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nyheder2019juli31

6h

Verdens største batteri kan forsyne storby med strøm i seks timer

Teslas kommende megabatterier skal hjælpe, når strømmen svigter.

51min

One in 10 older adults currently binge drinks

More than a tenth of adults age 65 and older currently binge drink, putting them at risk for a range of health problems, according to a study by researchers at NYU School of Medicine and the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU College of Global Public Health.

6h

AI Can Predict Kidney Failure Days in Advance

A new program could save lives in hospitals, where kidney injury is one of the most common causes of death — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

now

Networks sue Locast, a service that streams TV for free

The country's biggest TV networks—ABC, CBS, NBC and FOX—are suing Locast, a streaming service that transmits their broadcasts for free.

8min

Magnetic 'springs' break down marine microplastic pollution

Using tiny coil-shaped carbon-based magnets, researchers have developed a new approach to purging water sources of the microplastics that pollute them without harming nearby microorganisms.

13min

Quantum computers to clarify the connection between the quantum and classical worlds

A new algorithm will allow quantum computers to investigate how the classical world we experience emerges from the quantum world, and test other foundational issues in quantum mechanics.

13min

Camera can ‘see’ moving stuff around corners

A new camera system can can reconstruct room-size scenes and moving objects that are hidden around a corner, researchers report. The technology could one day help autonomous cars and robots operate even more safely than they would with human guidance. David Lindell, a graduate student in electrical engineering at Stanford University, donned a high visibility tracksuit and got to work, stretching,

15min

Clearing up the 'dark side' of artificial leaves

While artificial leaves hold promise as a way to take carbon dioxide — a potent greenhouse gas — out of the atmosphere, there is a 'dark side to artificial leaves that has gone overlooked for more than a decade,' according to Meenesh Singh, assistant professor of chemical engineering in the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Engineering.

17min

You can't squash this roach-inspired robot

A new insect-sized robot created by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, can scurry across the floor at nearly the speed of a darting cockroach — and it's nearly as hardy as a cockroach, too: Try to squash this robot under your foot, and more than likely, it will just keep going. Small, durable robots like these could be advantageous in search and rescue missions, the creators s

17min

Pentagon: New Laser Tech Can Make People Hear Voice Commands

Zappy Brain The Pentagon is working on a weapon that uses lasers and plasma to transmit sound files, even human speech, directly to individual people at great distances. That’s according to a story by the Military Times newspaper, which reports that military researchers are working on ways to use lasers and plasma to control crowds. The story is short on technical details — but, at the same time,

23min

Southern White Rhino Born After Artificial Insemination

The successful delivery spells hope for the related northern white rhino, which is facing extinction.

25min

200 Reindeer Starved to Death. Experts Call It a Sign of Climate Change.

Scientists surveying reindeer populations in Norway said the deaths occurred on iced pastures in the Arctic, a result of global warming’s effect on a vulnerable ecosystem.

31min

What do we lose when we can't get lost?

Science writer Maura O'Connor spent four years traveling the world to better understand how humans navigate their terrain. She writes "getting lost is a uniquely human problem," noting that other species don't have issues navigating. While the book is not anti-technology, O'Connor questions our reliance on GPS and self-driving cars. None In a recent episode of The Portal , filmmaker Werner Herzog

33min

‘No one is immune’: Alaska's scientists despair over plan to shrink state universities

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02344-7 The University of Alaska's governing board plans to consolidate campuses to cope with a 40% cut in state funding.

33min

July: The Hottest Month

While July is the warmest month of any year in the Northern Hemisphere, this month—July 2019—is shaping up to be the hottest month ever recorded . All-time temperature records are being broken across North America and Europe. More wildfires than normal are raging across Russia, burning more than 7 million acres so far. Heat waves are affecting many parts of the Arctic and Greenland’s ice sheet, c

37min

Cockroach robot won't break after being repeatedly stamped on

A tiny robot keeps on working no matter how hard researchers stamp on it. It weighs less than 0.01 grams but has the staying power of a cockroach

37min

Humans are good at smelling cheese thanks to special smell receptors

Humans are good at smelling cheese, sweat, and sweet odours because we have more receptors for them than anything else, probably to help us choose which foods to eat

37min

Families of children with rare diseases open to advanced care plans with caregiver support

A novel palliative care intervention developed at Children's National Health System for caregivers of children and adolescents with rare diseases has shown preliminary success at helping families talk about potentially challenging medical decisions before a crisis occurs.

38min

Aspirin improves liver function after embolization of hepatocellular carcinoma

Aspirin therapy is associated with both improved liver function test results and survival after transarterial embolization for hepatocellular carcinoma, according to an ahead-of-print article by F. Edward Boas of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer published in the September 2019 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).

38min

Another trick up the immune system's sleeve: Regrowing blood vessels

Peripheral artery disease, which affects 8.5 million people in the US, can cut off blood flow to the arms and legs, sometimes forcing doctors to amputate limbs. A new approach from the Wyss Institute and Harvard SEAS uses a biomaterial scaffold to recruit the body's own immune T cells to help regrow blood vessels in mice with hindlimb ischemia, supporting immune engineering as a possible treatment

38min

Snake fang-like patch quickly delivers liquid medicines in rodents

Scientists have created a microneedle patch based on the fangs of a snake that can deliver therapeutic liquids and a vaccine through the skin of rodents in under 15 seconds.

38min

Plants use more water in soils leached by acid rain, West Virginia forest study shows

In one of the first long-term studies to explore how changing soils have impacted plant water uptake, researchers report that plants in soil leached by polluted rain drink more water. These findings reveal acid rain's long-term impact on large-scale forest water cycles, which is critical for understanding future water availability, and they could also help explain some of the

38min

How to recognize where a volcano will erupt

Eleonora Rivalta and her team from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam, together with colleagues from the University Roma Tre and the Vesuvius Observatory of the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia in Naples have devised a new method to forecast volcanic vent locations. The study is published in the journal Science Advances.

38min

Targeting a blood stem cell subset shows lasting, therapeutically relevant gene editing

In a paper published in the July 31 issue of Science Translational Medicine, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center used CRISPR-Cas9 to edit long-lived blood stem cells to reverse the clinical symptoms observed with several blood disorders, including sickle cell disease and beta-thalassemia.

38min

Mapping Oregon coast harbor seal movements using wearable devices

Wearable devices fitted to harbor seals reveal their movements around the Oregon coast, for a population that has been increasing following the implementation of marine reserves and protection acts. The study publishes July 31, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sheanna Steingass from Oregon State University, USA, and colleagues.

38min

Gibbons' large, long-term territories put them under threat from habitat loss

Wild gibbons living in the peat swamps of southern Borneo require between 20 and 50 hectares of forest territory for each group, making their populations particularly vulnerable to habitat loss, according to a study publishing July 31 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dr. Susan Cheyne at the Borneo Nature foundation, and colleagues.

38min

Confirmation of toasty TESS planet leads to surprising find of promising world

A piping hot planet discovered by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has pointed the way to additional worlds orbiting the same star, one of which is located in the star's habitable zone. If made of rock, this planet may be around twice Earth's size.

42min

Cryo-EM structure of the activated RET signaling complex reveals the importance of its cysteine-rich domain

Signaling through the receptor tyrosine kinase RET is essential during normal development. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations are involved in a variety of diseases, yet the molecular details of receptor activation have remained elusive. We have reconstituted the complete extracellular region of the RET signaling complex together with Neurturin (NRTN) and GFRα2 and determined its structure

42min

Efficient apoptosis requires feedback amplification of upstream apoptotic signals by effector caspase-3 or -7

Apoptosis is a complex multi-step process driven by caspase-dependent proteolytic cleavage cascades. Dysregulation of apoptosis promotes tumorigenesis and limits the efficacy of chemotherapy. To assess the complex interactions among caspases during apoptosis, we disrupted caspase-8, -9, -3, -7, or -6 and combinations thereof, using CRISPR-based genome editing in living human leukemia cells. While

42min

Stress inversions to forecast magma pathways and eruptive vent location

When a batch of magma reaches Earth’s surface, it forms a vent from which volcanic products are erupted. At many volcanoes, successive batches may open vents far away from previous ones, resulting in scattered, sometimes seemingly random spatial distributions. This exposes vast areas to volcanic hazards and makes forecasting difficult. Here, we show that magma pathways and thus future vent locati

42min

Fluctuation-induced distributed resonances in oscillatory networks

Across physics, biology, and engineering, the collective dynamics of oscillatory networks often evolve into self-organized operating states. How such networks respond to external fluctuating signals fundamentally underlies their function, yet is not well understood. Here, we present a theory of dynamic network response patterns and reveal how distributed resonance patterns emerge in oscillatory n

42min

Stochastic tunneling across fitness valleys can give rise to a logarithmic long-term fitness trajectory

Adaptation, where a population evolves increasing fitness in a fixed environment, is typically thought of as a hill-climbing process on a fitness landscape. With a finite genome, such a process eventually leads the population to a fitness peak, at which point fitness can no longer increase through individual beneficial mutations. Instead, the ruggedness of typical landscapes due to epistasis betw

42min

Neural correlates of weighted reward prediction error during reinforcement learning classify response to cognitive behavioral therapy in depression

While cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for major depressive disorder, only up to 45% of depressed patients will respond to it. At present, there is no clinically viable neuroimaging predictor of CBT response. Notably, the lack of a mechanistic understanding of treatment response has hindered identification of predictive biomarkers. To obtain mechanistically meaningful

42min

Intensified vegetation water use under acid deposition

Despite the important role vegetation plays in the global water cycle, the exact controls of vegetation water use, especially the role of soil biogeochemistry, remain elusive. In this study, we reveal a new mechanism of soil biogeochemical control of large-scale vegetation water use. Nitrate and sulfate deposition from fossil fuel burning have caused substantial soil acidification, leading to the

42min

Treating ischemia via recruitment of antigen-specific T cells

Ischemic diseases are a leading cause of mortality and can result in autoamputation of lower limbs. We explored the hypothesis that implantation of an antigen-releasing scaffold, in animals previously vaccinated with the same antigen, can concentrate T H 2 T cells and enhance vascularization of ischemic tissue. This approach may be clinically relevant, as all persons receiving childhood vaccines

42min

Covalent chemistry on nanostructured substrates enables noninvasive quantification of gene rearrangements in circulating tumor cells

Well-preserved mRNA in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) offers an ideal material for conducting molecular profiling of tumors, thereby providing a noninvasive diagnostic solution for guiding treatment intervention and monitoring disease progression. However, it is technically challenging to purify CTCs while retaining high-quality mRNA.Here, we demonstrate a covalent chemistry–based nanostructured

42min

Dynamic earthquake rupture in the lower crust

Earthquakes in the continental crust commonly occur in the upper 15 to 20 km. Recent studies demonstrate that earthquakes also occur in the lower crust of collision zones and play a key role in metamorphic processes that modify its physical properties. However, details of the failure process and sequence of events that lead to seismic slip in the lower crust remain uncertain. Here, we present obs

42min

Reward associations do not explain transitive inference performance in monkeys

Most accounts of behavior in nonhuman animals assume that they make choices to maximize expected reward value. However, model-free reinforcement learning based on reward associations cannot account for choice behavior in transitive inference paradigms. We manipulated the amount of reward associated with each item of an ordered list, so that maximizing expected reward value was always in conflict

42min

Cyclooxygenase 2 augments osteoblastic but suppresses chondrocytic differentiation of CD90+ skeletal stem cells in fracture sites

Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) is essential for normal tissue repair. Although COX-2 is known to enhance the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), how COX-2 regulates MSC differentiation into different tissue-specific progenitors to promote tissue repair remains unknown. Because it has been shown that COX-2 is critical for normal bone repair and local COX-2 overexpression in fracture sites

42min

The conduction pathway of potassium channels is water free under physiological conditions

Ion conduction through potassium channels is a fundamental process of life. On the basis of crystallographic data, it was originally proposed that potassium ions and water molecules are transported through the selectivity filter in an alternating arrangement, suggesting a "water-mediated" knock-on mechanism. Later on, this view was challenged by results from molecular dynamics simulations that re

42min

Structural basis and mechanism for metallochaperone-assisted assembly of the CuA center in cytochrome oxidase

The mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of the structurally unique, binuclear Cu 1.5+ •Cu 1.5+ redox center (Cu A ) on subunit II (CoxB) of cytochrome oxidases have been a long-standing mystery. Here, we reconstituted the CoxB•Cu A center in vitro from apo -CoxB and the holo -forms of the copper transfer chaperones ScoI and PcuC. A previously unknown, highly stable ScoI•Cu 2+ •CoxB complex was s

42min

Diversity of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the dominant mode of atmospheric intraseasonal variability and the cornerstone for subseasonal prediction of extreme weather events. Climate modeling and prediction of MJO remain a big challenge, partially due to lack of understanding the MJO diversity. Here, we delineate observed MJO diversity by cluster analysis of propagation patterns of MJO events, which rev

42min

A transcriptomic atlas of mammalian olfactory mucosae reveals an evolutionary influence on food odor detection in humans

The mammalian olfactory system displays species-specific adaptations to different ecological niches. To investigate the evolutionary dynamics of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) subtypes across mammalian evolution, we applied RNA sequencing of whole olfactory mucosa samples from mouse, rat, dog, marmoset, macaque, and human. We find that OSN subtypes, representative of all known mouse chemosensory

42min

{beta}-Catenin/Tcf7l2-dependent transcriptional regulation of GLUT1 gene expression by Zic family proteins in colon cancer

The zinc finger of the cerebellum (ZIC) proteins has been implicated to function in normal tissue development. Recent studies have described the critical functions of Zic proteins in cancers and the potential tumor-suppressive functions in colon cancer development and progression. To elucidate the functional roles of Zic proteins in colorectal cancer, we knocked out the Zic5 gene and analyzed the

42min

Satellite Spots “First Nearby Super-Earth” That Could Harbor Life

Super-Earth A team of astronomers from Cornell University claim they’ve found the first potentially habitable Earth-like planet outside the Solar System using NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS). The discovery of a star system called GJ 357 was announced today in a paper published by the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics . Its star is roughly one-third the size of our Sun and rough

44min

Watch a human try to crush this cockroach-inspired robot—and fail

Researchers develop a roboroach that can squeeze almost anywhere

50min

Monkeys can use basic logic to decipher the order of items in a list

Rhesus macaque monkeys don’t need rewards to learn and remember how items are ranked in a list, a mental feat that may prove handy in the wild.

51min

When it comes to volcanoes, Monte Carlo may save Naples

Researchers combine stress and statistics to refine eruption risk. Barry Keily reports.

55min

When is cognitive behavioural therapy useful for depression?

Scientists identify important differences in neural activity. Paul Biegler reports.

55min

Shark Steals Camera from Diver | Shark Week

Mike Dornellas makes a dangerous decision to get his camera out of the jaws of a shark! Stream Laws of Jaws: Dangerous Waters on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/laws-of-jaws-dangerous-waters Own Full Seasons of Shark Week: https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/Shark_Week?id=gg81I7BZ-J4&hl=en_US Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join

55min

Ketamine isn't an opioid and treats depression in a unique way

Ketamine has gotten a bad rap as an opioid when there's plenty of evidence suggesting it isn't one, experts say. They believe this reputation may hamper patients from getting necessary treatment for the kinds of depression that don't respond to typical antidepressants. In a new paper, the researchers clarify the mechanism behind ketamine's mechanism of action in hopes of restoring the therapy's st

56min

Multi-state switchable stationary phase opens new doors in chiral separation

A team including researchers has demonstrated HPLC separation of enantiomers using an optically active poly(phenylacetylene) derivative as a chiral stationary phase. The helical conformation of the polymer was altered from a mixed state to left- or right-handed chiral conformations.

56min

Major class of viruses reveals complex origins

A new study examines the evolutionary dynamics of circular Rep-encoding single-stranded (CRESS) DNA viruses. The findings show that this broad class of single-stranded DNA viruses, which infect all three cellular domains of life, have acquired their genetic components through complex evolutionary processes not traceable to a single ancestral event.

56min

Architecture of collagen and elastic fibers under the skin

By combining multiphoton imaging and biaxial tissue extension a research team found that collagen in the skin is organized in a mesh-like structure, and that elastic fibers — the connective tissue found in skin — follows the same orientation.

56min

AI improves efficiency and accuracy of digital breast tomosynthesis

Artificial intelligence (AI) helps improve the efficiency and accuracy of an advanced imaging technology used to screen for breast cancer, according to a new study.

56min

Closing the door: Breaking new ground related to a potential anticancer drug target

In order to sustain fast growth, cancer cells need to take up nutrients at a faster rate than healthy cells. The human glutamine transporter ASCT2 allows the amino acid glutamine to enter cells and is upregulated in many types of cancer cells, which need more glutamine. It is a potential target for new anti-cancer drugs. Researchers have now elucidated a structure of the human ASCT2 that provides

56min

How to recognize where a volcano will erupt

On television, the eruption of volcano shoots magma right out of the top. However, it is not so uncommon that magma erupts from the volcano's flank rather than its summit. After leaving the underground magma chamber, the magma forces its way sideways by fracturing rock, sometimes for tens of kilometres. Then, when it breaches the Earth's surface, it forms one or more vents from which it spills out

58min

Mapping Oregon coast harbor seal movements using wearable devices

Wearable devices fitted to harbor seals reveal their movements around the Oregon coast, for a population that has been increasing following the implementation of marine reserves and protection acts. The study publishes July 31, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sheanna Steingass from Oregon State University, USA, and colleagues.

58min

Gibbons' large, long-term territories put them under threat from habitat loss

Wild gibbons living in the peat swamps of southern Borneo require between 20 and 50 hectares of forest territory for each group, making their populations particularly vulnerable to habitat loss, according to a study publishing July 31 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dr. Susan Cheyne at the Borneo Nature foundation, and colleagues.

58min

Mapping Oregon coast harbor seal movements using wearable devices

Wearable devices fitted to harbor seals reveal their movements around the Oregon coast, for a population that has been increasing following the implementation of marine reserves and protection acts. The study publishes July 31, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sheanna Steingass from Oregon State University, USA, and colleagues.

1h

Gibbons' large, long-term territories put them under threat from habitat loss

Wild gibbons living in the peat swamps of southern Borneo require between 20 and 50 hectares of forest territory for each group, making their populations particularly vulnerable to habitat loss, according to a study publishing July 31 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dr. Susan Cheyne at the Borneo Nature foundation, and colleagues.

1h

Babies Want Fair Leaders

Babies as young as a year and a half want leaders to fix situations in which they see someone else being treated unfairly.

1h

When will we begin to take child sex trafficking more seriously?

Regan Williams, CEO of Seen and Heard, is on a mission to help foster youth develop necessary social and career skills through the performing arts. Williams says 300,000 American children are commercially trafficked every year. Children in our society are ignored except when they're famous or sexualized, which is part of the reason sexual abuse is not covered. None Between Jeffrey Epstein and Geo

1h

Will Future Lunar Bases Be Underground?

Lava tubes on the moon could be crucial sites for human outposts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

The Guardian view on climate breakdown: an emergency for all, but especially the poor | Editorial

Record temperatures in Europe and the US have reinforced the danger of global heating for many inhabitants. But others are and will be far worse hit We tend to learn better from experience than from what we have simply been told. So for many in Europe, sleepless nights and suffocating buses or workplaces have helped to make real the threat posed by global heating. Now statistics are reinforcing th

1h

Fragrance-releasing fabric could help neutralize sweaty gym clothes

Hot summer weather, stressful situations and intense workouts can produce unpleasant sweaty odors. But what if clothing could cover up these embarrassing smells with a burst of fragrance? Now, researchers have modified cotton fabric to emit a lemony citronella aroma upon contact with sweat.

1h

Amazon Is Feeding Talking Points About Its Spy Doorbell to Police

Approved Messaging Ring, the smart doorbell company owned by Amazon, has a startling level of power over the police departments it contracts with. In contracts reviewed by Gizmodo , Amazon retains the right to craft and approve any messaging that these police departments send to the public or media outlets about Ring cameras or its accompanying neighborhood watch app . The secret deals are a trou

1h

New Research Reveals how Electrons Interact in Twisted Graphene

With our study, we may have gotten closer to solving the problem of high-temperature superconductivity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

A Russian Space Cargo Ship Just Fell to Earth. See Its Fiery Demise.

"It looked like a big firework," astronaut says.

1h

China’s scientists alarmed, bewildered by growing anti-Chinese sentiment in the United States

Many academics dismiss conspiracy claims but worry about impacts on research

1h

1h

Russia Is Going to Up Its Game for the 2020 Elections

"You don't need to change votes to cause chaos," Senator Mark Warner tells WIRED in an exclusive interview.

1h

Finnish people's unique genetic makeup offers clues to disease

A new study harnessed the unique genetic history of the people of Finland to identify variations in DNA that might predispose certain individuals to disease, whether or not they are Finnish themselves. The study was conducted by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and collaborating institutions.

1h

Experiments explore the mysteries of 'magic' angle superconductors

A team led by Princeton physicist Ali Yazdani conducted experiments to explore superconductivity in a groundbreaking new material known as magic-angle twisted graphene. The team imaged electrons on the material's surface and found that electrons interact with each other in ways that could help explain how superconductivity arises in this material.

1h

New 'don't eat me' signal may provide basis for cancer therapies, Stanford researchers say

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered a new signal that cancers seem to use to evade detection and destruction by the immune system. The scientists have shown that blocking this signal in mice implanted with human cancers allows immune cells to attack the cancers.

1h

It's too soon to tell if DeepMind's medical AI will save any lives

A DeepMind AI can predict whether someone will get acute kidney injury 48 hours before it occurs, but it's too soon to tell if the tech will actually make a difference

1h

The human placenta may not have a microbiome after all

Recent evidence that the placenta has its own community of microbes is now uncertain as it seems the experiments were corrupted by contamination

1h

Call it Mighty Mouse: Breakthrough leaps Alzheimer's research hurdle

Researchers have made it possible to learn how key human brain cells respond to Alzheimer's, vaulting a major obstacle in the quest to understand and one day vanquish it. By developing a way for human brain immune cells known as microglia to grow and function in mice, scientists now have an unprecedented view of crucial mechanisms contributing to the disease.

1h

Krypton reveals ancient water beneath the Israeli desert

Getting reliable precipitation data from the past has proven difficult, as is predicting regional changes for climate models in the present. A combination of isotope techniques may help resolve both.

1h

Fragrance-releasing fabric could help neutralize sweaty gym clothes

Hot summer weather, stressful situations and intense workouts can produce unpleasant sweaty odors. But what if clothing could cover up these embarrassing smells with a burst of fragrance? Now, researchers have modified cotton fabric to emit a lemony citronella aroma upon contact with sweat.

1h

Animal friendships 'change with the weather' in the Masai Mara

When it comes to choosing which other species to hang out with, wild animals quite literally change their minds with the weather, a new study reveals. The findings could help conservationists better predict the risk of extinction faced by endangered species.

1h

Novel discovery of links between liver dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease

New research has uncovered novel connections between liver dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease (AD), paving a new path toward a systems level view of Alzheimer's relevant for early detection and ultimately for prevention.

1h

Giant nonreciprocal second-harmonic generation from antiferromagnetic bilayer CrI3

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1445-3 Large second-harmonic generation is observed in antiferromagnetic bilayers of CrI3, providing information about the microscopic origin of layered antiferromagnetism and motivating the use of two-dimensional magnets in nonlinear optical devices.

1h

Podcast: The placental microbiome, and advances in artificial intelligence

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02347-4 Tune into the latest from the world of science, with Nick Howe and Noah Baker.

1h

Memory editing from science fiction to clinical practice

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1433-7 A Review of advances in memory-editing techniques in humans suggests that these techniques are advancing beyond science fiction and could hold promise for translation into clinical practice.

1h

Exome sequencing of Finnish isolates enhances rare-variant association power

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1457-z Exome-wide sequencing studies of populations in Finland identified 26 deleterious alleles associated with 64 quantitative traits that are clinically relevant to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

1h

Reply to: Do not discard Staphylococcus aureus WTA as a vaccine antigen

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1417-7

1h

Towards artificial general intelligence with hybrid Tianjic chip architecture

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1424-8 The ‘Tianjic’ hybrid electronic chip combines neuroscience-oriented and computer-science-oriented approaches to artificial general intelligence, demonstrated by controlling an unmanned bicycle.

1h

Maximized electron interactions at the magic angle in twisted bilayer graphene

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1431-9 Scanning tunnelling spectroscopy is used to map the atomic-scale electronic structure of magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene, finding multiple signatures of electron correlations and thus providing insight into the sought-after mechanism behind superconductivity in graphene.

1h

Loss of p53 triggers WNT-dependent systemic inflammation to drive breast cancer metastasis

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1450-6 Loss of p53 in mouse models of breast cancer leads to activation of WNT signalling, which promotes metastatic spread by inducing systemic neutrophilic inflammation.

1h

Cholera toxin promotes pathogen acquisition of host-derived nutrients

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1453-3 Cholera toxin selectively promotes the growth of Vibrio cholerae through the acquisition of nutrients, including haem and fatty acids, from the host gut.

1h

Charge-order and broken rotational symmetry in magic angle twisted bilayer graphene

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1460-4

1h

Dietary methionine influences therapy in mouse cancer models and alters human metabolism

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1437-3 In two patient-derived xenograft models of colorectal cancer and a mouse model of autochthonous soft-tissue sarcoma, dietary restriction of methionine influences the outcome of cancer and interacts with antimetabolite and radiation therapies, through effects on one-carbon metabolism.

1h

CD24 signalling through macrophage Siglec-10 is a target for cancer immunotherapy

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1456-0 CD24 interacts with the tumour-associated-macrophage receptor Siglec-10 to inhibit the macrophage-mediated clearance of cancer cells, revealing a new ‘don’t eat me’ signal as a potential target for cancer immunotherapy.

1h

Plant cell-surface GIPC sphingolipids sense salt to trigger Ca2+ influx

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1449-z The sphingolipid GIPC in the plant cell plasma membrane binds to sodium and triggers calcium influx, thereby triggering responses to excess salt such as efflux of sodium ions from cells.

1h

Babies get critical gut bacteria from their mother at birth, placenta study suggests

Study rebuts controversial hints of a fetal microbiome

1h

Why Ebony Magazine’s Archives Were Saved

In a 1968 photograph taken by Moneta Sleet, Jr., a veiled and stoic Coretta Scott King comforts her youngest child at the funeral of her husband, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. It is five-year-old Bernice King’s eyes lingering in the camera’s gaze that haunt the viewer. The image, which was disseminated via dozens of wires, would become one of Sleet’s most iconic pictures. But it almost wasn’t taken

1h

Why the Placental Microbiome Should Be a Cautionary Tale

For decades, scientists believed that babies encounter microbes for the very first time when they are born. Both a healthy womb and the placenta that nourishes the growing fetus, they said, are sterile. If bacteria do sneak in, they’re intruders and bad news for the fetus. But in 2014, Kjersti Aagaard from Baylor College of Medicine challenged that dogma. In placental tissue samples from 320 wome

1h

Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’ Shows De-Aging Isn’t Just For Superheroes

On paper, Martin Scorsese’s upcoming movie The Irishman sounds exactly like what you might expect from the legendary filmmaker based on decades of his previous films. …

1h

Youthful Vlogger’s Face Filter Fails, Exposing Her as 58-Year-Old

Face/Off A seemingly youthful Chinese vlogger known as “Your Highness Qiao Biluo” was outed to be a 58-year-old woman when the face filtering software she used to make her look younger glitched during a livestream. The vlogger used a beauty filter to pose as a much younger-looking woman on Chinese live streaming website Doyu. During a live stream with a different vlogger, Qiao Biluo’s face filter

1h

And Now, a Bicycle Built for None

It’s not the first self-driving bike. But equipped with an A.I. chip, it may be the nearest to thinking for itself.

1h

New Research Reveals how Electrons Interact in Twisted Graphene

With our study, we may have gotten closer to solving the problem of high-temperature superconductivity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

No coding required: Companies make it easier than ever for scientists to use artificial intelligence

Ready-to-use machine learning tools help scientists tackle string theory, flatworms, and intruding cats

1h

Researchers develop a unique method of fabricating 3-D porous structures

Materials with controlled porosity have found diverse applications in separation, catalysis, energy storage, sensors and actuators, tissue engineering and drug delivery. Multiple methods have been developed to fabricate well-defined porous materials with pore sizes ranging from nanometers to millimeters. For example, the introduction of sacrificial templates can impart porosity to the materials en

1h

Climate change alters tree demography in northern forests

The rise in temperature and precipitation levels in summer in northern Japan has negatively affected the growth of conifers and resulted in their gradual decline, according to a 38-year-long study in which mixed forests of conifers and broad-leaved trees were monitored.

1h

Alphabet’s AI Might Be Able to Predict Kidney Disease

In a study involving 700,000 VA patients, an algorithm from DeepMind predicted 90% of cases of acute kidney injury up to 48 hours before it occurred.

1h

These Chaotic Games Are a Referee's Worst Nightmare

Photographer Pelle Cass imagines sports gone nutso.

1h

A new study challenges the idea that the placenta has a microbiome

A large study of more than 500 women finds little evidence of microbes in the placenta, contrary to previous reports on the placental microbiome.

1h

Weak average liquid-cloud-water response to anthropogenic aerosols

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1423-9 Satellite data for cloud tracks downwind of major pollution sources show a relatively small global average decrease in cloud water caused by anthropogenic aerosols, invalidating claims that aerosol-induced effects contribute substantially to climate cooling.

1h

Spectroscopic signatures of many-body correlations in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1422-x Scanning tunnelling spectroscopy and extended-Hubbard-model cluster calculations reveal that magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene is a strongly correlated electron system, similar to other unconventional superconductors.

1h

Lysine harvesting is an antioxidant strategy and triggers underground polyamine metabolism

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1442-6 The harvest of large quantities of lysine by yeast and other microbes triggers a reprogramming of redox metabolism, in which NADPH is channelled into glutathione metabolism to reduce levels of reactive oxygen species and increase tolerance to oxidative stress.

1h

Structure and mechanism of the cation–chloride cotransporter NKCC1

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1438-2 The cryo-EM structure of the zebrafish cation–chloride cotransporter NKCC1 reveals the domain organization, ion translocation pathway, ion-binding sites and key residues for binding activity, providing insights into the activity of this family of transporter proteins with key roles in physiology.

1h

Yeast cells handle stress by reprogramming their metabolism

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02288-y Stressed yeast cells take up the amino acid lysine and reprogram their metabolism to free up supplies of a stress-relieving molecule. Lysine uptake therefore increases the tolerance of yeast cells to stress.

1h

No bacteria found in healthy placentas

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02262-8 Analysis of hundreds of placentas provides convincing evidence that this organ does not harbour microorganisms that can enter the fetal gut — a key finding for research into how the human microbiota is established.

1h

How plants perceive salt

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02289-x High salt levels in the soil harm plant growth and limit crop yields. A salt-binding membrane lipid has been identified as being essential for salt perception and for triggering calcium signals that lead to salt tolerance.

1h

Deep learning detects impending organ injury in the clinic

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02308-x Organ damage is often detected late, when treatment options are limited. The use of artificial intelligence to continuously monitor a patient’s medical data can identify people at risk of imminent kidney injury.

1h

Weak sensitivity of cloud water to aerosols

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02287-z Human activities produce tiny airborne particles called aerosols. The discovery that the average impact of these aerosols on the water content of low-level clouds is minimal will lead to more-reliable models of future climate.

1h

Spectroscopy of graphene with a magic twist

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02285-1 When two graphene sheets are stacked so that there is a specific angle between them, fascinating properties reminiscent of high-temperature superconductors emerge. Spectroscopy now provides insights into this behaviour.

1h

Human placenta has no microbiome but can contain potential pathogens

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1451-5 The human placenta does not have a microbiota, suggesting that bacterial infection of the placenta is not a common cause of adverse pregnancy outcome, but group B Streptococcus is found in approximately 5% of placental samples.

1h

A clinically applicable approach to continuous prediction of future acute kidney injury

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1390-1 A deep learning approach that predicts the risk of acute kidney injury may help to identify patients at risk of health deterioration within a time window that enables early treatment.

1h

Do not discard Staphylococcus aureus WTA as a vaccine antigen

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1416-8

1h

Placental Microbiome's Existence Challenged

The authors of a new study find no evidence for bacteria in the placenta, but others in the field question their interpretation of the data.

1h

Experiments explore the mysteries of 'magic' angle superconductors

In spring 2018, the surprising discovery of superconductivity in a new material set the scientific community abuzz. Built by layering one carbon sheet atop another and twisting the top one at a "magic" angle, the material enabled electrons to flow without resistance, a trait that could dramatically boost energy efficient power transmission and usher in a host of new technologies.

1h

Russian spaceship brings 3 tons of supplies to space station

An unmanned Russian spaceship carrying tons of supplies to the International Space Station has docked with the orbiting laboratory.

1h

NASA finds heavy rain in hurricane Erick

NASA provided forecasters with a look at Hurricane Erick's rainfall rates and cloud temperatures with data from the GPM and Aqua satellites, as the storm headed to Hawaii.

1h

NASA casts a double eye on hurricane Flossie

NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites provided infrared views of Flossie before and after it became a hurricane while moving through the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Both satellites analyzed Flossie's cloud top temperatures and structure as the storm strengthened.

1h

DeepMind creates algorithm to predict kidney damage in advance

AI company’s model can give 48 hours’ warning of potentially fatal complications

1h

Look ma, no hands

Chinese chip creates a bicycle that responds to commands and can look after itself. Nick Carne reports.

1h

Candidates Want to End the Afghan War. Again.

“By the end of 2014, the Afghans will be fully responsible for the security of their country.” — Barack Obama, 2012 “We should leave Afghanistan immediately. No more wasted lives.” — Donald Trump via Twitter, 2013 “I would like to just get out. The problem is, [Afghanistan] just seems to be a lab for terrorists.” — Trump to Tucker Carlson , 2019 “We will withdraw. We have to.” — Pete Buttigieg, 2

1h

What Happens When the World’s Population Stops Growing?

For most of the time that humans have existed, our ranks have grown really, really slowly. There were an estimated 4 million people on Earth in 10,000 B.C. , and after the following 10 millennia, the planetwide population had only reached 190 million. Even in 1800, the total number of humans was still under 1 billion. The climb since then—made possible by advances in medicine, sanitation, and foo

1h

The Most Bonkers Phrase From CNN’s Presidential Debate

If you were playing presidential-debate bingo last night, “taking a shower after work” probably wasn’t one of the things you expected to hear from any of the 10 Democratic candidates who took the stage. Yet centrist contenders twice used it as a shorthand in seeking to distance themselves from the more left-leaning agendas of Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. About halfway through the

1h

NASA team builds CubeSat-compatible aerosol-detecting instrument

A NASA team has built a miniaturized instrument that will measure more comprehensively than existing instruments the specks of naturally occurring and manmade matter in the air that can adversely affect human health and the climate.

2h

Faint foreshocks foretell California quakes

New research mining data from a catalog of more than 1.8 million southern California earthquakes found that nearly three-fourths of the time, foreshocks signalled a quake's readiness to strike from days to weeks before the the mainshock hit, a revelation that could advance earthquake forecasting.

2h

Animal friendships 'change with the weather' in the Masai Mara

When it comes to choosing which other species to hang out with, wild animals quite literally change their minds with the weather, a new University of Liverpool study reveals.

2h

Traded forest tree seeds pose a great risk of introducing harmful pests

CABI has led an international team of scientists who strongly suggest that the global trade of forest tree seeds is not as safe as previously believed, with insect pests and fungal pathogens posing a great risk to trees and forest ecosystems worldwide.

2h

Poisonous grasses: new study provides reassurance

"Dangerous Pastures: Deadly Grass Puts Horses at Risk"—Such dire warnings on the websites of horse owners and horse lovers may cause people to see their environment in a whole new light. Because what they once considered the epitome of pristine nature, green meadows of grass gently swaying in the wind, is actually home to numerous toxic substances that can be lethal for horses, cattle and sheep.

2h

Animal friendships 'change with the weather' in the Masai Mara

When it comes to choosing which other species to hang out with, wild animals quite literally change their minds with the weather, a new University of Liverpool study reveals.

2h

Traded forest tree seeds pose a great risk of introducing harmful pests

CABI has led an international team of scientists who strongly suggest that the global trade of forest tree seeds is not as safe as previously believed, with insect pests and fungal pathogens posing a great risk to trees and forest ecosystems worldwide.

2h

Poisonous grasses: new study provides reassurance

"Dangerous Pastures: Deadly Grass Puts Horses at Risk"—Such dire warnings on the websites of horse owners and horse lovers may cause people to see their environment in a whole new light. Because what they once considered the epitome of pristine nature, green meadows of grass gently swaying in the wind, is actually home to numerous toxic substances that can be lethal for horses, cattle and sheep.

2h

Flesh-Eating Bacteria Thrive in Warm Coastal Waters. That Doesn't Mean You'll Get Sick.

Rising water temperature encourage the spread of harmful bacteria in ocean waters.

2h

Some of Southern California's most iconic and popular beaches have lost most of their biodiversity

To most people, a beach is a beach. You could likely take an image of almost any urban beach in Southern California—the flat, mostly featureless expanse of sand against blue-green water and blue skies—swap it with one of nearly any other urban beach in Southern California, and chances are that only a trained eye would notice the difference. Some of these differences lie just beneath the surface, h

2h

Parents' mental illness increases suicide risk in adults with tinnitus, hyperacusis

A study is the first to examine the relationship between parental mental illness like anxiety and depression in childhood and the risk of suicide and self-harm in adults who suffer from tinnitus, noise or ringing in the ears, and hyperacusis, extreme sensitivity to noise. Results show that among patients seeking help for these debilitating hearing disorders, poor mental health in their parents was

2h

Some of Southern California's most iconic and popular beaches have lost most of their biodiversity

To most people, a beach is a beach. You could likely take an image of almost any urban beach in Southern California—the flat, mostly featureless expanse of sand against blue-green water and blue skies—swap it with one of nearly any other urban beach in Southern California, and chances are that only a trained eye would notice the difference. Some of these differences lie just beneath the surface, h

2h

Actively swimming gold nanoparticles

Bacteria can actively move towards a nutrient source—a phenomenon known as chemotaxis—and they can move collectively in a process known as swarming. Chinese scientists have redesigned collective chemotaxis by creating artificial model nanoswimmers from chemically and biochemically modified gold nanoparticles. The model could help understand the dynamics of chemotactic motility in a bacterial swarm

2h

Shale natural gas development impacting recreationists

Researchers took a closer look at shale natural gas energy development (SGD) and how it is affecting the experiences of outdoor recreationists, like hikers and campers. They found a significant number of recreationists encountered SGD-related activities and a smaller number even changed their outdoor behaviors or experiences as a result of encountering SGD.

2h

Scientists cook up new recipes for taking salt out of seawater

As populations boom and chronic droughts persist, coastal cities like Carlsbad in Southern California have increasingly turned to ocean desalination to supplement a dwindling fresh water supply. Now scientists investigating how to make desalination less expensive have hit on promising design rules for making so-called 'thermally responsive' ionic liquids to separate water from salt.

2h

NASA casts a double eye on hurricane Flossie

NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites provided infrared views of Flossie before and after it became a hurricane while moving through the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Both satellites analyzed Flossie's cloud top temperatures and structure as the storm strengthened.

2h

Krypton reveals ancient water beneath the Israeli desert

Getting reliable precipitation data from the past has proven difficult, as is predicting regional changes for climate models in the present. A combination of isotope techniques developed by researchers at Argonne and UChicago may help resolve both.

2h

Call it Mighty Mouse: Breakthrough leaps Alzheimer's research hurdle

University of California, Irvine researchers have made it possible to learn how key human brain cells respond to Alzheimer's, vaulting a major obstacle in the quest to understand and one day vanquish it. By developing a way for human brain immune cells known as microglia to grow and function in mice, scientists now have an unprecedented view of crucial mechanisms contributing to the disease.

2h

Study finds lower stress, depression levels in mothers of children with autism

Mothers of young children with autism who focus on improving the quality of their own relationship skills — as opposed to teaching developmental skills to their children — experience dramatic improvements in their level of parenting stress and depression.

2h

Researchers produce electricity by flowing water over extremely thin layers of metal

Scientists from Northwestern University and Caltech have produced electricity by simply flowing water over extremely thin layers of inexpensive metals, including iron, that have oxidized. The films have a conducting metal nanolayer that is insulated with an oxide layer. Current is generated when pulses of rainwater and ocean water alternate and move across the nanolayers. These films represent an

2h

Novel discovery of links between liver dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease

New research from the Alzheimer's Disease Metabolomics Consortium (ADMC) and Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has uncovered novel connections between liver dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease (AD), paving a new path toward a systems level view of Alzheimer's relevant for early detection and ultimately for prevention.

2h

For children born with HIV, adhering to medication gets harder with age

Children born with HIV in the U.S. were less likely to adhere to their medications as they aged from preadolescence to adolescence and into young adulthood. The study is one of the first to examine why different age groups stop adhering to treatment.

2h

NASA finds heavy rain in hurricane Erick

NASA provided forecasters with a look at Hurricane Erick's rainfall rates and cloud temperatures with data from the GPM and Aqua satellites, as the storm headed to Hawaii.

2h

Animal friendships 'change with the weather' in the Masai Mara

When it comes to choosing which other species to hang out with, wild animals quite literally change their minds with the weather, a new University of Liverpool study reveals.The findings, which are published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, could help conservationists better predict the risk of extinction faced by endangered species.

2h

Faint foreshocks foretell California quakes

New research mining data from a catalog of more than 1.8 million southern California earthquakes found that nearly three-fourths of the time, foreshocks signalled a quake's readiness to strike from days to weeks before the the mainshock hit, a revelation that could advance earthquake forecasting.

2h

July's Celebratory Space Pictures

Appreciate anniversaries marked by moonwalks and stellar fireworks this month 2_crop_heic1912a.jpg This celestial explosion resembling an exploding peanut is the Eta Carinae star system, imaged by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3. Image credits: NASA/ESA/N. Smith/J. Morse Space Wednesday, July 31, 2019 – 13:00 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — July 2019 marked the 50th anniversar

2h

NASA finds tropical storm Wipha whipped up

Tropical Storm Wipha formed quickly in the South China Sea. It was affecting Hainan Island, China when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on July 31.

2h

Quantum computers to clarify the connection between the quantum and classical worlds

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have developed a new quantum computing algorithm that offers a clearer understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition, which could help model systems on the cusp of quantum and classical worlds, such as biological proteins, and also resolve questions about how quantum mechanics applies to large-scale objects.

2h

'Sniff-cam' to detect disease

Having bad breath can mean someone ate a smelly lunch, but it could indicate that the person is sick. Various scent compounds have been linked to illnesses such as diabetes, lung cancer and Parkinson's disease, leading scientists to develop technology that measures these substances. However, the challenge is creating instrumentation that can detect low, diagnostic levels of these disease biomarker

2h

TESS satellite uncovers 'first nearby super-Earth'

An international team of astronomers led by Cornell's Lisa Kaltenegger has characterized the first potentially habitable world outside of our own solar system.

2h

Babies Want Fair Leaders

Babies as young as a year-and-a-half want leaders to fix situations in which they see someone else being treated unfairly. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Can getting more vitamin A cut skin cancer risk?

People whose diets included high levels of vitamin A had a 17% reduction in risk for the second-most-common type of skin cancer compared to those who ate modest amounts of vitamin A, a new study shows. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is the second-most-common type of skin cancer among people with fair skin. Vitamin A is known to be essential for the healthy growth and maturation of skin cells,

2h

Chinese Researchers Are Working on an Electric Helicopter

Electric Helicopter A team of Chinese engineers are working on an electric helicopter, according to the state-owned China News Service . The team is hoping that the use of electric motors could not only save fuel but make helicopters lighter and easier to control. According to chief designer Deng Jinghui from the China Helicopter Research and Development Institute in Jingdezhen, Jiangxi province,

2h

Babies Want Fair Leaders

Babies as young as a year and a half want leaders to fix situations in which they see someone else being treated unfairly. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Fragrance-releasing fabric could help neutralize sweaty gym clothes

Hot summer weather, stressful situations and intense workouts can produce unpleasant sweaty odors. But what if clothing could cover up these embarrassing smells with a burst of fragrance? Now, researchers have modified cotton fabric to emit a lemony citronella aroma upon contact with sweat. They report their body-odor-fighting strategy in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

2h

New insights into the early stages of creep deformation

The properties of many materials can change permanently when they are pushed beyond their limits. When a given material is subjected to a force, or 'load', which is stronger than a certain limit, it can become so deformed that it won't return to its original shape, even after the load is removed. However, heavy loads aren't strictly necessary to deform materials irreversibly; this can also occur i

2h

Laser solitons: Theory, topology and potential applications

In almost all situations, even in a vacuum, light cannot travel endlessly without dissipating. Pulses of light known as solitons that propagate along fibres for long distances without changing their shape or losing focus have found applications in data transmission, but even these gradually dissipate unless the medium they travel through has ultra-low absorbance. Nikolay Rosanov of the National Re

2h

Optimizing structures within complex arrangements of bubbles

While structures which emulate foam-like arrangements of bubbles are lightweight and cheap to build, they are also remarkably stable. The bubbles which cover the iconic Beijing Aquatics Centre, for example, each have the same volume, but are arranged in a way which minimises the total area of the structure—optimising the building's construction. The mathematics underlying this behaviour is now wel

2h

1 in 10 older adults binge drink

More than one-tenth of adults 65 and older currently binge drink, putting them at risk for a range of health problems, a new study shows. The study also finds certain factors—including using cannabis and being male—are associated with an increase in binge drinking. Binge drinking is risky, particularly for older adults due to aging-related physical changes—an increased risk of falling, for exampl

2h

The urbanization of the beach

Some of Southern California's most iconic and popular beaches have lost most of their biodiversity, according to marine scientists.

2h

NASA finds tropical storm Wipha whipped up

Tropical Storm Wipha formed quickly in the South China Sea. It was affecting Hainan Island, China when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on July 31.

2h

Higher vitamin A intake linked to lower skin cancer risk

Researchers found that people who ate high levels of vitamin A were 17 percent less likely to get the second-most-common type of skin cancer years later.

2h

Confirmation of toasty TESS planet leads to surprising find of promising world

A piping hot planet discovered by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has pointed the way to additional worlds orbiting the same star, one of which is located in the star's habitable zone. If made of rock, this planet may be around twice Earth's size.

2h

New staffing model for an integrated specialist team approach to palliative care

The Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians has developed a new staffing model for specialist palliative care teams that can deliver an optimal, integrated palliative care program.

2h

Quantum computers to clarify the connection between the quantum and classical worlds

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have developed a new quantum computing algorithm that offers a clearer understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition, which could help model systems on the cusp of quantum and classical worlds, such as biological proteins, and also resolve questions about how quantum mechanics applies to large-scale objects.

2h

Neurocognitive basis for free will set out for the first time

Do human beings genuinely have free will? Philosophers and theologians have wrestled with this question for centuries and have set out the 'design features' of free will — but how do our brains actually fulfil them? Thomas Hills, Professor of Psychology at the University of Warwick, has answered this question for the first time in a new paper published today [31] in Proceedings of the Royal Socie

2h

Study debunks 'July Effect' for heart surgery

The notion that more medical errors occur in July compared to other months due to an influx of new medical school graduates starting their in-hospital training does not apply to heart surgery, according to research in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, published by Elsevier.

2h

Actively swimming gold nanoparticles

Bacteria can actively move towards a nutrient source — a phenomenon known as chemotaxis — and they can move collectively in a process known as swarming. Chinese scientists have redesigned collective chemotaxis by creating artificial model nanoswimmers from chemically and biochemically modified gold nanoparticles. The model could help understand the dynamics of chemotactic motility in a bacterial

2h

Postpartum transfusions on the rise, carry greater risk of adverse events

Women who receive a blood transfusion after giving birth are twice as likely to have an adverse reaction related to the procedure, such as fever, respiratory distress, or hemolysis (destruction of red blood cells), compared with non-pregnant women receiving the same care, according to a new study published today in Blood Advances. Women with preeclampsia, a condition marked by high blood pressure

2h

Shale natural gas development impacting recreationists

Researchers took a closer look at shale natural gas energy development (SGD) and how it is affecting the experiences of outdoor recreationists, like hikers and campers. They found a significant number of recreationists encountered SGD-related activities and a smaller number even changed their outdoor behaviors or experiences as a result of encountering SGD.

2h

Scientists cook up new recipes for taking salt out of seawater

As populations boom and chronic droughts persist, coastal cities like Carlsbad in Southern California have increasingly turned to ocean desalination to supplement a dwindling fresh water supply. Now scientists investigating how to make desalination less expensive have hit on promising design rules for making so-called 'thermally responsive' ionic liquids to separate water from salt.

2h

Tiny bubbles hold clue to better performing industrial technologies

Insights into how minute, yet powerful, bubbles form and collapse on underwater surfaces could help make industrial structures such as ship propellers more hardwearing, research suggests.

2h

Hackers Seize Control of Bulgarian Tax Agency, Sprinkler System

Wet And Wild The Bulgarian government is stuck in an unusually comical cybersecurity crisis. A hacker broke into servers of the National Revenue Agency, according to the Bulgarian language newsroom MediaPool , but also seized control over a city sprinkler system, dousing government officials when they tried to leave the Parliament Building. The government has accused and arrested 20-year-old cybe

2h

Police Investigate Death of Employee at Tesla’s Gigafactory

Sad Situation A Tesla employee has died while working at the company’s Nevada Gigafactory — and police aren’t certain what killed him. Here’s what we know: On July 22, 61-year-old employee Michael Johnston was found dead on the Gigafactory’s third floor, Tesla confirmed to Business Insider on Tuesday. The Storey County Police Department told BI that the death appears related to a medical issue, b

2h

UAE Mars probe will be Arab world first

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02338-5 The United Arab Emirates will send the Hope probe to the red planet next year.

2h

Russia has declared a state of emergency over Siberian wildfires

Russia has declared a state of emergency in five Siberian regions after a million people signed petitions demanding action on unprecedented wildfires

2h

Are You Scared of GMO Foods?

If so, says new research, learning the science behind them could change your mind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

The Wild World of Baby Sharks | Shark Week's The Daily Bite

On today's episode of The Daily Bite, we dive into the wild and weird world of shark pups. Stream Full Episodes from Shark Week: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Own Full Seasons of Shark Week: https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/Shark_Week?id=gg81I7BZ-J4&hl=en_US Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https:

2h

Encapsulated Indian medicinal herb shows anti-diabetic properties in mice

Extracts of the herb Withania coagulans, or Paneer dodi, are used in traditional Indian medicine. Although some healers claim that W. coagulans can help treat diabetes, the bitter-tasting plant hasn't been studied extensively by scientists. Now, researchers have found that herbal extracts packaged in polymers derived from natural substances can reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic mice.

2h

Trump Isn’t Taking Kim’s Bait

He dismissed the first firings of missiles in May, which shattered an 18-month spell of no North Korean provocations, as “some small weapons, which disturbed some of my people, and others, but not me.” He pooh-poohed the next pair of missile launches last week, which came less than a month after he embraced Kim Jong Un and became the first American president to step into North Korea, as “short-ra

2h

Daily briefing: Out of date before it’s published

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02351-8 How “living systematic reviews” can get on top of fast-moving fields, a plan to test a geoengineering project gains momentum and a revolutionary technique getting people with spinal-cord injuries back on their feet.

3h

‘Mosaic’ HIV vaccine to be tested in thousands of people across the world

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02319-8 The experimental vaccine targets more strains of the virus than any other ― and seems to have longer lasting effects.

3h

TESS satellite uncovers 'first nearby super-Earth'

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), a mission designed to comb the heavens for exoplanets, has discovered its first potentially habitable world outside of our own solar system — and an international team of astronomers has characterized the super-Earth, about 31 light-years away.

3h

'Sniff-cam' to detect disease

Having bad breath can mean someone ate a smelly lunch, but it could indicate that the person is sick. Various scent compounds have been linked to illnesses such as diabetes, lung cancer and Parkinson's disease, leading scientists to develop technology that measures these substances. However, the challenge is creating instrumentation that can detect low, diagnostic levels of these disease biomarker

3h

Encapsulated Indian medicinal herb shows anti-diabetic properties in mice

Extracts of the herb Withania coagulans, or Paneer dodi, are used in traditional Indian medicine. Although some healers claim that W. coagulans can help treat diabetes, the bitter-tasting plant hasn't been studied extensively by scientists. Now, researchers have found that herbal extracts packaged in polymers derived from natural substances can reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic mice. They re

3h

Are You Scared of GMO Foods?

If so, says new research, learning the science behind them could change your mind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

The weirdest things we learned this week: Feminist butter sculptures and America's first favorite pastime

Caroline S. Brooks with a butter sculpture bas-relief of Columbus for the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago. (Public Domain/) What's the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you'll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci's hit podcast . The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week hits Apple , Anchor , and everywhere else you listen to podcasts every Wed

3h

Verizon adds Washington DC, Atlanta, Detroit and Indianapolis to list of 5G cities

This morning Verizon (TechCrunch’s parent company) flipped the 5G switch on four additional cities. Washington DC, Atlanta, Detroit and Indianapolis join Chicago, Denver, Minneapolis/St. …

3h

Fragrance-releasing fabric could help neutralize sweaty gym clothes

Hot summer weather, stressful situations and intense workouts can produce unpleasant sweaty odors. But what if clothing could cover up these embarrassing smells with a burst of fragrance? Now, researchers have modified cotton fabric to emit a lemony citronella aroma upon contact with sweat. They report their body-odor-fighting strategy in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

3h

New twist on old surgical technique helps repair patient's skull base

A Rutgers-led team of surgeons developed a groundbreaking procedure based on a paramedian forehead flap, a century-old plastic surgery technique, to save the life of a patient who suffered complications following the removal of a cancerous tumor inside his skull. This method can help other patients with similar complications, for whom all other solutions have failed.

3h

WPI liquid biopsy chip snares circulating tumor cells in blood drops from cancer patients

Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute have developed a chip made of carbon nanotubes that can capture circulating tumor cells (CTCs) of all sizes and types, and can do so with far greater sensitivity than existing technologies. The unique design of the device makes it possible to easily identify and even culture the captured cells, which could make it possible to detect early-stage tumors

3h

Encapsulated Indian medicinal herb shows anti-diabetic properties in mice

Extracts of the herb Withania coagulans, or Paneer dodi, are used in traditional Indian medicine. Although some healers claim that W. coagulans can help treat diabetes, the bitter-tasting plant hasn't been studied extensively by scientists. Now, researchers have found that herbal extracts packaged in polymers derived from natural substances can reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic mice. They re

3h

Wearable health monitor stretches with skin

A wireless, wearable monitor built with stretchable electronics could allow comfortable, long-term health monitoring, researchers report. The monitor works for adults, babies, and small children without concern for skin injury or allergic reactions conventional adhesive sensors with conductive gels cause. The soft and conformable monitor can broadcast electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate, respirat

3h

Bloodhound Diary: All roads lead to South Africa

The British-based land speed record team is heading to Northern Cape to conduct high-speed trials.

3h

Bubble Experiment Finds Universal Laws

Each time a drop drips from a faucet, nature performs a magic trick. Breaking one blob into two calls for passage through a singularity — a single point where physical quantities flirt with the infinite. As the neck connecting the two blobs thins to nothing, the fluid pressure and speed race upward toward infinity, as if they were being divided by zero. Here, the equations used to describe fluids

3h

Trump Administration Proposes Allowing Drug Imports for Cheaper Prescriptions

Consumers and some Democrats have long complained that the United States should be allowed to buy drugs from Canada, where high-priced products like insulin are much cheaper.

3h

Biosynthesized fibers inspired strong and tough artificial nanocomposite fibers

High-performance biomass-based nanocomposites are emerging as promising materials for future structural and functional applications due to their environmentally friendly, renewable and sustainable characteristics. Bio-sourced nanocelluloses (a kind of nanofibers) obtained from plants and bacterial fermentation are the most abundant raw materials on earth. They have attracted tremendous attention r

3h

Leap toward robust binder-less metal phosphide electrodes for Li-ion batteries

Researchers at the Toyohashi University of Technology have successfully fabricated a binder-less tin phosphide (Sn4P3)/carbon (C) composite film electrode for lithium-ion batteries via aerosol deposition. The Sn4P3/C particles were directly solidified on a metal substrate via impact consolidation, without applying a binder. Charging and discharging cycling stabilities were improved by both complex

3h

Ground breaking Trinity research shows how MND affects multiple brain networks

Researchers in the Academic Unit of Neurology at Trinity College Dublin have identified characteristic changes in the patterns of electrical brain wave activity in motor neurone disease (MND). This ground breaking observation will help to develop treatments for the disease that affects over 350 people in Ireland.Their findings, published in the recent issue of the journal Human Brain Mapping revea

3h

Optimizing structures within complex arrangements of bubbles

New research published in EPJ E explores how different numbers of 2D bubbles of two different areas can be arranged within circular discs, in ways which minimize their perimeters.

3h

Poisonous grasses: new study provides reassurance

Stories of mass poisoning incidents of livestock due to toxic grasses made headlines especially overseas. Animal ecologists from Würzburg have studied whether this hazard is also lurking on German pastures.

3h

Human torso simulator offers promise for new back brace innovations

Engineers have for the first time created a simulator mimicking the mechanical behavior of the human torso –which could lead to innovations in the design of medical back supports.

3h

Laser solitons: Theory, topology and potential applications

Solitons have found applications in data transmission but even these gradually dissipate unless the medium they travel through has ultra-low absorbance. Nikolay Rosanov of St. Petersburg, Russia and his team have been working on a solution to this problem — laser solitons — since the 1980s; a colloquium paper summarising their recent work in this area has now been published in EPJ D as 'Laser So

3h

Vaccinations not a risk factor for multiple sclerosis

Data from over 12,000 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients formed the basis of a study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) which investigated the population's vaccination behavior in relation to MS. It showed that five years before their diagnosis, MS patients were statistically less likely to receive vaccinations than comparator groups. Consequently, there was no positive correlation between

3h

Traded forest tree seeds pose a great risk of introducing harmful pests

CABI has led an international team of scientists who strongly suggest that the global trade of forest tree seeds is not as safe as previously believed, with insect pests and fungal pathogens posing a great risk to trees and forest ecosystems worldwide.Non-native insect pests and fungal pathogens present one of the major threats to trees and forest ecosystems globally, with the potential to cause s

3h

New insights into the early stages of creep deformation

Research published in EPJ B reveals that creep deformation not only modifies material properties; it can also vary their statistical behaviour. Further, it obeys Omori law, used by seismologists to calculate time intervals between aftershocks.

3h

Successful first trial for dizziness monitoring device

A ground-breaking device to help patients with dizziness problems has moved a step forward following a successful research study. The Continuous Ambulatory Vestibular Assessment (CAVA) device aims to speed up the diagnosis of the most common causes of dizziness. The study shows the results of the biggest collection of continuous eye movement data after testing the effectiveness of the wearable dia

3h

New protein-sensing mechanism discovered

In a stunning discovery, molecular biologists from the University of Konstanz and ETH Zurich have been able to demonstrate that the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC) senses newly synthesized proteins upon birth inside the ribosomal tunnel.

3h

Chameleon-inspired structural color soft robot can interact with environment

A novel structural color soft robot with both color-changing and locomotion capabilities has been developed by a research team led by Dr. DU Xuemin from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

3h

Neuroimaging essential for Zika cases

Infants in a recent study 'represented a group of ZIKV-exposed infants who would be expected to have a high burden of neuroimaging abnormalities, which is a difference from other reported cohorts,' Sarah B. Mulkey, M.D., Ph.D., writes in an invited commentary published in JAMA Network Open that accompanies the Rio de Janeiro study.

3h

Goal-oriented rehab improves recovery in older adults

Goal-oriented, motivational physical and occupational therapy helps older patients recover more fully from broken hips, strokes and other ailments that land them in skilled nursing facilities for rehabilitation, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

3h

Is vitamin A intake associated with reduced risk of common skin cancer?

Data from two long-term study groups including nearly 125,000 health professionals in the US were used to evaluate the association between intake of vitamin A, through diet and supplementation, and risk of cutaneous squamous cell cancer during a follow-up period of more than 26 years.

3h

Study identifies human performance deficiencies associated with adverse surgical events

In the surgical setting, the concept "to err is human" could potentially be a matter of life and death. In an effort to identify surgical errors that could be prevented, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine conducted a comprehensive analysis of surgeries that resulted in adverse events over a six-month period and found that more than half were caused by human performance deficiencies. Their r

3h

Hearing loss, dementia risk in population of Taiwan

A population-based study using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan suggests hearing loss is associated with risk of dementia. The study included 8,135 patients with newly diagnosed hearing loss and an equal number of individuals without hearing loss for comparison.

3h

Colorectal cancer rates in Canada

The incidence of colorectal cancer among younger adults increased in recent years in this analysis of data from Canadian national cancer registries that included about 688,000 new colorectal cancers diagnosed over more than 40 years. Among men younger than 50, there was an average annual percentage change of 3.47% from 2006 to 2015.

3h

Psoriasis therapy linked to reduced coronary inflammation in patients with skin condition

Researchers have found that anti-inflammatory biologic therapies used to treat moderate to severe psoriasis can significantly reduce coronary inflammation in patients with the chronic skin condition. Scientists said the findings are particularly notable because of the use of a novel imaging biomarker, the perivascular fat attenuation index (FAI), that was able to measure the effect of the therapy

3h

Magnetic 'springs' break down marine microplastic pollution

Plastic waste that finds its way into oceans and rivers poses a global environmental threat with damaging health consequences for animals, humans, and ecosystems. Now, using tiny coil-shaped carbon-based magnets, researchers in Australia have developed a new approach to purging water sources of the microplastics that pollute them without harming nearby microorganisms. Their work appears July 31, 2

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3h

CNN Was Ill-Equipped for This

“Tonight: a fight for the heart of the party . Senator Bernie Sanders, determined to seize his second chance at the nomination … going head-to-head with Senator Elizabeth Warren. Longtime friends fighting for the same cause—and the same voters.” That was the introduction to the compilation video CNN aired on Tuesday evening, just before the network’s Democratic primary debate started. The video w

3h

Democratic Hopefuls Clash on Climate Action During Debate

Candidates argued over various policy proposals, such as a carbon tax and the Green New Deal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Microfluidic array catches, holds single cervical cells for faster screening

Several screening tests for cervical cancer have been developed in recent years. One technique uses immunofluorescent staining to determine the levels of biomarkers to indicate a cell is undergoing HPV-related cancerous growth. Immunostaining for these proteins, however, can be time-intensive. One new approach looks to provide a way to screen cervical cells with immunostaining more efficiently, dr

3h

Tiny magnetic coils could help break down microplastic pollution

Carbon nanotubes designed to release plastic-eroding chemicals could clear the long-lasting trash from waterways.

3h

Lesbian, gay, and bi women fare worst after cancer

Women who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual have less access to care after cancer treatment compared to heterosexual women, research finds. One in three Americans will face a cancer diagnosis in their lifetimes. Ulrike Boehmer, a researcher at the Boston University School of Public Health who studies health disparities in LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) people, says that cancer

3h

Many-body simulation of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of excitons and trions in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11497-y 2D electronic spectroscopy found experimental indications of coherently interacting excitons and trions in doped transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). Here, the authors perform simulations of 2D spectra of monolayer TMDCs based on a many-body formalism, allowing to relate exciton-trion coherence to quantum b

3h

Revisiting enteric methane emissions from domestic ruminants and their δ13CCH4 source signature

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11066-3 Global average, geographical distribution and temporal variations of the 13C isotopic signature of enteric fermentation emissions are not well understood. Here the authors established a global dataset and show a larger emission increase between the two periods (2002–2006 and 2008–2012) than previous studies.

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Publisher Correction: IAPP toxicity activates HIF1α/PFKFB3 signaling delaying β-cell loss at the expense of β-cell function

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11516-y

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A one-gate elevator mechanism for the human neutral amino acid transporter ASCT2

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11363-x How the human Alanine Serine Cysteine Transporter 2 (ASCT2) binds its substrates, neutral amino acids, and releases them on the cytoplasmic side remains unclear. Here authors present an inward-open structure of the human ASCT2 which shows that a hairpin serves as a gate in the inward-facing state.

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Author Correction: Hydrology and the future of the Greenland Ice Sheet

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11573-3

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Sulcal organization in the medial frontal cortex provides insights into primate brain evolution

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11347-x The frontal cortex has expanded over primate evolution. Here, the authors use neuroimaging data from the brains of humans, chimpanzees, baboons, and macaques, to reveal shared and distinct sulcal morphology of the medial frontal cortex.

3h

Engineering transkingdom signalling in plants to control gene expression in rhizosphere bacteria

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10882-x The root microbiota is critical for promoting crop yield. Here, the authors create a synthetic pathway for the production of the rhizopine scyllo-inosamine in Medicago truncatula and barley, and show its perception by rhizosphere bacteria for targeted regulation of bacterial gene expression.

3h

Cell-type-specific resolution epigenetics without the need for cell sorting or single-cell biology

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11052-9 Compared to bulk data, cell-type-specific DNA methylation data provide higher resolution of epigenetic variation. Here, the authors introduce Tensor Composition Analysis, a novel computational approach for learning cell-type-specific DNA methylation from tissue-level bulk data, and show its application in epigen

3h

A Single Male Cat’s Reign of Terror

After the victims were found dead—“decapitated” and “breasts opened”—the residents of a beachside community in Mandurah, Australia, took matters into their own hands. Five locals, along with Claire Greenwell, a biologist at Murdoch University, arranged an overnight stakeout. Another neighbor lent them a mobile home, so they could take turns sleeping at the scene. The target of all this drama? A c

3h

The Democrats’ Visceral Fear of Losing to Donald Trump

DETROIT—Marianne Williamson is an unusual presence in the presidential race: her inscrutable accent, her talk of a “ false god ” and the political power of love, and her ability to translate her career in self-help into enough support to make the debates twice over. Yet it was Williamson—not any of the professional Democrats onstage—who last night was able to cut through a long back-and-forth abo

3h

Centimeter-long snail robot is powered with light

Researchers at the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw, Poland used liquid crystal elastomer technology to demonstrate a bio-inspired microrobot capable of mimicking the adhesive locomotion of snails and slugs in natural scale. The 10-millimeter long soft robot harvests energy from a laser beam and can crawl on horizontal surfaces, climb vertical walls and an upside-down glass ceiling.

3h

SUTD researchers developed a unique method of fabricating 3D porous structures

SUTD researchers have developed a novel method of 3D printing to fabricate 3D porous structures in one step. This method is named as immersion precipitation 3D printing (ip3DP). The porosity of the 3D printed objects is easily controlled by the concentrations of polymers and additives, and the types of solvents.

3h

A new choice for young women with pre-cancerous cervical disease

A single test for women has been shown to aid in predicting which cases of precancerous cervical disease will become more serious, helping with decisions on whether or not surgery is needed, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London.

3h

New protein-sensing mechanism discovered

In a stunning discovery, molecular biologists from the University of Konstanz and ETH Zurich have been able to demonstrate that the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC) senses newly synthesized proteins upon birth inside the ribosomal tunnel.

3h

Magnetic 'springs' break down marine microplastic pollution

Plastic waste that finds its way into oceans and rivers poses a global environmental threat with damaging health consequences for animals, humans, and ecosystems. Now, using tiny coil-shaped carbon-based magnets, researchers in Australia have developed a new approach to purging water sources of the microplastics that pollute them without harming nearby microorganisms. Their work appears July 31 in

3h

Carbon nanosprings could break down microplastics

Engineers try new approach to combat a ubiquitous pollutant.

3h

New protein-sensing mechanism discovered

In a stunning discovery, molecular biologists from the University of Konstanz and ETH Zurich have been able to demonstrate that the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC) senses newly synthesized proteins upon birth inside the ribosomal tunnel.

4h

What the brains of people with excellent general knowledge look like

The brains of people with excellent general knowledge are particularly efficiently wired. This was shown by neuroscientists using magnetic resonance imaging.

4h

Citizen scientists offer ray of hope

Volunteer snorkelers and scuba divers have been helping capture images of reef manta rays to better protect the threatened species. Project Manta relied on these citizen scientists to photograph or video individual reef manta rays (Mobula alfredi) across Australia's east coast.

4h

House move during early pregnancy linked to heightened premature birth risk

Moving to a new residence during the first three months of pregnancy is linked to a heightened risk of premature birth and low birthweight, as well as a slightly higher risk of a smaller-than-expected-size baby, according to new research.

4h

PE fitness tests have little positive impact for students

A new study reveals that school fitness tests have little impact on student attitudes to PE — contrary to polarized views on their merits — and for many students, fitness testing during PE may be wasting valuable class time when used in isolation from the curriculum.

4h

Microfluidic array catches, holds single cervical cells for faster screening

Several screening tests for cervical cancer have been developed in recent years. One technique uses immunofluorescent staining to determine the levels of biomarkers to indicate a cell is undergoing HPV-related cancerous growth. Immunostaining for these proteins, however, can be time-intensive. One new approach looks to provide a way to screen cervical cells with immunostaining more efficiently, dr

4h

Decoding the complex life of a simple parasite

Scientists decode the genome sequence of one of nature's most complex parasites, dicyemids.

4h

Weight stigma in men associated with harmful health consequences

As many as 40% of men report experiencing weight stigma, but little is known about how this stigma affects their health. This study found that men experiencing weight stigma have more depressive symptoms, are more likely to binge eat, and have lower self-rated health.

4h

Major class of viruses reveals complex origins

Comparing a living cell to a virus is a bit like comparing the Sistine Chapel to a backyard dog house. Lacking the intricate machinery of living cells, viruses represent biology stripped down to an extreme level. They are the true minimalists of the biological world.

4h

What it was like to grow up under China's one-child policy | Nanfu Wang

China's one-child policy ended in 2015, but we're just beginning to understand what it was like to live under the program, says TED Fellow and documentary filmmaker Nanfu Wang. With footage from her film "One Child Nation," she shares untold stories that reveal the policy's complex consequences and expose the creeping power of propaganda.

4h

Major class of viruses reveals complex origins

Comparing a living cell to a virus is a bit like comparing the Sistine Chapel to a backyard dog house. Lacking the intricate machinery of living cells, viruses represent biology stripped down to an extreme level. They are the true minimalists of the biological world.

4h

NRL pigment package for ships slows discoloration, lowers solar temperature load

A pigment package designed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory to slow discoloration of the exterior coating on surface ships has started to make its way into the fleet and is producing early, positive results.

4h

Scientists take step toward more efficient fuel refining processes

Researchers at the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocesses Technology (QIBEBT) in China have made headway toward more sustainable and economic fuel production by developing a biochemical approach to allow more control over the conversion of natural gas into usable liquid fuel.

4h

Scientists cook up new recipes for taking salt out of seawater

As populations boom and chronic droughts persist, coastal cities like Carlsbad in Southern California have increasingly turned to ocean desalination to supplement a dwindling fresh water supply. Now scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) investigating how to make desalination less expensive have hit on promising design rules for making so-call

4h

Biosynthesized fibers inspired strong and tough artificial nanocomposite fibers

Nanocellulose-based macrofibers are promising materials for future applications. Various strategies have been pursued to improve their strength. However, the conflict between strength and toughness is still the main challenge that restricts their practical applications. In a recently reported work, researchers presented a hierarchical helical and nanocomposite structural design strategy inspired b

4h

'Promising' antibody therapy extends survival in mice with pancreatic cancer

Scientists have found a way to target and knock out a single protein that they have discovered is widely involved in pancreatic cancer cell growth, survival and invasion.

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Battery gets ‘blue energy’ from ocean and freshwater mix

An affordable, durable technology could harness so-called blue energy, renewable power generated in places where salty ocean water and freshwater mingle, researchers report. The paper, which appears in ACS Omega , describes the battery and suggests using it to make coastal wastewater treatment plants energy-independent. “Blue energy is an immense and untapped source of renewable energy,” says stu

4h

Ancient Meteor Strike Deluged Mars With Planet-Scale Tsunami

Wave Pool A close look at a gigantic crater on Mars has some scientists convinced that the Red Planet used to have a massive ocean on its northern hemisphere — and that an asteroid impact created a planet-sized mega-tsunami. Scientists have long debated whether liquid water ever flowed across the surface of Mars, but this new analysis lends weight to the argument that it was once home to a very w

4h

Multi-state switchable stationary phase opens new doors in chiral separation

The concept of chirality can be challenging for the layperson, with "chemical handedness" seeming a very minor distinction. However, as the consequences of the notorious thalidomide disaster illustrate, understanding chiral materials is a major concern. The continued development of chiral separation techniques therefore remains a key research area. A team involving researchers from Kanazawa Univer

4h

Scientists discover material that can make solar cells more efficient

Researchers at Siberian Federal University, together with colleagues from the Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm, Sweden), discovered new properties of material based on palladium, which can increase the performance of solar cells.

4h

Research finds shale natural gas development impacting recreationists

As the Trump administration opens millions of acres of once protected land and coastline for oil and natural gas exploration, there is mounting concern about the potential impact on the environment as well as those who enjoy the outdoors. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire took a closer look at one of these industries, shale natural gas energy development (SGD), and how it is affecting

4h

Citizen scientists offer ray of hope

Volunteer snorkelers and scuba divers have been helping capture images of reef manta rays to better protect the threatened species.

4h

Citizen scientists offer ray of hope

Volunteer snorkelers and scuba divers have been helping capture images of reef manta rays to better protect the threatened species.

4h

Protective protein guards against DNA damage & could help target fast growing cancer cells

The discovery that an essential protein plays a protective role during cell division, could open the door to better targeted treatment of fast-growing cancer cells.

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Closing the door: breaking new ground related to a potential anticancer drug target

In order to sustain fast growth, cancer cells need to take up nutrients at a faster rate than healthy cells. The human glutamine transporter ASCT2 allows the amino acid glutamine to enter cells and is upregulated in many types of cancer cells, which need more glutamine. It is a potential target for new anti-cancer drugs. Researchers at the University of Groningen have now elucidated a structure of

4h

Scientists cook up new recipes for taking salt out of seawater

As populations boom and chronic droughts persist, coastal cities like Carlsbad in Southern California have increasingly turned to ocean desalination to supplement a dwindling fresh water supply. Now scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) investigating how to make desalination less expensive have hit on promising design rules for making so-call

4h

Scientists take step toward more efficient fuel refinement processes

Researchers at the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocesses Technology (QIBEBT) in China have made headway toward more sustainable and economic fuel production by developing a biochemical approach to allow more control over the conversion of natural gas into potable liquid fuel.

4h

AI improves efficiency and accuracy of digital breast tomosynthesis

Artificial intelligence (AI) helps improve the efficiency and accuracy of an advanced imaging technology used to screen for breast cancer, according to a new study.

4h

Quantum Darwinism, which may explain our reality, passes tests

Quantum Darwinism, a theory created by Wojciech Zurek , may explain decoherence. The theory looks to reconcile quantum mechanics with classical physics. Three recent studies support the theory. None Quantum mechanics is always good for a head-scratching idea – in part, due to its seeming incompatibility with classical physics. One of the major conundrums it offers is the concept of superposition

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Samsung won’t let Android tablets die, announces the Galaxy Tab S6

Would you believe Samsung is removing the headphone jack from tablets?

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DJI aims for the best first-person drone experience with new googles, controller and more

New gear from DJI will equip you with everything you need to become the best first-person drone racer that’s ever graced the Earth – you’ll be the Anakin Skywalker of FPV drone races. …

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American Wealth Is Broken

Editor’s Note: This article was supported by The Atlantic ’s membership program. Learn more . W ealth is a number, sure, but it’s also a feeling. I grew up living with my mom and maternal grandparents, while my dad played and coached in the NBA. For a time, our family’s safety net was held together by my grandfather’s HVAC business, but in 2001, it nearly came apart. That year, the company worked

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Japanese Scientist Wants to Grow Human Organs In Animal Embryos

Human-Animal Embryos A Japanese scientist from the University of Tokyo just got permission from the government to create animal embryos that contain human cells, Nature reports — work that could lead, eventually, to growing human organs in animal hosts for the purpose of transplantation. The work is significant because of its perilous ethical territory, as well as its political background: in Mar

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The Pioneering Female Botanist Who Sweetened a Nation and Saved a Valley

One of India’s finest plant scientists, Janaki Ammal spurred her country to protect its rich tropical diversity

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Ethnic communities help new refugees find work

Ethnic communities help newly-arrived refugees find work, a new study of asylum seekers in Switzerland shows. The findings show that new refugees were more likely to get a job within their first five years if Swiss officials assigned them to live in an area with a larger community of people who share their nationality, ethnicity, or language. “Our study shows that ethnic networks can be beneficia

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Hacker snuppede data om tusindvis af personer fra politiet i Los Angeles

Politiet har modtaget mails fra hackeren, som indeholder dele af de stjålne data. I alt er der blevet stjålet oplysninger på omkring 20.000 personer.

4h

Moving Beyond Mind-Controlled Limbs to Prosthetics That Can Actually ‘Feel’

Brain-machine interface enthusiasts often gush about “ closing the loop .” It’s for good reason. On the implant level, it means engineering smarter probes that only activate when they detect faulty electrical signals in brain circuits. Elon Musk’s Neuralink — among other players —are readily pursuing these bi-directional implants that both measure and zap the brain. But to scientists laboring to

4h

Multi-state switchable stationary phase opens new doors in chiral separation

A team including researchers from Kanazawa University demonstrated HPLC separation of enantiomers using an optically active poly(phenylacetylene) derivative as a chiral stationary phase. The helical conformation of the polymer was altered from a mixed state to left- or right-handed chiral conformations by introducing Na + or Cs + ions, respectively, producing a switchable system that offers three

4h

Climate change alters tree demography in northern forests

The rise in temperature and precipitation levels in summer in northern Japan has negatively affected the growth of conifers and resulted in their gradual decline, according to a 38-year-long study in which mixed forests of conifers and broad-leaved trees were monitored by a team of researchers from Hokkaido University.

4h

Leap toward robust binder-less metal phosphide electrodes for Li-ion batteries

Researchers at the Toyohashi University of Technology have successfully fabricated a binder-less tin phosphide (Sn4P3)/carbon (C) composite film electrode for lithium-ion batteries via aerosol deposition. The Sn4P3/C particles were directly solidified on a metal substrate via impact consolidation, without applying a binder. Charging and discharging cycling stabilities were improved by both complex

4h

Experimental observation of a new class of materials: Excitonic insulators

A FLEET study has found evidence of a new phase of matter predicted in the 1960s: the excitonic insulator, which has been keenly pursued by condensed matter physicists and 2D material scientists.The unique signatures of an excitonic insulating phase were observed in antimony Sb(110) nanoflakes.The University of Wollongong/Monash University collaboration provides a novel strategy to search for more

4h

Let's Break Down the Physics of a Wickedly Curving Baseball

An epic pitch by Oliver Drake of the Tampa Bay Rays appears to defy physics. It doesn't, of course—and here's how you can model it yourself.

4h

A Millennium Falcon from back in the Cambrian

Half-billion-year-old marine predator found in the famous Burgess Shale. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Keeping an eye on the Amazon

Mapping project highlights forest-loss rates.

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Stunning Shark Breach Filmed in South Africa! | Shark Week

In the waters off South Africa, Dr. Neil Hammershlag, photographer Chris Fallows and drone pilot Dean Engela capture stunning drone footage of a Great White shark breach. Stream Air Jaws Strikes Back on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/air-jaws-strikes-back Own Full Seasons of Shark Week: https://play.google.com/store/tv/show/Shark_Week?id=gg81I7BZ-J4&hl=en

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Teen parents feel isolated in school and lack professional learning opportunities

New findings on the little-researched area of teachers in teen parent units (TPUs) has revealed a perception of isolation from the mainstream school system and a lack of professional learning opportunities that could be impacting on student learning.

4h

Democratic Moderates Fade Into the Background

Last night’s Democratic debate showed how America’s political parties have turned upside down. At center stage stood Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, making arguments about decriminalizing illegal border crossings and abolishing private health insurance that would have sounded fantastical just a few years ago. Throwing darts from the edges were John Delaney, Steve Bullock, John Hickenlooper,

5h

People Are Livestreaming Funerals

Tuning In In recent years, more and more funeral homes are giving people the option to livestream funeral services. All too often, the difficulties of arranging last-minute travel to other states or countries means that people are left missing their friends’ or loved ones’ funerals, so now more and more people are opting to put them online, Wired reports . The growing trend shows how digital medi

5h

Bubbles hold clue to improved industrial structures

Insights into how minute, yet powerful, bubbles form and collapse on underwater surfaces could help make industrial structures such as ship propellers more hardwearing, research suggests.

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Network sounds the alarm to prevent famine from drought

A drought early-warning system called FEWS NET has made progress anticipating famines and coordinating aid in the 30 years since its launch, researchers report. Tens of millions of people face malnutrition the world over. The Famine Early Warning Systems Network, or FEWS NET, identifies the location, severity, and causes of food insecurity and issues alerts to humanitarian NGOs and government age

5h

Trump Administration Proposes Allowing Drug Imports for Cheaper Prescriptions

Consumers and some Democrats have long complained that the United States should be allowed to buy drugs from Canada, where high-priced products like insulin are much cheaper.

5h

Nearby Star System Looks to Be Ideal “Lab” for Exoplanet Studies

Star Lab Since launching in April 2018, NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has already discovered 21 new exoplanets — but three of them have astronomers particularly excited. This trio of exoplanets is orbiting a star just 73 light-years away from Earth, which is essentially our cosmic backyard — and scientists believe the system could serve as the ideal “lab” for exoplanet resea

5h

Could light and noise from Earth attract attention from outer space?

Since the first use of electric lamps in the 19th century, society hasn't looked back. Homes and streets are lit at all hours so that people can go about their business when they'd once have been asleep. Besides the obvious benefits to societies and the economy, there's growing awareness of the negative impact of artificial light.

5h

Two rare white rhinos pregnant at Belgian zoo

Two rare southern white rhinos have become pregnant at the same time at a zoo in Belgium, boosting efforts to save the endangered species.

5h

Scientists Create Miniature Sun in Wisconsin

The sun is easy to spot in the sky, and it’s not very far away in astronomical terms. So, scientists have spent a great deal of time studying our local life-giving star. However, the sun is also a nuclear inferno that will eradicate any people and most robots that get too close. To study the star up close, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison built a miniature sun . They call it the

5h

Two rare white rhinos pregnant at Belgian zoo

Two rare southern white rhinos have become pregnant at the same time at a zoo in Belgium, boosting efforts to save the endangered species.

5h

Black bears adapt to life near humans by burning the midnight oil

Amid reports that human activities are pushing many wild species to the edge of extinction, it's easy to miss the fact that some animal populations are expanding. Across North America, a number of species that were reduced by overhunting and loss of forested habitat in the 1800s are rebounding. This sometimes results in wildlife living near populated areas.

5h

A unique picture of migration patterns in South Africa can help urban planning

Economic disparities, inequality and unemployment, particularly among young people, remain pervasive in South Africa. Lack of access to services and inadequate living conditions also affect people's quality of life, health and well-being.

5h

Psychotherapy should be first-line treatment for depression in young people, trial finds

Young people seeking support for depression should be offered psychotherapy as the first line of treatment, a clinical trial by researchers at Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, has found.

5h

Citizen scientists offer ray of hope

Volunteer snorkelers and scuba divers have been helping capture images of reef manta rays to better protect the threatened species.The University of Queensland initiative – Project Manta – relied on these citizen scientists to photograph or video individual reef manta rays (Mobula alfredi) across Australia's east coast.

5h

What the brains of people with excellent general knowledge look like

The brains of people with excellent general knowledge are particularly efficiently wired. This was shown by neuroscientists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin using magnetic resonance imaging.

5h

I see the pattern under your skin

By combining multiphoton imaging and biaxial tissue extension a research team from Japan found that collagen in the skin is organized in a mesh-like structure, and that elastic fibers — the connective tissue found in skin — follows the same orientation.

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Major class of viruses reveals complex origins

A new study examines the evolutionary dynamics of circular Rep-encoding single-stranded (CRESS) DNA viruses. The findings show that this broad class of single-stranded DNA viruses, which infect all three cellular domains of life, have acquired their genetic components through complex evolutionary processes not traceable to a single ancestral event.

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UW study: House move during early pregnancy linked to heightened premature birth risk

Moving to a new residence during the first three months of pregnancy is linked to a heightened risk of premature birth and low birthweight, as well as a slightly higher risk of a smaller-than-expected-size baby, according to new research from the University of Washington published online today in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Democrats Search for Their Own ‘Make America Great Again’

In more than two sprawling hours of serial discussion that sometimes even came close to “debate” last night, 10 Democratic contenders for president—and the time-obsessed moderators who questioned them—served up a vivid contrast between the micro and the macro in American politics. It was a display of the difference between the specific policy proposals that connote a respectable résumé (or that c

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Why Millennial Socialists Aren’t Into Elizabeth Warren

They’re here for Bernie. This particular spot, in the Columbia Heights neighborhood of Washington, D.C., is normally a Wisconsin Badgers bar (or a Washington Huskies bar, depending on whom you ask). But last night the place was taken over by members of the D.C. chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America. There were more than two dozen of them, perched on metal stools in the outdoor section o

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Black bears adapt to life near humans by burning the midnight oil

Amid reports that human activities are pushing many wild species to the edge of extinction, it's easy to miss the fact that some animal populations are expanding. Across North America, a number of species that were reduced by overhunting and loss of forested habitat in the 1800s are rebounding. This sometimes results in wildlife living near populated areas.

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Saturated Heterocyclic Rings And Their Personalities

Here’s a ring system that you’ve never used before – the cyclopropyl system in purple at the end of the row in the diagram at right. It’s described in this paper from GSK-Stevenage as a new morpholine isostere. A 4-morpholino-pyrimidine hinge binder core is preferred in many PI3K and PIKK inhibitors, but the team was looking for a replacement to try to get better metabolic stability. As they desc

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Going green: Ethiopia's bid to plant four billion trees

These days whenever Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed appears in public, he removes his jacket, rolls up his sleeves, grabs a shovel and gets to planting a tree.

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How Does a Male Black Widow Find a Mate? Follow the Other Guys

Competition among these male spiders is fierce. So suitors take advantage of clues left by their reproductive rivals.

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Capacity what? The intangible side of conservation

Fauna & Flora International (FFI) believes in partnership—we always have and we always will. In 2018, we partnered with almost 400 organisations, businesses or governmental agencies. We favour this partnership approach because—put simply—it works better for everyone. Each partner brings something unique to the table and contributes in their own way to a common goal.

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Atomically precise bottom-up synthesis of π-extended [5] triangulene

Chemists have predicted zigzag-edged triangular graphene molecules (ZTGMs) to host ferromagnetically coupled edge states, with net spin scaling with the molecular size. Such molecules can afford large spin tunability, which is crucial to engineer next-generation molecular spintronics. However, the scalable synthesis of large ZTGMs and the direct observation of their edge states are a long-standing

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Capacity what? The intangible side of conservation

Fauna & Flora International (FFI) believes in partnership—we always have and we always will. In 2018, we partnered with almost 400 organisations, businesses or governmental agencies. We favour this partnership approach because—put simply—it works better for everyone. Each partner brings something unique to the table and contributes in their own way to a common goal.

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Dofthjärnan lika hos råtta och människa

Sommaren förknippas med dofter såsom jordgubbar, hav eller doften från grillen. Men hur förstår våra hjärnor vad det är vi doftar på? Forskare vid Stockholms universitet, New York University och Northwestern University i USA har undersökt hur hjärnan identifierar dofter genom att kombinera olika sinnesintryck. I en ny forskningsrapport visas hur de upptäckte att hjärnans sinnesregioner kan lära s

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Captive lion breeding in South Africa: the case for a total ban

A new report by global NGO, World Animal Protection, provides a damning indictment on the captive predator breeding industry. Big cats are being bred for the use of their bones in traditional Chinese medicine. China is estimated to house about 8 000 tigers in captivity, while South Africa may have as many as 14 000 lions. Nontobeko Mtshali asks Ross Harvey to analyse the issues around captive bree

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Stop! OX40-positive follicular helper T cells control rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a progressive autoimmune disease most frequently characterized by pain, swelling, and stiffness in joints. Here, increased numbers of OX40-expressing follicular helper T cells, accompanied by autoantibodies with an increased inflammatory ability, were found during the onset of experimental arthritis. A University of Tsukuba-led research team found that OX40-expressing folli

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UNH research finds shale natural gas development impacting recreationists

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire took a closer look at shale natural gas energy development (SGD) and how it is affecting the experiences of outdoor recreationists, like hikers and campers. They found a significant number of recreationists encountered SGD-related activities and a smaller number even changed their outdoor behaviors or experiences as a result of encountering SGD.

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Tiny bubbles hold clue to better performing industrial technologies

Insights into how minute, yet powerful, bubbles form and collapse on underwater surfaces could help make industrial structures such as ship propellers more hardwearing, research suggests.

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Parents' mental illness increases suicide risk in adults with tinnitus, hyperacusis

A study is the first to examine the relationship between parental mental illness like anxiety and depression in childhood and the risk of suicide and self-harm in adults who suffer from tinnitus, noise or ringing in the ears, and hyperacusis, extreme sensitivity to noise. Results show that among patients seeking help for these debilitating hearing disorders, poor mental health in their parents was

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SibFU scientists discovered material that can make solar cells more efficient

Researchers at Siberian Federal University, together with colleagues from the Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm, Sweden), discovered new properties of material based on palladium, which can increase the performance of solar cells.

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Older adults should be regularly screened for heart disease, diabetes risk

Measuring waistline, blood pressure, cholesterol, blood fats, and blood sugar during doctor visits can detect heart disease and diabetes earlier, according to a Clinical Practice Guideline issued today by the Endocrine Society.

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Boosting the anti-inflammatory action of the immune system

Researchers have identified a molecular switch that causes macrophages to clean up cellular debris caused by infections instead of contributing to inflammation and tissue injury.

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Captive lion breeding in South Africa: the case for a total ban

A new report by global NGO, World Animal Protection, provides a damning indictment on the captive predator breeding industry. Big cats are being bred for the use of their bones in traditional Chinese medicine. China is estimated to house about 8 000 tigers in captivity, while South Africa may have as many as 14 000 lions. Nontobeko Mtshali asks Ross Harvey to analyse the issues around captive bree

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The Hidden Volcanoes of Central Oregon

A river channel filled with cliff swallow holes carved into the Desert Spring Tuff. Image by Erik Klemetti Earlier this month, I spent a little over a week exploring one of the biggest mysteries in then Cascade Range. These volcanoes span from Northern California into British Columbia and host such well-known peaks as Mount St. Helens, Hood and Shasta. Yet, some of the largest eruptions over the p

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New Shipworm Eats Rock, a First for Animals

Like lichens, these animals mine stone. What they do with it is another question. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Promoting humanitarian action in a digital worlds

A Swinburne and Red Cross collaboration is shedding new light on the forms and drivers of humanitarian behavior in a modern, digital context.

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Study reveals unexpected fire role in longleaf pine forests

The longleaf pine forests of the southeastern U.S. depend on frequent fire to maintain their structure and the diversity of plants and animals they support. New research from the University of Georgia has found that fire may be playing another, unexpected role: releasing excessive nitrogen that appears to have accumulated as a legacy of prior land use.

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Study reveals unexpected fire role in longleaf pine forests

The longleaf pine forests of the southeastern U.S. depend on frequent fire to maintain their structure and the diversity of plants and animals they support. New research from the University of Georgia has found that fire may be playing another, unexpected role: releasing excessive nitrogen that appears to have accumulated as a legacy of prior land use.

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Startup’s Tech Vaporizes Trash From Overflowing Landfills

Double Whammy Currently, trash is breaking down in landfills across the globe, producing a steady stream of methane emissions that are contributing to Earth’s climate woes. Now, a California-based startup says it’s found a way to make practically every piece of trash in those landfills recyclable — while also producing much-needed renewable energy . Vaporize It The company is called Sierra Energy

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Researchers make critical cell division discovery

Researchers at the University of Dundee have solved one of the mysteries of cell division, a discovery which may shed light on cancer development and one day help develop new drugs to treat the disease.

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Siberian smoke heading toward U.S. and Canada

Fires in the Siberian area of Russia are usually quite severe by this time of year and 2019 is no exception. This NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP image taken on July 30, 2019 shows dozens to hundreds of fires burning across a large expanse of this mostly wilderness area of Russia. In fact, this year has been worse than most. Scientists have seen an unprecedented number of wildfires across the region since Jun

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From Robots to E-Scooters, All the Things We Loved This Month

Plus: Sony’s newest camera, a collaboration between Sonos and Ikea, and big changes from Twitter and Pinterest.

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Researchers make critical cell division discovery

Researchers at the University of Dundee have solved one of the mysteries of cell division, a discovery which may shed light on cancer development and one day help develop new drugs to treat the disease.

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What are native grasslands, and why do they matter?

Coalition minister Angus Taylor is under scrutiny for possibly intervening in the clearing of grasslands in the southern highlands of New South Wales. Leaving aside the political dimensions, it's worth asking: why do these grasslands matter?

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Radio halo detected in the galaxy cluster PSZ2 G099.86+58.45

Using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR), astronomers have probed PSZ2 G099.86+58.45, one of the densest cluster of galaxies known to date. The study revealed the presence of a radio halo in this cluster, making it one of the most distant such features ever discovered. The finding is detailed in a paper published July 24 on arXiv.org.

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What are native grasslands, and why do they matter?

Coalition minister Angus Taylor is under scrutiny for possibly intervening in the clearing of grasslands in the southern highlands of New South Wales. Leaving aside the political dimensions, it's worth asking: why do these grasslands matter?

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New way to make 3-D carbon components

UD's Kun Fu discovers new way to make 3-D carbon components

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Nutrient deficiencies in rice grown under higher carbon dioxide could elevate health risks for tens of millions

As a result of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, Earth is experiencing many discernable changes, such as melting glaciers, higher global sea levels, and an overall greening of the planet. But increasing carbon dioxide concentrations are also causing many invisible effects, including detrimental changes to the nutritional content of food.

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Neutrons shed light on industrial catalyst for hydrogen production

Collaborators at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and U.S. universities used neutron scattering and other advanced characterization techniques to study how a prominent catalyst enables the "water-gas shift" reaction to purify and generate hydrogen at industrial scale.

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When a Chatbot Becomes Your Best Friend

submitted by /u/ScarletEgret [link] [comments]

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Conservation biologists find new applications for AI tools

Automated cameras and other sensors deployed in the wild are transforming the way biologists monitor natural ecosystems and animal populations. These technologies can collect huge amounts of data, however, and conservation biologists are increasingly turning to the tools of artificial intelligence (AI) to sort through it all.

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Resistenta bakterier sprids på sjukhus

Forskare har analyserat prover från drygt 1 700 smittade patienter på hundratals sjukhus i 32 länder. Resultaten visar att mer än hälften av de resistenta bakterierna var genetiskt lika andra stammar från samma sjukhus. Det tyder på spridning mellan patienter på sjukhusen, enligt en rapport i tidskriften Nature Microbiology.

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Conservation biologists find new applications for AI tools

Automated cameras and other sensors deployed in the wild are transforming the way biologists monitor natural ecosystems and animal populations. These technologies can collect huge amounts of data, however, and conservation biologists are increasingly turning to the tools of artificial intelligence (AI) to sort through it all.

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Study finds technology increased voter turnout—and concerns about security

New research by a University of Chicago scholar found that the ability to vote with a mobile device increased turnout by three to five percentage points in the 2018 federal election in West Virginia, suggesting that mobile voting has the potential to significantly boost turnout in future elections.

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117 planteforskere appellerer til nye EU-politikere: Stop hetzen mod Crispr

GMO-loven skal opdateres til fordel for Crispr. Det mener en lang række europæiske forskere, som nu beder de nye EU-parlamentarikere om hjælp.

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Predicting seismic activity at fracking sites to prevent earthquakes

Scientists from the University of Bristol have found a more effective way to predict seismic activity at hydraulic fracturing sites, ensuring that potential earthquake activity remains within safe levels.

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Scientists debate the seriousness of problems with the value of the Hubble Constant

Astronomers, astrophysicists and particle physicists gathered recently at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California to discuss the seriousness of differing measurements of the Hubble Constant. They met to talk about a problem that has become a major concern in astrophysics—figuring out how fast the universe is actually expanding.

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Arctic wildfires, hybrid embryos and record-breaking heatwave

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02305-0 The week in science: 26 July–1 August 2019.

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Proxima junk

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02312-1 Welcome to the curiosity shop.

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Cybersecurity test on ISS

A compact experiment aimed at enhancing cybersecurity for future space missions is operational in Europe's Columbus module of the International Space Station, running in part on a Raspberry Pi Zero computer costing just a few euros.

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Wage theft has become a culturally accepted part of business

Many Australians are shocked by celebrity chef George Calombaris being caught for underpaying employees A$7.8 million. It didn't help, of course, that the television personality was also reported to be seeking a huge pay rise for appearing in the television program MasterChef Australia.

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Climate change alters tree demography in northern forests

The rise in temperature and precipitation levels in summer in northern Japan has negatively affected the growth of conifers and resulted in their gradual decline, according to a 38-year-long study in which mixed forests of conifers and broad-leaved trees were monitored by a team of researchers from Hokkaido University.

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Microbiologists solve the mystery of the compass needle in magnetic bacteria

Bacteria of the species Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense are unicellular organisms that can align their locomotion precisely with the Earth's magnetic field. They owe this ability to tiny magnetite crystals called magnetosomes. In the spiral-shaped bacterial cell, the crystals form a stable, straight chain that acts like a compass needle. Microbiologists at the University of Bayreuth, together wit

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Is Pluto a Planet?

Why can’t astronomers decide on whether or not Pluto is a planet? Everyday Einstein explains the controversy about our faraway neighbor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Climate change alters tree demography in northern forests

The rise in temperature and precipitation levels in summer in northern Japan has negatively affected the growth of conifers and resulted in their gradual decline, according to a 38-year-long study in which mixed forests of conifers and broad-leaved trees were monitored by a team of researchers from Hokkaido University.

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Microbiologists solve the mystery of the compass needle in magnetic bacteria

Bacteria of the species Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense are unicellular organisms that can align their locomotion precisely with the Earth's magnetic field. They owe this ability to tiny magnetite crystals called magnetosomes. In the spiral-shaped bacterial cell, the crystals form a stable, straight chain that acts like a compass needle. Microbiologists at the University of Bayreuth, together wit

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Study reveals new structure of gold at extremes

Gold is an extremely important material for high-pressure experiments and is considered the "gold standard" for calculating pressure in static diamond anvil cell experiments. When compressed slowly at room temperature (on the order of seconds to minutes), gold prefers to be the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure at pressures up to three times the center of the Earth.

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New exoplanet is smallest to be precisely measured

Earthlings have long daydreamed about faraway planets, but only recently have scientists been able to identify thousands of new exoplanets—and to learn more and more about what they look like.

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Ketamine isn't an opioid and treats depression in a unique way

Ketamine has gotten a bad rap as an opioid when there's plenty of evidence suggesting it isn't one, Johns Hopkins experts say. They believe this reputation may hamper patients from getting necessary treatment for the kinds of depression that don't respond to typical antidepressants. In a new paper, the researchers clarify the mechanism behind ketamine's mechanism of action in hopes of restoring th

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Countries are turning off the internet to stop violence. Does it work?

Governments are increasingly shutting down access to the internet in an effort to curb organised violence. But evidence shows it usually makes things worse

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Engineering new signaling networks to produce crops that need less fertilizer

An interdisciplinary research collaboration between the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge has engineered a novel synthetic plant-microbe signaling pathway that could provide the foundation for transferring nitrogen fixation to cereals.

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Image: Siberian wildfires as seen from orbit

Hundreds of wildfires have broken out in Siberia, some of which can be seen in this image captured from space on 28 July 2019. Almost three million hectares of land are estimated to have been affected, according to Russia's Federal Forestry Agency.

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Engineering new signaling networks to produce crops that need less fertilizer

An interdisciplinary research collaboration between the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge has engineered a novel synthetic plant-microbe signaling pathway that could provide the foundation for transferring nitrogen fixation to cereals.

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How stem cells maintain the oily glands on your skin

A new look at sebaceous glands offers insight into the development and maintenance of the skin and how cancer mutations affect stem cell behavior. Most people are familiar with the sebaceous glands which are responsible for moisturizing the skin—during puberty sometimes more than we would like. But even though the glands are a main component of our skin, scientists know surprisingly little about

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What compulsive dating-app users have in common

Loneliness and social anxiety is a bad combination for single people who use dating apps on their phones, a new study suggests.

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To End Student Debt, Tie Tuition to Post-Graduation Salaries

Opinion: If colleges only get paid when their graduates do, they’re incentivized to provide a service that actually gets students hired.

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Image of the Day: Frigid Cells

A new cryoprotectant safeguards frozen cells against degradation.

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To Fight Climate Change, We Should Actually Add Carbon Dioxide to the Atmosphere

We should convert methane, a more powerful greenhouse gas, into CO2 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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China’s CRISPR push in animals promises better meat, novel therapies, and pig organs for people

Country tallies many firsts with genome-edited dogs, monkeys, and pigs

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Future poison ivy treatment could target nerves

New research identifies new potential drug targets that could one day treat poison ivy’s aggravating itch in humans. The findings in JCI Insight point to two proteins and a neurotransmitter involved in poison ivy itch in mice. Blocking or suppressing the proteins and the receptor appeared to relieve poison-ivy itch in ways antihistamines and steroids cannot, says senior author Sven-Eric Jordt, an

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Study on Acupuncture for Angina

Another acupuncture study claims positive results, but is plagued by methodological flaws and dubious results.

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New discovery holds promise for reducing climate change threats

Researchers at Tuskegee University have modified and discovered new bio-based natural materials that could eliminate the harmful buildup of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. They believe the use of naturally occurring nanocellulose holds the key to efficiently and cost-effectively mitigating carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases associated with rising global temperatures and extreme weather ev

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Storability of vegetable carotene severely affected by oxygen in air

The shelf life of vegetable carotenoids when stored in powdered form is severely affected by oxygen in the storage environment—an effect that has a big impact on the food industry, but that can be dramatically reduced by implementing optimized production processes. This is the clear finding of an elaborate study using the know-how and equipment of EQ BOKU, a facility that provides precision scient

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Storability of vegetable carotene severely affected by oxygen in air

The shelf life of vegetable carotenoids when stored in powdered form is severely affected by oxygen in the storage environment—an effect that has a big impact on the food industry, but that can be dramatically reduced by implementing optimized production processes. This is the clear finding of an elaborate study using the know-how and equipment of EQ BOKU, a facility that provides precision scient

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Psychedelic Medicine Is Coming. The Law Isn't Ready

A surprising resurgence of psychedelic research has produced its first FDA-approved treatment, with more likely on the way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This Bizarre Ancient Sea Monster Looked Like the Millennium Falcon

A long time ago, in a galaxy not at all far away, a carnivore with an uncanny resemblance to the Millennium Falcon from "Star Wars" scuttled through the seas.

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Photos: 'Millennium Falcon' Predator Hunted Seas Half a Billion Years Ago

About a half-billion years ago, a predator that looked just like the Millennium Falcon terrorized tiny prey.

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Toxic chemicals hindering the recovery of Britain's rivers

Welsh rivers in urban locations still have damaged food chains and fewer species of invertebrates in comparison to rural rivers

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Psychedelic Medicine Is Coming. The Law Isn't Ready

A surprising resurgence of psychedelic research has produced its first FDA-approved treatment, with more likely on the way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How bacteria swim against the flow

It is well known that bacteria can swim against the current, which often causes serious problems—for example, when they spread in water pipes or in medical catheters. To prevent or at least slow down the spread of bacteria contaminating biological or medical ducts, scientists need to know how they swim against the flow. An international research team, including the group of Anke Lindner and Eric C

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How bacteria swim against the flow

It is well known that bacteria can swim against the current, which often causes serious problems—for example, when they spread in water pipes or in medical catheters. To prevent or at least slow down the spread of bacteria contaminating biological or medical ducts, scientists need to know how they swim against the flow. An international research team, including the group of Anke Lindner and Eric C

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SPEX project gets wings: first measurements SPEX airborne published

Researchers from SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research have published the first results of SPEX airborne, a spectrocalorimeter to measure aerosols. The polarization measurements aboard NASA's research aircraft ER2 have proven to be accurate beyond expectations, with an average maximum deviation of 0.5 percent from reference data. The results are published in Applied Optics.

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Researchers enrich silver chemistry

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have teamed up with colleagues in Russia and Saudi Arabia and proposed an efficient method for obtaining fundamental data necessary for understanding chemical and physical processes involving substances in the gaseous state. The proposed numerical protocol predicts the thermal effect of gas-phase formation of silver compounds and thei

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Excitonic insulators: Experimental observation of a new class of materials

A University of Wollongong / Monash University collaboration has found evidence of a new phase of matter predicted in the 1960s: the excitonic insulator.

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Food quality control made faster and easier

Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology have developed a new methodology for the simultaneous analysis of odorants and tastants. It could simplify and accelerate the quality control of food in the future.

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This Mathematician's 'Mysterious' New Method Just Solved a 30-Year-Old Problem

The proof took 30 years to be solved, but it's so simple and elegant that you can summarize it in a single tweet.

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Ancient Roman 'Pen' Was a Joke Souvenir

"I went to Rome and all I got you was this pen."

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The Conundrum Facing Democrats About America’s Role in the World

It’s the question that has plagued Democratic politicians since the disaster of the Iraq War: Where does the party stand on the use of U.S. force abroad? Another way to put it, as the CNN moderator Jake Tapper did when posing the first national-security question of last night’s debate: Should America be the world’s policeman? Senator Bernie Sanders had a fast answer: No. That’s easy enough to say

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The Ballad of Taystee Jefferson

This article contains spoilers through the entire series of Netflix’s Orange Is the New Black. In the very first scene of the very first episode of Orange Is the New Black , released on Netflix in 2013, Piper (played by Taylor Schilling) takes her first shower as an inmate at Litchfield prison. As she shivers under trickles of lukewarm water, her reverie is interrupted by a loudspeaker announceme

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What compulsive dating-app users have in common

Loneliness and social anxiety is a bad combination for single people who use dating apps on their phones, a new study suggests.Researchers found that people who fit that profile were more likely than others to say they've experienced negative outcomes because of their dating app use.

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Expectant mothers can mitigate the impact of marijuana on baby's brain development

A team of researchers led by members of the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus found that choline, an essential micronutrient, can prevent fetal brain developmental problems that can occur when mothers use marijuana while pregnant.

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Time to discuss consent in digital-data studies

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02322-z Anonymized data sets are growing and it is becoming easier to identify individuals. Research-consent procedures must be updated to protect people from being targeted.

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Skin in balance: Joint forces of polarity and cell mechanics

The cell polarity protein Par3 controls mechanical changes in the skin and plays an important role in cell division. Malfunction can lead to DNA damages. The balance of the system is of great importance—while too much differentiation leads to loss of stem cells and therefore premature aging, too many cell divisions can be a cause of skin cancer. The new study by a team around Sandra Iden about how

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Spotify hits 108 million paying subscribers but is still bleeding money

Spotify's numbers for the second quarter of 2019 are in, and it looks like the paying userbase now stands at a strong 108 million, an impressive result that is downplayed by less than stellar …

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Skin in balance: Joint forces of polarity and cell mechanics

The cell polarity protein Par3 controls mechanical changes in the skin and plays an important role in cell division. Malfunction can lead to DNA damages. The balance of the system is of great importance—while too much differentiation leads to loss of stem cells and therefore premature aging, too many cell divisions can be a cause of skin cancer. The new study by a team around Sandra Iden about how

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When Open Source Software Comes With a Few Catches

Smaller open source developers are fighting back against tech giants like Amazon using their code in commercial services.

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Jakarta’s Giant Seawall Is Useless if the City Keeps Sinking

If Indonesia's capital can’t find a way to hydrate its people without overexploiting groundwater, it’ll keep sinking, pulling that new seawall down with it.

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WIRED Book of the Month: *It Came From Something Awful*

In Dale Beran’s aggrandizing telling, 4chan’s crescendo of furious nihilism delivers President Trump to America.

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'Talking Lasers' That Beam Messages into Your Head Could Be Here in 5 Years, Pentagon Says

A laser beam hits the wall next to you — and suddenly, the wall talks.

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Redaktionens favoritter: Derfor har techgiganter opgivet egne biler

Nogle historier lever et alt for kort liv. Derfor har vi bedt et udpluk af Ingeniørens redaktører og journalister anbefale egne og andres historier. Her er, hvad de fandt frem.

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Millions of Black Holes Are Hiding in Our Galaxy. Here's How Astronomers Plan to Find Them.

In a new paper, a pair of Japanese astronomers hatch a plan for finding dozens or hundreds of the black holes that are hiding out in the Milky Way.

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Private Space Race Targets Greenhouse Gas Emitters

Cheaper, smaller satellites could help more precisely sniff out sources of methane — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Chrome update lets people get around paywalls with new incognito mode

Publishers have previously been alerted when people use the private browsing mode

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Private Space Race Targets Greenhouse Gas Emitters

Cheaper, smaller satellites could help more precisely sniff out sources of methane — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Moving to a New Home While Pregnant Could Raise Risk of Preterm Birth

In some cases, moving during pregnancy may increase the risk of preterm birth, a new study suggests.

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Birds can thank attractive dinosaurs for their flight feathers

Birds' feathers are so complicated that it was a mystery how they evolved. The answer might be a rare combination of natural and sexual selection

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Scientists say 10 warmest UK years have all been since 2002

Britain's weather service says the country's 10 hottest years since the 19th century have all occurred since 2002, as climate change makes the U.K. warmer and wetter.

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Environmental racism, the world as it isn’t, and a guided tour of the planets: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02302-3 Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

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Climate Change Can’t Be Left to the Scientists

Amid the fireworks of Tuesday night’s Democratic primary debate, there was a moderately interesting exchange about the inherently political task of dealing with climate change. It happened among the not-so-Killer B’s: the moderates Steve Bullock, Beto O’Rourke, and Pete Buttigieg. Bullock, the governor of Montana, began by addressing Senator Bernie Sanders, asking, “Are we going to actually addre

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What Chekhov Has to Tell Us About Capital Punishment

The Anton Chekhov short story “The Bet” opens with a morbid dinner conversation. The guests debate which is worse—to rot in prison forever, or to be killed swiftly? The attorney general, Bill Barr, weighed in last week on the side of Chekhov’s banker, a rich man who favors capital punishment. (Barr announced that the federal government will resume killing those convicted of capital offenses, a pr

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Can Anyone Stop Trump’s Border Wall?

On Friday, when the Supreme Court temporarily allowed the Trump administration to begin construction of his border wall using up to $2.5 billion in military funds that Congress had denied, President Donald Trump declared a “big victory.” But last week’s order is far from a final ruling. The Supreme Court has not yet decided the ultimate outcome of the case, and no court has given Trump’s abuse of

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The Supreme Court Is Bad for Your Health

Did Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts kill almost 16,000 people? That is one way, if a hyperbolic one, to read a new study on federalism and Medicaid. Economists looked at the long aftermath of the Court’s 2012 decision to allow states to opt out of the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion. They found that opt-in states experienced a 9.3 percent reduction in the mortality rate among ne

8h

En tredjedel af virksomheder har stadig Windows XP-maskiner på netværket

Selv om udvidet support for Windows XP sluttede i 2014, har 32 procent af virksomheder stadig aktive Windows XP-maskiner på deres netværk, viser en undersøgelse.

8h

Having Broadband Issues? This Tool Helps You Learn Local Laws

Washington disputes get the headlines, but much US telecom policy is determined by states and cities. A nonprofit has catalogued the rules and put them online.

8h

Rules for civil engagement: How to talk with someone unlike yourself

There are a basic set of rules you can use when talking with someone who believes different things than you do, says Jonathan Zimmerman. Statements like, "You're a blankety-blank" close discussions rather than open them. Instead, say, "You know, that's interesting. That's not the way I see it. Tell me more about why you think that." Being more open about your intentions can help, too. Tell the pe

8h

Our planet is in crisis. But until we call it a crisis, no one will listen | Caleb Redlener, Charlotte Jenkins and Irwin Redlener

We study disaster preparedness, and ‘climate change’ is far too mild to describe the existential threat we face When Senator Kamala Harris was asked about climate change during the Democratic debate in June, she did not mince words. “I don’t even call it climate change,” she said. “It’s a climate crisis.” She’s right – and we, at Columbia University’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness, wi

8h

Machine vision can spot unknown links between classic artworks

A new algorithm reveals a web of artistic connections by looking for humans posed similarly in different paintings.

9h

Amazonas palmer visar hur tropikerna formats

Västra Amazonas är en så kallad hotspot för den biologiska mångfalden i världen och är mycket varierat när det gäller geologi, klimat och biologiska funktioner. Palmer (Arecaceae) är en av de mest artrika växtfamiljerna i området med över 150 arter representerade. Dessa arter skiljer sig i utbredning, växtsätt och livsstrategi, och på många sätt bidrar de till en myriad av ekosystemtjänster. – Vå

9h

In Ghana, a Bumper Crop of Opinions on Genetically Modified Cowpea

Proponents say the seeds provide a raft of benefits and will help feed a fast-growing population on a warming planet. But social scientists warn that GM cowpea is being developed without an understanding of local agriculture practices. And safety concerns, however unfounded, remain a significant obstacle.

9h

There may be just 19 endangered vaquita porpoises left in the world

The vaquita, a small porpoise and the most endangered marine mammal, has long been threatened by fishing nets. A new study says there are just 19 animals left

9h

Genomic mechanisms for the evolution of flightlessness in steamer ducks

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02234-y The ability to fly has been lost in many groups of birds. A comparison of the wing structures and genomes of flighted and non-flighted species of steamer duck highlights a possible mechanism for the loss of flight.

9h

How a revolutionary technique got people with spinal-cord injuries back on their feet

Nature, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02306-z Electrical stimulation has promised huge gains for people with paralysis. Now comes the hard part — getting beyond those first steps.

9h

Glowing cholesterol helps scientists fight heart disease

A newly developed technique that shows artery clogging fat-and-protein complexes in live fish gave investigators from Carnegie, Johns Hopkins University, and the Mayo Clinic a glimpse of how to study heart disease in action. Their research, which is currently being used to find new drugs to fight cardiovascular disease, is now published in Nature Communications.

9h

First pictures of enzyme that drives new class of antibiotics

Researchers have solved the X-ray crystal structure of the enzyme that makes obafluorin — a broad spectrum antibiotic agent made by a fluorescent strain of soil bacteria. This new class of antibiotics might provide a powerful antidote to the growing scourge of antibiotic resistance.

9h

Blood pressure control less likely among those treated in low-income areas

People were half as likely to have their blood pressure controlled in a six-year clinical trial if they received care in low-income areas.Study participants at low-income sites were more likely to die before the end of the research study or die from complications of heart failure.Physicians should consider socioeconomic and other factors in a patient's environment that may influence the effectiven

9h

150 nordmænd evakueret efter jordskred

Kraftig regn i det vestlige Norge har resultereret i jordskred af den sådan kaliber, at 150 indbyggere har måttet evakueres.

9h

Defibrotide enhances fibrinolysis in human endotoxemia – a randomized, double blind, crossover trial in healthy volunteers

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47630-6

9h

InGaP electron spectrometer for high temperature environments

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47531-8

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Detection of dynamic protein complexes through Markov Clustering based on Elephant Herd Optimization Approach

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47468-y

9h

Mobile continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer system for automated measurements of N2 and N2O fluxes in fertilized cropping systems

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47451-7 Mobile continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer system for automated measurements of N 2 and N 2 O fluxes in fertilized cropping systems

9h

An ultra-compact leaky-integrate-and-fire model for building spiking neural networks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47348-5

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Quantitative analysis of nasal transcripts reveals potential biomarkers for Parkinson’s disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47579-6

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Development of social learning and play in BaYaka hunter-gatherers of Congo

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47515-8

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First pictures of enzyme that drives new class of antibiotics

Understanding how antibiotic scaffolds are constructed in nature can help scientists prospect for new classes of antibiotics through DNA sequencing and genome mining. Researchers have used this knowledge to help solve the X-ray crystal structure of the enzyme that makes obafluorin—a broad spectrum antibiotic agent made by a fluorescent strain of soil bacteria. The new work from Washington Universi

9h

First pictures of enzyme that drives new class of antibiotics

Understanding how antibiotic scaffolds are constructed in nature can help scientists prospect for new classes of antibiotics through DNA sequencing and genome mining. Researchers have used this knowledge to help solve the X-ray crystal structure of the enzyme that makes obafluorin—a broad spectrum antibiotic agent made by a fluorescent strain of soil bacteria. The new work from Washington Universi

10h

EPA clears path for proposed copper and gold mine near Alaska's Bristol Bay

Federal officials said Tuesday they would not block a proposed copper and gold mine near Alaska's Bristol Bay despite objections by critics who contend it would imperil a fishery and harm wetlands and streams.

10h

Vaquita porpoise about to go extinct, researchers warn

The vaquita porpoise, one of the world's most endangered animals, could become extinct within a year if fishing nets continue being used illegally, a university in Scotland warned on Wednesday.

10h

Vaquita porpoise about to go extinct, researchers warn

The vaquita porpoise, one of the world's most endangered animals, could become extinct within a year if fishing nets continue being used illegally, a university in Scotland warned on Wednesday.

10h

GRAFIK: Sådan skal dansk bølgeanlæg trække energi ud af bølgerne

Crestwings forsøgsanlæg Tordenskjold har gennemført sine første 5 måneders test og skal inden længe på vandet til endnu en test.

10h

Researchers raise the heat on molten metals to forge future technologies

Solid-state materials are important for developing new technologies, from renewable energy applications to electronics. Manufacturing these advanced materials often requires metal-flux synthesis, a complex process that relies heavily on costly trial-and-error.

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Virksomheder forudsiger kunders adfærd: »Drønfarligt« hvis forbrugerne ikke ved det

Flere virksomheder laver analyser og såkaldte profileringer, der skal spå om kundernes fremtidige adfærd.

11h

Biodiversity highest on Indigenous-managed lands

More than one million plant and animal species worldwide are facing extinction, according to a recent United Nations report. Now, a new UBC-led study suggests that Indigenous-managed lands may play a critical role in helping species survive.

11h

Overturning the truth on conservation tillage

Just as we blend, cut, and fold ingredients together to follow a recipe, farmers use equipment to stir together soil and crop residue (stalks and roots of previous crops) before planting. This mechanical action is called tillage.

11h

Rare photo captures sea lion falling into mouth of whale

In a stunning photo, a wildlife photographer has captured a sea lion falling into the mouth of a humpback whale in what he calls a "once-in-a-lifetime" moment.

11h

Rare photo captures sea lion falling into mouth of whale

In a stunning photo, a wildlife photographer has captured a sea lion falling into the mouth of a humpback whale in what he calls a "once-in-a-lifetime" moment.

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Teslasuit: A full-body VR suit

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

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Jaybird's Vista are a sleeker pair of wireless exercise earbuds

Since we reviewed Jaybird's Run, the company's first truly wireless earbuds, the competition has heated up significantly. So much so that just making the Run fully waterproof …

11h

Jaybird Vista Review: Sporty Earbuds Worth a Listen

Jaybird’s latest sweat-proof fully wireless earbuds feel almost weightless, and hold an impressive charge.

11h

Glimmer of hope as Italy battles 'olive tree leprosy'

Working in an arid Italian field of crumbly soil, agronomists are battling a rampant bacterium that has already infected millions of olive trees and could threaten the entire Mediterranean basin.

11h

An ancient Egypt-to-Black Sea route? Adventurers to test theory

Were the ancient Egyptians able to use reed boats to travel as far as the Black Sea thousands of years ago?

11h

'80s tape, toy dino: Chinatown archaeological dig cut short

An archaeological dig in Boston's historic Chinatown has been cut short after it turned up a 1980s music cassette, a toy dinosaur and other bric-a-brac.

12h

'Love hormone' has stomach-turning effect in starfish

A hormone that is released in our brain when we fall in love also makes starfish turn their stomach inside out to feed, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

12h

'Love hormone' has stomach-turning effect in starfish

A hormone that is released in our brain when we fall in love also makes starfish turn their stomach inside out to feed, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

12h

Warmer winters could lead to longer blue crab season in Chesapeake Bay

Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are predicting that warmer winters in the Chesapeake Bay will likely lead to longer and more productive seasons for Maryland's favorite summer crustacean, the blue crab.

12h

Warmer winters could lead to longer blue crab season in Chesapeake Bay

Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are predicting that warmer winters in the Chesapeake Bay will likely lead to longer and more productive seasons for Maryland's favorite summer crustacean, the blue crab.

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13h

A Tectonic Plate Under Oregon Is Being Slowly Ripped Apart

It could be linked to unusual volcanic patterns in the region.

13h

Prosecuting Syrian War-Crimes Suspects From Berlin

BERLIN—Among the Syrians living here in the German capital, Anwar Raslan had long been notorious. Soon he may be known farther afield—not just as the first senior Syrian official to be held accountable for acts carried out during that country’s conflict, but perhaps more importantly as the defendant in a case that changed the way the world prosecutes war crimes. In Damascus, Raslan had been a col

13h

UK Lyme disease cases may be three times higher than estimated

Researchers say tick-borne disease ‘is everywhere’ with 8,000 diagnoses likely in 2019 Cases of Lyme disease in the UK may be three times higher than previous estimates, according to new research. After analysing the anonymous medical records of 8.4 million people from across the UK, scientists forecast that the total number of Lyme disease diagnoses in the UK could top 8,000 in 2019, compared wi

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28-årige Sara fik en kronisk psykisk sygdom: 'Jeg behøver ikke være mærket resten af mit liv'

Sara Agerbo troede, hendes drømme var knust, da hun blev diagnosticeret med borderline og angst.

14h

Biodiversity highest on Indigenous-managed lands

More than one million plant and animal species worldwide are facing extinction, according to a recent United Nations report. Now, a new UBC-led study suggests that Indigenous-managed lands may play a critical role in helping species survive.

14h

Warmer winters could lead to longer blue crab season in Chesapeake Bay

Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are predicting that warmer winters in the Chesapeake Bay will likely lead to longer and more productive seasons for Maryland's favorite summer crustacean, the blue crab.

14h

Overturning the truth on conservation tillage

Conservation tillage does not lower yield in modern cropping systems.

14h

Early onset of menstruation associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes

Diabetes is a global health concern expected to affect 693 million people worldwide by 2045. It's been well documented how diet and exercise influence risk of type 2 diabetes; however, a new study suggests that early menarche also is associated with a higher risk, but body mass index (BMI) may mediate this association. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North

14h

Many North American indigenous youth experience symptoms of depression during adolescence

A new study that analyzed data on the development of depressive symptoms among Indigenous youth in the United States and Canada found that many of the youth had experienced these symptoms during adolescence. The study also identified the risks associated with developing symptoms of depression and how depressive symptoms were associated with alcohol use disorder.

14h

Study: Children born to older parents tend to have fewer behavior problems

A new Dutch study considered the behavior problems of children born to older parents. Specifically, researchers looked at externalizing behaviors (e.g., aggression) and internalizing behaviors (e.g., anxiety, depression) of children born to older parents when the youth were 10 to 12 years old. They found that children of older parents tend to have fewer externalizing behavior problems than childre

14h

Samsung profit slumps more than half as chip market weakens

The world's biggest smartphone and memory chip maker Samsung Electronics on Wednesday reported second-quarter net profits slumping by more than half in the face of a weakening chip market, and …

14h

22 møller kollapset: Først fire år efter første uheld advares mølle-ejere

Efter fire år og 22 tilfælde af nedfaldne vinger, fejl på interne dele og knækkede mølletårne blev ejere af en bestemt husstandsvindmøllemodel orienteret om, at der kunne være sikkerhedsmæssige problemer med deres vindmøller.

14h

Democratic Debate Turns Ferocious Over Health Care

The candidates sparred angrily over whether to wipe out private health insurance and institute a government-run health system.

15h

The Millennium Falcon look-alike that terrorized the ancient seas

Nature, Published online: 30 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02317-w A predator that loomed large in its day had a domed hull like that of the Star Wars spaceship.

16h

Antibiotika kan dæmpe lymfekræft i huden

Ny forskning fra LEO Foundation Skin Immunology Research Center ved Københavns Universitet og samarbejdspartnere…

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Warren and Buttigieg Beg Democrats Not to Fear Republicans

Democrats need to win the presidency and the Senate to have a chance of enacting any of the ambitious health-care plans they’ve proposed in the presidential primary so far, including Medicare for All. But if tonight’s debate made anything clear, it’s that they first have to get Republicans out of their head—and out of their fight. Ten of the party’s White House contenders spent the initial chunk

16h

John Delaney Had One Good Point on Medicare for All

In the middle of a vigorous argument over Medicare for All during the Democratic debate tonight, former Representative John Delaney pointed out the reason he doesn’t support moving all Americans onto Medicare: It generally pays doctors and hospitals less than private-insurance companies do. Because of that, some have predicted that if private insurance ends, and Medicare for All becomes the law o

16h

Elizabeth Warren’s Big Night

Updated on July 30 at 10:48 p.m. ET Senator Bernie Sanders often positions himself as the political heir of Franklin D. Roosevelt, but tonight in Detroit, Senator Elizabeth Warren was the candidate who borrowed the 32nd president’s dictum that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. Anxiety stalks the Democratic Party. From the grass roots to the candidates, the party is haunted by the spe

16h

Democrats Make the Case That They’re the Moral Party

This story will be updated as the debate continues. The great irony of Donald Trump’s presidency is the dizzying contradiction between his personal conduct and his policies , and his claim to be the defender of American values . Onstage at the first part of the second Democratic presidential primary debates tonight, Trump’s potential 2020 opponents moved aggressively to take morality back for the

16h

A rare, deadly virus is circulating in Florida—and this is just the beginning

Our changing climate makes environments more accommodating for people-biting mosquitoes. (Pablo Cabrera/CDC/) A mosquito-borne virus called the Eastern equine encephalitis virus is circulating in Orange County, Florida, health officials warned this week. The virus was identified in a group of chickens researchers use to monitor levels of mosquito-borne diseases in the area. Eastern equine encepha

16h

Bye Aerospace tests eFlyer 2 prototype with 90 kW Siemens motor

submitted by /u/davidwholt [link] [comments]

16h

The Next Wave of Extremists Will Be Green (2017)

submitted by /u/RoughTourist [link] [comments]

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Our Boring Tunnel Future – Part 1

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Human-animal hybrids to be developed in Japan

submitted by /u/jkon731 [link] [comments]

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DOE Announced $14m for Fusion Energy Sciences Research

submitted by /u/eutsgueden [link] [comments]

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Climate change: UK's 10 warmest years all occurred since 2002

The patterns of warm and cold years in Britain are a clear signal of climate change, say scientists.

17h

Can scientists find the formula for 'better aging?'

New research studies aging cells to find out how they change, and how this leads to further health decline. Its findings may help promote 'better aging.'

17h

What to know about the ‘extremely unusual’ Capital One hack

Wikipedia The hack included around 140,000 social security numbers. (From: Wikipedia ) (Wikimedia Commons/) Between major breaches like ones from Equifax and Marriott , you could be forgiven for having data-theft fatigue. It's that world-weary feeling of knowing that once again, the personal information of millions has been compromised. But the news about one how one hacker managed to nab informa

17h

Parrots Are Making the U.S. Home

Released or escaped parrots are now living in most states and are breeding in at least 21. For some, it’s a second chance at survival.

17h

Tesla Just Announced a Giant New Battery System to Store Renewable Energy

Fossil fuel advocates are running out of excuses.

18h

Reconciling a scientific standoff in colon cancer research

When two studies attempting to identify new colon cancer treatment methods found different results, a researcher at the University of Arizona Cancer Center was asked to help settle the uncertainty.

18h

Are repeat low-level stresses to blame for ACL tears?

ACL tears may be the result of the cumulative effect of less-severe, repeated stresses, rather than one instant of giving the joint more than it can handle, researchers report. Tears of the knee’s anterior cruciate ligament, a serious injury for athletes, may not just be the result of one instant of giving the joint more than it can handle, but rather the cumulative effect of less-severe, repeate

18h

A Swiss Army Knife for Your Mind

If you practice what you read in this article, your life will improve — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Tickle' therapy could help slow aging, research suggests

'Tickling' the ear with a small electrical current appears to rebalance the autonomic nervous system for over-55s, potentially slowing down one of the effects of ageing, according to new research.

18h

'Love hormone' has stomach-turning effect in starfish

A hormone that is released in our brain when we fall in love also makes starfish turn their stomach inside out to feed, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

18h

‘Millennium Falcon’ predator soared across ocean floor at dawn of animal life

Fossils show large predator prowled Cambrian sediments 500 million years ago

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Big flocks don’t always signal waterbird hotspots

Deciding if areas are waterbird hotspots or ripe for new condos isn’t as cut and dried as you might think, a new study shows. Imagine your favorite beach filled with thousands of ducks and gulls. Now envision coming back a week later and finding workers constructing townhouses on that spot. This many ducks in one place surely should indicate it’s exceptionally good for birds and deserves protecti

19h

Prehistoric Ocean Predator Resembles a Large and Vicious Horseshoe Crab

“Prey would have been sucked into the circular mouth and shredded by the multiple rows of large teeth”

19h

A Millennium Falcon from back in the Cambrian

Half-billion-year-old marine predator found in the famous Burgess Shale. Dyani Lewis reports.

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There may be just 19 of the world's most endangered mammal left

The vaquita, a small porpoise and the most endangered marine mammal, has long been threatened by fishing nets. A new study says there are just 19 animals left

19h

Cambroraster: Ancient Predator Looked Like Millennium Falcon

Artist rendering of Cambroraster, a predator from half a billion years ago. (Credit: Lars Fields © Royal Ontario Museum) Half a billion years ago, Cambroraster falcatus was a bizarre predator of the Cambrian seas. As it moved through the water, enormous mouth and rake-like claws at the ready for its next meal, it cast a shadow on the seafloor reminiscent of the most famous bucket of bolts in the e

19h

Looking to Have a Lucid Dream? There's a Pill for That

(Credit: Jakub Grygier/Shutterstock) It’s possible to choose between being the captain or the co-pilot of your dreams. Lucid dreaming is a phenomenon that sees people taking control of the narrative of their dreams, often with thrilling results. Always wanted to fly? You can lift right off. Hungry for a giant cheeseburger? Dive right in. Practitioners say that the technique requires discipline and

19h

New phase in block copolymers discovered

All matter consists of one or more phases — regions of space with uniform structure and physical properties. The common phases of H2O (solid, liquid and gas), also known as ice, water and steam, are well known. Similarly, though less familiar, perhaps, polymeric materials also can form different solid or liquid phases that determine their properties and ultimate utility. This is especially true o

19h

Parrots Are Making the U.S. Home

Released or escaped parrots are now living in most states and are breeding in at least 21. For some, it’s a second chance at survival. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Increased risk of cardiovascular disease for healthy 75-year-olds who stop taking statins

A nationwide study of 120,173 people in France, who were aged 75 between 2012 and 2014 and had been taking statins continuously for two years, has found those who stopped taking their statins had a 33% increased risk of being admitted to hospital with heart or blood vessel problems during an average follow-up period of 2.4 years. The study is published in the European Heart Journal.

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A voracious Cambrian predator, Cambroraster, is a new species from the Burgess Shale

Palaeontologists at the Royal Ontario Museum and University of Toronto have uncovered fossils of a large new predatory species in half-a-billion-year-old rocks from Kootenay National Park in the Canadian Rockies. This new species has rake-like claws and a pineapple-slice-shaped mouth at the front of an enormous head, and it sheds light on the diversity of the earliest relatives of insects, crabs,

19h

The buffering capacity of the brain and optic nerve against spaceflight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome [Letters (Online Only)]

We read with great interest and enthusiasm the article by Van Ombergen et al. (1) published in PNAS. We would like to congratulate the authors for doing this prospective study with findings of great importance to the field of space health research, and we appreciate the opportunity to make a…

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Reply to Wostyn et al.: Investigating the spaceflight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome and the human brain in lockstep [Letters (Online Only)]

We thank Wostyn et al. (1) for their positive and insightful comments with respect to the association of the symptoms of the spaceflight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome (SANS) and our region-of-interest analysis of the brain’s ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system after long-duration spaceflight (2). We would like to expand upon some points…

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Structural basis for GPCR-independent activation of heterotrimeric Gi proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Heterotrimeric G proteins are key molecular switches that control cell behavior. The canonical activation of G proteins by agonist-occupied G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has recently been elucidated from the structural perspective. In contrast, the structural basis for GPCR-independent G protein activation by a novel family of guanine-nucleotide exchange modulators (GEMs)…

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Functional selection of protease inhibitory antibodies [Applied Biological Sciences]

Critical for diverse biological processes, proteases represent one of the largest families of pharmaceutical targets. To inhibit pathogenic proteases with desired selectivity, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) hold great promise as research tools and therapeutic agents. However, identification of mAbs with inhibitory functions is challenging because current antibody discovery methods rely on…

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UvrD helicase activation by MutL involves rotation of its 2B subdomain [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Escherichia coli UvrD is a superfamily 1 helicase/translocase that functions in DNA repair, replication, and recombination. Although a UvrD monomer can translocate along single-stranded DNA, self-assembly or interaction with an accessory protein is needed to activate its helicase activity in vitro. Our previous studies have shown that an Escherichia coli…

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Histone acetylation recruits the SWR1 complex to regulate active DNA demethylation in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

Active DNA demethylation is critical for controlling the DNA methylomes in plants and mammals. However, little is known about how DNA demethylases are recruited to target loci, and the involvement of chromatin marks in this process. Here, we identify 2 components of the SWR1 chromatin-remodeling complex, PIE1 and ARP6, as…

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Two PKA RI{alpha} holoenzyme states define ATP as an isoform-specific orthosteric inhibitor that competes with the allosteric activator, cAMP [Biochemistry]

Protein kinase A (PKA) holoenzyme, comprised of a cAMP-binding regulatory (R)-subunit dimer and 2 catalytic (C)-subunits, is the master switch for cAMP-mediated signaling. Of the 4 R-subunits (RIα, RIβ, RIIα, RIIβ), RIα is most essential for regulating PKA activity in cells. Our 2 RIα2C2 holoenzyme states, which show different conformations…

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Effects of the peer metagenomic environment on smoking behavior [Social Sciences]

Recent scholarship suggests that the genomes of those around us affect our own phenotypes. Much of the empirical evidence for such “metagenomic” effects comes from animal studies, where the socio-genetic environment can be easily manipulated. Among humans, it is more difficult to identify such effects given the nonrandom distribution of…

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Personal infidelity and professional conduct in 4 settings [Economic Sciences]

We study the connection between personal and professional behavior by introducing usage of a marital infidelity website as a measure of personal conduct. Police officers and financial advisors who use the infidelity website are significantly more likely to engage in professional misconduct. Results are similar for US Securities and Exchange…

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STAT6 induces expression of Gas6 in macrophages to clear apoptotic neutrophils and resolve inflammation [Medical Sciences]

Efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils (PMNs) by alveolar macrophages (AMФs) is vital for resolution of inflammation and tissue injury. Here, we investigated the role of AMФ polarization and expression of the efferocytic ligand Gas6 in restoring homeostasis. In the murine model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI), we observed augmented…

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How Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus stably transforms peripheral B cells towards lymphomagenesis [Medical Sciences]

Primary effusion lymphomas (PELs) are causally associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and 86% of PELs are coinfected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). Understanding how PELs develop has been impaired by the difficulty of infecting B cells with KSHV in vitro, and the inability of KSHV to transform them. We show…

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Anomalous relaxation and the high-temperature structure factor of XXZ spin chains [Physics]

We compute the spin-structure factor of XXZ spin chains in the Heisenberg and gapped (Ising) regimes in the high-temperature limit for nonzero magnetization, within the framework of generalized hydrodynamics, including diffusive corrections. The structure factor shows a hierarchy of timescales in the gapped phase, owing to s-spin magnon bound states…

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Increasing crop heterogeneity enhances multitrophic diversity across agricultural regions [Ecology]

Agricultural landscape homogenization has detrimental effects on biodiversity and key ecosystem services. Increasing agricultural landscape heterogeneity by increasing seminatural cover can help to mitigate biodiversity loss. However, the amount of seminatural cover is generally low and difficult to increase in many intensively managed agricultural landscapes. We hypothesized that increasing the..

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High-speed AFM reveals subsecond dynamics of cardiac thin filaments upon Ca2+ activation and heavy meromyosin binding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) can be used to study dynamic processes with real-time imaging of molecules within 1- to 5-nm spatial resolution. In the current study, we evaluated the 3-state model of activation of cardiac thin filaments (cTFs) isolated as a complex and deposited on a mica-supported lipid bilayer….

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A selective membrane-targeting repurposed antibiotic with activity against persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [Microbiology]

Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections is complicated by the development of antibiotic tolerance, a consequence of the ability of S. aureus to enter into a nongrowing, dormant state in which the organisms are referred to as persisters. We report that the clinically approved anthelmintic agent bithionol kills methicillin-resistant S. aureus…

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Dissecting macroecological and macroevolutionary patterns of forest biodiversity across the Hawaiian archipelago [Ecology]

Biodiversity patterns emerge as a consequence of evolutionary and ecological processes. Their relative importance is frequently tested on model ecosystems such as oceanic islands that vary in both. However, the coarse-scale data typically used in biogeographic studies have limited inferential power to separate the effects of historical biogeographic factors (e.g.,…

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Aging of spermatogonial stem cells by Jnk-mediated glycolysis activation [Cell Biology]

Because spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are immortal by serial transplantation, SSC aging in intact testes is considered to be caused by a deteriorated microenvironment. Here, we report a cell-intrinsic mode of SSC aging by glycolysis activation. Using cultured SSCs, we found that aged SSCs proliferated more actively than young SSCs…

19h

In vitro 0N4R tau fibrils contain a monomorphic {beta}-sheet core enclosed by dynamically heterogeneous fuzzy coat segments [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Misfolding of the microtubule-binding protein tau into filamentous aggregates is characteristic of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. Determining the structures and dynamics of these tau fibrils is important for designing inhibitors against tau aggregation. Tau fibrils obtained from patient brains have been found by…

19h

Energy conversion via metal nanolayers [Chemistry]

Current approaches for electric power generation from nanoscale conducting or semiconducting layers in contact with moving aqueous droplets are promising as they show efficiencies of around 30%, yet even the most successful ones pose challenges regarding fabrication and scaling. Here, we report stable, all-inorganic single-element structures synthesized in a single…

19h

Ethnic networks can foster the economic integration of refugees [Political Sciences]

There is widespread concern in Europe and other refugee-receiving continents that living in an enclave of coethnics hinders refugees’ economic and social integration. Several European governments have adopted policies to geographically disperse refugees. While many theoretical arguments and descriptive studies analyze the impact of spatially concentrated ethnic networks on immigrant…

19h

Selective incorporation of proteinaceous over nonproteinaceous cationic amino acids in model prebiotic oligomerization reactions [Biochemistry]

Numerous long-standing questions in origins-of-life research center on the history of biopolymers. For example, how and why did nature select the polypeptide backbone and proteinaceous side chains? Depsipeptides, containing both ester and amide linkages, have been proposed as ancestors of polypeptides. In this paper, we investigate cationic depsipeptides that form…

19h

The overlooked significance of plasma volume for successful adaptation to high altitude in Sherpa and Andean natives [Physiology]

In contrast to Andean natives, high-altitude Tibetans present with a lower hemoglobin concentration that correlates with reproductive success and exercise capacity. Decades of physiological and genomic research have assumed that the lower hemoglobin concentration in Himalayan natives results from a blunted erythropoietic response to hypoxia (i.e., no increase in total…

19h

A thylakoid membrane-bound and redox-active rubredoxin (RBD1) functions in de novo assembly and repair of photosystem II [Plant Biology]

Photosystem II (PSII) undergoes frequent photooxidative damage that, if not repaired, impairs photosynthetic activity and growth. How photosynthetic organisms protect vulnerable PSII intermediate complexes during de novo assembly and repair remains poorly understood. Here, we report the genetic and biochemical characterization of chloroplast-located rubredoxin 1 (RBD1), a PSII assembly factor…

19h

Profile of Rodolphe Barrangou [Profiles]

CRISPR, the Instapot of genome editing tools, has its origins in a bacterial immune system that recognizes and slices the genetic material of invading phages. Rodolphe Barrangou, a professor of food science at North Carolina State University, demonstrated the original function of the characteristic repeating genetic sequences long before it…

19h

Radiokrypton unveils dual moisture sources of a deep desert aquifer [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

In arid regions, groundwater is a vital resource that can also provide a long-term record of the regional water cycle. However, the use of groundwater as a paleoclimate proxy has been limited by the complex hydrology and the lack of appropriate chronometers to determine the recharge time without complication. Applying…

19h

QnAs with David Reich [QnAs]

Harvard Medical School geneticist David Reich feels lucky to have found paleogenetics, a field that combines his love of history with his love of science. Reich plumbs data, collected by transcribing ancient DNA, to learn about human history, including migration patterns, social structures, health, and disease. Paleogenetics has exploded in…

19h

Parvalbumin interneuron in the ventral hippocampus functions as a discriminator in social memory [Neuroscience]

The ability to identify strange conspecifics in societies is supported by social memory, which is vital for gregarious animals and humans. The function of hippocampal principal neurons in social memory has been extensively investigated; however, the nonprincipal neuronal mechanism underlying social memory remains unclear. Here, we first observed parallel changes…

19h

Enhancing humoral immunity via sustained-release implantable microneedle patch vaccination [Immunology and Inflammation]

Sustained exposure of lymphoid tissues to vaccine antigens promotes humoral immunity, but traditional bolus immunizations lead to rapid antigen clearance. We describe a technology to tailor vaccine kinetics in a needle-free platform translatable to human immunization. Solid pyramidal microneedle (MN) arrays were fabricated with silk fibroin protein tips encapsulating a…

19h

Universal amplification-free molecular diagnostics by billion-fold hierarchical nanofluidic concentration [Engineering]

Rapid and reliable detection of ultralow-abundance nucleic acids and proteins in complex biological media may greatly advance clinical diagnostics and biotechnology development. Currently, nucleic acid tests rely on enzymatic processes for target amplification (e.g., PCR), which have many inherent issues restricting their implementation in diagnostics. On the other hand, there…

19h

Power quality and modern energy for all [Sustainability Science]

“Modern energy for all,” an internationally supported initiative to connect populations to electricity services, is expected to help reduce poverty-induced vulnerabilities. It has become a primary strategy for meeting sustainable development goals, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. However, when electricity is supplied by a capacity-constrained grid to a resource-constrained population, the…

19h

Dynamic colocalization of 2 simultaneously active VSG expression sites within a single expression-site body in Trypanosoma brucei [Microbiology]

Monoallelic exclusion ensures that the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei exclusively expresses only 1 of thousands of different variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat genes. The active VSG is transcribed from 1 of 15 polycistronic bloodstream-form VSG expression sites (ESs), which are controlled in a mutually exclusive fashion. Unusually, T. brucei uses…

19h

Parochialism, social norms, and discrimination against immigrants [Political Sciences]

Ingroup bias and outgroup prejudice are pervasive features of human behavior, motivating various forms of discrimination and conflict. In an era of increased cross-border migration, these tendencies exacerbate intergroup conflict between native populations and immigrant groups, raising the question of how conflict can be overcome. We address this question through…

19h

African biomass burning is a substantial source of phosphorus deposition to the Amazon, Tropical Atlantic Ocean, and Southern Ocean [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The deposition of phosphorus (P) from African dust is believed to play an important role in bolstering primary productivity in the Amazon Basin and Tropical Atlantic Ocean (TAO), leading to sequestration of carbon dioxide. However, there are few measurements of African dust in South America that can robustly test this…

19h

QnAs with Elizabeth Ainsworth [QnAs]

The atmosphere of today will be increasingly different in the coming decades as it continues to respond to human influences. Elizabeth Ainsworth, of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS), recently received the 2019 National Academy of Sciences Prize in Food and Agriculture Sciences for her efforts…

19h

Reappraising academic and social adversity improves middle school students’ academic achievement, behavior, and well-being [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

The period of early adolescence is characterized by dramatic changes, simultaneously affecting physiological, psychological, social, and cognitive development. The physical transition from elementary to middle school can exacerbate the stress and adversity experienced during this critical life stage. Middle school students often struggle to find social and emotional support, and…

19h

Infants expect leaders to right wrongs [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Anthropological and psychological research on direct third-party punishment suggests that adults expect the leaders of social groups to intervene in within-group transgressions. Here, we explored the developmental roots of this expectation. In violation-of-expectation experiments, we asked whether 17-mo-old infants (n = 120) would expect a leader to intervene when observing…

19h

Pore-pressure diffusion, enhanced by poroelastic stresses, controls induced seismicity in Oklahoma [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Induced seismicity linked to geothermal resource exploitation, hydraulic fracturing, and wastewater disposal is evolving into a global issue because of the increasing energy demand. Moderate to large induced earthquakes, causing widespread hazards, are often related to fluid injection into deep permeable formations that are hydraulically connected to the underlying crystalline…

19h

Catalyst turns CO2 into green fuel ingredient

A new technology efficiently converts CO 2 and hydrogen directly into methanol, researchers report. The global economy still relies on the fossil carbon sources of petroleum, natural gas, and coal, not just to produce fuel, but also as a raw material the chemical industry uses to manufacture plastics and countless other chemical compounds. Although efforts have been made for some time to find way

19h

A voracious Cambrian predator, Cambroraster, is a new species from the Burgess Shale

Palaeontologists at the Royal Ontario Museum and University of Toronto have uncovered fossils of a large new predatory species in half-a-billion-year-old rocks from Kootenay National Park in the Canadian Rockies. This new species has rake-like claws and a pineapple-slice-shaped mouth at the front of an enormous head, and it sheds light on the diversity of the earliest relatives of insects, crabs,

19h

Lyme disease may be more common in the UK than we thought

An analysis of Lyme disease cases in the UK suggests that the infection may be three times more common than the current estimates

19h

Host your own science film festival

The full SCINEMA 2019 program is just waiting to be shown.

19h

Food quality control made faster and easier

Scientists have developed a new methodology for the simultaneous analysis of odorants and tastants. It could simplify and accelerate the quality control of food in the future.

19h

This newfound predator may have terrorized the Cambrian seafloor

A newly discovered spaceship-shaped predator raked through the Cambrian seafloor in search of food.

19h

Marital infidelity and professional misconduct linked, study shows

People who cheat on their spouses are significantly more likely to engage in misconduct in the workplace, according to a new study.

20h

Antioxidant compound from soybeans may prevent marijuana-induced blood vessel damage

Marijuana exposure damages cells of the inner lining of blood vessels throughout the heart and vascular system. In studies with human cells and arteries from mice, a compound found in soybeans blocked the damage and may have potential in preventing cardiovascular side effects of marijuana use.

20h

Soft wearable health monitor uses stretchable electronics

A wireless, wearable monitor built with stretchable electronics could allow comfortable, long-term health monitoring of adults, babies and small children without concern for skin injury or allergic reactions caused by conventional adhesive sensors with conductive gels.

20h

West Coast forest landowners will plant less Douglas-fir in warming climate, model shows

West Coast forest landowners are expected to adapt to climate change by gradually switching from Douglas-fir to other types of trees such as hardwoods and ponderosa pine.

20h

Brand-brand competition is unlikely to reduce list prices of medicines

Greater brand-brand competition alone will likely not lower list prices of brand-name drugs in the US, according to a new study.

20h

To conserve water, Indian farmers fire up air pollution

A measure to conserve groundwater in northwestern India has led to unexpected consequences: added air pollution in an area already beset by haze and smog.

20h

Virtual reality to solve minor personal problems

A new study shows that conversation with oneself embodied as Dr. Sigmund Freud works better to improve people's mood, compared to just talking about your problems in a virtual conversation with pre-scripted comments. Researchers claimed that the method could be used by clinicians to help people dealing with minor personal problems.

20h

Sexual competition helps horned beetles survive deforestation

A study of how dung beetles survive deforestation in Borneo suggests that species with more competition among males for matings are less likely to go extinct, according to new research.

20h

Fly antimicrobial defense system doubles as tumor-killer

An antimicrobial agent called Defensin kills tumour cells and shrinks tumour size in fruit flies, with help from a pathway that flags the cells for destruction.

20h

Ethiopia plants 350 million trees in one day, breaking record

Ethiopians planted 353,633,660 seedlings on Monday, likely breaking a world record for the most trees ever planted in a single day. Ethiopia has suffered rapid deforestation over the past half-century. On a broader scale, reforestation might be one of the most effective ways to curb climate change. None Ethiopia planted more than 353 million indigineous trees in 12 hours as part of a nationwide r

20h

Beds, floors, and football: the most dangerous products for kids in three charts

Swings are risky, but no riskier than football. (Pexels/) Beds are supposed to keep you safe and warm, but they’re the leading cause of traumatic brain injury for kids under the age of one. Maybe that’s not surprising—most babies spend a lot of time in their cribs. But if we want to keep kids safe (and we do), it’s important to know exactly what products are most likely to harm them. Enter: the N

20h

UK tick-borne Lyme disease cases may be 3 times higher than previous estimates

New cases of tick-borne Lyme disease in the UK may be three times higher than previous estimates suggest, and might top 8,000 in 2019, based on these figures, concludes research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

20h

House move during early pregnancy linked to heightened premature birth risk

Moving house during the first three months of pregnancy is linked to a heightened risk of premature birth and low birthweight as well as a slightly higher risk of a smaller than expected size baby, finds US research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

20h

Food quality control made faster and easier

Scientists have developed a new methodology for the simultaneous analysis of odorants and tastants. It could simplify and accelerate the quality control of food in the future.

20h

Autonomic nervous system appears to function well regardless of mode of childbirth

'In a low-risk group of babies born full-term, the autonomic nervous system and cortical systems appear to function well regardless of whether infants were exposed to labor prior to birth,' says Sarah B. Mulkey, M.D., Ph.D., the study's lead author.

20h