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nyheder2019juni05

How a brief dip in air pollution affects the body

A study based on air pollution levels before, during, and after the Beijing Olympics reveals how it affects the human body at the level of metabolites. Metabolites are small molecules that are the end products of environmental exposures, such as air pollution, and body metabolism. “Think of our body as a society. These metabolites fulfill different positions, such as teacher, farmer, worker, sold

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Preserved Poop is an Archaeological Treasure

Anthropologists found parasite eggs in ancient poop samples, providing a glimpse of human health as hunter gatherers transitioned to settlements. Christopher Intagliata reports — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9min

'Cannibalism' is a double-whammy for cell health

University of Sydney mathematician Hugh Ford has developed a model tested by experiment that shows cell cannibalism is an important driver in the build-up of cholesterol and other harmful materials.

13min

Heart disease deaths nearly halved in a decade — but condition remains UK's biggest killer

A new analysis of global heart disease deaths has revealed the number of UK people dying from the condition halved between 2005 and 2015, with the death rate falling from 80 deaths per 100,000 to 46 per 100,000.

13min

Widowed and divorced men more at risk of dying from serious heart conditions than women

Surviving some of the most common heart and circulatory diseases may be impacted by your gender and marital status, according to new research presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) Conference in Manchester.

13min

High blood pressure during pregnancy increases risk of heart attacks and strokes

Women who have high blood pressure during their pregnancies, or a related more severe condition called pre-eclampsia, are at much higher risk of heart attacks and strokes than those who have normal blood pressure, according to new research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and presented at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference today in Manchester.

13min

Mortality rate 'weekend effect' not a reliable measure of care quality in hospitals

The higher mortality rate for weekend hospital admissions should not be used as an indicator of quality of care due to the lack of data preceding patient admission and on the severity of their illness, a new study conducted at the University of Warwick Medical School has concluded.

13min

Bees can link symbols to numbers: Study

We know bees get the concept of zero and can do basic math. Now researchers have discovered they may also be capable of connecting symbols to numbers. It's a finding that sheds new light on how numerical abilities may have evolved over millennia and even opens new possibilities for communication between humans and other species.

13min

Pregnancy hormone loosens ‘frozen shoulder’

New research suggests relaxin, a hormone that surges during pregnancy, could lead to treatment for frozen shoulder. More than nine million Americans know the scary feeling: sudden, severe shoulder pain and the sensation that their arm feels stuck, unable to move. “Frozen shoulder” is a common condition that happens when the connective tissues around the shoulder joint become thickened and stiff,

14min

Do cluster roots of red alder play a role in nutrient acquisition from bedrock? [Letters (Online Only)]

Perakis and Pett-Ridge (1) recently reported in PNAS that N2-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) trees obtain significantly more rock-derived strontium than 5 codominant nonfixing trees in a mixed temperate rainforest in the Oregon Coast Range. The authors ascribe this to the fact that excess fixed N generates acidity, accelerating leaching…

18min

Reply to Lambers et al.: How does nitrogen-fixing red alder eat rocks? [Letters (Online Only)]

The symbiotic nitrogen (N)-fixing tree red alder (Alnus rubra) is an ecologically and economically important species that has been studied for over 50 y (1, 2). Our recent finding that red alder can preferentially access rock-derived nutrients provides additional insight into the ecology of this N-fixing tree. Our manuscript evaluates…

18min

Economics of the disintegration of the Greenland ice sheet [Sustainability Science]

Concerns about the impact on large-scale earth systems have taken center stage in the scientific and economic analysis of climate change. The present study analyzes the economic impact of a potential disintegration of the Greenland ice sheet (GIS). The study introduces an approach that combines long-run economic growth models, climate…

18min

Ancient Yersinia pestis genomes from across Western Europe reveal early diversification during the First Pandemic (541-750) [Evolution]

The first historically documented pandemic caused by Yersinia pestis began as the Justinianic Plague in 541 within the Roman Empire and continued as the so-called First Pandemic until 750. Although paleogenomic studies have previously identified the causative agent as Y. pestis, little is known about the bacterium’s spread, diversity, and…

18min

NRF2/ARE pathway negatively regulates BACE1 expression and ameliorates cognitive deficits in mouse Alzheimer’s models [Neuroscience]

BACE1 is the rate-limiting enzyme for amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) generation, a key event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). By an unknown mechanism, levels of BACE1 and a BACE1 mRNA-stabilizing antisense RNA (BACE1-AS) are elevated in the brains of AD patients, implicating that dysregulation of BACE1 expression plays an…

18min

Boundary mode lubrication of articular cartilage with a biomimetic diblock copolymer [Medical Sciences]

We report the design of a diblock copolymer with architecture and function inspired by the lubricating glycoprotein lubricin. This diblock copolymer, synthesized by sequential reversible addition–fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization, consists of a cationic cartilage-binding domain and a brush-lubricating domain. It reduces the coefficient of friction of articular cartilage under boundary mo

18min

The Cdk1/Cdk2 homolog CDKA;1 controls the recombination landscape in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

Little is known how patterns of cross-over (CO) numbers and distribution during meiosis are established. Here, we reveal that cyclin-dependent kinase A;1 (CDKA;1), the homolog of human Cdk1 and Cdk2, is a major regulator of meiotic recombination in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis plants with reduced CDKA;1 activity experienced a decrease of class…

18min

Hydrodynamics control shear-induced pattern formation in attractive suspensions [Engineering]

Dilute suspensions of repulsive particles exhibit a Newtonian response to flow that can be accurately predicted by the particle volume fraction and the viscosity of the suspending fluid. However, such a description fails when the particles are weakly attractive. In a simple shear flow, suspensions of attractive particles exhibit complex,…

18min

Riccardo Giacconi (1931-2018) [Retrospectives]

Riccardo Giacconi, the “Father of X-ray Astronomy,” Nobel laureate, and one of the most influential figures in astrophysics over the past 60 years, died on December 9, 2018, at the age of 87. With a career spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, Riccardo opened up new windows for observing the universe and…

18min

Shift in temporal and spatial expression of Hox gene explains color mimicry in bees [Commentaries]

Few insects exhibit the striking color pattern radiation found in bumble bees (Bombus) (1, 2) and some wasps (3, 4). Bumble bees have diversified globally into an unusually wide range of color patterns, many of which converge into high-fidelity Müllerian mimetic complexes across a wide geographic range. Despite extensive documentation…

18min

A different branch of the high Tc family? [Commentaries]

In PNAS, Li et al. (1) suggest that Ba2CuO4−y is a member of a different branch of high-Tc cuprate superconducting materials. This branch is characterized as heavily overdoped with an exceptionally short Cu apical O spacing and O vacancies that are located in the CuO2 planes. These characteristics, illustrated in…

18min

Regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans neuronal polarity by heterochronic genes [Developmental Biology]

Many neurons display characteristic patterns of synaptic connections that are under genetic control. The Caenorhabditis elegans DA cholinergic motor neurons form synaptic connections only on their dorsal axons. We explored the genetic pathways that specify this polarity by screening for gene inactivations and mutations that disrupt this normal polarity of…

18min

Searching for the emergence of stone tool making in eastern Africa [Commentaries]

Modern humans rely entirely on technology for their subsistence, and the interaction between technological and biological adaptations has played a key role in the evolution of our lineage. When exactly technology emerged in the fossil record and thus started to shape primate evolution has appealed to researchers since the beginnings…

18min

How Chlamydia trachomatis conquered gut microbiome-derived antimicrobial compounds and found a new home in the eye [Commentaries]

Different variants of the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis cause the diseases trachoma and chlamydia. The trachoma strains cause chronic infections of the conjunctival epithelium and an intense inflammatory response that can lead to corneal damage, and trachoma is the most common cause of infectious blindness. The Chlamydia strains…

18min

Variable G protein determinants of GPCR coupling selectivity [Pharmacology]

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) activate four families of heterotrimeric G proteins, and individual receptors must select a subset of G proteins to produce appropriate cellular responses. Although the precise mechanisms of coupling selectivity are uncertain, the Gα subunit C terminus is widely believed to be the primary determinant recognized by…

18min

Dual mechanisms of posttranscriptional regulation of Tet2 by Let-7 microRNA in macrophages [Immunology and Inflammation]

Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (Tet2) is an epigenetic regulator that removes methyl groups from deoxycytosine residues in DNA. Tet2-deficient murine macrophages show increased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced and spontaneous inflammation at least partially because Tet2 acts to restrain interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 expression in induced cells. MicroRNAs have emerged as critical regulatory…

18min

Inward-facing conformation of a multidrug resistance MATE family transporter [Biochemistry]

Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters mediate excretion of xenobiotics and toxic metabolites, thereby conferring multidrug resistance in bacterial pathogens and cancer cells. Structural information on the alternate conformational states and knowledge of the detailed mechanism of MATE transport are of great importance for drug development. However, the structures…

18min

Hsp90 of E. coli modulates assembly of FtsZ, the bacterial tubulin homolog [Biochemistry]

Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a highly conserved molecular chaperone involved in ATP-dependent client protein remodeling and activation. It also functions as a protein holdase, binding and stabilizing clients in an ATP-independent process. Hsp90 remodels over 300 client proteins and is essential for cell survival in eukaryotes. In bacteria,…

18min

Evidence for a vestigial nematic state in the cuprate pseudogap phase [Physics]

The CuO2 antiferromagnetic insulator is transformed by hole-doping into an exotic quantum fluid usually referred to as the pseudogap (PG) phase. Its defining characteristic is a strong suppression of the electronic density-of-states D(E) for energies |E| < Δ*, where Δ* is the PG energy. Unanticipated broken-symmetry phases have been detected…

18min

The origins of specialized pottery and diverse alcohol fermentation techniques in Early Neolithic China [Anthropology]

In China, pottery containers first appeared about 20000 cal. BP, and became diverse in form during the Early Neolithic (9000–7000 cal. BP), signaling the emergence of functionally specialized vessels. China is also well-known for its early development of alcohol production. However, few studies have focused on the connections between the…

18min

Salmonella biofilms program innate immunity for persistence in Caenorhabditis elegans [Microbiology]

The adaptive in vivo mechanisms underlying the switch in Salmonella enterica lifestyles from the infectious form to a dormant form remain unknown. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans as a heterologous host to understand the temporal dynamics of Salmonella pathogenesis and to identify its lifestyle form in vivo. We discovered that Salmonella…

18min

Ratiometric two-photon microscopy reveals attomolar copper buffering in normal and Menkes mutant cells [Biochemistry]

Copper is controlled by a sophisticated network of transport and storage proteins within mammalian cells, yet its uptake and efflux occur with rapid kinetics. Present as Cu(I) within the reducing intracellular environment, the nature of this labile copper pool remains elusive. While glutathione is involved in copper homeostasis and has…

18min

Olfactory sensory neurons mediate ultrarapid antiviral immune responses in a TrkA-dependent manner [Immunology and Inflammation]

The nervous system regulates host immunity in complex ways. Vertebrate olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are located in direct contact with pathogens; however, OSNs’ ability to detect danger and initiate immune responses is unclear. We report that nasal delivery of rhabdoviruses induces apoptosis in crypt OSNs via the interaction of the…

18min

Engineering the phototropin photocycle improves photoreceptor performance and plant biomass production [Plant Biology]

The ability to enhance photosynthetic capacity remains a recognized bottleneck to improving plant productivity. Phototropin blue light receptors (phot1 and phot2) optimize photosynthetic efficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana by coordinating multiple light-capturing processes. In this study, we explore the potential of using protein engineering to improve photoreceptor performance and thereby plant…

18min

Temple occupation and the tempo of collapse at Angkor Wat, Cambodia [Anthropology]

The 9th–15th century Angkorian state was Southeast Asia’s greatest premodern empire and Angkor Wat in the World Heritage site of Angkor is one of its largest religious monuments. Here we use excavation and chronometric data from three field seasons at Angkor Wat to understand the decline and reorganization of the…

18min

Mangroves shelter coastal economic activity from cyclones [Economic Sciences]

Mangroves shelter coastlines during hazardous storm events with coastal communities experiencing mangrove deforestation are increasingly vulnerable to economic damages resulting from cyclones. To date, the benefits of mangroves in terms of protecting coastal areas have been estimated only through individual case studies of specific regions or countries. Using spatially referenced…

18min

A bacterial isolate from the Black Sea oxidizes sulfide with manganese(IV) oxide [Microbiology]

In stratified basins, for example the Black Sea, in between the oxygenated surface waters and sulfidic bottom waters a suboxic zone lacking oxygen (O2), H2S, and mostly also nitrate (NO3−) has been frequently reported (1). Despite the absence of electron acceptors, high bacterial CO2 fixation rates at the border with…

18min

Adult sex ratio influences mate choice in Darwin’s finches [Evolution]

The adult sex ratio (ASR) is an important property of populations. Comparative phylogenetic analyses have shown that unequal sex ratios are associated with the frequency of changing mates, extrapair mating (EPM), mating system and parental care, sex-specific survival, and population dynamics. Comparative demographic analyses are needed to validate the inferences,…

18min

Uncovering modern paint forgeries by radiocarbon dating [Chemistry]

Art forgeries have existed since antiquity, but with the recent rapidly expanding commercialization of art, the approach to art authentication has demanded increasingly sophisticated detection schemes. So far, the most conclusive criterion in the field of counterfeit detection is the scientific proof of material anachronisms. The establishment of the earliest…

18min

Reconstructing sexual divisions of labor from fingerprints on Ancestral Puebloan pottery [Anthropology]

An understanding of the division of labor in different societies, and especially how it evolved in the human species, is fundamental to most analyses of social, political, and economic systems. The ability to reconstruct how labor was organized, however, especially in ancient societies that left behind few material remains, is…

18min

Attendance trends threaten future operations of America’s state park systems [Sustainability Science]

This research examines how the operating expenditures of America’s state park systems will be affected by a continued growth in attendance consistent with observed trends as well as potential climate futures. We construct a longitudinal panel dataset (1984–2017) describing the operations and characteristics of all 50 state park systems. These…

18min

Fast-moving bat ears create informative Doppler shifts [Applied Biological Sciences]

Many animals have evolved adept sensory systems that enable dexterous mobility in complex environments. Echolocating bats hunting in dense vegetation represent an extreme case of this, where all necessary information about the environment must pass through a parsimonious channel of pulsed, 1D echo signals. We have investigated whether certain bats…

18min

UBE3A-mediated PTPA ubiquitination and degradation regulate PP2A activity and dendritic spine morphology [Neuroscience]

Deficiency in the E3 ubiquitin ligase UBE3A leads to the neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome (AS), while additional dosage of UBE3A is linked to autism spectrum disorder. The mechanisms underlying the downstream effects of UBE3A gain or loss of function in these neurodevelopmental disorders are still not well understood, and effective…

18min

The promise and peril of sexual harassment programs [Social Sciences]

Two decades ago, the Supreme Court vetted the workplace harassment programs popular at the time: sexual harassment grievance procedures and training. However, harassment at work remains common. Do these programs reduce harassment? Program effects have been difficult to measure, but, because women frequently quit their jobs after being harassed, programs…

18min

Elephants have a nose for quantity [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Animals often face situations that require making decisions based on quantity. Many species, including humans, rely on an ability to differentiate between more and less to make judgments about social relationships, territories, and food. Habitat-related choices require animals to decide between areas with greater and lesser quantities of food while…

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Unique transmembrane domain interactions differentially modulate integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 and {alpha}IIb{beta}3 function [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Lateral transmembrane (TM) helix–helix interactions between single-span membrane proteins play an important role in the assembly and signaling of many cell-surface receptors. Often, these helices contain two highly conserved yet distinct interaction motifs, arranged such that the motifs cannot be engaged simultaneously. However, there is sparse experimental evidence that dual-engagement…

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Correction for Rasmussen et al., Primitive Old World monkey from the earliest Miocene of Kenya and the evolution of cercopithecoid bilophodonty [Corrections]

ANTHROPOLOGY Correction for “Primitive Old World monkey from the earliest Miocene of Kenya and the evolution of cercopithecoid bilophodonty,” by D. Tab Rasmussen, Anthony R. Friscia, Mercedes Gutierrez, John Kappelman, Ellen R. Miller, Samuel Muteti, Dawn Reynoso, James B. Rossie, Terry L. Spell, Neil J. Tabor, Elizabeth Gierlowski-Kordesch, Bonnie F….

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Renewable CO2 recycling and synthetic fuel production in a marine environment [Sustainability Science]

A massive reduction in CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning is required to limit the extent of global warming. However, carbon-based liquid fuels will in the foreseeable future continue to be important energy storage media. We propose a combination of largely existing technologies to use solar energy to recycle atmospheric…

18min

Profile of David D. Ginty [Profiles]

The sense of touch is key to humans’ ability to experience the world, but unraveling the neural pathways underpinning this key sense has been a challenge. David D. Ginty has spent more than two decades investigating the development of the somatosensory system and fundamental mechanisms underlying the sense of touch….

18min

GABA-stimulated adipose-derived stem cells suppress subcutaneous adipose inflammation in obesity [Immunology and Inflammation]

Accumulating evidence suggests that subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues are differentially associated with metabolic disorders. In obesity, subcutaneous adipose tissue is beneficial for metabolic homeostasis because of repressed inflammation. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) sensitivity is crucial in determining fat depot

18min

Intraarticular injection of relaxin-2 alleviates shoulder arthrofibrosis [Engineering]

Arthrofibrosis is a prevalent condition affecting greater than 5% of the general population and leads to a painful decrease in joint range of motion (ROM) and loss of independence due to pathologic accumulation of periarticular scar tissue. Current treatment options are limited in effectiveness and do not address the underlying…

18min

Specific factors in blood from young but not old mice directly promote synapse formation and NMDA-receptor recruitment [Neuroscience]

Aging drives a progressive decline in cognition and decreases synapse numbers and synaptic function in the brain, thereby increasing the risk for neurodegenerative disease. Pioneering studies showed that introduction of blood from young mice into aged mice reversed age-associated cognitive impairments and increased synaptic connectivity in brain, suggesting that young…

18min

Influence of single-nanoparticle electrochromic dynamics on the durability and speed of smart windows [Chemistry]

Nanomaterials have tremendous potential to increase electrochromic smart window efficiency, speed, and durability. However, nanoparticles vary in size, shape, and surface defects, and it is unknown how nanoparticle heterogeneity contributes to particle-dependent electrochromic properties. Here, we use single-nanoparticle-level electro-optical imaging to measure structure–function relationships in

18min

QnAs with Hidde L. Ploegh [QnAs]

Over the past decade, immunotherapy has been slowly transforming cancer treatment. Among the treatment approaches already in the clinic are checkpoint inhibitors, which are antibodies that unshackle patients’ own tumor-targeting immune cells, and chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T cells), which are genetically engineered T cells infused into patients to…

18min

Why Working-Class New Yorkers Drop Their “R’s” – Facts So Romantic

William Labov took something as small as one letter and showed how a subtle detail of our language could tell who we are. Photograph by Everett Historical / Shutterstock In George Bernard Shaw’s play Pygmalion , professor Henry Higgins says: “You can spot an Irishman or a Yorkshireman by his brogue. I can place any man within six miles. I can place him within two miles in London. Sometimes within

21min

Bees can link symbols to numbers

Scientists provide more evidence that bees are not only busy, they’re clever too. Nick Carne reports.

30min

'Cannibalism' is a double-whammy for cell health

Certain Inflammatory and infectious diseases, such as hardening arteries and tuberculosis, are caused by the build-up inside immune cells of harmful substances, such as cholesterol and bacteria. A study published today by University of Sydney researcher Hugh Ford has shown that these concentrations occur in part by virtue of cell cannibalism.

34min

Bees can link symbols to numbers, study finds

We've learned bees can understand zero and do basic math, and now a new study shows their tiny insect brains may be capable of connecting symbols to numbers.

34min

'Cannibalism' is a double-whammy for cell health

Certain Inflammatory and infectious diseases, such as hardening arteries and tuberculosis, are caused by the build-up inside immune cells of harmful substances, such as cholesterol and bacteria. A study published today by University of Sydney researcher Hugh Ford has shown that these concentrations occur in part by virtue of cell cannibalism.

34min

Preserved Poop is an Archaeological Treasure

Anthropologists found parasite eggs in ancient poop samples, providing a glimpse of human health as hunter gatherers transitioned to settlements. Christopher Intagliata reports — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

35min

The Lancet Psychiatry: Despite increase in rates of non-suicidal self-harm, few people receive medical or psychological support

A new study of non-suicidal self-harm in England, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, suggests that rates grew from around 2% to 6% of the population between 2000 and 2014. At the same time, the study noted no evidence of an increase in treatment contact for this group.

48min

Nanoparticles stimulated by microwaves to combat cancer

A physicist has proposed a new concept for treating cancer cells.

1h

Fruit juice is not healthy. Taxing it will slash American obesity.

Research at the University of Waterloo claims that taxing fruit juice results in healthier purchasing habits. Participants that were taxed "produced greater reductions in sugars and calories than those that did not." Experts say that stripping fruit of its fiber for juice is a dubious nutritional practice. None If people think taxing soda is a bad idea, wait until they hear about the juice man co

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Pathogens may have facilitated the evolution of warm-blooded animals

Animals first developed fever as a response to infections: the higher body temperatures primed their immune systems. At the time, 600 million years ago, virtually all animal species were cold-blooded. They had to spend long periods of time in warm areas of their habitat to achieve fever-range body temperatures. A researcher believes that pathogens may be the reason why warm-blooded creatures first

1h

Ear-generated Doppler shifts in bat biosonar

A new study demonstrates that the ears of bats come with a 'built-in ambulance' that creates the same physical effect as the sound of an ambulance passing by. Researchers think the study of ear-generated Doppler shifts in bat biosonar could give rise to new sensory principles that could enable small, yet powerful sensors.

1h

New material with magnetic shape memory

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich have developed a new material whose shape memory is activated by magnetism. It retains a given shape when it is put into a magnetic field. It is a composite material consisting of two components. What is special about the new material is that, unlike previous shape-memory materials, it consists of a polymer and droplets of a so-called m

1h

ESA Draws Up Plans to Bring Back a Sample From Mars

A sample return mission would require multiple launches and grabbing samples out of Mars’ orbit. (Credit: ESA/ATG Medialab) NASA isn’t the only space agency with a hunger for the Red Planet. The European Space Agency would also like to snatch samples from Mars, and now they're making their own plans for a mission that will bring back priceless pieces of our neighboring planet. ESA’s plans will cer

1h

Exercise Alleviates Symptoms of Autism, Mouse Study Says

(Credit: Andrew Burgess/Shutterstock) Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has no cure. And medications to treat the condition’s core symptoms – anxiety, repetitive behaviors and difficulty engaging in social interactions like talking to others – do not exist. Now researchers may have landed on a simple and effective way to ease autism symptoms: exercise. Exercise reversed autistic behaviors in an anima

1h

Neuroscience's Shoe Saga

If you delve into the wildest depths of the scientific literature, you will find a trilogy of papers so weird, that they have become legendary. In these articles, spanning a 12 year period, author Jarl Flensmark says that heeled shoes cause mental illness, while flat footwear promotes brain health: Is there an association between the use of heeled footwear and schizophrenia? (2004)Physical activit

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Common dietary supplements linked to miscarriages in rodents

Health Over-the-counter vitamins and other supplements don't go through the same testing as prescription drugs. People who could become pregnant shouldn’t take dietary supplements that contain vinpocetine, the Food and Drug Administration warned this week, because the synthetic…

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Author Correction: Statistical optimization of light intensity and CO2 concentration for lipid production derived from attached cultivation of green microalga Ettlia sp.

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43507-w Author Correction: Statistical optimization of light intensity and CO 2 concentration for lipid production derived from attached cultivation of green microalga Ettlia sp.

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Author Correction: Serum GFAP as a biomarker for disease severity in multiple sclerosis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43990-1 Author Correction: Serum GFAP as a biomarker for disease severity in multiple sclerosis

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Author Correction: Mutual interaction of red blood cells influenced by nanoparticles

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44659-5 Author Correction: Mutual interaction of red blood cells influenced by nanoparticles

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Author Correction: Low-Temperature Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction Grown Anatase TiO2 Nanocrystalline Films for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cell and Gas Sensor Applications

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43987-w Author Correction: Low-Temperature Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction Grown Anatase TiO 2 Nanocrystalline Films for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cell and Gas Sensor Applications

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Author Correction: Infectious DNAs derived from insect-specific flavivirus genomes enable identification of pre- and post-entry host restrictions in vertebrate cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44657-7 Author Correction: Infectious DNAs derived from insect-specific flavivirus genomes enable identification of pre- and post-entry host restrictions in vertebrate cells

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Gene-edited babies may live shorter lives, analysis finds

The gene-editing technique CRISPR offers major benefits to humanity, but scientists don't believe the field is mature enough for widespread editing. For this reason, when Chinese scientist He Jiankui edited the genes of two babies to be resistant to HIV, his work provoked outrage. A new study of 400,000 genetic profiles reveals that He's genetic editing did indeed have an unintended consequence.

1h

New research shows that sleep helps determine your personality

People who suffer from emotional instability tend to exhibit poor sleep duration, continuity, and subjective sleep quality. Conscientiousness people report less variability in sleep duration and continuity. The study suggests that how you sleep this week predicts your personality five years from now. None Sleep science is a rapidly growing field that has, time and again, proven how important slee

1h

Author Correction: Aqueous Li-ion battery enabled by halogen conversion–intercalation chemistry in graphite

Nature, Published online: 05 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1281-5 Author Correction: Aqueous Li-ion battery enabled by halogen conversion–intercalation chemistry in graphite

1h

Apple and New York Are Changing the Privacy Game, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

1h

Civility still matters to some in cyberspace

In the online world, where incivility is all too common, new research found that being polite is golden, at least when individuals who pose questions online get to choose the "best answer."

1h

Nanoparticles stimulated by microwaves to combat cancer

A physicist has proposed a new concept for treating cancer cells.

1h

Scientists call on funders to make research freely available immediately

Scientific research usually takes months to be published by academic journals, and once it is, many of the papers can only be read by scientists from wealthy institutes that subscribe to the journals. Over the years, there have been various attempts to make research more widely available, but most papers remain behind paywalls and scientists complain that the peer review process at journals now ta

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Do images of food on kids' clothes influence eating behavior?

As some sweet treat fans celebrate National Doughnut Day on June 7, 2019 a pediatrician examines the new trend of donuts showing up on children's clothing.

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Opioids are not sleep aids, and can actually worsen sleep research finds

Evidence that taking opioids will help people with chronic pain to sleep better is limited and of poor quality, according to an interdisciplinary team of psychologists and medics.

1h

Frogs find refuge in elephant tracks

Researchers in Myanmar describe flooded elephant tracks as key breeding grounds and 'stepping stones' connecting populations.

1h

Mathematicians work out how to predict success in show business

Mathematicians have found a way to predict whether an actor's career has peaked or if their most successful days lie ahead.

1h

Ferrari's fastest production car is an electric hybrid

Cars The SF90 can go 211 miles per hour and hits 62 mph in just 2.5 seconds. The fastest Ferrari uses a combination of combustion and electric motors.

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Smartphone relaxation app helps some manage migraine

Migraine sufferers who used a smartphone-based relaxation technique at least twice a week experienced on average four fewer headache days per month, a new study shows.

1h

'Chernobyl': 2019 Needed a Hit This Bleak

Hey, things could be worse.

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Chronic fatigue scientist fired after conduct complaints, Stanford says

School of Medicine won’t specify why it fired Jose Montoya

2h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Relationship Status: It’s Complicated

What We’re Following Today It’s Tuesday, June 4. ‣ The White House reportedly directed the former administration officials Hope Hicks and Annie Donaldson to not turn over requested documents to the House Judiciary Committee. ‣ The upcoming 2020 census could feature the worst undercount of black and Latino people since 1990, according to the nonpartisan think tank the Urban Institute. The census f

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China Unveils First Chip Designed Specifically For Mind-Reading

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Global carbon dioxide emissions reached record high in 2018

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China unveils transparent, suspended Sky Train

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Automation in education is the positive side of automation. It will educate billions of kids to read and calculate in the form of game or app.

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Chemists could make 'smart glass' smarter by manipulating it at the nanoscale

Chemists have devised a potentially major improvement to both the speed and durability of smart glass by providing a better understanding of how the glass works at the nanoscale.

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Rare fossils provide more detailed picture of biodiversity during Middle Ordovician

Marine fossil specimens unearthed in northern Portugal are filling a gap in understanding evolution during the Middle Ordovician period.

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Scientists crack origin of the Persian walnut

Prized worldwide for its high-quality wood and rich flavor of delicious nuts, the Persian walnut (Juglans regia) is an important economic crop. Using genomic data analyzed with phylogenetic and population genetic approaches, researchers have now cracked this mystery, showing that the Persian walnut is the result of hybridization between two long-extinct species around 3.45 million years ago.

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SEC expands its war on cryptocurrency companies with a lawsuit against Kik

The Securities and Exchange Commission has sued Kik Interactive for the $100 million token sale the company announced two years ago. It’s an expansion of legal actions that began last …

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Watch an AI Die, Neuron by Neuron

Death of AI We now know what it looks like when a neural network dies. This strange new experience is courtesy of an artist who identified herself only as “the girl who talks to AI” in an email to Vice . For a recent project titled “What I saw before the darkness,” she programmed an artificial intelligence to generate a human-looking face, then shut off its own neurons one at a time — a process s

2h

Tigers: The Largest Cats in the World

Tigers are the biggest cats in the world, but their populations are struggling. With only 3,200 left in the wild, there are now more living in captivity than in the wild.

2h

Solving the sun's super-heating mystery with Parker Solar Probe

It's one of the greatest and longest-running mysteries surrounding, quite literally, our sun: Why is its outer atmosphere hotter than its fiery surface?

2h

'Citizen scientists' help track foxes, coyotes in urban areas

As foxes and coyotes adapt to urban landscapes, the potential for encounters with humans necessarily goes up. A team of scientists is taking advantage of this fact to enlist the eyeballs and fingertips of humans — getting them to report online what they see in their own neighborhoods and parks.

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Geoscience data group urges all scientific disciplines to make data open and accessible

Institutions, science funders, data repositories, publishers, researchers and scientific societies from all scientific disciplines must work together to ensure all scientific data are easy to find, access and use, according to a new commentary.

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Walmart sued over how it markets homeopathic products

The lawsuit was brought by a nonprofit organization called the Center For Inquiry, which last year brought a similar suit against CVS. Walmart currently sells a wide variety of homeopathic products in stores and online, including its own products under the Equate brand. The lawsuit alleges that Walmart labels and promotes homeopathic products as if they're actual medicines. None Walmart is being

2h

Using physics to print living tissue

Bioprinting is a relatively new technology that has advanced mostly by trial and error. Scientists are now using the laws of physics and predictive computer modeling to improve these techniques and optimize the bioprinting process.

2h

Researchers identify link between more frequent, intense heat events and deaths in Las Vegas

New research led by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) traces the relationship between extreme heat and mortality rates, identifying a clear correlation between heat wave episodes and heat-related deaths in Las Vegas over the last ten years.

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Limiting warming to 2 degrees C will require emission cuts across entire food system

Better understanding agriculture and the food system's unique place in climate change — as both drivers of climate change and victims of it — is helping to increase support for climate action. Unfortunately, progress across the food system is lagging, according to a new analysis.

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Deep learning techniques teach neural model to 'play' retrosynthesis

Researchers at Columbia Engineering have developed a new technique based on reinforcement learning that trains a neural network model to correctly select the 'best' reaction at each step of the retrosynthetic process. This form of AI provides a framework for researchers to design chemical syntheses that optimize user specified objectives such synthesis cost, safety, and sustainability. The new app

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LEDs created from wonder material could revolutionize lighting and displays

Perovskites could one day replace the organic LEDs in cellphones and flat screen TVs

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Xbox is getting its own line of personal hygiene products

Over the years, we have seen many product crossovers. There was the KFC / Huawei smartphone, Pizza Hut sneakers, KFC’s wing box drone, Sony / Nike PlayStation sneakers, a KFC VR game — you get …

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Terrawatch: oxygen feasts and famines kick-started complex life

Examining isotopes in Cambrian rocks reveals ‘boom and bust’ cycles in levels of gas Life on Earth got started more than 4bn years ago, but it was another 3.5bn years before evolution really started to take off. The turning point happened about 540m years ago and is known as the Cambrian explosion . A plethora of complex creatures burst on to the scene, many of which were the precursors of the an

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Dartmouth study reveals how ACOs use home visits to improve care and reduce hospital use

Dartmouth-led study offers new details about how Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are using home visits to improve care management and identify patient needs while aiming to reduce costs.

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Bats have an ambulance in their ears

'The Doppler shift patterns produced by the ear motions could give these bat species the option to concentrate their energy in a narrow frequency band yet be also able to tell target direction.'

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Facial bones of black adults age differently than other races, Rutgers study finds

Facial bones in black adults maintain higher mineral density as they age than other races, resulting in fewer changes to their facial structure, a Rutgers study finds.The study, published in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery, is the first to document how facial bones change as black adults age. The findings suggest significant differences in how facial bones age across races, which can affect how plasti

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WVU study: Diabetics exposed to common household chemicals have lower heart disease rates

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention deemed exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances — a class of chemicals used in cookware, cleaning products and paint–a public health concern. But new research by a team of scientists including Kim Innes, a professor of Epidemiology in the WVU School of Public Health, explores how exposure to PFAS may be linked to lower heart disease rates in diabetic a

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Pathogens may have facilitated the evolution of warm-blooded animals

Animals first developed fever as a response to infections: the higher body temperatures primed their immune systems. At the time, 600 million years ago, virtually all animal species were cold-blooded. They had to spend long periods of time in warm areas of their habitat to achieve fever-range body temperatures. Michael Logan, a Tupper Fellow at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama

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Snout dated: Slow-evolving elephant shark offers new insights into human physiology

Slow-evolving elephant shark reveals hormonal adaptation and offers new insights into human physiology.

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House Committee Votes To Continue Ban On Genetically Modified Babies

A congressional committee has upheld a prohibition against the Food and Drug Administration considering using gene-edited embryos to establish pregnancies. (Image credit: Mark Schiefelbein/AP)

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The 'Great Dying' Nearly Erased Life On Earth. Scientists See Similarities To Today

It was the biggest extinction in Earth's history. A new Smithsonian exhibit notes that some of the same things that killed 90 percent of life 250 million years ago are happening now. (Image credit: Lynette Cook/Science Source)

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GM, Fiat Chrysler Caught Buying “Right to Pollute” From Tesla

Green Money In the United States, automakers earn greenhouse gas credits — also known as zero-emissions vehicle (ZEV) credits — from the government based on the number of electric vehicles they sell. Each manufacturer has to pay a fine if they don’t maintain a certain number of these credits, so the idea is that the system will encourage investment in EVs. Since Tesla only makes EVs, it has a sur

2h

The Apple Watch Is Now the Control Center for Your Health

Apple announced new health and fitness features for its wearable that make the Apple Watch uniquely powerful as a personal monitoring tool.

2h

Using physics to print living tissue

Bioprinting is a relatively new technology that has advanced mostly by trial and error. Scientists are now using the laws of physics and predictive computer modeling to improve these techniques and optimize the bioprinting process.

2h

Researchers develop superconducting quantum refrigerator

Researchers have harnessed superconductivity to conceive of a quantum refrigerator that could cool atoms to nearly absolute zero temperatures.

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Would you eat genetically modified food if you understood the science behind it?

While genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are considered safe by an overwhelming majority of scientists, only about one third of consumers share that view. A team of psychologists and biologists set out to discover if consumers' attitudes would change if the public understood the underlying science better. The short answer is 'yes.'

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Best practices of nucleic acid amplification tests for the diagnosis of clostridioides (clostridium)

A new review looks at the challenges of testing for Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile infection (CDI) and recommendations for newer diagnostic tests. Accurate diagnosis of CDI is critical for effective patient management and implementation of infection control measures to prevent transmission.

2h

Models of 'seeds and soil' to combat breast cancer metastasis

Scientists have identified key biological pathways that regulate the spread of tumor cells to vital organs. These findings may have a significant influence on the development of new therapies that slow or prevent breast cancer metastasis.

2h

#WSF19: Risk-Taking in Extreme Sports

When us mere mortals watch extreme-sports athletes, many of us wonder: Is the risk worth the reward? What drives these risk-takers to put their lives in danger? Are we wired differently, or is it the culture one grows up in, or both? At Friday night’s World Science Festival event, “Risky-Business: the Evolution of Dangerous Behavior,” the panelists set out to answer these and other questions abou

3h

Developers sue Apple over app store fees

A lawsuit filed Tuesday by developers alleges Apple is abusing its monopoly position in its online marketplace to extract excessive fees from those creating iPhone applications.

3h

Severe water stress threatens river basins around the globe

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01759-6 Areas where water supplies are stretched thinnest are clustered in Asia and North America.

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Early lives of Alaska sockeye salmon accelerating with climate change

An ample buffet of freshwater food, brought on by climate change, is altering the life history of one of the world's most important salmon species.

3h

Exposing modern forgers

Researchers have developed a process that can provide conclusive evidence with regard to modern fakes of paintings, even in cases where the forger used old materials. This verification process requires less than 200 micrograms of paint.

3h

Children's brains reorganize after epilepsy surgery to retain visual perception

Children can keep full visual perception — the ability to process and understand visual information — after brain surgery for severe epilepsy, according to a new study. A study of children who had undergone epilepsy surgery suggests that the lasting effects on visual perception can be minimal, even among children who lost tissue in the brain's visual centers.

3h

This Case Could Change How the SEC Regulates Cryptocurrencies

The SEC filed a complaint against social media company Kik, claiming that it improperly marketed its 2017 initial coin offering as an investment vehicle.

3h

2019's Top Contenders for the Song of Summer

From Megan Thee Stallion to Tyler, the Creator, these seven songs should be on everyone's playlists this season.

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Air Canada gets into drone delivery business

Canada's flagship airline is getting into the business of delivering cargo by drones, announcing on Tuesday a sales agreement with Drone Delivery Canada to market its services across the country.

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Renault ex-boss linked to 11mn euros of suspicious spending: board

An internal audit conducted by carmakers Renault and Nissan identified 11 million euros of questionable expenses at their Dutch subsidiary linked to Carlos Ghosn, the ousted boss of the French-Japanese group, the Renault board said Tuesday.

3h

Developers sue Apple over app store fees

A lawsuit filed Tuesday by developers alleges Apple is abusing its monopoly position in its online marketplace to extract excessive fees from those creating iPhone applications.

3h

Early lives of Alaska sockeye salmon accelerating with climate change

An ample buffet of freshwater food, brought on by climate change, is altering the life history of one of the world's most important salmon species.

3h

NASA-NOAA satellite sees system 91L's eeach into the western gulf of Mexico

System 91L is an area of tropical low pressure located in the Bay of Campeche. On June 3, when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed the western Gulf of Mexico, it captured an image of the storm that showed its extensive reach.

3h

Researchers use nanoparticles stimulated by microwaves to combat cancer

A physicist at The University of Texas at Arlington has proposed a new concept for treating cancer cells, further advancing the University's status as a leader in health and the human condition.

3h

Early lives of Alaska sockeye salmon accelerating with climate change

An ample buffet of freshwater food, brought on by climate change, is altering the life history of one of the world's most important salmon species.

3h

Lymphoma trial finds combination targeted therapy effective prior to chemotherapy

Results of a Phase II clinical trial revealed that combination targeted therapy, consisting of rituximab, lenalidomide and ibrutinib (RLI), had an 84.6 percent overall response rate (ORR) and 38.5% complete response rate (CRR) when given prior to any chemotherapy for newly diagnosed patients with a specific type of diffuse large b-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).

3h

Companies battling shareholder complaints have a potent weapon-advertising

A new study explores how firms can configure advertising investments to respond to shareholder complaints and limit the damage of these public battles.

3h

New device sheds light on mechanism, efficacy of arthritis treatment

The debate over how one of the most popular osteoarthritis treatments should be federally regulated could change, thanks to a new study and a new device that provides a better understanding of the science behind hyaluronic acid (HA) injections.

3h

Everything will connect to the internet someday, and this biobattery could help

In the future, small paper and plastic devices will be able to connect to the internet for a short duration, providing information on everything from healthcare to consumer products, before they are thrown away. Researchers have developed a micro biobattery that could power these disposable sensors.

3h

The Coalition Out to Kill Tech as We Know It

In October 2016, then-President Barack Obama hosted a miniature version of the blowout tech conference South by Southwest, which the White House called South by South Lawn . Obama, as The New York Times put it at the time, “brought Silicon Valley to Washington.” He even hinted that if he hadn’t been president, he might have become a venture capitalist . “The conversations I have with Silicon Vall

3h

UTA researcher uses nanoparticles stimulated by microwaves to combat cancer

A physicist at The University of Texas at Arlington has proposed a new concept for treating cancer cells, further advancing the University's status as a leader in health and the human condition.

3h

NASA-NOAA satellite sees system 91L's eeach into the western gulf of Mexico

System 91L is an area of tropical low pressure located in the Bay of Campeche. On June 3, 2019 when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed the western Gulf of Mexico, it captured an image of the storm that showed its extensive reach.

3h

Should STEMI patients recover in the ICU?

Providers need more clear guidance on whether a patient who has suffered from STEMI heart attack should recover in the intensive care unit, a new University of Michigan study, published in The BMJ, finds.

3h

Solving the sun's super-heating mystery with Parker Solar Probe

It's one of the greatest and longest-running mysteries surrounding, quite literally, our sun — why is its outer atmosphere hotter than its fiery surface?

3h

IKEA Wants to Sell You Robotic Furniture for Your Tiny Apartment

Furniture, Assemble! Swedish furniture maker IKEA is partnering with American startup Ori to create a line of robotic furniture to allow people to “create their dream homes in small spaces.” The ROGNAN lineup optimizes a limited number of square feet by turning the space into a modular and adaptable living area. A video render shows off a couch-wardrobe-combination that can hide a bed underneath

3h

Investment offer to take Cornwall and Virgin into orbit

Significant backing is offered to Virgin Orbit and Spaceport Cornwall to make Newquay launches happen.

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New orca calf reported in southern resident J pod

A new calf has been born to J pod, Canadian whale-watch companies were reporting Friday.

3h

Organ meats should be part of a planet-friendly diet

Environment It's not so offal after all A new study on the German meat industry found that if locals ate offal—including but not limited to liver, tripe, tongue, and other innards—livestock emissions for the…

3h

For Latinos with diabetes, new study looks at ways to improve medication adherence

A new study shows certain lifestyle changes and low-cost interventions may improve how Latino patients with diabetes manage their medication regimen.

3h

American Tourists Die Suddenly from Mysterious Illness in Fiji

The husband and wife died within days of each other.

3h

Oil Rigs May Get Second Lives as Fish Habitat

Earth New research shows how decommissioned oil rigs can become home to an abundance of fish and invertebrates. 06/04/2019 Katharine Gammon, Contributor To read more…

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Exomoons may be home to extra-terrestrial life

New research looks at the possibility of moons outside our solar system causing gaps in the rings of planet J1407b.

3h

Climate change may mean heavy rain falls in the early morning

Heavy rain and thunder normally comes in the late afternoon when heat from the sun has built up, but that could change later this century

3h

Getting Fire From A Tree Without Burning The Wood

Cottonwood trees can harbor microorganisms that have a special (and flammable) characteristic. (Image credit: Sean Bagshaw/Science Source/Getty Images)

4h

NASA is Launching a GPS System for Space

Atomic Clock NASA is about to send its “Deep Space Atomic Clock” into the emptiness of space — where it’ll help spacecraft figure out where they are, like a cosmic GPS system. The toaster-sized system is set to launch aboard a SpaceX Heavy Falcon rocket scheduled to launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on June 22. It measures how long it takes for a signal to go from one point to another and t

4h

Salmon get a major athletic boost via a single enzyme

A single enzyme anchored to the walls of salmons' blood vessels helps reduce how hard their hearts have to work during exercise by up to 27%. The findings help explain how the fish undertake arduous upstream migrations, and could help species acclimate to elevated water temperatures associated with climate change.

4h

Vitamin D could help cancer patients live longer

Physicians have found that vitamin D, if taken for at least three years, could help cancer patients live longer. The findings suggest that the vitamin carries significant benefits other than just contributing to healthy bones.

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Drug-resistant tuberculosis reversed in lab

About 1.5 million people died of tuberculosis (TB) in 2017, making it the most lethal infectious disease worldwide. A growing rise in drug-resistant TB is a major obstacle to successfully treating the illness. Now, researchers have found a compound that prevents and even reverses resistance to isoniazid, the most widely used antibiotic for treating tuberculosis.

4h

Tolerance to stress is a 'trade-off' as fruit flies age

With the help of the common fruit fly (D. melanogaster), which ages quickly because it only lives about 60 days, neuroscientists provide insights into healthy aging by investigating the effects of a foraging gene on age and stress tolerance.

4h

Using population genetics, scientists confirm origins of root rot in Michigan ornamentals

Floriculture is an economically important industry in Michigan. The health of these crops is threatened by Pythium ultimum (root rot), a water mold that infects the roots of popular plants. Despite efforts to control of pathogen, root rot occurs annually for many growers. This study confirmed for the first time that the root rot pathogen is likely moved unnoticed within the state via infected plan

4h

Beta blockers can block the effects of stress and anger in patients prone to emotion-triggered atrial fibrillation

Individuals who are prone to emotion-triggered atrial fibrillation (AF) may benefit from taking beta blockers. A new study shows that beta blockers can block the effects of psychological stress and anger in individuals prone to AF.

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Could boosting the gut microbiome be the secret to healthier older age?

Fecal transplants from young to aged mice can stimulate the gut microbiome and revive the gut immune system, a study by immunologists has shown. The study suggest that the gut microbiome could be a target for the treatment of a range of age-associated symptoms to facilitate healthy ageing.

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Home exercise program reduces rate of falling in at-risk seniors

An in-home exercise program reduced subsequent falls in high-risk seniors by 36%, according the results of a 12-month clinical trial published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

4h

Early lives of Alaska sockeye salmon accelerating with climate change

An ample buffet of freshwater food, brought on by climate change, is altering the life history of one of the world's most important salmon species.

4h

Ultimate Ears Wonderboom 2 Speaker Promises Big Sound In A Rugged Package

Logitech is a company that has a lot of products under its umbrella. Gamers tend to think of it mostly as a gaming keyboard and mouse company with products like the recently announced the MX518 …

4h

New Law Would Let Corporations Patent Human Genes

Private Property If a new amendment to federal patent legislation gets signed into law, biotech and pharmaceutical companies may be able to patent individual human genes — claiming the right to all experimentation, tests, and treatments of genetic conditions. The law would reverse the legal precedent that the U.S. Patent Office can’t grant intellectual property rights over products of nature or a

4h

Oil Rigs May Get Second Lives as Fish Habitat

Oil Rigs May Get Second Lives as Fish Habitat New research shows how decommissioned oil rigs can become home to an abundance of fish and invertebrates. oil-rig-swimmer.jpg Image credits: Desmond Ho Rights information: These images may only be reproduced with this Inside Science article. Teaser image credit: Scott Giettler Earth Tuesday, June 4, 2019 – 14:30 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside S

4h

Supercomputing dynamic earthquake rupture models

Multiple interactions found in postulated network of faults in the Brawley seismic zone in southern California.

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Patagonia ice sheets thicker than previously thought

A new study of Patagonia's ice fields finds that many glaciers in the region are much thicker than previously thought.

4h

MilliporeSigma: Immobilon® GO – How Does it Work?

Are individual wash steps dragging you down when it comes to Western blotting? Take the load off your hands with the Immobilon® GO system!

4h

MIT robot solves Rubik's Cube in world record time: 0.38 seconds

A robot developed by MIT students Ben Katz and Jared Di Carlo has set the world record for solving the Rubik's Cube. The fastest human record is held by Australian Feliks Zemdegs, who solved it in 4.22 seconds in 2018. The original-size Rubik's Cube (3x3x3) has 43 quintillion possible combinations – and one solution. None There's a special place in our hearts for the Rubik's Cube. Pop culture ico

4h

Views From Above: The Past Eight Months in Orbit

Since late last year, nine different astronauts from four nations have rotated through Expeditions 57, 58, and 59 aboard the International Space Station, which is still orbiting 250 miles above Earth more than 20 years since its first component was launched. These recent expeditions carried out observations and experiments related to cancer research, climate change, human endurance in microgravit

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Meet the Master Muralist Who Inspired Today's Generation of Paleoartists

The treasured Jay Matternes murals of lost Mesozoic worlds are featured in a new Smithsonian book

4h

Solving the sun's super-heating mystery with Parker Solar Probe

It's one of the greatest and longest-running mysteries surrounding, quite literally, our sun—why is its outer atmosphere hotter than its fiery surface?

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Do images of food on kids' clothes influence eating behavior?

As some sweet treat fans celebrate National Doughnut Day on June 7, 2019 a pediatrician examines the new trend of donuts showing up on children's clothing.

4h

Civility still matters to some in cyberspace

In the online world, where incivility is all too common, new research from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin found that being polite is golden, at least when individuals who pose questions online get to choose the "best answer."

4h

The Double Bind of Trump’s Outrageous Statements

One of the open secrets of Donald Trump’s success in the 2016 presidential campaign was his ability to grab attention—and, accordingly, deflect it from his adversaries— by making outrageous comments . Sure, there would sometimes be backlash to things he said, but he could always deflect that with another comment. Whether this reflected a planned strategy or an intuitive feel for controlling the m

4h

Judges Give Both Sides a Grilling in Youth Climate Case Against the Government

A federal appeals court will hear a closely watched lawsuit brought by young people to compel the federal government to take action on climate change

4h

'Sign In With Apple' Protects You in Ways Google and Facebook Don't

Apple's new single-sign-on scheme has benefits that its competitors seem unlikely to match.

4h

Many kids with pneumonia get unnecessary antibiotics, chest X-rays

Preschool children with community-acquired pneumonia often receive unnecessary tests and treatment at outpatient clinics and emergency departments, according to a nationally representative study.

4h

Sleepless nights linked to high blood pressure

A bad night's sleep may result in a spike in blood pressure that night and the following day, according to new research led by the University of Arizona. The study, to be published in Psychosomatic Medicine, offers one possible explanation for why sleep problems have been shown to increase the risk of heart attack, stroke and even death from cardiovascular disease.

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Labels of US probiotic products lacking

When it comes to buying probiotics, most product labels do not give consumers enough information to make an informed decision, according to a research team.

4h

The elements we might mine on the moon

Space Lunar exploration started as an adventure, now prospectors also see dollar signs in that smiling cheese. Lunar exploration started as an adventure, now prospectors also see dollar signs in that smiling cheese. Here are seven things they might find when they get there.

4h

This Smart Bed’s Dynamic Heating and Cooling Mattress Adjusts its Temp While You Sleep

In recent years, technology has made all sorts of everyday objects “smart.” Phones are smart. TVs are smart. Light bulbs are smart. Even refrigerators are smart. So why are you still sleeping on a regular mattress ? You should be sleeping on The Pod. Created by the tech startup Eight Sleep, it’s the world’s most advanced smart bed and features a dynamic heating and cooling mattress that just migh

4h

Scientists Predict Quantum Jumps, Turning Physics on Its Head

Cat’s Out In 1935, physicist Erwin Schrödinger concocted a thought experiment to illustrate a pair of strange quantum physics phenomena: superposition and unpredictability. The experiment became known as Schrödinger’s cat, and for more than 80 years, it’s served as a cornerstone of quantum physics. But in a newly published study, a team of Yale scientists essentially destroys the premise at the c

4h

Why Did People Take Iodine Pills After Chernobyl Exploded?

In the HBO miniseries 'Chernobyl,' a Soviet physicist realizes that there's been a release of radioactive material nearby and immediately pops an iodine pill. Why?

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France to ban destroying unsold goods, targeting Amazon, luxury brands

France's prime minister on Tuesday announced a crackdown on the destruction of unsold or returned consumer products, a move that will affect online retailers such as Amazon and luxury goods brands.

5h

Sig Has a Broken Crane and No Crab | Deadliest Catch

Captain Sig's unlucky streak continues as he fails to catch any opilio crab and faces a broken crane on the boat. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.c

5h

This AI Generates New Remixes of Jai Paul… Forever

AI Remix Remember the much-hyped electronica artist Jai Paul, who earned accolades during the early 2010s for the tracks “BTSTU” and “Jasmine”? After a long break, Paul is back with a pair of new singles — and a fascinating artificial intelligence project that produces new takes on his classic track “Jasmine” in perpetuity. Paul Y’all The enigmatic Paul, who’s such a perfectionist that he’s known

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Ultra-selective ligand-driven separation of strategic actinides

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10240-x Radionuclides are of great importance for fields such as nuclear medicine and waste recycling, but their efficient purification remains a challenge. Here the authors show that an octadentate hydroxypyridinone chelator enables efficient and robust separation processes for isotopes of Ac, Pu, and Bk.

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Aβ-induced vulnerability propagates via the brain’s default mode network

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10217-w Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition occurs in Alzheimer's disease but its relation to disease features such as local brain hypometabolism or cognitive decline is unclear. Here, the authors show that Aβ aggregation in the brain’s default mode network leads to hypometabolism in distant but functionally connected areas.

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Strain-tunable van der Waals interactions in few-layer black phosphorus

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10483-8 Layered materials governed by van der Waals (vdW) interactions offer opportunities for interlayer tuning of the materials' properties. Here, the authors demonstrate that in-plane tensile strain can effectively tune the vdW interactions of few-layered black phosphorus and weaken its interlayer coupling even thoug

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Invariance properties of bacterial random walks in complex structures

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10455-y It has been previously shown theoretically that the average path length of random walks inside a closed domain is invariant. Here the authors demonstrate that this invariance property can be used to predict the mean residence time of swimming bacteria exploring structured micro-environments.

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Emergent bound states and impurity pairs in chemically doped Shastry-Sutherland system

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10410-x Exploring the impurity-induced phenomena facilitates the understanding of emergent quantum materials. Here the authors show the anomalous magnetization transitions as well as demonstrate the relation between the impurities and the excited spin states in the Mg doped Shastry-Sutherland compound SrCu2(BO3)2.

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Detection of DNA base modifications by deep recurrent neural network on Oxford Nanopore sequencing data

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10168-2 DNA modification generates unique electric signals in Oxford Nanopore sequencing data but the signals can be complicated to decipher. Here, the authors develop a deep learning framework, DeepMod, to detect DNA base modifications including 5mC and 6mA using Nanopore sequencing data

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A synthesis strategy for tetracyclic terpenoids leads to agonists of ERβ

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10415-6 Many natural-product like drugs have a tetracyclic terpenoid core. Here, the authors developed a synthesis of triterpene-like tetracyclic systems, and apply this method to the preparation of a number of enantiomeric compounds, two of which are very selective ligands for estrogen receptor beta

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Tunable self-healing of magnetically propelling colloidal carpets

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10255-4 Activity often suppresses equilibrium ordering and crystallization in a group of driven or self-propelling colloids. Massana-Cid et al. show tunable self-healing process, where magnetic colloidal rollers are assembled to crystalline carpets upon a balance between magnetism and hydrodynamic interactions.

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Watchdog says FBI has access to about 640M photographs

A government watchdog says the FBI has access to about 640 million photographs—including from driver's licenses, passports and mugshots—that can be searched using facial recognition technology.

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No increased risk of birth defects in children of fathers treated for testicular cancer

New research has found no increased risk of congenital malformations associated with treatment with radiotherapy or chemotherapy in children of fathers with testicular cancer. The study, by Yahia Al-Jebari of Lund University, Sweden and colleagues, is published in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine on June 4, 2019. It followed 4,207 children of 2,380 fathers and finds that those conceived after

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Scientists call on funders to make research freely available immediately

Scientific research usually takes months to be published by academic journals, and once it is, many of the papers can only be read by scientists from wealthy institutes that subscribe to the journals. Over the years, there have been various attempts to make research more widely available, but most papers remain behind paywalls and scientists complain that the peer review process at journals now ta

5h

We Found “Jeopardy!” Kingslayer Emma Boettcher’s Thesis on Data Mining

On Monday, someone did the seemingly impossible: Dethroned “Jeopardy!” legend James Holzhauer, the professional sports bettor from Vegas whose gargantuan run at the show broke brains and shattered records. The kingslayer? Chicago librarian Emma Boettcher, who wrote her master’s thesis on deep learning and “Jeopardy!” And we found it . Boettcher’s 2016 paper, titled “Predicting the Difficulty of T

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How to make sure you stay on track with your goals

We all have a list of goals — either written down or floating around in our heads — that will help take our lives in the direction we want. Having that list is a great first step, but you have to actually keep track of, and then follow through on your goals in order to make them count. Major behavior changes don't happen overnight — you're far more likely to succeed if you use Microsteps (small,

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Alcohol consumption is associated with the risk of developing colorectal neoplasia: Propensity score matching analysis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44719-w Alcohol consumption is associated with the risk of developing colorectal neoplasia: Propensity score matching analysis

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Exceptional fracture resistance of ultrathin metallic glass films due to an intrinsic size effect

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44384-z Exceptional fracture resistance of ultrathin metallic glass films due to an intrinsic size effect

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Quality of life after photo-selective vaporization and holmium-laser enucleation of the prostate: 5-year outcomes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44686-2 Quality of life after photo-selective vaporization and holmium-laser enucleation of the prostate: 5-year outcomes

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Experimental study on removing heavy metals from the municipal solid waste incineration fly ash with the modified electrokinetic remediation device

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43844-w Experimental study on removing heavy metals from the municipal solid waste incineration fly ash with the modified electrokinetic remediation device

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Systematic assessment of prescribed medications and short-term risk of myocardial infarction – a pharmacopeia-wide association study from Norway and Sweden

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44641-1 Systematic assessment of prescribed medications and short-term risk of myocardial infarction – a pharmacopeia-wide association study from Norway and Sweden

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Carbon dioxide levels in atmosphere hit record high in May

Atmospheric carbon dioxide continued its rapid rise in 2019, with the average for May peaking at 414.7 parts per million (ppm) at NOAA's Mauna Loa Atmospheric Baseline Observatory.

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Dowsing for electric fields in liquid crystals

Nematic liquid crystals can be oriented in a curious way termed the 'dowser texture', which is sensitive to external conditions. Physicists have now published an article that shows that the dowser texture responds to electric fields in different ways in different nematic materials.

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Vulnerability to Ebola and Lassa fever can now be properly assessed

Identifying vulnerabilities to outbreaks of Ebola and Lassa fever is possible following new research. This will aid government agencies and health organizations in evaluating a country's vulnerability to outbreaks, and inform decisions on strategic investments and plans.

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Zebrafish capture a 'window' on the cancer process

Cancer-related inflammation impacts significantly on cancer development and progression. New research has observed in zebrafish, for the first time, that inflammatory cells use weak spots or micro-perforations in the extracellular matrix barrier layer to access skin cancer cells.

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Killing the unkillable cancer cells

We all know someone affected by the battle against cancer. And we know that treatments can be quite efficient at shrinking the tumor but too often, they can't kill all the cells, and so it may come back. With some aggressive types of cancer, the problem is so great that there is very little that can be done for the patients.

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New genes out of nothing

One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. Researchers now show how new genes and functions that are advantageous to bacteria can be selected from random DNA sequences.

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DATE

I have got a very very serious thoughts. A million years from now if the earth still exists how will be the people represent the date. For example ,today after a million years the date will be like 4/5/10002019 , isn't that thing weird . They have got a huge history to go through …….they will be looking at us in the same way as we are looking at the CAVE PEOPLE and a transistor will be like F

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Three of the most common fallacies about the simulation theory

submitted by /u/AtaturkcuOsman [link] [comments]

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Consensus sequence design as a general strategy to create hyperstable, biologically active proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Consensus sequence design offers a promising strategy for designing proteins of high stability while retaining biological activity since it draws upon an evolutionary history in which residues important for both stability and function are likely to be conserved. Although there have been several reports of successful consensus design of individual…

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Chaperone-mediated reflux of secretory proteins to the cytosol during endoplasmic reticulum stress [Cell Biology]

Diverse perturbations to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) functions compromise the proper folding and structural maturation of secretory proteins. To study secretory pathway physiology during such “ER stress,” we employed an ER-targeted, redox-responsive, green fluorescent protein—eroGFP—that reports on ambient changes in oxidizing potential. Here we find that diverse ER stress regimes cause…

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NURR1 activation in skeletal muscle controls systemic energy homeostasis [Cell Biology]

Skeletal muscle plays a central role in the control of metabolism and exercise tolerance. Analysis of muscle enhancers activated after exercise in mice revealed the orphan nuclear receptor NURR1/NR4A2 as a prominent component of exercise-responsive enhancers. We show that exercise enhances the expression of NURR1, and transgenic overexpression of NURR1…

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Role for polo-like kinase 4 in mediation of cytokinesis [Cell Biology]

The mitotic protein polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4) plays a critical role in centrosome duplication for cell division. By using immunofluorescence, we confirm that PLK4 is localized to centrosomes. In addition, we find that phospho-PLK4 (pPLK4) is cleaved and distributed to kinetochores (metaphase and anaphase), spindle midzone/cleavage furrow (anaphase and telophase),…

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Short-interval severe fire erodes the resilience of subalpine lodgepole pine forests [Ecology]

Subalpine forests in the northern Rocky Mountains have been resilient to stand-replacing fires that historically burned at 100- to 300-year intervals. Fire intervals are projected to decline drastically as climate warms, and forests that reburn before recovering from previous fire may lose their ability to rebound. We studied recent fires…

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Circumventing kinetics in biogeochemical modeling [Environmental Sciences]

Microbial metabolism drives biogeochemical fluxes in virtually every ecosystem. Modeling these fluxes is challenged by the incredible diversity of microorganisms, whose kinetic parameters are largely unknown. In poorly mixed systems, such as stagnant water columns or sediments, however, long-term bulk microbial metabolism may become limited by physical transport rates of…

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A metaanalysis of bat phylogenetics and positive selection based on genomes and transcriptomes from 18 species [Evolution]

Historically, the evolution of bats has been analyzed using a small number of genetic loci for many species or many genetic loci for a few species. Here we present a phylogeny of 18 bat species, each of which is represented in 1,107 orthologous gene alignments used to build the tree….

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Developmental integration and evolution of labile plasticity in a complex quantitative character in a multiperiodic environment [Evolution]

Labile plasticity in a complex quantitative character is modeled, with multiple components contributing to net plasticity in the character. Each component has a specific development rate, norm of reaction, and cost of plasticity. For example, thermal adaptation in mammals includes seasonal fat deposition and fur growth, short-term shivering and sweating…

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Epigenetic upregulation of FKBP5 by aging and stress contributes to NF-{kappa}B-driven inflammation and cardiovascular risk [Genetics]

Aging and psychosocial stress are associated with increased inflammation and disease risk, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Because both aging and stress are also associated with lasting epigenetic changes, a plausible hypothesis is that stress along the lifespan could confer disease risk through epigenetic effects on molecules involved…

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Enhanced susceptibility to chemically induced colitis caused by excessive endosomal TLR signaling in LRBA-deficient mice [Immunology and Inflammation]

LPS-responsive beige-like anchor (LRBA) protein deficiency in humans causes immune dysregulation resulting in autoimmunity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), hypogammaglobulinemia, regulatory T (Treg) cell defects, and B cell functional defects, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible are incompletely understood. In an ongoing forward genetic screen for N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-in

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TrxR1, Gsr, and oxidative stress determine hepatocellular carcinoma malignancy [Medical Sciences]

Thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1)-, glutathione reductase (Gsr)-, and Nrf2 transcription factor-driven antioxidant systems form an integrated network that combats potentially carcinogenic oxidative damage yet also protects cancer cells from oxidative death. Here we show that although unchallenged wild-type (WT), TrxR1-null, or Gsr-null mouse livers exhibited similarly low DNA damage indices, these..

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Activation of unliganded FGF receptor by extracellular phosphate potentiates proteolytic protection of FGF23 by its O-glycosylation [Medical Sciences]

Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 23 produced by bone is a hormone that decreases serum phosphate (Pi). Reflecting its central role in Pi control, serum FGF23 is tightly regulated by serum Pi alterations. FGF23 levels are regulated by the transcriptional event and posttranslational cleavage into inactive fragments before its secretion. For…

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Genomic correlates of clinical outcome in advanced prostate cancer [Medical Sciences]

Heterogeneity in the genomic landscape of metastatic prostate cancer has become apparent through several comprehensive profiling efforts, but little is known about the impact of this heterogeneity on clinical outcome. Here, we report comprehensive genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 429 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) linked with longitudinal…

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Estrogen receptor signaling is reprogrammed during breast tumorigenesis [Medical Sciences]

Limited knowledge of the changes in estrogen receptor (ER) signaling during the transformation of the normal mammary gland to breast cancer hinders the development of effective prevention and treatment strategies. Differences in estrogen signaling between normal human primary breast epithelial cells and primary breast tumors obtained immediately following surgical excision…

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A human organoid system that self-organizes to recapitulate growth and differentiation of a benign mammary tumor [Medical Sciences]

As 3D culture has become central to investigation of tissue biology, mammary epithelial organoids have emerged as powerful tools for investigation of epithelial cell polarization and carcinogenesis. However, most current protocols start from single cells suspended in Matrigel, which can also restrict cell differentiation and behavior. Here, we show that…

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A glycan shield on chimpanzee CD4 protects against infection by primate lentiviruses (HIV/SIV) [Microbiology]

Pandemic HIV-1 (group M) emerged following the cross-species transmission of a simian immunodeficiency virus from chimpanzees (SIVcpz) to humans. Primate lentiviruses (HIV/SIV) require the T cell receptor CD4 to enter into target cells. By surveying the sequence and function of CD4 in 50 chimpanzee individuals, we find that all chimpanzee…

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Structural and functional analyses of the N-terminal domain of the A subunit of a Bacillus megaterium spore germinant receptor [Microbiology]

Germination of Bacillus spores is induced by the interaction of specific nutrient molecules with germinant receptors (GRs) localized in the spore’s inner membrane. GRs typically consist of three subunits referred to as A, B, and C, although functions of individual subunits are not known. Here we present the crystal structure…

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Ultrafast optical clearing method for three-dimensional imaging with cellular resolution [Neuroscience]

Optical clearing is a versatile approach to improve imaging quality and depth of optical microscopy by reducing scattered light. However, conventional optical clearing methods are restricted in the efficiency-first applications due to unsatisfied time consumption, irreversible tissue deformation, and fluorescence quenching. Here, we developed an ultrafast optical clearing method (FOCM)…

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Human nonvisual opsin 3 regulates pigmentation of epidermal melanocytes through functional interaction with melanocortin 1 receptor [Physiology]

Opsins form a family of light-activated, retinal-dependent, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that serve a multitude of visual and nonvisual functions. Opsin 3 (OPN3 or encephalopsin), initially identified in the brain, remains one of the few members of the mammalian opsin family with unknown function and ambiguous light absorption properties. We…

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Alternative outlets for sustaining photosynthetic electron transport during dark-to-light transitions [Plant Biology]

Environmental stresses dramatically impact the balance between the production of photosynthetically derived energetic electrons and Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle (CBBC) activity; an imbalance promotes accumulation of reactive oxygen species and causes cell damage. Hence, photosynthetic organisms have developed several strategies to route electrons toward alternative outlets that allow for storage or

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Casein kinase 1 family regulates PRR5 and TOC1 in the Arabidopsis circadian clock [Plant Biology]

The circadian clock provides organisms with the ability to adapt to daily and seasonal cycles. Eukaryotic clocks mostly rely on lineage-specific transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs). Posttranslational modifications are also crucial for clock functions in fungi and animals, but the posttranslational modifications that affect the plant clock are less understood. Here,…

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A mathematical theory of semantic development in deep neural networks [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

An extensive body of empirical research has revealed remarkable regularities in the acquisition, organization, deployment, and neural representation of human semantic knowledge, thereby raising a fundamental conceptual question: What are the theoretical principles governing the ability of neural networks to acquire, organize, and deploy abstract knowledge by integrating across many…

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Muscle development and regeneration controlled by AUF1-mediated stage-specific degradation of fate-determining checkpoint mRNAs [Cell Biology]

AUF1 promotes rapid decay of mRNAs containing 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) AU-rich elements (AREs). AUF1 depletion in mice accelerates muscle loss and causes limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Here, we demonstrate that the selective, targeted degradation by AUF1 of key muscle stem cell fate-determining checkpoint mRNAs regulates each stage of muscle…

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Interrogating dense ligand chemical space with a forward-synthetic library [Chemistry]

Forward-synthetic databases are an efficient way to enumerate chemical space. We explored here whether these databases are good sources of novel protein ligands and how many molecules are obtainable and in which time frame. Based on docking calculations, series of molecules were selected to gain insights into the ligand structure–activity…

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Bone resorption and body reorganization during maturation induce maternal transfer of toxic metals in anguillid eels [Environmental Sciences]

During their once-in-a-lifetime transoceanic spawning migration, anguillid eels do not feed, instead rely on energy stores to fuel the demands of locomotion and reproduction while they reorganize their bodies by depleting body reserves and building up gonadal tissue. Here we show how the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) breaks down its…

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An ammonite trapped in Burmese amber [Evolution]

Amber is fossilized tree resin, and inclusions usually comprise terrestrial and, rarely, aquatic organisms. Marine fossils are extremely rare in Cretaceous and Cenozoic ambers. Here, we report a record of an ammonite with marine gastropods, intertidal isopods, and diverse terrestrial arthropods as syninclusions in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. We used X-ray–microcomputed…

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Aneuploidy drives lethal progression in prostate cancer [Medical Sciences]

Aneuploidy, defined as chromosome gains and losses, is a hallmark of cancer. However, compared with other tumor types, extensive aneuploidy is relatively rare in prostate cancer. Thus, whether numerical chromosome aberrations dictate disease progression in prostate cancer patients is not known. Here, we report the development of a method based…

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Protective role for the N-terminal domain of {alpha}-dystroglycan in Influenza A virus proliferation [Medical Sciences]

α-Dystroglycan (α-DG) is a highly glycosylated basement membrane receptor that is cleaved by the proprotein convertase furin, which releases its N-terminal domain (α-DGN). Before cleavage, α-DGN interacts with the glycosyltransferase LARGE1 and initiates functional O-glycosylation of the mucin-like domain of α-DG. Notably, α-DGN has been detected in a wide variety…

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Positron emission tomography reporter gene strategy for use in the central nervous system [Medical Sciences]

There is a growing need for monitoring or imaging gene therapy in the central nervous system (CNS). This can be achieved with a positron emission tomography (PET) reporter gene strategy. Here we report the development of a PET reporter gene system using the PKM2 gene with its associated radiotracer [18F]DASA-23….

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Systematic evasion of the restriction-modification barrier in bacteria [Microbiology]

Bacteria that are recalcitrant to genetic manipulation using modern in vitro techniques are termed genetically intractable. Genetic intractability is a fundamental barrier to progress that hinders basic, synthetic, and translational microbiology research and development beyond a few model organisms. The most common underlying causes of genetic intractability are restriction-modification (RM)…

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Cardiac myosin activation with 2-deoxy-ATP via increased electrostatic interactions with actin [Physiology]

The naturally occurring nucleotide 2-deoxy-adenosine 5′-triphosphate (dATP) can be used by cardiac muscle as an alternative energy substrate for myosin chemomechanical activity. We and others have previously shown that dATP increases contractile force in normal hearts and models of depressed systolic function, but the structural basis of these effects has…

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In vivo evidence for dysregulation of mGluR5 as a biomarker of suicidal ideation [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Recent evidence implicates dysregulation of metabotropic glutamatergic receptor 5 (mGluR5) in pathophysiology of PTSD and suicidality. Using positron emission tomography and [18F]FPEB, we quantified mGluR5 availability in vivo in individuals with PTSD (n = 29) and MDD (n = 29) as a function of suicidal ideation (SI) to compare with…

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Negative emotional contagion and cognitive bias in common ravens (Corvus corax) [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Emotional contagion is described as an emotional state matching between subjects, and has been suggested to facilitate communication and coordination in complex social groups. Empirical studies typically focus on the measurement of behavioral contagion and emotional arousal, yet, while highly important, such an approach often disregards an additional evaluation of…

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Correction for Kroger et al., Acquisition of a hybrid E/M state is essential for tumorigenicity of basal breast cancer cells [Corrections]

CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “Acquisition of a hybrid E/M state is essential for tumorigenicity of basal breast cancer cells,” by Cornelia Kröger, Alexander Afeyan, Jasmin Mraz, Elinor Ng Eaton, Ferenc Reinhardt, Yevgenia L. Khodor, Prathapan Thiru, Brian Bierie, Xin Ye, Christopher B. Burge, and Robert A. Weinberg, which was first…

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Chemical hints of ayahuasca use in pre-Columbian shamanic rituals Contents of ritual bundle: leather bag, snuff tablets, camelid-bone spatulas, headband, snuff tube, fox-snout pouch, and plant pieces on strings. Scale bars are 10 cm. Archaeological studies have found evidence of ritual consumption of psychoactive plants among native cultures in South…

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Molecular models should not be published without the corresponding atomic coordinates [Biological Sciences]

In PNAS, Romero et al. (1) present models of how glucocerebrosidase (GCase) interacts with saposin C (SAPC) and membranes. Unfortunately, the authors do not publish representative atomic coordinates or molecular dynamics trajectories for their models, denying researchers the opportunity to scrutinize the data Romero et al. (1) use to draw…

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Reply to Graham et al.: In silico atomistic coordinates and molecular dynamics simulation traȷectories of the glucocerebrosidase-saposin C complex [Biological Sciences]

To our knowledge, there are no established policies among journals on the submission of atomistic coordinates of in silico models or molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Atomistic coordinates are customarily made available on request. However, microsecond-long molecular dynamics trajectories can range from several hundred gigabytes to terabytes in size. Our multiple…

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New progress on the zeta function: From old conjectures to a major breakthrough [Mathematics]

Early History The zeta function ζ(s) today is the oldest and most important tool to study the distribution of prime numbers and is the simplest example of a whole class of similar functions, equally important for understanding the deepest problems of number theory. The celebrated Riemann hypothesis is that all…

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Ancient medicinal plants of South America [Anthropology]

Many archaeologists suggest that shamanic practices are ancient, starting at least 30,000 y ago (1–3). As an analytical concept, anthropologists define shamans as religious practitioners who interact directly with the spirit world to help their people. Shamans in each culture have their own practices and are called by different names…

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Predicting clinical outcome of therapy-resistant prostate cancer [Medical Sciences]

Clinical Course of Prostate Cancer and Tumor Histology Prostate cancer (PCa) is among the most common malignancies in men and a leading cause of cancer-related death. Due to its high incidence, men generally undergo annual screening for serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Those with elevated serum PSA are usually…

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Mapping hydroxyl variability throughout the global remote troposphere via synthesis of airborne and satellite formaldehyde observations [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The hydroxyl radical (OH) fuels tropospheric ozone production and governs the lifetime of methane and many other gases. Existing methods to quantify global OH are limited to annual and global-to-hemispheric averages. Finer resolution is essential for isolating model deficiencies and building process-level understanding. In situ observations from the Atmospheric Tomography…

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Climate change mitigation potential of carbon capture and utilization in the chemical industry [Environmental Sciences]

Chemical production is set to become the single largest driver of global oil consumption by 2030. To reduce oil consumption and resulting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, carbon dioxide can be captured from stacks or air and utilized as alternative carbon source for chemicals. Here, we show that carbon capture and…

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Knowledge of animal appearance among sighted and blind adults [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

How does first-person sensory experience contribute to knowledge? Contrary to the suppositions of early empiricist philosophers, people who are born blind know about phenomena that cannot be perceived directly, such as color and light. Exactly what is learned and how remains an open question. We compared knowledge of animal appearance…

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Substrate inhibition imposes fitness penalty at high protein stability [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Proteins are only moderately stable. It has long been debated whether this narrow range of stabilities is solely a result of neutral drift toward lower stability or purifying selection against excess stability—for which no experimental evidence was found so far—is also at work. Here, we show that mutations outside the…

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Microbial biospherics: The experimental study of ecosystem function and evolution [Ecology]

Awareness that our planet is a self-supporting biosphere with sunlight as its major source of energy for life has resulted in a long-term historical fascination with the workings of self-supporting ecological systems. However, the studies of such systems have never entered the canon of ecological or evolutionary tools and instead,…

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NAC-type transcription factors regulate accumulation of starch and protein in maize seeds [Agricultural Sciences]

Grain starch and protein are synthesized during endosperm development, prompting the question of what regulatory mechanism underlies the synchronization of the accumulation of secondary and primary gene products. We found that two endosperm-specific NAC transcription factors, ZmNAC128 and ZmNAC130, have such a regulatory function. Knockdown of expression of ZmNAC128 and…

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Chemical evidence for the use of multiple psychotropic plants in a 1,000-year-old ritual bundle from South America [Anthropology]

Over several millennia, various native plant species in South America have been used for their healing and psychoactive properties. Chemical analysis of archaeological artifacts provides an opportunity to study the use of psychoactive plants in the past and to better understand ancient botanical knowledge systems. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry…

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Evolution of interlayer and intralayer magnetism in three atomically thin chromium trihalides [Applied Physical Sciences]

We conduct a comprehensive study of three different magnetic semiconductors, CrI3, CrBr3, and CrCl3, by incorporating both few-layer and bilayer samples in van der Waals tunnel junctions. We find that the interlayer magnetic ordering, exchange gap, magnetic anisotropy, and magnon excitations evolve systematically with changing halogen atom. By fitting to…

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Optical edge detection based on high-efficiency dielectric metasurface [Applied Physical Sciences]

Optical edge detection is a useful method for characterizing boundaries, which is also in the forefront of image processing for object detection. As the field of metamaterials and metasurface is growing fast in an effort to miniaturize optical devices at unprecedented scales, experimental realization of optical edge detection with metamaterials…

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Machine learning reveals systematic accumulation of electric current in lead-up to solar flares [Astronomy]

Solar flares—bursts of high-energy radiation responsible for severe space weather effects—are a consequence of the occasional destabilization of magnetic fields rooted in active regions (ARs). The complexity of AR evolution is a barrier to a comprehensive understanding of flaring processes and accurate prediction. Although machine learning (ML) has been used…

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Structure of full-length human phenylalanine hydroxylase in complex with tetrahydrobiopterin [Biochemistry]

Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is a key enzyme in the catabolism of phenylalanine, and mutations in this enzyme cause phenylketonuria (PKU), a genetic disorder that leads to brain damage and mental retardation if untreated. Some patients benefit from supplementation with a synthetic formulation of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) that partly acts…

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Assembly of the complexes of oxidative phosphorylation triggers the remodeling of cardiolipin [Biochemistry]

Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial phospholipid with a very specific and functionally important fatty acid composition, generated by tafazzin. However, in vitro tafazzin catalyzes a promiscuous acyl exchange that acquires specificity only in response to perturbations of the physical state of lipids. To identify the process that imposes acyl specificity…

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MmpL3 is a lipid transporter that binds trehalose monomycolate and phosphatidylethanolamine [Biochemistry]

The cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is notable for the abundance of mycolic acids (MAs), essential to mycobacterial viability, and of other species-specific lipids. The mycobacterial cell envelope is extremely hydrophobic, which contributes to virulence and antibiotic resistance. However, exactly how fatty acids and lipidic elements are transported across the…

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Bacterial scattering in microfluidic crystal flows reveals giant active Taylor-Aris dispersion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The natural habitats of planktonic and swimming microorganisms, from algae in the oceans to bacteria living in soil or intestines, are characterized by highly heterogeneous fluid flows. The complex interplay of flow-field topology, self-propulsion, and porous microstructure is essential to a wide range of biophysical and ecological processes, including marine…

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Self-organizing motors divide active liquid droplets [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The cytoskeleton is a collection of protein assemblies that dynamically impose spatial structure in cells and coordinate processes such as cell division and mechanical regulation. Biopolymer filaments, cross-linking proteins, and enzymatically active motor proteins collectively self-organize into various precise cytoskeletal assemblies critical for specific biological functions. An outstanding que

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Molecular structure of an N-terminal phosphorylated {beta}-amyloid fibril [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The structural polymorphism in β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques from Alzheimer disease (AD) has been recognized as an important pathological factor. Plaques from sporadic AD patients contain fibrillar deposits of various amyloid proteins/peptides, including posttranslational modified Aβ (PTM-Aβ) subtypes. Although many PTM-Aβs were shown to accelerate the fibrillation process, increase neuronal cytotoxicity

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Design of self-assembly dipeptide hydrogels and machine learning via their chemical features [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Hydrogels that are self-assembled by peptides have attracted great interest for biomedical applications. However, the link between chemical structures of peptides and their corresponding hydrogel properties is still unclear. Here, we showed a combinational approach to generate a structurally diverse hydrogel library with more than 2,000 peptides and evaluated their…

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Aberrant expression of select piRNA-pathway genes does not reactivate piRNA silencing in cancer cells [Cell Biology]

Germline genes that are aberrantly expressed in nongermline cancer cells have the potential to be ideal targets for diagnosis and therapy due to their restricted physiological expression, their broad reactivation in various cancer types, and their immunogenic properties. Among such cancer/testis genes, components of the PIWI-interacting small RNA (piRNA) pathway…

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Concepts and tools for mechanism and selectivity analysis in synthetic organic electrochemistry [Chemistry]

As an accompaniment to the current renaissance of synthetic organic electrochemistry, the heterogeneous and space-dependent nature of electrochemical reactions is analyzed in detail. The reactions that follow the initial electron transfer step and yield the products are intimately coupled with reactant transport. Depiction of the ensuing reactions profiles is the…

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Crossing the bridge from molecular catalysis to a heterogenous electrode in electrocatalytic water oxidation [Chemistry]

Significant progress has been made in designing single-site molecular Ru(II)-polypyridyl-aqua catalysts for homogenous catalytic water oxidation. Surface binding and transfer of the catalytic reactivity onto conductive substrates provides a basis for heterogeneous applications in electrolytic cells and dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells (DSPECs). Earlier efforts have focused on phosphonic

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Spontaneous and directed symmetry breaking in the formation of chiral nanocrystals [Chemistry]

Symmetry plays a crucial part in our understanding of the natural world. Mirror symmetry breaking is of special interest as it is related to life as we know it. Studying systems which display chiral amplification, therefore, could further our understanding of symmetry breaking in chemical systems, in general, and thus…

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Microsecond and millisecond dynamics in the photosynthetic protein LHCSR1 observed by single-molecule correlation spectroscopy [Chemistry]

Biological systems are subjected to continuous environmental fluctuations, and therefore, flexibility in the structure and function of their protein building blocks is essential for survival. Protein dynamics are often local conformational changes, which allows multiple dynamical processes to occur simultaneously and rapidly in individual proteins. Experiments often average over these…

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Untangling the formation and liberation of water in the lunar regolith [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The source of water (H2O) and hydroxyl radicals (OH), identified on the lunar surface, represents a fundamental, unsolved puzzle. The interaction of solar-wind protons with silicates and oxides has been proposed as a key mechanism, but laboratory experiments yield conflicting results that suggest that proton implantation alone is insufficient to…

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Stabilizing the metastable superhard material wurtzite boron nitride by three-dimensional networks of planar defects [Engineering]

Wurtzite boron nitride (w-BN) is a metastable superhard material that is a high-pressure polymorph of BN. Clarifying how the metastable high-pressure material can be stabilized at atmospheric pressure is a challenging issue of fundamental scientific importance and promising technological value. Here, we fabricate millimeter-size w-BN bulk crystals via the hexagonal-to-wurtzite…

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Ice sheet contributions to future sea-level rise from structured expert judgment [Environmental Sciences]

Despite considerable advances in process understanding, numerical modeling, and the observational record of ice sheet contributions to global mean sea-level rise (SLR) since the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, severe limitations remain in the predictive capability of ice sheet models. As a consequence, the…

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Jensen polynomials for the Riemann zeta function and other sequences [Mathematics]

In 1927, Pólya proved that the Riemann hypothesis is equivalent to the hyperbolicity of Jensen polynomials for the Riemann zeta function ζ(s) at its point of symmetry. This hyperbolicity has been proved for degrees d≤3. We obtain an asymptotic formula for the central derivatives ζ(2n)(1/2) that is accurate to all…

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Inner Workings: Family of protein fragments promises fresh view of Alzheimer's disease [Medical Sciences]

Neuroscientist Joris de Wit was pretty sure he was on the right track as he homed in on a receptor for a potentially beneficial brain molecule. Known as sAPPalpha (soluble amyloid precursor protein alpha), the molecule is a seemingly benevolent sibling to amyloid beta, the peptide that forms clumps in…

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Functional cooperation of {alpha}-synuclein and VAMP2 in synaptic vesicle recycling [Neuroscience]

The function of α-synuclein (α-syn) has been long debated, and two seemingly divergent views have emerged. In one, α-syn binds to VAMP2, acting as a SNARE chaperone—but with no effect on neurotransmission—while another posits that α-syn attenuates neurotransmitter release by restricting synaptic vesicle mobilization and recycling. Here, we show that…

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Synapsins regulate {alpha}-synuclein functions [Neuroscience]

The normal function of α-synuclein (α-syn) remains elusive. Although recent studies suggest α-syn as a physiologic attenuator of synaptic vesicle (SV) recycling, mechanisms are unclear. Here, we show that synapsin—a cytosolic protein with known roles in SV mobilization and clustering—is required for presynaptic functions of α-syn. Our data offer a…

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Linear magnetoresistance in the low-field limit in density-wave materials [Physics]

The magnetoresistance (MR) of a material is typically insensitive to reversing the applied field direction and varies quadratically with magnetic field in the low-field limit. Quantum effects, unusual topological band structures, and inhomogeneities that lead to wandering current paths can induce a cross-over from quadratic to linear MR with increasing…

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The British Remind Trump That He's Still the Leader of the Free World

LONDON—To President Donald Trump, a political protest isn’t so much an expression of hard-won democratic freedoms as a personal rebuke. At his campaign rallies ahead of his election, Trump would cheer when protesters were evicted—“I’d like to punch him in the face,” he told the crowd when a demonstrator was thrown out of a rally in Las Vegas in February 2016. The notion that he was running for an

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New approach optimizes use of future wave electricity generators during disaster

When hurricanes strike, electricity loss ranks as one of the top concerns. New work looks to develop a strategy for how floating devices that harness the energy of ocean waves might be able to provide this much needed aid. Researchers are studying a new approach to supplying electricity that potentially provides a way of optimizing recovery efforts and poses questions about how relief is currently

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Novel insights into cholesterol regulation may lead to new therapies for heart disease

In a landmark study, scientists discovered what makes white blood cell counts spike in individuals who have high cholesterol, possibly leading to new therapies for heart disease. They looked at hypercholesterolemia, which is the type of high cholesterol that causes very high levels of LDL — the so-called 'bad' cholesterol — to circulate in the blood. They identified a new regulatory mechanism in

5h

Antibiotic produced by the microbiome kills bacteria by disturbing energy metabolism

A research team has investigated the mode of action of a new class of antibiotics that is highly effective against multidrug-resistant pathogens. The so-called fibupeptides impair the energy supply to the bacterial cell, consequently causing their death.

5h

Physical inactivity proved risky for children and pre-teens

At what age do children lose the desire to exercise? Researchers (UNIGE) followed 1,200 pupils and found out that from the age of 9, the positive reasons for exercising begin to be replaced by displaced incentives: to get a good mark or improve your image with others. These results call for a more detailed analysis of how PE is taught in schools to counter physical inactivity leading to a sedentar

5h

Chemicals in biodegradable food containers can leach into compost

PFAS compounds from compostable food containers could end being absorbed by plants and later eaten by people, though the health effects are unclear.

5h

Scientists call on funders to make research freely available immediately

Scientific research usually takes months to be published by academic journals, and once it is, many of the papers can only be read by scientists from wealthy institutes that subscribe to the journals. Over the years, there have been various attempts to make research more widely available, but most papers remain behind paywalls and scientists complain that the peer review process at journals now ta

5h

Urgent Climate Action Could Prevent Many Heat-Related Deaths

Extreme hot temperatures will kill thousands in major U.S. cities unless new policies manage to limit warming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Urgent Climate Action Could Prevent Many Heat-Related Deaths

Extreme hot temperatures will kill thousands in major U.S. cities unless new policies manage to limit warming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Apple is breaking up iTunes. Here's what you need to know.

Technology iTunes is going away, but the iTunes Store lives on in various forms. Apple announced at WWDC that on Macs, iTunes would be supplanted by three separate programs and a feature in the Finder.

5h

Update: House spending panel restores U.S. ban on gene-edited babies

Spending panel had earlier dropped ban, which had been in place for 4 years

5h

Why It Still Matters Which Music Streaming Service You Sign Up For

Take a look at the music streaming services of the moment and you’d be forgiven for not seeing any major differences: They all offer access to around 50 million tracks on demand, they all give …

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James Holzhauer Prompted a Fundamental Question About Jeopardy

Jeopardy had never seen a contestant like James Holzhauer before. During his 32-game win streak, which ended Monday night , the 34-year-old professional sports gambler piled up nearly $2.5 million in prize money. He also set a new single-day-earnings record—$131,127—that exceeded the previous record holder’s sum by more than $50,000. Holzhauer made so much money so quickly thanks to an aggressive

5h

New orca calf reported in southern resident J pod

A new calf has been born to J pod, Canadian whale-watch companies were reporting Friday.

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New orca calf reported in southern resident J pod

A new calf has been born to J pod, Canadian whale-watch companies were reporting Friday.

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Pharma groups combine to promote drug discovery with AI

Blockchain system allows companies to share data without revealing commercial secrets

5h

Feds declare emergency as gray whale deaths reach highest level in nearly 20 years

Alarmed by the high number of gray whales that have been washing up dead on West Coast beaches this spring, the federal government on Friday declared the troubling trend a wildlife emergency.

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Sea turtles start nesting season with 'unheard-of' numbers on one NC island, town says

Each day from May through August, volunteers walk and survey the 26 miles of coastline on North Carolina's Topsail Island looking for the tell-tale tracks of sea turtles coming onto the beach.

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Feds declare emergency as gray whale deaths reach highest level in nearly 20 years

Alarmed by the high number of gray whales that have been washing up dead on West Coast beaches this spring, the federal government on Friday declared the troubling trend a wildlife emergency.

5h

Sea turtles start nesting season with 'unheard-of' numbers on one NC island, town says

Each day from May through August, volunteers walk and survey the 26 miles of coastline on North Carolina's Topsail Island looking for the tell-tale tracks of sea turtles coming onto the beach.

5h

The ambitious plan to reinvent how websites get their names

The domain name system is vulnerable to censorship and hacking. Blockchain could help.

6h

Nation's most ambitious project to clean up nuclear weapons waste has stalled

The Energy Department's most environmentally important and technically ambitious project to clean up Cold War nuclear weapons waste has stalled, putting at jeopardy an already long-delayed effort to protect the Columbia River in central Washington.

6h

Marine life is disappearing, imperiling San Diego's future

Just as scientists are starting to understand the life forms and landscape of the ocean, they are also coming to grips with the threat of mass extinctions, speakers said at a marine biodiversity forum last week.

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Marine life is disappearing, imperiling San Diego's future

Just as scientists are starting to understand the life forms and landscape of the ocean, they are also coming to grips with the threat of mass extinctions, speakers said at a marine biodiversity forum last week.

6h

Fler asylsökande borde genomgå hälsokontroll

– Tidigare har det antagits att många asylsökande inte vill delta i hälsoundersökningar, men mina studier tyder på att det låga deltagandet snarare beror på strukturella hinder, säger Robert Jonzon, doktorand vid Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa vid Umeå universitet. I hans avhandling framgår att det råder avsevärda skillnader mellan Sveriges 21 landsting och regioner ifråga om str

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Mark med högfluorerade ämnen ska renas direkt i fält

För närvarande finns ingen etablerad metod för att effektivt rena PFAS-förorenade jordmassor och vattentäkter. Nu ska forskare vid Luleå tekniska universitet kombinera de mest lovande efterbehandlingsmetoderna som beskrivs vetenskapligt, och skala upp dem till metoder som fungerar direkt i fält. – Vårt mål i detta projekt är att kompromissa mellan behandlingseffektivitet och praktisk tillämpning

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Empathy in healthcare is finally making a comeback

A doctor friend – let's call her Anne – was teaching three smart medical students who were told to diagnose a woman complaining of nonspecific pain and anxiety. After 20 minutes of questions, the students wrote seven pages of notes and recommended two drugs: a painkiller and an antidepressant. Anne considered the students' analysis and agreed that it was based on sound medical evidence. But somet

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Lymphoma trial finds combination targeted therapy effective prior to chemotherapy

Results of a Phase II clinical trial conducted at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center revealed that combination targeted therapy, consisting of rituximab, lenalidomide and ibrutinib (RLI), had an 84.6 percent overall response rate (ORR) and 38.5% complete response rate (CRR) when given prior to any chemotherapy for newly diagnosed patients with a specific type of diffuse large b-cell

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Brains of children with epilepsy able to re-map after surgery to retain visual perception

For children with severe epilepsy, surgery is the last resort used to prevent seizures but the treatment can often come with the risk of both visual and cognitive impairments. Now, a new study funded by the National Eye Institute and jointly led by researchers at York University's Faculty of Health and Carnegie Mellon University, finds that the brains of children with severe epilepsy can compensat

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Children's brains reorganize after epilepsy surgery to retain visual perception

Children can keep full visual perception — the ability to process and understand visual information — after brain surgery for severe epilepsy, according to a study funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health. A new report by Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, researchers from a study of children who had undergone epilepsy surgery suggests that the l

6h

Ant reactions to habitat disruptions inform a result of evolution

A Concordia biology professor is calling on ant experts to develop a set of common principles that influence the way the insects respond when their habitat undergoes severe disruption.

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Ant reactions to habitat disruptions inform a result of evolution

A Concordia biology professor is calling on ant experts to develop a set of common principles that influence the way the insects respond when their habitat undergoes severe disruption.

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Renault interested in Fiat Chrysler merger but to hold new meeting

French carmaker Renault on Tuesday said it was studying "with interest" an offer for a merger with Fiat Chrysler (FCA) after a crunch management meeting but added its board would meet again for further deliberations.

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California maintains life science dominance, report finds

California retains the crown as the nation's top recipient of federal life science funding, signifying the industry's dynamism, according to a new report from Biocom, a California life science trade group.

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American youths sue for a livable climate

Growing up in Fairbanks, Alaska, Nathan Baring has seen the signs of a warming world all around him. The winters have begun to lose their infamous chill. Thawing permafrost is shifting the ground beneath his feet. And some years, there isn't even enough snow to ski.

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Rare fossils provide more detailed picture of biodiversity during Middle Ordovician

A clutch of marine fossil specimens unearthed in northern Portugal that lived between 470 and 459 million years ago is filling a gap in understanding evolution during the Middle Ordovician period.

6h

It's alive! Researchers create innovative 'living' bridge

Engineers at the University of New Hampshire have designed a unique living laboratory on a heavily traveled iconic bridge which could change the way infrastructure is viewed. The Memorial Bridge, which links Portsmouth, New Hampshire to Kittery, Maine, has been outfitted with data sensors that have transformed it into a self-diagnosing, self-reporting "smart" bridge that captures a range of inform

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Researchers first to develop models of 'seeds and soil' to combat breast cancer metastasis

Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center have identified key biological pathways that regulate the spread of tumor cells to vital organs. These findings may have a significant influence on the development of new therapies that slow or prevent breast cancer metastasis.

6h

Biden, Warren propose new plans to combat climate change

Former Vice President Joe Biden on Tuesday unveiled a $1.7-trillion, 10-year plan to combat climate change, the latest entry in a spate of proposals from Democratic White House hopefuls to address a global environmental issue that was rarely addressed in past presidential campaigns.

6h

Frogs find refuge in elephant tracks

Frogs need elephants. That's what a new WCS-led study says that looked at the role of water-filled elephant tracks in providing predator-free breeding grounds and pathways connecting frog populations.

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Frogs find refuge in elephant tracks

Frogs need elephants. That's what a new WCS-led study says that looked at the role of water-filled elephant tracks in providing predator-free breeding grounds and pathways connecting frog populations.

6h

UV light may illuminate improvements for next generation electronic devices

By adding one more layer of atoms to already infinitesimally small semiconductors, a next-level generation of electrical devices becomes possible. This work to build better and faster electronics is well underway, but little was known about how to test the ingredients of these devices to ensure performance. Now, researchers from the Nagoya Institute of Technology (NITech) in Japan have developed a

6h

Lab-Generated Lymph Nodes Connect to Lymphatic System in Mice

Researchers hope that "lympho-organoids" could eventually treat lymphedema in humans, but the technique is currently a proof-of-concept.

6h

Report: 2020 Candidates Are Going to Get Owned by Deepfakes

2020 Vision The technology to create believable deepfakes — computer-generated media depicting real people doing or saying things that never occurred — is already here and widely accessible. And yet, as America moves towards its 2020 presidential election, Axios reports that not a single candidate can point to measures they’ve taken to prevent the spread of this potentially-dangerous media. Not M

6h

Exomoons may be home to extra-terrestrial life

Moons orbiting planets outside our solar system could offer another clue about the pool of worlds that may be home to extra-terrestrial life, according to an astrophysicist at the University of Lincoln.

6h

Four pizza makers that are worth the dough

Gadgets Knead I say more. Pizza makers for your home that’ll make you feel like a real pizzaiolo.

7h

The Smithsonian’s ‘Deep Time’ exhibit gives dinosaurs new life

The Smithsonian’s renovated fossil hall puts ancient dinosaurs and other creatures in context.

7h

Best practices of nucleic acid amplification tests for the diagnosis of clostridioides (clostridium)

A new review looks at the challenges of testing for Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile infection (CDI) and recommendations for newer diagnostic tests. Accurate diagnosis of CDI is critical for effective patient management and implementation of infection control measures to prevent transmission. The research is published this week in the Clinical Microbiology Reviews.

7h

Exomoons may be home to extra-terrestrial life

Computer simulations were run to calculate whether a moon orbiting outside the ring system of J1407b caused gaps. Computer simulations were run to calculate whether a moon orbiting outside the ring system of J1407b caused gaps. It was found they were unlikely to be caused by a moon orbiting outside the ring system.Identifying exomoons may be a promising avenue for finding extra-terrestrial life, a

7h

Labels of US probiotic products lacking, researchers find

When it comes to buying probiotics, most product labels do not give consumers enough information to make an informed decision, according to a Georgetown University Medical Center research team.

7h

Synthego Introduces the Next Generation of CRISPR Knockout Technology with the Gene Knockout Kit v2

Novel bioinformatics-powered multi-guide design guarantees gene knockouts in any human-derived cell type, eliminating trial-and-error in CRISPR guide design

7h

A New Approach to Addiction Treatment

We need to create learning laboratories, where researchers interact directly with patients — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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2018 blev et blodigt år for cyklister

1.862 personer kom alvorligt til skade i trafikken i 2018, det højeste antal i fem år. Dødstallet faldt til gengæld en anelse.

7h

A New Approach to Addiction Treatment

We need to create learning laboratories, where researchers interact directly with patients — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Daily briefing: How to ferret out lesser-known sources of funding

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01766-7 Use online search portals, networking and even crowdfunding to fill your research coffers. Plus: the ‘CRISPR babies’ might have shortened life expectancies and a brief history of slime.

7h

New way to estimate current induced magnetization switching efficacy in ultrathin systems

Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in collaboration with colleagues from South Ural State University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed an alternative method for numerical evaluation of the current induced local magnetization effect in ultrathin ruthenium-cobalt-ruthenium films with a wolfram layer added. That is another throw to fathom how to control spin orientat

7h

Ant reactions to habitat disruptions inform a result of evolution, according to Conco

Concordia University biology professor Jean-Philippe Lessard reviews the ant traits system developed by Alan Andersen and calls for the creation of a global framework to help categorize the world's ant population.

7h

UV light may illuminate improvements for next generation electronic devices

NITech scientists have developed the method to make sure the mechanisms to connect between the two-dimensional layer of atoms and the semiconductors as perfect as possible, which will lead to develop novel optoelectronic devices.

7h

Study: Cholesterol in eggs tied to cardiac disease, death

The risk of heart disease and death increases with the number of eggs an individual consumes, according to a UMass Lowell nutrition expert who has studied the issue.

7h

How chronic inflammation may drive down dopamine and motivation

A new computational method will allow scientists to measure the effects of chronic inflammation on energy availability and effort-based decision-making. The method may yield insights into how chronic, low-grade inflammation contributes to motivational impairments in some cases of depression, schizophrenia and other medical disorders.

7h

Female cannabis users underrepresented in health research, study reveals

Research at the University of York has shown that women are underrepresented in research into links between cannabis and psychosis, which could limit understanding of the impact of the drug.

7h

Would you eat genetically modified food if you understood the science behind it?

While genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are considered safe by an overwhelming majority of scientists, only about one third of consumers share that view. A team of psychologists and biologists from the University of Rochester, the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, and Cardiff University in Wales, set out to discover if consumers' attitudes would change if the public understood the un

7h

Professor: Belief in Aliens Could Replace Traditional Religion

New Religion The number of Americans who believe in intelligent alien life is now about the same as the number who believe in God — and Diana Pasulka doesn’t think that’s a coincidence. Pasulka is a professor of religious studies at the University of North Carolina and the author of “ American Cosmic ,” a newly published book in which she argues that belief in UFOs and aliens is following the sam

7h

A New Approach to Addiction Treatment

We need to create learning laboratories, where researchers interact directly with patients — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

McConaughey or Culkin? Algorithm predicts actors' peak years

Researchers say best years tend to be preceded by rise in number of acting credits Macaulay Culkin peaked young, Jane Lynch hit the big time in her late 40s and Matthew McConaughey’s mid-career resurgence is the stuff of legend. Now researchers say they have developed an algorithm that predicts with 85% accuracy whether an actor is yet to have their most productive year, or whether they have alre

7h

New “Injectable Cartilage” Could Revolutionize Plastic Surgery

Injectable Cartilage According to Chinese state-owned news site Ecns , a team of Chinese scientists has developed “injectable cartilage” that can be used to repair human tissue. The new technique could revolutionize plastic surgery by “growing” cartilage from a patient’s own cells — and using it to radically tinker with their appearance. Growing Ears and Chins By removing a small portion of carti

7h

Ikea is making custom accessories for gamers

Ikea is partnering with prosthetics company Unyq and e-sports company Area Academy to create a line of accessories for gamers. Called Uppkoppla, which means “online,” the 3D-printed …

7h

The Culinary Legacy of Leah Chase

It has become common practice to baptize one and all as “icons” and “activists.” Leah Chase, the legendary chef of New Orleans’s famed Dooky Chase’s Restaurant, was indeed both at a time before today’s reduction of the terms. Chase, who died on June 1 at the age of 96, quietly changed the culinary and political culture of New Orleans with her work, leaving behind a rich legacy of African American

7h

Frogs find refuge in elephant tracks

Frogs need elephants. That's what a new WCS-led study says that looked at the role of water-filled elephant tracks in providing predator-free breeding grounds and pathways connecting frog populations.

7h

Sleepless nights linked to high blood pressure

A bad night's sleep may result in a spike in blood pressure that night and the following day, according to new research led by the University of Arizona. The study, to be published in Psychosomatic Medicine, offers one possible explanation for why sleep problems have been shown to increase the risk of heart attack, stroke and even death from cardiovascular disease.

7h

What Does 'Amazon’s Choice' Actually Mean?

It almost certainly doesn’t involve Amazon employees selecting products they think are the best.

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Researchers develop superconducting quantum refrigerator

Imagine a refrigerator so cold it could turn atoms into their quantum states, giving them unique properties that defy the rules of classical physics.

7h

Fish Cannons, Koi Herpes and Other Tools to Combat Invasive Carp

Researchers are experimenting with a Rube Goldberg-esque mix of tactics to control hearty, nonnative swimmers that re-engineer nutrient-rich Midwest waters.

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“Our current approaches are not working:” Time to make misconduct investigation reports public, says integrity expert

With the 6th World Conference on Research Integrity (WCRI) underway in Hong Kong, C.K. Gunsalus, who has served as a research integrity officer, expert witness in scientific integrity cases, and consultant, argues in Nature this week that universities should “Make reports of research misconduct public.” We asked her a few questions about why she has … Continue reading “Our current approaches are n

7h

Years of taking vitamin D appear to cut cancer death risk

Vitamin D, if taken for at least three years, could help cancer patients live longer, say researchers. The findings suggest that the vitamin carries significant benefits other than just contributing to healthy bones. A paper on the work was presented yesterday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting. “Vitamin D had a significant effect on lowering the risk of death among those

7h

'Citizen scientists' help track foxes, coyotes in urban areas

As foxes and coyotes adapt to urban landscapes, the potential for encounters with humans necessarily goes up. A team of scientists is taking advantage of this fact to enlist the eyeballs and fingertips of humans—getting them to report online what they see in their own neighborhoods and parks.

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Can computers make decisions like humans? A new study may have the answer

A team of British researchers has developed a method that enables computers to make decisions in a way that is more similar to humans. Specifically, the method mimics the complex process of how humans make decisions by enabling the computers to render several acceptable decisions to one specific problem. The research was published in the May issue of IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica (JAS).

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Nitric oxide-scavenging hydrogel developed for rheumatoid arthritis treatment

Nitric oxide (NO) prevents high blood pressure and artery plaque build-up in our body. However, its duplicity is revealed when it causes serious inflammatory disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus, Crohn's disease, and rheumatoid arthritis.

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'Citizen scientists' help track foxes, coyotes in urban areas

As foxes and coyotes adapt to urban landscapes, the potential for encounters with humans necessarily goes up. A team of scientists is taking advantage of this fact to enlist the eyeballs and fingertips of humans—getting them to report online what they see in their own neighborhoods and parks.

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Congress Is Deciding Whether to Break Up Facebook, Google

Break It Up Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives launched a new antitrust investigation into Silicon Valley on Monday. The lawmakers are deciding whether tech giants like Facebook and Google have become monopolies and need to be broken up, according to CNET . What’s at stake: determining if U.S. antitrust law is robust enough to tackle the novel problems of super-powerful tech monopolie

8h

Companies battling shareholder complaints have a potent weapon: Advertising

An international team of researchers from Goethe University Frankfurt, University of Adelaide, Hanken School of Economics, and Maastricht University published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing, which finds that advertising can be used to respond to shareholder complaints.

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Immunterapi mod husstøvmideallergi giver markant bedre søvn

Ni ud af ti patienter med husstøvmideallergi fik forbedret deres søvnkvalitet efter et års behandling med immunterapi.

8h

Montana State Geneticist Resigns After Harassment Allegations

An internal report finds Hikmet Budak touched students inappropriately and discriminated against them based on their country of origin, sex, marriage status, and other factors.

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Here's How Europe's Rosalind Franklin Rover Will Phone Home From Mars

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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AI in procurement: how tech is finally making its mark

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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State of AI in the Enterprise, 2nd Edition

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The 2020 presidential campaigns aren't ready for deepfakes

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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This sub is 90% climate related and not tech related

I have noticed since joining this sub that all I ever see is climate change posts. There are hardly any cool tech related posts. You may as well change this sub to climate change tech. I came here to see crazy new inventions not step into climate debates. submitted by /u/Lorenz99 [link] [comments]

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Watching AI Slowly Forget a Human Face Is Incredibly Creepy

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

8h

Anaconda Mom Gives Birth to Baby Clones, No Male Required

When it comes to making babies, it usually takes two to tango. But Anna, a 10-foot-long (3 meters) anaconda at Boston's New England Aquarium, did it solo. Earlier this year, Anna gave birth to 18 snake babies all by herself, no male snakes required.

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Human Civilization Will Crumble by 2050 If We Don't Stop Climate Change Now, New Paper Claims

Human society could collapse by 2050, a new climate policy paper claims.

8h

Association for Molecular Pathology expresses serious concerns with Congress' attempt to resurrect human gene patenting debate and reverse settled Supreme Court ruling

AMP has expressed serious concerns with Congress' recent proposal to amend Section 101 of the Patent Act. If enacted, the draft legislation would overturn 150 years of patent case law and permit patenting of human genes and naturally occurring associations between genes and diseases.

8h

Rare fossils provide more detailed picture of biodiversity during Middle Ordovician

Marine fossil specimens unearthed in northern Portugal are filling a gap in understanding evolution during the Middle Ordovician period.

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Building blocks of the Earth

Geologists from the Universities of Cologne and Bonn gain new insights regarding the Earth's composition by analysing meteorites. They conclude that the building blocks that brought volatile elements to Earth have a chemical composition similar to that of primitive carbonaceous chondrites.

8h

'Citizen scientists' help track foxes, coyotes in urban areas

As foxes and coyotes adapt to urban landscapes, the potential for encounters with humans necessarily goes up. A team of scientists is taking advantage of this fact to enlist the eyeballs and fingertips of humans — getting them to report online what they see in their own neighborhoods and parks.

8h

Estimating the wear and tear of ice on structures over coming decades or even centuries

Mechanisms behind the effects of ice on physical structures — particularly over the long term — have remained an open question in a time of continuous environmental change. Researchers at Aalto University have developed a new method of assessing how ever-moving, heavy loads of ice affect structures like bridges or even wind turbines across a wide variety of conditions over the very long term, ev

8h

Many kids with pneumonia get unnecessary antibiotics, chest X-rays

Preschool children with community-acquired pneumonia often receive unnecessary tests and treatment at outpatient clinics and emergency departments, according to a nationally representative study led by Todd Florin, M.D., MSCE, from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago.

8h

Zebrafish capture a 'window' on the cancer process

Cancer-related inflammation impacts significantly on cancer development and progression. New research has observed in zebrafish, for the first time, that inflammatory cells use weak spots or micro-perforations in the extracellular matrix barrier layer to access skin cancer cells.

8h

Chemists could make 'smart glass' smarter by manipulating it at the nanoscale

Colorado State University chemists have devised a potentially major improvement to both the speed and durability of smart glass by providing a better understanding of how the glass works at the nanoscale.

8h

Exposing modern forgers

Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a process that can provide conclusive evidence with regard to modern fakes of paintings, even in cases where the forger used old materials. This verification process requires less than 200 micrograms of paint.

8h

Researchers develop superconducting quantum refrigerator

University of Rochester researchers harnessed superconductivity to conceive of a quantum refrigerator that could cool atoms to nearly absolute zero temperatures.

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Exercise fine-tunes brain's connections, eases autism spectrum disorder in mouse model

A mouse model of autism has revealed how exercise changes the structure of the brain by eliminating the excess connections between neurons characteristic of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). After one month of voluntary running on a wheel, behavioral differences disappeared and structural differences in ASD model mice's brains were reduced.

8h

Mathematicians work out how to predict success in show business

Mathematicians from Queen Mary University of London have found a way to predict whether an actor's career has peaked or if their most successful days lie ahead.

8h

Deaths from falls increase among older US adults

Death rates from falls for US adults 75 or older increased from 2000 to 2016 in this study that analyzed nationally representative vital statistics data. The absolute number of deaths from falls increased from 8,613 in 2000 to 25,189 in 2016.

8h

Using physics to print living tissue

3D printers can be used to make a variety of useful objects by building up a shape, layer by layer. Scientists have used this same technique to 'bioprint' living tissues. Bioprinting is a relatively new technology that has advanced mostly by trial and error. Scientists are now using the laws of physics and predictive computer modeling to improve these techniques and optimize the bioprinting proces

8h

New approach optimizes use of future wave electricity generators during disaster

When hurricanes strike, electricity loss ranks as one of the top concerns. New work, described in the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, looks to develop a strategy for how floating devices that harness the energy of ocean waves might be able to provide this much needed aid. Researchers are studying a new approach to supplying electricity that potentially provides a way of optimizing rec

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'Only the stressed die young'

A new study has found that fruit flies lacking the transcription factor Ets21c live longer in a favourable, unstressed environment, but die earlier under stress. This serves as a promising lead that stress signalling pathways in which Ets-type transcription factors are involved may govern renewal in human epithelial tissues.

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Boeing’s Own Engineers May Have Been Unaware of 737 Max Problems

Boeing is still working to get its 737 Max planes back in the air, but regulators are understandably cautious after a pair of deadly crashes. The company claims it has devised fixes for the aircraft, but no one seems to trust its MCAS anti-stall system. The post Boeing’s Own Engineers May Have Been Unaware of 737 Max Problems appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Pilots sleeping in the cockpit could improve airline safety

Health The airline industry and the government agency that regulates it, the Federal Aviation Administration, have taken steps to reduce pilot fatigue, but many pilots and…

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Reproducibility trial publishes two conclusions for one paper

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01751-0 The British Journal of Anaesthesia’s unusual experiment is designed to broaden replicability efforts beyond just methods and results.

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Ebola cases pass 2,000 as crisis escalates

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01735-0 Cases have doubled in just over two months in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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Climate change is driving rapid shifts between high and low water levels on the Great Lakes

The North American Great Lakes contain about one-fifth of the world's surface fresh water. In May, new high water level records were set on Lakes Erie and Superior, and there has been widespread flooding across Lake Ontario for the second time in three years. These events coincide with persistent precipitation and severe flooding across much of central North America.

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Is your showbiz career over? Maths can reveal if an actor is peaking

Actors take note: your future may not be so much written in the stars as written in the stats, according to new research published today. …

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Deadly Falls in Older Americans Are Rising. Here’s How to Prevent Them.

The rate of deaths after falls is rising for people over 75, a new study shows. But falls are avoidable for most seniors. We have some tips.

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Geoscience data group urges all scientific disciplines to make data open and accessible

Institutions, science funders, data repositories, publishers, researchers and scientific societies from all scientific disciplines must work together to ensure all scientific data are easy to find, access and use, according to a new commentary in Nature by members of the Enabling FAIR Data Steering Committee.

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Dowsing for electric fields in liquid crystals

You may not know it, but you probably spend several hours a day looking at nematic liquid crystals; they are used in virtually every smartphone, computer and TV screen. They are liquids composed of elongated molecules, which in some situations can be oriented in a curious way termed the 'dowser texture', which is sensitive to external conditions. Physicists Pawel Pieranski of the Universite Paris-

8h

The racist roots of American policing: From slave patrols to traffic stops

Outrage over racial profiling and the killing of African Americans by police officers and vigilantes in recent years helped give rise to the Black Lives Matter movement.

8h

The war on women coaches

During the past women's college basketball season, two prominent head coaches, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill's Sylvia Hatchell and Georgia Tech's MaChelle Joseph, were fired.

8h

Donald Trump and Theresa May discuss climate change, Huawei and trade

US president Donald Trump is on his first state visit to the UK. Amid the ceremony and speeches, he discussed cybersecurity with UK Prime Minister Theresa May

8h

Her flytter ingeniørerne deres stemmer hen

Dansk Folkeparti, Alternativet og Liberal Alliance har været dårligst til at fastholde deres naturvidenskabelige vælgere siden Folketingsvalget i 2015, viser Ingeniørens måling.

8h

A combination of insecticides and mites weakens honeybees

Today, scientists at the Institute of Bee Health of the University of Bern and the honeybee research association COLOSS have published an article in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports that shows a synergistic time-lag interaction between the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and neonicotinoid insecticides reducing survival of winter honeybees, Apis mellifera. This article emphasizes the n

8h

A combination of insecticides and mites weakens honeybees

Today, scientists at the Institute of Bee Health of the University of Bern and the honeybee research association COLOSS have published an article in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports that shows a synergistic time-lag interaction between the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and neonicotinoid insecticides reducing survival of winter honeybees, Apis mellifera. This article emphasizes the n

8h

Controversial U.S. bill would lift Supreme Court ban on patenting human genes

Backers say changes needed to spur innovation, but critics disagree

8h

A combination of insecticides and mite weakens honeybees

Today, scientists of the Institute of Bee Health of the University of Bern and the honeybee research association COLOSS have published an article in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports that shows a synergistic time-lag interaction between the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and neonicotinoid insecticides reducing survival of winter honeybees, Apis mellifera. This article emphasizes the n

8h

New genes out of nothing

One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. Swedish researchers now show how new genes and functions that are advantageous to bacteria can be selected from random DNA sequences. The results are presented in the scientific journal mBio.

8h

Killing the unkillable cancer cells

We all know someone affected by the battle against cancer. And we know that treatments can be quite efficient at shrinking the tumor but too often, they can't kill all the cells, and so it may come back. With some aggressive types of cancer, the problem is so great that there is very little that can be done for the patients.

8h

Geoscience data group urges all scientific disciplines to make data open and accessible

Institutions, science funders, data repositories, publishers, researchers and scientific societies from all scientific disciplines must work together to ensure all scientific data are easy to find, access and use, according to a new commentary in Nature by members of the Enabling FAIR Data Steering Committee.

8h

Acting success is a function of maths, not talent

Machine learning analysis fails to give hope to struggling performers, delivering only gloom and statistical despair. Andrew Masterson reports.

8h

Using population genetics, scientists confirm origins of root rot in Michigan ornamentals

Floriculture, the growing of flowering and ornamental plants for gardens and floristry, is an economically important industry in Michigan, which ranks third in the United States for the wholesale value of floriculture products. The health of these crops is threatened by many diseases, including Pythium ultimum, a water mold that infects the roots of popular plants including poinsettia and geranium

8h

Salmon get a major athletic boost via a single enzyme

Salmon species, known for undertaking arduous upstream migrations, appear to owe a good deal of their athletic ability to the presence of a single enzyme.

8h

Top Russian internet firm reportedly under pressure on data

Russia's leading internet company said Tuesday that it's committed to data privacy as it responded to reports that the national intelligence agency is pressuring it into handing over encryption keys.

8h

Laws of physics replace trial and error in new approaches to bioprinting

3-D printers can be used to make a variety of useful objects by building up a shape, layer by layer. Scientists have used this same technique to "bioprint" living tissues, including muscle and bone.

8h

Estimating the wear and tear of ice on physical structures over coming decades or even centuries

Conditions in Arctic waters are among the most extreme in the world. Strong winds and currents powerfully push ice across vast distances, resulting in large ridges reaching tens of metres in height. At the same time, global warming and increased human presence have added new pressures in these northern environments. Yet the mechanisms behind the effects of ice on physical structures—particularly o

8h

Mathematicians work out how to predict success in show business

Mathematicians from Queen Mary University of London have found a way to predict whether an actor's career has peaked or if their most successful days lie ahead.

8h

Supercomputing dynamic earthquake rupture models

Some of the world's most powerful earthquakes involve multiple faults, and scientists are using supercomputers to better predict their behavior. Multi-fault earthquakes can span fault systems of tens to hundreds of kilometers, with ruptures propagating from one segment to the other. During the last decade, scientists have observed several cases of this complicated type of earthquake. Major example

8h

What's your attitude about body hair removal?

As beachgoers scramble to trim their nether regions ahead of swim season, new UNLV research shows they aren't alone in their ambitions for a bare bikini line.

8h

Using population genetics, scientists confirm origins of root rot in Michigan ornamentals

Floriculture, the growing of flowering and ornamental plants for gardens and floristry, is an economically important industry in Michigan, which ranks third in the United States for the wholesale value of floriculture products. The health of these crops is threatened by many diseases, including Pythium ultimum, a water mold that infects the roots of popular plants including poinsettia and geranium

8h

Salmon get a major athletic boost via a single enzyme

Salmon species, known for undertaking arduous upstream migrations, appear to owe a good deal of their athletic ability to the presence of a single enzyme.

8h

"Everything happens for a reason" — and other lies I've loved | Kate Bowler

In life's toughest moments, how do you go on living? Kate Bowler has been exploring this question ever since she was diagnosed with stage IV cancer at age 35. In a profound, heartbreaking and unexpectedly funny talk, she offers some answers — challenging the idea that "everything happens for a reason" and sharing hard-won wisdom about how to make sense of the world after your life is suddenly, co

8h

As Renewable Energy Subsidies Expire, Experts Advocate Tax Credits

The credits could target all low-carbon electricity generation, instead of solely wind and solar — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Mange nye lægemidler bliver ‘game changer’

EAACIs specialistkomiteer får en vigtig rolle i at vurdere og validere kvaliteten af de nye mange nye lægemidler, som er på vej, mener professor Carsten Bindslev-Jensen

8h

Ny test finder mange tilfælde af penicillinallergi

Én ud af fire personer med penicillinallergi diagnosticeres tidligere, når de normale blodprøver suppleres med ny test, viser dansk undersøgelse præsenteret på EAACI.

8h

Hårfarve kan give ikke-synlige skader på hudbarrieren

Hudbiopsier viser, at også personer, der tilsyneladende ikke reagerer på det stærkt allergene stof PPD, får skader på hudbarrieren

8h

Outdoor learning has huge benefits for children and teachers—so why isn't it used in more schools?

Research shows that healthier and happier children do better in school, and that education is an important determinant of future health. But education is not just about lessons within the four walls of a classroom. The outdoor environment encourages skills such as problem solving and negotiating risk which are important for child development.

8h

New genes out of nothing

One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. Swedish researchers now show how new genes and functions that are advantageous to bacteria can be selected from random DNA sequences. The results are presented in the scientific journal mBio.

8h

Lowest level of fatalities in organised violence in seven years

New data from the Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP), Uppsala University shows that in 2018 the number of fatalities in organised violence reached the lowest level in seven years. However, the large share of internationalised conflicts, to which external states contribute troops, worries researchers. These conflicts tend to be both bloodier and longer.

8h

New genes out of nothing

One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. Swedish researchers now show how new genes and functions that are advantageous to bacteria can be selected from random DNA sequences. The results are presented in the scientific journal mBio.

8h

Study assesses impacts of water flow management through El Vado Dam

New research from a University of New Mexico graduate student looks at the tenuous relationship between preserving one of New Mexico's most scenic waterways, while also providing continuous access to alternative energy sources.

8h

Astronomers Spot Twin Planets Carving Holes in a Brand-New Solar System

The two planets appear to have cleared a wide gap in their young star's protoplanetary disk. This is the first-ever observation of this behavior.

8h

Gene mutation evolved to cope with modern high-sugar diets

A common gene mutation helps people cope with modern diets by keeping blood sugar low, but close to half of people still have an older variant that may be better suited to prehistoric diets, finds a new study.

8h

Gene-edited chicken cells resist bird flu virus in the lab

Scientists have used gene-editing techniques to stop the bird flu virus from spreading in chicken cells grown in the lab. The team prevented the virus from taking hold by deleting a section of chicken DNA inside lab-grown cells.

8h

New research explores the mechanics of how birds flock

Wildlife researchers have long tried to understand why birds fly in flocks and how different types of flocks work. A new study explores the mechanics and benefits of the underlying flock structure used by four types of shorebirds. Understanding more about how these birds flock moves researchers a step closer to understanding why they flock.

8h

Choosing the right drug to fight cancer

Biochemists have discovered a new mechanism to better predict whether an anti-cancer therapy will work.

8h

Plant lineage points to different evolutionary playbook for temperate species

An ancient, cosmopolitan lineage of plants is shaking up scientists' understanding of how quickly species evolve in temperate ecosystems and why.

8h

Oldest flaked stone tools point to the repeated invention of stone tools

A new archaeological site discovered by scientists working in Ethiopia shows that the origins of stone tool production are older than 2.58 million years ago. Previously, the oldest evidence for systematic stone tool production and use was 2.58 to 2.55 million years ago.

8h

Immune Cells Measure Time to Identify Foreign Proteins

To mount a successful defense against invading organisms, the immune system must quickly and accurately identify which cells belong in the body and which do not. That might seem straightforward enough, but it’s not such an easy feat to achieve. The responsibility falls largely on the shoulders of T-cells, white blood cells with specialized receptors embedded in their surface that allow them to bi

8h

Extra finger 'birth defect' could provide blueprint for robotic extra limbs

New research on two people born with extra functional fingers has shown how the brain adapts to the workload imposed by more digits.

8h

Vulnerability to Ebola and Lassa fever can now be properly assessed

Identifying vulnerabilities to outbreaks of Ebola and Lassa fever is possible following new research from the University of Surrey and University of Cambridge. This will aid government agencies and health organisations in evaluating a country's vulnerability to outbreaks, and inform decisions on strategic investments and plans.

8h

Opioids are not sleep aids, and can actually worsen sleep research finds

Evidence that taking opioids will help people with chronic pain to sleep better is limited and of poor quality, according to an interdisciplinary team of psychologists and medics from the University of Warwick in partnership with Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.

8h

You survived a heart attack — now what about the depression?

Heart attack patients with prolonged depression or anxiety are at a higher risk of death. That's the finding of research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology.'Temporary mood swings, if they are not too frequent or dramatic, are a normal part of life,' said study author Dr. Erik Olsson, of Uppsala University, Sweden.

8h

Glyphosate in tampons? No indication of residues of any health significance

Just like other feminine hygiene products, tampons consist mainly of cotton. As cotton is treated with plant protection products, pesticide residues cannot be completely excluded. The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) has no data on how high the percentage of tampons on the German market is which could possibly contain residues of glyphosate.

8h

Nitric oxide-scavenging hydrogel developed for rheumatoid arthritis treatment

The research team of POSTECH utilized NO-cleavable-crosslinker that reacts to NO and developed a NO-scavenging nano-sized hydrogel (NO-Scv gel). They had done a test on animal successfully and confirmed its better effect than the current therapeutic drugs.

8h

Is there a demographic need for migration in Europe?

A European Commission-IIASA flagship report has found that an increase in the EU population aged 65+ is certain — regardless of higher fertility or migration. However, raising labor force participation (particularly for women) and improved education of natives and migrants have the power to nullify aging-related worries.

8h

Dowsing for electric fields in liquid crystals

Nematic liquid crystals can be oriented in a curious way termed the 'dowser texture', which is sensitive to external conditions. Physicists Pawel Pieranski of the Universite Paris-Sud, Paris, France and Maria Helena Godinho of Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal have now published a paper in EPJ E that shows that the dowser texture responds to electric fields in different ways in differe

8h

Psychological model of defectologist's readiness for professional development

In this new paper, the researchers theorize that professional competences of a defectologist (a Russian term for educators engaged in assisted teaching for disabled individuals) rely on their psychological readiness for such a profession.

8h

Physical inactivity proved risky for children and pre-teens

At what age do children lose the desire to exercise? Researchers (UNIGE) followed 1,200 pupils and found out that from the age of 9, the positive reasons for exercising begin to be replaced by displaced incentives: to get a good mark or improve your image with others. These results call for a more detailed analysis of how PE is taught in schools to counter physical inactivity leading to a sedentar

8h

Antibiotic produced by the microbiome kills bacteria by disturbing energy metabolism

A research team from the universities of Tübingen and Göttingen as well as from the German Center for Infection Research has investigated the mode of action of a new class of antibiotics that is highly effective against multidrug-resistant pathogens. The so-called fibupeptides impair the energy supply to the bacterial cell, consequently causing their death.

8h

Nanoscale ‘donuts’ offer boost to quantum computing

By patterning nanoscale donuts into a 2D crystal, researchers have achieved a new level of control over its electrical and optical properties. As researchers eye nanoscale materials for applications like quantum information processing, a method to tailor them from the bottom up will make them more practical. The research team reports its results in Science Advances . Growing 2D crystals over an a

8h

'Fear' of killer shrimp may threaten rivers

An invasive "killer shrimp" that has reached UK rivers could be altering the behaviour of other species.

9h

Anklager: Der var årsagssammenhæng mellem manglende indlæggelse og kvindes død

To tidligere 1813-læger er frikendt for uagtsomt manddrab i en sag, hvor anklageren skærpede strafferammen i forhold til det oprindelige. Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed og forsvarsadvokater forholder sig tavse. Ingen har endnu besluttet, om de vil anke.

9h

Exploring deeper understanding and better description of networks

In network science, switching the focus from node degrees to network cycles could reveal many interesting properties from the perspective of totally homogenous networks. This paper introduces a cycle-based vector-space framework through boundary operators, with some important concepts and methodologies developed from algebraic topology, such as characteristic number, homology group and Betti numbe

9h

The physical limit of quantum optics resolves a mystery of computational complexity

Recently, Prof. Man-Hong Yung, associate professor of SUSTech and his colleagues published a paper 'Universal bound on sampling bosons in linear optics and its computational implications' in National Science Review (NSR), offering a complete solution to the open problem posed by Prof. Scott Aaronson in 2012–apart from sampling problems, can one exploit linear optics to achieve quantum supremacy i

9h

Companies battling shareholder complaints have a potent weapon-advertising

A new study in the Journal of Marketing explores how firms can configure advertising investments to respond to shareholder complaints and limit the damage of these public battles.

9h

Opioid analgesics increase the risk of pneumonia among persons with Alzheimer's disease

Opioid analgesics were associated with a 30% increase in the risk of pneumonia in persons with Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The risk was most pronounced in the first two months of use. This is the first study to investigate the association between opioids and pneumonia in this population. The results were published in the Journal of Alzheimer's

9h

Novel insights into cholesterol regulation may lead to new therapies for heart disease

In a landmark study, scientists at Houston Methodist Research Institute discovered what makes white blood cell counts spike in individuals who have high cholesterol, possibly leading to new therapies for heart disease. They looked at hypercholesterolemia, which is the type of high cholesterol that causes very high levels of LDL — the so-called 'bad' cholesterol — to circulate in the blood. They

9h

Salmon get a major athletic boost via a single enzyme

A single enzyme anchored to the walls of salmons' blood vessels helps reduce how hard their hearts have to work during exercise by up to 27%. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, help explain how the fish undertake arduous upstream migrations, and could help species acclimate to elevated water temperatures associated with climate change.

9h

Researchers study surveillance MRI in breast cancer survivors

The addition of breast MRI to mammography in screening breast cancer survivors for new cancers results in higher cancer detection rates, but also more biopsies that are benign, according to a large study.

9h

Vitamin D could help cancer patients live longer

Michigan State University physicians have found that vitamin D, if taken for at least three years, could help cancer patients live longer. The findings suggest that the vitamin carries significant benefits other than just contributing to healthy bones and were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting on June 3, 2019.

9h

New device sheds light on mechanism, efficacy of arthritis treatment

The debate over how one of the most popular osteoarthritis treatments should be federally regulated could change, thanks to a Cornell University study and a new device that provides a better understanding of the science behind hyaluronic acid (HA) injections.

9h

Can computers make decisions like humans? A new study may have the answer

A team of British researchers has developed a method that enables computers to make decisions in a way that is more similar to humans. Specifically, the method mimics the complex process of how humans make decisions by enabling the computers to render several acceptable decisions to one specific problem.

9h

Patagonia ice sheets thicker than previously thought, study finds

A new study UC Irvine and collaborators of Patagonia's ice fields finds that many glaciers in the region are much thicker than previously thought.

9h

Apple WWDC 2019: iTunes is yesterday; today's all about swifter new iOS features

When word leaked over the weekend that Apple was planning to shut down iTunes in the next version of its desktop software, there was an outcry and talk of an end of an era.

9h

Elephants May Sniff Out Quantities With Their Noses

Understanding how the endangered mammals smell the world could help with their conservation, researchers say.

9h

Separation anxiety no more: A faster technique to purify elements

Researchers have developed a new chemical separation method that is vastly more efficient than conventional processes, opening the door to faster discovery of new elements, easier nuclear fuel reprocessing, and, most tantalizing, a better way to attain actinium-225, a promising therapeutic isotope for cancer treatment.

9h

Researchers discover cells that change their identity during normal development

The ability of a developed cell to transform into another type of cell is exceptionally rare. But UVA researchers have discovered this in zebrafish.

9h

Sticking to sports can help kids adjust

By participating in organized physical activity from the age of 6, children will have less risk of emotional difficulties by the time they're 12, a new study finds.

9h

Red and white meats are equally bad for cholesterol

Contrary to popular belief, consuming red meat and white meat such as poultry, have equal effects on blood cholesterol levels, according to a new study.

9h

Breakthrough process to create cancer-killing drugs

A new strategy for drug development can be used to produce targeted therapies against a variety of diseases.

9h

FILMAD FÖRELÄSNING: Har jag haft ett epileptiskt anfall?

Vad är epilepsi och hur yttrar det sig? Christine Ekdahl Clementson, forskare och läkare, håller en populärvetenskaplig föreläsning.

9h

Will the UK use a legal loophole to hit government climate targets?

Ministers have controversially agreed to count historical carbon cuts against future climate change targets, which the UK is set to miss

9h

New website for tracking marine heatwaves

While the impacts of climate change are reflected in the massive storms, heat waves and droughts that ravage communities around the world, the ocean too is feeling the heat.

9h

Massefyring på DTU-institut

DTU Management varsler fyring af 35-45 medarbejdere som følge af millionunderskud og faldende eksterne bevillinger. DTU er presset af den ny bevillingsreform, der rammer ekspanderende universiteter, siger direktøren.

9h

Responses to ocean rise: the ancestors’ tales

Climate change challenged communities millennia ago. How they coped can be discerned in traditional stories, passed down for thousands of years. Geographer Patrick Nunn reports.

9h

Dense, distant and full of dark matter

NASA’s Chandra observatory looks at a galaxy in which nothing has happened for billions of years.

9h

Prominent research organisation slammed as shill for multinationals

Investigation finds ‘independent’ non-profit funded by food and beverage giants. Andrew Masterson reports.

9h

Double trouble: binary asteroid photographed as it zooms past

A harmless, well-known bolide pair serves as a proxy for a possible future threat. Andrew Masterson reports.

9h

A Closer Look at the Robots Helping Us Explore Space

Buck Rogers had Twiki. Luke Skywalker palled around with C-3PO and R2-D2. And astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) now have their own robotic companions in space— Astrobee . A pair of the cube-shaped robots were launched to the ISS during an April re-supply mission and are currently being commissioned for use on the space station. The free-flying space robots, dubbed Bumble and

9h

Enabling transportation agencies to automate traffic monitoring

Scientists announce the release of ActiveVision, a machine vision tool that transportation agencies can use to autonomously detect and report traffic condition changes. ActiveVision's algorithms process camera data to provide real-time information on weather conditions and other anomalies affecting congestion. Designed for integration with intelligent transportation systems (ITS), ActiveVision can

9h

New process to rinse heavy metals from soils

Poisonous heavy metals contaminating thousands of sites nationwide threaten to enter the food chain, and there's been no easy way to remove them. An experimental chemical bath and electrochemical filter could now extract heavy metals from the soil and leave fields safe.

9h

Augmented ACL reconstruction procedure

An innovative procedure that explores the use of amnion, bone marrow concentrate and suture tape in ACL reconstruction may result in earlier return to play protocols for athletes, suggests a new study.

9h

The Physics of the Millennium Falcon's Jump to Hyperspace

The faster-than-light travel in *Star Wars* involves some otherworldly acceleration. Here's how to calculate the g-forces of a hyperspace jump.

9h

Busting the myth that Canadians are polarized on climate and immigration

In 2015, the Liberals came to power winning every seat in Atlantic Canada with their progressive platform and promise to do politics differently, contrasting Justin Trudeau's "sunny ways" with the austere conservatism of Stephen Harper. Much has changed since then.

9h

Supercomputing dynamic earthquake rupture models

Multiple interactions found in postulated network of faults in the Brawley seismic zone in southern California. XSEDE resources Stampede, Stampede2 (TACC), Comet (SDSC) awarded to researchers in support of multi-fault earthquake research. Multi-fault earthquakes in Southern California potentially impact millions of people in US and Mexico.

9h

Firefox Deploys a Slew of New Privacy Features, Taking Aim at Facebook and Invasive Online Trackers

There are plenty of browsers to choose from, but two of the most popular, when it comes to privacy at least, are headed down radically divergent paths.Read more…

9h

Bird adds new vehicle to its fleet: a two-seater electric bicycle with an LCD screen.

Bird, which operates in more than 100 cities around the globe, plans to add a seated electric vehicle that can accommodate up to two adults to its fleet.

9h

Listing reveals Watch Dogs 3's London setting, players can control any NPC

2014’s Chicago-set Watch Dogs was plagued with technical problems when it launched on the PC, and Aiden Pearce was one of the most dreary protagonists ever, but many people, myself included, …

9h

Painstaking veterinary forensics to combat animal abuse

Many people have seen dramatizations of forensics on shows likes Bones and CSI. Forensics is the application of scientific principles and methods to criminal investigations at crimes scenes and in labs.

9h

Firepits of the Gods: Ancient memories of maar volcanoes

In the heart of Takapuna, north-central Auckland, is a natural lake—Pupuke—while a little way offshore lies the volcanic Rangitoto Island. Long ago, a family of giants lived at Takapuna until one day, ill-advisedly, they insulted the irascible fire goddess Mahuika. Enraged, Mahuika tore a hole in the land where the giants lived, creating what became Lake Pupuke, dumping the material offshore to fo

9h

State park attendance trends suggest parks will be overburdened by mid-century

A combined team of researchers from Utah State University and North Carolina State University has found evidence that suggests state parks in the U.S. will become so crowded by mid-century that states will have difficulty paying for their upkeep. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of historical attendance records of all the

9h

Painstaking veterinary forensics to combat animal abuse

Many people have seen dramatizations of forensics on shows likes Bones and CSI. Forensics is the application of scientific principles and methods to criminal investigations at crimes scenes and in labs.

9h

The best apps for listening to music on your phone

DIY Pump up the jam. Pump it up. If you use your smartphone as a portable jukebox, you've got many different music apps to pick from on Android and iOS.

9h

The Myth That Babies Look More Like Their Dads

I was shocked to see my daughter when I gave birth. The whole pregnancy, my doctor had said she was going to be small, like me, and I was picturing someone who, well, looked like me. But this large, pale child emerged, with a decidedly different nose and head. If she hadn’t looked just like my husband, I would have doubted she was mine. As time went on, their likeness grew even more pronounced. “

9h

Seagate Boosts Hard Drives to 16TB With New IronWolf and Exos Models

Seagate's new helium-filled 16TB hard drives achieve their amazing density through HAMR — the use of a laser diode to pre-heat the area of the drive to be written. The post Seagate Boosts Hard Drives to 16TB With New IronWolf and Exos Models appeared first on ExtremeTech .

9h

Using population genetics, scientists confirm origins of root rot in Michigan ornamentals

Floriculture is an economically important industry in Michigan. The health of these crops is threatened by Pythium ultimum (root rot), a water mold that infects the roots of popular plants. Despite efforts to control of pathogen, root rot occurs annually for many growers. This study confirmed for the first time that the root rot pathogen is likely moved unnoticed within the state via infected plan

9h

What's your attitude about body hair removal?

New study lays bare cultural reasons around the globe for bikini waxing and man-scaping.

9h

New “Flying-V” Plane Puts Passenger Seats in the Wings

Fuel for Thought Airlines are testing all sorts of ways to make planes less of a drag on the environment. Virgin Atlantic recently used recycled waste to power a commercial flight, while Boeing and JetBlue have backed an effort to create hybrid electric planes . The Netherland’s KLM Royal Dutch Airlines is taking a different approach. It just partnered with a university to develop the “Flying-V,”

9h

Big tech surveillance could damage democracy

Data is often called the oil of the 21st century.

9h

Training neural belief-propagation decoders for quantum error-correcting codes

Two researchers at Université de Sherbrooke, in Canada, have recently developed and trained neural belief-propagation (BP) decoders for quantum low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. Their study, outlined in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, suggests that training can enhance the performance of BP decoders significantly, helping to solve issues that are commonly associated with their a

9h

Eyes in the sky: How satellites can monitor infrastructure health

Increasing global population growth and resource exploitation is creating a huge demand for civil infrastructure, including buildings, subways and train lines, bridges, dams, highways and airports.

9h

An effective, affordable early childhood education sector for Australia

Leading up to the election, Labor campaigned on an ambitious suite of early childhood policies, including 15 hours of funded preschool for every Australian three-year-old and $4 billion to increase childcare subsidies.

9h

DNA-based holidays encourage a dangerous flirtation with race | Arwa Mahdawi

Airbnb and the genetic testing company 23andMe have teamed up to suggest travel itineraries based on ancestry. It’s another boost for outdated and unscientific ideas 23andMe, the at-home genetic testing company, has teamed up with Airbnb to offer travel itineraries based on your DNA . Give 23andMe some spit and some money, and it will give you an ancestry report in return, along with suggestions

9h

Tolerance to stress is a 'trade-off' as fruit flies age

The consequences of aging are damage and degeneration of cells, which leads to loss of function, vulnerability to disease, and eventually, death. A hallmark of the aging process is the progressive decline of the nervous system, including both motor and cognitive functions. To complicate matters, natural variation in aging populations makes it difficult to study the factors that contribute to behav

10h

Tolerance to stress is a 'trade-off' as fruit flies age

The consequences of aging are damage and degeneration of cells, which leads to loss of function, vulnerability to disease, and eventually, death. A hallmark of the aging process is the progressive decline of the nervous system, including both motor and cognitive functions. To complicate matters, natural variation in aging populations makes it difficult to study the factors that contribute to behav

10h

Tracking security staff at large-scale events

Spectacular fireworks, a large crowd, and music with a driving beat—on the first weekend in May the Rhine in Flames event will set the large parks along the Rhine in Bonn topsy-turvy. In 2019, a team of researchers from Fraunhofer FIT provided innovative support for the security staff: they set up a new tracking system that displayed, in real time, the locations of all police officers, firefighter

10h

Pilots sleeping in the cockpit could improve airline safety

Airline pilots are often exhausted. An extreme example happened in 2008, when a pilot and a co-pilot both fell asleep at the controls, missing their landing in Hawaii—earning pilot's license suspensions as well as getting fired. More recently, overtired pilots came very close to landing on top of another airplane at San Francisco International Airport in 2017.

10h

No tea or coffee, Indians warned, as heatwave continues

Hospitals across the desert state of Rajasthan reported a surge in heatstroke cases Tuesday as fierce temperatures kept up for a fourth day across northern India.

10h

S: Vi har ikke mere at tilføje om cigaretpriser

Vi har et etisk og moralsk efterslæb, når det kommer til forebyggelse, mener Socialdemokratiet. Alligevel afviser partiet som det eneste fortsat at fortælle, hvad en pakke cigaretter bør koste.

10h

Going Home With Ocean Vuong

O cean Vuong and I are in my car on one of the roads by his house in Northampton, where he’s lived for the past couple of years and teaches poetry at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Vuong is relaxed and chatty in the passenger seat. In just a 10-minute span, it feels as if we’ve covered an hour’s worth of conversation: our jade necklaces (his, a slender carving of the goddess Guan Yin

10h

Ancient human polymorphisms linked to modern-day health concerns for Native Americans

Scientists report that ancient variations in the proteins that metabolize omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in humans may have consequences for the health of modern-day Native American communities.

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Ancient human polymorphisms linked to modern-day health concerns for Native Americans

Scientists report that ancient variations in the proteins that metabolize omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in humans may have consequences for the health of modern-day Native American communities.

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The Search for the World's Oldest Alcohol

Before the brewpub there was the brew cave. In Israel's Raqefet Cave archaeologists recently reported traces of what could be the earliest known beer production 13,000 years ago. The evidence comes from three stone mortars, analyzed in a 2018 Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports paper. After extracting residues from the rocks, the researchers identified plant molecules, including wheat or ba

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Tolerance to stress is a 'trade-off' as fruit flies age

With the help of the common fruit fly (D. melanogaster), which ages quickly because it only lives about 60 days, FAU neuroscientists provide insights into healthy aging by investigating the effects of a foraging gene on age and stress tolerance.

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Everything will connect to the internet someday, and this biobattery could help

In the future, small paper and plastic devices will be able to connect to the internet for a short duration, providing information on everything from healthcare to consumer products, before they are thrown away. Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a micro biobattery that could power these disposable sensors.

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Could CRISPR treat sickle cell disease?

A new study suggests using CRISPR-Cas9 and a corrective short DNA template could offer a safe and efficient way to to repair the mutation that causes sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease, which affects about 100,000 Americans and millions worldwide, is a painful and often fatal inherited condition. A single mutation in hemoglobin subunit beta (aka beta-globin) forces normal, disc-shaped red b

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‘Politeness bias’ can skew our online research

When individuals who pose questions online get to choose the “best answer,” there’s a bias toward politeness, research finds. The researchers say in their paper they hoped to raise awareness about “how this type of cognitive bias could affect people’s decision-making processes.” The researchers looked at how answers are rated on Stack Exchange, a highly popular network of more than 170 Q&A sites

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Facebook still wants your data

Have you noticed your Facebook feed looks different lately?

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3-D magnetic interactions could lead to new forms of computing

A new form of magnetic interaction which pushes a formerly two-dimensional phenomenon into the third dimension could open up a host of exciting new possibilities for data storage and advanced computing, scientists say.

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Loss of Arctic sea ice stokes summer heat waves in southern U.S.

Over the last 40 years, Arctic sea ice thickness, extent and volume have declined dramatically. Now, a new study finds a link between declining sea ice coverage in parts of the Canadian Arctic and an increasing incidence of summer heat waves across the southern United States.

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Research finds soil carbon key to combating climate change

Curtin University research has provided new insights to support more effective management of soil carbon in a bid to help combat global greenhouse gas emissions and climate change.

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Psychologists target root cause of soil erosion

Psychologists might hold the key to reducing soil erosion that wrecks pasture land belonging to the Maasai tribe in Tanzania.

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Civility still matters to some in cyberspace

In the online world, where incivility is all too common, new research from the McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas at Austin found that being polite is golden, at least when individuals who pose questions online get to choose the "best answer."

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The search for an alternative to GDP to measure a nation's progress – the New Zealand experience

There is consensus among New Zealand policymakers and researchers that GDP is not a good measure of a nation's well-being. But the debate about what metric should replace GDP is ongoing.

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Rise and grind: The growing gig economy and its impact on the American workforce

The growing contingent of freelancers, independent contractors and the self-employed in the American workforce has consumed the U.S. business community and media in recent years, even as researchers wrestle with how to draw a clear picture of the nature of the country's teeming network of workers earning income outside the traditional employment structure. Large, multinational companies are built

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Gamma-ray pulsations detected from the pulsar J0952−0607

An international team of astronomers reports the detection of gamma-ray pulsations from the millisecond pulsar (MSP) known as PSR J0952−0607. The finding, available in a paper published May 27 on arXiv.org, sheds more light on the properties of this pulsar and could be helpful in improving our understanding of MSPs in general.

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From the archive

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01713-6 How Nature reported plans to send a monkey into space in 1969, and a milestone in aviation in 1919.

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Neolithic pottery sherds from China reveal alcoholic beverage production techniques

A team of researchers from Stanford University, Zhengzhou University, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Archaeology has learned more about the ways Neolithic people in China made alcoholic beverages by studying pottery sherds from that era. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of residu

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India's Airtel seeks $750m from Africa unit's IPO

India's debt-laden telecoms giant Bharti Airtel hopes to raise $750 million when it lists its African unit on the London Stock Exchange, the company said Tuesday.

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German car sales shake off emissions-test blues

New car registrations in Germany jumped sharply in May, official data showed Tuesday, suggesting the powerhouse sector for Europe's top economy was recovering from a months-long bout of the blues.

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US scientist sounds warning on future Everest dangers

Mount Everest and its surrounding peaks are increasingly polluted and warmer, and nearby glaciers are melting at an alarming rate that is likely to make it more dangerous for future climbers, a U.S. scientist who spent weeks in the Everest region said Tuesday.

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What All the Affection for Monarch Butterflies Misses

Here in Maryland, where I live, monarch butterflies were everywhere last summer. Some days I saw several black-and-orange visitors wafting past or opportunistically sucking nectar from nearby flowers. It was a dramatic—and welcome—contrast to recent years, when I would have counted myself lucky to notch that many encounters in a season. Monarch butterflies are in trouble, and when scientists repo

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How one fern hoards toxic arsenic in its fronds and doesn’t die

To survive high levels of arsenic, a fern sequesters the heavy metal in its shoots with the help of three proteins.

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How mangroves protect people from increasingly frequent and powerful tropical storms

Mangroves are incredibly productive coastal ecosystems found in the tropics and subtropics. These dense green forests are known for their bizarre-looking roots that poke up into the air from shallow water. Among the meshed webs of roots are fish nurseries, enabling humans to make a living from the marine life in and around the mangroves.

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Inexpensive chip-size satellites orbit Earth

A decade ago, while still a Ph.D. student at Cornell University, Zac Manchester imagined building chip-scale satellites that might work together to study Earth or explore space. On June 3, as NASA Ames Research Center announces the successful deployment of the largest swarm of ChipSats in history, Manchester, now an assistant professor at Stanford, is already envisioning the future of this technol

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Why critical media literacy should be taught in schools

When a scholar of critical theory in the tradition of the Frankfurt School and an award-winning photojournalist and teacher educator collaborate at UCLA to examine the need for critical media literacy, or CML, in education and beyond, the result is a groundbreaking book.

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New research explores the mechanics of how birds flock

Wildlife researchers have long tried to understand why birds fly in flocks and how different types of flocks work. A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill explores the mechanics and benefits of the underlying flock structure used by four types of shorebirds. Understanding more about how these birds flock moves researchers a step closer to understanding why they flock.

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Crest Whitestrips and the myth of big company innovation

Paul Sagel seems to have violated all the presumed rules about innovation at big companies. With a swipe of gel and a strip of plastic, the Procter & Gamble research fellow created a $250 million annual line of business for company No. 42 on the Fortune 500.

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Ancestral Puebloan pottery-making wasn't 'women's work'

New research from Dr. John Kantner, a University of North Florida professor specializing in anthropological archaeology, suggests that pottery making wasn't a primarily female activity in ancient Puebloan society, as had long been assumed based on historical evidence that women produced pottery for each household.

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New research explores the mechanics of how birds flock

Wildlife researchers have long tried to understand why birds fly in flocks and how different types of flocks work. A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill explores the mechanics and benefits of the underlying flock structure used by four types of shorebirds. Understanding more about how these birds flock moves researchers a step closer to understanding why they flock.

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Patagonia ice sheets thicker than previously thought, study finds

After conducting a comprehensive, seven-year survey of Patagonia, glaciologists from the University of California, Irvine and partner institutions in Argentina and Chile have concluded that the ice sheets in this vast region of South America are considerably more massive than expected.

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Sexual violence is a driver of women's political mobilization

Sexual violence in armed conflict does not necessarily silence women. On the contrary, sexual violence can be a driver of women's political mobilization for peace and women's rights, a dissertation from the University of Gothenburg shows.

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Stopping deadly infection outbreaks in the world's largest refugee camp

Local villagers helped Shamsark off the boat, all but carrying her and her three small children as they stumbled up the slippery bank to safety. She took one look back across the river, through the grey mist to the orange fires of burning Rohingya villages, to where their whole lives had been, where she'd left her husband's body lying on the ground after he'd been shot.

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New research explores the mechanics of how birds flock

Wildlife researchers have long tried to understand why birds fly in flocks and how different types of flocks work. A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill explores the mechanics and benefits of the underlying flock structure used by four types of shorebirds. Understanding more about how these birds flock moves researchers a step closer to understanding why they flock.

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Huawei Purchased Facial Recognition Technology from Russian Firm

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Cressida Dick Says The Public Expects Facial Recognition Policing

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Bad teeth revealed as biggest problem for pet greyhounds

Dental disease is the most common health issue facing pet greyhounds, according to the largest ever study of greyhounds treated in first opinion veterinary clinics. The research, led by the Royal Veterinary College's (RVC) VetCompassTM programme in collaboration with the University of Bristol Vet School, reveals that 39 percent of greyhounds suffer from dental problems, which is a far higher perce

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Left behind: How disruptive technology may choose society's winners and losers

New platforms like home- and ride-sharing services often are praised for leveling the playing field, cutting out the middle man and boosting the economy.

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Bad teeth revealed as biggest problem for pet greyhounds

Dental disease is the most common health issue facing pet greyhounds, according to the largest ever study of greyhounds treated in first opinion veterinary clinics. The research, led by the Royal Veterinary College's (RVC) VetCompassTM programme in collaboration with the University of Bristol Vet School, reveals that 39 percent of greyhounds suffer from dental problems, which is a far higher perce

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NASA Releases Stunning Images From Doomed Spitzer Telescope

NASA is preparing to wrap up Spitzer's mission, but the agency isn't done showing off what the spacecraft can do. NASA has just released images of a dense stellar cluster captured by the aging telescope. The post NASA Releases Stunning Images From Doomed Spitzer Telescope appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Landmænd taber klagesager om pesticidforbud ved Aarhus

Aarhus Kommune forbød i 2016 anvendelsen af pesticider på 46 ejendomme. Nogle af landmændene klagede over forbuddet, men Miljø- og Fødevareklagenævnet har nu afgjort, at forbuddet var berettiget.

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A brief history of Ariane 5 launches with science missions onboard

If it wasn't for launch capabilities we would never have delved deep into the echo of the Big Bang nor lived out the adventures of Rosetta and Philae at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Nor would we have captured some of the Universe's most energetic phenomena, or be on our way to the innermost planet of the solar system. Some of ESA's biggest science missions only got off the ground—literally—tha

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Nano 'junk' could save lives

Nuisance particles loathed by manufacturers have found an innovative new purpose delivering life-changing drugs straight to cancerous tumors and diseased tissues.

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Snapshots of the flu virus replication machine in action

Researchers from EMBL Grenoble have, for the first time, observed different functional states of the influenza virus polymerase as it is actively transcribing. These results, published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, provide valuable information for the next generation of anti-influenza drugs.

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How genes interact to build tissues and organisms

Although the knowledge we have about human cells and tissues has steadily increased over recent decades, many things remain unknown. For instance, cells exist in transient, dynamic states and understanding them is fundamental to decipher diseases and find cures. Classic techniques used in the lab to study cell types faced limitations and did not enable a finely detailed profile of cell function.

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Chemists could make 'smart glass' smarter by manipulating it at the nanoscale

"Smart glass," an energy-efficiency product found in newer windows of cars, buildings and airplanes, slowly changes between transparent and tinted at the flip of a switch.

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Bio-based fertilizers as a solution for phosphorus sufficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions

Bio-based fertilizers (BBFs) will have an increasingly important role in future food production. By optimising the use of nutrient-rich side-streams like manure and sewage sludge as BBFs in agriculture, European dependency on imported fertilisers can be reduced. A circular economy can also provide new BBF-related job opportunities in rural areas.

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Angkor Wat archaeological digs yield new clues to its civilization's decline

Cambodia's famous temple of Angkor Wat is one of the world's largest religious monuments, visited by over 2 million tourists each year.

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Snapshots of the flu virus replication machine in action

Researchers from EMBL Grenoble have, for the first time, observed different functional states of the influenza virus polymerase as it is actively transcribing. These results, published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, provide valuable information for the next generation of anti-influenza drugs.

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Can we model heavy nuclei from first principles?

Modelling the properties of atomic nuclei is a demanding task. It requires a theory that we can apply to a large variety of nuclear species regardless of their masses. M.Sc. Gianluca Salvioni's doctoral dissertation on theoretical nuclear physics attempts formulating such a theory by using inputs from accurate first-principle calculations available for light nuclei.

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Observing Gaia from Earth to improve its star maps

While ESA's Gaia mission has been surveying more than one billion stars from space, astronomers have been regularly monitoring the satellite's position in the sky with telescopes across the world, including the European Southern Observatory in Chile, to further refine Gaia's orbit and ultimately improve the accuracy of its stellar census.

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How genes interact to build tissues and organisms

Although the knowledge we have about human cells and tissues has steadily increased over recent decades, many things remain unknown. For instance, cells exist in transient, dynamic states and understanding them is fundamental to decipher diseases and find cures. Classic techniques used in the lab to study cell types faced limitations and did not enable a finely detailed profile of cell function.

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Small particles can have big consequences for electronics in space missions

Several space missions planned by the European Space Agency and NASA have their target set on Jupiter and its moons. The extraordinarily harsh radiation environments in the Jovian system will set some strict requirements for the electronics inside the spacecraft. To ensure the proper function of the spacecraft, it is important to understand and quantify the physical mechanisms causing the errors i

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Credit data generators for data reuse

Nature, Published online: 04 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01715-4 To promote effective sharing, we must create an enduring link between the people who generate data and its future uses, urge Heather H. Pierce and colleagues.

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Varieties of Nonsense

Here’s a bulletin that should surprise no one: there’s a lot of wrong information out there. And by “out there” I mean not only the scientific literature, of course, although there’s certainly plenty of that. But there’s a taxonomy of wrongness, and the biggest split comes between “honestly intended but mistaken” and “deliberately faked”. You can further subdivide those, too, of course. The first

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America's been rolling back natural land protections since 1892—but never like this

Environment The legal protections put in place in the U.S. and worldwide to preserve natural areas are increasingly being altered or erased. The United States has a history of preserving natural areas—and then paring back those protections. Such rollbacks of the legal protection of natural areas in the U.S.

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New Information on the CRISPR Babies

Last year a Chinese researcher, Dr. He Jiankui, announced that he had altered the germ line DNA of two babies using the relatively new and powerful gene-editing technique known as CRISPR . Dr. He is back in the news because of a new study looking at the effect of a mutation similar to the one Dr. He created on the life expectancy of those with the natural variant. The study finds that those who a

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Inside Britain’s top secret research laboratory

The BBC was given access inside Porton Down, where some of the world's deadliest viruses are researched.

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Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories

Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories A month's worth of cool science stories summed up. Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories Video of Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories Earth Tuesday, June 4, 2019 – 08:00 Alistair Jennings, Contributor References: 1. UN development goals 2. Biodiversity carbon 3. Hippo 4. Spider web 5. Spiders Use Webs To Catapult Themselves 6. Zeolites methane 7. L

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