesity by regulating the diverse communities of intestinal bacteria in mice, according to a new study, which shows how changes in gut microbiota can influence the development of metabolic disorders.

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Tidewater glaciers: Melting underwater far faster than previously estimated?

A tidewater glacier in Alaska is melting underwater at rates upwards of two orders of magnitude greater than what is currently estimated, sonar surveys reveal.

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A test of general relativity at the galaxy's center suggests Einstein's theory still holds

In a detailed study of a star orbiting the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy, researchers report that Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) accurately describes the behavior of light struggling to escape the gravity around this massive structure.

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Mapping cells in the 'immortal' regenerating hydra

The tiny hydra, a freshwater invertebrate related to jellyfish and corals, has an amazing ability to renew its cells and regenerate damaged tissue. Cut a hydra in half, and it will regenerate its body and nervous system in a couple of days. Researchers at UC Davis have now traced the fate of hydra's cells, revealing how three lines of stem cells become nerves, muscles or other tissues.

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Einstein's general relativity theory is questioned but still stands for now, team reports

More than 100 years after Albert Einstein published his iconic theory of general relativity, it's beginning to fray at the edges, said Andrea Ghez, UCLA professor of physics and astronomy. Now, in the most comprehensive test of general relativity near the monstrous black hole at the center of our galaxy, Ghez and her research team report July 25 in the journal Science that Einstein's theory of gen

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These gut bacteria prevent mice from becoming obese — what could that mean for us?

A specific class of bacteria from the gut prevents mice from becoming obese, suggesting these same microbes may similarly control weight in people, a new study reports. The beneficial bacteria, called Clostridia, are part of the microbiome — collectively trillions of bacteria and other microorganisms that inhabit the intestine. University of Utah Health investigators led the study which publishes

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Hidden genetic variations power evolutionary leaps

So-called 'cryptic' genetic variation plays an important role in evolution, despite having no immediate effect on the behavior or appearance of the organism.

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How HIV infection may contribute to wide-ranging metabolic conditions

HIV-infected cells release vesicles that contain a viral protein called Nef, impairing cholesterol metabolism and triggering inflammation in uninfected bystander cells, according to a study published July 25, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Dmitri Sviridov of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia, and colleagues.

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LG's CineBeam ultra short throw 4K projector is a budget buster

LG at the Consumer Electronics Show in January demoed an impressive ultra short throw projector in the LG HU85LA. Now more than seven months later, it’s finally available although coercing your …

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The US Air Force Launched the Largest Uncrewed Structure in Space

It’s Large The US Air Force just confirmed that earlier this month it successfully deployed an experimental satellite nearly the size of a football field. The satellite, called the DSX, was the largest passenger on a June SpaceX launch that brought two dozen satellites into orbit. It’s also the largest human-made, uncrewed object to have ever been sent into orbit, according to SpaceNews . Cosmic

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FTC fines Facebook $5 billion over Cambridge Analytica scandal

The FTC said Facebook violated a 2012 agreement it made with the agency over user data. Facebook must restructure its board of directors, undergo regular privacy audits and pay a $5 billion fine. Still, some say the punishment doesn't go far enough. None The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has ordered Facebook to create new layers of oversight on how it handles user data, and to pay a $5 billion f

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Star hurtling around a giant black hole proves Einstein right – again

We watched a star orbit the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy for 24 years and its light is stretched just as Einstein predicted it should be

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How to trick electrons to see the hidden face of crystals

The 3D analysis of crystal structures requires a full 3D view of the crystals. Crystals as small as powder, with edges less than one micrometer, can only be analysed with electron radiation. With electron crystallography, a full 360-degree view of a single crystal is technically impossible. A team of researchers modified the holder of the tiny crystals so that a full view becomes possible.

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Glem naturlige udsving: Global opvarmning er uden fortilfælde i 2.000 år

Ny forskning understreger, at moderne klimaforandringer er unikke.

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Immune system defects seem to contribute to obesity in mice

Subtle defects affecting T cells altered the animals’ microbiome and fat absorption, providing hints of what might also be going on in people.

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U.S. food supply has way too much processed stuff

Americans are over-exposed to products that are high in calories, saturated fat, sugar, and salt, a new study reports. The United States packaged food and beverage supply in 2018 was ultra-processed and generally unhealthy, according to the study. Since about 80% of Americans’ total calorie consumption comes from store-bought foods and beverages (packaged and unpackaged), the food and beverage su

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Hidden genetic variations power evolutionary leaps

Laboratory populations that quietly amass 'cryptic' genetic variants are capable of surprising evolutionary leaps, according to a paper in the July 26 issue of Science. A better understanding of cryptic variation may improve directed evolution techniques for developing new biomolecules for medical and other applications.

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The Outdated Language of Space Travel

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reflecting on the Apollo 11 mission, 50 years later. Half a century ago, there was only one kind of astronaut in the United States. Men launched atop rockets to space. Men maneuvered landers down to the surface of the moon. Men guided spacecraft safely home. From start to finish, they were at the controls. So it makes sense that the effort to send p

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Burning the furniture

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Finding the gates

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Lemon twist catalysis

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Pleasure from music

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The nucleolus functions as a phase-separated protein quality control compartment

The nuclear proteome is rich in stress-sensitive proteins, which suggests that effective protein quality control mechanisms are in place to ensure conformational maintenance. We investigated the role of the nucleolus in this process. In mammalian tissue culture cells under stress conditions, misfolded proteins entered the granular component (GC) phase of the nucleolus. Transient associations with

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Cryptic genetic variation accelerates evolution by opening access to diverse adaptive peaks

Cryptic genetic variation can facilitate adaptation in evolving populations. To elucidate the underlying genetic mechanisms, we used directed evolution in Escherichia coli to accumulate variation in populations of yellow fluorescent proteins and then evolved these proteins toward the new phenotype of green fluorescence. Populations with cryptic variation evolved adaptive genotypes with greater di

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Resetting histone modifications during human parental-to-zygotic transition

Histone modifications regulate gene expression and development. To address how they are reprogrammed in human early development, we investigated key histone marks in human oocytes and early embryos. Unlike that in mouse oocytes, the permissive mark trimethylated histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) largely exhibits canonical patterns at promoters in human oocytes. After fertilization, prezygotic genome

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Organic semiconductor photocatalyst can bifunctionalize arenes and heteroarenes

Photoexcited electron-hole pairs on a semiconductor surface can engage in redox reactions with two different substrates. Similar to conventional electrosynthesis, the primary redox intermediates afford only separate oxidized and reduced products or, more rarely, combine to one addition product. Here, we report that a stable organic semiconductor material, mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-

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Molecular electrocatalysts can mediate fast, selective CO2 reduction in a flow cell

Practical electrochemical carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) conversion requires a catalyst capable of mediating the efficient formation of a single product with high selectivity at high current densities. Solid-state electrocatalysts achieve the CO 2 reduction reaction (CO 2 RR) at current densities ≥ 150 milliamperes per square centimeter (mA/cm 2 ), but maintaining high selectivities at high current densi

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Direct observations of submarine melt and subsurface geometry at a tidewater glacier

Ice loss from the world’s glaciers and ice sheets contributes to sea level rise, influences ocean circulation, and affects ecosystem productivity. Ongoing changes in glaciers and ice sheets are driven by submarine melting and iceberg calving from tidewater glacier margins. However, predictions of glacier change largely rest on unconstrained theory for submarine melting. Here, we use repeat multib

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Spatiotemporal light control with frequency-gradient metasurfaces

The capability of on-chip wavefront modulation has the potential to revolutionize many optical device technologies. However, the realization of power-efficient phase-gradient metasurfaces that offer full-phase modulation (0 to 2) and high operation speeds remains elusive. We present an approach to continuously steer light that is based on creating a virtual frequency-gradient metasurface by combi

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Singular angular magnetoresistance in a magnetic nodal semimetal

Transport coefficients of correlated electron systems are often useful for mapping hidden phases with distinct symmetries. Here we report a transport signature of spontaneous symmetry breaking in the magnetic Weyl semimetal cerium-aluminum-germanium (CeAlGe) system in the form of singular angular magnetoresistance (SAMR). This angular response exceeding 1000% per radian is confined along the high

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A cytosine deaminase for programmable single-base RNA editing

Programmable RNA editing enables reversible recoding of RNA information for research and disease treatment. Previously, we developed a programmable adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing approach by fusing catalytically inactivate RNA-targeting CRISPR-Cas13 (dCas13) with the adenine deaminase domain of ADAR2. Here, we report a cytidine-to-uridine (C-to-U) RNA editor, referred to as RNA Editing

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Targeting a ceramide double bond improves insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis

Ceramides contribute to the lipotoxicity that underlies diabetes, hepatic steatosis, and heart disease. By genetically engineering mice, we deleted the enzyme dihydroceramide desaturase 1 (DES1), which normally inserts a conserved double bond into the backbone of ceramides and other predominant sphingolipids. Ablation of DES1 from whole animals or tissue-specific deletion in the liver and/or adip

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A rice gene that confers broad-spectrum resistance to {beta}-triketone herbicides

The genetic variation of rice cultivars provides a resource for further varietal improvement through breeding. Some rice varieties are sensitive to benzobicyclon (BBC), a β-triketone herbicide that inhibits 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD). Here we identify a rice gene, HIS1 ( HPPD INHIBITOR SENSITIVE 1 ), that confers resistance to BBC and other β-triketone herbicides. We show that HIS

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New Products

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Take the leap

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Stem cell differentiation trajectories in Hydra resolved at single-cell resolution

The adult Hydra polyp continually renews all of its cells using three separate stem cell populations, but the genetic pathways enabling this homeostatic tissue maintenance are not well understood. We sequenced 24,985 Hydra single-cell transcriptomes and identified the molecular signatures of a broad spectrum of cell states, from stem cells to terminally differentiated cells. We constructed differ

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T cell-mediated regulation of the microbiota protects against obesity

The microbiota influences obesity, yet organisms that protect from disease remain unknown. During studies interrogating host-microbiota interactions, we observed the development of age-associated metabolic syndrome (MetS). Expansion of Desulfovibrio and loss of Clostridia were key features associated with obesity in this model and are present in humans with MetS. T cell–dependent events were requ

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News at a glance

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Mite fight

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Small wonders

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Underwater melting

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Mind the angle

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Transforming biology to design next-generation computers, using a surprise ingredient

A group has found ways of transforming structures that occur naturally in cell membranes to create other architectures, like parallel 1nm-wide line segments, more applicable to computing.

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Breakthrough in quantum computing

Chemistry and physics researchers have advanced quantum simulation by devising an algorithm that can more efficiently calculate the properties of molecules on a noisy quantum computer.

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Einstein's general relativity theory is questioned but still stands for now

More than 100 years after Albert Einstein published his iconic theory of general relativity, it is beginning to fray at the edges, said Andrea Ghez, UCLA professor of physics and astronomy. Now, in the most comprehensive test of general relativity near the monstrous black hole at the center of our galaxy, Ghez and her research team report July 25 in the journal Science that Einstein's theory of ge

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Hidden genetic variations power evolutionary leaps

Laboratory populations that quietly amass 'cryptic' genetic variants are capable of surprising evolutionary leaps, according to a paper in the July 26 issue of Science. A better understanding of cryptic variation may improve directed evolution techniques for developing new biomolecules for medical and other applications.

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Underwater glacial melting is occurring at higher rates than modeling predicts

Researchers have developed a new method to allow for the first direct measurement of the submarine melt rate of a tidewater glacier, and, in doing so, they concluded that current theoretical models may be underestimating glacial melt by up to two orders of magnitude.

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Decades-Old Computer Science Conjecture Solved in Two Pages

A paper posted online this month has settled a nearly 30-year-old conjecture about the structure of the fundamental building blocks of computer circuits. This “sensitivity” conjecture has stumped many of the most prominent computer scientists over the years, yet the new proof is so simple that one researcher summed it up in a single tweet . “This conjecture has stood as one of the most frustratin

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BPA-Free But Still Dangerous? Replacement Chemicals Linked to Childhood Obesity

a new study suggests that the chemicals used to replace BPA may also be cause for concern.

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Juul Targeted Schools, Camps and Youth Programs, House Panel Claims

House Democrats opened the second day of hearings into the e-cigarette company’s marketing and philanthropic activities. Juul executives were to testify.

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We’ve had private currencies like Libra before. It was chaos.

If private digital currencies start competing with national currencies, it could cause some of them to be more volatile. Almost 200 years ago, we saw something similar.

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The Secret to Success on YouTube? Kids

A study by the Pew Research Center finds that videos including children younger than 13 get three times as many views as others.

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Take soapbox racing to the next level with a motorcycle engine

CycleKart Club member Justin Tremain's second build was inspired by the 1927 Nash Legion Special. (Justin Tremain/) For the DIY petrol head, the ultimate project is building a kit car. The downside? It takes serious cash and serious time. Similarly, restoring a classic car means following someone else’s rules, go-karting is fast but so very serious, and soapbox racers are for kids and wind-tunnel

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Worm pheromones protect major crops

Protecting crops from pests and pathogens without using toxic pesticides has been a longtime goal of farmers. Researchers have found that compounds from an unlikely source – microscopic soil roundworms – could achieve this aim. These compounds helped protect major crops from various pathogens, and thus have potential to save billions of dollars and increase agricultural sustainability around the w

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Transforming biology to design next-generation computers, using a surprise ingredient

A group has found ways of transforming structures that occur naturally in cell membranes to create other architectures, like parallel 1nm-wide line segments, more applicable to computing.

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How neuromuscular connections are maintained after nerve lesions

After nerve injury, the protein complex mTORC1 takes over an important function in skeletal muscle to maintain the neuromuscular junction, the synapse between the nerve and muscle fiber. Researchers have now shown that the activation of mTORC1 must be tightly balanced for a proper response of the muscle to nerve injury. The study opens new insights into muscle weakness related to neuromuscular dis

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Preventing people from abandoning exotic pets that threatened biodiversity

Abandoning exotic pets is an ethical problem that can lead to biological invasions that threaten conservation of biodiversity in the environment. An article published in the journal Biological Invasions, whose first author is the researcher Alberto Maceda Veiga, from the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio), reveals that the release of invasive species in the envi

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'Trash talk' really can put players off their game

A study of 200 adults conducted by a graduate student confirmed the ability of trash talk to negatively affect the game performance of a competitor.

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Calculating the properties of molecules on a noisy quantum computer

Chemistry and physics researchers have advanced quantum simulation by devising an algorithm that can more efficiently calculate the properties of molecules on a noisy quantum computer.

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The Guardian view on James Lovelock: Earth, but not as we knew it | Editorial

As he celebrates his centennial birthday, the scientist continues to rewrite our future James Lovelock, the scientist and writer, is 100 years old on Friday and remains a combination of environmental Cassandra and Old Testament prophet. Unlike them, though, he changes his mind about what the future holds. Foolish consistency, Emerson wrote, is the hobgoblin of little minds, and Mr Lovelock’s mind

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Have you accidentally offended someone? Here’s advice for you and them.

In a diverse world, we run the risk of accidentally saying something that will offend someone. That does not mean you should automatically be disqualified from continuing in the discussion. We cannot have a 'one strike you're out' reaction, says Allison Stanger. If you offend someone inadvertently, it's extremely important that you apologize and say 'That was not my intention.' Apologizing is the

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Supervisors driven by bottom line fail to get top performance from employees: Baylor study

Supervisors driven by profits could actually be hurting their coveted bottom lines by losing the respect of their employees, who counter by withholding performance, according to a new study led by Baylor University.

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NASA finds one burst of energy in weakening Depression Dalila

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite found just a small area of cold clouds in thunderstorms within weakening Tropical Depression Dalila, enough to maintain it as a tropical cyclone.

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Research finds connecting patients with their community could transform healthcare

Engaging a wider range of resources to connect patients with organizations within their community can help transform healthcare and improve overall well-being, according to new research. The authors have introduced 'patient ecosystem management,' an organizational process that focuses on treating patients differently in terms of assessing, managing and expanding resources to achieve patient health

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Georgetown technique using urine suggest individualize bladder cancer treatment possible

Researchers have devised a very promising non-invasive and individualized technique for detecting and treating bladder cancer. The method uses a 'liquid biopsy' — a urine specimen — instead of the invasive tumor sampling needed today, and a method developed and patented by Georgetown to culture cancer cells that can reveal the molecular underpinnings of each patient's unique bladder cancer.

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Strange bacteria hint at ancient origin of photosynthesis

Structures inside rare bacteria are similar to those that power photosynthesis in plants today, suggesting the process is older than assumed.

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Strange bacteria hint at ancient origin of photosynthesis

Structures inside rare bacteria are similar to those that power photosynthesis in plants today, suggesting the process is older than assumed.

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Sony RX100 VII focuses on video and speed improvements – CNET

Sony's updated $1,200 flagship compact wants a cut of your vlogging budget.

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NBCUniversal’s Streaming Service May Be Launched In April 2020

Comcast has been working on its NBCUniversal standalone streaming service for a while now and we finally have an idea of when it might go live. NBCUniversal CEO Steve Burke has revealed during …

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Bacteria enhance coral resilience to climate change effects

Researchers investigated the interplay between corals and bacteria under changing environmental conditions. Their research results were published in the current issue of the journal Nature Communications.

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One or the other: Why strength training might come at the expense of endurance muscles

The neurotransmitter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts in the muscle, so that during strength training endurance muscle fiber number is decreased. Researchers have more closely investigated this factor, from the group of myokines, and demonstrated that it is produced by the muscle and acts on both muscles and synapses. The results also provide new insights into age-related muscle atrop

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Genetic screen identifies genes that protect cells from Zika virus

A new study uses a genetic screen to identify genes that protect cells from Zika viral infection. The research may one day lead to the development of a treatment for Zika and other infections.

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Physics of life: Motor proteins and membrane dynamics

Motility is an essential property of many cell types, and is driven by molecular motors. Researchers have now discovered that the motor protein myosin VI contributes directly to the deformation of the cell membrane, as required for locomotion or endocytosis.

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Brain matter alterations in U.S. government personnel who developed neurological symptoms in Cuba

Advanced neuroimaging reveals key brain differences, particularly in the cerebellum, between impacted patients and healthy individuals, which may underlie clinical findings previously reported.

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NASA Official: SpaceX’s Moon Chances Are “Slim”

Photo Finish NASA and Elon Musk’s SpaceX seemingly have their own little space race going on. As NASA scrambles to get its crewed Artemis mission to the Moon by 2024, SpaceX is eyeing a robotic landing within two years, according to Business Insider . And as NASA narrows down its list of contractors for future missions, Musk wanted SpaceX to prove itself by landing on the Moon within two years. B

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Researcher's innovative flood mapping helps water and emergency management officials

When Jude Kastens was developing a new floodplain mapping model more than a decade ago as part of his doctoral dissertation at the University of Kansas, he aimed to address a critical information gap that often hindered officials during major flooding events: the lack of real-time, wide-area predictions for floodwater extent and depth.

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How the pufferfish got its wacky spines

Pufferfish are known for their strange and extreme skin ornaments, but how they came to possess the spiky skin structures known as spines has largely remained a mystery. Now, researchers have identified the genes responsible for the evolution and development of pufferfish spines in a study publishing July 25 in the journal iScience. Turns out, the process is pretty similar to how other vertebrates

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Little helpers for the rainforest

Tropical rainforests store large quantities of carbon dioxide, produce oxygen and provide habitats for many animal and plant species. If these ecosystems, which are so important for the global climate and biodiversity, are destroyed, they will recover very slowly, if at all. Scientists from the German Primate Center (DPZ) – Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, the University Estadual Paulista,

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How the pufferfish got its wacky spines

Pufferfish are known for their strange and extreme skin ornaments, but how they came to possess the spiky skin structures known as spines has largely remained a mystery. Now, researchers have identified the genes responsible for the evolution and development of pufferfish spines in a study publishing July 25 in the journal iScience. Turns out, the process is pretty similar to how other vertebrates

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Little helpers for the rainforest

Tropical rainforests store large quantities of carbon dioxide, produce oxygen and provide habitats for many animal and plant species. If these ecosystems, which are so important for the global climate and biodiversity, are destroyed, they will recover very slowly, if at all. Scientists from the German Primate Center (DPZ) – Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, the University Estadual Paulista,

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Slowing metabolism can prevent detrimental effects of genetic mutations

Just by slowing their metabolism, mutant fruit flies can go from zero to hero.

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Pheromones give nematodes a boost in controlling pests

Beneficial nematodes are used as biological control agents to fight a variety of insect pests that severely damage crops. However, in many cases the nematodes don't measure up to other control methods such as certain chemical pesticides.

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Star nearing death offers a preview of our Sun's fate

An international team of astronomers has witnessed a rare dynamic event foreshadowing the death of a red giant star for the first time – a discovery that reinforces predictions about our Sun's ultimate demise.

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Slowing metabolism can prevent detrimental effects of genetic mutations

Just by slowing their metabolism, mutant fruit flies can go from zero to hero.

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Pheromones give nematodes a boost in controlling pests

Beneficial nematodes are used as biological control agents to fight a variety of insect pests that severely damage crops. However, in many cases the nematodes don't measure up to other control methods such as certain chemical pesticides.

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Breeders toughen up bees to resist deadly mites

New molecular tools help select bees that can rid their hives of the parasites

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Soon There Will Be Unlimited Hair

In the tunnels under New York, commuters squeeze into lumbering trains and try not to make eye contact with the people whose sweaty bodies are pressed against theirs. As they surrender to the will of the transit authority, their eyes wander upward to find an unlikely promise of control: Many cars are plastered with ads that say “Balding is now optional.” These ads feature men in various states of

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50 years ago, a drug that crippled a generation found new life as a leprosy treatment

In 1969, a drug that crippled a generation found new life as a treatment for leprosy.

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NAFTA's demise puts Canada in the 'penalty box,' study shows

Research has long indicated that the elimination of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), or simply the withdrawal of the U.S. from NAFTA, would reduce standards of living in Canada, Mexico and the U.S.

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Worm pheromones protect major crops

Protecting crops from pests and pathogens without using toxic pesticides has been a longtime goal of farmers. Researchers at Boyce Thompson Institute have found that compounds from an unlikely source—microscopic soil roundworms—could achieve this aim.

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The UK has its hottest ever July day with temperatures hitting 38.1C

The UK has seen its hottest July day and second hottest day on record as the temperature has reached 38.1C in Cambridge

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California signs deal with 4 automakers to raise gas mileage

Four major automakers have reached a deal with California to increase gas mileage and greenhouse gas emissions standards, bypassing the Trump administration's plan to freeze standards at 2021 …

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Worm pheromones protect major crops

Protecting crops from pests and pathogens without using toxic pesticides has been a longtime goal of farmers. Researchers at Boyce Thompson Institute have found that compounds from an unlikely source—microscopic soil roundworms—could achieve this aim.

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Terahertz imaging technique reveals subsurface insect damage in wood

Insect infestation is becoming an increasingly costly problem to the forestry industry, especially in areas experiencing increased droughts and hot spells related to climate change. A new terahertz imaging technique could help slow the spread of these infestations by detecting insect damage inside wood before it becomes visible on the outside.

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Flying Hoverboard Inventor Fails to Fly Across English Channel

Channeling the Green Goblin Franky Zapata’s attempt to make history on Thursday ended with a splash. Earlier in July, the former jet-ski champion made waves when he flew over Paris’ Bastille Day parade on a hoverboard of his own invention. His next big stunt was supposed to be a hoverboard flight across the English Channel on the 110th anniversary of French inventor Louis Blériot’s history-making

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Is just 1 dose of the HPV vaccine enough?

One dose of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, vaccine works just as well as the recommended two or three doses for preventing cervical pre-cancer, a new study indicates. Researchers compared cervical screening outcomes for a quarter of a million Australian women eligible for vaccination under the national program. The findings show that for women vaccinated at a young age, when most were not expo

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A Warm Bedtime Bath Can Help You Cool Down And Sleep Better

Research suggests a warm bath or shower an hour or two before bedtime can help you unwind and fall asleep faster. Why? It will help lower your core temperature, and that's a circadian sleep signal. (Image credit: PhotoTalk/Getty Images)

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Terahertz imaging technique reveals subsurface insect damage in wood

Insect infestation is becoming an increasingly costly problem to the forestry industry, especially in areas experiencing increased droughts and hot spells related to climate change. A new terahertz imaging technique could help slow the spread of these infestations by detecting insect damage inside wood before it becomes visible on the outside.

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Strange bacteria hint at ancient origin of photosynthesis

Structures inside rare bacteria are similar to those that power photosynthesis in plants today, suggesting the process is older than assumed.

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Brains work in sync during music therapy

For the first time researchers have been able to demonstrate that the brains of a patient and therapist become synchronized during a music therapy session, a breakthrough that could improve future interactions between patients and therapists.

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More can be done to prevent children from having in-flight medical emergencies

Resources are limited on an airplane during an in-flight emergency and access to care is not always immediate. A new study reveals that 15.5 percent of in-flight emergencies involve children and that one in six cases require additional care.

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Exposure to common chemicals in plastics linked to childhood obesity

Exposure to common chemicals in plastics and canned foods may play a role in childhood obesity, according to a new study.

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An algorithm developed to study the structure of galaxies helps explain a key feature of embryonic development

As embryos develop, they follow predetermined patterns of tissue folding, so that individuals of the same species end up with nearly identically shaped organs and very similar body shapes.

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Bacteria enhance coral resilience to climate change effects

Coral reefs are delicate ecosystems that are particularly sensitive to human influences such as climate change and environmental pollution. Even if the warming of the earth does not exceed 1.5 to 2 degrees Celsius—a limit set by the International Panel of Climate Change (IPCC)—more than 70 percent of coral reef ecosystems are likely to be lost, resulting in an economic and ecological catastrophe.

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Study calls for legal reform on 'hidden crime' few male victims will talk about

A call for a change in the law to class men, forced to have sex with women, as rape victims has been made in a new study by Lancaster University researchers published today.

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Detox pathway extends lifespan of the worm C. elegans

A mutant worm with a change in one mitochondrial gene produces more reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can be harmful to cells by causing oxidative stress. However, this mutant worm is able to live twice as long as the wild type. Professor Dr. Aleksandra Trifunovic and her team at the CECAD Cluster of Excellence in Aging Research at the University of Cologne showed for the first time that this l

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Bacteria enhance coral resilience to climate change effects

Coral reefs are delicate ecosystems that are particularly sensitive to human influences such as climate change and environmental pollution. Even if the warming of the earth does not exceed 1.5 to 2 degrees Celsius—a limit set by the International Panel of Climate Change (IPCC)—more than 70 percent of coral reef ecosystems are likely to be lost, resulting in an economic and ecological catastrophe.

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Detox pathway extends lifespan of the worm C. elegans

A mutant worm with a change in one mitochondrial gene produces more reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can be harmful to cells by causing oxidative stress. However, this mutant worm is able to live twice as long as the wild type. Professor Dr. Aleksandra Trifunovic and her team at the CECAD Cluster of Excellence in Aging Research at the University of Cologne showed for the first time that this l

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Physicists create metallic alloy for magnetic refrigerator

Physicists at the Laboratory of Novel Magnetic Materials of the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University study magnetic materials and magnetostructural phase transition in order to create a new magnetic cooling technology. They have studied the properties of manganese and arsenic alloys that have magnetocaloric characteristics.

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Slave ship model brings a harrowing story to life in 3-D

A 3-D model of an 18th century slave ship, which captures the cramped, dirty and stifling conditions experienced by enslaved Africans, has been launched as a new digital teaching tool.

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Preventing people from abandoning exotic pets that threaten biodiversity

Abandoning exotic pets is an ethical problem that can lead to biological invasions that threaten conservation of biodiversity in the environment. An article published in the journal Biological Invasions, whose first author is the researcher Alberto Maceda Veiga, from the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio), reveals that the release of invasive species in the envi

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Moto E6 gets octa-core processor and removable battery for under $150

Motorola on Thursday pushed out a refreshed version of its Moto E smartphone boasting an interesting mix of new features at a compelling price.

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Ten-state program increases healthy eating and physical activity at child care facilities

Nearly 1,200 child care programs in 10 states have improved their healthy eating and physical activity standards after participating in Nemours Children's Health System's National Early Care and Education Learning Collaboratives (NECELC) project, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Daily briefing: The consolations of fieldwork

Nature, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02301-4 The healing power of nature and camaraderie, the quest to eliminate the last samples of rinderpest and the creativity and guts of researchers studying Ebola in a war zone.

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Strange Forest 'Superorganism' Is Keeping This Vampire Tree Alive

By grafting their roots together in a hidden underground network, trees could be forming giant "superorganisms" that span entire forests.

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Preschool teachers ask children too many simple questions

When preschool teachers read books in their classrooms, the questions they ask play a key role in how much children learn, research has shown. But a new study that involved observing teachers during class story times found that they asked few questions — and those that they did ask were usually too simple.

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Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question

Advanced simulations have solved a problem in turbulent fluid flow that could lead to more efficient turbines and engines.

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Unlocking therapies for hard-to-treat lung cancers

Around 85 percent of lung cancers are classified as non-small-cell lung cancers, or NSCLCs. Some patients with these cancers can be treated with targeted genetic therapies, and some benefit from immunotherapies — but the vast majority of NSCLC patients have no treatment options except for chemotherapy.

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Device could automatically deliver drug to reverse opioid overdose

Researchers are developing a device that would automatically detect opioid overdose and deliver naloxone, a drug known to reverse deadly effects.

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Preventing people from abandoning exotic pets that threaten biodiversity

Abandoning exotic pets is an ethical problem that can lead to biological invasions that threaten conservation of biodiversity in the environment. An article published in the journal Biological Invasions, whose first author is the researcher Alberto Maceda Veiga, from the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio), reveals that the release of invasive species in the envi

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Fracking likely to result in high emissions

Natural gas releases fewer harmful air pollutants and greenhouse gases than other fossil fuels. That's why it is often seen as a bridge technology to a low-carbon future. A new study by the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) has estimated emissions from shale gas production through fracking in Germany and the UK. It shows that CO2-eq. emissions would exceed the estimated current

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Tesla Has Already Lost $1 Billion This Year

Red Ink Tesla just announced that it lost another $408 million this fiscal quarter. That’s an improvement over its $702 million loss last quarter, but still a bad sign for the scrappy automaker . Alongside with the new filings, The Verge reports that Tesla’s CTO, JB Straubel, is leaving that specific role within the company after 15 years. Ultimately, it’s troubling news for those who expected Mo

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The FDA asked a supplement company to recall all their products. Here's what you need to know.

Supplement companies do a lot to try to convince you they're safe and effective—but sometimes they can be neither. (Deposit Photos/) On Wednesday the Food and Drug Administration announced a voluntary recall by the company Herbal Doctor Remedies, a brand of herbal supplements distributed by several online retailers. What's surprising about this recall is that it includes all of Herbal Doctor Reme

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Elephant extinction will raise carbon dioxide levels in atmosphere

One of the last remaining megaherbivores, forest elephants shape their environment by serving as seed dispersers and forest bulldozers as they eat over a hundred species of fruit, trample bushes, knock over trees and create trails and clearings. Their ecological impact also affects tree populations and carbon levels in the forest, researchers report, with significant implications for climate and c

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The Science Behind “Blade Runner”’s Voight-Kampff Test – Facts So Romantic

Is a fictional test designed to distinguish between replicants and humans, called the Voight-Kampff test, feasible? Universo Produção / Flickr Rutger Hauer, the Dutch actor who portrayed Roy Batty in the film Blade Runner , passed away recently. To celebrate his iconic role, we are revisiting this piece on the Voight-Kampff test, a device to detect if a person is really human. Is Rick Deckard a r

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The Disappearing Physicist and His Elusive Particle – Issue 74: Networks

The members of the physics institute at Via Panisperna were in the habit of giving themselves jocular nicknames: Enrico Fermi was “The Pope,” Orso Corbino was “God the Almighty,” and Franco Rasetti was “The Cardinal Vicar.” It was 1930, and the Italian capital boasted a miraculous collection of scientists on their way to revolutionizing atomic and nuclear physics. Not since Galileo had Italy show

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Elephant extinction will raise carbon dioxide levels in atmosphere

One of the last remaining megaherbivores, forest elephants shape their environment by serving as seed dispersers and forest bulldozers as they eat over a hundred species of fruit, trample bushes, knock over trees and create trails and clearings. Their ecological impact also affects tree populations and carbon levels in the forest, researchers report, with significant implications for climate and c

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Study reveals top tools for pinpointing genetic drivers of disease

Published in Nature Communications, the study is the largest of its kind and was led by Walter and Eliza Hall Institute computational biologists Professor Tony Papenfuss, Dr. Daniel Cameron and Mr Leon Di Stefano.

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A Wikipedia for Generation Z

If you want to know who the biggest TikTok star is right now, who is in Emma Chamberlain ’s squad, or where Baby Ariel grew up, only one website will give you the answers: Famous Birthdays . Despite its name, the site contains more than just birthdays—it’s more like a constantly updated, highly detailed map of who matters to the teen internet, featuring a mix of biographical information, photos,

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ESPN Backs Itself Into a Corner

Updated at 3:48 p.m. ET on July 25, 2019 Late last week, the ESPN host Dan Le Batard veered outside the sports network’s hard-line stance on avoiding politics on the air. He unloaded on President Donald Trump for attacking four congresswomen of color. Just as notably, he criticized his own network’s no-politics policy as “cowardly,” putting ESPN—where I used to work—in the crosshairs of contentio

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Forget the Theater Criticism—Mueller’s Conclusions Are the Real News

If you thought yesterday’s testimony from former Special Counsel Robert Mueller was dull and devoid of surprises, wait until you read the coverage. “The Blockbuster That Wasn’t: Mueller Disappoints the Democrats,” intones The New York Times . “Mueller Answers Trump Taunts in Testimony Unlikely to Change the Political Dynamic,” The Washington Post agrees . “While hearing it from Mueller may change

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Study reveals top tools for pinpointing genetic drivers of disease

Published in Nature Communications, the study is the largest of its kind and was led by Walter and Eliza Hall Institute computational biologists Professor Tony Papenfuss, Dr. Daniel Cameron and Mr Leon Di Stefano.

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Study suggests dark-colored wing feathers may help birds fly more efficiently

A team of researchers at the University of Ghent has found evidence that suggests birds with white wing feathers close to the body and black wing tips get increased lift from their wing colors. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes their study of wing color in several species of birds and what they found.

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Attitudes toward race, immigration underscored vote switching in 2016 election

Nearly three years later, it's rare to read a postmortem of the 2016 presidential election that doesn't include at least a passing mention of one of the electorate's more elusive unicorns: the Obama-to-Trump voter.

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Researchers lead breakthrough in quantum computing

The large, error-correcting quantum computers envisioned today could be decades away, yet experts are vigorously trying to come up with ways to use existing and near-term quantum processors to solve useful problems despite limitations due to errors or "noise."

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Don't Be Too Quick to Dismiss "Soft Science"

Surprisingly, the study of leadership and management is often more reliable than much of medical research — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Don't Be Too Quick to Dismiss "Soft Science"

Surprisingly, the study of leadership and management is often more reliable than much of medical research — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Strange bacteria hint at ancient origin of photosynthesis

Structures inside rare bacteria are similar to those that power photosynthesis in plants today, suggesting the process is older than assumed.

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Terahertz imaging technique reveals subsurface insect damage in wood

Insect infestation is becoming an increasingly costly problem to the forestry industry, especially in areas experiencing increased droughts and hot spells related to climate change. A new terahertz imaging technique could help slow the spread of these infestations by detecting insect damage inside wood before it becomes visible on the outside.

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NAFTA's demise puts Canada in the 'penalty box,' study shows

A new study from the University of Notre Dame shows that the elimination of the North American Free Trade Agreement would economically hurt Canada, Mexico and the US, but with a surprising twist — Canada would suffer the most.

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Clinical trial identifies new breast cancer drug as a potential therapy for glioblastoma

Ivy Brain Tumor Center at the Barrow Neurological Institute, has released the results of its recent Phase 0 clinical trial of the breast cancer drug ribociclib (Kisqali®) for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. The agent, recently approved by the FDA for advanced breast cancer, is part of a newly-discovered class of targeted therapy that undermines cancer cell division and could form the back

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Worm pheromones protect major crops

Protecting crops from pests and pathogens without using toxic pesticides has been a longtime goal of farmers. Researchers at Boyce Thompson Institute have found that compounds from an unlikely source – microscopic soil roundworms – could achieve this aim. As described in research published in Journal of Phytopathology, these compounds helped protect major crops from various pathogens, and thus hav

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Study calls for legal reform on 'hidden crime' few male victims will talk about

A call for a change in the law to class men, forced to have sex with women, as rape victims has been made in a new study by Lancaster University researchers published today.Men have added their voices to a ground-breaking study – the first of its kind to interview men in the UK – which examines their experience of non-consensual sex with women (known as 'forced to penetrate' cases or FTP).

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SpaceX Aborts Starhopper’s First Flight Test After Fiery Start

Catch Fire, Then Halt SpaceX’s Starhopper is looking to be quite the firestarter — but that’s not necessarily the worst thing in the world. During a routine static fire test last week, a giant fireball engulfed the craft — a prototype for Starship , the massive rocket SpaceX is developing to ferry humans to the Moon, Mars, and the other side of the Earth. Then, during what was supposed to be Star

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Study suggests dark-colored wing feathers may help birds fly more efficiently

A team of researchers at the University of Ghent has found evidence that suggests birds with white wing feathers close to the body and black wing tips get increased lift from their wing colors. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes their study of wing color in several species of birds and what they found.

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Boris Johnson’s stance on climate change has flip-flopped

New U.K. prime minister has voted against carbon capture technology

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This “Quantum Microphone” Can Listen to a Single Sound Particle

Quantum State Researchers at Stanford University have developed a “quantum microphone” that’s sensitive enough to measure the individual particles of sound known as “phonons.” “We expect this device to allow new types of quantum sensors, transducers and storage devices for future quantum machines,” said study leader Amir Safavi-Naeini, assistant professor of applied physics at Stanford in a unive

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America's packaged food supply is ultra-processed

Americans are overexposed to products that are high in energy, saturated fat, sugar and salt, according to a new study that reports the United States packaged food and beverage supply in 2018 was ultra-processed and generally unhealthy.

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Tiger Sharks Surround Divers | Shark Week

While trying to retrieve their remote camera system, Forrest Galante and his team suddenly find themselves surrounded by tiger sharks. Shark Week 2019 starts Sunday July 28 9p! Stream Extinct or Alive: The Lost Shark on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/extinct-or-alive-the-lost-shark Own Full Seasons of Shark Week: https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/Shar

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Transforming biology to design next-generation computers, using a surprise ingredient

A Purdue University group has found ways of transforming structures that occur naturally in cell membranes to create other architectures, like parallel 1nm-wide line segments, more applicable to computing.

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Bacteria enhance coral resilience to climate change effects

An international group of researchers led by Professor Christian Voolstra, biologist at the University of Konstanz, investigated the interplay between corals and bacteria under changing environmental conditions. Their research results were published in the current issue of the journal Nature Communications.

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Physicists from IKBFU create metallic alloy for magnetic refrigerator

Physicists of the Laboratory of Novel Magnetic Materials of the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University study magnetic materials and magnetostructural phase transition in order to create a new magnetic cooling technology.

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Genetic screen identifies genes that protect cells from Zika virus

A new Tel Aviv University study uses a genetic screen to identify genes that protect cells from Zika viral infection. The research may one day lead to the development of a treatment for Zika and other infections.

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HIV spreads through direct cell-to-cell contact

The spread of pathogens like the HI virus is often studied in a test tube, i.e. in two-dimensional cell cultures, even though it hardly reflects the much more complex conditions in the human body. Using novel cell culture systems, quantitative image analysis, and computer simulations, an interdisciplinary team of scientists from Heidelberg University has now explored how HIV spreads in three-dimen

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Brains work in sync during music therapy — study

For the first time researchers have been able to demonstrate that the brains of a patient and therapist become synchronised during a music therapy session, a breakthrough that could improve future interactions between patients and therapists.

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Moon has more water ice than previously thought

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Current Era of Climate Change More Uniform than in the Past

In contrast to the global change over the past 150 years, temperature extremes in the preceding 2,000 were regional.

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Former UK science minister returns as Brexit government assembles

Nature, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02298-w Jo Johnson is back at the science ministry while hardline Brexiters take leading roles.

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'Limitless potential' of artificial protein ushers in new era of 'smart' cell therapies

A first-of-its-kind artificial protein — designed on a computer and synthesized in the lab — can be used to build brand-new biological circuits inside living cells. These circuits transform ordinary cells into smart cells that are endowed with remarkable abilities.

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Missile strike false alarm most stressful for less anxious Hawaiians

After learning that a warning of a missile headed to Hawaii was a false alarm, the most anxious local Twitter users calmed down more quickly than less anxious users, according to a study of tweets before, during and after the event.

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Amoeba builds barriers for protection against bacteria

Dictyostelium discoideum, the soil-dwelling single-celled amoeba that feeds on bacteria, builds a barrier around its colonies that counteracts bacterial attempts to penetrate them, facilitates amoebal feeding and protects them from oxidative stress.

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Mouse, not just tick: New genome heralds change in Lyme disease fight

As Lyme disease increases, researchers have taken a significant step toward finding new ways to prevent its transmission. The experts, who include a pioneer in Lyme disease discovery, have sequenced the genome of the animal carrying the bacteria that causes the illness. The advance provides a launching pad for fresh approaches to stopping Lyme disease from infecting people.

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Opioid prescribing rates higher in US compared with other countries

Physicians in the United States may prescribe opioids more frequently to patients during hospitalization and at discharge when compared to their physician peers in other countries, according to a recently published study.

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Smaller class size means more success for women in STEM

A new study demonstrates that increasing class size has the largest negative impact on female participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) classrooms, and offers insights on ways to change the trend.

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How to consider nature's impact on mental health in city plans

An international team has created a framework for how city planners and municipalities around the world can start to measure the mental health benefits of nature and incorporate those into plans and policies for cities and their residents.

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A Brutal Disease Kills Monkeys. Flies Could Be Spreading It.

A downside of social living among monkeys and chimpanzees, a new study suggests, is being at greater risk of deadly disease.

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ECB charts path for new stimulus

The European Central Bank signaled Thursday it could unleash a new stimulus package and slash rates further, in a bid to shore up stubbornly low inflation and kickstart sluggish growth in the eurozone.

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The Millennial Left Is Tired of Waiting

The key political partnership of the Millennial left was born over noodles. Saikat Chakrabarti met Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez at Potjanee, a Thai restaurant near his apartment in the West Village, in March 2017. She was looking to get into politics; he was helping fund people getting into politics through the Justice Democrats, the progressive political action committee he’d co-founded that year. T

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Will Trump’s Racist Attacks Help Him? Ask Blue-Collar White Women.

Donald Trump’s turn toward more overt racism in his “go back” attacks on four Democratic congresswomen of color rests on an unspoken bet: that the women who are part of his core constituencies will respond to his acrimony as enthusiastically as the men. But polling throughout Trump’s presidency has indicated that his belligerent and divisive style raises more concern among women voters than men i

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Two-Third Of Gamers Confess To Being Severely Harassed By Online Trolls

If you have ever been harassed while playing an online game, you are far from alone. That is not to say that this revelation will come as any consolation, but according to a new study by the …

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One or the other: Why strength training might come at the expense of endurance muscles

The neurotransmitter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts in the muscle, so that during strength training endurance muscle fiber number is decreased. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have more closely investigated this factor, from the group of myokines, and demonstrated that it is produced by the muscle and acts on both muscles and synapses. The results published in PN

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What happens when you overdose? (video)

Your body is a delicately balanced chemical system, and if you take too much of a drug you destroy that balance. That's what happens when you overdose. This week on Reactions, learn how to spot an overdose and the ways different types of drugs wreak havoc in your brain: https://youtu.be/xLSz3wEgwJ8.

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Generic mobile phone chargers escalate risk of burn, electrocution

Electric currents generated by mobile phone chargers, particularly from lower-cost generic manufacturers, are causing serious injuries. Generic mobile phone chargers are less likely to meet established safety and quality tests than the brand counterparts, according to analysis and case studies in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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New model identifies most efficient logistics for military operations

Military deployments to environments lacking basic infrastructure — whether humanitarian missions or combat operations — involve extensive logistical planning. As part of a research project for the US Army, researchers at North Carolina State University designed a model to help military leaders better account for logistical risk and uncertainty during operational planning and execution.

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Make more with your 3D printers: from smooth surfaces to complex patterns

The production revolution envisioned by 3D printing visionaries is only a few steps away, when we will be able to print objects with whatever shape and properties we need. This summer at the 2019 SIGGRAPH conference we will move three steps closer, when the scientists from Inria Nancy-Grand Est present their new findings.

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Detox pathway extends lifespan of the worm C. elegans

Mutation in mitochondrial gene doubles the lifespan in the worm C. elegans by turning on a detox pathway, researchers of the Cluster of Excellence CECAD report in Nature Communications.

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Virginia Tech researchers lead breakthrough in quantum computing

A team of Virginia Tech chemistry and physics researchers have advanced quantum simulation by devising an algorithm that can more efficiently calculate the properties of molecules on a noisy quantum computer.

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Favorable five-year survival reported for patients with advanced cancer treated with the immunotherapy

A research team led by experts at the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center reports favorable five-year survival rates from the first multidose clinical trial of the immunotherapy drug nivolumab (anti-PD-1) as a treatment for patients whose previous therapies failed to stem their advanced melanoma, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) or non-small-cell

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Researchers discover the science behind giving up

Findings, reported July 25 in Cell, offer new insight into the complex world of motivation and reward by discovering the science behind giving up.The study is among the first to describe the effects of the complex nociception modulatory system.The researchers said this discovery could lead to helping people find motivation when they are depressed and conversely decrease motivation for drugs in sub

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Preclinical study of therapeutic strategy for Lafora disease shows promise

A team of scientists have designed and tested in mice a novel and promising therapeutic strategy for treating Lafora Disease (LD), a fatal form of childhood epilepsy. This new type of drug is a first-in-class therapy for LD and an example of precision medicine that has potential for treating other types of aggregate-based neurological diseases.

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Inherited BRCA2 mutations linked to increased risk of childhood lymphoma

A report from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital links inherited mutations in the BRCA2 gene with an increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents. The work appears as an advance online publication today in JAMA Oncology.

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Association between number of thyroidectomies performed by surgeon, complications

This observational study examined at what point an increasing number of operations to remove the thyroid performed annually by a surgeon is associated with a lower rate of complications among patients.

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To become, or not to become… a neuron

Researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen and Jérôme Bonnefont (VIB-KU Leuven and ULB) have unraveled a new mechanism controlling the switch between growth and differentiation of neural stem cells during brain development. They discovered a specific factor that makes stem cells 'deaf' to proliferative signals, which in turn causes them to differentiate into neurons and shape the marvelous complexity

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Association of BRCA2 mutations with risk of childhood lymphoma

This research letter reports on the association of BRCA2 gene mutations and potential risk for pediatric or adolescent lymphoma. The study used whole-genome sequencing data for 1,380 survivors of pediatric or adolescent lymphoma (815 survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma and 565 survivors of non-Hodgkin lymphoma), of which 13 survivors had BRCA2 mutations (five survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma and eight surv

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Penn biochemists streamline construction method for human artificial chromosomes

Researchers describe a new way to form an essential part of the artificial chromosome, called the centromere, by bypassing the biological requirements needed to form a natural one.

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Biologists and mathematicians team up to explore tissue folding

MIT scientists have now discovered a key feature of embryonic tissue that helps explain how this process is carried out so faithfully each time. In a study of fruit flies, they found that the reproducibility of tissue folding is generated by a network of proteins that connect like a fishing net, creating many alternative pathways that tissues can use to fold the right way.

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When a fix for one vision problem causes another

Aging diminishes the ability of the eyes ability to focus up close. Research from Johannes Burge of the University of Pennsylvania found that monovision, which uses lenses with different power in each eye, can cause dramatic misperceptions of distance and 3D direction for moving objects. This could have real implications for public health and public safety.

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High-performance flow batteries offer path to grid-level renewable energy storage

A low-cost, high-performance battery chemistry developed by University of Colorado Boulder researchers could one day lead to scalable grid-level storage for wind and solar energy that could help electrical utilities reduce their dependency on fossil fuels.

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New AI tool developed by Dana-Farber identifies cancer outcomes using radiology reports

Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have demonstrated that an artificial intelligence tool can perform as well as human reviewers — and much more rapidly — in extracting clinical information regarding changes in tumors from unstructured radiology reports for patients with lung cancer.

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Molecular traffic jam may underlie rare kidney disease, other protein misfolding disorders

Researchers have discovered that some protein-misfolding disorders may arise from a single, previously unrecognized cause: a jam at a specific step in a cellular shipping network called the secretory pathway, which delivers proteins either to the cell surface or one of the cell's protein-disposal systems. They have also found a compound that corrects for this in lab and animal models.

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Slowing metabolic rate can prevent detrimental effects of genetic mutations

In a new Northwestern University study, researchers slowed mutant fruit flies' metabolic rates by 50%, and the expected detrimental effects of many mutations never manifested. After experimentally testing fruit flies' many different genetic mutations, the researchers found the same result each time.

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Pain and gain: Skin nerves anticipate and fight infection, Pitt research finds

A surprising new discovery in mouse models reveals a previously unknown role for pain in immunity and has implications for treating autoimmune diseases.

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Human artificial chromosomes bypass centromere roadblocks

Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) could be useful tools for both understanding how mammalian chromosomes function and creating synthetic biological systems, but for the last 20 years, they have been limited by an inefficient artificial centromere. In the journal Cell on July 25, researchers announce that they have made progress on this key component.

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A tree stump that should be dead is still alive; here's why

Within a shrouded New Zealand forest, a tree stump keeps itself alive by holding onto the roots of its neighboring trees, exchanging water and resources through the grafted root system. New research, publishing July 25 in iScience, details how surrounding trees keep tree stumps alive, possibly in exchange for access to larger root systems. The findings suggest a shift from the perception of trees

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How the pufferfish got its wacky spines

Pufferfish are known for their strange and extreme skin ornaments, but how they came to possess the spiky skin structures known as spines has largely remained a mystery. Now, researchers have identified the genes responsible for the evolution and development of pufferfish spines in a study publishing July 25 in the journal iScience. Turns out, the process is pretty similar to how other vertebrates

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Seeing clearly: Revised computer code accurately models an instability in fusion plasmas

Subatomic particles zip around fusion machines known as tokamaks and sometimes merge, releasing large amounts of energy. Now, physicists have confirmed that an updated computer code could help to predict and ultimately prevent the particles from leaking from the magnetic fields confining them.

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Clues on how soils may respond to climate change found

Rock core samples from a period of warming millions of years ago indicate soils contributed to a rapid rise in atmospheric greenhouse gas and suggest modern climate models may overestimate Earth's ability to mitigate future warming, according to an international team of scientists.

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Moral character of victims can influence consumer action against companies

When David Dao was forcibly removed from a United Airlines flight in 2017 after declining to give up his seat for United employees, there was immediate public outrage against the airline. But quickly after the event, news spread that Dao had used his medical license to trade prescription drugs for sex. Online reports implied that Dao, rather than United Airlines, was to blame because he was viewed

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Tree stumps that should be dead can be kept alive by nearby trees

A tree stump that should have died is being kept alive by neighbouring trees that are funnelling water and nutrients to it through an interconnected root system

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Bionic eye helps people who are blind read letters again

A pair of smart glasses and an implant behind the retina have given vision back to people with macular degeneration, letting them read letters again

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Music festivals let people try out more sustainable lifestyles

Summer is the time of music festivals—and a new study published in the scientific journal Geoforum has suggested that they offer an opportunity for people to try out more sustainable lifestyles.

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Tree stumps can live on indefinitely…

…with a little help from their friends

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How to make a flat lens

Cover its surface with tiny antennae

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Working memory is structured hierarchically

Researchers in cognitive psychology at HSE University have experimentally demonstrated that the colors and orientations of objects are stored and processed independently in working memory. The results of the experiment were published in Acta Psychologica journal.

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How neuromuscular connections are maintained after nerve lesions

After nerve injury, the protein complex mTORC1 takes over an important function in skeletal muscle to maintain the neuromuscular junction, the synapse between the nerve and muscle fiber. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now shown that the activation of mTORC1 must be tightly balanced for a proper response of the muscle to nerve injury. The study published in «Nature Communi

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Physics of life: Motor proteins and membrane dynamics

Motility is an essential property of many cell types, and is driven by molecular motors. A Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU)in M has now discovered that the motor protein myosin VI contributes directly to the deformation of the cell membrane, as required for locomotion or endocytosis.

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Technologies for the Sixth Generation Cellular Network

Future wireless data networks will have to reach higher transmission rates and shorter delays, while supplying an increasing number of end devices. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) use ultra-rapid electro-optical modulators to convert terahertz data signals into optical signals. This is reported in Nature Photonics.

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How to trick electrons to see the hidden face of crystals

The 3D analysis of crystal structures requires a full 3D view of the crystals. Crystals as small as powder, with edges less than one micrometer, can only be analysed with electron radiation. With electron crystallography, a full 360-degree view of a single crystal is technically impossible. A team of researchers from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna modified the holder of the t

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Preventing people from abandoning exotic pets that threatened biodiversity

Abandoning exotic pets is an ethical problem that can lead to biological invasions that threaten conservation of biodiversity in the environment. An article published in the journal Biological Invasions, whose first author is the researcher Alberto Maceda Veiga, from the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio), reveals that the release of invasive species in the envi

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Madagascar spider silk 10 times stronger than Kevlar

Protein discovery has implications for biomechanics and manufacturing. Barry Keily reports.

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Peer pressure could nudge people towards sustainable diets

Modelling suggests it would be more effective than facts. Natalie Parletta reports.

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‘Conspiracies’ dominate YouTube climate modification videos

Important scientific terms have been hijacked, study suggests. Nick Carne reports.

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White dwarfs really on the move

Dead stars found whipping around each other in a matter of minutes.

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Don’t forget – less chilli

Study finds possible link to cognitive decline.

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How the pufferfish got its wacky spines

The process actually isn’t that crazy.

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Trees share water to keep this dying stump alive

New study shows trees can share water between their roots

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The Stump That Didn’t Die

At some point, a kauri tree fell in a New Zealand forest, and no one noticed. Nor did anyone pay attention when the remnant of its trunk rotted away, leaving behind a stump that’s barely even a stump—a chair-size, hollowed-out half cylinder, sticking up from the middle of a hiking trail, leafless and apparently dead. “It doesn’t look spectacular at all,” says Sebastian Leuzinger of the Auckland U

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Tree Stump Stays Alive with a Little Help from Neighboring Trees

Tree Stump Stays Alive with a Little Help from Neighboring Trees Researchers discover evidence of a kauri tree "superorganism" in New Zealand. New Zealand Living tree-stump.jpg Image credits: Sebastian Leuzinger/iScience Rights information: Credit Required Creature Thursday, July 25, 2019 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — In the wilds of New Zealand, scientists have found a

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Introducing Singularity University Radio: The Home for SU Podcasts

In this gig-economy age of entrepreneurs and full-time hustlers, podcasts have become a signature way to stay up-to-date, inspired, and educated while on the move. Whether you’re at home making dinner, commuting, or at the gym keeping the mind and body pumped full of healthy endorphins, podcasts offer a rare chance to learn and laugh without getting in the way of your daily grind. So to help the

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Slowing metabolic rate can prevent detrimental effects of genetic mutations

Just by slowing their metabolism, mutant fruit flies can go from zero to hero.

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Biochemists streamline construction method for human artificial chromosomes

For the past 20 years, researchers have been trying to perfect the construction of human artificial chromosomes, or HACs for short. In a paper published today in Cell, Penn researchers describe a new way to form an essential part of the artificial chromosome, called the centromere, by bypassing the biological requirements needed to form a natural one. Simply put, they biochemically delivered a pro

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Antarctic krill use 'hotspots' for their young

New research, published this week (24 July 2019) in the journal PLOS ONE, shows how Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba), a key species in the Southern Ocean food web, choose different areas of the ocean at the various stages of their life cycle. This understanding of their distribution and movement is essential for conservation of this important food source, which is the main diet for animals such

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Balancing beams: Multiple laser beamlets show better electron and ion acceleration

A research team led by Osaka University showed how multiple overlapping laser beams are better at accelerating electrons to incredibly fast speeds, as compared with a single laser. This method can lead to more powerful and efficient X-ray and ion generation for laboratory astrophysics, cancer therapy research, as well as a path toward controlled nuclear fusion.

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Paris bakes in record 41C as Europe heatwave hits blistering peak

Paris on Thursday baked in a record hot temperature of 41 degrees Celsius as a ferocious heatwave in northern Europe reached its peak, sparking concerns about public health and new misery for rail travellers.

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Could rat brains hold the secret to giving cars, robots better navigational skills?

Neuroscientists say special 'mapping' brain cells could inspire the design of smarter self-driving vehicles.

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Motorized prosthetic arm can sense touch, move with your thoughts

Biomedical engineers are helping develop a prosthetic arm for amputees that can move with the person's thoughts and feel the sensation of touch via an array of electrodes implanted in the muscles of the patient.

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People Are Going to Tesla Service Centers Just to Learn About Autopilot

Autopilot 101 Tesla is selling a lot more cars than it used to. In Q2 of this year, the electric car company moved 77,634 Model 3 vehicles alone. And many of those new owners seem to be hazy about how to use the cars’ Autopilot feature, Electrek reports : the single most common reason why customers visit Tesla service centers is to learn about the steering-assist tech. Course Correct According to

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Slowing metabolic rate can prevent detrimental effects of genetic mutations

Just by slowing their metabolism, mutant fruit flies can go from zero to hero.

6h

Biochemists streamline construction method for human artificial chromosomes

For the past 20 years, researchers have been trying to perfect the construction of human artificial chromosomes, or HACs for short. In a paper published today in Cell, Penn researchers describe a new way to form an essential part of the artificial chromosome, called the centromere, by bypassing the biological requirements needed to form a natural one. Simply put, they biochemically delivered a pro

6h

Antarctic krill use 'hotspots' for their young

New research, published this week (24 July 2019) in the journal PLOS ONE, shows how Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba), a key species in the Southern Ocean food web, choose different areas of the ocean at the various stages of their life cycle. This understanding of their distribution and movement is essential for conservation of this important food source, which is the main diet for animals such

6h

Is your favorite brand authentic?

In the modern media world, consumers are constantly bombarded with advertisements claiming that products are "luxury," "European," created with "old-world traditions and craftsmanship" and more, but how do people know if these descriptions are true? The name Haagen-Dazs evokes a premium, imported brand image, but the company's original brand name was Senator Frozen Foods.

7h

Could rat brains hold the secret to giving cars, robots better navigational skills?

Neuroscientists say special 'mapping' brain cells could inspire the design of smarter self-driving vehicles.

7h

Disrupting immune cell behavior may contribute to heart disease and failure, study shows

A new study provides evidence that when circulating anti-inflammatory white blood cells known as monocytes fail to properly differentiate into macrophages — the cells that engulf and digest cellular debris, bacteria and viruses — certain forms of heart disease may result.

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Motorized prosthetic arm can sense touch, move with your thoughts

Biomedical engineers are helping develop a prosthetic arm for amputees that can move with the person's thoughts and feel the sensation of touch via an array of electrodes implanted in the muscles of the patient.

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Cellular soldiers designed to kill cancer cells that get loose during surgery

Biomedical engineers have discovered a method to track down and kill escaping cancer cells during tumor removal surgeries. The method, which uses the body's own defenses in the form of modified lipid nanoparticles adhered to white blood cells, could preventing metastasis and save lives.

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Storming Area 51 to find aliens? Here's some science to consider

Millions of people have signed up to a tongue-in-cheek Facebook event to storm the US military base "Area 51" on 20 September to discover whether aliens are inside. While the organisers said it was a joke, the US military wasn't amused, responding it would "discourage anyone from trying to enter the area".

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Microbial manufacturing: Genetic engineering breakthrough for urban farming

Researchers at SMART, MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, and National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed a technology that greatly accelerates the genetic engineering of microbes that can be used to manufacture chemicals used for urban farming. The new technology will result in a faster, cheaper, more accurate, and near-scarless plasmid construction, using standard and reusable part

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Reducing greenhouse gas in Rocky Mountain region has health, financial benefits

Research by Drexel University and the University of Colorado at Boulder suggests that imposing fees on energy producers that emit greenhouse gas could improve the health and financial well-being of the Rocky Mountain region.

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Microbial manufacturing: Genetic engineering breakthrough for urban farming

Researchers at SMART, MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, and National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed a technology that greatly accelerates the genetic engineering of microbes that can be used to manufacture chemicals used for urban farming. The new technology will result in a faster, cheaper, more accurate, and near-scarless plasmid construction, using standard and reusable part

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Investments in biking routes improve access to jobs in US metros

First-of-its-kind research from the Accessibility Observatory at the University of Minnesota ranks the 50 largest (by population) metropolitan areas in the United States for connecting workers with jobs via bicycle.

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To make a flat joke funnier, cue the laugh track

Nature, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02273-5 Canned laughter helps people see the humour in bad jokes.

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A Rare Nature Documentary That Tells a Deeply Human Story

Honeyland is the story of an ecosystem. In its initial moments, Tamara Kotevska and Ljubomir Stefanov’s documentary about a rural beekeeper in the mountains of Macedonia seems like a singular, focused tale: a portrait of a woman performing a near-forgotten art. Indeed, the work that the protagonist, Hatidze, does, following ancient honey-harvesting traditions largely unknown to modern audiences,

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How the U.S. Could Lose a War With China

If a war broke out between the United States and China, the clash between two of the world’s most powerful militaries would be horrific. And the United States could very well lose. That’s a concern among current and former defense officials and military analysts, one of whom told Breaking Defense earlier this year that in war games simulating great-power conflict in which the United States fights

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Sclerosing agent delivery improvements to protect against malignant pleural effusion

Preclinical trials were held on mice. Senior Research Associate Alexander Deneka (Laboratory of Molecular and Biochemical Bases of Pathogenesis and Therapy of Cancer Diseases, Kazan Federal University) explains that the method in question was first proposed by British scientists; they proved that liquid can be drained from a pleural cavity with the help of a talcum powder solution.

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The positive and negative role of LRH-1 during inflammation

The research group around Professor Thomas Brunner at the University of Konstanz discovers the role that the LRH-1 protein plays in the immune system — inhibiting this protein could help treat inflammatory diseases.

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Paleontology — new light on cichlid evolution in Africa

A collaborative research project carried out under the auspices of the GeoBio-Center at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich has developed an integrative approach to the classification of fossil cichlids,and identified the oldest known member of the tribe Oreochromini.

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Molecular biophysics — the ABC of ribosome recycling

Ribosomes, the essential machinery used for protein synthesis is recycled after each one round of translation. An enzyme called ABCE1 is responsible for this process and turns out to be remarkably plastic as Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biophysicists report.

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Neurobiology — sushi for synapses

Synapses between nerve cells in the brain undergo constant remodeling, which is the basis of learning. An Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich team has now traced the molecules that direct remodeling and shown that they circulate in the living cell like running sushi.

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Attitudes toward race, immigration underscored vote switching in 2016 election

It's estimated that around 9% of voters who supported Barack Obama in 2012 crossed party lines to endorse Donald Trump in 2016 — but why? According to a team of researchers that included Loren Collingwood, an associate professor of political science at the University of California, Riverside, the reasons behind so-called "vote switching" might be more complicated than originally expected.

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US emergency medical services underrepresented of women and minorities

Women and minority groups are underrepresented in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in the US and workforce diversity is not likely undergo big changes anytime soon, according to a new 10-year study of almost 700,000 newly certified emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics, published in Prehospital Emergency Care.

7h

Balancing beams: Multiple laser beamlets show better electron and ion acceleration

Researchers at Osaka University show how creating interference patterns with four laser beamlets improves the efficiency of energy transfer when accelerating electron and ion beams. This method can be used to enhance biological and astrophysical research.

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NASA’s Chandra X-ray telescope celebrates 20 years in space

The U.S. space agency has released new images for the Chandra X-ray Observatory’s 20th birthday.

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Stress may put a ‘frog in your throat’

Stress might be to blame for the feeling of having a “frog in your throat,” stammering, or other voice control issues, according to a new study. The pilot study expands on the Trait Theory of Voice Disorders, often used in understanding functional voice disorders. The researchers discovered that stress-induced brain activations could lead to voice disorders such as muscle tension dysphonia, a dis

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Visits to the dentist decline in old age, especially among minorities

Visits to the dentist drop significantly after adults turn 80, finds a new study.

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Fracking activities may contribute to anxiety and depression during pregnancy

A new study identifies a link between proximity to hydraulic fracking activities and mental health issues during pregnancy.

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With bitter foods, what you eat determines what you like to eat

Introducing plant-based foods to a diet is a common-sense approach to healthy eating, but many people don't like the taste of vegetables, bitter greens, in particular. But give that broccoli a chance. Doing so won't just change your mind; it will actually change the taste of those foods, according to a new study.

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How nature builds hydrogen-producing enzymes

A team has discovered how hydrogen-producing enzymes, called hydrogenases, are activated during their biosynthesis. They showed how the cofactor — part of the active center and also the heart of the enzyme — is introduced inside.

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Brain parts involved in parenting in frogs revealed

A team of researchers from Stanford University, Harvard University, Centro Jambatu de Investigación y Conservación de Anfibios and East Carolina University has isolated the brain regions involved in poison dart frog parenting. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of three types of poison dart frogs and what they learned.

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Study shows U.S. veterans earn more money in the workplace than non-veterans

Military veterans are faring better in the workplace than their non-veteran counterparts. In fact, between 2005 and 2015, veterans' average hourly wages were nearly $5 higher—at almost $26 an hour—compared to $21 an hour for non-veterans. Those findings, and more, by faculty economists Dr. Francesco Renna and Dr. Amanda Weinstein, at The University of Akron are discussed in their paper, "The veter

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Brain parts involved in parenting in frogs revealed

A team of researchers from Stanford University, Harvard University, Centro Jambatu de Investigación y Conservación de Anfibios and East Carolina University has isolated the brain regions involved in poison dart frog parenting. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of three types of poison dart frogs and what they learned.

7h

Toddlers can’t truly answer ‘this or that’ questions

If you ask a toddler, “would you like cake or broccoli?” the answer—8 times out of 10—will be broccoli, report researchers. This has less to do with parents successfully instilling healthy food preferences than the order of the choices. The new study in PLOS ONE finds that toddlers are highly subject to recency bias when faced with “or” questions: They tend to pick the last option, even if it’s n

7h

Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question

Advanced simulations have solved a problem in turbulent fluid flow that could lead to more efficient turbines and engines.

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Pure altruism: The connection that explains why we help strangers

Just over two years ago, my home city of Manchester suffered a terrorist attack. Waiting in the arena foyer after an Ariana Grande concert, a young man detonated a bomb strapped to his chest, killing 22 people and injuring several hundred. But in the midst of the senseless savagery of the attack, there were many stories of heroism and selflessness.

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Being your true self isn't always treated equally in the business world, new study finds

Is authenticity truly beneficial in the workplace? Are places of work conducive to employee authenticity? Not for everyone, research from FIU Business finds.

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Scientists develop fluorescent sensors to track nutrients in hydrogel-based healing

It's important to know one's new cells are getting nourishment. Rice University scientists are working on a way to tell for sure.

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Automakers, Rejecting Trump Pollution Rule, Strike a Deal With California

Four of the world’s largest automakers, including the Ford Motor Company, have struck a deal with California to reduce tailpipe pollution.

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Program cuts smoking among people getting cancer treatment

A new program is helping patients undergoing cancer treatment quit smoking, research shows. When patients who smoke begin cancer treatment at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis—or at any of Siteman’s satellite locations—they also now receive advice about quitting smoking, referrals to easy-access smoking-cessation services and

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Why companies should not give their customers discounts after service failures

A new study finds that price-based recovery incentives after service failures are negatively associated with the likelihood that subscribers renew their service contracts.

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Antibiotics can inhibit skin lymphoma

New research from the LEO Foundation Skin Immunology Research Center at the University of Copenhagen shows, surprisingly, that antibiotics inhibit cancer in the skin in patients with rare type of lymphoma.

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Airborne particles can send our detox systems into overdrive

As the world gets more and more industrialized, the risk of developing respiratory diseases increases. Very small particles released from industry and vehicle fumes are harmful to our health but exactly how is still unclear. In a collaborative study, researchers in Japan, the US and Germany have uncovered one mechanism that can exaggerate inflammation in response to diesel fumes and worsen symptom

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Signals from skin cells control fat cell specialization

When cells change to a more specialized type, we call this process cellular differentiation. Scientists have revealed that protein secretions by skin cells known as keratinocytes control the differentiation of subsurface skin fat cells. This discovery could potentially help to treat obesity. Associate Professor Takehiko Ueyama and Professor Naoaki Saito at the Biosignal Research Center of Kobe Uni

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Fracking likely to result in high emissions

Natural gas releases fewer greenhouse gases than other fossil fuels. That's why it is often seen as a bridge technology to a low-carbon future. A study by the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) has estimated emissions from shale gas production through fracking in Germany and the UK. It shows that CO2-eq. emissions would exceed the estimated current emissions from conventional gas

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Revolutionary method could bring us much closer to the description of hyperdiverse faunas

Largely relying on DNA barcoding, rather than traditional practices, a simplified diagnostics method for species description could be the key to revealing Earth's biodiversity before much of it goes extinct. Proposed by a US-Canadian research team in a new publication in the open-access journal Deutsche Entomologische Zeitschrift, the approach is demonstrated in practice with the description of 18

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Study: Reducing greenhouse gas in rocky mountain region has health, financial benefits

Research by Drexel University and the University of Colorado at Boulder suggests that imposing fees on energy producers that emit greenhouse gas could improve the health and financial well-being of the Rocky Mountain region.

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Children with medical emergencies during airline flights have limited aid

Children afflicted with medical emergencies during commercial airline trips tend to have common ailments such as vomiting, fever or allergic reactions — events that should be easily treated, according to a study led by Duke Health researchers.But few airlines stock first-aid kits with pediatric versions of therapies that would help, including liquid forms of pain relievers or allergy medications.

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More can be done to prevent children from having in-flight medical emergencies

Resources are limited on an airplane during an in-flight emergency and access to care is not always immediate. A new study published in Annals of Emergency Medicine reveals that 15.5 percent of in-flight emergencies involve children and that one in six cases require additional care.

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Researchers suggest empathy be a factor in medical school admissions

The national norms can help to distinguish between two applicants with similar academic qualifications, and identify students who might need additional educational remedies to bolster their level of empathy. Research indicates that physicians with higher levels of empathy demonstrate greater clinical competence and deliver better patient outcomes than less empathetic doctors.

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Some Pacific salmon populations are especially at risk from climate change

Four population groups of Pacific salmon in California, Oregon, and Idaho are especially vulnerable to climate change, according to a new study.

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Kids widely exposed to smoking in movies

More than half of the top-grossing movies in Ontario in the past 16 years featured smoking, according to researchers with the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit — and most of these films were rated as acceptable for youth.

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Waist size is a forgotten factor in defining obesity

A new study finds that some people considered to be a normal weight could unknowingly be at high risk for obesity-related health issues.

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ADVANCE study provides evidence for shift to dolutegravir-containing ART

Medical researchers have presented evidence for a shift to dolutegravir-containing antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.

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Magnetic eyelashes: A new source of MRI artifacts

Researchers used a phantom to show that magnetic eyelashes worn during MRI can cause substantial artifact and that detachment of the eyelashes from the phantom can occur.

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Secret to more efficient learning

A new study could hold the key to learning languages, teaching children colors or even studying complex theories.

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Thanks, Gaia: Astronomers spy Europa blocking distant star

On 31 March 2017, Jupiter's moon Europa passed in front of a background star—a rare event that was captured for the first time by ground-based telescopes thanks to data provided by ESA's Gaia spacecraft.

7h

How to trick electrons to see the hidden face of crystals

The 3-D analysis of crystal structures requires a full 3-D view of the crystals. Crystals as small as powder, with edges less than one micrometer, can only be analysed with electron radiation. With electron crystallography, a full 360-degree view of a single crystal is technically impossible. A team of researchers led by Tim Gruene from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna modified

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Expressing religious identity at work good for staff wellbeing

When employees are provided with a supportive environment to express their religious identity in the workplace they experience increased wellbeing and work more efficiently, according to a new research review from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

7h

Using weather radar to monitor insects

Scientists are developing a pioneering technique that allows them to monitor insects in the air using weather radars, as part of a research project called BioDAR.

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How motherhood has been redefined through migration and maternal motion

Historically, men dominated migration patterns as they moved in search of employment opportunities to provide for their families. Patriarchal societies expected men to be the sole provider while women looked after homes and families. The feminization of migration shows that women are migrating increasingly and providing as heads of households. This changing family dynamic has implications for ways

7h

Are ecobricks the answer to plastic pollution?

The use of single-use plastics in households has become a pariah. Many people are trying to reduce the use of single-use plastics or to recycle them. One such innovation is creating "ecobricks"—filling empty two-litre plastic bottles with single-use plastics over time—and delivering these to collection points for use in constructing low-cost houses. Schalk Mouton asks Professor Herman Potgieter, t

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Massive nests of sociable weavers endure for generations, and house other species, as well

It is six o'clock on a sweltering afternoon in the Kalahari Desert and the mercury is still hovering around 40 degrees Celsius. The arid landscape seems empty, save for a few bushes and camelthorn trees in the distance. On some of the trees, what appear to be half-constructed thatched roofs weigh down the dry branches.

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Backyard not backward: Intentional living, the rise of imikhukhu and urban densification for dignity

Backyard dwellings are a growing trend in a world where the need for accommodation is pressing. By saving money on their living spaces, many tenants are saving money for other investments.

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Can We Cure HIV?

Everyday Einstein explores the human immunodeficiency virus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Using weather radar to monitor insects

Scientists are developing a pioneering technique that allows them to monitor insects in the air using weather radars, as part of a research project called BioDAR.

7h

Massive nests of sociable weavers endure for generations, and house other species, as well

It is six o'clock on a sweltering afternoon in the Kalahari Desert and the mercury is still hovering around 40 degrees Celsius. The arid landscape seems empty, save for a few bushes and camelthorn trees in the distance. On some of the trees, what appear to be half-constructed thatched roofs weigh down the dry branches.

7h

Archaeologists and anthropologists peer into original homes of the past to see what made us who we are today

There was a time when the laughter of Stone Age children filled the Sibudu Cave. About 64 000 years ago, a child was part of a hunter-gatherer family that took temporary shelter in this cave, which lies close to the KwaZulu-Natal town of KwaDukuza.

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Opinion: Hitting turbulence? Aviation and the climate crisis

In the U.K., there is a legal commitment to reducing the net carbon account for all six greenhouse gases by 80 percent (1990-2050) under the Climate Change Act 2008, and recently this target has been raised to 100 percent. By 2050 U.K. greenhouse gas emissions will be cut to net zero. At present the aviation sector has been allowed to set and deliver voluntary targets. As globalization progresses,

7h

Materials for hydrogen service advanced by new multilab consortium

Researchers at Sandia and Pacific Northwest national laboratories are leading a collaborative effort to investigate how hydrogen affects materials such as plastics, rubber, steel and aluminum.

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Small Towns Fear They Are Unprepared For Future Climate-Driven Flooding

The central U.S. just experienced the most widespread river flooding ever recorded there. Flood defenses in major cities largely performed well, but many smaller communities were simply overwhelmed. (Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory)

7h

New “Automated Following” Tech Lets One Driver Control Two Trucks

Keep on Truckin’ Peloton Technology’s vision of the future of truck automation includes trucks that aren’t autonomous at all. At the recent Automated Vehicle Symposium in Orlando, Fla., the Silicon Valley-based startup unveiled Automated Following, a new system that grants a truck an extraordinary degree of self-driving autonomy — by designing it to copy the actions of a human-driven truck. Copy

7h

Five Ways Buildings of the Future Will Use Biotech to Become Living Things

What if our homes were alive? I don’t mean smart homes with the disembodied voice of Alexa deciding the setting for your living room spotlights. I mean actually alive—growing, living, breathing, and even reproducing. The idea might seem far-fetched, but in the face of a climate crisis, we humans need to think radically about the way we live in and build our environment. Biology is capable of extr

7h

Indian farmers shocked as suspected meteorite crashes into rice field

Football-sized object landed in paddy in Bihar state after ‘fireball’ came down from sky A suspected meteorite has plunged from the sky, startling farmers and crashing into the middle of a rice field in eastern India, according to authorities. The object – the size of a football – landed with a thud in a paddy field in Bihar states’s Madhubani district on Monday, sending up clouds of smoke. Kapil

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NHS abandons plan to let healthy people pay for DNA sequencing

Amid concerns over two-tier health system, new scheme will read volunteers’ DNA for free Government plans to sell DNA sequencing to healthy people on condition that they share their results for medical research have been scrapped amid concerns it would create an inequitable two-tier health system. Matt Hancock, who survived Boris Johnson’s cabinet makeover to keep his job as health secretary, ann

7h

Training my dog taught me that it's people who really need training

As I watched my hunting dog standing off the lead and lined up with all the other Kleiner Münsterländers, awaiting her turn to swim out and bring back the dead duck (an important training item) thrown into the deep water, I felt a sense of pride.

7h

Training my dog taught me that it's people who really need training

As I watched my hunting dog standing off the lead and lined up with all the other Kleiner Münsterländers, awaiting her turn to swim out and bring back the dead duck (an important training item) thrown into the deep water, I felt a sense of pride.

7h

Lobster organs and reflexes damaged by marine seismic surveys

A new study of the impact on marine life of seismic air guns, used in geological surveys of the seafloor, has found that the sensory organs and righting reflexes of rock lobster can be damaged by exposure to air gun signals.

7h

Scientists take high-speed video of waves to better understand sea spray

Waves crashing on seashores generate tiny droplets of water known as sea spray. Sea spray moves heat and water from the ocean to the atmosphere, but scientists are unsure which part of the wave-breaking process generates the most spray, whether it be wind shear, splashing, or the popping of air bubbles at the surface of the wave.

8h

Giant gate-tunable bandgap renormalization and excitonic effects in a 2-D semiconductor

Investigating the remarkable excitonic effects in two-dimensional (2-D) semiconductors and controlling their exciton binding energies can unlock the full potential of 2-D materials for future applications in photonic and optoelectronic devices. In a recent study, Zhizhan Qiu and colleagues at the interdisciplinary departments of chemistry, engineering, advanced 2-D materials, physics and materials

8h

Scientists Accidentally Created a Liquid Magnet

Oops Scientists created a metallic liquid capable of maintaining a magnetic field for the first time in history — and they did it entirely by accident. University of Massachusetts Amherst engineers were working on 3D-printing liquids when they discovered that the droplets of iron, oil, and water were able to maintain a magnetic field, the researchers told Live Science , a first for any liquid . H

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Hair could be the key to better mental-illness diagnosis in teens

It's possible that a lock of hair could one day aid in the diagnosis of depression and in efforts to monitor the effects of treatment, said the author of a new study examining cortisol levels in the hair of teens.

8h

Evidence a cancer drug may be extended to many more patients

Drugs currently used to treat less than 10% of breast cancer patients could have broader effectiveness in treating all cancers, including ovarian and prostate cancers.

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Molecule reduces accumulation of toxic protein in Parkinson's disease model

The discovery supports GM1 ganglioside as a potential target for Parkinson's therapy.

8h

An asteroid just buzzed past Earth, and we barely noticed in time

A 100-metre-wide asteroid passed just 70,000km from Earth on Thursday, Australian time. It was discovered by the Brazilian SONEAR survey just days ago, and its presence was announced mere hours before it zoomed past our planet. The lack of warning shows how quickly potentially dangerous asteroids can sneak up on us.

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Climate Change May Have Prepared This Superbug to Kill Humans

Fungus Among Us In April, we reported on the rise of Candida auris (C. auris), a deadly antibiotic-resistant fungus which, in just 10 years, went from infecting its first known victim to raising concerns about a new global epidemic. Now, an international team of researchers thinks it knows how the fungus was able to turn deadly so quickly : climate change. Beat the Heat For the study, published i

8h

Microbial manufacturing: Genetic engineering breakthrough for urban farming

Researchers at DiSTAP, SMART, MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, and National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed a new technology that revolutionises the creation of genetic material, enabling drastically accelerated genetic engineering of microbes that can be used to manufacture chemicals used for urban farming. The new Guanine/Thymine (GT) DNA assembly technology will accelerate t

8h

Could α-Klotho be a potential biomarker of stress?

Researchers at Osaka University elucidated an interesting association between psychological stress and serum levels of α-Klotho (αKl).

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Study reveals top tools for pinpointing genetic drivers of disease

A new benchmarking study has determined the best analysis tools for identifying errors in a patient's DNA that are responsible for driving disease. Being able to pinpoint these 'genomic rearrangements' is vital for understanding how illnesses occur, and therefore, how best to treat them.

8h

Dangers of the blame game

The moral character of a victim of a product or service failure can influence how much consumers blame the victim for their suffering, which in turn affects how much consumers hold companies responsible.

8h

Researchers develop new technology for multiple sclerosis diagnosis and treatment

Researchers at the Center for BrainHealth®, part of The University of Texas at Dallas, in collaboration with a team from UT Southwestern, have developed technology for a novel diagnostic method for multiple sclerosis (MS). The new approach has the potential to determine which damaged regions in an MS patient's brain have the capacity to heal themselves, and which do not.

8h

Elephant extinction will raise carbon dioxide levels in atmosphere

Forest elephants engineer the ecosystem of the entire central African forest, and their catastrophic decline toward extinction has implications for carbon policy.

8h

Is your favorite brand authentic?

Researchers recently discovered that stories about the origins of a company influence whether consumers believe a brand is authentic.

8h

Researchers seeking fragments of fireball in Ontario

Researchers are seeking the public's help in locating fragments of a fireball that shone as bright as the full moon observed by Western's All-Sky Camera Network across at 2:44 a.m. ET this morning.

8h

Tree Stumps Are Dead, Right? This One Was Alive

When two ecologists hiking in New Zealand discovered this stump, they had to figure out how it could still be alive.

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Fewer fish may reach breeding age as climate change skews timing of reproduction, food availability

Climate change may be depriving juvenile fish of their most crucial early food source by throwing off the synchronization of when microscopic plants known as phytoplankton bloom and when fish hatch, according to Princeton University researchers. The long-term effect on fish reproductivity could mean fewer fish available for human consumption.

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Cryo-EM structures show how vertical single β-barrel viruses manage self-assembly

In 1977, Carl Woese et al introduced the three-domain system of biological classification that divides life forms into Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryotes. This was the first time that the differences between Archaea and Bacteria were recognized. The first observed archaea were extremophiles, able to survive and thrive in extremely harsh conditions, but ongoing research has found them in a wide range

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Fewer fish may reach breeding age as climate change skews timing of reproduction, food availability

Climate change may be depriving juvenile fish of their most crucial early food source by throwing off the synchronization of when microscopic plants known as phytoplankton bloom and when fish hatch, according to Princeton University researchers. The long-term effect on fish reproductivity could mean fewer fish available for human consumption.

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Cryo-EM structures show how vertical single β-barrel viruses manage self-assembly

In 1977, Carl Woese et al introduced the three-domain system of biological classification that divides life forms into Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryotes. This was the first time that the differences between Archaea and Bacteria were recognized. The first observed archaea were extremophiles, able to survive and thrive in extremely harsh conditions, but ongoing research has found them in a wide range

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Internet gifs aren't just for the lols: Giphy wants to make money too

Money-spinning change is on the way to your emojis, gifs and TikToks, as companies like Giphy make plans to monetize animations and wacky videos set to music

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Study finds new insights on overdose rates, county segregation, and socioeconomics

Deaths from drug overdoses have risen dramatically in the United States over the past 20 years, and researchers seek to understand complex factors that may affect these deaths. A new study led by George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services examined drug overdose deaths at the county level. It found that socioeconomic factors and segregation may have independent effects that vary

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Gravity changes mass of muscles and bones, which was experimentally observed in space

An international collaboration led by scientists mainly at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) , Japan, has found that bone and muscle mass are regulated by the altered gravity. The experiments were done in space using Kibo, a ISS module developed by JAXA, and on the ground.

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Study in mice advances combination immune therapy for ovarian cancer

Delivering two federally approved immunity-altering drugs together significantly extended the lives of mice injected with human ovarian cancer cells, an early proof-of-concept experiment that may advance treatment for the most deadly — although rare — gynecologic malignancy in humans, according to scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center who performed the research.

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Missile strike false alarm most stressful for less anxious Hawaiians, study finds

After learning that a warning of a missile headed to Hawaii was a false alarm, the most anxious local Twitter users calmed down more quickly than less anxious users, according to a study of tweets before, during and after the event, published by the American Psychological Association.

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Exposure to common chemicals in plastics linked to childhood obesity

Exposure to common chemicals in plastics and canned foods may play a role in childhood obesity, according to a study published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

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Little helpers for the rainforest

Primate researchers show how monkeys contribute to the regeneration of tropical forests.

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Diet of traditional Native foods revealed in hair samples

University of Alaska Fairbanks researchers have linked specific chemical signatures found in human hair with a diet of traditional Yup'ik foods. The finding could help scientists make connections between diet and long-term health trends in Alaska Native populations.

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Expanding the limits of personalized medicine with high-performance computing

Imagine that you have a serious medical condition. Then imagine that when you visit a team of doctors, they could build an identical virtual 'twin' of the condition and simulate millions of ways to treat it until they develop an effective treatment. That is the vision of a team of scientists, led by Argonne National Laboratory.

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Glimpsing Our Post-Consumption Future at the Cooper Hewitt

The Design Triennial envisions the possibilities for algae, yeast and other nonpolluting materials. Will they help save the planet?

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The road to Scandinavia's bronze age: Trade routes, metal provenance, and mixing

The geographic origins of the metals in Scandinavian mixed-metal artifacts reveal a crucial dependency on British and continental European trading sources during the beginnings of the Nordic Bronze Age, according to a new study.

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New study to explore impact of football-based Twinning Project on offenders

The Twinning Project has announced the launch of ground-breaking new partnership with the University of Oxford, who will analyze the results of the Twinning Project's approach of using sport to tackle reoffending rates of prisoners in the UK.

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Sonos and Ikea’s Symfonisk wireless speakers are a symphony of sound and design

Sonos and Ikea’s Symfonisk collaboration took a lot of people by surprise when it was announced earlier this year, but the match up is less unlikely than it might appear at first glance. …

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Image: Recovering burn scars in Argentina

ESA minisatellite Proba-V's ongoing view shows the rapid regeneration of South American grasslands from wildfire burn scars.

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Leiden physicists image lumpy superconductor

High-temperature superconductivity is one of the big mysteries in physics. Milan Allan's research group used a Josephson Scanning Tunneling Microscope to image spatial variations of superconducting particles for the first time, and published about it in the journal Nature.

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Got It All Ready For You, Mr. FDA Inspector

Many folks outside of this industry don’t realize that the FDA sends inspectors to drug manufacturing facilities in other countries. That might sound a bit odd, but agreeing to such inspections is in fact a condition of being able to sell pharmaceutical substances in the US (or to supply other companies that do). It’s a big job, and one feels sure that there are things that slip through the many

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Technologies for the sixth generation cellular network

Future wireless data networks will have to reach higher transmission rates and shorter delays, while supplying an increasing number of end devices. For this purpose, network structures consisting of many small radio cells are required. To connect these cells will require high-performance transmission lines at high frequencies up to the terahertz range. Moreover, seamless connection to glass fiber

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These squirrel-size monkeys helped bring Peru’s Amazon back to life

Tamarins eat fruit and excrete their seeds in deforested areas, reviving plant life

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Sonos Ikea Symfonisk Review: A Sonos Speaker With Ikea's Good Looks

The audio company teams up with the furniture giant on two new products: a bookshelf speaker and a combo lamp/speaker.

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Drag Queen vs. David Duke: Whose Tweets Are More 'Toxic'?

Opinion: Researchers used Google's AI tool to rank the harmfulness of tweets by white nationalists and drag queens. The results were discouraging.

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DeepMind is helping Waymo evolve better self-driving AI algorithms

A more efficient way to training neural nets could provide a crucial edge in the hyper-competitive world of automated driving—and elsewhere.

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Determining traits from genes

Advanced technologies allow scientists to decipher information about genes faster and more accurately than ever before. But bridging the gap between the genome and how it will be expressed has proven challenging. Scientists used a model grass to demonstrate, for the first time, a two-step process that links genes to internal properties of a plant and in turn links those internal properties to plan

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Engineers discover lead-free perovskite semiconductor for solar cells using data analytics, supercomputers

Solar panel installations are on the rise in the U.S., with more than 2 million new installations in early 2019, the most ever recorded in a first quarter, according to a recent report by Solar Energy Industries Association and Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables.

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Chemists close gap in making nanomedicines safer, more efficient

Dr. Jie Zheng believes he's turned a barrier into a bridge when it comes to nanomedicine implementation.

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Determining traits from genes

Advanced technologies allow scientists to decipher information about genes faster and more accurately than ever before. But bridging the gap between the genome and how it will be expressed has proven challenging. Scientists used a model grass to demonstrate, for the first time, a two-step process that links genes to internal properties of a plant and in turn links those internal properties to plan

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Why stop at plastic bags and straws? The case for a global treaty banning most single-use plastics

Single-use plastics are a blessing and a curse. They have fueled a revolution in commercial and consumer convenience and improved hygiene standards, but also have saturated the world's coastlines and clogged landfills. By one estimate 79 percent of all plastic ever produced is now in a dump, a landfill or the environment, and only 9 percent has been recycled.

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Molecular mayhem at root of battery breakdown

Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have uncovered a molecular game of musical chairs that hurts battery performance.

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Climate Scientists: Current Warming Is Not Part of Earth’s Natural Cycle

Credit: Luca Galuzzi/CC BY-SA 2.5 It has become increasingly difficult for climate change deniers to rationalize their position. They’ve gone from claiming that the globe isn’t warming to saying this is just part of a normal cycle. That position is just as wrong, according to climate scientists. A trio of new studies adds weight to that assessment , showing that the current rate of warming is “un

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‘Quantum microphone’ can count individual particles of sound

A new “quantum microphone” is so sensitive that it can measure individual particles of sound, called phonons, researchers report. The device could eventually lead to smaller, more efficient quantum computers that operate by manipulating sound rather than light. “We expect this device to allow new types of quantum sensors, transducers, and storage devices for future quantum machines,” says study l

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The 20th century was the hottest in nearly 2,000 years, studies show

Two new studies show that the 20th century was the Earth's warmest period recorded in 2,000 years of the planet's record.

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The Apollo experiment that keeps on giving

Neal Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins departed from the moon 50 years ago, but one of the experiments they left behind continues to return fresh data to this day: arrays of prisms that reflect light back toward its source, providing plentiful insights. Along with the Apollo 11 astronauts, those of Apollo 14 and 15 left arrays behind as well: The Apollo 11 and 14 arrays have 100 quartz gl

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Shining a new light on the evolution of supernovae

A research team led by UNSW Canberra scientist Ivo Seitenzahl is shining a new light on the evolution of supernovae—a hotly contested topic amongst astrophysicists.

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Tuna are spawning in marine protected areas

Marine protected areas are large swaths of coastal seas or open ocean that are protected by governments from activities such as commercial fishing and mining. Such marine sanctuaries have had rehabilitating effects on at-risk species living within their borders. But it's been less clear how they benefit highly migratory species such as tuna.

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Tuna are spawning in marine protected areas

Marine protected areas are large swaths of coastal seas or open ocean that are protected by governments from activities such as commercial fishing and mining. Such marine sanctuaries have had rehabilitating effects on at-risk species living within their borders. But it's been less clear how they benefit highly migratory species such as tuna.

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Nintendo Unveils Disney-Themed Nintendo Switch Console

If you’re thinking about getting your hands on the Nintendo Switch console, you might be interested to learn that the company has recently taken the wraps off what appears to be a Disney-themed …

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Commercial fishing threatens sharks worldwide

Even the remotest parts of the ocean appear to offer highly migratory sharks little refuge from industrialized fishing fleets, according to a major new international study published in the journal Nature.

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Road-building spree in Papua New Guinea threatens environment, communities and economy

A huge road-building scheme in Papua New Guinea could imperil some of the largest, biologically richest and culturally most diverse forests on the planet, says an international research team led by James Cook University in Australia.

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Commercial fishing threatens sharks worldwide

Even the remotest parts of the ocean appear to offer highly migratory sharks little refuge from industrialized fishing fleets, according to a major new international study published in the journal Nature.

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Smartwatch app that soothes the nerves helps improve exam results

A smartwatch app that produces a slow, soothing tapping on the wrist seems to help people relax and perform slightly better exams

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Nanotech injection nabs cancer cells on the run

Cellular soldiers created using the body’s own defenses can track down and kill cancer cells that escape during surgeries, researchers report. This could prevent metastasis and save lives, particularly in cases of triple negative breast cancer. Researchers attached two proteins to the surface of lipid nanoparticles: TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand—or TRAIL—and the adhesion receptor E-select

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The Global Warming Consensus

The degree to which there is a scientific consensus in anthropogenic global warming (AGW) remains politically controversial, even though it is not scientifically controversial. Denial of the consensus remains a cornerstone of AGW denial, so let’s examine the science and the arguments used to deny it. Much of the public discussion focusses on the 2013 Cook article which claimed that there is a 97%

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Mysterious, Ultrabright Fireball Streaks Across the Sky Over Canada

The fireball let out several bright flares before it extinguished, dropping a number of meteorite fragments on Earth's surface.

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UPS Wants to Go Full-Scale With Its Drone Deliveries

The delivery giant is done experimenting and is petitioning the FAA for the right to launch revenue-generating drone flights without today’s restrictions.

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7 Great Travel Accessories: A Packing List of Essentials

Whether your stuck on the tarmac or trapped at cruising altitude, these items will make your next journey more tolerable.

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Image of the Day: Cichlid Cranium

Maternal care for the fish alters the structure of their developing heads.

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Parasitic plant steals genes to use against its victims

The parasitic plant dodder has stolen a large amount of genetic material from its hosts, including over 100 functional genes, according to new research. These stolen genes contribute to dodder’s ability to latch onto and steal nutrients from the host and even to send genetic weapons back into the host. “Horizontal gene transfer, the movement of genetic material from one organism into the genome o

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GOP senators wanted to stop climate change training for weathercasters. It backfired

In the long and fraught battle to persuade Americans that the Earth's climate is changing, scientists increasingly have relied on a stalwart ally—television weather forecasters.

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Electricity-driven undersea reactions may have been important for the emergence of life

Though it remains unknown how life began, there is a community of scientists who suspect it occurred in or around deep sea hydrothermal environments. At such sites, water heated by contact with hot rocks from Earth's mantle flows into the lower ocean, passing over and through minerals which are themselves precipitated by the interaction of this hot water with cold seawater. The minerals often incl

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Global water map could warn of future floods

A new global map of freshwater hydrography may be the most accurate ever made—so precise scientists could use it to predict future flooding events around the world. The map, called MERIT Hydro, uses complex computer algorithms to determine the shape of millions of Earth’s rivers, lakes, and canals and also provides a hydrologically-consistent map of Earth’s topography. “We believe this map is the

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The world's "Third Pole" is melting away. Here's how we can stop it from disappearing | Tshering Tobgay

The Hindu Kush Himalaya region is the world's third-largest repository of ice, after the North and South Poles — and if current melting rates continue, two-thirds of its glaciers could be gone by the end of this century. What will happen if we let them melt away? Environmentalist and former Prime Minister of Bhutan Tshering Tobgay shares the latest from the "water towers of Asia," making an urgen

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When Using Racist, Define Your Terms

A long-running debate about when to use the word racist resurfaced this month, prompted by mass grappling with how to cover Donald Trump’s recent attacks on four House Democrats. Trump’s short political career includes denying that Barack Obama was born in the United States, calling for a ban on Muslim travel here, characterizing masses of Mexican immigrants as rapists, and asserting that a judge

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Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question

Advanced simulations have solved a problem in turbulent fluid flow that could lead to more efficient turbines and engines.

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7-foot mako shark tagged off Texas reappears off North Carolina's Outer Banks

A 7-foot-5-inch-long mako shark tagged last year off Texas appeared Wednesday morning off North Carolina's Outer Banks.

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7-foot mako shark tagged off Texas reappears off North Carolina's Outer Banks

A 7-foot-5-inch-long mako shark tagged last year off Texas appeared Wednesday morning off North Carolina's Outer Banks.

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Quantum uncertainty helps solve an old problem

Controlling how electrons zip through a material is of central importance to build novel electronic devices. How the electronic motion is affected by magnetic fields is an old problem that has not been fully resolved, yet has already led to multiple physics Nobel prizes. Now, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg have solved one of the longstan

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Method forms fractals out of proteins

A new method can turn proteins into never-ending patterns called fractals, report researchers. They say the method could help engineer human tissues or create a filter for tainted water. “Biomolecular engineers have been working on modifying the building blocks of life—proteins, DNA, and lipids—to mimic nature and form interesting and useful shapes and structures,” says senior author Sagar D. Kha

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Scans show less gray matter in brains of murderers

The brains of murderers look different from those of people convicted of other crimes, researchers report. Researchers examined brain scans of more than 800 incarcerated men and found that those who had committed or attempted homicide had reduced gray matter when compared to those involved in other offenses. The differences could link to how they process empathy and morality, researchers say. The

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Fake news war divides, confuses in Hong Kong

Chinese tanks at the border? False. Photo of a protester biting off a policeman's finger? Misleading. In polarised Hong Kong, a fake news fight for public opinion has become as crucial a battleground as the city streets.

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The Strange Similarity of Neuron and Galaxy Networks – Issue 74: Networks

Christof Koch, a leading researcher on consciousness and the human brain, has famously called the brain “the most complex object in the known universe.” It’s not hard to see why this might be true. With a hundred billion neurons and a hundred trillion connections, the brain is a dizzyingly complex object. But there are plenty of other complicated objects in the universe. For example, galaxies can

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We’re More of Ourselves When We’re in Tune with Others – Issue 74: Networks

When musicians have chemistry, we can feel it. There’s something special among them that’s missing when they perform alone. Anyone who’s heard a Mick Jagger solo album knows that’s the case. Clearly nature wants us to jam together and take flight out of our individual selves. The reward is transcendence, our bodies tell us so. What’s the secret of that chemistry? It’s a question that one of the m

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Using AI, and Film, to Track Tear Gas Use Against Civilians

Oscar-winning filmmaker Laura Poitras teamed up with a London nonprofit developing machine learning tools to identify lethal weapons in online videos.

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How Scientists Built a ‘Living Drug’ to Beat Cancer

Researchers didn’t know if it would work, but they had little to lose when they tried a new drug known as a CAR-T—a living cell reprogrammed to recognize and kill leukemia—on a dying 6-year-old.

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How African American families can talk about diabetes

African Americans, who have a high risk of type 2 diabetes, may often share myths and misconceptions about the disease from one generation to the next, researchers say. To understand how family experiences influence risk and management of the disease, researchers interviewed parents and adult children of 20 African American families with strong histories of type 2 diabetes. The interviews, which

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Hurricanes need water, right? Not necessarily

Hurricanes usually mean water as they use warm, moist air for fuel. However, new simulations show they can form in extremely cold, dry climates. A climate as cold and dry as the one scientists used in a new study will probably never become the norm on Earth, especially as climate change is making the world warmer and wetter. But the findings could have implications for storms on other planets and

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France to unveil new space defence strategy

France will on Thursday outline a new strategy for defence in space after President Emmanuel Macron announced the creation of a French space force command to deal with emerging threats to its interests in orbit.

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India farmers shocked as suspected meteorite crashes into rice field

A suspected meteorite the size of a football plunged into a rice field in eastern India, startling farmers, authorities said Thursday.

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Incoming EU chief says to launch climate fund

Ursula von der Leyen, president-elect of the European Commission, said Thursday the European Union plans to launch a special fund to wean members off fossil fuels and wide-ranging consultations on the future of Europe.

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Chinese importers looking at buying more US farm goods

Chinese companies are willing to import more U.S. farm goods, the Ministry of Commerce said Thursday, as envoys prepared to meet in Shanghai next week for talks aimed at ending a tariff war.

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China launches first private rocket capable of carrying satellites

A Chinese startup successfully launched the country's first commercial rocket capable of carrying satellites into orbit Thursday, as the space race between China and the US heats up.

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Astronomers observe the awakening of a Be/X-ray binary

Using ESA's XMM-Newton space telescope, astronomers have spotted bright X-ray outbursts emitted by a Be/X-ray binary known as A0538−66. The discovery marks the ending of an over three-decade-long period of quiescence of this system. The finding is detailed in a paper published July 18 on arXiv.org.

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Climate Change? "Meh," Say Gentoo Penguins

Their ability to adapt can help guide how we respond to a warming world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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When ‘You’re Adopted’ Is Used as an Insult

I don’t remember exactly how old I was the first time I heard one of my classmates hurl “You’re adopted” at another as an insult. But I was old enough to know two things: First, that my parents’ process of adopting me was long, complicated, and emotionally exhausting—not to mention expensive; and second, that some kids’ parents euphemistically called them “surprises.” To my young mind, being adop

10h

What Tick Saliva Does to the Human Body

José Ribeiro was 33 when he got his first tick bite, in the 1980s, and he remembers it as a momentous occasion. He had recently started studying tick saliva, a complex molecular cocktail that ticks inject into their hosts to inhibit pain, prevent blood clotting, and suppress the immune system—all so the tick can feed undetected for days and days and days. Ribeiro had been studying this in a lab,

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Preschool teachers ask children too many simple questions

When preschool teachers read books in their classrooms, the questions they ask play a key role in how much children learn, research has shown.

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So Much of the Arctic Is on Fire, You Can See It From Space

Wildfires burning large swaths of Russia are generating so much smoke, they're visible from space, new images from NASA's Earth Observatory reveal.

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Medieval Warrior Woman Found in a Viking Graveyard Was No Viking

Analysis of her weapon suggested it came from what is now Poland.

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Climate Change? "Meh," Say Gentoo Penguins

Their ability to adapt can help guide how we respond to a warming world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Burying CAESAR: How NASA Picks Winners–and Losers–in Space Exploration

Despite an impartial selection process, the space agency’s plans for robotic interplanetary missions lead to biases in our knowledge of the solar system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Burying CAESAR: How NASA Picks Winners–and Losers–in Space Exploration

Despite an impartial selection process, the space agency’s plans for robotic interplanetary missions lead to biases in our knowledge of the solar system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Preschool teachers ask children too many simple questions

When preschool teachers read books in their classrooms, the questions they ask play a key role in how much children learn, research has shown.But a new study that involved observing teachers during class story times found that they asked few questions — and those that they did ask were usually too simple.

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You can crowdsource innovation. Here’s how Lumina does it.

The conventional model of innovation involves piloting a product, scaling it, and then mainstreaming it. However, the Lumina Foundation believes that this model won't work quite so well for education: Instead, rapidly prototyping and iterating different ideas is the likely the best way to create a more equitable education system for our rapidly changing society. That's why the Lumina Foundation i

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Cock and bull story leads to retraction of bovine herpesvirus paper

The ancients had a thing for hybrids (think animals, not cars): half goat-half humans, horses with human torsos, winged horses and lions, you get the picture. But a chicken-cow mix wasn’t on that list … until now. A group of researchers in Brazil has lost a paper in a veterinary journal for trying to reuse … Continue reading Cock and bull story leads to retraction of bovine herpesvirus paper

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Fransk opfinder forsøger at krydse kanal med jetmotorer – og styrter

Den franske opfinder Franky Zapata, der står bag et såkaldt flyboard drevet af fem jetdyser, forsøgte onsdag at flyve over Den Engelske Kanal. Missionen lykkedes ikke, da Franky Zapata styrtede i vandet omkring halvvejs på turen. Se en video af flyboardet i aktion her.

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What Orange Is the New Black Saw Coming

There was a moment during the seven years Jenji Kohan spent writing Orange Is the New Black when she spoke with a friend who was shooting a television series in Paris. “I was joking with her, like, ‘You’ve written yourself into Paris and I’ve written myself into prison,’” Kohan told me on the phone earlier this month. “‘And you’re a genius and I’m an idiot.’ I spend my days in prison! And there’s

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Who Will Hold the Police Accountable?

On an unseasonably warm February afternoon in 2017, Jocques Clemmons was driving through the James A. Cayce Homes, the largest public-housing complex in Nashville, when he rolled through a stop sign and into the parking lot of the building where his girlfriend and younger son lived. A big, affable father of two, he was 31 years old and, like most of the neighborhood’s residents, black. Officer Jo

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Shape shifting protocells hint at the mechanics of early life

Inspired by the processes of cellular differentiation observed in developmental biology, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Bristol have demonstrated a new spontaneous approach to building communities of cell-like entities (protocells) using chemical gradients.

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Dark matter particles won’t kill you. If they could, they would have already

The fact that no one has been killed by shots of dark matter suggests the mysterious substance is relatively small and light.

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Shape shifting protocells hint at the mechanics of early life

Inspired by the processes of cellular differentiation observed in developmental biology, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Bristol have demonstrated a new spontaneous approach to building communities of cell-like entities (protocells) using chemical gradients.

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Huge Arctic fires have now emitted a record-breaking amount of CO2

Wildfires still burning in the Arctic have continued for so long they have now released more carbon dioxide than any other year since records began

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Nye retningslinjer: Nu skal data fra videoovervågning slettes indenfor 72 timer

Den danske TV-overvågningslov kræver sletning af videoovervågningsbilleder senest efter 30 dage. Nu lægger EU op til at der kun må lagres i langt kortere tid.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Evakuerer man stadig kvinder og børn først?

En læser vil gerne vide, hvem der kommer først i redningsbådene. Det svarer Søfartsstyrelsen på.

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Rotavirus cell invasion triggers a cacophony of calcium signals

Time-lapsing imaging and other experimental approaches reveal that rotavirus induces hundreds of discrete and highly dynamic calcium spikes that increase during peak infection.

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