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nyheder2019juni01

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You can have your plate and eat it too, says Polish inventor

Polish inventor and entrepreneur Jerzy Wysocki catches a brown plate—still warm—as it drops out of a machine and he begins to eat the crunchy, fibrous tableware.

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Forskere finder spor efter 'livets byggesten' fra rummet

Fund styrker teorien om, at livet ikke opstod på Jorden, men rejste hertil med meteoritter.

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Making Sense of Magnetic Navigation

A new book about remarkable feats of migration by animals explores the front lines of research into how they do it.

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Making Sense of Magnetic Navigation

A new book about remarkable feats of migration by animals explores the front lines of research into how they do it.

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North Korea swine flu outbreak puts South on edge

South Korean troops stationed along the world's last Cold War frontier have been put on high alert in the face of a new infiltration threat from the nuclear-armed North—fever-stricken wild boar.

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North Korea swine flu outbreak puts South on edge

South Korean troops stationed along the world's last Cold War frontier have been put on high alert in the face of a new infiltration threat from the nuclear-armed North—fever-stricken wild boar.

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Why Peru's M8 Earthquake Was Damaging, but Not Catastrophic

Not all magnitude 8 earthquakes are created equal. Find out what separates merely devastating from completely catastrophic. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Right at Home with Citizen Science

Explore one of the least scientifically studied places on the planet: your home! Our editors picked these five projects to help you and scientists learn more about indoor air quality, microbes, tap water pipes, and living things lurking in your home! Find more projects you can do at home here. Cheers,The SciStarter Team Never Home Alone: The Wild Life of Our Homes Document the arthropods in and ar

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Former Silicon Valley insider on how technology is "downgrading humans"

submitted by /u/speakhyroglyphically [link] [comments]

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DeepMind's AI Beats Humans At Quake III Arena

submitted by /u/FriendOfOrder [link] [comments]

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D.C. attorney general’s lawsuit against Facebook can proceed, judge rules

Facebook suffered an early defeat in a D.C. court on Friday, after a judge ruled against the social-networking giant's attempts to quash a case brought by the D.C. attorney general challenging …

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Watch This Neglected Nintendo Game Boy Get Lovingly Restored To Its Factory Fresh Form

There is something strangely cathartic about seeing an old piece of hardware that has suffered the fate of time and neglect, get restored to its original glory (or close to it). Maybe on a …

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Martin Parr's Soviet space dog collection – in pictures

“From the first moment I saw a piece of space dog ephemera I was hooked,” says the photographer and avid collector Martin Parr in the foreword to a new book featuring his canine-themed Soviet memorabilia. In the 1950s, before man was sent into space, the USSR dispatched dogs up there (first a stray called Laika – meaning “barker” – then Belka and Strelka), which kickstarted a huge industry in col

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New breast cancer treatment offers hope of longer life to younger women

Combining ribociclib with hormone therapy found to cut risk of death by up to a third Younger women with breast cancer have been given the hope of living longer after what is described as “one of the greatest advances in breast cancer research in recent decades”. Adding ribociclib, a targeted drug that disrupts cancer cells, to standard hormone therapy was found to boost survival among premenopau

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #22

A chronological listing of news articles posted on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, May 26 through Sat, June 1, 2019 Editor's Pick 12 books on how climate change is transforming businesses and the global economy For some businesses and entrepreneurs, climate change isn't just a threat. It's an opportunity . The significant transformations required to meet the c

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Humans and volcanoes caused nearly all of global heating in past 140 years

Emissions from fossil fuels and volcanoes can explain nearly all of the changes in Earth’s surface temperatures over the past 140 years, a new study has found. The research refutes the popular climate denial myth that recent global warming is merely a result of natural cycles. Those arguments have always suffered a key physical flaw, namely that cycles are cyclical. For example, El Niño events, w

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Letters: ‘There’s a Joy in Interacting With the Printed Word’

The Books of College Libraries Are Turning Into Wallpaper University libraries, Dan Cohen wrote last month , are seeing steady, and in many cases precipitous, declines in the use of the books on their shelves. There’s a path to making print live and breathe beyond this wallpaper role. We need to make the stacks beckon users by showcasing their interests. At my home library, we recently held a pub

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When Fingers Changed Fins

A new study offers a surprising look at what happened when fishy fins evolved into arms and legs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What is Life Extension?

submitted by /u/r_longevity [link] [comments]

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Here's how to be more persuasive during a negotiation and get what you need

The art of negotiation can take years to master, and because of the personalities and the objectives involved, no two negotiations are exactly alike. That said, we humans are predictable in some ways, and there are certain techniques that have been proven time and again in negotiations of all kinds to lead to more desirable outcomes. Robert Cialdini, an expert in the psychology of persuasion and

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This Week’s Awesome Stories From Around the Web (Through June 1)

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE DeepMind Can Now Beat Us at Multiplayer Games Too Cade Metz | The New York Times “DeepMind’s project is part of a broad effort to build artificial intelligence that can play enormously complex, three-dimensional video games, including Quake III, Dota 2 and StarCraft II. Many researchers believe that success in the virtual arena will eventually lead to automated systems wit

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Space Photos of the Week: How Stars Get 86’d

Sometimes a host galaxy ejects your drunk friend—and you along with him.

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No, the Gun Culture Won’t Always Win

Too many guns. Too little hope. After each succeeding gun massacre, a dull fatalism grips the American mind. The victims of such massacres are counted in the thousands; the victims of individual murder, of suicide, and of heartrending accident by now are counted in the tens of thousands. Yet action to save lives is vetoed again and again by an implacable minority who see gun ownership as integral

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How to leave the great outdoors exactly how you found it

DIY No, you can't just throw food in the woods. Leave No Trace is comprised of seven principles meant to minimize the unavoidable effects we have on natural places and eliminate the avoidable ones. Over time, even the…

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Frederiksberg Sporveje går sine egne veje

De første frederiksbergske sporvogne var ombyggede omnibusser og kunne kun køre i den ene retning, derefter måtte de vendes i en vendesløjfe eller på en drejeskive. Men denne konstruktion gav mulighed for nogle eftertragtede siddepladser i læ på det åbne øverste dæk.

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Could the Next Big Information Technology Be … DNA?

How DNA is used to store—and generate—information at extreme scales — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why Giant Human-Sized Beavers Died Out 10,000 Years Ago

The now-extinct animals once lived from Florida to Alaska, and weighed as up to 100 kilograms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Deer Get by with a Little Help from Bat Friends

Minnesota white-tailed deer have found an unlikely ally in bats, which eat the biting flies the deer attract — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Meet the Animals That Literally Sleep with One Eye Open

Why dolphins, seals and other animals developed the capacity to sleep with half their brain awake — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Weekend reads: “Banished” data used in a paper; cancer group’s database draws ethical scrutiny; company employees banned as peer reviewers

Before we present this week’s Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured a retraction demand from CrossFit; a “case of good science” … Continue reading Weekend reads: “Banished” data used in a pape

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The YouTuber on a Mission to Save the Classic RPG

English professor Matt Barton is out to draw attention to the bygone favorites of the genre.

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Security News This Week: A Teen Waltzed Into Mar-a-Lago

Google's ad-blocking backlash, a privacy lawsuit against Apple, and more of the week's top security news.

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Understanding through Time

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Monkeys Use Alarm Calls to Tell Predators to Scram

New research shows that primate calls deter predators in the wild — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Zapping Nerves with Ultrasound Could Treat Inflammation

Stimulating nerves in the spleens of mice with ultrasound reduced their inflammatory responses and arthritis symptoms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Could the Next Big Information Technology Be … DNA?

How DNA is used to store—and generate—information at extreme scales — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In Case You Missed It

Top news from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Readers Respond to the February 2019 Issue

Letters to the editor from the February 2019 issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We Can't Count on Missile Defense to Defeat Incoming Nukes

Missiles designed to destroy incoming nuclear warheads fail frequently in tests and could increase global risk of mass destruction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why Giant Human-Sized Beavers Died Out 10,000 Years Ago

The now-extinct animals once lived from Florida to Alaska, and weighed as up to 100 kilograms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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An Intimate Portrait of Asian Elephants, A Case for Math-Driven Physics, and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We Need More Women Working in the Energy Sector

Diversity leads to innovation, which is crucial to fight climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bag Bans Won't Solve the Plastic Pollution Problem

Policies need to address a deeper, more systemic failure of global recycling systems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Online Voting Seems like a Great Idea–Until You Look Closer

Tech experts can’t guarantee it’s safe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Deer Get by with a Little Help from Bat Friends

Minnesota white-tailed deer have found an unlikely ally in bats, which eat the biting flies the deer attract — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rubella Vaccines Succeed; Alcock and Brown Fly across the Atlantic

Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Rise of the First Animals

New fossils and analyses of ancient ocean chemistry reveal the surprisingly deep roots of the Cambrian explosion — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Minorities Breathe More Than Their Share of Polluted Air

Blacks and Hispanics in the U.S. are exposed to more emissions than whites and consume less from the industries responsible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Follow the Water

Solving global water issues will greatly benefit food and energy, too — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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An "Internet of Plants" Could Tell Farmers When Crops Need Watering

A system that transmits radio waves through fruit could help farmers monitor soil moisture — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Meet the Animals That Literally Sleep with One Eye Open

Why dolphins, seals and other animals developed the capacity to sleep with half their brain awake — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Calculus Reveals the Universe—and Can Make a Tuna Melt Sandwich

A new book that can make you love calculus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Virtual Assistants Are Getting Smarter All the Time. Can We Trust Them with Our Data?

Virtual assistants are getting smarter. Let's think about how that will play out — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Yes, Climate Change Is Making Severe Weather Worse

Recent disasters show how climate change is making winter storms, flooding rains and summer heat waves more extreme — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Is Pot Any Good for Treating Pain?

The data are spotty, but there’s still a reasonable case to be made — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Experiment That Will Probe the Deepest Recesses of the Atom

Where do protons and neutrons get their mass and spin? Surprisingly, we don't know. A new facility promises to peek inside these particles to find answers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Care and Keeping of Raccoon Dogs

Earlier this week, a pair of raccoon dogs were reported to be “ terrorising ” a village in the United Kingdom after they escaped from a nearby enclosure. Raccoon dogs, also called tanukis , look like supermodel raccoons with their lanky limbs, slender necks, and soulful eyes. But they’re actually wild canines, most closely related to foxes. The stories that came out of Nottinghamshire—a goat and

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Did the Maya Really Sacrifice Their Ballgame Players?

How did the Maya, Aztec and other Mesoamerican cultures play the ballgame? And did they really sacrifice the game's players?

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Why Does the Moon Keep Flashing Us?

There's something flashing us on the moon, and we don't know what it is. But that might be about to change, thanks to a new telescope.

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UFOs Are Real, But Don't Assume They're Alien Spaceships

Aliens shouldn't be the default explanation for weird stuff in the sky.

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Apple to kill off iTunes as it embraces streaming music with replacement app

Apple appears to be killing off iTunes, bringing an end to one of the most popular apps in history.

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Eve Ensler (author, activist) – No way out but through

"I think in the case of men, the more they are separated from their tenderness, their vulnerability, their hearts, their tears… their questions, the more violent they become." "Language changes everything. It's like saying the word 'vagina'. If you can't say it, you can't see it. If you can't see it, you can't talk about it. If you can't talk about it a lot can happen it to it in the dark witho

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An Illicit Chemical Is Again Jeopardizing the Ozone Layer

An unwelcome spike in emissions from a long-banned chemical has been traced to Chinese factories, raising concerns about the ozone layer's integrity.

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NRG trial suggests total neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer is safe

Results from the first experimental arm using veliparib as part of total neoadjuvant therapy (induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and surgery; TNT) in patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma on the NRG Oncology Phase II clinical trial NRG-GI002 were recently presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting.

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NRG oncology trial of metformin for non-small cell lung cancer

Initial results of NRG-LU001 indicate that, although the diabetes agent metformin was well-tolerated by patients, the agent has not clearly improved progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) for trial participants with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

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Ribociclib plus hormone therapy extends survival for patients with premenopausal advanced hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

Adding the targeted therapy ribociclib to hormone therapy significantly improved overall survival (OS) in premenopausal patients with advanced hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer, according to results of the MONALEESA-7 Phase III clinical trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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A Drug Prolonged Life in Younger Women With Advanced Breast Cancer

Adding a newer medicine to the standard hormonal treatment helped women who had not reached menopause or were still going through it.

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Vast New Reservoir of Water Ice Has Been Found Beneath Mars' North Pole

This could be the largest ice reservoir on the Red Planet.

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The Disturbing Logic of Trump’s Lovefest With Kim Jong Un

The grisly news that the North Korean leader Kim Jong Un allegedly executed his envoy for nuclear talks with the United States didn’t come as a total surprise. Rumors have swirled for weeks that Kim purged his negotiating team over the collapse of his second summit with President Donald Trump in February. North Korean state media published ominous language about “stern judgment” for “traitors” on

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How Art Can Double as Historical Corrective

Alicia Hall Moran moved across the stage at Carnegie Hall’s Stern Auditorium in late March, her mezzo-soprano carrying across the sold-out venue of almost 3,000. Supported by her husband, the MacArthur-winning jazz pianist Jason Moran, and by the Harlem Chamber Players orchestra, she unspooled an original song in dreamlike tones: “You don’t need me to tell you / All the things that one can do / I

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We Just Generated Usable Electricity From Americium For The First Time

One of the most hyped alternatives to rocket fuel.

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What Amazon Might Want With Boost Mobile

Sprint and T-Mobile have agreed to spin off Boost Mobile to win approval of their planned merger. A report says ecommerce giant Amazon is interested.

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Why Net Neutrality Advocates Remain Optimistic

A member of Congress and an FCC commissioner urge supporters to keep up the pressure to restore net neutrality despite opposition in the Senate and White House.

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15 Best Weekend Tech Deals: Laptops, TVs, Games, and More

We picked our favorite tech deals this weekend, and a new Android phone preorder you should consider.

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Vil gøre biologien »ingeniørbar«: Kunstig colibakterie giver plads til at designe nye egenskaber

Forskere har med success skabt en komplet kunstig colibakterie, der lever i bedste velgående med kun 61 codoner i sit DNA. Det er tre færre end stort set alt liv på Jorden. De tre fripladser giver rum til at kode nye funktioner ind i organismen og åbner for uanede muligheder.

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Don’t Expect Trump’s Europe Trip to Go Smoothly

Facing troubles at home, beleaguered presidents often look abroad for a reset. Richard Nixon dashed off to the Middle East to “wage peace” as his presidency wobbled during Watergate. Bill Clinton flew to Russia and northern Europe a couple of weeks after admitting his affair with Monica Lewinsky. President Donald Trump has taken this trusty playbook for deflecting domestic scandal and turned it i

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It’s Time to Reform the Special-Counsel Rules—Again

In the past three years, we have had two special-counsel investigations of alleged misconduct in the executive branch, and neither came to a widely accepted and lauded outcome. Robert Mueller was a formally appointed special counsel in the Russia matter; Jim Comey assumed the functional equivalent of the role in investigating and making a prosecutorial judgment in the case of Hillary Clinton’s em

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The Push to Remove Any Mention of Slavery From Vermont’s Constitution

V ermont’s constitution is the hardest in the nation to amend. But in the coming years, state lawmakers want to alter it for a highly unusual purpose: to get rid of the language that abolished slavery. The effort is part of a broader push on the part of legislators to solidify Vermont’s self-image as a bastion of liberal values and personal freedoms, which has been tested by recent racist inciden

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Why flat-Earth theory and anti-vax conspiracies exist

If you see animals when you look at clouds or see faces in pieces of wood, that's called pareidolia: the phenomenon of making familiar objects from vague stimuli. Humans evolved to be superstitious, and Michio Kaku posits that there is a gene for superstition and magical thinking. Nine times out of 10, your beliefs can be wrong, but one time out of 10 it saved your ancestors' butts, says Kaku. Fl

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Aber råber: 'Pas på, en ørn!', når droner flyver henover dem

Forskere fik sig en overraskelse, da de fløj med droner henover abe-koloni.

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After SpaceX Starlink Launch, a Fear of Satellites That Outnumber All Visible Stars

Images of the Starlink constellation in orbit have rattled astronomers around the world.

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The Shenanigans Behind a Stealthy Apple Keychain Attack

An 18-year-old security researcher made headlines earlier this year with KeySteal, a macOS hack. Now he's showing the world how it worked.

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US preparing antitrust probe of Google: report

The US Department of Justice is preparing an antitrust investigation of Internet titan Google, the Wall Street Journal reported on Friday.

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Endangered condor may have hatched in Zion National Park

There's likely a new baby condor at Zion National Park in southwest Utah.

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Scientists find flaws in plan to lift US wolf protections

Scientists tasked with reviewing government plans to lift protections for gray wolves across most of the U.S. said in a report released Friday that the proposal has numerous factual errors and other problems.

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US preparing antitrust probe of Google: report

The US Department of Justice is preparing an antitrust investigation of Internet titan Google, the Wall Street Journal reported on Friday.

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Endangered condor may have hatched in Zion National Park

There's likely a new baby condor at Zion National Park in southwest Utah.

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Scientists find flaws in plan to lift US wolf protections

Scientists tasked with reviewing government plans to lift protections for gray wolves across most of the U.S. said in a report released Friday that the proposal has numerous factual errors and other problems.

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In Nigeria's Lagos, aquatic weed plagues waterways

Traffic jams on the snarled up roads of Nigeria's megacity of Lagos are legendary, but a growing problem is also clogging up the waterways of Africa's biggest city—water hyacinths.

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'It's ghost slavery': the troubling world of pop holograms

Dead stars from Whitney Houston to Maria Callas are going on tour again. As Miley Cyrus explores the issue in a new Black Mirror, we uncover the greatest identity crisis in music today Miley Cyrus Q&A: ‘My personal experiences helped craft the episode’ In the star-making Disney Channel switcheroo Hannah Montana, Miley Cyrus played a teenage girl who is able to metamorphose from regular eighth gra

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DIY facial recognition is coming and it will change the world as we know it.

https://yro.slashdot.org/story/19/05/29/2323201/diy-facial-recognition-for-porn-is-a-dystopian-disaster This has much wider implications than just porn. Bruce Sterling has toyed with these ideas in his Deep Eddy stories, but we are now about to enter an era that will change everyting that we know. submitted by /u/Chris_in_Lijiang [link] [comments]

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FN-udstilling fokuserer på den teknologiske kamp mod sult

PLUS. Udryddelsen af sult i 2030 kræver ikke bare mad – teknologiske svar på en lang række udfordringer er nødvendige, viser FN’s World Food Programme på udstilling, du kan se på Respond Festival 6.-8. juni.

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June 2019 Interactive Crossword

Try your hand at a sciency brain teaser.

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Contributors

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2019 issue of The Scientist.

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Ten Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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Turkey’s Global Soft-Power Push Is Built on Mosques

The mosque being built in Albania’s capital will be the largest in all the Balkans. Still a few months away from opening, it already dominates a corner of Tirana, overshadowing the neighboring Parliament building from a 105,000-square-foot compound. The building’s walls are clad in pale stone and topped with domes and minarets, which look nothing like any structures that have stood in the area be

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In-situ measurement of 3D protein structure inside living eukaryotic cells

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have successfully determined the high-resolution three-dimensional structure of proteins inside living eukaryotic cells. They combined 'in-cell' nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, a bioreactor system and cutting-edge computational algorithms to determine protein structures in crowded intracellular environments for the first time. The techn

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Microbe Miner: A Profile of Rob Knight

Developing computational tools to analyze the reams of microbial sequencing data his lab generates, the UC San Diego microbiologist is a pioneer of microbiome research.

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How Bacteria "Walk" Across a Surface

Scientists identify the coordinated sequence of pili movements that Pseudomonas aeruginosa use to move.

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Infographic: High Precision Magnetic Tweezers

Microscope-mounted magnets with computerized feedback control allow precision manipulations of intracellular objects.

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Fruit Flies Hide Their Eggs in Plain View

Chemical cues help Drosophila mask their eggs from predators.

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The Hunt for Electrically Active Microbes

A new portable instrument could help to lure useful bugs in from the wild.

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Drug Discovery Techniques Open the Door to RNA-targeted Drugs

New ways to search for druggable RNAs and matching small molecules

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Mouse Diets Affect How Gut Bacteria Interact with T Cells

An experiment delves into how the microbiome shapes immunity.

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New Repository Will Hold the World's Microbial Riches

The Microbiota Vault takes a holistic approach to preserving Earth's microscopic diversity.

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Infographic: Microbial Moves

Bacteria coordinate a pilus's movement based on touch.

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Bovine Inoculations, circa 1870s

Lymph from cattle proved more effective at inducing immunity to smallpox than the older, person-to-person method.

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Intracellular Magnetic Manipulations

Optimized tweezers enable precise 3-D manipulations of a cell's organelles.

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Making Sense of Magnetic Navigation

A new book about remarkable feats of migration by animals explores the front lines of research into how they do it.

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Otto Cordero Studies Bacteria in the Wild

The MIT associate professor wants to understand microbial communities in their ecological context.

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Belief in the Unseen

Science doesn’t require faith, but fostering trust in its practitioners can help the public move past unfounded doubts.

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Quantum Biology May Help Solve Some of Life's Greatest Mysteries

From the remarkable speed of enzyme-catalyzed reactions to the workings of the human brain, numerous biological puzzles are now being explored for evidence of quantum effects.

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Infographic: Quantum Explanations for Biological Phenomena

Weird effects on the scale of subatomic particles may play roles in enzyme catalysis, photosynthesis, and avian magnetoreception.

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Do Commensal Microbes Stoke the Fire of Autoimmunity?

Molecules produced by resident bacteria and their hosts may signal immune cells to attack the body's own tissues.

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Making STEM Education More Welcoming to Underrepresented Minorities

Diversity programs are shifting their focus from just providing academic support to creating a learning environment that is more inclusive of people of different backgrounds.

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Could Tolerating Disease Be Better than Fighting It?

Quieting immune attacks against pathogens and even providing nutrients to the invaders could improve health, according to a new line of research.

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Infographic: Commensal Mimicry in Autoimmune Disease

Antigens originating from the microbiome may trigger an autoimmune response.

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In a Warming Climate, Seaweed's Microbiome May Mediate Disease

Kelp in warm, acidified waters develop blistered frond and the composition of microbial communities could help explain why, a study suggests.

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Browsing Deer Affect How A Forest Sounds

Changes in the auditory environment as a result of herbivory could influence how animals communicate, and may have implications for sound-based monitoring of species.

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Infographic: Immunity Isn't the Body's Only Defense System

Symbiotic bacteria, metabolism, and stress pathways can all help animals tolerate, rather than succumb, to disease.

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Could Manipulating the Microbiome of Artworks Prevent Their Decay?

Treating the microbial community residing on a painting with probiotics may offer a way to stave off biodegradation, a study suggests.

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Why Peru's M8 Earthquake Was Damaging, but Not Catastrophic

Not all magnitude 8 earthquakes are created equal. Find out what separates merely devastating from completely catastrophic. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Smoke from Canadian wildfires now covers millions of square miles — and is visible from a million miles away

As of the morning of May 31, 2019, smoke from Canadian wildfires covered millions of square miles of North America. Yesterday, I published a story featuring satellite views of wildfires burning in northern Alberta: Striking satellite imagery reveals multiple wildfires blazing across northern Alberta Since then, things have gotten worse, with one blaze — the Chuckegg Creek fire — exploding to nearl

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US government preparing potential investigation into Google over its monopoly on competition

Potential case looms after EU fined technology behemoth £7bn in last three years

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TOX and TOX2 transcription factors cooperate with NR4A transcription factors to impose CD8+ T cell exhaustion [Immunology and Inflammation]

T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR T cells) have shown impressive therapeutic efficacy against leukemias and lymphomas. However, they have not been as effective against solid tumors because they become hyporesponsive (“exhausted” or “dysfunctional”) within the tumor microenvironment, with decreased cytokine production and increased expression of several inhibitory surface…

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A major role for noncoding regulatory mutations in the evolution of enzyme activity [Evolution]

The quantitative evolution of protein activity is a common phenomenon, yet we know little about any general mechanistic tendencies that underlie it. For example, an increase (or decrease) in enzyme activity may evolve from changes in protein sequence that alter specific activity, or from changes in gene expression that alter…

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Arabidopsis ABCG28 is required for the apical accumulation of reactive oxygen species in growing pollen tubes [Plant Biology]

Tip-focused accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is tightly associated with pollen tube growth and is thus critical for fertilization. However, it is unclear how tip-growing cells establish such specific ROS localization. Polyamines have been proposed to function in tip growth as precursors of the ROS, hydrogen peroxide. The ABC…

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Hypoxia-induced switch in SNAT2/SLC38A2 regulation generates endocrine resistance in breast cancer [Medical Sciences]

Tumor hypoxia is associated with poor patient outcomes in estrogen receptor-α–positive (ERα+) breast cancer. Hypoxia is known to affect tumor growth by reprogramming metabolism and regulating amino acid (AA) uptake. Here, we show that the glutamine transporter, SNAT2, is the AA transporter most frequently induced by hypoxia in breast cancer,…

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2H/1H variation in microbial lipids is controlled by NADPH metabolism [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The hydrogen-isotopic compositions (2H/1H ratios) of lipids in microbial heterotrophs are known to vary enormously, by at least 40% (400‰) relative. This is particularly surprising, given that most C-bound H in their lipids appear to derive from the growth medium water, rather than from organic substrates, implying that the isotopic…

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Plant-derived coumarins shape the composition of an Arabidopsis synthetic root microbiome [Plant Biology]

The factors that contribute to the composition of the root microbiome and, in turn, affect plant fitness are not well understood. Recent work has highlighted a major contribution of the soil inoculum in determining the composition of the root microbiome. However, plants are known to conditionally exude a diverse array…

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Circuit-specific control of the medial entorhinal inputs to the dentate gyrus by atypical presynaptic NMDARs activated by astrocytes [Neuroscience]

Here, we investigated the properties of presynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (pre-NMDARs) at corticohippocampal excitatory connections between perforant path (PP) afferents and dentate granule cells (GCs), a circuit involved in memory encoding and centrally affected in Alzheimer’s disease and temporal lobe epilepsy. These receptors were previously reported to increase PP release probability.

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Protein phosphatase 2A has an essential role in promoting thymocyte survival during selection [Immunology and Inflammation]

The development of thymocytes to mature T cells in the thymus is tightly controlled by cellular selection, in which only a small fraction of thymocytes equipped with proper quality of TCRs progress to maturation. It is pivotal to protect the survival of the few T cells, which pass the selection….

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Intracellular iron deficiency in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells induces pulmonary arterial hypertension in mice [Physiology]

Iron deficiency augments hypoxic pulmonary arterial pressure in healthy individuals and exacerbates pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in patients, even without anemia. Conversely, iron supplementation has been shown to be beneficial in both settings. The mechanisms underlying the effects of iron availability are not known, due to lack of understanding of…

19h

Possible cooption of a VEGF-driven tubulogenesis program for biomineralization in echinoderms [Evolution]

Biomineralization is the process by which living organisms use minerals to form hard structures that protect and support them. Biomineralization is believed to have evolved rapidly and independently in different phyla utilizing preexisting components. The mechanistic understanding of the regulatory networks that drive biomineralization and their evolution is far from…

19h

Stress transforms lateral habenula reward responses into punishment signals [Neuroscience]

Neuronal activity in the lateral habenula (LHb), a brain region implicated in depression [C. D. Proulx, O. Hikosaka, R. Malinow, Nat. Neurosci. 17, 1146–1152 (2014)], decreases during reward and increases during punishment or reward omission [M. Matsumoto, O. Hikosaka, Nature 447, 1111–1115 (2007)]. While stress is a major risk factor…

19h

LSD1 destabilizes FBXW7 and abrogates FBXW7 functions independent of its demethylase activity [Cell Biology]

FBXW7 acts as a typical tumor suppressor, with loss-of-function alterations in human cancers, by promoting ubiquitylation and degradation of many oncoproteins. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is a well-characterized histone demethylase. Whether LSD1 has demethylase-independent activity remains elusive. Here we report that LSD1 directly binds to FBXW7 to destabilize FBXW7 independent…

19h

Magnetic field-induced intermediate quantum spin liquid with a spinon Fermi surface [Physics]

The Kitaev model with an applied magnetic field in the H∥[111] direction shows two transitions: from a nonabelian gapped quantum spin liquid (QSL) to a gapless QSL at Hc1≃0.2K and a second transition at a higher field Hc2≃0.35K to a gapped partially polarized phase, where K is the strength of…

19h

Apple bumps the App Store cell connection download cap up to 200 MB

Good news: Apple now allows you to download bigger apps over a cellular connection than it used to. Bad news: there’s still a cap, and you still can’t bypass it. As noticed by 9to5Mac, …

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DeepMind Can Now Beat Us at Multiplayer Games, Too

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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To defend against phages, bacteria take ‘naps’

For bacteria, a good, long nap is sometimes the best defense against hostile invaders. In Nature , scientists show that microbes under viral attack turn their defenses not only on their enemies, but also on themselves. This drastic measure, the researchers found, doesn’t kill the bacteria, but rather sends them into a dormant state that prevents the infection from spreading. Among bacteria, virus

20h

LaSalle Leffall Jr., 89, Dies; Cancer Society’s First Black Leader

A prominent surgeon and Howard University professor, he promoted awareness of the risks of cancer, particularly among African-Americans.

20h

How lobbying undercuts climate action

A new study quantifies the effects of political lobbying on the likelihood of climate policy enactment. Disturbingly few domestic climate change policies have been enacted around the world so far, report researchers. That’s despite all the evidence that the benefits of reducing greenhouse gases outweigh the costs of regulation. “There is a striking disconnect between what is needed to avoid dange

20h

NASA Announces Three Private Companies to Land Science Experiments on the Moon

Intuitive Machines is one of three companies announced today that will land NASA science experiments on the moon within the next two years. (Credit: Intuitive Machines) During a NASA press conference Friday, Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of the agency's Science Mission Directorate, introduced the first three of nine companies awarded contracts to deliver payloads to the moon over the n

21h

What Flavor is Your Solar System?

I spend a lot of time on science Twitter. It's a great source of breaking research news (as long as you curate your Twitter feed carefully), but also a fascinating peek into the human psyche. People who love astronomy naturally connect it to the other things that they are passionate about: politics, family, cats, science fiction…and food. Lots and lots of food. It's strange that there aren't any

21h

Rebroadcast: Nature PastCast, May 1985

Nature, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01582-z We delve into the archives to tell the stories behind some of Nature’s biggest papers.

21h

FEMA's most whimsical metric? The Waffle House index.

FEMA employs many metrics to assess the severity of natural disasters, but one of the strangest is the Waffle House index. Because Waffle Houses have incredibly robust disaster management policies, their response to a natural disaster can be used to assess how quickly a community can get back on its feet. If your area is about to be hit by a hurricane or an earthquake, look to the local Waffle Ho

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Nicotine and caffeine withdrawal may lead to unnecessary suffering and testing in intensive care patients

Nicotine and caffeine withdrawal can cause unnecessary suffering to patients in intensive care units (ICUs), and could be leading to unneeded laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging such as X-rays and MRIs, according to a systematic review of clinical and observational studies involving 483 adults.

22h

Wrong side surgical errors substantially underreported and totally preventable

Performing a procedure on the wrong side of a patient's body, although rare, may be more common than generally thought. More than 80 wrong side error (WSE) incidents were reported across 100 hospitals in Spain over the past decade, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress (the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology) in Vienna, Austria (Ju

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Explorers and soldiers don't worry — anesthesia works in Antarctica!

New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress (the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology) in Vienna, Austria (June 1-3) shows that commonly used anesthetic drugs still work, even after exposure to the extreme environmental conditions of the Antarctic.

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Nut of note: 70% of world's macadamia can be traced back to single Australian tree

New research shows a single 19th century tree in southern Queensland gave rise to the world’s dominant plant variety The small Queensland town of Gympie has been identified as the origin of 70% of the world’s macadamia nuts. New research into the fatty seed has revealed the world’s dominant commercial cultivar – grown in Hawaii – originated from a single tree in southern Queensland from the 19th

22h

New MIT-developed glove teaches A.I.-based robots to 'identify' everyday objects

MIT-affiliated researchers develop a hypersensitive glove that can capture the way in which we handle objects. The data captured by the glove can be "learned" by a neural net. Smart tactile interaction will be invaluable when A.I.-based robots start to interact with objects — and us. None Our hands are amazing things. For sighted people, it may be surprising how good they are at recognizing objec

22h

Can you injure yourself by stretching?

Ask Us Anything Stretching should never cause agonizing pain. Is it possible to overstretch? We’ve all had that moment at work: You stand up or lean back to stretch and all of a sudden extreme pain ensues. So can a benign extending…

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Three Cases of Brain-Infecting Parasite Recently Confirmed in Hawaii

Last December, a tourist in Hawaii ate a slug on a dare — not realizing, of course, a wiggly brain-loving parasite was along for the ride.

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A small electrical zap to the brain could help you retrieve a forgotten memory

Psychologists have provided strong evidence that a certain region of the brain plays a critical role in memory recall. The research also shows for the first time that using an electrical current to stimulate that region, the left rostrolateral prefrontal cortex, improves people's ability to retrieve memories.

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Climate change is already affecting global food production — unequally

Researchers found that climate change is affecting different areas of global food production differently.

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Astrocytes protect neurons from toxic buildup

Neurons off-load toxic by-products to astrocytes, which process and recycle them.

22h

How a Group of Students Built and Launched a Rocket to Space

It's hard to make a rocket when the senior members of your team keep graduating, taking their expertise with them. But these undergrads found a way.

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