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nyheder2019juli27

9h

Physicists discover new quantum trick for graphene: magnetism

Sometimes the best discoveries happen when scientists least expect it. While trying to replicate another team's finding, Stanford physicists recently stumbled upon a novel form of magnetism, predicted but never seen before, that is generated when two honeycomb-shaped lattices of carbon are carefully stacked and rotated to a special angle.

11h

Redaktionens favoritter: Sådan kurerede Stig Günther sig selv med donorafføring

Nogle historier lever et alt for kort liv. Derfor har vi bedt et udpluk af Ingeniørens redaktører og journalister anbefale egne og andres historier. Her er, hvad de fandt frem.

15h

Why We’re Moving Forward With Impeachment

Three months ago, Special Counsel Robert Mueller completed his investigation into Russian election interference and President Donald Trump’s obstruction of justice. When the redacted report finally became available to Congress and the American people, it painted a damning picture of a corrupt president who welcomed and encouraged an attack on our country, capitalized on it, and then tried to cove

26min

Trump administration releases details on fetal tissue restrictions

Rule kicking in on 25 September will require lengthy new paperwork, ban fetal tissue in training grants

27min

Should Black People Wear Sunscreen?

Does it make sense for me, a dark-skinned black woman, to wear sunscreen? The answer is more complicated than it may seem.

35min

UC Berkeley appoints Rich Lyons as its first chief officer of innovation and entrepreneurship

UC Berkeley's new vision to be carried out by Rich Lyons, its new chief innovation and entrepreneurship officer. Richard Lyons talks with Big Think about the need to transform universities' "intellectual capital." All educational disciplines could benefit with greater innovative principles. As universities are forced to confront a rapidly transforming educational landscape, the University of Cali

44min

Production sites of stars are rare

Astronomers using the Nobeyama Radio Obeservatory (NRO) 45-m telescope found that high-density gas, the material for stars, accounts for only 3% of the total mass of gas distributed in the Milky Way. This result provides key information for understanding the unexpectedly low production rate of stars.

56min

Physicists count sound particles with quantum microphone

A device that eavesdrops on the quantum whispers of atoms could form the basis of a new type of quantum computer.

58min

A good first step toward nontoxic solar cells

A team of engineers has found what they believe is a more stable, less toxic semiconductor for solar applications, using a novel double mineral discovered through data analytics and quantum-mechanical calculations.

58min

Great Stunt, Spider-Man! Now Let's Fine-Tune the Physics

This rehearsal clip is amazing, but something in the hero’s motion might set your Spidey senses tingling.

59min

Football-Size Meteorite May Have Landed in an Indian Rice Field

The strange magnetic rock was the size of a football.

59min

After Scorching Europe, Heat Wave Is Poised to Melt Greenland

Heat that shattered records in Europe this week is on the move.

59min

Bentley's Bentayga Hybrid hints at its future in electric luxury vehicles

The Bentayga Hybrid plugs in to charge. (Bentley/) While electric drive provides environmental benefits, it has characteristics that make it ideal for prestige vehicles too. In addition to using increased efficiently over gas-powered vehicles, EVs are smooth, silent and powerful. Those are all traits traditionally assigned to posh luxury vehicles from carmakers like Bentley. They have normally ac

1h

Sizzling Southwest summers can cause pavement burns in seconds

When temperatures in the Southwestern US climb to over 100 degrees, the pavement can get hot enough to cause second-degree burns in seconds. In a new study, a team of surgeons reviewed pavement burn admissions into a Las Vegas area burn center over five years. The team compared the outdoor temperatures at the time of each patient admission to, in essence, determine how hot is too hot.

1h

Like film editors and archaeologists, biochemists piece together genome history

Biochemists discovered a large-scale molecular movement associated with RNA catalysis that provides evidence for the origin of RNA splicing and its role in the diversity of life on Earth.

1h

Physicists count sound particles with quantum microphone

A device that eavesdrops on the quantum whispers of atoms could form the basis of a new type of quantum computer.

1h

For salmonella detection, genomic tool emerges as a key

The world's food supply will become safer as the food industry shifts to high-resolution, whole-genome sequencing — which examines the full DNA of a given organism all at once. This move to make sequencing ubiquitous will lead to the consistently reliable detection of salmonella.

1h

A good first step toward nontoxic solar cells

A team of engineers has found what they believe is a more stable, less toxic semiconductor for solar applications, using a novel double mineral discovered through data analytics and quantum-mechanical calculations.

1h

Two therapeutic targets identified for deadly lung cancer

The vast majority of deadly lung cancer cases (85 percent) are termed non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs), which often contain a mutated gene called LKB1. Researchers have now discovered precisely why inactive LKB1 results in cancer development. The surprising results highlight how LBK1 communicates with two enzymes that suppress inflammation in addition to cell growth, to block tumor growth.

1h

Regal Cinemas debuts unlimited movie subscription service – CNET

The three-tiered pricing system ranges from $18 to $23.50.

1h

Radio Atlantic: The Veteran Candidate

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) Listen to Edward-Isaac Dovere interview Seth Moulton on Radio Atlantic. They’re all the same out-of-touch, establishment leaders making the same bad decisions, argues Seth Moulton: the military leaders he disagreed with when he was in the Marines; the congressman he beat in a primary to win his Massachusetts seat

1h

SpaceX's Starship Rocket Test, Equifax Owes You, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

1h

Huge Ash Cloud Blasts Out of Indonesian Volcano

A volcano on the island of Java, in Indonesia, blasted ash into the air today (July 26), causing panic and spurring an evacuation of the vicinity, according to the Associated Press.

2h

Ancient Mars Tsunami Raises Questions About a Surprisingly Wet World

Elevation changes also indicate where Mars may have once had a vast northern ocean. (Credit: Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Science Team/NASA) Three and a half billion years ago, an asteroid slammed into Mars. The cataclysm wasn’t terribly unusual for this period in the solar system’s history, but the fallout would leave its mark. The asteroid carved out an enormous crater. It also sent a wall of wa

2h

Even Inside Their Eggs, Bird Embryos Are Listening

Sandpiper eggs in a nest. (Credit: Drakuliren/Shutterstock) The speckled brown eggs of seabirds may look like lifeless lumps of shell, but inside, developing chicks are already paying attention to their parents. Researchers studying yellow-legged gull chicks have discovered that the animals can respond to their parents’ alarm calls while in the egg and even pass on the information to younger nestm

2h

As Earth's high north blazes with intense wildfires, Europe's heat is about to invade the Arctic

As the Suomi NPP satellite watched overhead on July 21, 2019, a swirling low-pressure system over Siberia pulled wildfire smoke into its giant vortex . (Source: NASA Earth Observatory) Heat records were obliterated across Western Europe yesterday, with Paris reaching an unfathomable all-time high of nearly 109 degrees. It's the second heat wave in the region in as many months — and this one has be

2h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Roby Waived

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, July 26. ‣ The Senate Intelligence Committee concluded yesterday that Russian hacking efforts targeted election systems in all 50 states in 2016. (Office of Speaker Nancy Pelosi / Twitter) ‣ House Speaker Nancy

2h

Probiotics Are Everywhere. Scientists Still Can't Agree if They Actually Help

(Credit: T. L. Furrer/Shutterstock) What if I told you that countless tiny beings living inside your body right now were responsible for everything from the health of your gut to your mental health? It sounds crazy. But, that’s exactly what research into the microbiome is showing us. Tens of trillions of bacteria inhabit our bodies — scientists call them the human microbiome. The past decade or so

2h

Stanford physicists count sound particles with quantum microphone

A device that eavesdrops on the quantum whispers of atoms could form the basis of a new type of quantum computer.

2h

Like film editors and archaeologists, biochemists piece together genome history

UC San Diego biochemists discovered a large-scale molecular movement associated with RNA catalysis that provides evidence for the origin of RNA splicing and its role in the diversity of life on Earth.

2h

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood: Tarantino love letter to movies has a bloody twist – CNET

Commentary: I like this homage to Hollywood's golden age starring Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Margot Robbie. But I could do without all the blood spattering.

2h

'Unprecedented': more than 100 Arctic wildfires burn in worst ever season

Huge blazes in Greenland, Siberia and Alaska are producing plumes of smoke that can be seen from space The Arctic is suffering its worst wildfire season on record, with huge blazes in Greenland, Siberia and Alaska producing plumes of smoke that can be seen from space . The Arctic region has recorded its hottest June ever . Since the start of that month, more than 100 wildfires have burned in the

2h

Study: Sizzling Southwest summers can cause pavement burns in seconds

When temperatures in the Southwestern US climb to over 100 degrees, the pavement can get hot enough to cause second-degree burns in seconds. In a new study, a team of UNLV School of Medicine surgeons reviewed pavement burn admissions into a Las Vegas area burn center over five years. The team compared the outdoor temperatures at the time of each patient admission to, in essence, determine how hot

2h

Two therapeutic targets identified for deadly lung cancer

The vast majority of deadly lung cancer cases (85 percent) are termed non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs), which often contain a mutated gene called LKB1. Salk Institute researchers have now discovered precisely why inactive LKB1 results in cancer development. The surprising results highlight how LBK1 communicates with two enzymes that suppress inflammation in addition to cell growth, to block

2h

Sony Unveils Wearable Air Conditioner That Sits in a Shirt Pocket

Beat the Heat With global temperatures rising at an alarming rate , it’s getting harder and harder to avoid melting into a sweaty puddle during the summer months. Now, tech giant Sony has come up with a futuristic solution to the problem of staying cool: a tiny personal air conditioner that fits in a shirt pocket. Cool Tech Sony calls its personal air conditioner the Reon Pocket, and it’s worn ju

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The IRS Is Sending Warning Letters Over Cryptocurrency Back Taxes

Crypto Crackdown Before the end of July, the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) plans to send 10,000 warning letters to Americans who may owe back taxes for their cryptocurrency. The IRS announced the initiative on Friday in a press release that explains how taxpayers may get one of three versions of the so-called educational letters based on their current crypto holdings and tax situations. Alo

2h

Everything you need to know about shark bites

It’s OK, I’m a filter feeder. (Marcel Ekkel/Flickr, CC BY/) Sharks elicit outsized fear , even though the risk of a shark bite is infinitesimally small. As a marine biologist and director of the Florida Program for Shark Research , I oversee the International Shark Attack File —a global record of reported shark bites that has been maintained continuously since 1958. We are careful to emphasize ho

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Genetics Articles Retracted at Higher Rate than Other Disciplines

A study estimates that 0.15 percent of genetics articles are retracted, most commonly for duplication and plagiarism.

3h

Medications used to treat atrial fibrillation may raise risk of falls

To prevent atrial fibrillation symptoms, health professionals may treat patients with medications to control their heart rate or rhythm. However, these medications can potentially raise the risk for falls and fainting.

3h

New CRISPR platform expands RNA editing capabilities

McGovern Institute Investigator and Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard core member Feng Zhang and his team have developed a strategy, called RESCUE (RNA Editing for Specific C to U Exchange), that expands CRISPR's RNA editing capabilities.

3h

A good first step toward nontoxic solar cells

A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis has found what they believe is a more stable, less toxic semiconductor for solar applications, using a novel double mineral discovered through data analytics and quantum-mechanical calculations.

3h

After Investigation, Neil deGrasse Tyson Will Keep His Job

Dr. Tyson was accused of sexual misconduct. The American Museum of Natural History said he would remain director of the Hayden Planetarium.

3h

It's time to take Google's Pixel phones more seriously

Google got a lot right with the Pixel 3a. It has excellent cameras, reliable performance, respectable battery life and clever software. Best of all, at $400, the Pixel 3a costs half …

3h

Apple won't get tariff waivers for certain China imports: Trump

President Donald Trump said Friday that Apple would face tariffs for components of its Mac Pro computers which are expected to be manufactured in China.

3h

Questions remain about Florida's new school-based mental health effort

Florida is planning to reinvent school-based mental health awareness, but Florida International University (FIU) psychologists are raising questions about the plan's implementation.

3h

Discovered: Cosmic, translucent pearls in fossilized Florida clams

For 13 years scientists have been clueless to the origin of these translucent beads. New evidence suggests that the pearls are microtektites, a byproduct of an ancient meteorite impact. These cosmic remains were encapsulated in two to three million year old shell fossils. Researchers were treated to quite the discovery after sifting through some old fossil contents collected from clams in a Saras

3h

Grasshoppers on the go make migratory stop in Vegas area

A migration of mild-mannered grasshoppers sweeping through the Las Vegas area is being attributed to wet weather several months ago.

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Brain region linked to altered social interactions in autism model

Neuroscientists identify brain region linked to altered social interactions autism model. Restoring activity of a specific forebrain region also reversed social traits associated with autism.

3h

The effects of skin aging vary depending on ethnicity, review finds

Neelam Vashi, M.D., director of the Center for Ethnic Skin at Boston Medical Center, has published a review paper in Clinics in Dermatology that discusses how aging presents in patients, and the differences that are attributed to skin type, exposures and genetic factors.

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Gas Monkey's '79 International Harvester Scout | Fast N' Loud

See Gas Monkey's updated '79 International Scout II featuring a Hellcat crate engine! Stream Full Episodes of Fast N' Loud: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/fast-n-loud/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FastNLoudTV https://twitter.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FastNLoudTV https://www.facebook.com/Dis

3h

Tree-eating beetle gains ground in US West, raising concerns

Matt Johnson treks along an Arizona riverbank and picks out a patch of yellow-tinged tamarisks. He sweeps a cloth net across the trees, hoping to scoop up beetles that munch on their evergreen-like leaves.

3h

Scientists Unraveled Why Some Tiny Galaxies Have Huge Black Holes

Master Blaster In the farthest reaches of the universe, there are some galaxies with perplexing forms. These galaxies, called blue nuggets due to their high concentration of blue-colored stars, are considerably smaller than average — but are home to mind-bendingly gargantuan supermassive black holes . Now, according to Space.com , astronomers think they’ve identified how the galaxies’ development

3h

Tree-eating beetle gains ground in US West, raising concerns

Matt Johnson treks along an Arizona riverbank and picks out a patch of yellow-tinged tamarisks. He sweeps a cloth net across the trees, hoping to scoop up beetles that munch on their evergreen-like leaves.

3h

Trump threatens French wine in digital tax retaliation

US President Donald Trump on Friday vowed "substantial" retaliation against France for a tax hitting US tech giants, accusing his counterpart Emmanuel Macron of "foolishness" and issuing a veiled threat to impose tariffs on French wine.

3h

Europe heatwave relents as travel chaos causes new pain

A heatwave that smashed temperature records in northern Europe finally relented Friday but thousands of holidaymakers were snared in travel chaos that followed the hot weather.

3h

Mouse genetics influences the microbiome more than environment

Genetics has a greater impact on the microbiome than maternal birth environment, at least in mice, according to a study published this week in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Vaginal birth, known to transfer microbiota to a newborn, failed to make a lasting microbial imprint on offspring.

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Mouse genetics influences the microbiome more than environment

Genetics has a greater impact on the microbiome than maternal birth environment, at least in mice, according to a study published this week in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Vaginal birth, known to transfer microbiota to a newborn, failed to make a lasting microbial imprint on offspring.

3h

Mouse model supports importance of fatty acid balance in chronic disease

Using novel transgenic mouse models they developed, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have provided new evidence that it is the ratio of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, rather than the total amount of them, that influences risk of developing chronic disease. This work has important implications for wellness and dietary guidelines. Their paper is just out in Nature's Communication

3h

When considering presidential candidates, age is just a number

With more people living longer and healthier lives than ever before, a new white paper published by the American Federation for Aging Research shows there is no such thing as being too old to be president.

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Researchers Launch First Study of In Vivo CRISPR Therapy in Humans

A trial is recruiting patients to test the gene-editing technology's ability to treat an inherited form of blindness caused by a mutation in the CEP290 gene.

3h

Mouse model supports importance of fatty acid balance in chronic disease

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators find evidence that it is the ratio of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, rather than the total amount, that influences risk of chronic disease.

3h

Mouse model supports importance of fatty acid balance in chronic disease

Using novel transgenic mouse models they developed, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have provided new evidence that it is the ratio of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, rather than the total amount of them, that influences risk of developing chronic disease. This work has important implications for wellness and dietary guidelines. Their paper is just out in Nature's Communication

3h

SpaceX Starhopper Completes First Untethered Flight

After a brief delay, SpaceX’s Starship has gone on its first flight. It was a short hover test, and the version of the spacecraft that took to the sky was a far cry from the one CEO Elon Musk wants to send to Mars. Still, the “Starhopper” prototype has proven that the rocket has what it takes to leave Earth behind. SpaceX has spent months putting the final touches on Starhopper at the company’s B

3h

Man Dies From Rare 'Brain-Eating' Amoeba After Swimming in North Carolina Lake

A man in North Carolina died from a rare "brain-eating" amoeba infection after swimming in a lake at a local water park, according to news reports.

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“Eggless” Eggs Made From Plants Land First Fast Food Deal

Rise and Shine Plant-based proteins have already made their way into your favorite late-night snacks . Now they’re coming for your breakfast. According to a new CNBC story , Canadian chain Tim Hortons has struck a deal with JUST Inc. to start selling the company’s plant-based eggs in select restaurants — making it the first major fast-food chain to take a chance on the chicken-less eggs. Mung Pao

4h

Flexible battery works when stretched and could power wearable devices

A lithium-ion battery that can conduct electricity and retain some of its charge even when stretched could be used to power flexible wearable devices

4h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Why New York’s Revenge Porn Law is Flawed

The state of New York officially criminalized the spread of nonconsensual pornography, but WIRED’s Emma Grey Ellis tells the Gadget Lab team this new law is only a partial victory.

4h

Facebook Cofounder: Please Break up Facebook

Second Thoughts Facebook cofounder Chris Hughes recently met with federal regulators to try and kill the monster he created with Mark Zuckerberg. Hughes, who also published a New York Times op-ed on the subject in May, reaffirmed his stance that Facebook has become too big for its own good and that it needs to be broken up, according to Ars Technica . And having met with Congress, the Justice Dep

4h

These 4 Ancient Apocalypses Changed the Course of Civilization

The eruption of the Icelandic volcano Hekla may have led to the collapse of multiple thriving Bronze Age societies. (Credit: Abraham Ortelius/Wikimedia Commons) Life, as they say, goes on. Until one day it doesn’t. For ancient societies, without the means to predict natural disasters, destruction could often come suddenly and completely by surprise. Below are four of the most devastating natural e

4h

Astronomers Spot an Asteroid Just Before it Zips Between Earth and Moon

An unexpected asteroid named 2019 OK just flew between Earth and the moon, hammering home the need for continued improvements in both finding and tracking potentially hazardous asteroids. (Credit: Illustration via Pixabay) Earth had a close encounter Thursday morning when Asteroid 2019 OK sped by at 1:22 GMT, at a speed of nearly 55,000 miles (88,500 kilometers) per hour. The closest it came to Ea

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Sea of Galilee earthquakes triggered by excessive water pumping

Taking water from the ground can unload faults and trigger tremors

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Mechano-thermo-chromic device with supersaturated salt hydrate crystal phase change

Active control of transparency/color is the key to many functional optoelectric devices. Applying an electric field to an electrochromic or liquid crystal material is the typical approach for optical property control. In contrast to the conventional electrochromic method, we developed a new concept of smart glass using new driving mechanisms (based on mechanical stimulus and thermal energy) to co

4h

Atomic-scale interface engineering of Majorana edge modes in a 2D magnet-superconductor hybrid system

Topological superconductors are predicted to harbor exotic boundary states—Majorana zero-energy modes—whose non-Abelian braiding statistics present a new paradigm for the realization of topological quantum computing. Using low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy, here, we report on the direct real-space visualization of chiral Majorana edge states in a monolayer topological superconductor

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Atomically precise bottom-up synthesis of {pi}-extended [5]triangulene

The zigzag-edged triangular graphene molecules (ZTGMs) have been predicted to host ferromagnetically coupled edge states with the net spin scaling with the molecular size, which affords large spin tunability crucial for next-generation molecular spintronics. However, the scalable synthesis of large ZTGMs and the direct observation of their edge states have been long-standing challenges because of

4h

Manipulating efficient light emission in two-dimensional perovskite crystals by pressure-induced anisotropic deformation

The hybrid nature and soft lattice of organolead halide perovskites render their structural changes and optical properties susceptible to external driving forces such as temperature and pressure, remarkably different from conventional semiconductors. Here, we investigate the pressure-induced optical response of a typical two-dimensional perovskite crystal, phenylethylamine lead iodide. At a moder

4h

Unconventional quantum optics in topological waveguide QED

The discovery of topological materials has motivated recent developments to export topological concepts into photonics to make light behave in exotic ways. Here, we predict several unconventional quantum optical phenomena that occur when quantum emitters interact with a topological waveguide quantum electrodynamics bath, namely, the photonic analog of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. When the emit

4h

Stretchable batteries with gradient multilayer conductors

Stretchable conductors are essential components in next-generation deformable and wearable electronic devices. The ability of stretchable conductors to achieve sufficient electrical conductivity, however, remains limited under high strain, which is particularly detrimental for charge storage devices. In this study, we present stretchable conductors made from multiple layers of gradient assembled

4h

Atomically thin three-dimensional membranes of van der Waals semiconductors by wafer-scale growth

We report wafer-scale growth of atomically thin, three-dimensional (3D) van der Waals (vdW) semiconductor membranes. By controlling the growth kinetics in the near-equilibrium limit during metal-organic chemical vapor depositions of MoS 2 and WS 2 monolayer (ML) crystals, we have achieved conformal ML coverage on diverse 3D texture substrates, such as periodic arrays of nanoscale needles and tren

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Nanoscale transient gratings excited and probed by extreme ultraviolet femtosecond pulses

Advances in developing ultrafast coherent sources operating at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and x-ray wavelengths allow the extension of nonlinear optical techniques to shorter wavelengths. Here, we describe EUV transient grating spectroscopy, in which two crossed femtosecond EUV pulses produce spatially periodic nanoscale excitations in the sample and their dynamics is probed via diffraction of a t

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Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with a microfluidic diamond quantum sensor

Quantum sensors based on nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond have emerged as a promising detection modality for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy owing to their micrometer-scale detection volume and noninductive-based detection. A remaining challenge is to realize sufficiently high spectral resolution and concentration sensitivity for multidimensional NMR analysis of picoliter sample

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Pathways and challenges for efficient solar-thermal desalination

Solar-thermal desalination (STD) is a potentially low-cost, sustainable approach for providing high-quality fresh water in the absence of water and energy infrastructures. Despite recent efforts to advance STD by improving heat-absorbing materials and system designs, the best strategies for maximizing STD performance remain uncertain. To address this problem, we identify three major steps in dist

4h

Single molecule-mediated assembly of polyoxometalate single-cluster rings and their three-dimensional superstructures

The assembly of atomically precise clusters into superstructures has tremendous potential in structural tunability and applications. Here, we report a series of single-cluster nanowires, single-cluster nanorings, and three-dimensional superstructure assemblies built by POM clusters. By stepwise tuning of interactions at molecular levels, the configurations can be varied from single-cluster nanowi

4h

Three-spin solid effect and the spin diffusion barrier in amorphous solids

Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has evolved as the method of choice to enhance NMR signal intensities and to address a variety of otherwise inaccessible chemical, biological and physical questions. Despite its success, there is no detailed understanding of how the large electron polarization is transferred to the surrounding nuclei or where these nuclei are located relative to the polarizing a

4h

Save The Salmon, Save The World

Fish matter. (Image credit: Igor Spilenok / Spilenok.com)

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France to Develop Anti-Satellite Laser Weapons for Space Warfare

Laser Focus On Thursday, French Defense Minister Florence Parly announced the nation’s plans to develop anti-satellite laser weapons — though she says the country will only use them in retaliation. “If our satellites are threatened, we intend to blind those of our adversaries,” Parly said, according to Agence France-Presse . “We reserve the right and the means to be able to respond: that could im

4h

Meet Homo floresiensis: The Real-life Hobbits of Indonesia

Homo floresiensis, popularly called the "hobbits," may have interacted with the ancestors of modern humans. (Credit: daderot/Wikimedia Commons) 60,000 years ago, diminutive beings dwelled on the Indonesian island of Flores, alongside komodo dragons, pygmy stegodons and real-life rodents of unusual size. The now-extinct humans — known scientifically as Homo floresiensis, and popularly as the hobbit

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Study: “Dark Matter Bullets” Could Tear Human Flesh Apart

A new preprint study suggests that tiny amounts of dark matter — the mysterious material that seems to make up about 85 percent of the matter in the universe — could behave like high-speed projectiles, capable of tearing through human flesh. It’s a pretty outlandish claim to make — especially considering we haven’t really found direct evidence of dark matter yet. We don’t really know what it look

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The $26.5B T-Mobile/Sprint Merger Moves a Big Step Forward

The Justice Department approved the $26.5 billion deal, with conditions. But it still faces a lawsuit from 13 states and DC.

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Parent-child bonding program yields the ‘good life’

A “good life” in adulthood can start in grade school if parents and teachers learn how to build strong bonds with children, and help their kids form attachments to family and school, research shows. What defines a “good life” in your 30s? The exact answer probably depends on the person, but most people could agree on some general themes: good physical and mental health, solid relationships, and a

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Walking after a spinal cord injury

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Phosphate Shortage: The Dwindling Resource Required to Grow Food

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Soon There Will Be Unlimited Hair

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How Facial Recognition is Changing CBP Operations

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Plant-based eggs land their first major fast food deal

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The GOP Finally Rejects Trump

The two-year, $2.7 trillion budget deal before Congress this week forced Republican lawmakers to answer a tricky question. Which is stronger: their seemingly unswerving loyalty to President Donald Trump, or their equally reflexive opposition to Speaker Nancy Pelosi? Yesterday, it appeared to be the latter. House Republicans overwhelmingly rejected Trump rather than siding with the Democratic lead

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Compound found in red wine opens door for new treatments for depression, anxiety

A new University at Buffalo-led study has revealed that the plant compound resveratrol, which is found in red wine, displays anti-stress effects by blocking the expression of an enzyme related to the control of stress in the brain.

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For salmonella detection, genomic tool emerges as a key

The world's food supply will become safer as the food industry shifts to high-resolution, whole-genome sequencing — which examines the full DNA of a given organism all at once. This move to make sequencing ubiquitous will lead to the consistently reliable detection of salmonella. A paper co-authored by researchers from Cornell University and the Mars Global Food Safety Center (GFSC), Beijing — i

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City of Hope study finds novel mechanism of action for NK cells in checkpoint inhibitor for cancer

City of Hope scientists have discovered that natural killer (NK) cells provide one reason why anti-PD-L1 antibodies might work when tumor cells do not express PD-L1. The study, published today in Cancer Discovery, found that NK cells can also express PD-L1 in some cancer patients. PD-L1 expression on the NK cells identifies them as charged or highly activated and can demonstrate anti-tumor activit

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Up your 3D printing game with virtual desktops

Horrified by your own mess? #same (Sebastian Herrmann via Unsplash/) Creating a 3D-printed item from scratch is a lot like inflating a balloon. It's not too hard once you get started, but the more work you put into it, the more space it takes up. And while you probably have enough space to blow up a typical balloon, computer screen real estate is a finite resource. That can be a problem if you’ve

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Single cell analysis of human foetal liver captures the transcriptional profile of hepatobiliary hybrid progenitors

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11266-x The liver parenchyma consists of several cell types, but the origin of this tissue in humans is unclear. Here, the authors perform single cell RNA sequencing of human fetal and adult liver to identify a hepatobiliary hybrid progenitor population of cells, which have a similar gene signature to mouse oval cells.

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Self-sustained biphasic catalytic particle turbulence

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11221-w Turbulent systems are particularly suitable for heat transport. Here the authors add active particles to a turbulent system, and the coupling of turbulent convection and the collective dynamics of active particles leads to a 500% enhancement in heat transfer compared to a standard turbulent heat exchanger.

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Spiculogenesis and biomineralization in early sponge animals

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11297-4 Sponge animals likely originated in the Precambrian, but their early spicular fossils are ambiguous. Here, Tang et al. report a new Cambrian sponge taxon with weakly biomineralized spicules and suggest that the poor Precambrian record may reflect the later evolution of biomineralization.

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Regulation of antitumour CD8 T-cell immunity and checkpoint blockade immunotherapy by Neuropilin-1

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11280-z Neuropilin-1 (Nrp-1) is a marker for CD4 + regulatory T cells. Here the authors show that Nrp-1 is co-expressed with PD-1 on a subset of CD8 tumour-infiltrating T lymphocytes and inhibits T-cell migration and cytotoxicity when bound by its ligand semaphorin-3A, while blockade of Nrp-1 synergises with anti-PD-1 t

5h

Engineering electronic structure to prolong relaxation times in molecular qubits by minimising orbital angular momentum

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11309-3 Molecular spin qubits show great promise for quantum information processing, but loss of phase information due to noise interference hinders their applicability. Here the authors engineer the electronic configurations of the metal centres in a series of divalent rare-earth complexes and succeed in prolonging the

5h

A machine-compiled database of genome-wide association studies

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11026-x Most databases of genotype-phenotype associations are manually curated. Here, Kuleshov et al. describe a machine curation system that extracts such relationships from the GWAS literature and synthesizes them into a structured knowledge base called GWASkb that can complement manually curated databases.

5h

Reconfigurable two-dimensional optoelectronic devices enabled by local ferroelectric polarization

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11328-0 Photodetectors based on two dimensional (2D) materials still suffer from low performance. Here, the authors tackle this issue by introducing a reconfigurable design enabled by locally tuning the doping of a 2D molybdenum disulfide film through the polarization of an underlying ferroelectric material.

5h

Computational and experimental demonstrations of one-pot tandem catalysis for electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction to methane

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11292-9 Carbon dioxide can be electrocatalytically reduced to valuable fuels and chemicals, but is hindered by poor catalytic efficiency and selectivity. Here the authors report improved electrocatalytic conversion of carbon dioxide into methane using a tandem catalysis strategy.

5h

Mouse genetics influences the microbiome more than environment

Genetics has a greater impact on the microbiome than maternal birth environment, at least in mice, according to a study published this week in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Vaginal birth, known to transfer microbiota to a newborn, failed to make a lasting microbial imprint on offspring.

5h

Saudi Prince Plans City With Human Gene Editing, Artificial Rain

Neom sounds like something straight out of a science-fiction novel. The in-development Saudi Arabian city-state will have robot maids, flying taxis, and glow-in-the-dark sand, according to confidential planning documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal . An artificial moon will light up the sky every night, and a Jurassic Park-style island will let visitors mingle with robot dinosaurs. But al

5h

Dinosaur bone: Scientists uncover giant femur in France

The two-metre long femur is thought to have belonged to a sauropod from the late Jurassic era.

5h

In this remote Indian village, every person's name is a song

In the remote mountain village of Kongthong, villagers call out to each other using short tunes that resemble birdsong. These songs act as a second name for each villager, and are used more frequently than a villagers "real" name. The practice is called jingrwai lawbei , which translates to "song of the clan's first woman." None If you were to approach the mountain village of Kongthong in India,

5h

How to Get Your Equifax Settlement Money

A settlement with the FTC means Equifax will pay victims of its breach $125 or more. Make sure it pay ups.

5h

Danmarks mest populære bil får hug i miljøtest

Dieseludgaven af Nissan Qashqai udleder 17 gange mere skadelig kvælstofgas end tilladt.

5h

Barr Won’t Get His Macabre Holiday Celebration

During the late-13th-century siege of Valencia, Spain, legend relates, Doña Jimena Díaz strapped the corpse of her husband—the legendary warrior El Cid—to his horse to lead his disheartened troops. Perhaps not since that incident has a group of fighters bound itself so tightly to a cadaver as the Trump-era conservative legal movement, which has clasped capital punishment to its bosom while the na

5h

Canned Cocktails Give Millennials What They’ve Always Desired

Over the past year, the dark cans of stout in the corner of my local grocery store’s craft-beer fridge have given way to lighter, smaller containers. I didn’t stop to inspect these new offerings until a pink box with a palm-frond print—a Bat-Signal for middle-class Millennial women—caught my eye. What I found wasn’t beer at all, but a four-pack of rosé spritzers from a local brand called Flora, n

5h

Florida Police Cut a Secret Deal to Promote Amazon’s Ring Cameras

Secret Deals The police department of Lakeland, Florida cut a secret deal with Amazon to promote the company’s Ring doorbell cameras. In exchange for free cameras and de facto surveillance software that lets cops access people’s Ring feeds, the police are advertising Ring cameras to their communities, according to a confidential agreement obtained by Motherboard . It’s the first glimpse into the

5h

The Ice Is Melting Even Faster Than They Thought

A new study shows that the ice at the bottoms of submerged glaciers could be melting 100 times faster than anyone thought.

5h

Organic Apples Have Way More Beneficial Bacteria Than Conventional Ones

About 90 million bacteria live in a single apple.

5h

Daily briefing: Current global warming is unparalleled in 2,000 years

Nature, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02320-1 For more than 98% of the globe, the warmest period in 2,000 years has been in the past century. Plus, how virtual-reality mazes are unlocking brain mysteries and why opponents to a telescope in Hawaii are not anti-science.

5h

Alarming Sonar Results Show Glaciers May Be Melting Faster Than We Expected

Direct measurements reveal a glacier is melting 10 to 100 times quicker than previously thought, with implications for sea-level rise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Alarming Sonar Results Show Glaciers May Be Melting Faster Than We Expected

Direct measurements reveal a glacier is melting 10 to 100 times quicker than previously thought, with implications for sea-level rise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

7 Ways to Die in the Future

When will the first person die via sentient sex robot? What about the first death in deep space? For that matter, who’ll be the first person to escape the traditional age of death — living to be 1,000 years old, or even far longer? It’s time to make some guesses. The current most common causes of death are pretty predictable: heart disease, cancer, and “accidents,” according to the Center for Dis

6h

Lårben från jättedinosaurie hittat i Frankrike

Ett två meter långt lårben från en dinosaurie hittades i veckan på en utgrävningsplats i sydvästra Frankrike. Lårbenet tros ha tillhört sauropod, en växtätare med lång hals som existerade för över 140 miljoner år sedan.

6h

In Congo, a New Plan to Fight Ebola Follows a Government Power Struggle

After the resignation of the country’s health minister, the president will take over the response to the epidemic and distribute a new vaccine.

6h

Why Big Banks Could Soon Jump on the Quantum Bandwagon

If you’re trying to model an uncertain economic future, consider using a machine that runs on probability.

6h

When considering presidential candidates, age is just a number

The first-ever, science-based study estimating the longevity and survival probabilities of all 27 current U.S. presidential candidates finds that age alone is not a relevant factor in judging their fitness to hold office. The study — authored by S. Jay Olshansky, PhD, and published in a white paper by the American Federation for Aging Research — suggests that nearly all the candidates meet the c

6h

Researchers develop novel imaging approach with potential to identify patients with CAD

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have developed a novel imaging approach that has the potential to identify patients with coronary disease without administration of drugs or contrast dye and within a short 15 minute exam protocol.

6h

Mapping how the ‘immortal’ hydra regrows cells may demystify regeneration

In the continually regenerating hydra, fluorescent markers help researchers track stem cells on the way to their cellular fate.

6h

Dialysis Firm Cancels $524,600.17 Medical Bill After Journalists Investigate

This week, NPR profiled a Montana man who was billed nearly half a million dollars for 14 weeks of dialysis, after being caught in a dispute between insurer and the dialysis provider. Now he owes $0. (Image credit: Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News)

6h

Google is providing up to 100,000 Home Minis to people with mobility challenges

For most, voice activated smart home devices are little more than a modern convenience. Being able to turn the lights off or adjust the thermostat without having to get off the couch saves a …

6h

A forest’s breath raises doubts about key carbon-cycle numbers

Nature, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02230-2 Data from a Massachusetts woods suggest that landmasses might capture more carbon than previously thought.

6h

MC Hammahead – Do The Hammahead (Official Music Video)

#DoTheHammahead ➡️ https://linktr.ee/mchammahead Shark Week 2019 starts Sunday July 28 9p! Stream Full Episodes from Shark Week: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Own Full Seasons of Shark Week: https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/Shark_Week?id=gg81I7BZ-J4&hl=en_US Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https:

6h

Soil pore structure is key to carbon storage

Scientists have recently discovered a new mechanism determining how carbon is stored in soils that could improve the climate resilience of cropping systems and also reduce their carbon footprints.

6h

Top tools for pinpointing genetic drivers of disease

A new benchmarking study has determined the best analysis tools for identifying errors in a patient's DNA that are responsible for driving disease. Being able to pinpoint these 'genomic rearrangements' is vital for understanding how illnesses occur, and therefore, how best to treat them.

6h

Potential biomarker of psychological stress

Researchers at Osaka University elucidated an interesting association between psychological stress and serum levels of ?-Klotho (?Kl).

6h

What Market Research Can Learn from Baseball

The data points we choose to focus on determine how we see the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

SpaceX’s shiny new spaceship prototype has flown for the first time

The Starhopper, SpaceX’s prototype for its interplanetary spacecraft Starship, made its first flight without a leash tying it to the ground on 25 July

6h

Is Kratom Safe During Pregnancy? Researchers Start to Investigate

Recent reports of babies born with opioid withdrawal symptoms after their mothers used kratom during pregnancy have generated much concern about the medicinal herb.

6h

When considering presidential candidates, age is just a number

A new white paper shows there is no such thing as being too old to be president.

6h

What Market Research Can Learn from Baseball

The data points we choose to focus on determine how we see the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Stor asteroid passerade oväntat nära jorden

En asteroid med en diameter på 57–130 meter och med en hastighet på 24 kilometer i sekunden passerade oväntat nära jorden i torsdags. Asteroiden, kallad 2019 OK, passerade mellan jorden och månens omloppsbana på ett avstånd av 73 000 kilometer.

6h

What Market Research Can Learn from Baseball

The data points we choose to focus on determine how we see the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Election hackers likely targeted 50 states in 2016. The states will be watching this time around.

In 2020, all state voter databases will be protected by sensors that alert the federal government to hacking attempts.

6h

Can folate offset air pollution’s harm during pregnancy?

Pregnant women exposed to higher levels of air pollutants had children with lower IQs, compared to the children of women exposed to lower levels, a new study reports. Researchers looked at 1,005 pregnant women participating in the Conditions Affecting Neurodevelopment and Learning study, set in Shelby County, Tennessee, and assessed the IQs of their offspring between the ages of 4 and 6. As repor

6h

NASA finds two areas of strength in Tropical Storm Nari

NASA's Terra satellite found two small areas of strength in Tropical Storm Nari on July 26 as it began to affect Japan.

6h

Researchers deploy new tech to explore depths of Gulf of Mexico

A multi-institution research team will deploy experimental technology next week to explore the deep scattering layers of the ocean.

6h

Images show Lightsail 2 spacecraft's solar sail has deployed

Photos transmitted from The Planetary Society's LightSail 2 spacecraft orbiting Earth confirm that it successfully deployed its solar sail.

6h

Researchers developing method to test seismic vulnerability of water pipeline systems

Financiers and investment planners work with risk and assess it each day.

6h

Bangladesh flood death toll surpasses 100

The death toll from monsoon storms in Bangladesh rose above 100 Friday with flood levels still rising in many parts of the country, officials said.

6h

HDO-antimiR represents a new weapon in the fight against microRNA-related disease

MicroRNA (miRNA) is a type of RNA that plays an important role in various cellular processes and is also involved in developing defenses against pathogens. Increasing numbers of studies have indicated that certain human diseases are caused by altered expression and organization of miRNA.

6h

NASA finds two areas of strength in Tropical Storm Nari

NASA's Terra satellite found two small areas of strength in Tropical Storm Nari on July 26 as it began to affect Japan.

6h

HDO-antimiR represents a new weapon in the fight against microRNA-related disease

MicroRNA (miRNA) is a type of RNA that plays an important role in various cellular processes and is also involved in developing defenses against pathogens. Increasing numbers of studies have indicated that certain human diseases are caused by altered expression and organization of miRNA.

6h

Practical use for regret, hindsight

Psychologists reveal that people think about the advice they would give their younger selves more often than many people might think, and for many this mental exercise is anything but futile. The findings have been truly revealing about the nature of regret, how people can use it to self-actualize and what areas people tend to fixate on in their later years.

7h

Lobster organs and reflexes damaged by marine seismic surveys

A new study of the impact on marine life of seismic air guns, used in geological surveys of the seafloor, has found that the sensory organs and righting reflexes of rock lobster can be damaged by exposure to air gun signals.

7h

New tech for multiple sclerosis diagnosis and treatment

Researchers have developed technology for a novel diagnostic method for multiple sclerosis (MS). The new approach has the potential to determine which damaged regions in an MS patient's brain have the capacity to heal themselves, and which do not.

7h

Diet of traditional Native foods revealed in hair samples

Researchers have linked specific chemical signatures found in human hair with a diet of traditional Yup'ik foods. The finding could help scientists make connections between diet and long-term health trends in Alaska Native populations.

7h

Brain-inspired computer system sheds surprising new light on how images impact emotions

Neuroscientists have developed a brain-inspired computer system that can look at an image and determine what emotion it evokes in people. Combining it with brain-imaging tests, they've learned images impact emotions more than once thought.

7h

Shaping light with a Smartlens

Camera performance on mobile devices has proven to be one of the features that most end-users aim for. The importance of optical image quality improvement, and the trend to have thinner and thinner smartphones have pushed manufactures to increase the number of cameras in order to provide phones with better zoom, low-light exposure high quality photography, and portrait settings, to name a few. But

7h

The democratic governance of agricultural multinationals is essential for environmental sustainability

The European project Diverfarming, founded by the European Commission within its Horizon 2020 programme, not only seeks environmental sustainability among crop diversification and low input management practices, but also seeks to implement sustainable innovations into the agri-food supply chain making it more sustainable too. In this way, value chain actors will also obtain benefits such as econom

7h

Antipsychotic use in youths with ADHD is low, but still cause for concern

A new study eased fears about the proportion of youths with ADHD taking antipsychotic drugs, but still found that many prescriptions may be inappropriate.

7h

How is urban green space associated with mental health?

This observational study looked at how green space is associated with mental health. Some research has suggested living near more green space may be associated with benefits. This analysis included nearly 47,000 city-dwelling adults in Australia and examined how living near different kinds of green space (including tree canopy, grass and low-lying vegetation) may be associated with risk of psychol

7h

Opioid use after vaginal or cesarean delivery among US women

This study used national insurance claims data for about 988,000 women to look at the association between an opioid prescription after a vaginal or cesarean delivery and rates of new persistent opioid use among US women.

7h

Racial bias associated with burnout among resident physicians

Symptoms of physician burnout appear to be associated with greater bias toward black people in this study of nearly 3,400 second-year resident physicians in the United States who identified as nonblack. Survey data from questionnaires that were part of another study were used. About 45% of physician residents had symptoms of burnout.

7h

Are US adults meeting physical activity guidelines?

The proportion of US adults adhering to the 'Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans' from the US Department of Health and Human Services didn't significantly improve between 2007 and 2016 but time spent sitting increased. The first edition of the federal guidelines recommending types and duration of physical activity were released in 2008 and updated in 2018, including a recommendation to spen

7h

Burnout symptoms associated with racial bias in medical residents

Mayo Clinic researchers have found an association between increased symptoms of burnout and heightened racial bias in medical residents. The study appears in JAMA Network Open.'When physicians aren't operating in an optimal mental and emotional state, they may find it harder to push back against their own biases,' says Liselotte Dyrbye, M.D., who led the study. 'If burnout contributes to dispariti

7h

One in 75 new mothers go on to long-term opioid painkiller use; risk rises with size of Rx

Nearly half of American women having a baby in the last decade received a prescription for a powerful opioid painkiller as part of their birth experience, a new study shows. And one or two in every hundred were still filling opioid prescriptions a year later — especially those who received birth-related opioid prescriptions before the birth, and those who received the largest initial doses.

7h

Research: Decade-Long “Megadrought” Could Roast American Southwest

Dry Heat As our ongoing climate change catastrophe continues to get worse , the American Southwest may soon find itself in a decade-long “megadrought.” That’s according to Columbia University scientists who found evidence of 14 of these megadroughts between the ninth and 15th centuries in what’s now California, New Mexico, Arizona, and other nearby U.S. states, Live Science reports . The research

7h

Brain-inspired computer system sheds surprising new light on how images impact emotions

Neuroscientists have developed a brain-inspired computer system that can look at an image and determine what emotion it evokes in people. Combining it with brain-imaging tests, they've learned images impact emotions more than once thought.

7h

Discovery paves way for new generation of solar cells

A new study explains how a promising type of perovskites — human-made crystals that can convert sunlight into electricity — can be stabilized. As a result, the crystals turn black, enabling them to absorb sunlight. This is necessary to be able to use them in new solar panels that are easy to make and highly efficient.

7h

Radiotherapy targets tumours precisely — with less damage to healthy cells

A new way of concentrating radiotherapy dose in tumors, while minimizing damage to healthy cells, has been proposed in recent research.

7h

Vitamin D supplementation may slow diabetes progression

Vitamin D supplementation may slow the progression of type 2 diabetes in newly diagnosed patients and those with prediabetes, according to a new study.

7h

Antibiotic-resistant genes found in London's canals and ponds

Central London's freshwater sources contain high levels of antibiotic-resistant genes, with the River Thames having the highest amount, according to research by UCL. The Regent's Canal, Regent's Park Pond and the Serpentine all contained the genes but at lower levels than the Thames, which contained genes providing resistance for bacteria to common antibiotics such as penicillin, erythromycin and

7h

Paris Agreement hampered by inconsistent pledges

Some countries' Paris Climate Agreement pledges may not be as ambitious as they appear, a new study has found. The Paris Agreement takes a bottom-up approach to tackling climate change, with countries submitting pledges in the form of nationally determined contributions (NDCs) to greenhouse emissions. However, researchers reveal a lack of consistency and transparency between the various commitment

7h

Dynamically tuneable lens capable of almost any complex optical function

A team of researchers reports on a dynamically tuneable lens capable of achieving almost any complex optical function.

7h

The Power of Onlyness: Go From "You" to "Us" with Trust

Humans subconsciously assess one another for trustworthiness.Make the process more conscious by getting to know your counterparts' interests: Do your separate interests converge? On the flip side, help others understand your personal "user guide". Be intentional about expressing your own unique interests. Listen for why to figure out what others care about to help you navigate relationships and f

7h

Computers can’t tell if you’re happy when you smile

Emotion recognition is a $20 billion industry, but a new study says the most popular method is deeply flawed.

7h

Work that kills

More than 64% of employed Russians work evenings, nights or weekends, and this is one of the highest figures among European countries. Andrei Shevchuk and Anna Krasilnikova from HSE University were the first to study the extent of nonstandard working hours in Russia and its impact on work-life balance.

7h

Banning tobacco sales to people under age 21 reduces smoking

County- and municipality-level bans on tobacco sales to individuals under age 21 yield substantive reductions in smoking among 18- to 20-year-olds, according to a new study from the Yale School of Public Health.

7h

Parachuting Into Shark Infested Waters | Shark Week

Parachuting into Pacific and some of the sharkiest waters on earth, Paul de Gelder and James Glancy must try to make it back to shore alive. Shark Week 2019 starts Sunday July 28 9p! Stream Full Episodes from Shark Week: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Own Full Seasons of Shark Week: https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/Shark_Week?id=gg81I7BZ-J4&hl=en_US Subscribe to Discovery: htt

7h

The new political story that could change everything | George Monbiot

To get out of the mess we're in, we need a new story that explains the present and guides the future, says author George Monbiot. Drawing on findings from psychology, neuroscience and evolutionary biology, he offers a new vision for society built around our fundamental capacity for altruism and cooperation. This contagiously optimistic talk will make you rethink the possibilities for our shared fu

7h

Aussie businesses not ready to tackle modern slavery

New research from the University of South Australia finds that Australian businesses are ill-prepared for mandatory modern slavery reporting, with more than two-thirds of ASX 100 companies unable to produce a disclosure statement about potentially exploitative labour practices.

7h

Urban trees found to improve mental and general health

People in urban areas have a lower risk of developing psychological distress and better overall health if they have more trees within a walkable distance from their homes, a study by University of Wollongong (UOW) researchers has found.

7h

Solution: Magic Moiré in Twisted Graphene

Materials science was rocked recently by an amazing discovery : When a layer of graphene, a sheet of carbon crystal with atoms arranged in a one-atom-thick hexagonal lattice, is dropped on another one and rotated to just the correct angle, the resulting bilayer graphene magically acquires the ability to become superconductive. Our June Insights puzzle explored a set of simple questions designed t

7h

Trump straws: How the US president is using straws to beat liberals with

Why Trump is selling plastic straws at $15 a pack – and using them as a stick to beat liberals with.

7h

Model to predict risk of low blood sugar in people with diabetes

A new study identifies the risk factors that could help healthcare providers recognize patients being treated for diabetes who are most likely to have low blood sugar. Many patients with diabetes, especially those with recurring episodes of low blood sugar, are unaware when it occurs, despite the risk of serious adverse events including cognitive impairment, coma and death.

7h

Next-gen membranes for carbon capture

Chemical engineers have developed a new class of high-performance membranes for carbon capture that greatly exceed current targets.

7h

“City Killer” Asteroid Whizzes Past Earth Almost Undetected

Asteroid 2019 OK A space rock that could have leveled an entire city just hurtled right past Earth, coming within six Earth diameters of smashing into our home planet. Astronomers didn’t spot the “city killer” asteroid, according to the Washington Post , until days before it careened close to the Earth than the Moon at about 61 times the speed of a commercial jet. NASA data suggests the asteroid

7h

The Books Briefing: I Spy

It’s a paradox of spycraft, just as it is of some forms of editing, that the most successful acts of espionage are the ones least noticed. And sometimes spies’ accomplishments are hidden even in history. Take the novel-worthy story of Mary Bowser, who gathered information for the Union Army by posing as a slave in the Confederate White House during the Civil War: Her identity (including, as it tu

7h

The Press Has Adopted Trump’s Reality-Show Standards

On Wednesday, Robert Mueller testified to the House Judiciary Committee that the president of the United States sought and benefited from Russian interference during the 2016 campaign, and that he attempted to deflect culpability from Russia while lying to the public about his hidden attempts to secure a construction project in Moscow. After winning the election, Mueller testified, the president

7h

Market competition sets tone for lower cost of UK mobile phone contracts, research shows

Healthy and competitive markets—and not stringent regulations—help dial back the cost of mobile phone contacts, according to new research.

7h

Japan approves first human-animal embryo experiments

Nature, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02275-3 The research could eventually lead to new sources of organs for transplant, but ethical and technical hurdles need to be overcome.

7h

A computer that understands how you feel

Neuroscientists have developed a brain-inspired computer system that can look at an image and determine what emotion it evokes in people. Combining it with brain-imaging tests, they've learned images impact emotions more than once thought. It could ultimately be used to develop new technologies.

7h

New paper points to soil pore structure as key to carbon storage

Alexandra Kravchenko, Michigan State University professor in the Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, and several of her colleagues recently discovered a new mechanism determining how carbon is stored in soils that could improve the climate resilience of cropping systems and also reduce their carbon footprints.

7h

Visible punishment institutions are key in promoting large-scale cooperation

Social dilemmas are ever-present in contemporary society, with people 'cheating the system' and jeopardising collective outcomes in place of their own personal gains.

7h

Copy-number variants in development of insecticide resistance in malaria mosquitoes

Researchers have used whole genome sequencing to understand copy-number variants (CNVs) in malaria mosquitoes and their role in insecticide resistance.

7h

Dynamically tuneable lens capable of almost any complex optical function

A team of researchers reports on a dynamically tuneable lens capable of achieving almost any complex optical function.

7h

Ladies' choice: What drives faster, flashier formation of new animal species

Evolution is actually a Sadie Hawkins dance, as new research shows females not only determine whether male animals develop bright colors, but also how fast new species develop.

7h

Study in mice advances combination immune therapy for ovarian cancer

Delivering two federally approved immunity-altering drugs together significantly extended the lives of mice injected with human ovarian cancer cells, an early proof-of-concept experiment that may advance treatment for the most deadly — although rare — gynecologic malignancy in humans.

7h

Have we evolved to construct reality?

Perception is not objective reality. Case in point: The image just above is stationary and flat. But try telling your brain that. A new book, The Case Against Reality: Why Evolution Hid the Truth from Our Eyes (W. W. Norton, 2019), applies this concept to the whole of human consciousness—how we see, think, feel, and interact with the world around us. And author Donald Hoffman , a cognitive scient

8h

SpaceX Just Flew Its Starship Prototype Without a Tether

Starship Hover SpaceX’s Starhopper — a prototype version of its upcoming mega-rocket Starship — just completed its first untethered test flight late last night at the space company’s facility in Texas. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk took to Twitter to post two separate videos, showing the scaled-down but still enormous test vehicle hovering freely in the air for a few seconds before gently descending back

8h

Birds Are Trying To Adapt To Climate Change — But Is It Too Little, Too Late?

By breeding and migrating earlier, some birds are adapting to climate change. But it's probably not happening fast enough for some species to survive, according to new research. (Image credit: Michael P. Harris)

8h

Image: Lake Balaton in western Hungary from orbit

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Lake Balaton in western Hungary. With a surface area of around 600 sq km and a length of around 78 km, this freshwater lake is the largest in central Europe.

8h

Dinosaur bone: Scientists uncover giant femur in France

The two-metre long femur is thought to have belonged to a sauropod from the late Jurassic era.

8h

Reducing China's CO2 Emissions Would Curb Deadly Air Pollution in the U.S.

China’s move away from fossil fuels would mean 2,000 fewer premature deaths in the U.S. by 2030 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

New Research: Global Temp Rising at Fastest Rate in 2,000 Years

Clap Back One of climate skeptics’ favorite arguments for doing nothing about global warming is the idea that what’s happening on Earth right now isn’t unusual . The planet is always going through cycles of warmer and cooler weather, they argue, and eventually temperatures will swing back down. But new research indicates that what’s happening on Earth right now is unlike anything the planet has e

8h

World's smallest fossil monkey found in Amazon jungle

A team of Peruvian and American scientists have uncovered the 18-million-year-old remains of the smallest fossil monkey ever found.

8h

What happens in the brain when we give up?

Inside the brain, a group of cells known as nociceptin neurons get very active before mice give up on reaching hard-to-get rewards, researchers report. These cells emit nociceptin, a complex molecule that suppresses dopamine, a chemical largely associated with motivation. The findings, which appear in Cell , offer new insight into the complex world of motivation and reward. The nociceptin neurons

8h

Yellow is not the new black: Discovery paves way for new generation of solar cells

A study led by KU Leuven for the first time explains how a promising type of perovskites — man-made crystals that can convert sunlight into electricity — can be stabilized. As a result, the crystals turn black, enabling them to absorb sunlight. This is necessary to be able to use them in new solar panels that are easy to make and highly efficient. The study was published in Science.

8h

An unexpected developmental hierarchy in an unusual disease

Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease affecting primarily young children. While LCH may sometimes heal by itself without treatment, other patients require chemotherapy, or may even succumb to the disease. The reasons for these differences in severity are poorly understood. Researchers from St. Anna Children's Cancer Research Institute (CCRI) and CeMM Research Center for Molecular M

8h

Radiotherapy targets tumours precisely — with less damage to healthy cells

A new way of concentrating radiotherapy dose in tumours, while minimising damage to healthy cells, has been proposed in research led by scientists at the University of Strathclyde.

8h

'Dark Matter Bullets' Could Tear Through the Human Body, Wild New Study Suggests

A type of dark matter might be capable of causing gunshot-like wounds.

8h

Hidden life revealed inside dinosaur bones

One of the tricks you learn hunting dinosaurs in Canada is to look for orange. Dinosaur bones are dull browns, tans, and greys. But in the middle of the drab sandstones of the badlands—a dry landscape where wind and water have worn away much of the rock—you'll sometimes catch a flash of fluorescent orange. Walk over and you may well find a dinosaur bone weathering out.

8h

Apple credit card could launch in first half of August says report

Once released, Bloomberg reports that customers will be able to sign up for the card through their phones' Wallet app which also contains built in support for those running version 12.4 iOS …

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WhatsApp to launch digital payments service in India

Messaging giant WhatsApp plans to launch its first payment service this year in India, its biggest market with 400 million users, the company said Friday.

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Astronomers see the Sun’s future in a dying star

T UMi’s convulsion a rare dynamic event.

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A tree stump that refuses to die

Its neighbours are chipping in to keep it alive.

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Space junk: A recycling station could be cleaning up in Earth orbit by 2050

There are about 22,000 large objects orbiting the Earth, including working and broken satellites and bits of old rocket from past space expeditions. If you include all the equipment dropped by astronauts while floating in space and the debris from colliding satellites down to around 1cm in size, there are about one million bits of space junk in Earth's orbit.

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Solar energy becomes biofuel without solar cells

Soon we will be able to replace fossil fuels with a carbon-neutral product created from solar energy, carbon dioxide and water. Researchers have successfully produced microorganisms that can efficiently produce the alcohol butanol using carbon dioxide and solar energy, without needing to use solar cells.

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Asteroid-Mining Bacteria Blast Off for Space Station

Test of mining prowess of microbes lifted off yesterday. Six of the BioRock reactors.jpg Eighteen biomining reactors like the six pictured above are headed to the International Space Station to test the ability of microbes to help gather minerals from objects such as asteroids. Image credits: Rosa Santomartino Rights information: This image may only be used with this Inside Science story. Space

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Solar energy becomes biofuel without solar cells

Soon we will be able to replace fossil fuels with a carbon-neutral product created from solar energy, carbon dioxide and water. Researchers have successfully produced microorganisms that can efficiently produce the alcohol butanol using carbon dioxide and solar energy, without needing to use solar cells.

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What It’s Like to Join the Freemasons

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with three old friends who found a sense of community when they joined the Freemasons. They discuss what Masons actually do together (at least the parts that aren’t secret) and how their weekly meetin

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Glacier melting underwater up to 100 times faster than thought

US researchers directly measure below the waterline for the first time.

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Women 'missing out on best heart care'

Australian study suggests they are less likely to receive recommended medications.

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How to stroke a cat, according to science

Lauren Finka, from the UK's Nottingham Trent University, looks at the social shift in human-cat relations.

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No telescope needed

Milky Way is there for the eye to see.

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Researchers Can Predict Your Personality by Tracking Your Phone

Personality Test Scientists can predict aspects of our personalities based on data from our phones’ accelerometers, which track our movements throughout the day. Scientists from Australia’s RMIT University claim to have mapped five personality traits onto common behaviors that are detectable through phone location and usage, Engadget reports . It’s a bizarre field of study, and one that stands to

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Tim Flannery: Climate change – very big and fast moving

Tim Flannery, chief councillor of Climate Council Australia, warns about the pace of climate change.

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Earth's 'boring billion' years of stagnant, stinking oceans might actually have been rather dynamic

Geologists have dubbed Earth's middle age the "boring billion." Occurring some 1,800 to 800 million years ago, it has long been considered a period when little happened on Earth in terms of biological evolution, climate, or the chemistry of the oceans and atmosphere. But emerging evidence now suggests that the "boring billion" may have been far more dynamic than that.

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Brain-Machine Interfaces Are Getting Better and Better—and Neuralink’s New Brain Implant Pushes the Pace

Elon Musk grabbed a lot of attention with his July 16 announcement that his company Neuralink plans to implant electrodes into the brains of people with paralysis by next year. Their first goal is to create assistive technology to help people who can’t move or are unable to communicate. If you haven’t been paying attention, brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that allow people to control robotic arms

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Liver transplants could be redundant with discovery of new liver cell

Researchers at King's College London have used single cell RNA sequencing to identify a type of cell that may be able to regenerate liver tissue, treating liver failure without the need for transplants.

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Solar energy becomes biofuel without solar cells

Soon we will be able to replace fossil fuels with a carbon-neutral product created from solar energy, carbon dioxide and water. Researchers at Uppsala University have successfully produced microorganisms that can efficiently produce the alcohol butanol using carbon dioxide and solar energy, without needing to use solar cells. This has been presented in a new study published in the scientific journ

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Satellite-connected tags set to boost marine conservation

Four tiger sharks have been tagged with a new device that will help conservationists to conduct detailed analysis of their migrations over years.

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Could Twitter be a tool for improving schools?

Twitter has become a tool for school administrators to more efficiently and effectively lead schools, according to a new study.

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Ethics Probes Launched at Department of the Interior and EPA

Two new ethics probes were opened this week — one into the policies of the U.S. Department of the Interior regarding public records requests and one into the actions of former EPA air quality chief William L. Wehrum, a chief architect of the rollback of several Obama-era policies.

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Satellite-connected tags set to boost marine conservation

Four tiger sharks have been tagged with a new device that will help conservationists to conduct detailed analysis of their migrations over years.

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Forestry practice inspired by wildfire could help save grizzly bears, study shows

A shift in how Alberta forests are managed could benefit grizzly bears, according to new research from the University of Alberta.

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Twitter rallies on growth in users, revenue

Twitter shares rallied Friday after a second-quarter update showed better-than-expected revenues and a growth in users even as the social network cracks down on fake accounts and inappropriate …

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Forestry practice inspired by wildfire could help save grizzly bears, study shows

A shift in how Alberta forests are managed could benefit grizzly bears, according to new research from the University of Alberta.

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Proms pay space-aged tribute to Nasa engineer Christopher Kraft

Chris Kraft, who founded Nasa's mission control, is honoured at the Proms after his death this week.

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Moon landing: How Jodrell Bank tracked Apollo 11 and a Russian probe

An engineer at Jodrell Bank says he could hear every word from Apollo 11's famous mission.

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Researchers show the importance of copy-number variants in the development of insecticide resistance in malaria mosquitoes

Researchers from LSTM, working alongside colleagues from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Cambridge and the Big Data Institute, University of Oxford, have used whole genome sequencing to understand copy-number variants (CNVs) in malaria mosquitoes and their role in insecticide resistance.

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Shaping light with a smartlens

A team of researchers reports on a dynamically tuneable lens capable of achieving almost any complex optical function.

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Market competition sets tone for lower cost of UK mobile phone contracts, research shows

Healthy and competitive markets — and not stringent regulations — help dial back the cost of mobile phone contacts, according to new research.

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Stature and education level of diabetic women to find those at risk of dementia in Nigeria

A joint survey by researchers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) and Benue State University (BSU) finds that short height and low education levels are characteristic traits of Nigerian women with type 2 diabetes showing early symptoms of dementia. This work points to the importance of childhood nutrition and education programmes, particularly for girls, in public health improvement s

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New gene found for a deadly childhood cancer offers possibility of targeted drug therapy

Neuroblastoma accounts for 15% of total childhood cancer deaths and survival rates of high-risk neuroblastoma patients is 50%.For the first time, Australian researchers from Children's Cancer Institute have discovered that a gene called JMJD6 plays an important role in the most aggressive form of the disease. The discovery opens up a new way to treat neuroblastoma, using drugs that target this gen

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Under development medical camera could help cut time and cost of procedures

Researchers have completed a successful clinical trial to detect and image radioactive tracers used in PET and in SPECT scans at the same time in a patient. It is hoped the method will enable doctors to scan patients for abnormalities in shorter times while reducing the amount of radiation patients would be exposed to.

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This “Artificial Throat” Is Like a Neck Tattoo That Creates Sound

Mute Point A single devastating injury to the vocal cords can be enough to strip a person of their ability to speak forever, which can cause problems in everything from careers to relationships. Now, a team of Chinese researchers say they’ve created an “artificial throat” that could give patients who are mute due to an injury the ability to speak again — and they won’t even need to go under the k

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Next-gen membranes for carbon capture

CO2 produced from burning fossil fuels is still mostly released into the atmosphere, adding to the burden of global warming. One way to cut CO2 levels is through carbon capture, a chemical technique that removes CO2 from emissions ("postcombustion"), preventing it from entering the atmosphere. The captured CO2 can then be recycled or stored in gas or liquid form, a process known as sequestration.

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An update on the ongoing coral disease outbreak in Florida

Florida's coral reefs are experiencing a multi-year outbreak of stony coral tissue loss disease. Here is a description of the problem, what NOAA and partners are doing in response to the problem, and how you can help.

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New paper points to soil pore structure as key to carbon storage

Alexandra Kravchenko, Michigan State University professor in the Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, and several of her colleagues recently discovered a new mechanism determining how carbon is stored in soils that could improve the climate resilience of cropping systems and also reduce their carbon footprints.

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Measuring the maelstrom: How sediments move and settle during strong flow events in submarine canyons

Several times a year turbulent underwater pulses of sand, mud, and water sweep down the winding channel of Monterey Canyon. Like flash floods on land, these so-called "turbidity currents" roar down the floor of the canyon, leaving a residue of sediment in their wake. A recent research paper shows that these events often carry sand-sized particles 50 kilometers (31 miles) down the canyon and leave

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Diving into Citizen Science: The Origins of Ocean Sanctuaries

Since 2000, I’ve been an avid scuba diver in Southern California. When the Yukon, a 366 ft. long Canadian warship, sunk off the coast of San Diego in July of 2000, it became an artificial reef for divers to explore, piquing my interest in and igniting a lifelong passion for diving. In late 2006, my dive buddy, Barbara Lloyd, and I found ourselves at a crossroads. Both of us had earned various divi

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Volcano on Indonesia's Java gushes ash, causes panic

A towering column of ash exploded from a volcano on Indonesia's most populous island, Java, forcing tourists and residents to flee the mountain.

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From Europe to the Arctic, temperature records tumble in 2019

"We" may only be just over halfway through it, but 2019 has already seen temperature records smashed from Europe to the Arctic circle and could prove to be one of the hottest ever recorded.

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Visible punishment institutions are key in promoting large-scale cooperation: Study

New international research by Monash University has found that one way to overcome social dilemmas is through visible prosocial punishment — the existence of collective institutions that punish individuals who don't cooperate.

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HDO-antimiR represents a new weapon in the fight against microRNA-related disease

Malfunctioning microRNA (miRNA) has been implicated in various genetic diseases. Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) developed a new type of molecule that inhibits miRNA. Compared with other miRNA inhibitors, their molecule, termed 'HDO-antimiR,' had greater miRNA-silencing potency. These findings provide new insights into the biology of miRNA silencing and support the potent

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Aussie businesses not ready to tackle modern slavery

New research from the University of South Australia finds that Australian businesses are ill-prepared for mandatory modern slavery reporting, with more than two-thirds of ASX 100 companies unable to produce a disclosure statement about potentially exploitative labour practices.

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Successful application of machine learning in the discovery of new polymers

As a powerful example of how artificial intelligence (AI) can accelerate the discovery of new materials, scientists in Japan have designed and verified polymers with high thermal conductivity– a property that would be the key to heat management, for example, in the fifth-generation (5G) mobile communication technologies. Their study highlights the great advantages of machine learning methods over

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The democratic governance of agricultural multinationals is essential for environmental sustainability

An international team of researchers investigate how partnering works to achieve sustainability in agri food supply chains using using a pioneer case study: Barilla Sustainable Farming (BSF)

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World's smallest fossil monkey found in Amazon jungle

Some 18 million years ago, a tiny monkey weighing little more than a baseball lived in the Amazon rainforest, the smallest fossil monkey known worldwide. The finding is based on a single tooth, twice the size of a pinhead, which scientists recently uncovered in a river bank in southeastern Peru. The specimen helps bridge a 15-million-year gap in the fossil record for New World monkeys.

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How baseless fears over 5G rollout created a health scare

Misconceptions about the technology and lack of consultation with local communities may have boosted conspiracy theories When Tonia Antoniazzi stood up in the House of Commons to talk about the risks of 5G, she admitted that “initiating a conversation … has had members of my own team and family telling me that it is all made up.” But the Labour MP was undeterred, securing a debate in parliament a

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Coral host responses to heat and sediment stress

NUS marine ecologists have discovered changes in the gene expression of corals subjected to short-term heat and sediment stress which provide critical insights for more effective reef management strategies.

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Rat brains have special map cells for navigation

Rats have specialized brain cells in the striatum that provide them with a map of their surroundings, according to new research. The researchers believe that human brains likely have these neurons too, although further research is necessary to be certain. The study offers valuable insights into the workings of the brain’s navigational system—knowledge that could help create smarter autonomous veh

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Virus-Only Gene Editing, Or Not?

I wrote here about a new company (Homology Medicine) that claimed to have a viral method for gene editing that did not involve any sort of double-strand DNA breaking enzyme (as you need during the CRISPR, TALENs, or zinc-finger nuclease methods). That’s a pretty interesting claim, because double-strand breaks (DSBs) are powerful but can be hard to control. But as is always the case, interesting c

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Giving cats food with an antibody may help people with cat allergies

Research by pet-food maker Purina aims to disable the major allergen carried in cat saliva, a protein called Fel d1.

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Amazon's Revolutionary Retail Strategy? Recycling Old Ideas

Opinion: Amazon's prevailing business strategy is to try everything—even what's been done before—to reshape retail. Sound backward? It's actually brilliant.

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Nintendo's Reportedly Fixing Those Broken Joy-Cons for Free

The Joy-Con drift is finally being addressed. Plus: A new study confirms you should play games with your mic on mute.

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Science snapshots: Chromosomes, crystals, and drones

From Berkeley Lab: exploring human origins in the uncharted territory of our chromosomes; scientists grow spiraling new material; drones will fly for days with this new technology

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PastCast: Secret science in World War 2

Nature, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02099-1 In the Nature PastCast series, we delve into the archives to tell the stories behind some of Nature’s biggest papers.

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Hawaii telescope protests draw supporters to defend project

A giant telescope planned for Hawaii's tallest mountain will enhance humanity's knowledge of the universe and bring quality, high-paying jobs, supporters said as protesters blocked construction for a second week.

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Hydrogel sucks moisture from the air to get clean water

A new way to harvest water from the humid air above water surfaces with a hydrogel could help address water scarcity. The new method takes advantage of the huge amount of water that evaporates from water surfaces such as reservoirs and the open sea each day. The solution lies in a unique zinc-based water-absorbing hydrogel that researchers developed last year. This gel-like material is over eight

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Stem cell therapy treats bone metastases but saves bone

A new therapeutic treatment uses engineered stem cells to target and kill cancer bone metastases while preserving the bone, a study with mice shows. The approach equips engineered mesenchymal stem cells with targeting agents that drive them to bone metastatic sites, where they offload therapeutics. “What’s powerful about this strategy is that we deliver a combination of both anti-tumor and anti-b

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Envisioning Our Future with Isaac Arthur

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Invasive Aliens

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Desperate for workers, aging Japan turns to robots for healthcare

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Will We Colonize Our Solar System? with Dr. Robert Zubrin

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India readies plan for $4 billion Tesla-scale battery storage plants

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Materials Scientists Uncover Source of Degradation in Sodium Batteries

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First free flight of SpaceX's Starhopper aborted after engine fire

On Wednesday, July 24th, the prototype test vehicle for the SpaceX craft the Starhopper commenced its first untethered "hop test" at the company's test facility in Boca Chica, Texas. This test is an important milestone for SpaceX, intended to validate the Raptor engine in free flight and bring the company one step closer to creating the super-heavy launch system that will allow for trips to the mo

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Einstein's Theory of Relativity Holds Up Around a Supermassive Black Hole

Astronomers have shown that Einstein's ideas about the warping of space and time holds true as the best description yet of how gravity works.

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The Man Who Found the Titanic Is Hunting for Amelia Earhart's Plane

The adventurer who discovered the Titanic is taking on a new mission: finding the Electra, the long-lost plane of Amelia Earhart, the record-breaking pilot who was last heard from on July 2, 1937.

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Civilization-Collapsing Megadroughts of Medieval Times Could Be in Store for a Warming Earth

From the 800s to the 1400s, about a dozen megadroughts struck the American Southwest, and all lasted longer than a decade.

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Employers miss out on talent by overlooking workers living with disabilities

Businesses increasingly see diversity in the workplace as positive for their operations, according to a Conference Board of Canada survey of Canadian organizations.

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New quantum phenomenon helps to understand fundamental limits of graphene electronics

A team of researchers from the Universities of Manchester, Nottingham and Loughborough has discovered a quantum phenomenon that helps to understand the fundamental limits of graphene electronics.

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Manganese can speed up the danger in lead pipes

In conjunction with certain other chemicals, naturally occurring manganese can lead to big changes in the water in lead pipes, research finds. Depending on what disinfectants are used in the water, those changes can have significant—even dangerous—consequences, according to the study in Environmental Science and Technology . The research focuses on a unique form of lead, PbO 2 or lead dioxide (le

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Arctic wildfires: What's caused huge swathes of flames to spread?

The fires are releasing significant amounts of carbon gases, further contributing to global warming.

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How to Fight Toxic Masculinity

The code of toxic masculinity requires that men are dominant over everyone else, have no needs, show no emotion, and are always #winning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New protein found in strongest spider web material

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and Slovenia has found a previously unknown protein in the strongest known spider web material. In their paper published in the journal Communications Biology, the group describes their study of Darwin's bark spider silk and the glands that produce it.

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Extreme weather caused by climate change has damaged 45% of Australia's coastal habitat

If you think climate change is only gradually affecting our natural systems, think again.

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How to Fight Toxic Masculinity

The code of toxic masculinity requires that men are dominant over everyone else, have no needs, show no emotion, and are always #winning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New protein found in strongest spider web material

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and Slovenia has found a previously unknown protein in the strongest known spider web material. In their paper published in the journal Communications Biology, the group describes their study of Darwin's bark spider silk and the glands that produce it.

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Extreme weather caused by climate change has damaged 45% of Australia's coastal habitat

If you think climate change is only gradually affecting our natural systems, think again.

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New monkey species found in Amazon area threatened by deforestation

With its distinctive white tail, the Munduruku marmoset is the newest species of monkey we have found – but deforestation in the Amazon threatens its habitat

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Internet joke plan to 'raid' Area 51 gets stern reply from US military

What has driven millions of people to sign up to "storm" Area 51, the US government's military base? It's clearly just a bit of fun by internet jokesters, but the US military isn't laughing

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Our cities need more trees, but some commonly planted ones won't survive climate change

We need trees in our lives. This past summer, Adelaide experienced the hottest temperature ever recorded in an Australian state capital, hitting 46.6 degrees on January 24. Trees beautify otherwise grey cities and cool our suburbs during heatwaves. But different species have different levels of tolerance of heat, lack of water and other threats posed by climate change.

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Our cities need more trees, but some commonly planted ones won't survive climate change

We need trees in our lives. This past summer, Adelaide experienced the hottest temperature ever recorded in an Australian state capital, hitting 46.6 degrees on January 24. Trees beautify otherwise grey cities and cool our suburbs during heatwaves. But different species have different levels of tolerance of heat, lack of water and other threats posed by climate change.

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Melting ice may change shape of Arctic river deltas

Thawing ice cover and easily erodible permafrost may destabilize Arctic river deltas, according to new research.

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Heatwave: The human body is already close to thermal limits elsewhere

I am a scientist who researches climate hazards. This week I have published research on the potential for a catastrophic cyclone-heatwave combo in the global south. Yet over the past few days I have been approached by various media outlets to talk not about that hazard, but about the unfolding UK heatwave and climate change. It is always satisfying to respond to public interest around weather extr

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War on science: Trump administration muzzles climate experts, critics say

Whistleblowers and groups tracking agency decisions say administration is ignoring science and censoring expertise The Trump administration is disregarding science and expertise across a wide range of government work, as documented by whistleblowers and groups tracking agency decisions. Trump officials are censoring warnings about the climate crisis, moving critical agencies out of Washington and

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Going Back to the Moon

With the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 landing on the moon there has been a lot of talk about NASA’s plans to return. Each new dribble of news can be exciting, but a coherent plan remains elusive. Somewhat of a plan is starting to take shape, however. In a recent commentary for the Washington Post , Astronomer Phil Plait made an interesting point – that the Apollo mission was designed to be self-

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The Soviet Space Program Was Not Woke

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series reflecting on the Apollo 11 mission, 50 years later. About this time 50 years ago, three men returned home from a long journey. They had flown to the moon, planted an American flag in the silver regolith, and flown back. After a decade of jostling, the United States became the indisputable winner of the space race. But the Soviet Union netted anothe

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The ‘African Giant’ Challenging Musical Boundaries

I n January, when Coachella announced the lineup for its annual music festival in California, the Nigerian-born singer Burna Boy—one of only two African artists set to perform—quickly reacted to the placement of his name on the promotional materials . “I really appreciate you,” he wrote in an Instagram Story after the poster reveal. “But I don’t appreciate the way my name is written so small in y

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Finding a gene that regulates sleep

What keeps us awake—and helps us fall asleep? The answer is complex, but involves what are called circadian rhythms, which are found in all species with sleep-wake cycles—physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a regular schedule.

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Think Twice Before Giving Young Children Reflux Medications

A recent study demonstrates an association between reflux medications in infancy and increased risk of fractures in early childhood, yet another reason to be cautious when using pharmaceutical interventions to manage a mostly benign and self-limited condition.

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Finding a gene that regulates sleep

What keeps us awake—and helps us fall asleep? The answer is complex, but involves what are called circadian rhythms, which are found in all species with sleep-wake cycles—physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a regular schedule.

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Image of the Day: Expressive Hydra

Researchers track which genes are active in the polyp during successive cell states.

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Listening to the whispers of individual cells

For the cells in our bodies to function as a unit, they must communicate with one another constantly. They secrete signalling molecules—ions, proteins and nucleic acids—that are picked up by adjacent cells, which in turn pass on the signal to other cells. Our muscles, digestive system and brain are only able to function thanks to this type of communication. And this is the only way in which our im

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Engineers find new way to create single-chain protein nanostructures

The ancient art of paper folding known as origami is used to make intricate birds or other shapes. Inspired by the work of DNA origami, in which nanostructures are made from folding DNA, a team of engineers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has found a new way to create single-chain protein nanostructures by using synthetic biology and protein-assembly tec

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The influence of microbes on soil respiration

Millions of microbes living in the soil could influence how soils respond to temperature changes. They also influence the amount of carbon dioxide soils give off or respire. Yet scientists rarely consider these microbes when modeling temperature effects around the world. An international team of scientists analyzed the results of more than two dozen warming experiments to quantify how much these m

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Online Survey Software | Qualtrics Survey Solutions

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The influence of microbes on soil respiration

Millions of microbes living in the soil could influence how soils respond to temperature changes. They also influence the amount of carbon dioxide soils give off or respire. Yet scientists rarely consider these microbes when modeling temperature effects around the world. An international team of scientists analyzed the results of more than two dozen warming experiments to quantify how much these m

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Scientists discover approach to activate inert gases

Inert gases like argon typically do not form chemical bonds except under extreme conditions, such as the icy cold of outer space. As shared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team of scientists has developed a groundbreaking approach to design and generate gaseous ions that bind even argon at room temperature. This surprising innovation creates opportunities t

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Twitter shares jump 10% on solid user growth, revenue beat

Twitter Inc on Friday reported better-than-expected second-quarter revenue as design changes to its microblogging website attracted more users and advertisers, sending its shares up 10%. …

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SpaceX dragon en route to space station with NASA science, cargo

A SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft is on its way to deliver the second commercial crew docking port and about 5,000 pounds of science investigations and supplies for the International Space Station after a 6:01 p.m. EDT Thursday launch from Florida.

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Understanding nematodes to address climate change

Fun fact: The microscopic worms BYU professor Byron Adams studies are not only the most abundant animal species on earth, they also make up four-fifths of animal life on this planet. That's right, four out of every five animals on earth are nematode worms.

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Careful analysis of volcano's plumbing system may give tips on pending eruptions

A volcano will not send out an official invitation when it's ready to erupt, but a team of researchers suggest that scientists who listen and watch carefully may be able to pick up signs that an eruption is about to happen.

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Seeking new physics, scientists borrow from social networks

When two protons collide, they release pyrotechnic jets of particles, the details of which can tell scientists something about the nature of physics and the fundamental forces that govern the universe.

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Europe prepares for Mars courier

The first round-trip to the Red Planet will see a European orbiter bringing martian samples back to Earth. ESA is opening the door to industry to build the spacecraft that will deliver the precious rocks, dust and gas from Mars—the key to understanding whether life ever existed on our closest planetary neighbour.

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Researchers report rice gene that confers broad-spectrum resistance to β-triketone herbicides

Genomes of the genus Oryza, including both domesticated and wild species, have been well characterized because of the importance of rice to the global food supply. The wealth of genetic variation in rice varieties has allowed the identification of useful genes for crop breeding by map-based cloning methods. With regard to large-scale farming, in particular, weed control with the use of appropriate

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Next-gen membranes for carbon capture

EPFL chemical engineers have developed a new class of high-performance membranes for carbon capture that greatly exceed current targets.

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Researchers report rice gene that confers broad-spectrum resistance to β-triketone herbicides

Genomes of the genus Oryza, including both domesticated and wild species, have been well characterized because of the importance of rice to the global food supply. The wealth of genetic variation in rice varieties has allowed the identification of useful genes for crop breeding by map-based cloning methods. With regard to large-scale farming, in particular, weed control with the use of appropriate

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NASA's TESS mission completes first year of survey, turns to northern sky

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has discovered 21 planets outside our solar system and captured data on other interesting events occurring in the southern sky during its first year of science. TESS has now turned its attention to the Northern Hemisphere to complete the most comprehensive planet-hunting expedition ever undertaken.

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MABI instrument can determine the concentration and source of black carbon pollution in the atmosphere

ANSTO scientists, who are experts in the monitoring of fine particle pollution, have developed a research instrument to measure the concentration of black carbon in the atmosphere and determine its source.

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Revolutionary method could bring us much closer to the description of hyperdiverse faunas

Two hundred and sixty-one years ago, Linnaeus formalized binomial nomenclature and the modern system of naming organisms. Since the time of his first publication, taxonomists have managed to describe 1.8 million of the estimated 8 to 25 million extant species of multicellular life, somewhere between 7 percent and 22 percent. At this rate, the task of treating all species would be accomplished some

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Revolutionary method could bring us much closer to the description of hyperdiverse faunas

Two hundred and sixty-one years ago, Linnaeus formalized binomial nomenclature and the modern system of naming organisms. Since the time of his first publication, taxonomists have managed to describe 1.8 million of the estimated 8 to 25 million extant species of multicellular life, somewhere between 7 percent and 22 percent. At this rate, the task of treating all species would be accomplished some

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Does Technology Spell Doom for Close Relationships?

Research shows it’s not helping, but solutions do exist — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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‘Rainfall has rocketed’: the remote weathermen charting the climate crisis

The Met Office team on a south Atlantic island reveal the extreme lengths they go to in order to forecast the weather At 11.15am on a blustery spring morning, Lori Bennett stands on an exposed bluff on the remote south Atlantic island of St Helena, holding a gigantic, wobbling balloon. The wind is roaring, waves are churning up a swell and the sea air is charged with industrial hydrogen pumped fr

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This Robo-Van Startup Will Handle Walmart's 'Middle Mile'

Gatik isn’t a long-haul trucker and doesn’t want to transport people. It’s hoping to carve a niche moving goods from warehouses to stores.

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Amazon's 'The Boys' Tests the Limits of Superhero Fatigue

The new show turns comic-book heroes into villains—and runs up against a supersize challenge.

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Does Technology Spell Doom for Close Relationships?

Research shows it's not helping, but solutions do exist — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Measures that lengthen life leave a telltale genetic mark

Nature, Published online: 25 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02269-1 A diverse array of interventions that increase longevity activate the same genes.

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Does Technology Spell Doom for Close Relationships?

Research shows it’s not helping, but solutions do exist — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Study shows YouTube videos with kids or video games are the most successful

The Pew Research Center looked at over 40,000 YouTube channels with at least 250,000 subscribers that existed through late 2018, analyzing the videos they produced in the first week of 2019. …

11h

11h

Forensics Friday: Would you flag this paper if it were under review?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the tenth in a series, Forensics Friday. Take a look at the image below, and then take our poll. … Continue reading

11h

Detained Migrant Children Need Continuous Medical Care

Health care providers say a lack of transparency and communication are barriers to ensuring the children are getting adequate, ongoing treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Detained Migrant Children Need Continuous Medical Care

Health care providers say a lack of transparency and communication are barriers to ensuring the children are getting adequate, ongoing treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Dispatches From the World Beneath Our Feet

Humans are innately drawn to and repulsed by underground worlds, British nature writer Robert MacFarlane writes in "Underland," his wide-ranging survey of the world's deep, dark places, from the otherworldly limestones caves of Italy to buried labs in England and the icy crevasses of Greenland.

12h

Hoses, ice packs help tame Tokyo heat before the Olympics

The heat is on for organizers of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Several days after marking one year to go before the opening ceremony, the notorious Tokyo heat kicked in just in time for a beach volleyball test event that gave organizers a chance to implement their heat counter-measures.

12h

Australia considers more regulation of Google and Facebook

The Australian government released report on Friday that recommends more regulation on the market power of multinational digital platforms including Google and Facebook that would ensure fair …

12h

Study finds animals with fancy, colorful males have choosy mothers

Evolution is actually a Sadie Hawkins dance, as new research shows females not only determine whether male animals develop bright colors, but also how fast new species develop.

12h

How to study better and avoid a test-day disaster

Getting hints makes students feel like they're learning, but a cognitive psychology study on monkeys, specifically on two rhesus macaques called Oberon and MacDuff, has proven that getting hints backfires when it comes to test day. If you're relying on outside help, you're not employing what's called the 'generation effect'. The generation effect refers to the mental effort of generating an answe

12h

Opponents of the Thirty Meter Telescope fight the process, not science

Nature, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02304-1 Painting Native Hawaiian culture as against modern science is a false dichotomy, explains Rosie Alegado.

12h

More Money Than Anyone Imagined

Eight years ago, we were in the midst of a frothy, frothy tech bubble. It was all anyone could talk about—at investor conferences , in the pages of The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal , in notes by research analysts. “Irrational exuberance has returned to the internet world,” The Economist warned, in one of many stories on the topic. That late-1990s feeling was “back,” said Esquire , p

12h

How to Choose Between the U.S. and China? It’s Not That Easy.

SEOUL—At a time when the struggle for supremacy between Washington and Beijing is intensifying, numerous countries—from Australia and New Zealand, to Japan and South Korea, to Thailand, the Philippines, Brazil, and Germany—are finding themselves in an awkward position: having the United States as their security ally and China as their top trading partner. The U.S. and Chinese governments aren’t e

12h

Unlimited Donations to Candidates, Coming Soon?

During the George W. Bush administration, then–Solicitor General Paul Clement successfully defended the constitutionality of the 2002 McCain-Feingold law, which tightened electioneering and fundraising regulations. Can Clement now get traction on a new case, Thompson v. Hebdon , that could partially reverse that earlier victory and help lead to more big money in politics? It seems possible, if no

12h

Beyoncé Remixed the Meaning of The Lion King

When it was released in 1994, The Lion King was billed as Disney animation’s first original story: No fairy tale inspired it. But in the development process, the creators noticed—and then played up —similarities to Shakespeare’s Hamlet in the script they’d come up with. They thought about the Old Testament figures Joseph and Moses too. Some viewers called out similarities to the Japanese cartoon

12h

Study finds animals with fancy, colorful males have choosy mothers

Evolution is actually a Sadie Hawkins dance, as new research shows females not only determine whether male animals develop bright colors, but also how fast new species develop.

12h

Scientists Can Finally Build Feedback Circuits in Cells

The circuitry could act as control mechanisms in safe, smart cells programmed to kill tumors and treat brain injuries.

12h

Climate change could raise the risk of deadly fungal infections in humans

The rise of Candida auris, a deadly fungus spurring outbreaks in the United States and worldwide, may have been aided by climate change.

12h

Tog med farligt gods afsporet i Norge

Et godstog med farligt gods er afsporet på Nordlandsbanen. Beboere i en radius af én kilometer er evakueret, ligesom E6 var spærret i flere timer.

12h

Ladies' choice: What drives faster, flashier formation of new animal species

Evolution is actually a Sadie Hawkins dance, as new research shows females not only determine whether male animals develop bright colors, but also how fast new species develop.

13h

Expert panel in macular degeneration recommends paradigm shift for future directions

A panel of investigators assembled by the National Advisory Eye Council (NAEC) calls for large-scale collaborative research to address dry macular degeneration — the leading cause of blindness among the elderly — for which there is currently no effective treatment.

13h

Methylmercury exposure, genetic variation in metabolic enzymes, and the risk of glioma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47284-4

13h

MICA*049, not MICA*009, is associated with Behçet’s disease in a Chinese population

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47289-z MICA *049, not MICA *009, is associated with Behçet’s disease in a Chinese population

13h

Optimal Semiconductors for 3H and 63Ni Betavoltaics

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47371-6 Optimal Semiconductors for 3 H and 63 Ni Betavoltaics

13h

Intensification of hot Eurasian summers by climate change and land–atmosphere interactions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47291-5

13h

The influence of Echinacea purpurea leaf microbiota on chicoric acid level

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47329-8

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13h

Early-life factors are associated with waist circumference and type 2 diabetes among Ghanaian adults: The RODAM Study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47169-6

13h

MC4R and ENPP1 gene polymorphisms and their implication in maternal and neonatal risk for obesity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47402-2

13h

Biking through my PhD

Nature, Published online: 26 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02254-8 Overcoming my initial struggles after leaving China to start my PhD has been like riding a bike.

13h

When droplets walk across a liquid surface

When a container of silicone oil or other similar liquid is vertically shaken at a regular frequency, 1-millimeter-sized droplets of the same liquid placed on the liquid's surface appear to "walk" across the surface at speeds of about 1 cm/second, propelled by their own waves. In a new study, physicists have found that these walking droplets can be much larger (up to 2.8 mm in diameter) and faster

13h

14h

Musk: Framgångsrik uppskjutning av Starhopper

Den första riktiga provflygningen av SpaceX rymskeppsprototyp gick bra, bekräftar Elon Musk i en tweet.

15h

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15h

Københavns Universitet optager flere studerende end i 2018

7.326 ansøgere får i dag tilbudt en studieplads på en af Københavns Universitets…

15h

16h

Coal power in Europe has had its biggest ever decline

Electricity generation from coal power stations across Europe fell by nearly a fifth in the first half of 2019, driven by high carbon prices and low gas prices

16h

Programmeringssproget Rust kan løse farlige problemer i C og C++

Måske er det på tide at putte gamle sprog i skraldespanden og benytte et mere moderne og sikkert system-sprog, lyder det fra Microsoft.

16h

James Lovelock at 100 says asteroids pose key threat to humanity

Creator of Gaia theory recalls how it nearly had another name and says the age of AI is nigh James Lovelock has spent a lifetime pondering the forces that shape Earth. It was a pursuit that brought about his most famous creation: a view of the world where life maintains the conditions for life, which he niftily named Gaia theory. The hypothesis, as it was back then, was wholeheartedly embraced by

16h

DTU-dekan: Rekordstort optag af kvinder er ikke tilfredsstillende

DTU kæmper for at tiltrække kvindelige studerende, og det går så småt den rigtige vej, mener ny dekan.

16h

Despondent Guatemalan coffee growers dream of US return

Many Guatemalans who spent years working in the United States to come home and set up a small coffee-growing business have seen their savings drained and their hopes dashed due to low coffee prices.

16h

Landmark Gene-Editing Work May Help Restore Vision

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

16h

Researchers lead breakthrough in quantum computing

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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World’s Largest Nuclear Fusion Experiment Clears Milestone

submitted by /u/thow78 [link] [comments]

16h

Fishing for plastic on Amsterdam's eco-friendly canal cruises

Equipped with fishing rods and thick gloves, a group of people peers into the water from one of the many boats that line Amsterdam's famous canals.

17h

China accuses FedEx of 'holding up' Huawei parcels

China accused FedEx of deliberately "holding up" the delivery of more than 100 Huawei packages after the US firm misrouted some parcels from the telecom giant, state media said Friday.

17h

New Milwaukee zoo exhibit to improve standards for elephants

Ruth loves popcorn. But she has to work for it, by blowing air with her trunk through a white pipe attached to a barrel above her head to push it out.

17h

New Milwaukee zoo exhibit to improve standards for elephants

Ruth loves popcorn. But she has to work for it, by blowing air with her trunk through a white pipe attached to a barrel above her head to push it out.

17h

Antibiotic-resistant genes found in London's canals and ponds

Central London's freshwater sources contain high levels of antibiotic resistant genes, with the River Thames having the highest amount, according to research by UCL.

17h

Muslim LGBTQI+ refugees more likely to gain asylum in Germany if they conform to stereotypes, study

LGBTQI+ Muslims seeking asylum are more successful if they speak, dress and act in accordance with Western notions of homosexuality, according to a new study.

17h

Antibiotic-resistant genes found in London's canals and ponds

Central London's freshwater sources contain high levels of antibiotic resistant genes, with the River Thames having the highest amount, according to research by UCL.

17h

Paris Agreement hampered by inconsistent pledges, research finds

Some countries' Paris Climate Agreement pledges may not be as ambitious as they appear, a new study has found.

17h

The interplay between gender and autism spectrum disorder – Science Weekly podcast

The Science Weekly team are taking a bit of a break so we’ll be revisiting some of our favourite shows from the archive. Including this one from 2017 , when Nicola Davis looked at why so many women with autism are misdiagnosed and how this issue resonates with broader ideas of neurodiversity. We also hear from a listener about how this episode affected her life. Continue reading…

17h

A New British Prime Minister Faces the Same Old Brexit Problem

Insanity, the saying goes, is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. It’s a tactic Theresa May demonstrated brilliantly during her three-year tenure as Britain’s prime minister, in which she attempted to push her negotiated Brexit deal setting out the terms of Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union three times—only to have it rejected by whopping majoriti

17h

The interplay between gender and autism spectrum disorder – Science Weekly podcast

The Science Weekly team are taking a bit of a break so we’ll be revisiting some of our favourite shows from the archive. Including this one from 2017, when Nicola Davis looked at why so many women with autism are misdiagnosed and how this issue resonates with broader ideas of neurodiversity. We also hear from a listener about how this episode affected her life.. Help support our independent journa

17h

Musk: Framgångsrik uppskjutning av Starhopper

Den första riktiga provflygningen av SpaceX rymskeppsprototyp gick bra, bekräftar Elon Musk i en tweet.

17h

Photos of the Week: European Heat Wave, Canoe Journey, Foggy Dinner

Puffins in Wales, baseball in San Francisco, a boat market in Bangladesh, wildfires in Portugal, protests in Puerto Rico, Comic-Con International in San Diego, swimming and diving in South Korea, a ballerina at the Louvre, canola fields in Alberta, the polar bear Nanook in Germany, and much more

17h

Fire myter og et par gode råd: Her din guide til en solrig weekend uden forbrændinger

Vidste du, at det kun tager 33 minutter for en halv-bleg gennemsnitsdansker at blive solskoldet?

18h

The Human Brain Project Hasn’t Lived Up to Its Promise

submitted by /u/stefantalpalaru [link] [comments]

18h

Danske Beredskaber opruster til en brandfarlig sensommer

Danske Beredskaber har brugt året til at forberede sig på en tør sommer med høj risiko for naturbrande.

18h

SpaceX Just Unleashed Its Starship Rocket for the First Time

The prototype, called Starhopper, hovered in the air for a few moments. Next stop: Space.

18h

Masters of Science 2019

Six scientists share their latest discoveries, from human origins to exotic materials and mini-brains

18h

Meet the relatives: the new human story

There used to be a broad consensus about our origins. A spate of discoveries has forced a radical rethink

18h

Introducing Masters of Science 2019

Science editor Clive Cookson on the third instalment of our series, celebrating the latest advances in fields from exobiology to synthetic intelligence

18h

Professor: El-fly kommer ikke til at hjælpe os med klimakrisen

PLUS. Flyindustrien investerer på livet løs i kapløbet om at udvikle bæredygtige el-fly. Men teknologien har så mange udfordringer, at klimaproblemerne kan nå at overhale os, inden vi når at få flyene på vingerne, lyder det fra energiekspert.

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18h

Revolutionary method could bring us much closer to the description of hyperdiverse faunas

Largely relying on DNA barcoding, rather than traditional practices, a simplified diagnostics method for species description could be the key to revealing Earth's biodiversity before much of it goes extinct. The approach is demonstrated in practice with the description of 18 new to science species of parasitic wasps, recently discovered from the Área de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

19h

Coping skills program helps social service workers reduce stress, trauma after disasters

Social work professors found that a mental health intervention called Caregivers Journey of Hope can bolster social service workers' emotional resilience and ability to cope with the stress and trauma associated with disasters such as Superstorm Sandy.

19h

Immune therapy takes a 'BiTE' out of brain cancer

Investigators have created a new method that could make immune therapy more effective again brain tumors and expand its use against other types of solid tumors.

19h

3D printed pill samples gut microbiome to aid diagnosis and treatment

A research team led by engineers has developed a 3D printed pill that samples bacteria found in the gut — known as the microbiome — as it passes through the gastrointestinal tract (GI). The ability to profile bacterial species throughout the GI tract could have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and conditions that are affected by the microbiome.

19h

Frog in your throat? Stress might be to blame for vocal issues

A researcher has found that there is more to vocal issues than just feeling nervous and that stress-induced brain activations might be to blame.

19h

Too much caffeine during pregnancy may damage baby's liver

Having too much caffeine during pregnancy may impair baby's liver development and increase the risk of liver disease in adulthood, according to a new study. Pregnant rats given caffeine had offspring with lower birth weights, altered growth and stress hormone levels and impaired liver development.

19h

3D printed pill samples gut microbiome to aid diagnosis and treatment

A research team led by engineers has developed a 3D printed pill that samples bacteria found in the gut — known as the microbiome — as it passes through the gastrointestinal tract (GI). The ability to profile bacterial species throughout the GI tract could have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and conditions that are affected by the microbiome.

19h

Wildfires Ravaging The Arctic Right Now Are So Intense, You Can See Them From Space

Siberia, Greenland, and Alaska are enveloped in smoke.

19h

Artificial intelligence is taking an increased role in diagnosing and treating cancer

A new machine learning system was able to identify cancer outcomes as well as human readers, and much more rapidly. (Deposit Photos/) Doctors hope the future of cancer treatment is personal: Using genetics, they’ll be able to match patients with precisely the drug or treatment option that will fight their tumors. However, information on tumor genetics often isn’t linked with data on how well pati

20h

Airplane first-aid kits don’t have what kids need

Few airlines stock first-aid kits with pediatric versions of therapies that would help children dealing with medical emergencies, researchers report. In a new study of children’s medical emergencies on planes, researchers found that most incidents involve common ailments such as vomiting, fever, or allergic reactions—events that should be easily treated. “Children represent almost 16% of emergenc

21h

A.I. taught itself to solve Rubik’s Cube in under a second

The Rubik’s Cube is no match for a new artificial intelligence system, researchers report. Since its invention by a Hungarian architect in 1974, the Rubik’s Cube has furrowed the brows of many who have tried to solve it. DeepCubeA, a deep reinforcement learning algorithm, can find the solution in a fraction of a second, without any specific domain knowledge or in-game coaching from humans. “How d

21h

Antibiotics fight rare cancer and bacteria at the same time

For patients with a rare lymphoma cancer, aggressive treatment with antibiotics can inhibit both cancer cells and the staphylococcal infections that many develop, researchers report. A new study shows that the treatment reduces the number of cancer cells and significantly diminishes the cancer for a period of time in patients with severe skin inflammation. CTCL is a rare lymphoma cancer in the T-

21h

Mechanical and kinetic factors drive sorting of F-actin cross-linkers on bundles [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

In cells, actin-binding proteins (ABPs) sort to different regions to establish F-actin networks with diverse functions, including filopodia used for cell migration and contractile rings required for cell division. Recent experimental work uncovered a competition-based mechanism that may facilitate spatial localization of ABPs: binding of a short cross-linker protein to…

21h

A deep intronic splice mutation of STAT3 underlies hyper IgE syndrome by negative dominance [Genetics]

Heterozygous in-frame mutations in coding regions of human STAT3 underlie the only known autosomal dominant form of hyper IgE syndrome (AD HIES). About 5% of familial cases remain unexplained. The mutant proteins are loss-of-function and dominant-negative when tested following overproduction in recipient cells. However, the production of mutant proteins has…

21h

Mutant huntingtin disrupts mitochondrial proteostasis by interacting with TIM23 [Neuroscience]

Mutant huntingtin (mHTT), the causative protein in Huntington’s disease (HD), associates with the translocase of mitochondrial inner membrane 23 (TIM23) complex, resulting in inhibition of synaptic mitochondrial protein import first detected in presymptomatic HD mice. The early timing of this event suggests that it is a relevant and direct pathophysiologic…

21h

Collective sinking promotes selective cell pairing in planktonic pennate diatoms [Ecology]

Finding a partner in an inherently unsteady 3-dimensional system, such as the planktonic marine environment, is a difficult task for nonswimming organisms with poor control over their orientation. We experimentally investigate the process of cell pairing in pennate marine diatoms and present field evidence of its occurrence in the ocean….

21h

Hippocampal deletion of NaV1.1 channels in mice causes thermal seizures and cognitive deficit characteristic of Dravet Syndrome [Neuroscience]

Dravet Syndrome is a severe childhood epileptic disorder caused by haploinsufficiency of the SCN1A gene encoding brain voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.1. Symptoms include treatment-refractory epilepsy, cognitive impairment, autistic-like behavior, and premature death. The specific loci of NaV1.1 function in the brain that underlie these global deficits remain unknown. Here we…

21h

Frustration and folding of a TIM barrel protein [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel proteins have not only a conserved architecture that supports a myriad of enzymatic functions, but also a conserved folding mechanism that involves on- and off-pathway intermediates. Although experiments have proven to be invaluable in defining the folding free-energy surface, they provide only a limited understanding of…

21h

TMEM203 is a binding partner and regulator of STING-mediated inflammatory signaling in macrophages [Immunology and Inflammation]

Regulation of IFN signaling is critical in host recognition and response to pathogens while its dysregulation underlies the pathogenesis of several chronic diseases. STimulator of IFN Genes (STING) has been identified as a critical mediator of IFN inducing innate immune pathways, but little is known about direct coregulators of this…

21h

Blastocyst activation engenders transcriptome reprogram affecting X-chromosome reactivation and inflammatory trigger of implantation [Physiology]

Implantation of the blastocyst into the uterus is the gateway for further embryonic development in mammals. Programming of blastocyst to an implantation-competent state known as blastocyst activation is the determining factor for implantation into the receptive uterus. However, it remains largely unclear how the blastocyst is globally programmed for implantation….

21h

Kinome profiling of non-Hodgkin lymphoma identifies Tyro3 as a therapeutic target in primary effusion lymphoma [Microbiology]

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) make up the majority of lymphoma diagnoses and represent a very diverse set of malignancies. We sought to identify kinases uniquely up-regulated in different NHL subtypes. Using multiplexed inhibitor bead-mass spectrometry (MIB/MS), we found Tyro3 was uniquely up-regulated and important for cell survival in primary effusion lymphoma…

21h

NADPH-dependent extracellular superoxide production is vital to photophysiology in the marine diatom Thalassiosira oceanica [Environmental Sciences]

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) like superoxide drive rapid transformations of carbon and metals in aquatic systems and play dynamic roles in biological health, signaling, and defense across a diversity of cell types. In phytoplankton, however, the ecophysiological role(s) of extracellular superoxide production has remained elusive. Here, the mechanism and function…

21h

Autophagy genes in myeloid cells counteract IFN{gamma}-induced TNF-mediated cell death and fatal TNF-induced shock [Immunology and Inflammation]

Host inflammatory responses must be tightly regulated to ensure effective immunity while limiting tissue injury. IFN gamma (IFNγ) primes macrophages to mount robust inflammatory responses. However, IFNγ also induces cell death, and the pathways that regulate IFNγ-induced cell death are incompletely understood. Using genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 screening, we identified autophagy genes…

21h

SLAMF9 regulates pDC homeostasis and function in health and disease [Immunology and Inflammation]

SLAMF9 belongs to the conserved lymphocytic activation molecule family (SLAMF). Unlike other SLAMs, which have been extensively studied, the role of SLAMF9 in the immune system remained mostly unexplored. By generating CRISPR/Cas9 SLAMF9 knockout mice, we analyzed the role of this receptor in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), which preferentially express…

21h

Hox genes limit germ cell formation in the short germ insect Gryllus bimaculatus [Developmental Biology]

Hox genes are conserved transcription factor-encoding genes that specify the identity of body regions in bilaterally symmetrical animals. In the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, a member of the hemimetabolous insect group Orthoptera, the induction of a subset of mesodermal cells to form the primordial germ cells (PGCs) is restricted to the…

21h

Man Dies of ‘Brain-Eating’ Amoeba After Swimming in Lake

Naegleria fowleri, a single-celled organism found in warm freshwater, can be fatal if it enters the body through the nose.

21h

21h

Election hackers likely targeted 50 states in 2016. The states will be watching this time around.

In 2020, all state voter databases will be protected by sensors that alert the federal government to hacking attempts.

21h

California's Auto-Emissions Deal Could Trump the Feds' Plans

Ford, Honda, Volkswagen, and BMW agree to tougher California mileage standards, potentially disrupting Trump’s proposal to relax US rules.

22h

Five or more hours of smartphone usage per day may increase obesity

As smartphones continue to be an inherent part of life and grow as a primary source of entertainment — particularly among young people — it leads to a decrease in physical activity. University students who used their smartphones five or more hours a day had a 43% increased risk of obesity and were more likely to have other lifestyle habits that increase the risk of heart disease.

22h

New method enables more extensive preclinical testing of heart drugs and therapies

A new biomimetic culture system mimics the environment of a living organ through continuous electrical stimulation and oxygenation, maintaining viability and functionality of heart slices for six days. Previous culture systems maintained functional heart slices for no more than 24 hours. The extended viability time will enable improved preclinical testing of drugs and gene therapies for effectiven

22h

The science behind giving up

Findings offer new insight into the complex world of motivation and reward by discovering the science behind giving up. The study is among the first to describe the effects of the complex nociception modulatory system. The researchers said this discovery could lead to helping people find motivation when they are depressed and conversely decrease motivation for drugs in substance abuse disorders, l

22h

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23h

UPS Wants to Unleash Drones, a Galaxy Fold Relaunch, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

23h

Antibiotic-resistant genes found in London's canals and ponds

Central London's freshwater sources contain high levels of antibiotic-resistant genes, with the River Thames having the highest amount, according to research by UCL.The Regent's Canal, Regent's Park Pond and the Serpentine all contained the genes but at lower levels than the Thames, which contained genes providing resistance for bacteria to common antibiotics such as penicillin, erythromycin and t

23h

Muslim LGBTQI+ refugees more likely to gain asylum in Germany if they conform to stereotypes, study

LGBTQI+ Muslims seeking asylum are more successful if they speak, dress and act in accordance with Western notions of homosexuality, according to a new study.

23h

Paris Agreement hampered by inconsistent pledges, new research finds

Some countries' Paris Climate Agreement pledges may not be as ambitious as they appear, a new study has found.The Paris Agreement takes a bottom-up approach to tackling climate change, with countries submitting pledges in the form of nationally determined contributions (NDCs) to greenhouse emissions.However, writing today in Environmental Research Letters, researchers from the Autonomous Universit

23h

Tourist Photographs Help African Wildlife Census

Photographs snapped by safari tourists are a surprisingly accurate way to assess populations of African carnivores. Christopher Intagliata reports.

23h

Icelandic plaque to commemorate first glacier 'killed' by climate change

Icelandic locals and scientists have created a plaque for the melted Okjökull glacier. Due to climate change, the glacier is no more. If this trend persists, by 2200 all of Iceland's glaciers will have melted. Loud and roaring glaciers once populated the Icelandic shores. Their reign and permanence stood unquestioned for centuries — millennia. That is, until now. The glacier that was once known a

23h

Tourist Photographs Help African Wildlife Census

Photographs snapped by safari tourists are a surprisingly accurate way to assess populations of African carnivores. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How This Lab-Grown Patch Could Repair Your Heart

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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23h

Apple Is Buying Intel's Modem Unit to Control Its 5G Destiny

Apple said it is buying the Intel unit that makes smartphone modems. The deal allows the iPhone maker to further customize the components inside its devices.

23h

The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: Testosterone may significantly improve sexual function and sexual wellbeing in postmenopausal women

The most comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of testosterone treatment for women undertaken, including 46 reports on 36 trials involving 8,480 women, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal, suggests it can significantly improve sexual wellbeing for postmenopausal women. Benefits include improved sexual desire, function and pleasure, together with reduced concerns an

23h

Tobacco industry has bumped up prices beyond that required by tax changes

The tobacco industry has bumped up the prices for its products beyond that required by tax changes, even when tax rises were large and unexpected, reveal the findings of research published online in the journal Tobacco Control.

23h

The Milky Way has a long history of cosmic cannibalism

A computer generated model of the Milky Way. (ESA/Hubble, NASA, L. Calçada/) In its infancy, the Milky Way galaxy was far from a peace-loving cosmic body crawling through the universe. It lurched forward in search of more stars to accrete, growing and evolving over time. In a new report published in Nature Astronomy , a group of scientists led by Carme Gallart from the Institute of Astrophysics o

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Tourist Photographs Help African Wildlife Census

Photographs snapped by safari tourists are a surprisingly accurate way to assess populations of African carnivores. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

How to Watch the 2019 Fortnite World Cup Finals

The big Fortnite finals tournament begins Friday and concludes Sunday. Here's how to tune in from anywhere in the world.

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