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nyheder2019juni06

Banket ti år tilbage: Kvælstof-overskud stiger efter landbrugspakken

Dansk landbrug benytter stadig mere fosfor og kvælstof, uden at de ekstra mængder bliver opsuget af afgrøder og dyr. Helt uacceptabelt, men en forventet konsekvens af landbrugspakken, siger miljøorganisation.

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Physicists can predict the jumps of Schrodinger's cat (and finally save it)

Yale researchers have figured out how to catch and save Schrödinger's famous cat, the symbol of quantum superposition and unpredictability, by anticipating its jumps and acting in real time to save it from proverbial doom. In the process, they overturn years of cornerstone dogma in quantum physics.

6h

Psykiatri-demonstration er startskuddet på en ny aktivistgruppe

Flere tusinde mennesker samlede sig lørdag foran Christiansborg i protest, vurderer tovholder på projektet Mikkel Rasmussen. Selvom blot et fåtal af politikere mødte op, kalder han arrangementet for en succes og forklarer, at det er begyndelsen på en ny aktivistgruppe.

7h

The Big Names Missing From the Mueller Hearings

House Democrats on Monday announced a long-awaited series of hearings on the Mueller report that, they hope, will drive home President Donald Trump’s misdeeds to a far larger share of the American public. Their star witness, however, will not be Robert Mueller, the recently-departed special counsel and principal author of the 448-page document at the center of the proceedings. Nor will it be Atto

6min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Great British Face-Off

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, June 3. ‣ House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler announced that his panel will hold a series of hearings on former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. The first, which will take place on June 10, will focus on allegations that the president obstructed justice. Here’s what else we’re watching: Britai

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WWDC 2019: iOS 13, Mac Pro, and Everything Apple Announced

Today from Apple: iOS goes dark, Mac Pro goes to 11, and iTunes goes bye-bye.

13min

Key obstacles to scaling up DNA data storage

Researchers have developed new techniques for labeling and retrieving data files in DNA-based information storage systems, addressing two of the key obstacles to widespread adoption of DNA data storage technologies.

24min

In the future, will we acquire skills, not degrees?

U.S. college enrollment has declined for the eighth consecutive year. Recent survey found that a majority of freelancers found skills training to be more important than having a degree. It's becoming harder for universities to keep up with a rapidly changing workforce. It should come as no surprise to mostly anyone who is paying attention, that we're in a seriously fast moving and complex technol

24min

Yeah, Young Blood Transfusions Do Seem to Fight Aging

Brain Juice Taking the blood of the young and using it to revitalize the old is a popular concept supported by piecemeal scientific evidence and surrounded by hype . But now scientists may have figured out how these transfusions work, thanks to two newly-identified proteins. Scientists from Stanford University took blood from two groups of mice — one cohort was two weeks old and the other 12 to 1

27min

James Ketchum, Who Conducted LSD Experiments on Soldiers, Dies at 87

An Army psychiatrist, he spearheaded a Cold War project to test whether recreational drugs could be used in chemical attacks to disable enemy troops.

37min

To catch and reverse a quantum jump mid-flight

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1287-z Experiment overturns Bohr’s view of quantum jumps, demonstrating that they possess a degree of predictability and when completed are continuous, coherent and even deterministic.

42min

The hunt for the lesser-known funding source

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01734-1 Scientists can use search skills and solid connections to find grants from foreign governments, foundations and crowdfunding.

42min

Even low light before bed can disrupt sleep-hormone cycles

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01703-8 In some people, faint evening light is enough to delay the normal rise in melatonin.

42min

Gene edits to ‘CRISPR babies’ might have shortened their life expectancy

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01739-w Study of almost half a million people links mutation that protects against HIV infection to an earlier death.

42min

Elephants have a nose for portion size

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01746-x Pachyderms use their trunks to discriminate between two hidden food piles of unequal size.

42min

US science academy approves plan to oust sexual harassers

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01758-7 Members of the National Academy of Sciences voted to rescind membership in the organization for proven cases of sexual harassment.

42min

A brief history of slime

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01732-3 Christopher Howe delights in a new book on the planet’s most powerful organisms — algae.

42min

Watching cancer cells evolve through chromosomal instability

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01709-2 Chromosomal abnormalities are a hallmark of many types of human cancer, but it has been difficult to observe such changes in living cells and to study how they arise. Progress is now being made on this front.

42min

Chinese American scientists uneasy amid crackdown on foreign influence

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01605-9 Government concerns are also posing difficulties for US academia at large.

42min

Make reports of research misconduct public

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01728-z Confronted with bad behaviour, institutions will keep asking the wrong questions until they have to show their working, says C. K. Gunsalus.

42min

Hummingbirds look and learn

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01719-0 A study provides evidence that male hummingbirds learn both songs and visual displays by listening to and watching others in their community.

42min

Mapping human microbiome drug metabolism by gut bacteria and their genes

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1291-3 Mapping human microbiome drug metabolism by gut bacteria and their genes

42min

Daily briefing: Stunning science images shortlisted for the Wellcome photography prize

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01761-y Amazing science, technology and medicine photography, how to explain a bad year to grad schools and a call to make research misconduct reports public.

42min

Woman forced to carry foetus with neither brain nor skull

Doctor reveals the pain and futility of US anti-abortion laws. Paul Biegler reports.

46min

Measuring impact of product placement

Researchers reveals the impact of product placement in television programming. The findings indicate that prominent product placement embedded in television programming does have a net positive impact on online conversations and web traffic for the brand.

46min

Immunotherapy drug found safe in treating cancer patients with HIV, study suggests

The results of a new study suggest that patients living with HIV and one of a variety of potentially deadly cancers could be safely treated with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, also known by its brand name, KEYTRUDA.

46min

On Praying for the President

It is not weird for a Southern Baptist pastor to pray for the president of the United States. Yes, 81 percent of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump, and have remained firmly supportive of the president during his first two years in office. Yes, he has surrounded himself with a coterie of evangelical advisers who have cemented the association between conservative Christianity and Trumpism.

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EV at 15,900€ coming this fall (100km range)

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

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New Research: Human Civilization Will Likely Collapse By 2050

Doom and Gloom A distressing Australian climate change analysis has some bad news: human civilization is set out to collapse by 2050 if don’t grapple with the imminent threat of climate change. The analysis concludes that climate change is “a current and existential national security risk” that “threatens the premature extinction of Earth-originating intelligent life or the permanent and drastic

55min

Woman Had a Huge Tapeworm 'Egg' Encased in Her Brain. Why She's Super Happy About It.

When is it a huge relief to hear you have a parasite lurking in your brain? When it's not a cancerous brain tumor.

56min

Rich kids fare better in adulthood than smart ones, Georgetown researchers say

A study by Georgetown's Center on Education and the Workforce demonstrates how much easier it is for upper-class children to attain successful adulthoods. Test scores tend to drop for even the smartest kids from the lower economic percentiles. By following kids through their education with support, the odds can be evened-out. None In America, work hard, get good grades, and you'll be well on your

57min

Astronomers Worry That Elon Musk's New Satellites Will Ruin The View

The billionaire wants to deploy thousands of satellites in order to provide global Internet, but astronomers say they could create unsightly glare. (Image credit: John Raoux/AP)

1h

Russia Demands Tinder Turn Over Users’ Sexts, Pics

From Russia With Love Russian Tinder users hoping to find true love — or at least a hot date — on the app may soon have to explain their actions to the government. On Friday, the nation added Tinder to its “organizers of information dissemination” list, according to Roskomsvobod , an organization designed to counter internet censorship. Russian law requires companies on the list to store users’ d

1h

Plant lineage points to different evolutionary playbook for temperate species

An ancient, cosmopolitan lineage of plants is shaking up scientists' understanding of how quickly species evolve in temperate ecosystems and why.

1h

For many, friends and family, not doctors, serve as a gateway to opioid misuse

In a common narrative of the path to opioid misuse, people become addicted to painkillers after a doctor prescribed them pills to treat an injury and then, later, switch to harder drugs, such as heroin. However, nonmedical opioid users were more likely to say they began abusing opioids after friends and family members offered them the drugs, according to researchers.

1h

Diets of Latinos and blacks have greatest environmental impact per dollar spent on food

Despite spending less than white households on food overall, black and Latino households have more impact on the environment per dollar spent on food than white households, according to a new study published in Environmental Engineering Science.

1h

Stratolaunch, Builder of World's Largest Airplane, May Be Closing

The world's largest airplane may be grounded after just one flight.

1h

Water filters, efficient cookstoves improve health in vulnerable Rwandan populations

A large-scale program to deliver water filters and portable biomass-burning cookstoves to Rwandan homes reduced the prevalence of reported diarrhea and acute respiratory infection in children under 5 years old by 29% and 25%, respectively. The results suggest that programmatic delivery of household water filters and improved cookstoves can provide a scalable interim solution for rural populations

1h

Anti-vaxxers are only part of the measles problem

Health Massive outbreaks in the 1990s hold some clues for how to combat the resurgence. Though we don’t talk about it much, the early ‘90s were historic for measles. The disease had been relatively dormant since the 1970s, since the vaccine was first…

1h

Bronze Age Siberian 'Birdman' Wore a Collar of Beaks and Skulls

This unusual garment may have been used for protection or rituals.

1h

Researchers explore augmented ACL reconstruction procedure

An innovative procedure that explores the use of amnion, bone marrow concentrate and suture tape in ACL reconstruction may result in earlier return to play protocols for athletes, suggests a new study from the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

1h

Urban pollution enhances up to 400% formation of aerosols over the Amazon rainforest

This phenomenon affects cloud production and rainfall, with consequences for the local and global climate, which researchers have warned about in the study published in Nature Communications.

1h

Lista: Fem myter om cancerframkallande mat – så sanna är de

Vi översköljs av rön och råd om livsmedel vi bör undvika för att minska risken att drabbas av cancer. Hur farligt är knäckebröd, och hur bra är det egentligen att äta kosttillskott? Cancerfondens expert Maiju Wetterhall slår hål på myterna.

1h

‘We Aren’t Free—We Are Limited to Hiding Behind Veils’

Pakistan is routinely ranked as the third most dangerous country in the world for women. One in three married Pakistani women reports facing physical violence from her husband (although informal estimates are much higher); thousands of women are murdered each year by family members in “honor killings”; many more are tortured, mutilated, and abused inside their own homes. Child marriage, a long-he

1h

New method to gauge atmosphere's ability to clear methane

Methane is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. Hydroxyl radicals (OH) react with methane and break it down, but it's been hard for scientists to get a handle on how much OH is present in the atmosphere at high-enough spatial and temporal resolution to be useful. New research got creative and correlated data from a NASA research plane and orbiting satellites to devise a new way to determine OH

1h

Germline gene therapy: Safety

An internationally known embryologist and his son make the case for using gene-editing tools to prevent inherited disease, in a new editorial. The authors push back against recent calls for a moratorium on germline gene editing, following the revelation last year of the world's first gene-edited babies in China.

1h

Early contact with needle-exchange program reduces hepatitis C infection

People who inject drugs and who are female, homeless or amphetamine users often share needles and syringes, and consequently run a higher risk of infection hepatitis C virus infection that affect the liver.

1h

Pop-up parks deliver big benefits in small spaces

'Pop-up parks' represent one possible means to help meet the demands of urbanites for more opportunities to connect with nature in their neighborhoods, serve important conservation functions by providing small-scale habitat refuges for a wide variety of threatened plants and animals in urban environments, and deliver a suite of ecosystem services to urban residents and wildlife alike.

1h

Anti hypertensive drug use was associated with a decreased dementia risk

Various clinical trials indicate what effects can be expected from standardized intervention programs on the basis of existing evidence. Little is known about the way in which such programs can be implemented in actual care practice. However, it may be possible to use data from clinical practice to estimate the potential of drug prescriptions to delay or reduce the development of dementia.

1h

Nanomaterial safety on a nano budget

A laboratory develops and shares a low-cost method to safely handle the transfer of bulk carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials.

1h

Apple’s Biggest WWDC Announcements in Two Minutes or Less

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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The Mindset of Eating Disorders

Savvy Psychologist reveals 4 psychological drivers behind anorexia, bulimia, orthorexia, and other forms of disordered eating — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

2-D crystals conforming to 3-D curves create strain for engineering quantum devices

A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory explored how atomically thin two-dimensional (2-D) crystals can grow over 3-D objects and how the curvature of those objects can stretch and strain the crystals. The findings, published in Science Advances, point to a strategy for engineering strain directly during the growth of atomically thin crystals to fabrica

1h

Newfound autoimmune syndrome causes muscle pain, weakness

A previously unknown autoimmune muscle disease involving sudden onset of debilitating muscle pain and weakness has been identified. The syndrome easily could be mistaken for other muscle diseases that require different treatment, so the findings are expected to help physicians treat patients appropriately, the researchers said.

1h

Slowdown in Earth's temps stabilized nature's calendar

When the rate of the Earth's air temperature slows down for a significant amount of time, so can phenology.

1h

Precision calibration empowers largest solar telescope

As with any astronomical instrument, calibration is required in order to remove effects that the instrument itself might have on the data. New research marks a substantial advance in ensuring the accurate solar information measured and collected by the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST).

1h

Most detailed X-ray image of batteries yet to reveal why they still aren't good enough

A multi-institute team of researchers has developed the most comprehensive view yet of lithium-ion battery electrodes, where most damage typically occurs from charging them repeatedly. Manufacturers could use this information to design batteries for your smartphone or car that are both more reliable and longer-lasting, the researchers say.

1h

2D crystals conforming to 3D curves create strain for engineering quantum devices

A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory explored how atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals can grow over 3D objects and how the curvature of those objects can stretch and strain the crystals. The findings, published in Science Advances, point to a strategy for engineering strain directly during the growth of atomically thin crystals to fabricate

1h

Climate action urgently required to protect human health in Europe

In this landmark report, the European Academies' Science Advisory Council (EASAC) focuses on the consequences of climate change for human health in Europe and the benefits of acting now to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in order to stabilize the climate.

1h

This Grumpy, Medieval Chess Piece Was Lost for Nearly 200 Years. Now It Could Fetch Over $1 Million.

A medieval chess piece that was MIA for nearly two centuries was chilling in a drawer.

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An Alien Star Was Just Caught Shooting an Enormous Plasma Blast into Space

This observation, the first ever of an alien coronal mass ejection, reveals new details about how stars other than our sun behave.

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The Mindset of Eating Disorders

Savvy Psychologist reveals 4 psychological drivers behind anorexia, bulimia, orthorexia, and other forms of disordered eating — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Measuring impact of product placement

Researchers from Indiana University and Emory University published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science (Editor's note: The source of this research is INFORMS), which reveals the impact of product placement in television programming. The findings indicate that prominent product placement embedded in television programming does have a net positive impact on online conversations and

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In the aftermath of company scandals, auditors charge higher fees or leave

When thousands of fake Wells Fargo accounts came to light in 2016, the media scrutinized everyone behind the scandal, with the bank's external auditor, KPMG, sharing print space in nearly every article. A new study from researchers at University of Colorado Denver, Bentley University, and Northeastern University found that the media blowback related to environmental, social and governance (ESG) sc

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Team develops new method to gauge atmosphere's ability to clear methane, a potent greenhouse gas

New research by UMBC's Glenn Wolfe and collaborators is shaping how scientists understand the fate of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in Earth's atmosphere.

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Prosthetic ‘tripod foot’ offers stability on rough terrain

Hiking trails and other rough terrain are especially difficult for people with prosthetic legs. Now, engineers have come up with a more stable option. The cornerstone of the new design is a kind of tripod foot that responds to rough terrain by actively shifting pressure among three different contact points. Researchers say the tool they developed for quickly emulating and improving their prototyp

1h

Astronomers Call for Regulation of SpaceX Starlink Satellites

Bright Star The International Astronomical Union (IAU), an association made up of more than 12,000 astronomy professionals from across the globe, released a statement calling for the regulation of satellite constellation efforts — including SpaceX’s Starlink initiative. The news comes after SpaceX launched the first 60 of some 12,000 planned low-Earth orbit satellites last month — but the unusual

2h

Trap-and-release accelerates study of swimming ciliated cells

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have been studying cilia for years to determine how their dysfunction leads to infertility and other conditions associated with cilia-related diseases. Now, they will be able to perform these studies more rapidly through a new method that uses sound waves to momentarily trap cells propelled by cilia, then releases them to measure their movement as

2h

NASA sees strong storms in developing gulf system 91L

NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms in the developing low pressure area designated as System 91L is it moved through the Gulf of Campeche just north of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.

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Research group finds way to turn plastic waste products into jet fuel

A research group led by Washington State University scientists has found a way to turn daily plastic waste products into jet fuel.

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MacOS Catalina: Apple's next MacOS will open up to iPad apps, be available in the fall – CNET

Called Catalina, the next version of MacOS will finally retire iTunes in favor of three dedicated media apps, let Mac users run iPad apps and ship in the fall.

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Tool-use became widespread 10,000 years earlier than we thought

The discovery of an ancient collection of tools suggests that our ancient ancestors began using stone tools on a regular basis about 2.6 million years ago

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A little formula in first days of life may not impact breastfeeding at 6 months

A study has lodged a new kink in the breastfeeding dilemma that adds to the angst of exhausted new parents: While most newborns lose weight in the first days of life, do you or don't you offer a little formula after breastfeeding if the weight loss is more than usual?

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In the aftermath of company scandals, auditors charge higher fees or leave

CU Denver researcher predicts that auditors notice and incorporate media-provided ESG information in their risk response, which has not been examined before. Supporting this prediction, she finds that ESG-related negative media coverage of an audit client is associated with a higher likelihood of auditor resignation and increased audit fees. This response is incremental to the issues that underlie

2h

Promising cancer target for liposarcoma

A study has revealed a close association between liposarcoma (LPS), a type of cancer that develops from fat cells, and the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein family.

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Improvements in water quality could reduce ecological impact of climate change on rivers

Improvements in water quality could reduce the ecological impact of climate change on rivers, finds a new study.

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A Star Just Coughed Something Up and Scientists Want to Know Why

Spitting Up Scientists just got their first complete glimpse at a massive solar eruption from a star other than our Sun. The cosmic explosion, technically called a coronal mass ejection, rocketed about 2 quintillion pounds of the star’s plasma out into space, according to a press release from the Chandra X-Ray Center. That makes the explosion 10,000 times larger than any of our sun’s eruptions. T

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Dozens of New Super-distant Supernovas Help Chart the Far-off Cosmos

A small subset of the supernovas that Subaru discovered. Each set of three images shows (left to right) the sky before the supernova exploded, after, and the difference between the two images. (Credit: N. Yasuda et al.) Before our solar system formed or our sun even began to shine, stars halfway across the cosmos were exploding in brilliant flashes of light called supernovas. The light from their

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China Unveils First Chip Designed Specifically for Mind-Reading

Just Think As the name suggests, brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are devices that provide a direct line of communication between the brain and a computer. Essentially, they pull off the seemingly sci-fi feat of reading minds, and research into them has made remarkable strides in recent years — we now have BCIs that can turn your thoughts into audible sentences or even let you play a game of tele

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If anyone can see the morally unthinkable online, what then?

Imagine you work at a Latex glove factory. One night, you type 'Latex' into Google: you’re searching for competitors' products, but you find other things too. Some of what you find turns you on. But some of it you wish you could unsee: prior to the search, it was morally unthinkable. It's easy to under-appreciate the importance of the morally unthinkable. Discussions of ethics tend to focus on ma

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Early farmers liked alcohol so much they invented two ways to brew it

Residues on pottery from two 7000-year-old sites in China suggest early farmers developed two different ways to brew alcoholic drinks

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Elephants can judge the quantity of hidden food just by using smell

Asian elephants have shown that they can judge quantities – the amount of seeds in a locked bucket – just by using their extremely sensitive sense of smell

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Two brain-rejuvenating proteins have been identified in young blood

Young blood has mysterious powers to improve cognition in older animals. Two proteins that boost structures in neurons seem to be behind the effect

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Tool-use became widespread 10,000 years earlier than we thought

The discovery of an ancient collection of tools suggests that our ancient ancestors began using stone tools on a regular basis about 2.6 million years ago

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Plastic water bottles may one day fly people cross-country

A research group led by Washington State University scientists has found a way to turn regular plastic waste products into jet fuel.

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NASA sees strong storms in developing gulf system 91L

NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms in the developing low pressure area designated as System 91L is it moved through the Gulf of Campeche just north of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.

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Apple Refreshes Mac Pro With Modular Design, $6,000 Starting Price

At WWDC today, Apple unveiled the first Mac Pro refresh since 2013. The new Mac Pro has up to 28 CPU cores, 1.5TB of RAM, multiple GPUs, and a modular design. Bonus: it also looks like a cheese …

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Apple's Got a Fresh Plan to Make HomeKit Actually Useful

When it comes to smart home platforms, Apple HomeKit’s been sort of like the ugly stepchild. Smart home devices were much slower to adopt it than Amazon Alexa or Google Assistant, and even though …

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Key obstacles to scaling up DNA data storage

Researchers have developed new techniques for labeling and retrieving data files in DNA-based information storage systems, addressing two of the key obstacles to widespread adoption of DNA data storage technologies.

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Which brain hemorrhage patients have treatable underlying conditions

A new study identifies patients more likely to have underlying lesions from brain-bleeds, a finding that could help doctors treat the condition more rapidly.

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US Gov Now Collecting Social Media Handles of Visa Applicants

Just @ Me Before they can enter the United States, visa applicants will now need to let the government know what they’ve been up to on social media. On Friday, a new policy went into effect requiring nearly all U.S. visa applicants to share information about any social media accounts they’ve had in the past five years. The State Department claims the move will improve national security — but oppo

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Watch an elephant ‘count’ simply by using its sense of smell

Asian elephants can discriminate food quantities using only their trunk

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Immunotherapy drug found safe in treating cancer patients with HIV

The results of a study led by physicians at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center showed that patients living with HIV and one of a variety of potentially deadly cancers could be safely treated with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, also known by its brand name, KEYTRUDA.

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For those about to rock: the birthplace of humanity’s tool kit found

Stone artefacts from 2.6 million years ago are the earliest Homo tools ever found. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Meditation goes digital in new clinical trial

Scientists have developed a personalized digital meditation training program that significantly improved attention and memory in healthy young adults — a group already at the peak of brain health — in just six weeks.

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Stalk antibodies provide flu protection in humans

A universal flu vaccine that could prevent a potential influenza pandemic has been a holy grail for epidemiologists around the world ever since the first flu vaccines were developed in 1938.

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Sweet! How C. difficile toxin A enters intestinal cells

Clostridiodes difficile infection has become a leading cause of severe, sometimes fatal diarrheal illness, with the bacterium's toxins causing the damage. New work cements our knowledge of how C. diff's two primary toxins, A and B, slip into intestinal cells, the first step toward a possible treatment that doesn't involve antibiotics. This latest study, on toxin A, shows its activity can be blocke

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An effective sweeper closes DNA replication cycling

Scientists reported a novel molecular mechanism for the regulation of PCNA cycling during DNA replication. They proved that ATAD5-RLC opens PCNA ring to be removed from DNA as a bona-fide PCNA unloader. Since uncontrolled disassembly of replication machineries causes genomic instability that may result in cellular transformation, this study will be beneficial to develop strategies for cancer treat

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Major stem cell discovery to boost research into development and regenerative medicine

A new approach has enabled researchers to create Expanded Potential Stem Cells (EPSCs) of both pig and human cells. The research has incredible potential for studying human development and regenerative medicine. This is the first time scientists have been able to derive stem cells from early pig embryos and will also be beneficial for animal health and food production.

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Sleep, wake, repeat: How do plants work on different time zones?

Researchers have developed a new method to reliably measure plant circadian clocks and how different plants respond to day and night, and that these circadian rhythms change as they age.

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Brush your teeth — postpone Alzheimer's

Researchers in Norway have discovered a clear connection between oral health and Alzheimer's disease.

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A treasure map to understanding the epigenetic causes of disease

Researchers have identified special regions of the genome where a blood sample can be used to infer epigenetic regulation throughout the body, allowing scientists to test for epigenetic causes of disease.

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NASA Picks First Private Landers for Lunar Science

Three companies are receiving millions of dollars apiece to ferry payloads to the moon’s surface in 2020 and 2021 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Oldest flaked stone tools point to the repeated invention of stone tools

A new archaeological site discovered by an international and local team of scientists working in Ethiopia shows that the origins of stone tool production are older than 2.58 million years ago. Previously, the oldest evidence for systematic stone tool production and use was 2.58 to 2.55 million years ago.

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Hominids may have been cutting-edge tool makers 2.6 million years ago

Contested finds point to a sharp shift in toolmaking by early members of the Homo genus.

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Government Scientists Launch Investigation into Whale Deaths

About 70 gray whales have been found dead this year on the west coast of the US.

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Bioinks to print therapeutics in 3D

A team of researchers has developed an innovative way to print therapeutics in 3D for regenerative medicine.

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Apple Kills iTunes. Let's Pay Our Respects

Yes, iTunes was bloated and terrible. But it still deserves a proper sendoff.

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The Philippines wants to make planting trees a graduation requirement

Environment Maintaining that greenery will likely prove challenging. Legislators in the Philippines proposed a new graduation requirement: Before leaving elementary school, high school, and college, every student in the island nation must…

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Using AI to predict breast cancer and personalize care

Despite major advances in genetics and modern imaging, the diagnosis catches most breast cancer patients by surprise. For some, it comes too late. Later diagnosis means aggressive treatments, uncertain outcomes, and more medical expenses. As a result, identifying patients has been a central pillar of breast cancer research and effective early detection. With that in mind, a team from MIT's Comput

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HomePod will support multiple users and music handoffs

Apple just addressed some of the complaints about the HomePod in one fell swoop. A future update to the smart speaker will bring multiple major upgrades, most notably support for multiple …

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Seaweed helps trap carbon dioxide in sediment

Researchers have found that these slimy macroalgae play an important role in permanently removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

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Bioinks to print therapeutics in 3D

A team of researchers has developed an innovative way to print therapeutics in 3D for regenerative medicine.

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Lithium boosts muscle strength in mice with rare muscular dystrophy

Researchers have found that lithium improves muscle size and strength in mice with a rare form of muscular dystrophy that causes weakness in the shoulders and hips. The findings could lead to a drug for the disabling condition.

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New genetic weapons challenge sickle cell disease

Researchers advancing gene-editing techniques to help patients with sickle cell disease discover an unexpected boost in fetal hemoglobin production, which mutes the effect of the disease.

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Six fingers per hand

A congenital additional finger brings motor advantages, new research shows.

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New Finding Advances the Search for a Universal Flu Vaccine

Antibodies to a portion of the influenza virus that varies relatively little from strain to strain may provide flu protection in humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New Finding Advances the Search for a Universal Flu Vaccine

Antibodies to a portion of the influenza virus that varies relatively little from strain to strain may provide flu protection in humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Those Gene-Hacked Babies May Be Doomed to Die Young

Closer Look About half a year after Chinese scientist He Jiankui first brought gene-hacked babies into the world, cooler heads have finally prevailed: scientists pored over hundreds of thousands of medical records to learn how the genes that He altered affect human health. He’s team gene-hacked the twin babies — and a third baby due this summer — to knock out a gene called CCR5 in hopes that it w

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2019 Power-Sector Trends Point to a Continued Rise in U.S. Emissions

Growth in natural gas could offset any reductions from the continued decline in coal-power generation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Measuring impact of product placement

Researchers from Indiana University and Emory University published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science (Editor's note: The source of this research is INFORMS), which reveals the impact of product placement in television programming. The findings indicate that prominent product placement embedded in television programming does have a net positive impact on online conversations and

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Trap-and-release accelerates study of swimming ciliated cells

J. Mark Meacham and Minji Kim in his lab studied cilia in an acoustic trap that allows them to analyze hundreds of cells in minutes.

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Cybersecurity flaws in chips are still taking too long to fix

Delays in plugging security holes in semiconductor chips put everything from servers to phones at risk. Here are some suggestions for speeding things up

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How Did Tonight’s Jeopardy Result Not Leak Sooner?

This story reveals the outcome of tonight’s Jeopardy episode. Like many other articles on the internet today, this piece contains a spoiler about James Holzhauer, the Jeopardy contestant who has been winning money at a rate the show has never seen before. If you’d rather not know how Holzhauer does on tonight’s episode, you should stop reading now. The spoiler, as you may have guessed: Holzhauer’

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Physicists can predict the jumps of Schrödinger's cat (and finally save it)

Researchers have figured out how to catch and save Schrödinger's famous cat, the symbol of quantum superposition and unpredictability, by anticipating its jumps and acting in real time to save it from proverbial doom.

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Sophie Turner and Maisie Williams Aren't Married

Though the internet does like to ask if they're a couple often.

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Use Wolfram Alpha to find out everything Google can't tell you

DIY But we admit "Wolfram Alpha-ing" isn't as easy to say as "googling." The computational engine Wolfram Alpha can fill in some of the gaps left by Google across science, technology, math, culture, and more.

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Downpours of torrential rain more frequent with global warming

The number of extreme downpours increased steadily between 1964 and 2013 — a period when global warming also intensified, according to new research.

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Combination of water scarcity and inflexible demand puts world's river basins at risk

Nearly one-fifth of the world's population lives in a stressed water basin where the next climate change-driven incident could threaten access to an essential resource for agriculture, industry and life itself, according to a new article.

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CRISPR baby mutation significantly increases mortality

Six months ago, a Chinese scientist announced that he had edited the genomes of two babies born last year. The germline edits with CRISPR-Cas9 supposedly changed the CCR5 gene to prevent HIV from invading immune cells. An analysis of records in the U.K. Biobank shows that having two copies of this mutation is associated with a 21 percent increase in mortality.

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Sponges collect penguin, seal, and fish DNA from the water they filter

Scientists report that sponges, which can filter 10,000 liters of water daily, catch DNA in their tissues as they filter-feed. This proof-of-concept study identified fish, seal, and penguin DNA in sponges from the Antarctic and Mediterranean, demonstrating that sponges can be used to monitor biodiversity.

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New interaction between thin film magnets discovered

An international research team has made a discovery that could significantly improve racetrack memory devices storing the data in nanowires in the form of oppositely magnetized areas, so-called domains.

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A more accurate, low-cost 39 GHz beamforming transceiver for 5G communications

Researchers present a 39 GHz transceiver with built-in calibration for fifth-generation (5G) applications. The advantages to be gained include better quality communications as well as cost-effective scalability.

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Fiat Chrysler-Renault Merger Points to High Cost of Developing Electric Cars

Renault has EV technology FCA covets, and so does Renault partner Nissan. Fiat Chrysler has the money to spend because Jeep and Ram trucks are selling so well. Confused? You're not alone. Just don't get us started on the Ford-GM merger rumors. The post Fiat Chrysler-Renault Merger Points to High Cost of Developing Electric Cars appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Germline gene therapy pioneer, teenage son make case for safe treatment

An internationally known embryologist and his son make the case for using gene-editing tools to prevent inherited disease, in an editorial published today in the journal Nature Medicine. The authors push back against recent calls for a moratorium on germline gene editing, following the revelation last year of the world's first gene-edited babies in China.

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In Search of Green Dwarfs

A new idea in the quest to find life beyond Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In Search of Green Dwarfs

A new idea in the quest to find life beyond Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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No More Notch? Oppo, Xiaomi Show Off Under-Display Selfie Cameras

Many phones have adopted a display notch in the last couple of years, but that may be a flash in the pan. Oppo and Xiaomi have just shown off their upcoming under-display camera technology. The post No More Notch? Oppo, Xiaomi Show Off Under-Display Selfie Cameras appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Could this unusual immune cell be the cause of type 1 diabetes?

Scientists have found a hybrid of B and T immune cells that could be a prime driver of the autoimmunity that many people believe causes type 1 diabetes.

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James Holzhauer's 'Jeopardy!' Game Monday Is a Must-See

This story is one big spoiler about James Holzhauer. Don’t read past here if you don’t want to know. Seriously.

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Grassland areas should be chosen wisely

According to researchers, choosing the best areas to convert from cereals to grasslands depends on whether you prioritize improvement of nature and the aquatic environment, how much biomass you can produce, or how much land is needed to so do — or a combination. The researchers developed a method that enabled them to optimize selection of the best areas, where multiple benefits were taken into co

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Apple TV to support PS4, Xbox One controllers – CNET

Apple is ramping up its gaming chops by announcing Apple TV's support for two of the most popular gaming controllers.

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Apple's iOS 13 brings new photo and camera tools – CNET

The Camera and Photos apps on your iPhone or iPad will get some new features with the release of iOS 13.

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iPadOS: Apple reveals whole new operating system for the iPad

Apple has revealed an entirely new version of its operating system devoted to the iPad.

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Russia requires Tinder to provide data on its users

Dating app Tinder is now required to provide user data to Russian intelligence agencies, the country's communications regulator said Monday.

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The Day GOP Resistance to Trump Died

If you’re looking for a date to chisel on the gravestone of the Republican resistance to President Donald Trump, June 1, 2019, will work nicely. That’s the day that Maryland Governor Larry Hogan told The Washington Post , “I’m not going to be a candidate for president in 2020.” The day before, former Ohio Governor John Kasich also closed the door , which was only very slightly ajar, on his own 20

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Researchers develop new method to gauge atmosphere's ability to clear methane

Methane is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. Hydroxyl radicals (OH) react with methane and break it down, but it's been hard for scientists to get a handle on how much OH is present in the atmosphere at high-enough spatial and temporal resolution to be useful. New research published in PNAS got creative and correlated data from a NASA research plane and orbiting satellites to devise a new w

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UT Southwestern develops test to predict immunotherapy response in kidney cancer

A novel imaging test shows promise for identifying kidney cancer patients most likely to benefit from immunotherapy.

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PLOS welcomes the revised Plan S guidelines

As a fully Open Access publisher entirely ready to support cOAlition S-funded authors, we have always been in a position to give our support to this bold initiative, and entirely agree that the driving principles

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Effect of nitrogen supply method on root growth and grain yield of maize under alternate partial root-zone irrigation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44759-2 Effect of nitrogen supply method on root growth and grain yield of maize under alternate partial root-zone irrigation

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Tendons from kangaroo rats are exceptionally strong and tough

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44671-9 Tendons from kangaroo rats are exceptionally strong and tough

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Multi-omics analysis of the development and fracture resistance for maize internode

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44690-6 Multi-omics analysis of the development and fracture resistance for maize internode

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Influence of the corticospinal tract wiring pattern on sensorimotor functional connectivity and clinical correlates of upper limb function in unilateral cerebral palsy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44728-9 Influence of the corticospinal tract wiring pattern on sensorimotor functional connectivity and clinical correlates of upper limb function in unilateral cerebral palsy

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Automated detection of the HER2 gene amplification status in Fluorescence in situ hybridization images for the diagnostics of cancer tissues

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44643-z Automated detection of the HER2 gene amplification status in Fluorescence in situ hybridization images for the diagnostics of cancer tissues

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Measurement of collateral perfusion in acute stroke: a vessel-encoded arterial spin labeling study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44417-7 Measurement of collateral perfusion in acute stroke: a vessel-encoded arterial spin labeling study

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Dysregulated autophagy in muscle precursor cells from humans with type 2 diabetes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44535-2 Dysregulated autophagy in muscle precursor cells from humans with type 2 diabetes

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Social and Physiological Context can Affect the Meaning of Physiological Synchrony

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44667-5 Social and Physiological Context can Affect the Meaning of Physiological Synchrony

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Free Will Is Real

Philosopher Christian List argues against reductionism and determinism in accounts of the mind. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New Device Generates Electricity From Falling Snow

Electric Sleigh Ride A pair of scientists from the University of California in Los Angeles have invented a device that generates electricity by capturing the charge from an abundant source: falling snow. The researchers are hoping, according to Popular Science , that a mature version of such a device could power portable weather stations or help keep electronics going during a snowstorm when sola

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All the big Apple announcements from WWDC 2019

Technology Follow along as Tim Cook and his crew take the stage to show off Apple's new stuff. Apple's World Wide Developers Conference may introduce iOS 13, iPad OS, a new Mac Pro, the death of iTunes, and more.

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Antalet döda i krig det lägsta på sju år

För fjärde året i rad minskade de konfliktrelaterade dödsfallen i världen, och sedan 2014 har antalet offer minskat med hela 43 procent. Totalt registrerade Uppsala Conflict Data Program, UCDP, nästan 76 000 dödsfall under 2018. – Den främsta anledningen till denna minskning är nedtrappningen av konflikterna i Syrien och Irak. Sammantaget miste 18 000 färre människor livet i dessa konflikter jämf

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Advancing dementia and its effect on care home relationships

New research published today in the journal Dementia by researchers from the University of Chichester focuses on the effects of behavioral change due to dementia in a residential care home setting. Its findings are based on a survey of professional care-givers who shared their own experiences of the deterioration of the carer/cared-for relationship as dementia advances.

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Amazon says over 10 million items are now eligible for its free one-day delivery service

Amazon's one-day delivery service now covers more than '10 million products on Amazon, 'from Echo devices and headphones to household items and cleaning supplies,' the firm said Monday.

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Faculty Value Diversity, Though Time and Funding Are Barriers

A study finds professors from underrepresented groups more actively engage in diversity and inclusion activities.

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Burnout is now officially a medically-recognized syndrome

The World Health Organization has finally declared burnout a real syndrome with medical consequences. The condition, discussed in medical literature since the '70s, is well known and has affected millions. Treating burnout isn't so simple, and requires organizational changes. Everybody has heard of burnout . Given how high workplace stress levels have risen over the past few years, it would be mo

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Chandra Space Telescope Sees Star Pairs Ejected From Galaxies

Two galaxies in the Fornax Cluster, NGC 1399 and NGC 1404, glow with X-rays when viewed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The bright points of light beyond the galaxies' outskirts may be binary stars that have been kicked out of their homes. (Credit: NASA/CXC/McGill University/X. Jin et al) Astronomers have discovered evidence that some stars can be “kicked out” of their host galaxy, based on da

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Elephant Poaching is Decreasing as Ivory Demand Slows

(Credit: Kletr/Shutterstock) Tens of thousands of African elephants die each year from poaching. While astounding, researchers now estimate that number has plummeted since illegal hunting was at its peak in 2011. Just eight years ago, hunters took out more than 10 percent of the African elephant population — some 40,000. Now poaching kills less than four percent of the pachyderms, according to a n

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Comets Are Teaching Us How to Make Breathable Oxygen in Space

The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft saw material and gases – including oxygen – erupt off the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. (Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA) Space is an inhospitable place. For now, when humans go out in space capsules and stations, they need to bring their own air and water — and do without gravity — during th

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Mutations Mean Gene-Edited Twin CRISPR Babies May Die Early

Jiankui He talks to Matthew Porteus of Stanford during a panel talk in Hong Kong following his presentation about his gene editing experiment on two twins. (Credit: Ernie Mastroianni/Discover) This past November, Jiankui He, a Chinese scientist, claimed to have edited the genomes of twin girls when they were embryos. Genome editing on human embryos is against the law in the U.S., but not specifica

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Effects of Global Warming

Why are young – and not so young – people becoming more vociferous in their protests about global warming? Why has climate change become a political and partisan issue at democratic elections? Why do ‘greenies’ try to stop the development of new coal mines and call for speedier reduction of our greenhouse gas emissions? The answer is that the effects of greenhouse gas emissions, particularly Carb

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Astronomy group calls for urgent action on SpaceX Starlink satellites

One of the most important organisations in astronomy has waded into the row about SpaceX's global internet Starlink satellites ruining observations of the night sky

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Jack Cohen obituary

Reproductive biologist and author of popular science and science fiction books best known for the series The Science of Discworld The biologist Jack Cohen, who has died aged 85, worked on animal reproduction and the development of feathers and hair; his Living Embryos (1963) became a standard university text. He also co-authored popular science books and science fiction, and designed alien creatur

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Remote sensing of toxic algal blooms

Harmful algal blooms in the Red Sea could be detected from satellite images using a method developed at KAUST. This remote sensing technique may eventually lead to a real-time monitoring system to help maintain the vital economic and ecological resources of the Red Sea.

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Downpours of torrential rain more frequent with global warming

The frequency of downpours of heavy rain—which can lead to flash floods, devastation, and outbreaks of waterborne disease—has increased across the globe in the past 50 years, research led by the Global Institute for Water Security at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found.

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The dark side of the Anthropocene | Letter

Dominant narratives tend to neutralise any risks, but the potential catastrophic consequences must be faced, says Leslie Sklair Your extremely informative long read article ( Is the Anthropocene upon us? , 30 May) sums up the complicated story of how the Anthropocene has morphed from a technical term of geological stratigraphy (about rocks) to a vehicle for practitioners in other branches of the E

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Val av teknik mot koldioxidutsläppen kan ha politiska skäl

I sitt avhandlingsarbete har Ina Möller, Lunds universitet, velat förstå varför vissa ämnen blir föremål för politiska beslut och andra inte. Framförallt har hon velat ta reda på hur vetenskapen kan ta sig in i de politiska beslutsrummen. – Forskning betraktas av de flesta som något som är både opartiskt och bra. Men också forskare kan verka för att få gehör för sin forskning. I början av 2000-ta

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Microsoft is reportedly showing off a mysterious dual-screen Surface device to employees

While folding displays continue to become more popular throughout the tech industry, Microsoft may be working on something a bit different behind the scenes — a dual-screen prototype laptop, …

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Quest Diagnostics says data breach could have hit 11.9 million patients

Quest Diagnostics Inc said on Monday it was notified by a billing collections vendor that an unauthorized user gained access to information on nearly 11.9 million patients, including credit …

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Implementation of Oregon paid family leave to ensure equality critical, research finds

Oregon is considering a bill to implement paid family leave, House Bill 2005, following in the footsteps of Washington, which approved a similar policy in 2017.

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New genetic weapons challenge sickle cell disease

Researchers advancing gene-editing techniques to help patients with sickle cell disease discover an unexpected boost in fetal hemoglobin production, which mutes the effect of the disease.

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Nationwide study finds breast cancer patients unaware of surgical options

The majority of women who underwent lumpectomy or mastectomy surgeries for breast cancer report that the scars from those surgeries negatively affect their daily lives. Yet one-third of patients said that their physician did not tell them about surgical options that minimize scarring, according to a report published recently by the journal BMC Cancer.

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Evidence of multiple unmonitored coal ash spills found in N.C. lake

Coal ash solids in sediments collected from Sutton Lake in 2015 and 2018 suggest the North Carolina lake has been contaminated by multiple coal-ash spills, most of them apparently unmonitored and unreported. Levels of some contaminants were higher than those in sediments downstream from the massive TVA coal ash spill in Kingston, Tenn., in 2008. The new evidence highlights the risk of large-scale

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Large national study tracks veterans' health, highlights areas of unmet needs

For the first time, a large national population of United States veterans (3,000+) used the same standardized tool, PROMIS-29, that the general population uses for tracking health, and self-reported outcomes that matched physician diagnoses documented in medical records.'These are our nation's veterans. They served our country, and they deserve access to things made available to everyone,' the lea

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Downpours of torrential rain more frequent with global warming

The number of extreme downpours increased steadily between 1964 and 2013 — a period when global warming also intensified, according to research published in the journal Water Resources Research.

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New interaction between thin film magnets discovered

An international research team has made a discovery that could significantly improve racetrack memory devices storing the data in nanowires in the form of oppositely magnetized areas, so-called domains.

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Implementation of Oregon paid family leave to ensure equality critical, research finds

Oregon is considering a bill to implement paid family leave, House Bill 2005, following in the footsteps of Washington, which approved a similar policy in 2017.Oregon Health and Science University-Portland State University School of Public Health researchers concluded that it's not just approving paid family leave that's important for employees — how that policy is implemented to make it equitabl

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Researchers find seaweed helps trap carbon dioxide in sediment

Florida State University researchers working with colleagues in the United Kingdom have found that these slimy macroalgae play an important role in permanently removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

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Medieval Africans had a great way to purify gold

Scientists have successfully used a gold purifying process from medieval West Africa. Humble fragments of clay crucibles and coin molds flecked with gold that a team of British and Malian archaeologists excavated in 2005 led archaeologist Sam Nixon, in consultation with Thilo Rehren, a specialist on ancient materials and technologies, to theorize how West Africans used them to purify gold and cas

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How a leap of faith can take science forward

At the movies, scientific discoveries are often portrayed as a Eureka moment in the laboratory. Reality, however, couldn't be more different—early-stage academic inventions often require long cycles of testing, validation and regulatory approvals before they can be turned into something useful, such as a new vaccine.

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NASA Is Considering Cutting Other Programs to Pay for Moon Mission

Restructuring When NASA was tasked with the ambitious mission of sending astronauts to the Moon by 2024, the space agency was immediately kicked into overdrive . For months, NASA leadership insisted that they wouldn’t have to take money from other departments and missions to pay for the lunar voyage, which has since been dubbed Artemis . NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine previously said cuts to

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To tackle child labor, start with consumers

Consumer education campaigns that raise awareness about the use of child labour in global supply chains can be an effective countermeasure against the practice, according to new research published in Manufacturing & Service Operations Management.

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Researchers find seaweed helps trap carbon dioxide in sediment

Every beachgoer can spot seaweed in the ocean or piling up on the beach, but Florida State University researchers working with colleagues in the United Kingdom have found that these slimy macroalgae play an important role in permanently removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

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Update: In reversal, science publisher IEEE drops ban on using Huawei scientists as reviewers

Ban had been prompted by U.S. trade sanctions against Chinese company

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New Gene-Editing Method Could Lead To “Creation of a Super-Baby”

Avoiding Brightburn Chinese researchers have found a way to nearly triple the efficiency of a tool designed to edit genes in human embryos. Their method should be ready for clinical use soon, with gene-edited babies available in another year or two, Yang Hui, the lead researcher behind the project, told the South China Morning Post . But even she is concerned that her team’s technological breakth

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Their Children Were Conceived With Donated Sperm. It Was the Wrong Sperm.

As genetic testing becomes more widespread, parents are finding that sperm used in artificial insemination did not come from the donors they chose.

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Ready, jet… print

Inkjet printing is expected to fast track the commercialization of organic solar cells. Researchers from the KAUST Solar Center have exploited this technique to generate high-efficiency solar cells at large scales.

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'Law as Data' explores radical leap for legal analysis

Four thousand years ago, human societies underwent a fundamental transition when the rules governing how people interact shifted from oral custom to written laws: first captured in stone tablets such as the Code of Hammurabi, then migrating to scrolls and eventually printed law books. In recent years, the law has leaped from the analog to the digital, breaking out of the law library and onto any c

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Research team develops bioinks to print therapeutics in 3-D

A team of researchers at Texas A&M University has developed an innovative way to print therapeutics in 3-D for regenerative medicine.

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Genetic Mutation in "CRISPR Babies" May Shorten Lifespan

The gene a Chinese scientist attempted to modify in twin girls last year has been associated with premature death — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Genetic Mutation in "CRISPR Babies" May Shorten Lifespan

The gene a Chinese scientist attempted to modify in twin girls last year has been associated with premature death — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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2017 North Korean nuclear test 10 times larger than previous tests, new study finds

North Korea detonated a nuclear device in 2017 equivalent to about 250 kilotons of TNT, a new study estimates, creating an explosion 16 times the size of the bomb the United States detonated over Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945. The new assessment of the 2017 explosion's size is on the high end of previous estimate ranges.

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Heat, not drought, will drive lower crop yields, researchers say

Climate change-induced heat stress will play a larger role than drought stress in reducing the yields of several major U.S. crops later this century, according to Cornell University researchers who weighed in on a high-stakes debate between crop experts and scientists.

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Texas A&M research team develops bioinks to print therapeutics in 3D

A team of researchers at Texas A&M University has developed an innovative way to print therapeutics in 3D for regenerative medicine.

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Remote sensing of toxic algal blooms

Algal blooms in the Red Sea can be detected with a new method that accounts for dust storms and aerosols.

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Ready, jet… print!

Inkjet printing could produce high-efficiency organic solar cells with commercial potential.

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2017 North Korean nuclear test 10 times larger than previous tests, new study finds

North Korea detonated a nuclear device in 2017 equivalent to about 250 kilotons of TNT, a new study in AGU's Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth estimates. The 2017 test was an order of magnitude larger than the previous five underground tests at North Korea's Punggye-ri test site, according to the new study, which took into account the geology of the test site to estimate the size of the

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Most detailed X-ray image of batteries yet to reveal why they still aren't good enough

A multi-institute team of researchers has developed the most comprehensive view yet of lithium-ion battery electrodes, where most damage typically occurs from charging them repeatedly. Manufacturers could use this information to design batteries for your smartphone or car that are both more reliable and longer-lasting, the researchers say.

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Lithium boosts muscle strength in mice with rare muscular dystrophy

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that lithium improves muscle size and strength in mice with a rare form of muscular dystrophy that causes weakness in the shoulders and hips. The findings, published April 18 in Neurology Genetics, could lead to a drug for the disabling condition.

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Wearable motion detectors identify subtle motor deficits in children

A wristwatch-like motion-tracking device can detect movement problems in children whose impairments may be overlooked by doctors and parents, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

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NIH-supported study reveals a novel indicator of influenza immunity

A study of influenza virus transmission in Nicaraguan households reveals new insights into the type of immune responses that may be protective against influenza virus infection, report investigators. The findings could help scientists design more effective influenza vaccines and lead to the development of novel universal influenza vaccines. The research was funded by the National Institute of Alle

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In reversal, science publisher IEEE drops ban on using Huawei scientists as reviewers

Ban had been prompted by U.S. trade sanctions against Chinese company

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Trump’s Combative Visit With America’s Closest Ally

LONDON—Roads were closed . Flags were raised . Three days of pomp and circumstance were meticulously planned. By the time Air Force One prepared to touch down in London’s Stansted Airport Monday morning, it appeared that everything surrounding President Donald Trump’s state visit to Britain was going to plan. Then came the tweets. “Sadiq Khan, who by all accounts has done a terrible job as Mayor

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Hundens køn kan have stor betydning for hundeallergikere

Hundeallergikere i dansk undersøgelse reagerede vidt forskelligt på provokation med ekstrakter fra han- og hunhunde.

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Klimaændringer og astma-allergi hænger sammen

Årets EAACI-kongres sætter også fokus på de helbredsmæssige konsekvenser af menneskeskabte klimaforandringer

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AMD And Samsung Partner To Inject Radeon Graphics Into SoCs For Supercharged Mobile Devices

It is fair to say that AMD is firing on all cylinders these days, and companies are taking notice. Following the recent launch of its third-generation Ryzen processors based on Zen 2 and an …

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Volkswagen smashes electric vehicle record at Nürburgring

The wild all-electric racecar Volkswagen built to compete in the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb last year has smashed another record, this time at Germany’s world-famous Nürburgring. …

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Schrödinger's cat could be saved, say scientists

New research casts doubt on idea that a quantum jump is instant and unpredictable Schrödinger’s cat might not only be dead or alive, but also brought back from the brink, according to scientists who said they have discovered a warning sign for quantum transitions once thought to be instantaneous and unpredictable. The upshot is that the fate of Schrödinger’s cat can not only be predicted shortly

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The Science of Barbecue

It’s a mélange of chemistry, neuroscience and evolutionary biology, flavored with a big dollop of regional pride — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Feathers came first, then birds

New research, led by the University of Bristol, suggests that feathers arose 100 million years before birds—changing how we look at dinosaurs, birds, and pterosaurs, the flying reptiles.

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Feathers came first, then birds

New research, led by the University of Bristol, suggests that feathers arose 100 million years before birds—changing how we look at dinosaurs, birds, and pterosaurs, the flying reptiles.

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Researchers find slowdown in Earth's temps stabilized nature's calendar

Sometimes referred to as nature's calendar, phenology looks at the seasonal life cycle of plants and animals and is one of the leading indicators of climate change. It's the observance of natural occurrences like the first formation of buds and flowers in the spring and the changing colors of leaves in the fall. According to researchers at the University of New Hampshire, when the rate of the Eart

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'It’s a miracle': Helsinki's radical solution to homelessness | Cities

submitted by /u/josephgordonreddit [link] [comments]

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Sponges collect penguin, seal, and fish DNA from the water they filter

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Verizon 5G lab tunes up robots and medical tech heading your way

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Why the Proof of Fermat’s Last Theorem Doesn’t Need to Be Enhanced

Last June 23 marked the 25th anniversary of the electrifying announcement by Andrew Wiles that he had proved Fermat’s Last Theorem, solving a 350-year-old problem, the most famous in mathematics. The lore surrounding Wiles’ proof — the seven years he worked on the problem in secret, the gap in the proof that appeared a few months after the June announcement, the elegant solution a year later in a

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Did you solve it? Dogs in pursuit

The solution to today’s puzzle Earlier today I set you the following puzzle : Four dogs are in four corners of a square of side length 1. Each dog starts running towards the dog immediately anti-clockwise to it. The dogs start at the same time, they all run at the same speed, and at every moment each dog is running directly towards the neighbouring dog. Continue reading…

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Foretrækker du en naturvidenskabelig folketingskandidat? Her er det begrænsede udvalg

Fordelingen af ingeniører og andre med videregående naturvidenskabelige uddannelser er skæv i forhold til partiernes størrelse. Alternativet er topscorer, mens store partier som Socialdemokratiet og Venstre næsten ingen har.

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Emotions from touch

Touching different types of surfaces may incur certain emotions. This was the conclusion made by the psychologists from the Higher School of Economics in a recent empirical study. Previously, emotional perception was generally studied in relation to visual and audial modalities. The study's results were published in the journal Consciousness and Cognition.

5h

Newfound autoimmune syndrome causes muscle pain, weakness

A previously unknown autoimmune muscle disease involving sudden onset of debilitating muscle pain and weakness has been identified by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The syndrome easily could be mistaken for other muscle diseases that require different treatment, so the findings are expected to help physicians treat patients appropriately, the researchers said

5h

Heat, not drought, will drive lower crop yields, researchers say

Climate change-induced heat stress will play a larger role than drought stress in reducing the yields of several major US crops later this century, according to Cornell University researchers who weighed in on a high-stakes debate between crop experts and scientists.

5h

UNH researchers find slowdown in Earth's temps stabilized nature's calendar

According to researchers at the University of New Hampshire, when the rate of the Earth's air temperature slows down for a significant amount of time, so can phenology.

5h

Snapshot of chikungunya could lead to drugs, vaccines for viral arthritis

A team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has snapped high-resolution pictures of chikungunya virus latched onto a protein found on the surface of cells in the joints. The structures, published May 9, 2019 in the journal Cell, shows in atomic-level detail how the virus and cell-surface protein fit together — data that promises to accelerate efforts to design drugs and vaccin

5h

What causes battery electrode failure?

'It's impossible to have every single grain of rice identical in terms of their shapes and how far away it is to its neighbor,' Lin said. 'To make a better battery, you need to maximize the contribution from each individual particle…'

5h

Feathers came first, then birds

New research, led by the University of Bristol, suggests that feathers arose 100 million years before birds — changing how we look at dinosaurs, birds, and pterosaurs, the flying reptiles.

5h

Anti hypertensive drug use was associated with a decreased dementia risk

Various clinical trials indicate what effects can be expected from standardized intervention programs on the basis of existing evidence. Little is known about the way in which such programs can be implemented in actual care practice. However, it may be possible to use data from clinical practice to estimate the potential of drug prescriptions to delay or reduce the development of dementia.

5h

New TAILORx data guides adjuvant therapy in younger breast cancer patients

New data from TAILORx, the largest-ever breast cancer trial, guides adjuvant therapy in younger breast cancer patients with even greater precision than the original findings: no benefit from chemotherapy if age 50 or less with a score of 16-20 on the 21-gene Recurrence Score (RS) test and at low risk, clinically (determined by tumor size/histologic grade). Clinical risk and RS together may identif

5h

Why Crocodiles Are Not Just Living Fossils

They’ve changed remarkably over millions of years, and at one point may even have been warmblooded.

5h

The Science of Barbecue

It’s a mélange of chemistry, neuroscience and evolutionary biology, flavored with a big dollop of regional pride — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Pop-up parks deliver big benefits in small spaces

Pop-up stores, restaurants, and theaters are an increasingly common sight in cities around the world, where they add to the diversity of commercial options available to city dwellers. But while the pop-up phenomenon is normally associated with urban activities like shopping and dining, it has also caught the attention of city planners, ecologists, and conservation scientists striving to find new w

5h

Watch This 'Ford v Ferrari' Trailer Right Now

The new film, about the 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans, looks like fun.

5h

Pop-up parks deliver big benefits in small spaces

Pop-up stores, restaurants, and theaters are an increasingly common sight in cities around the world, where they add to the diversity of commercial options available to city dwellers. But while the pop-up phenomenon is normally associated with urban activities like shopping and dining, it has also caught the attention of city planners, ecologists, and conservation scientists striving to find new w

5h

A pair of fledgling planets directly seen growing around a young star

Astronomers have directly imaged two exoplanets that are gravitationally carving out a wide gap within a planet-forming disk surrounding a young star. While over a dozen exoplanets have been directly imaged, this is only the second multi-planet system to be photographed. (The first was a four-planet system orbiting the star HR 8799.) Unlike HR 8799, though, the planets in this system are still gro

5h

Exotic pets can become pests with risk of invasion

A large proportion of successful vertebrate invasions can be traced to the global exotic pet trade. However, surprisingly little is known about the economic, social, and ecological factors that shape the trade and how they influence the establishment of self-sustaining populations of non-native species.

5h

New mineral classification system captures Earth's complex past

The first minerals to form in the universe were nanocrystalline diamonds, which condensed from gases ejected when the first generation of stars exploded. Diamonds that crystallize under the extreme pressure and temperature conditions deep inside of Earth are more typically encountered by humanity. What opportunities for knowledge are lost when mineralogists categorize both the cosmic travelers and

5h

A Scientist Edited Babies' Genes In Utero. It Could Make Them More Likely to Die Early.

The genetic mutation that was attempted in the CRISPR babies is tied to an increased risk of early death.

5h

I’ve had children at school for 27 years. At last I can stop pretending to like it | Suzanne Moore

No more parents’ evenings, PTA meetings and tedious texts about rules – I can’t wait for my youngest to leave next week School’s out for ever. Just one more week and I will be free. FREE! I cannot tell you how I long for the end of school. You see, in the bizarre sociological experiment that is my life, I have had one child or another in school for about 27 years, and my youngest finishes next wee

5h

2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death

Analysis of DNA from more than 400,000 people in the U.K. suggests a genetic modification that protects against HIV may actually increase the overall risk of premature death. (Image credit: Bloomberg/Getty Images)

5h

Why Octopuses Might Be The Next Lab Rats

Move over, fruit flies, rats and zebrafish. Squid and octopuses have elaborate brains and behaviors, and scientists say studying them in the laboratory could yield important biological insights. (Image credit: Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera)

5h

Exotic pets can become pests with risk of invasion

A large proportion of successful vertebrate invasions can be traced to the global exotic pet trade. However, surprisingly little is known about the economic, social, and ecological factors that shape the trade and how they influence the establishment of self-sustaining populations of non-native species.

6h

Ecosystem service mapping and assessment: Research collection on methods and applications

Methods, data, practical applications and research insights to guide scientists and practitioners through the process of mapping and assessment of ecosystems and their services are the topic of the latest open science collection published in the open access journal One Ecosystem.

6h

Ecosystem service mapping and assessment: Research collection on methods and applications

Methods, data, practical applications and research insights to guide scientists and practitioners through the process of mapping and assessment of ecosystems and their services are the topic of the latest open science collection published in the open access journal One Ecosystem.

6h

Sensitive new laser technique detects volatile organic compounds

Researchers have developed a new way of operating miniature quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) to rapidly measure the absorption spectra of different organic molecules in the air simultaneously. The technique offers a sensitive method for detecting low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), improving the ability to track how these compounds affect human health, industrial processes and am

6h

Nanomaterial safety on a nano budget

With a little practice, it doesn't take much more than 10 minutes, a couple of bags and a big bucket to keep nanomaterials in their place.

6h

A Summertime Quandary: The Cooler Is Full of Melted Ice

If you want to keep the contents cool, better to leave the water in the ice chest if you can.

6h

Grassland areas should be chosen wisely

When farmland is converted from grain production to grasslands, the greatest environmental benefits are obtained by choosing land that is close to existing natural areas or has high nutritional loads to aquatic environments, a new study indicates.

6h

When They See Us and the Persistent Logic of ‘No Humans Involved’

The New York City teenagers Yusef Salaam, Korey Wise, Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana, and Antron McCray were not born in the wild. The boys, who were all arrested in 1989 after a 28-year-old white woman was brutally raped and abandoned in Central Park, called the sweltering metropolis their home. Their world was one of concrete and cookouts, basketball and barber shops. Before their arrest, th

6h

Google’s DeepMind Can Support, Defeat Humans in Quake III Arena

Google has trained its DeepMind AI to compete in a team environment in order to calculate winning strategies that can both defeat and support human players in Quake III Arena. The post Google’s DeepMind Can Support, Defeat Humans in Quake III Arena appeared first on ExtremeTech .

6h

AWE 2019: AR Is Alive and Well, but Not for Everyone Yet

When Google and Apple put AR front and center at their annual conferences, it was easy to think we'd all be using it every day. That hasn't happened, but the industry is getting on with solving hundreds of real-world problems. At the show, we saw what's possible now, and in the future. The post AWE 2019: AR Is Alive and Well, but Not for Everyone Yet appeared first on ExtremeTech .

6h

Nanomaterial safety on a nano budget

A Rice University laboratory develops and shares a low-cost method to safely handle the transfer of bulk carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials.

6h

Immune cells determine how fast certain tumors grow

By examining brain tumors in mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis discovered that immune cells that should be defending the body against disease sometimes can be enticed into providing aid and comfort to tumor cells instead. The more immune cells a tumor can recruit to its side, the faster the tumor grows, the researchers found.

6h

Drug-resistant tuberculosis reversed in lab

About 1.5 million people died of tuberculosis (TB) in 2017, making it the most lethal infectious disease worldwide. A growing rise in drug-resistant TB is a major obstacle to successfully treating the illness. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Umea University in Sweden have found a compound that prevents and even reverses resistance to isoniazid, the mos

6h

Native Hawaiians at far greater risk for pancreatic cancer

Native Hawaiians are at highest risk for pancreatic cancer, according to a USC study that provides a surprising look at disparities surrounding the deadly disease.

6h

Pop-up parks deliver big benefits in small spaces

'Pop-up parks' represent one possible means to help meet the demands of urbanites for more opportunities to connect with nature in their neighborhoods, serve important conservation functions by providing small-scale habitat refuges for a wide variety of threatened plants and animals in urban environments, and deliver a suite of ecosystem services to urban residents and wildlife alike.

6h

'Organs in a dish' pave the way for personalized medicine in gut and liver disease

One of the most exciting advancements in stem cell research has been the development of organoid systems, which are organ-like three-dimensional structures that mimic their corresponding organ in vivo. In this important review in Digestive and Liver Disease, published by Elsevier, scientists highlight some of the established and exciting novel uses for organoids or 'organs in a dish' in gastroente

6h

Exotic pets can become pests with risk of invasion

In a new study, a team of researchers gain further insight into the dynamics of the exotic pet trade and the role it plays in the introduction of invasive vertebrate populations across the globe.

6h

Sensitive new laser technique detects volatile organic compounds

Researchers have developed a new way of operating miniature quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) to rapidly measure the absorption spectra of different organic molecules in the air simultaneously.

6h

Ecosystem service mapping and assessment: Research collection on methods and applications

Methods, data, applications and research insights to guide scientists and practitioners through the process of mapping and assessment of ecosystems and their services are the topic of the latest open science collection published in the open-access journal One Ecosystem. The Special Issue gives a 360-degree insight into the main results from the three-and-a-half-year-long EU Horizon 2020-funded pro

6h

Sleep, wake, repeat: How do plants work on different time zones?

It's widely understood that humans have a circadian clock. When we travel long distances, things get knocked out of kilter.

6h

Sleep, wake, repeat: How do plants work on different time zones?

It's widely understood that humans have a circadian clock. When we travel long distances, things get knocked out of kilter.

6h

Research sheds light on the importance of police trust in the public

A recent study finds that police officers who place more trust in the public are also more likely to pursue cases on their own initiative—termed proactive policing—and have higher arrest rates. The finding may have implications for public safety, police training and future law enforcement research.

6h

Water management aided by mathematical model of fresh water lenses

A joint Russian-Omani paper was published in Journal of Hydrology. In the 1950s, Russian academician Vladimir Kunin, one of the founders of the Institute of Water Problems in Moscow and the Institute of Deserts in Ashkhabad, discovered and described fresh water lenses in the Karakum desert of Turkmenistan. These lenses float on the top of saline and hypersaline groundwater. The genesis of these le

6h

Genetic Mutation that Prevents HIV Infection Tied to Earlier Death

Those with two copies of the delta32 allele in the CCR5 gene are 21 percent more likely to die by age 76, although it's not clear why.

6h

Networks of sponges could capture DNA to track ocean health

Humble sponge could one day be a DNA-snaring machine

6h

Networking with ghosts in the machine… and speaking kettles

Imagine for just a moment that your kettle could speak? What would it say? How would it feel? More importantly, what on earth would you ask it?Now researchers at Lancaster University have done just that by conducting several 'talking head' interviews with household objects as part of an experiment to understand more about our relationship with networked technologies known as The Internet of Things

6h

Which brain hemorrhage patients have treatable underlying conditions

A new study identifies patients more likely to have underlying lesions from brain-bleeds, a finding that could help doctors treat the condition more rapidly.

6h

Research sheds light on the importance of police trust in the public

A recent study finds that police officers who place more trust in the public are also more likely to pursue cases on their own initiative — termed proactive policing — and have higher arrest rates. The finding may have implications for public safety, police training and future law enforcement research.

6h

Phosphorylation of Regnase-1 lets IL-17 run amok

A research team led by Osaka University found that the cytokine interleukin (IL)-17 triggers the phosphorylation of mRNA-degrading enzyme Regnase-1, resulting in excessive inflammation. By blocking this phosphorylation, novel therapies may be able to prevent the development or severity of IL-17-associated autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, and psoriasis.

6h

Hearing through your fingers: Device that converts speech

A novel study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience provides the first evidence that a simple and inexpensive non-invasive speech-to-touch sensory substitution device has the potential to improve hearing in hearing-impaired cochlear implant patients, as well as individuals with normal hearing, to better discern speech in various situations like learning a second language or trying to

6h

New mineral classification system captures Earth's complex past

A system of categorization that reflects not just a mineral's chemistry and crystalline structure, but also the physical, chemical, or biological processes by which it formed, would be capable of recognizing that nanodiamonds from space are fundamentally different to diamonds formed in Earth's depths.

6h

Is 'clean eating' just dirty rhetoric?

Study looks at #cleaneating as a healthy or harmful dietary strategy and explores perceptions of clean eating and associations with disordered eating among young adults.

6h

Major stem cell discovery to boost research into development and regenerative medicine

A new approach has enabled researchers to create Expanded Potential Stem Cells (EPSCs) of both pig and human cells. The research from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators offers incredible potential for studying human development and regenerative medicine. Published in Nature Cell Biology today, this is the first time scientists have been able to derive stem cells from early pig embryos

6h

SYNGO Consortium releases public data resource for universal reference in synapse research

Disruptions to the brain's synapses lie at the root of many disorders. The international SYNGO Consortium, which brings together 15 laboratories and the Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium, has now released SYNGO 1.0 — a portal that aims to represent current scientific knowledge about the genetic architecture of the synapse. In Neuron, researchers use SYNGO 1.0 to show that synaptic genes are much more

6h

Study: Underrepresented faculty play an uneven role in advancing diversity and inclusion

A team of researchers at Colorado State surveyed faculty members from ecology and evolutionary biology programs at universities across the United States and found that while most respondents reported engaging in diversity and inclusion activities, those who participated in these activities at the highest levels were more likely to identify themselves as non-white, non-male or the first generation

6h

Physicists can predict the jumps of Schrodinger's cat (and finally save it)

Yale researchers have figured out how to catch and save Schrödinger's famous cat, the symbol of quantum superposition and unpredictability, by anticipating its jumps and acting in real time to save it from proverbial doom. In the process, they overturn years of cornerstone dogma in quantum physics. The discovery enables researchers to set up an early warning system for imminent jumps of artificial

6h

New research addresses incidence of atrial fibrillation after aortic valve replacement

UAB investigators have outlined the incidence and implications of atrial fibrillation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement.

6h

Study looks at path to recovery of full daily function after mild TBI

This study describes the path to recovery of daily function in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using data from a study that followed a group of patients with mTBI over time. The study included 1,154 patients with mTBI who sought care at level 1 trauma centers and 299 patients with orthopedic injuries but no signs of head trauma for comparison. The two groups of patients weren't st

6h

How common is nonsuicidal self-injury among sexual minority, heterosexual adolescents?

This study describes how common nonsuicidal self-injury has been over time among sexual minority and heterosexual adolescents. The study used surveillance data for 2005 to 2017 from Massachusetts, the first state to assess sexual orientation (assessed as self-reported sexual identity and same-sex behavior).

6h

Sweet! How C. difficile toxin A enters intestinal cells

Clostridiodes difficile infection has become a leading cause of severe, sometimes fatal diarrheal illness, with the bacterium's toxins causing the damage. New work cements our knowledge of how C. diff's two primary toxins, A and B, slip into intestinal cells, the first step toward a possible treatment that doesn't involve antibiotics. This latest study, on toxin A, shows its activity can be blocke

6h

CRISPR baby mutation significantly increases mortality

Six months ago, a Chinese scientist announced that he had edited the genomes of two babies born last year. The germline edits with CRISPR-Cas9 supposedly changed the CCR5 gene to prevent HIV from invading immune cells. An analysis of records in the U.K. Biobank shows that having two copies of this mutation is associated with a 21% increase in mortality. UC Berkeley researchers caution against germ

6h

Combination of water scarcity and inflexible demand puts world's river basins at risk

Nearly one-fifth of the world's population lives in a stressed water basin where the next climate change-driven incident could threaten access to an essential resource for agriculture, industry and life itself, according to a paper by University of California, Irvine researchers and others, published today in Nature Sustainability.

6h

Stalk antibodies provide flu protection in humans

A universal flu vaccine that could prevent a potential influenza pandemic has been a holy grail for epidemiologists around the world ever since the first flu vaccines were developed in 1938.

6h

Meditation goes digital in new clinical trial

Scientists at UC San Francisco have developed a personalized digital meditation training program that significantly improved attention and memory in healthy young adults — a group already at the peak of brain health — in just six weeks.

6h

Sponges collect penguin, seal, and fish DNA from the water they filter

Just like humans leave DNA in the places we inhabit, water-dwelling animals leave DNA behind in the water column. In a paper published June 3 in the journal Current Biology, scientists report that sponges, which can filter 10,000 liters of water daily, catch DNA in their tissues as they filter-feed. This proof-of-concept study identified fish, seal, and penguin DNA in sponges from the Antarctic an

6h

A Middle East Peace Plan Built on Un-American Principles

The Trump administration hasn’t actually released its Middle East peace plan. It’s so close-held that the Palestinians who are to be its object have not been invited into discussions of the subject. But the whispers of those who have been consulted suggest the possibility that the sequencing will commence with economic incentives for Palestinian acceptance of eventual subjugation into the state o

6h

A Mutation That Resists HIV Has Other Harmful Consequences

In the 1990s, virologists in New York learned of a genetic mutation that would become one of the most famous ever discovered. They found it in a man who could not be infected with HIV . He turned out to be missing just 32 letters in a gene called CCR5 , and remarkably, it was enough to make him resistant to the virus killing so many others. About 1 percent of people of European descent carry two

6h

What the World’s Most Sociable People Reveal About Friendliness

Ben Monkaba’s smile stretches from one red sideburn to the other. When I recently spoke to him over Skype, his grin never left his face. He told me about the ups and downs of his childhood and how much he loves performing—as a drummer and vocalist, and also as a professional clown. He was once invited onstage to sing with the Beach Boys at a fair in Massachusetts. “That was a moment I’ll never fo

6h

Høje doser D-vitamin påvirker ikke risiko for astma

Dansk undersøgelse præsenteret på EAACI finder ikke lavere risiko for astma blandt børn af kvinder, der har fået høje doser D-vitamin under svangerskabet

6h

Mod en standardiseret måling af specifik IgE

Hans Jürgen Hoffmann har præsenteret EAACI-arbejdsgruppes bud på en standard for kvalitetssikring af basofil aktiverings tests, som måler den funktionelle aspekt af specifikt IgE

6h

China’s CRISPR babies could face earlier death

A genetic mutation that protects against HIV leads to a shorter life span, researchers find.

6h

The US Army’s Next Rifle May Use Facial Recognition

Point And Shoot The U.S. Army wants guns that wait to fire until they see the whites of the enemy’s eyes. At least, it put out a call for contractors to develop next-generation rifles that come equipped with facial recognition and automatic targeting software, according to Military.com . The new software could help make soldiers more precise and effective in combat — thought it remains unclear ho

6h

CRISPR babies might live shorter lives due to their gene mutations

The world's first CRISPR babies were given a mutation thought to cause resistance to HIV. But a new study suggests this mutation may also shorten lifespan

6h

Your gut bacteria may influence whether you get drug side effects

A study in mice suggests human gut bacteria breakdown many drug treatments – a finding that could explain why drugs are less effective in some people

6h

Using a meditation app each day may improve your memory and attention

Short bursts of app-guided meditation several times a day has been found to improve performance on memory and attention tasks in a study involving 40 adults

6h

Quantum leaps are real – and now we can control them

Quantum leaps are generally assumed to be instantaneous, but researchers have figured out how to intercept them midway, which may be useful in quantum computing

6h

Gut bacteria may change the way many drugs work in the body

A new survey of interactions between microbes and medications suggests that gut bacteria play a crucial role in how the body processes drugs.

6h

The Shorebirds of Delaware Bay Are Going Hungry

On their migrations north, famished birds stop to feast on eggs laid by horseshoe crabs. But the crabs were overfished, and conservationists say that some bird species may not recover.

6h

A warming climate spelled doom for giant ice-age beavers

Science The now-extinct giant beaver once lived from Florida to Alaska. Now extinct, the giant beaver was once a highly successful species. Scientists have found its fossil remains at sites from Florida to Alaska and the Yukon.

6h

China’s CRISPR babies could face earlier death

A genetic mutation that protects against HIV leads to a shorter life span, researchers find.

6h

Gene mutation meant to protect from HIV 'raises risk of early death'

China accuses gene-edit scientist of chasing fame as US research links mutation to shorter life expectancy A genetic mutation that a Chinese scientist tried to create in twin girls born last year, in the hope of protecting them against HIV, has been found to raise the risk of an early death. He Jiankui at the Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen sparked an international outcr

6h

Scientists sound alarm on using gene-editing technique in babies

Chinese biophysicist criticised for using ‘Crispr’ on human embryos without knowing risks

6h

Six fingers per hand

A congenital additional finger brings motor advantages.

6h

Research overcomes key obstacles to scaling up DNA data storage

Researchers have developed new techniques for labeling and retrieving data files in DNA-based information storage systems, addressing two of the key obstacles to widespread adoption of DNA data storage technologies.

6h

Sleep, wake, repeat: How do plants work on different time zones?

Researchers at the Earlham Institute, UK, have developed a new method to reliably measure plant circadian clocks and how different plants respond to day and night, and that these circadian rhythms change as they age.

6h

Concussion is a leading cause of injury for children in recreational sports

In a two-year study of children between ages 5-11 who play recreational sports, more suffered concussions than most any other sports-related injury.

6h

US abortion politics: How did we get here and where are we headed?

After Roe v. Wade, the pro-life movement accelerated rapidly, describes Munson in a new paper, 'Protest and Religion: The US Pro-Life Movement,' published last week in the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics. In the article, Munson explores religion as a key force shaping?and being shaped by the pro-life movement.

6h

HIV-protective mutation may boost influenza death risk

Gene targeted in the ‘CRISPR baby’ scandal might prove fatal, study finds. Nick carne reports.

6h

Nasa træder på speederen: Firmaer udvalgt til ‘skrabet’ månebase

Tidspresset med at få mennesker til månen i 2024 får Nasa til at ændre planer for månestationen Lunar Gateway. Men flere firmaer har nu fået tildelt opgaver.

6h

Photos From the 1986 Chernobyl Disaster

As the HBO miniseries Chernobyl comes to a conclusion tonight, viewers will have been taken on a dramatic trip back to 1986, experiencing the horror and dread unleashed by the world’s worst-ever civil nuclear disaster. Thirty-three years ago, on April 26, 1986, a series of explosions destroyed Chernobyl’s reactor No. 4, and several hundred staff and firefighters tackled a blaze that burned for 10

6h

Sponges collect penguin, seal, and fish DNA from the water they filter

Just like humans leave DNA in the places we inhabit, water-dwelling animals leave DNA behind in the water column. In a paper published June 3 in the journal Current Biology, scientists report that sponges, which can filter 10,000 liters of water daily, catch DNA in their tissues as they filter-feed. This proof-of-concept study identified fish, seal, and penguin DNA in sponges from the Antarctic an

6h

Study: Underrepresented faculty play an uneven role in advancing diversity and inclusion

Increasing the diversity of scientists is a priority for many universities and professional societies. Diverse teams are more productive and innovative, and more fully represent the human race by including ideas from different segments of the population.

6h

Sweet! How C. difficile toxin A enters intestinal cells

Clostridiodes difficile infection has become a leading cause of severe, sometimes fatal diarrheal illness. It flourishes best in hospitals and long-term care facilities where people are on long-term antibiotic treatment, but it's also an increasing problem in the community. Much of the damage from C. diff is caused by toxins the bacterium produces, which damage the intestinal lining.

6h

A Study Exposes the Health Risks of Gene-Editing Human Embryos

Last year, a Chinese scientist tried to give two babies a mutation to protect them from HIV. But that mutation also seems to shave years off people's lives.

6h

Sponges collect penguin, seal, and fish DNA from the water they filter

Just like humans leave DNA in the places we inhabit, water-dwelling animals leave DNA behind in the water column. In a paper published June 3 in the journal Current Biology, scientists report that sponges, which can filter 10,000 liters of water daily, catch DNA in their tissues as they filter-feed. This proof-of-concept study identified fish, seal, and penguin DNA in sponges from the Antarctic an

6h

Study: Underrepresented faculty play an uneven role in advancing diversity and inclusion

Increasing the diversity of scientists is a priority for many universities and professional societies. Diverse teams are more productive and innovative, and more fully represent the human race by including ideas from different segments of the population.

6h

Sweet! How C. difficile toxin A enters intestinal cells

Clostridiodes difficile infection has become a leading cause of severe, sometimes fatal diarrheal illness. It flourishes best in hospitals and long-term care facilities where people are on long-term antibiotic treatment, but it's also an increasing problem in the community. Much of the damage from C. diff is caused by toxins the bacterium produces, which damage the intestinal lining.

6h

Combination of water scarcity and inflexible demand puts world's river basins at risk

Nearly one-fifth of the world's population lives in a stressed water basin where the next climate change-driven incident could threaten access to an essential resource for agriculture, industry and life itself, according to a paper by University of California, Irvine researchers and others, published today in Nature Sustainability.

6h

Heart of lonesome galaxy is brimming with dark matter

Isolated for billions of years, a galaxy with more dark matter packed into its core than expected has been identified by astronomers using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.

6h

There Are Still 10 Chernobyl-Style Reactors Operating Across Russia. How Do We Know They're Safe?

The flawed reactor design that led to a catastrophic meltdown at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant was used in several other places. Some are still operating.

6h

Floating cities, the LEGO House and other architectural forms of the future | Bjarke Ingels

Design gives form to the future, says architect Bjarke Ingels. In this worldwide tour of his team's projects, journey to a waste-to-energy power plant (that doubles as an alpine ski slope) and the LEGO Home of the Brick in Denmark — and catch a glimpse of cutting-edge flood resilience infrastructure in New York City as well as an ambitious plan to create floating, sustainable cities that are adap

7h

National Academy of Sciences to allow expulsion of harassers

Gray-haired, heavily male membership votes in historic bylaw change permitting members to be ousted for misconduct

7h

Fler alkoholberoende blir nyktra med helnykterhet som mål

I studien har 349 vuxna alkoholberoende följts upp först efter två och ett halvt år och sedan fem år efter avslutad behandling. Bland klienterna hade en grupp målet att bli helnyktra, en annan att ha en kontrollerad alkoholkonsumtion. För en tredje grupp fanns inget mål uppsatt. Alla klienter i studien hade gått i olika evidensbaserade behandlingar i Region Västra Götaland; två 12-stegsbehandling

7h

An island haven for frogs in a sea of extinctions

New Guinea is one of the only places in the world where frogs are safe from the species-destroying chytrid fungus. An international team of scientists has published a new paper that shows how …

7h

Precision calibration empowers largest solar telescope

An article published in the SPIE publication Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems (JATIS), "Polarization Modeling and Predictions for DKIST Part 5: Impacts of enhanced mirror and dichroic coatings on system polarization calibration," marks a substantial advance in ensuring the accurate solar information measured and collected by the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST).

7h

Ultrafast metal-ion batteries based on new organic cathode material have been developed

Researchers from Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology, IPCP RAS and D.I. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology have designed a new polymer cathode material for ultrafast metal-ion batteries with superior characteristics. The results of this work were published in the Journal of Material Chemistry A.

7h

Elon Musk: Tesla Will Sell Roadster With SpaceX Thrusters in 2020

Ride the Lightning In an interview on the Ride the Lightning podcast this weekend, Tesla CEO Elon Musk revealed new details about the electric car company’s long-awaited Roadster . He claimed that the “SpaceX package” — essentially strapping rocket engine thrusters to the car to make it go really, really fast — could give the Roadster a staggering three Gs of thrust. “If you have three Gs of thru

7h

Scientists stack algorithms to improve predictions of yield-boosting crop traits

Hyperspectral data comprises the full light spectrum; this dataset of continuous spectral information has many applications from understanding the health of the Great Barrier Reef to picking out more productive crop cultivars. To help researchers better predict high-yielding crop traits, a team from the University of Illinois have stacked together six high-powered, machine learning algorithms that

7h

An affordable way to store clean energy

Renewable energy sources can fluctuate in the amount of power they are able to provide—which is why batteries are used to temporarily store the energy. The problem with lithium ion batteries is their short service life, while redox flow batteries have, to date, been cost-prohibitive. Now, however, innovative new redox flow systems are available at the same price point as lithium ion batteries, and

7h

Study: Heavy metals in North Carolina lake bottom extensive

A Duke University scientist says a toxic stew of coal ash has spilled repeatedly and apparently unnoticed from storage pits at a Wilmington power plant into an adjoining lake, and flooding from Hurricane Florence was only the latest example.

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Scientists stack algorithms to improve predictions of yield-boosting crop traits

Hyperspectral data comprises the full light spectrum; this dataset of continuous spectral information has many applications from understanding the health of the Great Barrier Reef to picking out more productive crop cultivars. To help researchers better predict high-yielding crop traits, a team from the University of Illinois have stacked together six high-powered, machine learning algorithms that

7h

Precision calibration empowers largest solar telescope

An article published in the SPIE publication Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems (JATIS), 'Polarization Modeling and Predictions for DKIST Part 5: Impacts of enhanced mirror and dichroic coatings on system polarization calibration,' marks a substantial advance in ensuring the accurate solar information measured and collected by the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST).

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High-performance data processing technology through a new database partitioning method

Improve query performance 4.2 times in average compared with Apache Spark SQL which is widely used parallel query processing system in both academia and industry. Can have a huge impact on large-scale data analysis for complex databases and queries.

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Water management helped by mathematical model of fresh water lenses

In this paper, the homeostasis of water lenses was explained as an intricate interaction of the following physical factors: infiltration to the lens from occasional (sporadic) rains, permanent evaporation from the water table, buoyancy due to a density contrast of the fresh and saline water, and the force of resistance to water motion from the dune sand.

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Study delivers insight into possible origins of immunological memory

Natural killer cells are part of the innate immune system. Their role is to detect virus-infected cells and destroy them. When an infection is detected, a small subset of the most effective killer cells is identified and selectively expanded — as a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now been able to show for the first time. This could represent a simple and evolutionary ancien

7h

ESO contributes to protecting Earth from dangerous asteroids

The unique capabilities of the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope have enabled it to obtain the sharpest images of a double asteroid as it flew by Earth on May 25. While this double asteroid was not itself a threatening object, scientists used the opportunity to rehearse the response to a hazardous Near-Earth Object (NEO), proving that ESO's front-line technology could be critical in

7h

Improvements in water quality could reduce ecological impact of climate change on rivers

Improvements in water quality could reduce the ecological impact of climate change on rivers, finds a new study by Cardiff University's Water Research Institute and the University of Vermont.

7h

Dinosaur Bones Shimmering With Opal Reveal a New Species in Australia

A discovery in an Australian opal mine remained unexamined for three decades—it turned out to be the most complete opalized dinosaur skeleton in the world

7h

An island haven for frogs in a sea of extinctions

New Guinea is one of the only places in the world where frogs are safe from the species-destroying chytrid fungus. An international team of scientists has published a new paper that shows how to keep it that way, but they need help to carry out their plan.

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A more accurate, low-cost 39 GHz beamforming transceiver for 5G communications

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and NEC Corporation, Japan, present a 39 GHz transceiver with built-in calibration for fifth-generation (5G) applications. The advantages to be gained include better quality communications as well as cost-effective scalability.

7h

An island haven for frogs in a sea of extinctions

New Guinea is one of the only places in the world where frogs are safe from the species-destroying chytrid fungus. An international team of scientists has published a new paper that shows how to keep it that way, but they need help to carry out their plan.

7h

How a Reporter Speaks to Women About Their Most Personal Experiences

Pam Belluck, a science reporter for The Times, recently discussed her reporting on surgical advancements for women who have experienced female genital cutting.

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7 factors may indicate your risk of heart disease

Seven key measures of heart health may offer a way to predict future risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study in JAMA Network Open identifies five patterns of how well people did or did not do on the measures over time. For example, people who consistently scored well had a lower chance of cardiovascular disease than those who did not. Further, improving the metrics related to a lower risk of

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Godzilla, King Kong: films are actually spot on in how to defeat kaijus – mathematician

How do you get rid of a giant pest like Godzilla, King Kong, or any of the other assorted kaiju (Japanese for "strange beast")? Evidence from films suggests that these monsters are highly destructive and tremendously difficult to kill.

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These ‘shocks’ contribute to executive turnover

New research indicates the disruptive events that contribute to top executives leaving companies. Called “shocks,” these employment-related events may be threats to a company’s reputation (such as lawsuits against the firm) or changes in the relationships an executive has at the company (such as CEO succession or departure of other top executives). In the study, each type of shock significantly i

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Accurate probing of magnetism with light

Probing magnetic materials with extreme ultraviolet radiation allows to obtain a detailed microscopic picture of how magnetic systems interact with light — the fastest way to manipulate a magnetic material. A team of researchers led by the Max Born Institute has now provided the experimental and theoretical groundwork to interpret such spectroscopic signals. The results were published in Physical

7h

Brush your teeth — postpone Alzheimer's

Researchers at the University of Bergen in Norway have discovered a clear connection between oral health and Alzheimer´s disease.

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Grassland areas should be chosen wisely

According to researchers from the Department of Agroecology at Aarhus University, choosing the best areas to convert from cereals to grasslands depends on whether you prioritize improvement of nature and the aquatic environment, how much biomass you can produce, or how much land is needed to so do — or a combination. The researchers developed a method that enabled them to optimize selection of th

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Ultrafast metal-ion batteries based on new organic cathode material have been developed

Researchers from Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology, IPCP RAS and D.I. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology have designed a new polymer cathode material for ultrafast metal-ion batteries with superior characteristics. The results of this work were published in the Journal of Material Chemistry A.

7h

To tackle child labor, start with consumers

A new study by SMU Assistant Professor Fang Xin finds evidence that educating consumers about the social impact of their purchases can help reduce child labor in global supply chains.

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An island haven for frogs in a sea of extinctions

New Guinea is one of the only places in the world where frogs are safe from the chytrid fungus that has made more than 90 species extinct. An international team of scientists has published a new paper that shows how to keep it that way, but they need help to carry out their plan.

7h

Mapping groundwater's influence on the world's oceans

Researchers at The Ohio State University have created high-resolution maps of points around the globe where groundwater meets the oceans — the first such analysis of its kind, giving important data points to communities and conservationists to help protect both drinking water and the seas.

7h

Lenovo Smart Clock review: Sometimes less is more

When Amazon released the Echo Spot in 2017, I praised it for being an adorable Alexa-powered smart clock. Yet, I thought its $130 asking price was a little high and having a camera …

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Netflix taps Russo Brothers for Magic: The Gathering anime series

Netflix, in partnership with Wizards of the Coast, the Russo brothers and Octopie, is bringing Magic: The Gathering to the screen for the first time ever.

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A Philips Hue smart plug and exposed filament bulbs appear to be coming

The next wave of Philips Hue products appears to have leaked this morning, revealing stylish new bulbs, a smart plug, and a number of new lighting fixtures. The details were reported …

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Autism hos barn med Downs syndrom utreds för sällan

– Att barn med Downs syndrom och svår intellektuell funktionsnedsättning även har autism är något man ofta inte tror och inte utreder. Vi efterlyser ökad observans och rekommenderar att screening ska erbjudas alla dessa barn, oavsett ålder, säger Ulrika Wester Oxelgren, överläkare i barnneurologi på Akademiska sjukhuset och ansvarig för en forskningsstudie vid Uppsala universitet om kopplingen me

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How prehistoric people faced climate change revealed by video game technology

How will climate change remake our world in the 21st century? Will we be able to adapt and survive? As with many things, the past is a good guide for the future. Humans have experienced climate changes in the past that have transformed their environment—studying their response could tell us something about our own fate.

7h

Smart strategy can save open-plan offices up to 25 percent of energy on lighting

Increasingly, employees share a large open office with flexible workplaces and working hours, leaving many desks vacant for large parts of the day. But the lighting is still on the whole day, in the whole office. Smart lighting with motion detectors can significantly reduce energy consumption in offices, but when light sources are frequently switched on and off, this becomes unpleasant and distrac

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World's first 8K OLED TV goes on sale

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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The forensic architects piecing together the story of war

Around the world there are 10 wars are being fought, according to recent figures. That covers humanity's most deadly clashes, but the figure rises to 49 if you count those state-based conflicts where 'only' 1,000 people or fewer have been killed in the past year. The captain's share of all this fighting happens in cities.

7h

Apple previews new software as it diversifies beyond iPhones

Apple will preview upcoming changes to its phone and computer software Monday as it diversifies to offset eroding sales of its bedrock product, the iPhone.

7h

How a leap of faith can take science forward

A new study by SMU Associate Professor Reddi Kotha reveals that language choices alone can influence whether inventors receive financial backing from their organizations.

7h

NUS researchers uncovers promising cancer target for liposarcoma

A study conducted by a team of researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore has revealed a close association between liposarcoma (LPS), a type of cancer that develops from fat cells, and the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein family.

7h

Scientists stack algorithms to improve predictions of yield-boosting crop traits

To help researchers better predict high-yielding crop traits, a team from the University of Illinois have stacked together six high-powered, machine learning algorithms that are used to interpret hyperspectral data — and they demonstrated that this technique improved the predictive power of a recent study by up to 15 percent, compared to using just one algorithm.

7h

A more accurate, low-cost 39 GHz beamforming transceiver for 5G communications

Researchers at Tokyo Tech and NEC Corporation, Japan, present a 39 GHz transceiver with built-in calibration for fifth-generation (5G) applications. The advantages to be gained include better quality communications as well as cost-effective scalability.

7h

Tuning the topological insulator Sb2Te3: Just add iron

Iron-doping of the topological insulator Sb2Te3 results in useful electronic and magnetic properties, quantified in a recent FLEET study at the University of Wollongong.The researchers studied the magneto-transport properties of an iron-doped topological insulator (Fe-Sb2Te3).'This improved understanding is critical to inform future possible use in low-energy electronics,' explains project leader

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An effective sweeper closes DNA replication cycling

IBS scientists reported a novel molecular mechanism for the regulation of PCNA cycling during DNA replication. They proved that ATAD5-RLC opens PCNA ring to be removed from DNA as a bona-fide PCNA unloader. Since uncontrolled disassembly of replication machineries causes genomic instability that may result in cellular transformation, this study will be beneficial to develop strategies for cancer t

7h

Lenovo Smart Clock With Google Assistant Review: Timely Talker

This cute little alarm clock has Google Assistant inside.

7h

The Best Way for a Mouse to Escape a Cat, According to Math

A mouse is stuck swimming in a pool while a cat paces, ready to strike. Here's how to calculate the mouse's optimal strategy.

7h

Deadly frog fungus completely absent from New Guinea

Pacific Ocean island represents haven from parasite that is killing amphibians worldwide. Nick Carne reports.

7h

A bumper crop of supernovae

Japanese astronomers photograph thousands of disintegrating stars.

7h

Heart burn: man’s chest catches fire during surgery

Conference hears of freak accident that scared everyone, but left the patient uninjured. Andrew Masterson reports.

7h

These $10 Sensor-Packed Gloves Could Give Robots a Sense of Touch

Machines are mastering vision and language , but one sense they’re lagging behind on is touch. Now researchers have created a sensor-laden glove for just $10 and recorded the most comprehensive tactile dataset to date, which can be used to train machine learning algorithms to feel the world around them. Dexterity would be an incredibly useful skill for robots to master, opening up new application

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Retningsbestemte pixels giver hologrammer du kan gå rundt om

PLUS. Danskere arbejder med at udvikle retningsbestemte pixels, så du kan smide de tunge virtual reality-briller og bevæge dig rundt om et 3D-hologram

7h

Mapping groundwater's influence on the world's oceans

Researchers at The Ohio State University have created high-resolution maps of points around the globe where groundwater meets the oceans—the first such analysis of its kind, giving important data points to communities and conservationists to help protect both drinking water and the seas.

7h

Radar sensor module to bring added safety to autonomous driving

When a child runs out onto the road, the average human driver takes 1.6 seconds to hit the brake pedal. The reaction time is cut to 0.5 seconds for automated vehicles fitted with radar/lidar sensors and a camera system. But at a speed of 50 km/h, that still means that the vehicle will continue for another seven meters before the brakes are applied and it comes to a standstill.

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New sub-species of pilot whale identified in Pacific Ocean

Short-finned pilot whales are found over a wide swath of the world's oceans, with habitats in the Indian, and Pacific, and North Atlantic oceans. Despite this wide distribution, the whales have been recognized as a single species—but a recent study has found that two unique subspecies actually exist. The study published June 3, 2019, in Molecular Ecology.

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Researchers solve mystery of the galaxy with no dark matter

A group of researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has clarified a 2018 mystery in the field of extragalactic astrophysics: The supposed existence of a galaxy without dark matter.

7h

Saber-toothed cat fossils provide evidence of canines able to puncture a skull

A team of researchers with members affiliated with several institutions in Argentina has found evidence that suggests the canine teeth of the saber-toothed cat were strong enough to puncture the skulls of other members of the same species. In their paper published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, the group describes their study of saber-toothed cat fossils and what they learned from them.

7h

Accurate probing of magnetism with light

Probing magnetic materials with extreme ultraviolet radiation allows to obtain a detailed microscopic picture of how magnetic systems interact with light—the fastest way to manipulate a magnetic material. A team of researchers led by the Max Born Institute has now provided the experimental and theoretical groundwork to interpret such spectroscopic signals. The results were published in Physical Re

7h

New sub-species of pilot whale identified in Pacific Ocean

Short-finned pilot whales are found over a wide swath of the world's oceans, with habitats in the Indian, and Pacific, and North Atlantic oceans. Despite this wide distribution, the whales have been recognized as a single species—but a recent study has found that two unique subspecies actually exist. The study published June 3, 2019, in Molecular Ecology.

7h

The ‘death jars’ of Laos continue to intrigue

Archaeologists find new sites, but still no clear answers. Nick Carne reports.

7h

'Underland' Connects Us To Dazzling Worlds Beneath Our Feet

The beauty of Robert Macfarlane's writing, and of the natural world it describes, is immense. His words also act as a warning, ensuring a recognition of human harms to the environment. (Image credit: W.W.Norton & Co. )

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Techathlon podcast: WWDC preview, looking back at the iPod, and the computer acronym game

Technology Play along with fun trivia games and catch up on the latest tech news all at the same time. The Techathlon podcast is back in full force this week. Listen to this week's episode in the player embedded in this article, or by subscribing on iTunes or Spotify.

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New light source brings freedom of design and added safety

Success in the increasingly competitive automobile market is reserved for those who combine well-engineered products with attractive design, for example through the perfect integration of headlamps. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a new lighting technology that gives designers more freedom to create vehicles with unconventional styling and also provides additional benefits to drivers and aut

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Hand-held scanner for detecting hazardous substances and explosives

Together with partners from research and industry, Fraunhofer IAF has developed a hand-held scanner for hazardous substances within the EU project CHEQUERS. The sensor detects explosive, toxic and other dangerous substances in real time and will help emergency personnel with on-site detections at crime scenes, after accidents or terroristic attacks. On April 25, the project consortium met for the

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Cleveland researchers test novel gene therapy for glioblastoma

A novel gene therapy clinical trial for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) shows promising results. The trial focuses on turning patients with a poor prognosis into those with a good prognosis. In the trial's Phase 1, median survival of GBM patients was 3.5-fold the expected survival based on published modeling studies with actual data from patients with similar situations in randomized clinical trials

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Adding targeted therapy to treatment extends lives of those with metastatic breast cancer

A UCLA-led study has found that using a drug called ribociclib in combination with a common hormone therapy may help premenopausal women with the most common type of breast cancer live longer than if they only receive the hormone therapy.

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Combination checkpoint blockade effective in pre-surgical setting for early-stage lung cancers

Neoadjuvant, or pre-surgical, treatment with nivolumab plus ipilimumab resulted in an overall major pathologic response (MPR) rate of 33 percent of treated patients with early-stage, resectable non-small cell lung cancers, meaning these patients had less than or equal to 10 percent viable tumor remaining at surgery. With these results, the combination immunotherapy met the pre-specified trial effi

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Quality — not quantity — of sleep linked to better health in teens

With summer break and longer days ahead, parents of young teens may be wondering whether to let good sleep habits slide over the next couple of months. New research led by Annalijn Conklin, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at the University of British Columbia, suggests there are more benefits to a good night's sleep than simply feeling refreshed. Chronic, low-quality sleep was assoc

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Critical need for greater understanding into diagnosis of inherited heart disease

Results of a study carried out by researchers at the Centenary Institute in collaboration with Wiser Healthcare, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and the University of Sydney, have shown that the use of advanced imaging equipment is driving a significant increase in the diagnosis of a little known inherited heart disease in adults.

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Avacta Group plc TMAC programme accelerates: clinical trial planned for early 2020

Key linker element of Avacta’s novel TMAC™ drug conjugate to be tested in humans within 12 months

8h

Explaining the shape of a leaf with the help of systems biology

Which factors determine the shape of a leaf? By using different methods of systems biology, Barbara Terebieniec has identified genes that control the leaf shape of the European aspen. Barbara Terebieniec presented her doctoral thesis at Umeå University on 14 March.

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Explaining the shape of a leaf with the help of systems biology

Which factors determine the shape of a leaf? By using different methods of systems biology, Barbara Terebieniec has identified genes that control the leaf shape of the European aspen. Barbara Terebieniec presented her doctoral thesis at Umeå University on 14 March.

8h

Problem-solving helps pupils to learn mathematics

A primary reason as to why pupils are having difficulties learning mathematics is the excessive emphasis on learning procedures and working with routine tasks. The pupils' knowledge would improve if larger emphasis was placed on problem solving. In his thesis, Johan Sidenvall gives reasons as to why procedural teaching is predominately used in schools today, and how teaching could be improved. Joh

8h

Amid All the Fossils, Smithsonian's New Dinosaur Exhibition Tells the Complex Story of Life

The much-anticipated exhibition is packed full of Mesozoic dinosaur drama, new science, hands-on discoveries and state-of-the-art museum artistry

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Beyond Dinosaurs: The Secrets of Earth's Past

From the formation of Earth through the changing climates and creatures of the past, the Smithsonian's new Hall of Fossils explores our planet's Deep Time

8h

How Does Earth's Carbon Cycle Work?

Stanford University’s Katharine Maher explains the mechanisms that heat and cool the planet

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Meet the Dinos of ‘Deep Time’

Of the 700 specimens that roam the Smithsonian’s new Hall of Fossils, these six standout dinosaurs make a big impression

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How Do Paleontologists Find Fossils?

Smithsonian’s Hans-Dieter Sues, who has collected fossil vertebrates in the U.S. and around the world shares some of his tips

8h

Pollution control of rivers can reduce impact of climate warming

Improvements in water quality could reduce the ecological impact of climate change on rivers, finds a new study by Cardiff University's Water Research Institute and the University of Vermont.

8h

Can Saliva Replace Blood for DNA Collection and Analysis?

Download this white paper to examine why saliva is a viable alternative to blood draws for obtaining DNA samples.

8h

How cities create their own clouds

Cities are more likely to be persistently covered by clouds than rural areas thanks to unique atmospheric conditions they produce, a new study has shown.

8h

Machine learning for sensors

Today microcontrollers can be found in almost any technical device, from washing machines to blood pressure meters and wearables. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Circuits and Systems IMS have developed AIfES, an artificial intelligence (AI) concept for microcontrollers and sensors that contains a completely configurable artificial neural network. AIfES is a platform-ind

8h

Economical energy storage for the electric car of tomorrow

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS in Dresden have developed a new production process with the aim of efficient and environmentally friendly future battery production. They coat the electrodes of the energy storage cells with a dry film instead of liquid chemicals. This simplified process saves energy and eliminates toxic solvents. A Finnish company is cur

8h

VLT observes a passing double asteroid hurtling by Earth at 70 000 km/h

The unique capabilities of the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope have enabled it to obtain the sharpest images of a double asteroid as it flew by Earth on 25 May. While this double asteroid was not itself a threatening object, scientists used the opportunity to rehearse the response to a hazardous Near-Earth Object (NEO), proving that ESO's front-line technology could be critical in

8h

Floating cities: The future or a washed-up idea?

Humans have a long history of living on water. Our water homes span the fishing villages in Southeast Asia, Peru and Bolivia to modern floating homes in Vancouver and Amsterdam. As our cities grapple with overcrowding and undesirable living situations, the ocean remains a potential frontier for sophisticated water-based communities.

8h

A method for producing 3-D Bose-Einstein condensates using laser cooling

Researchers at the MIT-Harvard Center for ultracold atoms and research laboratory of electronics have proposed a new method for producing 3-D Bose-Einstein condensates using laser cooling only. In their study, featured in Physical Review Letters, they demonstrated the efficacy of their technique in producing Bose-Einstein condensates, achieving temperatures that are well bellow the effective recoi

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No evidence that public have 'had enough of experts,' study finds

There is insufficient evidence to support claims that the public has had enough of experts, according to academics at the University of Sheffield.

8h

Nordic microalgae cleans wastewater and produces biodiesel

Lorenza Ferro demonstrates the potential of Nordic microalgae for simultaneous production of biomass and municipal sewage treatment in our Nordic climate. She has also studied how microalgae and bacteria work together and how this impacts the composition of microbial communities in open algae cultures. She is defending her thesis at Umeå University on Friday 15 March.

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Nordic microalgae cleans wastewater and produces biodiesel

Lorenza Ferro demonstrates the potential of Nordic microalgae for simultaneous production of biomass and municipal sewage treatment in our Nordic climate. She has also studied how microalgae and bacteria work together and how this impacts the composition of microbial communities in open algae cultures. She is defending her thesis at Umeå University on Friday 15 March.

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Ocean acidification makes some marine snails less able to resist predators

As humans release more and more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, the gas is dissolving into the ocean, making seawater more acidic. This threatens the growth and survival of animals such as some corals and snails, whose skeletons and shells may become thinner under more acidic conditions.

8h

Innovative drone conservation research shared internationally

Community efforts to protect dugongs in the Philippines were boosted by a recent technology training camp with Murdoch researchers.

8h

Research overcomes key obstacles to scaling up DNA data storage

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed new techniques for labeling and retrieving data files in DNA-based information storage systems, addressing two of the key obstacles to widespread adoption of DNA data storage technologies.

8h

Structures of BCL-2 in complex with venetoclax reveal the molecular basis of resistance mutations

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10363-1 The BCL-2 mutation G101V reduces venetoclax affinity and confers drug resistance in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Here, the authors present crystal structures and biochemical analyses of venetoclax bound to BCL-2 and the G101V mutant, revealing the structural basis for venetoclax resistance.

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Structural basis for the clamping and Ca2+ activation of SNARE-mediated fusion by synaptotagmin

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10391-x The neuronal Ca2+-sensor Synapotagmin-1 (Syt1) interacts with SNARE proteins and lipid membranes and synchronizes neurotransmitter release in response to Ca2+-influx. Here the authors provide insights into the underlying molecular mechanism by determining the cryo-EM structure of the Syt1–SNARE complex on a lipi

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Highly stacked 3D organic integrated circuits with via-hole-less multilevel metal interconnects

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10412-9 Though large-scale integration of organic transistors into integrated circuits via 3D stacking is a promising approach, reliable methods of device fabrication are still needed. Here, the authors report a metal interconnect scheme for reliable fabrication of 3D integrated organic transistor circuits.

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Single particle cryo-EM reconstruction of 52 kDa streptavidin at 3.2 Angstrom resolution

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10368-w It remains a challenge to obtain high-resolution structures of molecules smaller than 200 kDa using single particle cryo-EM. Here, the authors apply the Cs-corrector-VPP coupled cryo-EM and solve structures of the 52 kDa streptavidin (SA) protein at near-atomic resolution.

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Direct observation of picosecond melting and disintegration of metallic nanoparticles

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10328-4 Laser-matter interaction has been intensively studied in equilibrium states, but irreversible processes in a highly nonequilibrium state at nanoscales remains elusive due to experimental challenges. Here, Ihm et al. image heterogeneous melting of gold nanoparticles with nanometer and picosecond resolution.

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Activated Peyer′s patch B cells sample antigen directly from M cells in the subepithelial dome

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10144-w Gut lumen antigens must be continuously sampled by the immune system to maintain proper immune homeostasis. Here the authors show that activated CCR6+CCR1+GL7- gut B cells retrieve lumen antigens from specialized M cells and transfer them across the subepithelial dome in the Peyer’s patch to contribute to the ma

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Human evolved regulatory elements modulate genes involved in cortical expansion and neurodevelopmental disease susceptibility

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10248-3 Different classes of human evolved regulatory elements are located in non-coding regions of the genome. The authors connect the expansion of the cortical surface and connectivity with human evolved elements and show that their target genes are involved in neurodevelopmental disease susceptibility.

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Listeners form average-based representations of individual voice identities

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10295-w People can learn to identify a person based on their voice, despite variation in their voice. Here, the authors show that this ability relies on a statistical abstraction mechanism during which people form average-based representations of voices, even without prior exposure to the average.

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In review of 100 best-selling picture books, female protagonists are largely invisible

In recent years, there has been a surge in "female empowerment" stories in the Australian picture book market. This long-overdue movement was largely inspired by the success of the crowdfunded book Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls, spawning many imitations since its publication in 2016.

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Ocean acidification makes some marine snails less able to resist predators

As humans release more and more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, the gas is dissolving into the ocean, making seawater more acidic. This threatens the growth and survival of animals such as some corals and snails, whose skeletons and shells may become thinner under more acidic conditions.

8h

Camera captures innovative drag sail deployment in space

An on-board camera has captured the moment a Cranfield University-designed "space sail" was successfully deployed in orbit above the Earth's surface.

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Innovative drone conservation research shared internationally

Community efforts to protect dugongs in the Philippines were boosted by a recent technology training camp with Murdoch researchers.

8h

Research overcomes key obstacles to scaling up DNA data storage

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed new techniques for labeling and retrieving data files in DNA-based information storage systems, addressing two of the key obstacles to widespread adoption of DNA data storage technologies.

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Researchers can now predict properties of disordered polymers

Scientists are now able to read patterns on long chains of molecules to understand and predict behavior of disordered strands of proteins and polymers. The results could, among other things, pave the way to develop new materials from synthetic polymers.

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International clinical trial of new drug for men with advanced prostate cancer yields strong result

First results of phase III international clinical study called TITAN, which evaluated the effectiveness and safety of a new drug, apalutamide, to treat advanced prostate cancers. Researchers found that treatment with apalutamide significantly improved overall survival, with a 33% reduction in risk of death compared to standard-of-care therapy. Additionally, this study showed apalutamide significan

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No benefit from pazopanib in advanced kidney cancer after surgery to remove metastases

The results of the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group's phase three trial, E2810, show no disease-free survival benefit with the use of one year of pazopanib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (kidney cancer) who had no evidence of disease following surgery to remove further metastases. There was a trend toward decreased overall survival with pazopanib.

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Featured research findings from Nutrition 2019

Press materials are now available for Nutrition 2019, the flagship meeting of the American Society for Nutrition, to be held June 8-11, 2019 at the Baltimore Convention Center. The meeting will feature cutting-edge nutrition research and news.

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New sub-species of pilot whale identified in Pacific Ocean

Short-finned pilot whales are found over a wide swath of the world's oceans, with habitats in the Indian, and Pacific, and North Atlantic oceans. Despite this wide distribution, the whales have been recognized as a single species — but a recent study has found that two unique subspecies actually exist.

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Lack of sleep may increase likelihood of teens engaging in risky sexual behaviors

Teenagers who don't get enough sleep may be at an increased risk of engaging in unsafe sexual behaviors, such as not using condoms or having sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Chemists show that the catalytic range of enzymes can be enlarged

A team of chemists at the University of Manchester has found a way to incorporate an abnormal residue into an enzyme to show how the catalytic range of enzymes can be enlarged. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes expanding the range of catalytic enzymes that could be used to provide a broader variety of side chains for catalysis—by using an extended "alphabet" of am

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Star Wars News: Meet the New New Class of 'The Rise of Skywalker'

The next film in the franchise is all about millennials. Kinda.

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Tired: Eating Bugs. Wired: Eating Bug Meat Grown in a Lab

According to a group of researchers, culturing insect cells could be easier and more efficient than culturing cow cells.

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NCI-MATCH trial finds the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib effective

Findings from NCI-MATCH Arm H, orally presented on Monday, June 3rd at the ASCO 2019 annual meeting in Chicago, show that in a heavily pre-treated cohort of 17 distinct tumor types — several rare — with BRAF mutations, the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib showed promising activity outside of currently approved FDA indications. NCI-MATCH is reporting results from its 39 treatment arms as

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POLO trial for advanced pancreatic cancer: a new standard of care

Treatment with the drug olaparib significantly reduced the risk of disease progression or death from metastatic pancreatic cancer, according to findings from the recently completed, international, phase-III POLO (Pancreas cancer OLaparib Ongoing) trial.

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Tracking technology gives new insights into the behavior of migrating birds

Though much is known about where and when birds travel, a lot less is known about the composition of flocks and how long they stay together. Do birds come together in flocks by chance? Do they actively choose flock members?

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Traffic congestion reconsidered

Despite efforts to encourage a shift to sustainable transportation, traffic congestion is often the focus of debates over mobility. Global demand for automobiles rose significantly in the 1990s, with annual sales stabilizing at close to 80 million vehicles since 2017. Faced with the flood of cars, for decades governments have attempted to improve mobility of citizens—some measures focus on widenin

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Fermi observations provide insights into the nature of Terzan 5 globular cluster

Using NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, astronomers have collected important data that could disclose the real nature of the globular cluster Terzan 5. The new study, presented in a paper published May 24 on arXiv.org, delivers new information regarding the cluster's pulsar population and its broadband emission spectrum.

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Tracking technology gives new insights into the behavior of migrating birds

Though much is known about where and when birds travel, a lot less is known about the composition of flocks and how long they stay together. Do birds come together in flocks by chance? Do they actively choose flock members?

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NASA Reveals Commercial Partners for New Moon Landings

These US companies will help NASA deliver cargo and scientific instruments to the lunar surface in the next few years with the aim of supporting human landings and habitation by the mid-2020s. The post NASA Reveals Commercial Partners for New Moon Landings appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Bid to beat superbugs boosted by immune defense discovery

The fight against superbugs could be helped by the discovery of a potential therapy based on the body's natural immune defenses.

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Despite safety standard, laundry packet exposures increase in older children, adults

A new study investigated trends in calls to poison control centers across the country for exposure to liquid laundry detergent packets. It found a modest decrease in calls for children younger than 6 years of age following adoption of a 2015 product safety standard but an increase in calls for older children and adults.

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Researchers can now predict properties of disordered polymers

Scientists are now able to read patterns on long chains of molecules to understand and predict behavior of disordered strands of proteins and polymers. The results could, among other things, pave the way to develop new materials from synthetic polymers.

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How technology could help rural South Africa turn sunshine into income

The way energy is produced and distributed is changing rapidly as the industry moves away from carbon-based energy production. Technological development in the production of alternative energy has also sped up the emergence of decentralized systems. These build on large numbers of actors who generate small quantities of energy.

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Chemists show that the catalytic range of enzymes can be enlarged

A team of chemists at the University of Manchester has found a way to incorporate an abnormal residue into an enzyme to show how the catalytic range of enzymes can be enlarged. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes expanding the range of catalytic enzymes that could be used to provide a broader variety of side chains for catalysis—by using an extended "alphabet" of am

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Solar cell defect mystery solved after decades of global effort

A team of scientists at the University of Manchester has solved a key flaw in solar panels after 40 years of research around the world.

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Plan S Is Still Coming

It’s been a few months since I wrote about “Plan S”, the far-reaching effort by several European governments to require open-access publication for scientific projects that they fund. Since this was announced last fall, the whole scientific publishing world has been trying to deal with the potential consequences, authors and publishers alike. Expressions of support, of disbelief, and of warning h

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Tuning the topological insulator Sb2Te3: Just add iron

Iron-doping of the topological insulator Sb2Te3 results in useful electronic and magnetic properties, quantified in a recent FLEET study at the University of Wollongong.

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Animals' cultural lifestyles can influence evolution

Evolutionary adaptations resulting from cultural change, such as humans being able to consume dairy products, are more widespread in nature than previously thought.

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Animals' cultural lifestyles can influence evolution

Evolutionary adaptations resulting from cultural change, such as humans being able to consume dairy products, are more widespread in nature than previously thought.

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NASA's Mars 2020 gets HD eyes

One of the first operations the Mars 2020 rover will perform after touching down on the Red Planet's Jezero Crater on Feb. 18, 2021, will be to raise its remote sensing mast (RSM), which carries important optics and instrumentation.

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Three ancient globular clusters found in the galactic bulge

Three old and metal-poor globular clusters have been spotted in the Milky Way's bulge. The newly found clusters, designated Camargo 1107, 1108 and 1109, could offer important clues on structure and nature of the central region of our galaxy. The finding was reported in a paper published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters in January 2019, co-authored by Denilso Camargo an

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LGBTQ adolescents experiencing weight-based bullying found to have increased substance use

Weight-based victimization among sexual and gender minority youth is associated with increased offs of alcohol use, binge drinking, marijuana use, and cigarette use. These findings persist regardless of adolescents' demographic characteristics, body weight, sexual identity, gender identity, and sexual or gender minority victimization.

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This tabletop device turns the quantum definition of a kilogram into a real mass

The mini Kibble balance will measure 10 grams to an accuracy of a few ten-thousandths of a percent.

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Rekord: Storbritannien har ikke brugt kulkraft i to uger

Storbritannien har klaret sig i over to uger uden kulkraft. Det er ny rekord. Målet er at blive helt kulfri inden 2025.

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This robot’s parts are helpless alone, but turn smart as they team up

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Time to regulate facial recognition technology

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Beyond Self-Check Out: How Grocery Stores Are Incorporating Tech

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Xiaomi and Oppo revealed the world’s first under-display cameras

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Earthquakes that talk to each other

On 19th June 2012 at 8:53 pm local time, a moment magnitude-4.9 earthquake rattled the residents in and around the small town of Thorpdale in eastern Victoria. Moment magnitude measures the size or strength of an earthquake based on how much energy is released, which differs from the better known Richter scale.

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Five ethical questions for how we choose to use the moon

The moon has always served as an inspiration for humanity, and there are many potential benefits for further exploration of our planet's rocky satellite.

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A 50-million-year-old school of fish is etched forever in this rare fossil

Animals Megapixels: The ancient rock offers a glimpse of how this freshwater species behaved in unison. It’s not clear what overtook this school of fish, but the remnant—an untimely demise etched in a limestone slab for all eternity—is a breathtaking glimpse of ancient…

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Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital finder ny ledende overlæge

Jens Hannibal er ny ledende overlæge i Klinisk Biokemisk Afdeling på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital

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Apple macOS security protections can easily bypassed with ‘synthetic’ clicks, researcher finds

A security researcher has disclosed a new flaw that undermines a core macOS security feature designed to prevent apps — or malware — from accessing a user’s private data, webcam or microphone …

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China's Huawei to sell stake in undersea-cable unit

Huawei will sell its majority share in a submarine cable unit, the stake's buyer announced Monday, amid a US-led drive to isolate the Chinese telecom giant from global information networks over …

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Study identifies dominant fungi and their attributes on the planet's soils

An international research team including University of Alicante researcher Fernando T. Maestre has identified a list of some 80 species of dominant fungi that can be found in soils all over the world. The study, published in Nature Communications, identifies the attributes that allow these species to be so dominant on a global scale, and how they are associated with certain soil and climate charac

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Finding a needle in a haystack: Discovery of Ti2InB2 for synthesizing layered TiB

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have used boron as the X element in a family of materials called MAX phases, for which only carbon and nitrogen could previously be used. A clever search strategy allowed them to avoid resorting to trial and error to design this novel material, from which layered TiB can be obtained for applications in Li- or Na-ion batteries.

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Biometric recognition technology in the workplace

In Back to the Future II (1989), fingerprints are used to lock and unlock doors. It's a benign technology, apart from the rise of "thumb bandits" who amputate thumbs. Gattaca (1997) envisages a bleaker future, where corporations collect DNA samples and genetic discrimination reigns.

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Study identifies dominant fungi and their attributes on the planet's soils

An international research team including University of Alicante researcher Fernando T. Maestre has identified a list of some 80 species of dominant fungi that can be found in soils all over the world. The study, published in Nature Communications, identifies the attributes that allow these species to be so dominant on a global scale, and how they are associated with certain soil and climate charac

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Establishing the ultimate limits of quantum communication networks

At the moment, sensitive data is typically encrypted and then sent across fiber-optic cables and other channels together with the digital "keys" needed to decode the information. However, the data can be vulnerable to hackers.

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Nano-robots and VR for refugees: EPSRC 2019 winners – in pictures

An image of a Syrian refugee using virtual reality to help researchers design a shelter has been chosen as the winner of the 2019 national science photography competition organised by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). The competition attracted 169 entries which were drawn from researchers in receipt of EPSRC funding Continue reading…

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An effective sweeper closes DNA replication cycling

DNA replication is essential for living organisms to faithfully deliver genetic information from parental cells to daughter cells. Many proteins are assembled on the parental DNA to work as replication machineries. Among them, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key replication protein. This ring-structured molecule encircles chromosomes, thread-like structures where DNA molecules i

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An effective sweeper closes DNA replication cycling

DNA replication is essential for living organisms to faithfully deliver genetic information from parental cells to daughter cells. Many proteins are assembled on the parental DNA to work as replication machineries. Among them, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key replication protein. This ring-structured molecule encircles chromosomes, thread-like structures where DNA molecules i

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Another MacOS Bug Lets Hackers Invisibly Click Security Prompts

Yet again, a bug in Apple's safeguards against "synthetic clicks" allows hackers to slip past Mojave's security restrictions on apps.

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Maps of asthma emergencies show legacy of redlining

Residents of historically redlined neighborhoods are more than twice as likely as their peers to visit emergency rooms for asthma, research finds. For decades, redlining was used to justify discriminatory mortgage lending practices. And it may still be having an impact on the current health of affected communities, according to the study. An analysis of eight California cities shows that redlined

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Image of the Day: Fish Hunters

Watch penguins hunting from their point of view.

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John Roberts Strikes a Blow Against Free Speech

“Police officers conduct approximately 29,000 arrests every day,” Chief Justice John Roberts noted in his opinion in Nieves v. Bartlett , an important First Amendment case decided last Monday. That’s roughly the population of Georgia cuffed and stuffed on an annual basis. One might think that many arrests is too many. One might wonder about the degree to which factors such as race, immigration st

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UN: Balkans faces alarming levels of air pollution

People in all major cities across the western Balkans face alarming levels of air pollution that are reducing their life expectancies because the underdeveloped, politically fragile region is still heavily reliant on burning coal to generate power, the U.N. said Monday in a new report.

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Russia requires Tinder to provide data on its users

Dating app Tinder is now required to provide user data to Russian intelligence agencies, the country's communications regulator said Monday.

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China's Huawei to sell stake in undersea-cable unit

Huawei will sell its majority share in a submarine cable unit, the stake's buyer announced Monday, amid a US-led drive to isolate the Chinese telecom giant from global information networks over spying fears.

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Should You Nap?

Some cultures routinely have a siesta after lunch. Is napping in the middle of the day good for you or bad? The short answer is – it depends. However a new study adds further evidence for a possible benefit to the mid-day nap, at least for elementary school children. Let’s start with the concerns about napping, which has to do with “ sleep hygiene .” Sleep hygiene refers to behaviors that optimiz

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NRG Oncology trial sets new standard regimen for women with uterine carcinosarcomas

Results from the phase III NRG Oncology clinical trial GOG 0261 comparing paclitaxel plus carboplatin (PC) to paclitaxel plus ifosfamide (PI) in women with stage I-IV, recurrent carcinosarcoma of the uterus or ovary, indicate that the PC combination treatment should be considered a standard of care for this patient population.

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Patients who received PBI without chemotherapy experienced less fatigue, slightly poorer cosmesis

Patient-reported outcome (PRO) data indicates that partial breast irradiation (PBI) is more convenient than whole breast irradiation (WBI) for women with breast cancer who do not receive adjuvant chemotherapy.

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Suggested benefit in PCV chemoradiotherapy for both IDH-mutant WHO-defined molecular subgroups

A recent, updated predictive analysis of the three WHO-defined molecular subgroups based on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH) mutation status and 1p/19q co-deletion status represented in the high-risk treatment arms of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-RTOG 9802 indicates that both IDH-mutant sub-groups (IDHmut-noncodel and IDHmut-codel) could benefit from the addition of PCV chemotherapy to ra

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The unique circumstances of people who live in their vehicles

From tiny houses to encampment sweeps, from proposed business taxes to small armies of volunteers, Seattle's homeless crisis has sparked a series of possible solutions, along with controversy.

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Giant stellar eruption detected for the first time

A group of researchers has identified and characterized for the first time in a complete way a powerful eruption in the atmosphere of the active star HR 9024, marked by an intense flash of X-rays followed by the emission of a giant bubble of plasma, ie hot gas containing charged particles. This is the first time a coronal mass ejection, or CME, has been seen in a star other than our Sun. The coron

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The U.S needs to change its approach to flooding after record-breaking floods in Midwest, Northeastern geoscientist says

The record-breaking floods in the Midwest over the past week are revealing an urgent need to account for climate change, says geoscientist Samuel Munoz, an assistant professor of marine and environmental sciences at Northeastern.

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How the urban-rural divide shapes elections

Location, location, location—the popular real estate mantra can also be used to describe why American elections today turn out the way they do, says Stanford political scientist Jonathan Rodden. According to his new research, the geographic distribution of Democrats and Republicans has turned political campaigns into high-stakes battles in which the parties pit urban against rural interests.

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Mars on Earth: What's next?

A Mars sample return campaign would bring samples of the Red Planet back to Earth for examination in the best terrestrial laboratories—but choosing the samples and storing them on Mars for later return is only one part of the extensive campaign being planned by the mission designers and scientists.

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The radiation showstopper for Mars exploration

An astronaut on a mission to Mars could receive radiation doses up to 700 times higher than on our planet—a major showstopper for the safe exploration of our solar system. A team of European experts is working with ESA to protect the health of future crews on their way to the Moon and beyond.

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This reusable lunch kit is good for the earth and your food budget

Gadgets Bringing your food to work or school cuts waste in more ways than one. Bringing your food to work or school cuts waste in more ways than one. Cut single-use dishes, cups, and utensils for good.

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How to watch the live stream for today’s Apple WWDC keynote

Apple is holding a keynote today on the first day of its developer conference, and the company is expected to talk about a ton of software updates. At 10 AM PT (1 PM in New York, 5 PM in London, …

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The Electronic Paternity Test and Other Follies

A spate of “scientific” assays invented in the 1920s and 1930s were bogus—but they tell us a lot about the role of genetics in society, both then and now — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Baidu Censors the Internet in China—So Do Microsoft and Apple

The 30th anniversary of the end of the Tiananmen uprising highlights how Chinese, and Western, companies filter what Chinese internet users can see.

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What a Bay Area Dispute Says About the Future of Bike Share

Lyft's Motivate has exclusive bike-share contracts with several cities. San Francisco officials are debating what "exclusive" means.

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Antitrust Scrutiny of Google and Amazon Should Worry Silicon Valley

Reports say the federal government is considering antitrust probes of Google and Amazon. Big Tech could be a bogeyman for both sides in the 2020 election.

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Dear Therapist: It’s Hard to Accept Being Single

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, How do I tell my friends I really don't want to hear about the problems they are having in their relationships? It is really hard for me to listen to them complain about their spouses or significant others whe

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Researchers develop a fast, all-visible-light molecular switch with 100 nm band separation

A collaborative of institutions including the University of Groningen has developed an entirely new class of molecular photoswitches that meet many requirements previously considered unobtainable. The results have been published in Nature Communications on 3 June.

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The Electronic Paternity Test and Other Follies

A spate of “scientific” assays invented in the 1920s and 1930s were bogus—but they tell us a lot about the role of genetics in society, both then and now — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In-situ measurement of 3-D protein structure inside living eukaryotic cells

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have successfully determined the high-resolution, three-dimensional structure of proteins inside living eukaryotic cells. They combined "in-cell" nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, a bioreactor system and cutting-edge computational algorithms to determine protein structures in crowded intracellular environments for the first time. The tech

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Breaking the symmetry in the quantum realm

For the first time, researchers have observed a break in a single quantum system. The observation—and how they made the observation—has potential implications for physics beyond the standard understanding of how quantum particles interact to produce matter and allow the world to function as we know it.

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There Are Still 10 Chernobyl-Style Reactors Operating Across Russia. How Do We Know They're Safe?

The flawed reactor design that led to a catastrophic meltdown at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant was used in several other places. Some are still operating.

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Rare 'Flash Fire' Ignites in Man's Chest Cavity During Surgery

Scalpel,. Check. Sponge,. Check. Fire extinguisher…check?

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Amazon to Showcase Small Businesses in UK Pop-Up Shops

Amazon is opening 10 brick-and-mortar shops across the UK in an effort to promote small businesses. The tech titan partnered with Enterprise Nation, Direct Line for Business, and Square to launch …

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When One Protected Species Kills Another, What Are Conservationists to Do?

What if great white sharks threaten sea otters? Dilemmas are on the rise in an increasingly disrupted environment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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When One Protected Species Kills Another, What Are Conservationists to Do?

What if great white sharks threaten sea otters? Dilemmas are on the rise in an increasingly disrupted environment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sketching the Stars: How Art Can Advance Astronomy

Science and art are often thought of as incompatible. But for centuries astronomers have been using artistic techniques to bring the cosmos to life and share their discoveries, whether it's the chiaroscuro of Galileo's sketches of the moon or the computerized renderings of images from the Hubble telescope.

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Nyt Boeing 737-problem: Luftfartsmyndighed kontakter danske flyselskaber

Mere end 300 eksemplarer af mellemdistancesflyet Boeing 737 Max og forgængeren 737 NG, har potentielt defekte dele på vingerne, lyder det fra flyproducenten.

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Researchers retract a paper because it turns out not to be about bullshit

Sometimes what science really needs is more bullshit. Just ask a group of environmental scientists in China, who lost their 2019 article on soil contamination because what they thought was manure was in fact something else. The article, titled “Immobilization of heavy metals in e-waste contaminated soils by combined application of biochar and phosphate fertilizer,” … Continue reading Researchers r

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Trump's Defiance of the Rule of Law

President Trump has repeatedly said that his administration is the “most transparent in history,” and that it has “cooperated totally” with the special counsel’s investigation, or words to that effect. But the truth is quite the opposite. No prior administration has pushed the envelope of the law to deflect outside scrutiny to the same degree as this one. In a recent letter from the White House t

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What a Clash Between Conservatives Reveals

A story commonly told these days on both the left and the right says that American Christians, and especially evangelicals, are solidly behind President Donald Trump. The real story is far more complex, and has led many Christians to some fairly serious soul-searching, and others to ask hard questions about whether we even know what an “evangelical” is . Among Christians, as among so many other A

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Online-Privacy Laws Come With a Downside

It was the kind of call a journalist dreams about. Last fall, a tipster contacted the Bucharest-based Rise Project to offer the investigative-journalism outfit a suitcase full of evidence that, the anonymous source assured, implicated a high-powered Romanian politician in a massive fraud. The reporters pounced. In November, they published their initial findings on Rise’s Facebook page. The detail

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The ‘Special Relationship’ Is Built on More Than Personal Ties

In the study at the ambassador’s residence of the British embassy sits a watercolor portrait of Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein. Montgomery commanded the Allied ground forces during Operation Overlord , from the initial landings on D-Day through the Battle of Normandy , working closely with his American counterparts. His portrait might seem a tribute to sm

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Betalte for anden kundes kalveflanksteak med app: Nets peger på for kraftig bluetooth som forklaring

Ifølge Nets er det rækkevidden af læsefeltet i en betalingskort-terminal, der kan være årsagen til, at en kunde har betalt for en anden kundes vare i en Rema 1000-butik.

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WWDC 2019 Liveblog: All the Apple News as It Happens

Apple's developer conference kicks off June 3 at 10 am Pacific. Follow along with us for analysis and commentary from WIRED's editors.

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How to Watch Apple's WWDC 2019 Keynote

You can stream Monday's WWDC keynote on your iOS device, on your computer, or—the best way—on your Apple TV.

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Ét gen afgør, hvordan sneglehuset vender: Nu har forskere klippet det væk

Med gen-saksen Crispr har forskere fået snegles hus til at dreje mod venstre i stedet for højre, som det bør.

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Hvor blev sundhedsdebatten af?

Sundhedsområdet blev valgkampens fuser. Lægerne gjorde ikke nok og forsømte bl.a. at gøre problemerne på AUH til en løftestang for flere ressourcer. Og statsministeren kom med en infam bemærkning.

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»Vi kører førerløst i al slags vejr« – Franske Navya får konkurrent i Finland

PLUS. Finsk startup vil i samarbejde med japansk producent tage kampen op med franske Easymile og Navya på markedet for selvkørende shuttle-busser.

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A fast all-visible-light molecular switch with 100 nm band separation

A consortium of scientists from the Medical Imaging Center (University Medical Center Groningen), Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences (University of Amsterdam), Palacky University in Olomouc, the University of Nantes, Stratingh Institute for Chemistry (University of Groningen) and the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy in Florence have developed an entirely new class of molec

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Losing muscle to fat: misdirected fate of a multipotent stem cell drives LGMD2B

The sudden appearance of clinical symptoms in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B is due to a unique extracellular environment in which a specific membrane repair protein coaxes fibro/adipogenic precursors to first proliferate and then differentiate into fatty tissue, rather than play their normal role of helping the muscle fibers repair.

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People living with HIV face premature heart disease and barriers to care

People living with HIV face a higher risk of developing diseases of the heart and blood vessels compared to people without the disease. Seventy-five percent of people living with HIV are over age 45 and face significant health challenges at earlier ages than people who don't have HIV.

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LG starts selling world’s first 8K OLED TV this week

8K OLED TVs officially become a thing this week as LG starts taking orders in South Korea for arguably the most advanced consumer TV set ever created. The 88Z9 has an 88-inch OLED …

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If Seeing the World Helps Ruin It, Should We Stay Home?

In the age of global warming, traveling — by plane, boat or car — is a fraught choice. And yet the world beckons.

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2020 Candidates Are Going All In on Abortion Rights

Kirsten Gillibrand has made abortion the central issue of her presidential campaign. The senator from New York has consistently led the field of 2020 candidates on abortion policy, moving first and going the furthest to embrace an expansive vision of abortion rights. Her approach is a bellwether of where the Democratic Party is heading on this issue: Abortion is guaranteed to be a key topic in th

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Techtopia #107: IT-politikere lancerer fælles initiativ til politik på tværs af partier

En gruppe politikere på tværs af partier lancerer et bud på en fælles IT-politik op til folketingsvalget. Mød fire af dem og hør, hvad de er enige om, og hvad de er knap så enige om.

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What is programmatic marketing and buying?

submitted by /u/Way2Target_Martech [link] [comments]

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Osäker rättslig hantering vid Försäkringskassans felbedömningar

– I Sverige litar vi på staten och våra myndigheter. Det kan vara bra. Men ibland går det för långt. Makten legitimeras med ett harmonitänkande i relationen mellan stat och individ, vilket leder till en intimisering som kan undergräva rättssäkerheten. Allt kan inte lösas i samförstånd. Ibland blir det konflikt och då blir det tydligt att myndigheten har ett maktövertag, säger Matthias Abelin, dok

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Farlig asbest eller ufarlig eternit? Robotter skal se forskel

Nyt projekt vil gøre det billigere at skaffe sig af med eternitplader og samtidig gøre det muligt at genbruge de ufarlige af pladerne.

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Germany's Infineon to buy Cypress in 9-bn-euro deal

German chipmaker Infineon sealed a definitive agreement to make an offer for US competitor Cypress that values the firm at around nine billion euros ($10.1 billion), the two companies said in …

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New real-world features we'd like to see for iOS 13

It's that time of year again when Apple gives folks a sneak peek at new features for the iPhone and iPad. The company does it every June at the Worldwide Developer's Conference (WWDC) a forum to hype up app makers on new tools they could use in their apps.

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Starwatch: how to find Hercules and Corona Borealis

Two of the constellations first defined by Ptolemy, though faint, are well placed for observation this month It is a good time of year to search out two of the fainter northern constellations. Once identified, both bring considerable pleasure because of their distinctive shapes. The first is Hercules , the hero, the body of which is often described as having the shape of a keystone. Although fain

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Research integrity is much more than misconduct

Nature, Published online: 03 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01727-0 All researchers should strive to improve the quality, relevance and reliability of their work.

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Smart svetsning kan göra flygplanen lättare

Ett sätt att minska flygets koldioxidutsläpp är att bygga lättare flygmotorer som drar mindre bränsle. Men det kräver att man kan sammanfoga komponenterna med hjälp av effektiv och högkvalitativ lasersvetsning. Flera forskare arbetar parallellt med att undersöka vilka mätmetoder som kan bidra till att höja kvaliteten på lasersvetsning. Edvard Svenman på Högskolan Väst är en av dem. Han har på upp

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Germany's Infineon to buy Cypress in 9-bn-euro deal

With an offer to take over US competitor Cypress for around nine billion euros ($10.1 billion), German chipmaker Infineon aimed Monday to grab the number-eight spot in the industry and expand into the "Internet of Things".

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Mødet med to helte og en potentiel helt

Professor Christoffer Johansen rapporterer fra ASCO 2019: Stærke budskaber fra kirurgen Atul Gawande og kræft-nestoren Ian Tannock. Desværre fik onkologen David Scadden ikke solgt sin nye bog godt nok. Den er ellers et must read.

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The FDA’s accelerated drug approval program is failing to protect cancer patients

Drug approval is a process that should be and, for the most part, is rooted in rigorous science. However, there is always a countervailing pressure to approve new drugs rapidly, particularly in cancer. That's why the FDA created the accelerated approval program in the early 1990s. Unfortunately, increasingly this approval process appears to be failing us in oncology. Reform is needed.

14h

Kombi øger overlevelsen efter prostatakræft

Enzalutamide i tillæg til standardbehandlingen mod prostatakræft øger overlevelsen blandt patienter med metastaserende hormonsensitiv prostatakræft, viser amerikansk studie.

14h

Velfærd udjævner forskelsbehandling

Afroamerikanske kræftpatienter har oplevet stor forbedring i muligheden for hurtig behandling efter en diagnose i stater, hvor adgangen til Medicaid er blevet udvidet.

14h

Rige lever længere efter knoglemarvskræft

Overlevelse ved knoglemarvskræft bliver bestemt af socioøkonomiske faktorer, viser amerikansk studie. Derimod har hverken køn eller race indflydelse.

14h

»Det er jo fantastisk at være lungeonkolog«

Overlæge Marianne Marquard Knap fra AUH er begejstret over de mange nye og gode data indenfor immunterapi til alle lungecancerformer. Hun mangler bare at behandlingerne bliver indført i Danmark.

14h

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Twitter Use Decreases Students' Test Scores, So What's It Doing to The Rest of Us?

"Without the full background, you're more likely to be led astray."

14h

Tech group eases stance on Huawei as Beijing lashes back

The world's largest association of technology professionals backed away from barring from some of its activities employees of Chinese tech giant Huawei, the company at the center of a roiling trade dispute between Washington and Beijing.

14h

New York takes aim at skyscrapers' sky-high energy usage

It's a tall order indeed: How do you make aging, energy-hungry skyscrapers more efficient and less polluting? The city of New York, the historic capital of the skyscraper, is determined to do so by requiring the enormous buildings to drastically curtail their energy consumption.

14h

US ban has 'no effect' on Huawei's aviation business: official

US moves against Chinese tech titan Huawei have had "no effect" on the firm's aviation business despite several countries taking steps to block its mobile services, a top company executive said Monday.

14h

Drowning in waste, Russians fume over lack of recycling

Roman Yudakov points in the distance to a stinking mountain of trash looming over the Russian capital and sighs: "Take a look at our pyramid!"

14h

Researchers can now predict properties of disordered polymers

Thanks to a team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Massachusetts Amherst, scientists are able to read patterns on long chains of molecules to understand and predict behavior of disordered strands of proteins and polymers. The results could, among other things, pave the way to develop new materials from synthetic polymers.

14h

Spændende nye behandlinger mod brystcancer med resistens

Studier viser vigtig viden om resistensmekanismer i brystcancertumorer, fortæller forskningsleder fra OUH Henrik Ditzel. Han tager den nye viden med til OUH, hvor målet er at finde frem til en måde, hvor tumoren bliver holdt i skak med ny behandling.

15h

Skræddersyet indsats mod tidlig lungecancer

Studier peger i retningen af mere individualiserede behandlinger til lungecancerpatienter i tidligt stadie. Interessant tankegang, mener overlæge Azza Ahmed Khalil fra AUH.

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Snow might be the next clean energy source

submitted by /u/TequillaShotz [link] [comments]

15h

Mange NK-celler øger overlevelsen ved ovariecancer

Natural Killer celler har en positiv effekt for overlevelsen for patienter med ovariecancer, viser nyt studie fra læge og ph.d.-studerende Jon Røikjær Henriksen.

15h

Can you solve it? Dogs in pursuit

A quick mental run-around UPDATE: The solution can now be read by clicking here. Today’s problem is a classic puzzle and an excuse to post this picture of Melbourne’s annual sausage dog race, the Running of the Wieners. Four dogs are in four corners of a square of side length 1. Each dog starts running towards the dog immediately anti-clockwise to it. The dogs start at the same time, they all run

15h

Brexit 'may bar UK scientists from €100bn EU research fund'

Nobel prize winner warns UK science will suffer unless it can gain access to Horizon Europe One of Britain’s leading researchers has warned of a “major blow” to national science if ministers cannot secure access to a massive research programme that is being drawn up by the EU. The Horizon Europe programme will fund €100bn in research projects, maki