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nyheder2019juni08

Medicaid-expanding states had fewer cardiovascular deaths than other states

Counties in states with expanded Medicaid eligibility had 4.3 fewer cardiovascular deaths per 100,000 residents, on average, than if they hadn’t expanded.

7min

Chronic fatigue syndrome scientist fired after conduct complaints, Stanford says

School of Medicine won’t specify why it fired Jose Montoya

8min

Nasa to allow commercial access to the International Space Station

Move will allow private astronauts to spend up to 30 days in low-Earth orbit and businesses to shoot film and adverts in space Nasa will allow unprecedented commercial access to the International Space Station (ISS) for marketing, business and space tourism, the agency announced on Friday. The change paves the way for the wealthy to rocket from Earth and spend time aboard the astronaut home and l

9min

The Radical Fashion Roots of Rihanna's Fenty Line

“Kwame Brathwaite. archive.” In just three words, Rihanna shared with her Instagram and Twitter followers the inspiration behind her debut fashion line, Fenty. Accompanying the caption was a vintage photograph—taken by the Brooklyn-born documentary photographer Kwame Brathwaite—of three stylish black women models, one donning an elaborate headwrap, and two sporting Afros. The banner on the wall b

11min

New core-shell catalyst for ethanol fuel cells

Scientists at Brookhaven Lab and the University of Arkansas have developed a highly efficient catalyst for extracting electrical energy from ethanol, an easy-to-store liquid fuel that can be generated from renewable resources. The catalyst steers the electro-oxidation of ethanol down an ideal chemical pathway that releases the liquid fuel's full potential of stored energy.

14min

How to regulate Big Tech without breaking it up

The history of trustbusting shows there are many possible ways to combat the monopoly power of companies like Amazon, Facebook, and Google.

22min

The National Academy of Sciences Cracks Down on Sexual Harassment

Code of Conduct Members of the National Academy of Sciences can now be kicked out over sexual harassment as well as other forms of bullying, intimidation, and discrimination. The group, made up of prominent scientists and academics who advise government leaders on scientific matters while publishing new research, enacted a new code of conduct last week. According to a NAS press release , the new

22min

Google Walkout leader leaves the company over alleged retaliation

One of the leading organizers of last year's mass walkout of Google employees protesting the company's handling of sexual harassment cases has left the company, according …

26min

Researchers see stress and trauma in women's stories about abortion

A University at Buffalo-led research team has used public narratives, an increasingly popular form of person-centered advocacy offering a forum for sharing previously untold stories, to study the undue stress experienced by women in relation to abortion.

29min

Mature galaxy mesmerizes in new Hubble view

NGC 7773 is a beautiful example of a barred spiral galaxy. A luminous bar-shaped structure cuts prominently through the galaxy's bright core, extending to the inner boundary of NGC 7773's sweeping, pinwheel-like spiral arms. Astronomers think that these bar structures emerge later in the lifetime of a galaxy.

29min

Facial recognition tech is arsenic in the water of democracy, says Liberty

Human rights group calls on England and Wales to ban police use of AFR in public spaces Automated facial recognition poses one of the greatest threats to individual freedom and should be banned from use in public spaces, according to the director of the campaign group Liberty. Martha Spurrier, a human rights lawyer, said the technology had such fundamental problems that, despite police enthusiasm

39min

White House Climate Review Could Damage Careers, Scientists Warn

Concerns mount over reports that federal researchers could be compelled to participate in the controversial exercise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

43min

NASA is Officially Opening the Space Station to Tourists

Private Astronauts NASA just announced that it will officially allow regular citizens — not just certified astronauts — on board the International Space Station, as well as commercial and marketing activities. Tickets to the ISS won’t come cheap. NASA will be charging private companies about $35,000 a night for use of the station’s facilities, according to the New York Times . And that’s not incl

43min

Watch an ant rip apart a spiderweb to rescue a sibling

Desert harvester ants charge into danger and dismantle spider traps

44min

How a Google Cloud Catch-22 Broke the Internet

A Google Cloud outage that knocked huge portions of the internet offline also blocked access to the tools Google needed to fix it.

45min

Snart rammer danmarks første gylle-CO2 fadølsanlæggene

Dansk virksomhed er klar med landets første anlæg til i stor skala at opsamle CO2 fra biogasanlæg.

46min

High levels of rare gut bacteria may be linked to restless legs syndrome

Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may be more prevalent among patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS), according to preliminary findings from a small, new study.

50min

Older forests resist change — climate change, that is

Older forests in eastern North America are less vulnerable to climate change than younger forests, particularly for carbon storage, timber production, and biodiversity, new research finds. The study, to be published in Global Change Biology's June 12, 2019 edition, analyzed how climate change is expected to impact forests across the eastern US and Canada. It found that increased forest age reduces

50min

Comprehensive study of nuclear receptor DNA binding provides a revised framework for understanding receptor specificity

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10264-3 The type II nuclear receptors (NRs) and the retinoid X receptor (RXR) form heterodimeric transcription factors to regulate development, metabolism, and inflammation. Here the authors employ protein-binding microarrays to comprehensively analyze the DNA binding of 12 NR:RXRα heterodimers, and report promiscuous N

51min

Reply to: “On the understanding of current-induced spin polarization of three-dimensional topological insulators”

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10396-6 Reply to: “On the understanding of current-induced spin polarization of three-dimensional topological insulators”

51min

Over 16% efficiency organic photovoltaic cells enabled by a chlorinated acceptor with increased open-circuit voltages

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10351-5 Halogenation has proved an effective strategy to improve the power conversion efficiencies of organic solar cells but it usually leads to lower open-circuit voltages. Here, Cui et al. unexpectedly obtain higher open-circuit voltages and achieve a record high PCE of 16.5% by chlorination.

51min

Diffusing wave paradox of phototactic particles in traveling light pulses

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10535-z The amoebae Dictyostelium have previously been observed to migrate counter to the direction of a traveling chemical wave. Here the authors demonstrate that light-activated phototactic synthetic particles move counter to the pulse direction in a way which is reminiscent of the amoebae’s behavior.

51min

APC/CCDH1 synchronizes ribose-5-phosphate levels and DNA synthesis to cell cycle progression

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10375-x Ribose-5-phosphate (R5P) is required for DNA synthesis, but how this is regulated during cell cycle progression is unclear. Here the authors report that the cell cycle regulator APC/C-CDH1 synchronizes cell cycle progression with R5P-derived DNA synthesis by controlling TKTL1 stability

51min

In vivo nuclear capture and molecular profiling identifies Gmeb1 as a transcriptional regulator essential for dopamine neuron function

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10267-0 Despite the known role of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) signaling in the homeostatic control of mood and motor functions, little is known about how gene expression in these neurons is regulated. Here, authors develop an in vivo nuclear tagging and capture technique for low-input chromatin accessibility and transcr

51min

Anatomy of the energetic driving force for charge generation in organic solar cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10434-3 Understanding the energetic driving force is important for optimizing the performance of organic solar cells. Here Nakano et al. suggest that the dominant driving force is the energy difference between the singlet excited state and the charge transfer state after assessing 16 material combinations.

51min

Chirality invertible superstructure mediated active planar optics

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10538-w Optically reconfigurable elements are in demand for future applications. The authors report on the use of chirality-invertible cholesteric liquid crystals to actively manipulate geometric phase and create switchable planar optics elements that perform a variety of functions.

51min

NASA Went to the Stock Exchange to Try to Sell the ISS

The Trump administration is trying to turn the International Space Station into a business. It could learn from the first guy to try that: Ronald Reagan.

51min

Daily briefing: medRxiv brings preprints to medical science

Nature, Published online: 07 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01820-4 Safeguards will support preprints for clinical research. Plus: our bodies are mosaics riddled with mutations and we remember Alan Turing on the day of his death.

1h

DNA reveals ancient Siberians who set the stage for the first Americans

A previously unknown population of Ice Age people who traveled across Beringia was discovered in Russia.

1h

Terrifying Deepfake AI Alters Vids to Match Your Transcript Edits

The Pen Is Mightier If you can type, you can now create a convincing deepfake. Recent advances in artificial intelligence have made it far easier to create video or audio clips in which a person appears to be saying or doing something they didn’t actually say or do. Now, a team of researchers has developed an algorithm that simplifies the process of creating a deepfake to a terrifying degree, mak

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Built by Girls

How one organization is powering a generation of women in technology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How genes interact to build tissues and organisms

A group of scientists at the National Centre for Genomic Analysis (CNAG-CRG) from the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), in Barcelona, Spain, led by Holger Heyn, developed a new computational tool, based on the mathematical Graph theory, to infer global, large-scale regulatory networks, from healthy and pathological organs, such as those affected by diabetes or Alzheimer's disease. The researche

1h

NASA Is Testing Its Tiny Mars Helicopter for July 2020 Launch

Mars Helicopter NASA is planning to send its tiny Mars Helicopter to the surface of Mars alongside its Mars 2020 rover next summer. And the robot just passed a couple of important milestones . If all goes according to plan, the Mars Helicopter will launch cradled to the belly of NASA’s Mars 2020 rover in July 2020 on top of a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket at the Cape Canaveral Air Force S

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Built by Girls

How one organization is powering a generation of women in technology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Algorithm provides customized caffeine strategy for alertness

A web-based caffeine optimization tool successfully designs effective strategies to maximize alertness while avoiding excessive caffeine consumption, according to preliminary results from a new study.

1h

Teens sleep longer, are more alert for homework when school starts later

Preliminary findings from a new study of middle school and high school students suggest that they got more sleep and were less likely to feel too sleepy to do homework after their district changed to later school start times.

1h

Stopping Parkinson's disease before it starts

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Characterized by accumulation of the protein alpha-synuclein, there is currently no cure for PD. Scientists have now developed a novel treatment effectively ameliorated disease symptoms in a mouse model of PD.

1h

How brassinosteroid signaling makes roots grow longer under nitrogen deficiency

As sessile organisms, plants rely on their ability to adapt the development and growth of their roots in response to changing nutrient conditions. One such response, known to be displayed by plants grown in low nitrogen conditions, is the elongation of primary and lateral roots to explore the surrounding soil.

1h

How Biden’s Campaign Confronted Him on Abortion

Joe Biden’s aides knew that the 2020 front-runner was going to get ripped apart over his support of the Hyde Amendment, which bans federal funding for abortion procedures. They were frustrated that the former vice president wouldn’t change his stance, and that he wasn’t initially receptive to their concerns. Now that Biden has come out against Hyde, his aides are trying to prevent him from being

1h

NASA will let people pay to stay on the International Space Station

NASA has announced that it is opening the International Space Station up to private business, including astronauts who will pay $35,000 a night to visit

1h

Manipulating electron spin using artificial molecular motors

Artificial molecular switches and machines have undergone rapid advances over the past several decades. Particularly, artificial molecular motors are highly attractive from the viewpoint of chirality switching during rotational steps. Now, researchers fabricated an electron's spin-filtering device that can switch the spin polarization direction by light irradiation or thermal treatment. The presen

1h

Probing semiconductor crystals with a sphere of light

Tohoku University researchers have developed a technique using a hollow sphere to measure the electronic and optical properties of large semiconducting crystals. The approach, published in the journal Applied Physics Express, improves on current photoluminescence spectroscopy techniques and could lead to energy savings for mass producers, and thus consumers, of power devices.

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Scientists Built a Robot Sloth to Study Other Sloths

Low Octane Scientists are building a new robot programmed to sleep on the job. SlothBot, a slow-moving robot that will chill in the canopy level of forests, is expected to monitor environmental changes — and living sloth populations — for months at a time. Imitating the lazy lifestyle of a real sloth, the robot will only move when it needs to, according to Futurity , marking a departure from the

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Want to Buy a Ticket to the Space Station? NASA Says Soon You Can

NASA plans to open the International Space Station to commercial business, including tourism. But the tickets won’t be cheap.

1h

StarCraft FPS reportedly axed by Blizzard

A planned StarCraft first-person shooter, codenamed Ares, has been reportedly been cancelled by developer Blizzard, according to people inside the company who spoke to Kotaku. A prototype …

1h

Uncharted movie, starring Tom 'Spidey' Holland, gets release date – CNET

Treasure hunter Nathan Drake will leap from video games to theaters.

1h

Behavioural correlations of the domestication syndrome are decoupled in modern dog breeds

Scientists since Darwin have been intrigued by the simultaneous alteration of multiple morphological, physiological and behavioural traits across a wide range of domesticated animals, such as horses, pigs and dogs. For instance, reduced brain size, floppy ears, increased docility and hormonal changes are commonly seen in domesticated animals but not their wild ancestors. This phenomenon is known a

1h

Antarctic glacier named after GFZ satellite mission 'GRACE'

A glacier in the West Antarctic has been named after the German-American satellite mission GRACE. GRACE stands for "Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment." Between 2002 and 2017, the scientific mission measured the Earth's gravity field, from which conclusions can be drawn about the growth and melting of glaciers.

1h

Diabetes can be detected in gut of cats

The cat is the only animal, aside from humans and primates, which spontaneously develops type 2 diabetes. Therefore, researchers are interested in studying how diabetes develops in cats in order to learn more about the disease in general.

1h

VA study backs use of physician assistants, nurse practitioners in diabetes care

VA patients with diabetes have similar health outcomes regardless of whether their primary provider is a physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant, according to a Durham VA Health Care System study.

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Behavioural correlations of the domestication syndrome are decoupled in modern dog breeds

Scientists since Darwin have been intrigued by the simultaneous alteration of multiple morphological, physiological and behavioural traits across a wide range of domesticated animals, such as horses, pigs and dogs. For instance, reduced brain size, floppy ears, increased docility and hormonal changes are commonly seen in domesticated animals but not their wild ancestors. This phenomenon is known a

1h

Diabetes can be detected in gut of cats

The cat is the only animal, aside from humans and primates, which spontaneously develops type 2 diabetes. Therefore, researchers are interested in studying how diabetes develops in cats in order to learn more about the disease in general.

1h

Unknown Group of Ancient Humans Once Lived in Siberia, New Evidence Reveals

The teeth came from a genetically distinct population of humans.

1h

What Is the Smallest Known Dinosaur and Other Questions Answered by Dr. Hans Sues

Cat-loving paleontologist answers your questions in the National Museum of Natural History's YouTube series, "The Doctor Is In."

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Trailblazing Engineer Irene Peden Broke Antarctic Barriers for Women

Originally told she could not go to Antarctica without another woman to accompany her, Peden now has a line of cliffs on the continent named in her honor

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Bad night’s sleep can spike your blood pressure

A bad night’s sleep may result in a rise in blood pressure that night and the following day, according to a new study. The findings offer one possible explanation for why sleep problems increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, and even death from cardiovascular disease, researchers say. Scientific literature has increasingly established the link between poor sleep and cardiovascular health prob

1h

Worm study sparks hope for slowing muscle decline

Muscle decline caused by ageing and certain diseases could be dramatically slowed by stopping a chain reaction that damages cells, new research shows.

1h

Diabetes can be detected in gut of cats

Diabetes patients show reduced gut bacterial diversity, and now researchers have learned that the same is true of cats. The researchers behind the new study hope to be able to use cats as a model for future studies of the disease.

1h

Modelling reveals new insight into the electrical conductivity of ionic liquids

New research shows the key role of thermal fluctuations in sustaining the 'relay race' of charges needed to maintain electrical current in room temperature ionic liquids.

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Women soccer players usually peak in their 20s—here's why some excel into their 40s

Health Female athletes have certain advantages when it comes to endurance in sport. If Brazil's Formiga sees the field in the 2019 Women's World Cup, she’ll be the oldest athlete to appear in the tournament, taking the record from the United States’…

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Danske forskere: Det haster stærkt med at finde nye katalysatorer til spaltning af vand

Iridium er sjældent og dyrt, og det vil være en flaskehals for at opskalere processer til spaltning af vand. Nye katalysatorer behøves derfor.

1h

Teens sleep longer, are more alert for homework when school starts later

Preliminary findings from a new study of middle school and high school students suggest that they got more sleep and were less likely to feel too sleepy to do homework after their district changed to later school start times.

1h

Algorithm provides customized caffeine strategy for alertness

A web-based caffeine optimization tool successfully designs effective strategies to maximize alertness while avoiding excessive caffeine consumption, according to preliminary results from a new study.

1h

Costs of care similar or lower at teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals

Total costs of care are similar or somewhat lower among teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals among Medicare beneficiaries treated for common medical and surgical conditions, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

1h

Availability of opioid-overdose antidote at pharmacies

Pennsylvania became one of the first states in 2015 to implement a statewide standing order allowing pharmacists to dispense naloxone, an antidote for opioid overdoses, without a physician's prescription. This study looked at the availability (with or without a prescription) of naloxone nasal spray at 418 pharmacies in Philadelphia surveyed by telephone.

1h

Firearms and risk of suicide by US army soldiers

Examining to what extent firearm ownership and accessibility may be associated with suicide risk among US Army soldiers was the aim of this psychological autopsy study. The study included 135 soldiers who died by suicide on active duty between 2011-2013; firearms were the most common method with 61 of 111 soldiers who had a documented method of injury dying this way.

1h

Naloxone access law in Pennsylvania falls short

A new study finds that only one-third of pharmacies in Philadelphia carry naloxone nasal spray, a medication used to rapidly counter the effects of opioid overdose, and that many of the pharmacies that do carry the drug require patients to have a physician's prescription for it.

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Rapidly removing fluid from ICU patients in kidney failure linked to increased death risk

The faster fluid is removed using continuous dialysis from patients with failing kidneys, the higher the likelihood they will die in the next several months.

1h

Teen depression treatment should extend to parents’ marriage

A teen’s depression can affect parents’ satisfaction in their marriage, research finds. Parents often seek mental health treatment for a child struggling with depression, but the treatment shouldn’t stop with the depressed teen, suggests the study. “Families are interactive, fragile ecosystems…” The study finds that while depressed teens were involved in active treatment, parents’ marriages and p

1h

Some Real News About Fake News

The rise of fake news in the American popular consciousness is one of the remarkable growth stories in recent years—a dizzying climb to make any Silicon Valley unicorn jealous. Just a few years ago, the phrase was meaningless. Today, according to a new Pew Research Center study , Americans rate it as a larger problem than racism, climate change, or terrorism. But remarkable though that may seem,

1h

Fertilizer plants emit 100 times more methane than reported

Emissions of methane from the industrial sector have been vastly underestimated, researchers have found.

1h

Firearm Access Associated With Suicide Risk For U.S. Soldiers

(Credit: Bumble Dee/Shutterstock) Since 2004, the rate of death by suicide has exceeded that of death by combat injury for American soldiers. A review of more than 100 cases involving the suicide of an active-duty soldier found a significant association between firearm ownership, access and usage patterns and increased risk of suicide. The study, published today in the open-access, online-only jou

2h

Walmart Will Now Deliver Food Straight to Your Fridge

A Frigid Welcome Walmart just announced a new service for people who don’t want to — or aren’t able to — come to the door to pick up their groceries. As part of the InHome Delivery service, Walmart employees will be able to enter your home, don a internet-connected camera, and deliver groceries directly to your nasty fridge. Announcing Walmart InHome Delivery, a simple way to order fresh grocerie

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Posture impacts how you perceive your food

Standing just for a few minutes while eating can mute taste buds, impacting taste evaluation, temperature perception and overall consumption volume.

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USA lags behind EU, Brazil and China in banning harmful pesticides

Many pesticides that have been banned or are being phased out in the EU, Brazil and China, are still widely used in the USA, according to a new study.

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Fertilizer plants emit 100 times more methane than reported

Emissions of methane from the industrial sector have been vastly underestimated, researchers have found.

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Foraging for nitrogen

As sessile organisms, plants rely on their ability to adapt the development and growth of their roots in response to changing nutrient conditions. One such response, known to be displayed by plants grown in low nitrogen conditions, is the elongation of primary and lateral roots to explore the surrounding soil.

2h

Worm study sparks hope for slowing muscle decline

Muscle decline caused by ageing and certain diseases could be dramatically slowed by stopping a chain reaction that damages cells, new research shows.

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This Neural Network Gives Kittens A+ Names Like “Mr Sinister”

Naming Rescues AI is coming after all our jobs — including, now, giving adorable names to adoptable foster kitties so volunteers don’t have to suffer through the arduous task. With the help from research scientist Janelle Shane, the Morris Animal Refuge in Philadelphia created a neural network that came up with a series of kitty names, ranging from cute as hell to somewhat weird and disconcerting

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A Startup Is Suing Facebook, Princeton For Stealing Its AI Data

Intellectual Dishonesty A Lithuanian company called Planner 5D is suing both Facebook and Princeton University for stealing its artificial intelligence training data — an early skirmish in the strange new legal frontiers of AI. Princeton computer scientists scraped more than 45,000 files from Planner 5D’s software, according to a lawsuit filed on Wednesday, and used them to train their artificial

2h

Do the right thing at work? Depends on this belief

Is being honest a lot of work? The answer to that question can affect how dishonestly people behave at work, research finds. Julia Lee of the University of Michigan says the prevalence and high cost of employee fraud inspired the research. Estimates put the cost at up to $3.7 trillion worldwide of dishonest behavior by employees. “There is so much research on whether morality or doing the right t

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Crispr Babies May Have Shortened Lifespans

Chinese researcher He Jiankui was met with a firestorm of criticism when he made the bombshell announcement that he had modified the genomes of twin girls in an attempt to make their cells HIV-resistant. A study published this week in Nature Medicine says the edits could ultimately shorten the sisters’ lives.

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The National Academy of Sciences Will Now Expel Members for Sexual Harassment

This is the first time in the academy's 156-year history that any member could be expelled from the prestigious science group.

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The most detailed map of galaxies, black holes and stars ever made | Juna Kollmeier

Humans have been studying the stars for thousands of years, but astrophysicist Juna Kollmeier is on a special mission: creating the most detailed 3-D maps of the universe ever made. Journey across the cosmos as she shares her team's work on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, imaging millions of stars, black holes and galaxies in unprecedented detail. If we maintain our pace, she says, we can map every

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Facebook stops Huawei from pre-installing apps on phones

Facebook has stopped letting its apps come pre-installed on smartphones sold by Huawei in order to comply with U.S. restrictions, dealing a fresh blow to the Chinese tech giant.

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Goodbye X-Men—You Flawed, Frustrating Cinematic Revolution

Eighteen years ago, 'X-Men' taught audiences that comic books could live onscreen, as vast and rewarding as they were in their original form.

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Nasa to open International Space Station to tourists

The US space agency says it will allow tourists to visit the station from 2020.

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Some trees can change sex and are more likely to die when female

Striped maples change sex from year to year, and we used to think being female led to healthier trees, but it turns out that female trees are more likely to die

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Diabetes can be detected in gut of cats

Diabetes patients show reduced gut bacterial diversity, and now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have learned that the same is true of cats. The researchers behind the new study hope to be able to use cats as a model for future studies of the disease.

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Scholars investigate how mirror activity works

A team of researchers from Germany and Russia, including Vadim Nikulin from the Higher School of Economics, have demonstrated that long contraction of muscles in one hand increases involuntary reaction of the other one. Meanwhile, the time between muscle contractions in both hands decreases. The results of the study have been published in Neuroscience.

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Behavioural correlations of the domestication syndrome are decoupled in modern dog breeds

A new study published in Nature Communications by a team of researchers from Stockholm University used behavioural data from more than 76,000 dogs, to test the hypothesis that key behaviours in the domestication syndrome are correlated.

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Weight-loss patients at higher risk of death from substance use disorders

The death rate from drug- and alcohol-related causes in people who've had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is nearly triple that of the general public. And fewer than half of those who died had triggered a safety protocol for problematic substance use.

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Hedge fund buys struggling book retailer Barnes & Noble

Struggling bookseller Barnes & Noble said Friday it was being sold to hedge fund Elliott Management, which already owns British-based book retailer Waterstones.

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This Lab-Grown Patch Could Repair Your Heart After a Heart Attack

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the US for both men and women. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , 735,00 Americans have a heart attack each year, and 610,000 die of heart disease. Those who survive heart attacks remain at serious risk for heart failure. During a heart attack , the network of blood vessels that delivers blood to the heart, called the coron

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How your phone can interrupt the good vibes of a summer music festival

For many communities, summertime is festival season. Festivals allow us to escape our everyday lives. Whether it is time spent listening to music outside with our friends or trying out food trucks on date night, community events are a valued part of social life.

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Rapid retreat of Arctic coastline revealed in images from the air

Drone surveys have revealed extreme erosion on the Arctic coastline, highlight the ongoing change in the region in a warming climate.

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Fast and furious: detection of powerful winds driven by a supermassive black hole

This is the first publication based entirely on data obtained with EMIR, an instrument developed in the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) which analyses the infrared light gathered by the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) from the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Garafía, La Palma).

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Rapid change in coral reefs prompts global calls for a rethink

Coral reef experts from around the world are calling for an urgent re-evaluation of our climate goals in the light of increasing evidence of unprecedented speed of change to these fragile ecosystems.

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When social interaction helps you choose your food

How do we choose our food? By studying the neurobiological mechanisms involved in food choices of rodents, neuroscientists (UNIGE) have identified the important and lasting influence that peers can have on eating habits. Indeed, sensory stimuli linked to social contacts modify the neural connections of the networks involved in food choice, highlighting the social transmission of a food preference.

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Sediment from fishing choking out sea sponges, study shows

Sediment stirred up from fishing activity has a negative effect on reef-building sea sponges in northern British Columbia, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists.

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Ung ph.d kæmper for teknologiskift mod “meningsfuldt” design

Hun kalder sig selv dr. meaningful og elsker at provokere folk med kunst og design. Nu er hun klar med en opskrift på “meningsfuldhed” i teknologiudvikling.

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Europe shows challenges for US regulators targeting Big Tech

As U.S. authorities prepare to investigate Silicon Valley's digital giants, they'll look for inspiration—and warnings—from Europe, where regulators have led global efforts to rein in Big Tech with only mixed results.

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Super cheap centrifuge device started with a toy

A 5,000-year-old toy has inspired an inexpensive, hand-powered centrifuge for preparing scientific samples including DNA. The scientific tool could not only affect how field biologists conduct their research but also allow high-school students and others with limited resources to realize their own state-of-the-art experiments. The researchers demonstrated the device—dubbed the 3D-Fuge because it

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A generic drug from Argentina offers cystic fibrosis families hope

Parents in the UK are banding together to buy a generic cystic fibrosis drug from Argentina because the NHS and a drug manufacturer cannot agree on a price

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Jack of all trades or master of none? Impact of specialization on returns

A new study has found that specialist active management firms outperform those that have a more mixed offering of active and passive products, with the benefit of specialisation being 0.7 per cent a year on average.

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One-two-punch catalysts trapping carbon dioxide for cleaner fuels

Copper and platinum nanoparticles added to the surface of a blue titania photocatalyst significantly improve its ability to recycle atmospheric carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels.

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The Friends Who Have Been Playing the Same Game of Dungeons & Dragons for 30 Years

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week, she talks with a group of friends who have been playing Dungeons & Dragons together for nearly 30 years. They all went to the same high school in Huntington Beach, California, in the late 1980s. While no one i

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Key gadget specs and what they really mean

DIY Do you know what an IP rating is? Find out how processors, memory, battery life, storage, display tech, and camera lenses make up a finished device.

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Teachers are more depressed and anxious than the average Australian

Over half of Australian teachers suffer from anxiety and nearly one-fifth are depressed. These are the findings of our soon-to-be-published study assessing teachers' well-being.

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This centuries-old river red gum is a local legend worth fighting for

In Dr. Seuss's The Lorax, the Lorax famously said: "I am the Lorax. I speak for the trees. I speak for the trees, for the trees have no tongues."

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France to step up wolf culls as population surges

Wolf populations in the wild jumped in France last year, a faster-than-expected increase that will prompt the government to increase hunting quotas and take other measures to protect livestock herds, officials said Friday.

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This centuries-old river red gum is a local legend worth fighting for

In Dr. Seuss's The Lorax, the Lorax famously said: "I am the Lorax. I speak for the trees. I speak for the trees, for the trees have no tongues."

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France to step up wolf culls as population surges

Wolf populations in the wild jumped in France last year, a faster-than-expected increase that will prompt the government to increase hunting quotas and take other measures to protect livestock herds, officials said Friday.

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5 Comics to Read After You've Seen 'Dark Phoenix'

The movie wasn't great. These books are.

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A Surreal Subterranean Junkyard Piled With Old Cars

Robin Friend rappelled five stories down to capture this scene at the abandoned Gaewern Slate Quarry in Ceredigion, Wales.

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Rapid change in coral reefs prompts global calls for a rethink

Coral reef experts from around the world are calling for an urgent re-evaluation of our climate goals in the light of increasing evidence of unprecedented speed of change to these fragile ecosystems.Coral reefs, which have functioned relatively unchanged for some 24 million years, are now going through profound changes in their make-up.

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Why you can't just throw anything in the recycling bin

For many years the recycling collected from households in the UK and other Western countries has been exported. This strategy has enabled these countries to carry on without much thought about how consumers purchase goods and dispose of all the unwanted packaging and containers. As long as there are regular collections for recycling paper, metals and plastics, little consideration is given to wher

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Disappearing sea ice is changing the whole ecosystem of the Arctic Ocean

I drafted this article while looking north over the frozen Lincoln Sea, at the northernmost tip of Ellesmere Island in Canada. I was at Alert, a Canadian Forces Station which, at 82°N, is the most northerly permanently inhabited place on Earth. Just 815km away, across the Arctic Ocean, lay the North Pole.

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These 2 vape flavors are the most toxic

Your favorite vape flavor may be more harmful than the nicotine itself, according to a new study that used stem cells to study the effect of e-liquids on cardiovascular disease. The most toxic flavors? Cinnamon and menthol. As reported in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology , exposure to flavored e-liquids damages the endothelial cells, the thin layer of cells that line the interior

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5 Blockchain Breakthroughs Coming in the Next 5 Years

In almost every industry you can think of, blockchain is poised to cut out middlemen, dramatically improve transparency, and multiply the efficiency of countless transactions worldwide. While most well-known for its application in cryptocurrencies, blockchain is on the cusp of fundamentally revolutionizing supply chains, healthcare , elections, and real estate. But What Is Blockchain, and How Doe

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Race Replay: Big Chief and Ryan's Rematch for #1 | Street Outlaws

The number 1 spot is on the line as Big Chief and Ryan race for the second time in the night after Big Chief jumps the light during their first race. Don't miss new episodes of Street Outlaws at Mondays 9p! Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Di

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Why humans (or something very similar) may have been destined to walk the Earth

The paths available to evolving organisms are far from limitless, report evolutionary biologists James Horton and Tiffany Taylor from the University of Bath, UK.

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Researchers Built an AI That Translates Babies’ Cries

New Language Babies can cry because they’re sick or in pain, but sometimes — okay, a lot of the time — they cry because they’re hungry, cranky, or just feel like stretching their developing vocal cords. Now, researchers from Northern Illinois University have found a way to use artificial intelligence to decipher between the two types of vocalizations — and not only could the AI save new parents f

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Scientists reminded immune cells on what side they should be

International group of scientists in the joint study of the laboratory of the Wistar Institute, University of Pittsburgh and I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University discovered that during the cancer development immune cells called neutrophils begin to prevent other immune cells from fighting tumor and decelerate treatment. The scientists demonstrated that suppressing the activity of pr

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Manipulating electron spin using artificial molecular motors

Artificial molecular switches and machines have undergone rapid advances over the past several decades. Particularly, artificial molecular motors are highly attractive from the viewpoint of chirality switching during rotational steps. Now, researchers fabricated an electron's spin-filtering device that can switch the spin polarization direction by light irradiation or thermal treatment. The presen

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One-two-punch catalysts trapping CO2 for cleaner fuels

DGIST researchers are getting closer to developing a material that delivers a one-two punch: recycling atmospheric carbon dioxide for the production of cleaner hydrocarbon fuels.

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Probing semiconductor crystals with a sphere of light

Tohoku University researchers have developed a technique using a hollow sphere to measure the electronic and optical properties of large semiconducting crystals. The approach, published in the journal Applied Physics Express, improves on current photoluminescence spectroscopy techniques and could lead to energy savings for mass producers, and thus consumers, of power devices.

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How the 'good guy with a gun' became a deadly American fantasy

At the end of May, it happened again. A mass shooter killed 12 people, this time at a municipal center in Virginia Beach. Employees had been forbidden to carry guns at work, and some lamented that this policy had prevented "good guys" from taking out the shooter.

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Language matters when the Earth is in the midst of a climate crisis

In a 2015 essay, poet and novelist Margaret Atwood wrote, "It's not climate change, it's everything change."

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The Books Briefing: The Coming-of-Age of Queer Literature in America

This Pride Month marks 50 years since the Stonewall uprising—a monumental series of clashes between activists and police in New York City that helped usher in the movement for LGBTQ rights. In that time, the entertainment landscape has changed drastically. Teen coming-of-age films now offer more nuanced story lines for their LGBTQ protagonists, instead of reducing them to stereotypical side chara

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Northeastern U.S. deer more susceptible to wasting disease than those to the west

Some deer are more susceptible to chronic wasting disease that is spreading through herds of white-tailed deer across much of the United States, according to researchers, who have identified a panel of genetic markers that reliably predict which animals are most vulnerable to the contagious neurological disorder.

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New obstacle to effective accelerator beams

Release proposes explanation for failure to focus accelerator-fired ion beams.

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New synthesis of complex organic molecules revealed

Scientists have — for the first time — developed an efficient way to make organic molecules that have so far been difficult to synthesize because of their overall bulky structure and general instability.

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Manipulating nanoscale light in nanocavity of scanning tunneling microscope junctions

Manipulating nanoscale light in scanning tunneling microscope junctions is attained by nanofabrication of gold tips using a focused ion beam technique. Researchers have demonstrated that a spectrum of 'nanolight' in a nanoscale plasmonic junction can be modulated with plasmonic Fabry-Pérot tips. Precise control of nanolight is of key relevance to nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy to investigate s

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Research redefines constipation

New research finds that the public's perception of constipation differs drastically from that of doctors' and from the formal diagnosis guidelines.

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Childhood respiratory disorders may be diagnosed with a smartphone

Automated cough analysis technology incorporated in a smartphone app could help to diagnose childhood respiratory disorders, according to a new study.

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New method for engineering metabolic pathways

Two approaches provide a faster way to create enzymes and analyze their reactions, leading to the design of more complex molecules.

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Molecular bait can help hydrogels heal wounds

Bioengineers develop modular, injectable hydrogels enhanced by bioactive molecules anchored in the chemical crosslinkers that give the gels structure. The hydrogels can be mixed at room temperature and customized to help heal a variety of wounds.

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Why Electric Buses Haven't Taken Over the World—Yet

Here’s what stands between you and a cleaner commute.

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New synthesis of complex organic molecules revealed

Scientists have — for the first time — developed an efficient way to make organic molecules that have so far been difficult to synthesize because of their overall bulky structure and general instability.

3h

New method for engineering metabolic pathways

Two approaches provide a faster way to create enzymes and analyze their reactions, leading to the design of more complex molecules.

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Molecular bait can help hydrogels heal wounds

Bioengineers develop modular, injectable hydrogels enhanced by bioactive molecules anchored in the chemical crosslinkers that give the gels structure. The hydrogels can be mixed at room temperature and customized to help heal a variety of wounds.

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Increase in education specialists in university science departments

Science professors go through years of training to learn about their field, yet they often don't receive any formal education in how to teach students about it. This new study tracks one way that university science departments are working to amend that. Over the course of a decade, the researchers found, the number of education experts in science departments in the country's largest four-year publ

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DNA nanorobots target HER2-positive breast cancer cells

About 20% of breast cancers make abnormally high levels of a protein called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). When displayed on the surface of cancer cells, this signaling protein helps them proliferate uncontrollably and is linked with a poor prognosis. Now, researchers have developed a DNA nanorobot that recognizes HER2 on breast cancer cells, targeting them for destruction.

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Læger protesterer i samlet flok over lukning af hjerteafdeling

Både hjertelægerne på Sjællands Universitetshospital og to faglige selskaber ser med bekymring på lukningen af hjerteafdelingen i Køge.

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De flittige læger er dyre læger

34 offentligt ansatte læger tjente mere end to mio. kr. sidste år, og ifølge regionsdirektørerne er det et udtryk for, at de pågældende læger har ydet en ekstra indsats. Helt rimeligt, mener koncerndirektør i Midtjylland.

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Ledende overlæger halter langt efter kollegerne i lønstatistik

Ud af de 100 højest lønnede på tværs af alle regioner er kun fem ledende overlæger. Det er et tegn på, at ledelse i sundhedsvæsenet ikke honoreres godt nok, mener lægelig direktør Mads Koch Hansen. Lønpakken har ikke selvstændigt været i fokus hos os, siger regionsdirektør.

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Modelling reveals new insight into the electrical conductivity of ionic liquids

New research shows the key role of thermal fluctuations in sustaining the 'relay race' of charges needed to maintain electrical current in room temperature ionic liquids.

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Jack of all trades or master of none? Impact of specialization on returns

A new study has found that specialist active management firms outperform those that have a more mixed offering of active and passive products, with the benefit of specialization being 0.7% a year on average.It is the first study to explore the impact of specialization and is published this month in the journal International Review of Financial Analysis.

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More mysterious jars of the dead unearthed in Laos

Archaeologists have discovered 15 new sites in Laos containing more than one hundred 1,000-year-old massive stone jars possibly used for the dead.

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UCI scientists create new class of two-dimensional materials

Oxide perovskite crystals have many interesting physical and chemical properties, and materials science engineers would like to fabricate them as two-dimensional layers for use in advanced electronics and, potentially, quantum computers. In a breakthrough, a team led by UCI's Xiaoqing Pan has figured out how to make flexible, free-standing layers of the material.

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