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nyheder2019juni10

Mass anomaly detected under the moon's largest crater

A mysterious large mass of material has been discovered beneath the largest crater in our solar system—the Moon's South Pole-Aitken basin—and may contain metal from the asteroid that crashed into the Moon and formed the crater, according to a Baylor University study.

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Severed Head of a Giant 40,000-Year-Old Wolf Discovered in Russia

A local man came upon a grizzly site on the shore of the Tirekhtyakh River

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Are scientists on the brink of discovering a mirror universe?

Science fiction has long speculated about parallel universes and what they may be like. Researchers have devised new experiments to look for how a mirror universe may be influencing our own. If such evidence is found, it could bring to light many of the universe's mysteries, such as the nature of dark matter. None ​ In the original Star Trek episode " Mirror, Mirror ," the crew of the Enterprise

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Rare Tickborne Disease Tied to New Jersey Man's Death

A rare tick borne virus may have sickened two people in New Jersey, killing one, according to news reports.

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BU finds iron may not improve fertility

A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds that there is no consistent association between consuming iron and becoming pregnant.

6min

SIRT1 plays key role in chronic myeloid leukemia to aid persistence of leukemic stem cells

Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia are treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. While these effective drugs lead to deep remission and prolonged survival, primitive leukemia stem cells resist elimination during the remission and persist as a major barrier to cure. In a study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers show how the stress-responsive protein SIRT1 plays impor

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Alien Life Could Be Hiding Out on Far Fewer Planets Than We Thought

Where is complex alien life hanging out in the universe? Likely not on planets stewing in toxic gases, according to a new study that dramatically reduces the number of worlds where scientists will have the best luck finding ET.

9min

Female scientist's IVF contribution was 'unrecognised'

Letters from one the fertility treatment's pioneers says Jean Purdy contributed as much as him.

23min

A new candidate for dark matter and a way to detect it

Two theoretical physicists at the University of California, Davis have a new candidate for dark matter, and a possible way to detect it. They presented their work June 6 at the Planck 2019 conference in Granada, Spain and it has been submitted for publication.

26min

Switchgrass hybrid yields insights into plant evolution

Scientists have identified specific parts of genetic code within switchgrass that could contribute to larger switchgrass harvests while reducing potential crop weaknesses.

27min

A call to arms to fight the 'war on plastic'

BBC One presenter Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall investigates what we can all do to reduce our use of plastic.

29min

How cryptocurrency discussions spread

A rapidly increasing percentage of the world's population is connected to the global information environment. At the same time, the information environment is enabling social interactions that are radically changing how and at what rate information spreads. As part of an effort to understand communication patterns and build a quantitative framework for how this information expands online, research

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The mantis shrimp's perfect shield

How do you protect yourself from the perfect striking weapon? You develop the perfect shield.

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Professor: “Magic Mushrooms” Could Replace Antidepressants

Shroom Study Interest in the potential medical uses for psychedelics, such as “magic mushrooms” and LSD, has rapidly increased in recent years, leading to the opening of the world’s first formal center for psychedelics research in April — and the center’s leader is already prepared to make a bold prediction about the future of psychedelics in medicine. “I would imagine if you had some bookmakers

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NASA catches development of Tropical Cyclone 02A

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite provided confirmation of the development of Tropical Cyclone 02A in the Arabian Sea, Northern Indian Ocean.

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Mountain-dwellers can adapt to melting glaciers without caring about climate change

For many people, climate change feels like a distant threat—something that happens far away, or far off in the future. Scientists and climate communicators often think that if everyone saw the devastating impacts of climate change, we'd all be more likely to accept it as real, and that accepting climate science is essential to taking action against it. A recent study, published in Regional Environ

38min

Sellers on classified ad websites favor buyers from affluent neighborhoods

New Rice University research has found that people selling stuff on classified ad websites prefer dealing with buyers from affluent neighborhoods.

38min

How to make the perfect french fry, according to science

Science The key is a crispy exterior and a soft interior. What happens during cooking that turns a humble potato into the perfect french fry? Chef Jet Tila and food scientist Dr. Arielle Johnson break down the science of french…

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Bryan Cranston’s Tony Award speech: Demagoguery is real ‘enemy of the people’

Cranston portrayed a news anchor going through a mental breakdown after nearly losing his career. The play Network was an adaptation of the 1976 Oscar-winning film, written by Paddy Chayefsky. President Donald Trump has regularly — and as recently as yesterday (June 9) — called the media the "enemy of the people." None Bryan Cranston won a Tony Award on Sunday for portraying a broadcast journalis

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In romantic relationships, people do indeed have a 'type'

Researchers at the University of Toronto show that people do indeed have a 'type' when it comes to dating, and that despite best intentions to date outside that type — for example, after a bad relationship — some will gravitate to similar partners.

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Vodafone Egypt fined 500,000 euros for coverage outage

Egyptian authorities said Monday they had fined the national branch of mobile phone giant Vodafone 500,000 euros over a coverage outage last week just ahead of the Eid al-Fitr holiday.

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The Evolution of Sex Could Have Provided a Defense Against Cancer Cells

The first sexually reproducing eukaryotes may have found that the energy-intensive enterprise bolstered defenses against malignant cells

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Watch Live as NASA Builds the Mars 2020 Rover

Eyes on Mars NASA is letting the public into one of its ultra-sterile clean rooms — and it’s not even requiring that you wash your hands first. On Thursday, the agency began streaming a live video feed from a newly installed webcam in a clean room at its Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). It’s the same room where NASA engineers are currently assembling and testing the Mars 2020 rover — meaning anyo

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What if dark matter is lighter? Report calls for small experiments to broaden the hunt

Theorized dark matter particles haven't yet shown up where scientists had expected them. So researchers are now designing new and nimble experiments that can look for dark matter in previously unexplored ranges of particle mass and energy, and using previously untested methods.

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Sexual-orientation study

A new study from Professor Doug VanderLaan's lab in UofT Mississauga's Department of Psychology looking at biological mechanisms that are often thought to influence male sexual orientation was published in the latest edition of PNAS.

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New study shows how climate change could affect impact of roundworms on grasslands

The researchers found in extreme drought conditions that predator nematodes significantly decreased, which led to the growth of root-feeding nematodes.

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Trailblazing findings on the properties of daguerreotypes discovered by The Met and UNM

The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met) and The University of New Mexico (UNM) today announced the groundbreaking findings of a two-year study of the plasmonic properties of daguerreotypes.

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Pitt and CMU researchers discover how the brain changes when mastering a new skill

Researchers have discovered what happens in the brain as people learn how to perform tasks, which could lead to improved lives for people with brain injuries. The study, led by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University, revealed that new neural activity patterns emerge with long-term learning and established a causal link between these patterns and new behavioral

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Hamsters take cues from decreasing day length to prepare for the long winter

Analysis of the first fully-sequenced genome of the Siberian hamster shows how these small, seasonal breeders adapt their bodies and energy usage to survive the winter. The study shows that shifting day length alone was enough to trigger these changes, regardless of temperature or how much food is available.

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Exploring the causes of persistent corruption

IIASA researchers used a novel approach to explore the key processes and conditions that determine corruption levels. Their analysis shows that transparency about the integrity of institutions is key to fighting corruption, and that vigilance against corruption must be maintained despite its cost, even when corruption levels appear to be low.

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Education trumps age-structure in terms of providing a demographic dividend

The relationship between population changes and economic growth has been a controversial topic among demographers for many years. A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America today, challenges the dominant view that fertility decline and changes in age structure are key drivers of economic growth.

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Medical marijuana does not reduce opioid deaths, Stanford study finds

Legalizing medical marijuana does not reduce the rate of fatal opioid overdoses, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Past climate change pushed birds from the northern hemisphere to the tropics

Researchers have shown how millions of years of climate change affected the range and habitat of modern birds, suggesting that many groups of tropical birds may be relatively recent arrivals in their equatorial homes.

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Structuring sweetness: What makes Stevia 200 times sweeter than sugar

New research from Washington University in St. Louis reveals the molecular machinery behind the high-intensity sweetness of the stevia plant. The results could be used to engineer new non-caloric products without the aftertaste that many associate with sweetener marketed as Stevia.

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Scientists discover unlikely culprit for fertilizing North Pacific Ocean: Asian dust

The vast subtropical 'gyres' — large systems of rotating currents in the middle of the oceans — cover 40% of the Earth's surface and have long been considered biological deserts with stratified waters that contain very little nutrients to sustain life.

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The World’s Most Advanced Gut Microbiome Test is Changing Our Approach to Gut Health

You’ve probably noticed that TV doctors and natural health bloggers like to recommend all sorts of foods, beverages, and probiotic products that supposedly improve gut health. Unfortunately, while the science behind gut health is legit, a lot of these recommendations are not. Why? Because, just like the genome, everyone’s gut microbiome is unique , so what’s good for someone else might not necess

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Just my type: why new partners are often like exes

Study suggests people’s current and former partners tend to be similar in character When a friend or relative introduces their new partner, it can seem like a case of deja vu. Now research has backed up what many have long suspected: people really do have a type when it comes to coupling up. Psychologists say they have found that people tend to go for partners with personalities similar to their

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Best E3 Game and Console Sales (2019): Switch, PS4, PC, Xbox

E3 2019 is packed with gaming news, but it's also a time for killer deals. These are our favorites.

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New study shows how climate change could affect impact of roundworms on grasslands

Soil food webs play a key role in supporting grassland ecosystems, which cover about one-quarter of the land on Earth. Climate change poses a threat to these environments, partly because of the uncertainty of extremes in rainfall, which is projected to increase.

1h

Past climate change pushed birds from the northern hemisphere to the tropics

Researchers have shown how millions of years of climate change affected the range and habitat of modern birds, suggesting that many groups of tropical birds may be relatively recent arrivals in their equatorial homes.

1h

Scientists discover unlikely culprit for fertilizing North Pacific Ocean: Asian dust

The vast subtropical "gyres—large systems of rotating currents in the middle of the oceans—cover 40 percent of the Earth's surface and have long been considered biological deserts with stratified waters that contain very little nutrients to sustain life.

1h

Part-time work is humane and should be respected and encouraged

I woke up on a recent Tuesday morning and, while my husband got ready for work, I fixed some not-quite-healthy breakfast for the kids, harangued them until they brushed their teeth and put on shoes and socks, and drove them to school. Then I took the car to the mechanic for a minor repair and walked back to the house. Before starting my day of work, I made some calls to medical providers about ou

1h

New study shows how climate change could affect impact of roundworms on grasslands

Soil food webs play a key role in supporting grassland ecosystems, which cover about one-quarter of the land on Earth. Climate change poses a threat to these environments, partly because of the uncertainty of extremes in rainfall, which is projected to increase.

1h

Past climate change pushed birds from the northern hemisphere to the tropics

Researchers have shown how millions of years of climate change affected the range and habitat of modern birds, suggesting that many groups of tropical birds may be relatively recent arrivals in their equatorial homes.

1h

Hamsters take cues from decreasing day length to prepare for the long winter

Analysis of the first fully-sequenced genome of the Siberian hamster shows how these small, seasonal breeders adapt their bodies and energy usage to survive the winter.

1h

Structuring sweetness: What makes Stevia 200 times sweeter than sugar

New research from Washington University in St. Louis reveals the molecular machinery behind the high-intensity sweetness of the stevia plant. The results could be used to engineer new non-caloric products without the aftertaste that many associate with sweetener marketed as Stevia.

1h

The Misplaced Optimism in Legal Pot

Nearly five years ago, a team of researchers performing a study on medical cannabis came to a startling conclusion: The 13 states that had legalized medical marijuana had a 25 percent lower rate of opioid mortality than those that hadn’t. The study wasn’t designed to find an explanation for the trend, but the authors speculated that, perhaps, some chronic-pain patients who otherwise would have go

1h

Mountain-dwellers can adapt to melting glaciers without caring about climate change

For many people, climate change feels like a distant threat — something that happens far away, or far off in the future. Scientists and climate communicators often think that if everyone saw the devastating impacts of climate change, we'd all be more likely to accept it as real, and that accepting climate science is essential to taking action against it. A new study, published this month in Regio

1h

Hamsters take cues from decreasing day length to prepare for the long winter

Analysis of the first fully-sequenced genome of the Siberian hamster shows how these small, seasonal breeders adapt their bodies and energy usage to survive the winter.

1h

Structuring sweetness: What makes Stevia 200 times sweeter than sugar

New research from Washington University in St. Louis reveals the molecular machinery behind the high-intensity sweetness of the stevia plant. The results could be used to engineer new non-caloric products without the aftertaste that many associate with sweetener marketed as Stevia.

1h

Exploring the causes of persistent corruption

Corruption impedes equitable development, destabilizes societies, and undermines the institutions and values of democracy. It is viewed by many as one of the world's greatest problems. According to a Gallup poll, a majority of people even place its negative impacts ahead of global problems like climate change, poverty and terrorism.

1h

Education trumps age-structure in terms of providing a demographic dividend

The relationship between population changes and economic growth has been a controversial topic among demographers for many years. A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences today challenges the dominant view that fertility decline and changes in age structure are key drivers of economic growth.

1h

Trailblazing findings on the properties of daguerreotypes

The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met) and The University of New Mexico (UNM) today announced the groundbreaking findings of a two-year study of the plasmonic properties of daguerreotypes.

1h

We Drink Basically The Same Wine As Ancient Romans — And That's Not So Great

Many of today's most popular wine varieties are extremely genetically similar to wines that may have existed for thousands of years, a new study finds. In the face of climate change, that's risky. (Image credit: Leemage/Corbis via Getty Images)

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How cryptocurrency discussions spread

PNNL data scientist, Dr. Svitlana Volkova, the team analyzed three years of discussions on Reddit from January 2015 to January 2018. The team measured the speed and scale of discussion spread related to Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Monero cryptocurrencies.

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Canada Plans to Ban Single-Use Plastics, Joining Growing Global Movement

“People have had enough of seeing their parks and beaches covered with plastic,” said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Monday.

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Smart ways to manage updates on Windows and macOS

DIY Updates: They're what computers crave. Both Windows and macOS let you take control of how you download and install important updates—here's what you need to know.

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The chickenpox vaccine keeps kids safe from more than just itchy red spots

Health Shingles is even less fun than it sounds. Chickenpox used to be practically a childhood rite. You'd sleep on the couch, lie about not scratching your spots, get an oatmeal bath—it was a whole thing. But since…

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10 ways cities are tackling the global affordable housing crisis

The unprecedented rate of urbanization across the world has led to increased demand for good, affordable housing. A recent survey revealed that of 200 cities polled around the globe, 90% were considered unaffordable when applying the widely-used standard of average house prices being more than three-times median income. Affordability is not just about the ability to buy or rent a home, but also a

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A Judge Rules Against One Stem-Cell Clinic. There Are Hundreds of Them.

In a long-sought victory for the F.D.A., a federal judge said officials have the authority to regulate stem-cell treatments made from patients’ own fat.

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Sellers on classified ad websites favor buyers from affluent neighborhoods

New Rice University research has found that people selling stuff on classified ad websites prefer dealing with buyers from affluent neighborhoods.

2h

Radiation treatment increases cardiac risk for lung cancer patients

As advances in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) extend patients' lives, more of these patients are facing a different threat: adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks and heart failure.

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Russian Space Chief: We Would Never Hire Elon Musk

Dirty Laundry Russia’s space agency and SpaceX aren’t friends. It’s a strained relationship pockmarked by passive aggressive exchanges and trash talk. Now, Russian state-owned media network Russia Today reports that the head of Russian space agency Roscomos, Dmitry Rogozin, says he has no interest in hiring SpaceX CEO Elon Musk to help with reusable rocketry — not, to be clear, that he was lookin

2h

Bug-eating pitcher plants found to consume young salamanders, too

Pitcher plants growing in wetlands across Canada have long been known to eat creatures — mostly insects and spiders — that fall into their bell-shaped leaves and decompose in rainwater collected there. But researchers have discovered that vertebrates — specifically, salamanders — are also part of their diet.

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New Study Explains How Big Holes Form in Antarctic Ice Despite the Cold

New Study Explains How Big Holes Form in Antarctic Ice Despite the Cold These massive holes in the ice, known as polynyas, may appear more often as climate change advances. Seal-With-Tracker.jpg Image credits: Dan Costa /University of California, Santa Cruz Earth Monday, June 10, 2019 – 13:15 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — By analyzing data from seaborne robots and sensors glued

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Fiber-optic probe can see molecular bonds

Engineers have developed the world's first portable, inexpensive, optical nanoscopy tool that integrates a glass optical fiber with a silver nanowire condenser. The device is a high-efficiency round-trip light tunnel that squeezes visible light to the very tip of the condenser to interact with molecules locally and send back information that can decipher and visualize the elusive nanoworld.

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EPA Head Targets "Worst-Case" Climate Scenarios

Administrator Wheeler has called such projections unrealistic, but experts say they are most in line with current emissions trends — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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GMO Wheat Escapes Lab, Grows in the Wild

Planted Evidence In the late-1990s, agriculture company Monsanto began developing wheat genetically modified to resist the company’s Roundup weed killer . Monsanto ended the project in 2004, and to this day, no one is allowed to sell genetically modified wheat in the United States. But on Friday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the discovery of Roundup-resistant GM wheat growing in a

2h

Fiber-optic probe can see molecular bonds

Engineers have developed the world's first portable, inexpensive, optical nanoscopy tool that integrates a glass optical fiber with a silver nanowire condenser. The device is a high-efficiency round-trip light tunnel that squeezes visible light to the very tip of the condenser to interact with molecules locally and send back information that can decipher and visualize the elusive nanoworld.

2h

Stephen Hawking Was Right: Black Holes Can Evaporate, Weird New Study Shows

Researchers used a sonic black hole to confirm one of Stephen Hawking's theories.

2h

Night owls can 'retrain' their body clocks to improve mental well-being and performance

A simple tweak to the sleeping patterns of 'night owls' — people with extreme late sleeping and waking habits — could lead to significant improvements in sleep/wake timings, improved performance in the mornings, better eating habits and a decrease in depression and stress.

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Samsung's $400 CRG5 brings 240Hz, G-Sync compatibility to 27-inch curved monitor – CNET

At E3, Samsung debuted its first G-Sync-Compatible display.

2h

The mantis shrimp's perfect shield

The shield-like tail segment, or telson, of the smasher mantis shrimp is a multiscale structure with ridges on the outside and a structure shaped like a spiral staircase on the inside. It's inspiring a new class of lightweight, impact-resistant materials for helmets, cars, and more

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Keeping Your TV on at Night May Lead to Weight Gain

Exposure to light at night — from the glare of a bedroom TV or a street light through a window — may increase the risk of weight gain and obesity in women.

2h

Last month was hottest May in more than a century in Florida

A steadfast carousel of high pressure over Florida last month led to the warmest May in more than a century with an average temperature nearly four degrees above what's normal for the fifth month of the year.

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A new candidate for dark matter and a way to detect it

Two theoretical physicists at UC Davis have a new candidate for dark matter and a possible way to detect it.

3h

NASA catches development of Tropical Cyclone 02A

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite provided confirmation of the development of Tropical Cyclone 02A in the Arabian Sea, Northern Indian Ocean.

3h

Pneumonia mapped in largest genomic survey of any disease-causing bacterium

Researchers have mapped the most common bacterial cause of pneumonia around the world and revealed how these bacteria evolve in response to vaccination. Scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators carried out a global genomic survey of Streptococcus pneumoniae, discovering 621 strains across more than fifty countries. Published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, the study

3h

How electrical stimulation reorganizes the brain

Recordings of neural activity during therapeutic stimulation can be used to predict subsequent changes in brain connectivity, according to a study of epilepsy patients published in JNeurosci. This approach could inform efforts to improve brain stimulation treatments for depression and other psychiatric disorders.

3h

Anyone can program this cheap robot arm in just 15 minutes

Automata hopes its inexpensive devices can bring automation to companies that usually wouldn’t be able to afford high-end robotics.

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Pixel 4 Leak Shows Off Huge Camera Hump, Missing Fingerprint Sensor

The fourth-gen Pixels are still shrouded in mystery, but a new leak courtesy of OnLeaks does reveal a few details. One thing we can say for sure is the Pixel 4 will have a big-honkin' camera …

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Choosing the Wrong Lane in the Race to 5G

Opinion: The US should be focusing on building 5G networks with mid-band spectrum, because it will support faster, cheaper, and more ubiquitous deployment.

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Paralysis on America’s Rivers: There’s Too Much Water

Fast currents and swollen channels have made many of the nation’s rivers unsafe for commercial traffic, spreading economic pain from a spring of severe flooding.

3h

Insys, the Opioid Drug Maker, Files for Bankruptcy

The company recently settled with the federal government over claims it illegally marketed its fentanyl painkiller.

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Ancient Grape DNA Tells the Prolific History of Wine

Grape seeds dating back to medieval and Roman periods share many similarities with the wine grapes we enjoy today

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Up to 30 percent off Greenworks lawn gear and other sweet deals happening today

Gadgets The low-down on the day's best bargains. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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Photos: Massive Protests in Hong Kong

Hundreds of thousands of protesters shut down parts of Hong Kong yesterday, marching against a proposed law that would allow extradition to China. Organizers claim that more than 1 million demonstrators took to the streets to denounce the proposal, the largest such public demonstration in years. The city’s pro-Beijing leadership is showing no signs of backing down. As reported by the Associated P

3h

Boy Scouts Are Holding Together a War-Torn Country

I f you venture outside Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, it’s dangerous to travel alone. Journeying from village to village means navigating jungle or savanna without paved roads or reliable communication networks. CAR straddles one of the world’s largest magnetic anomalies, so compasses often err. And conflict among more than a dozen armed religious groups has balkanized the

3h

Millennials are 'canaries in the coalmine' for toxic economic trends

A new report by Stanford scholars lays out the problems US millennials face as a result of decades-long rising inequality. Problems they experience include rising mortality rates and increased poverty among those without college degrees.

3h

Molecular chatter makes for a 'hot tumor'

A Ludwig Cancer Research study has deciphered a complex molecular conversation between cancer and immune cells that is key to orchestrating the successful invasion of tumors by T cells that kill cancer cells.

3h

Astronomers Discover “Deep Structure” Under Moon’s Largest Crater

Mass Anomaly A team of astronomers found a “large excess of mass” under the Moon’s largest crater, the Aitken basin — likely a relic from an ancient asteroid impact event, but perhaps something much stranger. “Imagine taking a pile of metal five times larger than the Big Island of Hawaii and burying it underground,” said lead author Peter B. James from Baylor University in Waco, Texas in a statem

3h

One change can make diet more planet friendly

Food production is an important contributor to climate change, accounting for about a quarter of carbon emissions globally. According to a study that examined the real-world diets of thousands of people in the U.S., we could greatly reduce the carbon footprint of what we eat by changing just one food each day.

3h

Apple lets users track menstrual period cycles on Health app, Watch with software update

Within the variety of announcements made at the Worldwide Developers Conference this week, Apple revealed it will be adding new menstrual tracking software to the Health app with the upcoming iOS 13 and Watch OS 6 update.

3h

Razer Launches Its Own Energy Drink Called Respawn

What should you be drinking when you’re engrossed in a serious gaming session with your Razer mouse and keyboard on your Razer gaming PC? A Razer energy drink. What had originally started …

3h

Salesforce buying Tableau Software in $15.7B all-stock deal

Customer-management software developer Salesforce is buying Tableau Software in an all-stock deal valued at $15.7 billion.

3h

Study finds FDA dermatology advisors receive payments following drug approvals

A team of researchers examined post-advisory financial relationships between US physicians who advised FDA committees during dermatological drug approval processes. Critics of these industry-physician relationships claim these types of payments could incentivize advisors to alter their voting habits.

3h

Combating mosquito-borne diseases with bacteria

Viruses, spread through mosquito bites, cause human illnesses such as dengue fever, Zika and yellow fever. A new control technique harnesses a naturally occurring bacterium called Wolbachia that blocks replication of viruses and breaks the cycle of mosquito-borne disease, according to an international team of researchers.

3h

Biggest Meteorite Impact in the UK Found Buried in Water and Rock

Scientists have finally located the site of the biggest meteorite collision in the U.K.

3h

The Last Black Man in San Francisco Is an Elegy for a City

The city at the heart of Joe Talbot’s new film, The Last Black Man in San Francisco , is depicted with equal parts whimsy and despair. The opening images track a little girl, dressed up for school, as she skips along the bay, with a soft oboe score playing on the soundtrack. As she runs, she zips by police tape and men in hazmat suits who are engaged in the cleanup of the toxic water behind her.

3h

The First Murder Case to Use Family Tree Forensics Goes to Trial

A 32-year-old murder case has its first arrest after police turn to genetic genealogy. The technique's legality is now getting scrutiny in the courtroom.

3h

Biomarker predicts if pancreatic cysts will become cancer

A biomarker can predict with 95 percent accuracy the likelihood that a pancreatic cyst will become cancerous, a new study reports. Pancreatic cancer kills more than 45,000 people in the US each year, mostly because doctors detect cysts too late to surgically remove them and halt cancer’s spread. Cysts in the pancreas sometimes develop into invasive cancer, but not always. This creates a quandary

3h

Spectrographic analysis yields empirical benchmark for newborn 'hot Jupiter'

CI Tau b is a paradoxical planet, but new research about its mass, brightness and the carbon monoxide in its atmosphere is starting to answer questions about how a planet so large could have formed around a star that's only 2 million years old.

3h

Canada Joins Global Movement to Ban Single-Use Plastics

“People have had enough of seeing their parks and beaches covered with plastic,” said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Monday.

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Trump: “NASA Should NOT be Talking About Going to the Moon”

Message Received Since becoming president of the United States, Donald Trump has had a lot to say about space — but his latest tweet on the subject might be his most confusing yet. “For all of the money we are spending, NASA should NOT be talking about going to the Moon — We did that 50 years ago,” he tweeted on Friday, including his signature capitalization of seemingly random words. “They shoul

3h

Researchers 'stretch' the ability of 2-D materials to change technology

Two-dimensional (2-D) materials—as thin as a single layer of atoms—have intrigued scientists with their flexibility, elasticity, and unique electronic properties, as first discovered in materials such as graphene in 2004. Some of these materials can be especially susceptible to changes in their material properties as they are stretched and pulled. Under applied strain, they have been predicted to

3h

People with gambling problems seem to spend more on in-game loot boxes

When the makers of Heroes of the Storm removed loot boxes from their game, in-game spending decreased but only among problem gamblers

3h

Keanu Reeves Showed Up at E3 to Say He's in 'Cyberpunk 2077'

People cannot keep their chill about the actor's surprise appearance. Also, 'Dark Phoenix' bombed at the box office.

4h

Powerful lasers for fragile works of art

"Time alters all things," wrote the Latin poet Horace. Museum conservators would love to prove him wrong. Protecting artworks from the effects of aging requires an understanding of the way materials alter over time. Professor Patrizio Antici of Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) has developed a new diagnostic and analytical method for use in cultural conservation, putting his sc

4h

Multicolored light twists in new knotted ways

Around age six, we start learning how to tie our shoelaces, making knots that look like ribbons—or possibly more complex forms, if we are a little clumsy. We use knots every day, but the type of knots we generally use are associated with physical objects, things we can touch.

4h

New study dramatically narrows the search for advanced life in the universe

Scientists may need to rethink their estimates for how many planets outside our solar system could host a rich diversity of life.

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Antennas of flexible nanotube films an alternative for electronics

Metal-free antennas made of thin, strong, flexible carbon nanotube films are as efficient as common copper antennas, according to Rice University researchers.

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Researchers 'stretch' the ability of 2D materials to change technology

Two-dimensional (2D) materials — as thin as a single layer of atoms — have intrigued scientists with their flexibility, elasticity, and unique electronic properties. Now, University of Rochester researchers have combined 2D materials with oxide materials in a new way, using a transistor-scale device platform, to fully explore the capabilities of these changeable 2D materials to transform electro

4h

Sleeping with artificial light at night associated with weight gain in women

Sleeping with a television or light on in the room may be a risk factor for gaining weight or developing obesity, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health. The research, published online June 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine, is the first to find an association between sleeping with artificial light at night and weight gain in women. The results suggest that cutting off lights at b

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Direct from distant planet: Spectral clues to puzzling paradox

CI Tau b is a paradoxical planet, but new research about its mass, brightness and the carbon monoxide in its atmosphere is starting to answer questions about how a planet so large could have formed around a star that's only 2 million years old.

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One change can make diet more planet friendly

Food production is an important contributor to climate change, accounting for about a quarter of carbon emissions globally. According to a study that examined the real-world diets of thousands of people in the US, we could greatly reduce the carbon footprint of what we eat by changing just one food each day.

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Big Little Lies Ponders What Makes a Man

This article contains spoilers through Season 2, Episode 1 of Big Little Lies . The women of Big Little Lies spend their lives picking up the pieces men leave behind. In its first season , which was initially conceptualized as a stand-alone adaptation of the Liane Moriarty novel, the HBO series earned both critical acclaim and a touch of gendered condescension as it introduced viewers to five wom

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We Need To Get Serious about "Critical Materials"

The U.S. needs to widen its consideration of critical materials past a limited understanding of security in a deeply interconnected world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Necklace Made of Defleshed Human Skull Discovered in Mayan Warrior Tomb

Grisly war trophies made from the heads of vanquished enemies certainly grab attention. But archaeologists are more interested in what they may tell about a tumultuous time of shifting political power.

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Cyber of the fittest: Researchers develop first cyber agility framework to measure attacks

For more than a year, GozNym, a gang of five Russian cyber criminals, stole login credentials and emptied bank accounts from unaware Americans. To detect and quickly respond to escalating cyber-attacks like these, researchers at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) have developed the first framework to score the agility of cyber attackers and defenders. The cyber agility project was funde

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DNA base editing induces substantial off-target RNA mutations

In a study published in Nature on June 10, researchers from Dr. Yang Hui's Lab at the Institute of Neuroscience of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and collaborators from the CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology of CAS and Sichuan University demonstrated that DNA base editors generated tens of thousands of off-target RNA single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and these off-target S

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London Zoo Defends Return of Late-Night Parties Among the Animals

Activists say the mix of alcohol and music at the event, which is intended to bring visitors closer to the wildlife and raise conservation funds, is inappropriate.

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Settling the debate: Solving the electronic surface states of samarium hexaboride

Researchers show that samarium hexaboride is a topological insulator, which allows electrons to flow only along its exterior surface. Together with its strong electron correlations, this material has potential to be used in future spintronic quantum devices that utilize the spins of individual electrons.

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Genealogy companies could struggle to keep clients’ data from police

Police probably won’t stop searching DNA family trees to find crime suspects. New restrictions on database searches could spur more fights over privacy.

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DNA base editing induces substantial off-target RNA mutations

In a study published in Nature on June 10, researchers from Dr. Yang Hui's Lab at the Institute of Neuroscience of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and collaborators from the CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology of CAS and Sichuan University demonstrated that DNA base editors generated tens of thousands of off-target RNA single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and these off-target S

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A Republican Explains Why Clinton Was Guilty and Trump Is Not

When the House Judiciary Committee meets today for the start of hearings that could lead to the impeachment of President Donald Trump, two of the 17 Republicans on the dais will find themselves in a familiar position, having been deeply involved in the last formal attempt to remove a president from office. Representative Steve Chabot of Ohio, along with Representative James Sensenbrenner of Wisco

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Dramatic change in ancient nomad diets coincides with expansion of networks across Eurasia

A meta-analysis of dietary information recorded in the bones of ancient animals and humans recovered from sites scattered across the Eurasian steppe, from the Caucasus region to Mongolia, demonstrates that pastoralists spread domesticated crops across the steppe through their trade and social networks. Researchers from Kiel University sifted through previously published stable isotopic data and ap

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Clarifying the economic value of adjusting power consumption

Since the output of renewable energy such as photovoltaic generation tends to fluctuate, the power system can be viewed as a large-scale complex system with uncertainty. To stabilize the balance of supply and demand of electricity, we need an energy management system to control this. In recent years, energy management systems have been actively researched against the background of the liberalizati

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What Does It Mean To Lose A Pregnancy?

Some estimates say up to one in four women will have a miscarriage during their lives. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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We Need To Get Serious about "Critical Materials"

The U.S. needs to widen its consideration of critical materials past a limited understanding of security in a deeply interconnected world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists make case for stabilizing forest carbon to help mitigate climate change

There's no doubt that climate change is affecting ecosystems as well as the lifestyles of plants and animals around the globe. As temperatures rise, so do the complexity of the issues. Scientists, both in the United States and around the world, are actively pursuing mitigation solutions while providing governments with the understanding of natural hazards to help stem the effects of climate change

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Snow monitoring at the Sierra Nevada peaks offer the first medium-term data sets

When the Fluvial Dynamics and Hydrology research group at the University of Cordoba, led by Professor María José Polo, got to the Spanish Sierra Nevada in 2002, there were no weather stations above the height of 1,200 meters, meaning that there was a great deal of uncertainty regarding the measurements of everything that happened in the field of meteorology and hydrology between 1,200 meters and M

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The common wisdom about marketing cocreated innovations is wrong

Researchers from the University of Hong Kong, University of Tennessee, University of British Columbia, and Arizona State University published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that seeks the optimal strategy for communicating the value of cocreated innovations in order to drive consumer purchase and acceptance in the marketplace.

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Engineers use graph networks to accurately predict properties of molecules and crystals

Nanoengineers have developed new deep learning models that can accurately predict the properties of molecules and crystals. The models can enable researchers to rapidly scan the nearly-infinite universe of compounds to discover potentially transformative materials for various applications, such as high-energy density Li-ion batteries, warm-white LEDs, and better photovoltaics.

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Scientist makes case for stabilizing forest carbon to help mitigate climate change

There's no doubt that climate change is affecting ecosystems as well as the lifestyles of plants and animals around the globe. As temperatures rise, so do the complexity of the issues. Scientists, both in the United States and around the world, are actively pursuing mitigation solutions while providing governments with the understanding of natural hazards to help stem the effects of climate change

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Tart cherry shown to decrease joint pain, sore muscles in some breast cancer patients

Tart cherry reduces the musculoskeletal effects of aromatase inhibitors in patients with non-metastatic breast cancer, according to new findings.

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Mass anomaly detected under the moon's largest crater

A mysterious large mass of material has been discovered beneath the largest crater in our solar system — the Moon's South Pole-Aitken basin — and may contain metal from the asteroid that crashed into the Moon and formed the crater, according to a new study.

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Scientists make case for stabilizing forest carbon to help mitigate climate change

There's no doubt that climate change is affecting ecosystems as well as the lifestyles of plants and animals around the globe. As temperatures rise, so do the complexity of the issues. Scientists, both in the United States and around the world, are actively pursuing mitigation solutions while providing governments with the understanding of natural hazards to help stem the effects of climate change

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Google Stadia Game Streaming Service To Offer Publisher Subscriptions

Google Stadia, Google’s upcoming gaming service, was officially announced last week. Although it is not a subscription-based service, it will offer several compelling features. Google Stadia …

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Researchers develop new metamaterial that can improve MRI quality and reduce scan time

Could a small ringlike structure made of plastic and copper amplify the already powerful imaging capabilities of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine? Xin Zhang, Stephan Anderson, and their team at the Boston University Photonics Center can clearly picture such a feat. With their combined expertise in engineering, materials science, and medical imaging, Zhang and Anderson, along with Guangwu

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What if dark matter is lighter? Report calls for small experiments to broaden the hunt

The search for dark matter is expanding. And going small.

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S.African green groups sue government over air pollution

Two South African environmental groups are suing the government over air pollution in the northeastern province of Mpumalanga, where 83 percent of the country's coal is mined, their lawyer said Monday.

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Men Aren’t Quite Sure How to Be Abortion-Rights Activists

On a Wednesday night in late May, 44-year-old Matt Garbett of Atlanta attended a meeting held by NARAL Pro-Choice America, a prominent abortion-rights group, at the urging of a female friend who is active in the local chapter. A few weeks earlier, both Georgia and Alabama had taken measures to restrict access to abortion. Garbett had always believed that Americans should have the right to get an

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Wracked by an opioid scandal, Insys files for bankruptcy

American drug maker Insys announced on Monday it was filing for bankruptcy and will sell its assets as it faces legal and financial fallout from its role in the opioid crisis.

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Supreme Court sides with Alabama company in patent dispute

The Supreme Court sided Monday with an Alabama technology company over the U.S. Postal Service in a patent dispute.

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Powerful lasers for fragile works of art

Protecting artworks from the effects of aging requires an understanding of the way materials alter over time. Professor Patrizio Antici of Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) has developed a new diagnostic and analytical method for use in cultural conservation, putting his scientific knowledge of lasers and particle accelerators to work for the art world. He describes the new met

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Dramatic change in ancient nomad diets coincides with expansion of networks across Eurasia

Strengthening of political networks coincided with the intensification of agricultural production, resulting in the widespread adoption of millet by populations across Eurasia.

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Wellcome Sanger Institute to Close Animal Facility

The move reflects scientists using more cell lines and organoids in genetic research, although some experts disagree with the decision to scale back the use of animal models.

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A 16-Million-Year-Old Tree Tells a Deep Story of the Passage of Time

To explain the exceedingly long life of the planet, the Smithsonian’s new fossil hall designers began with this arboreal wonder

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Study counters narrative that street homeless are 'service resistant'

A team of researchers from the NYU Silver School of Social Work has found that bureaucratic barriers rather than personal intransigence lead many street homeless people in New York City to refuse outreach workers' offers of shelter.

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The Potential Influence of the 2020 U.S. Election Outcome on the 2020s decade.

I tend to view this election especially as a two-way fork in the road: we can either be propelled swiftly into a more progressive decade or perhaps a more stagnant, regressive, yet very rocky decade. Clearly, we don't know who will be the two final competing candidates, yet, so this could vary. ​ What are your predictions on how the next decade in the United States will be shaped by the 2020 elec

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Lessons on how autonomous air and land vehicles change our lives

Hi! We just launched a new podcast and blog called ThinkingThroughAutonomy! This is a home for original thought and analysis of how technology impacts our lives, jobs, and the environment. Here's some of our latest: KEY LESSONS IN URBAN MOBILITY : Stan Caldwell from CMU shares the lessons he and his colleagues are learning as they investigate new urban mobility technologies. In the chase to lever

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Training robots to relieve chronic pain

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Alternative meat seen as potentially juicy business

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A German Circus Uses Stunning Holograms Instead of Live Animal Performers

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Can We Travel Faster Than Light? with Dr. Miguel Alcubierre

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Grape expectations: DNA reveals history of vintage wine

The French were probably sipping wines we drink today 900 years ago, according to DNA from old grapes.

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People with a gambling problem spend more on in-game loot boxes

When the makers of Heroes of the Storm removed loot boxes from their game, in-game spending decreased but only among problem gamblers

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Humans have driven nearly 600 plant species to extinction since 1750s

Plants have been hard hit by human activity over the past 250 years, with Hawaii alone losing 79 species. Other extinction hotspots include Brazil and Australia

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The Ocean Is Sinking into Earth’s Mantle, and a Dead Supercontinent Is Partly to Blame

Water sinking into the ocean floor has contributed to 400 feet of sea level loss since the destruction of the supercontinent Pangaea, a new study shows.

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Multicolored light twists in new knotted ways

ICFO researchers report on the discovery of a new type of optical singularity with the topology of a knot.

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DNA base editing induces substantial off-target RNA mutations

Researchers from Dr. YANG Hui's Lab at the Institute of Neuroscience of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and collaborators from the CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology of CAS and Sichuan University demonstrated that DNA base editors generated tens of thousands of off-target RNA single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and these off-target SNVs could be eliminated by introducing poin

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Machine learning approach for low-dose CT imaging yields superior results

Machine learning has the potential to vastly advance medical imaging, particularly computerized tomography (CT) scanning, by reducing radiation exposure and improving image quality. Those new research findings will be published Monday in Nature Machine Intelligence by engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and radiologists at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

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Our brains appear uniquely tuned for musical pitch

In the eternal search for understanding what makes us human, scientists found that our brains are more sensitive to pitch, the harmonic sounds we hear when listening to music, than our evolutionary relative the macaque monkey. The study, funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, highlights the promise of Sound Health, a joint project between the NIH and the John F. Kennedy Center for th

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Fiber-optic probe can see molecular bonds

Engineers at UC Riverside have developed the world's first portable, inexpensive, optical nanoscopy tool that integrates a glass optical fiber with a silver nanowire condenser. The device is a high-efficiency round-trip light tunnel that squeezes visible light to the very tip of the condenser to interact with molecules locally and send back information that can decipher and visualize the elusive n

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Magnetism: An unexpected push for the hydrogen economy

For the first time, scientists have applied a magnetic field that directly enhanced the production of hydrogen via water splitting. The results have been published in Nature Energy.The simplicity of the discovery opens opportunities for implementing magnetic enhancement in water splitting, bringing the hydrogen-based economy closer.The catalysts use earth-abundant elements and avoid the use of cri

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A new picture of dengue's growing threat

New research shows the expanded risk of dengue virus infection through 2080, with detailed maps for 2020, 2050 and 2080. The paper is the first to use the projected spread of mosquitoes that carry the virus to inform the models. Unlike some past models, the results do not predict a large expansion of risk in Europe.

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Mysterious holes in Antarctic sea ice explained by years of robotic data

Why did a giant hole appear in the sea ice off Antarctica in 2016 and 2017, after decades of more typical sea ice cover? Years of Southern Ocean data have explained the phenomenon, helping oceanographers to better predict these features and study their role in global ocean cycles.

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The cholera bacterium's 3-in-1 toolkit for life in the ocean

The cholera bacterium uses a grappling hook-like appendage to take up DNA, bind to nutritious surfaces and recognize 'family' members, EPFL scientists have found. These discoveries will advance our understanding of how the bacterium that causes cholera adapts and survives in its natural environment.

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Our water cycle diagrams give a false sense of water security

Pictures of the earth's water cycle used in education and research throughout the world are in urgent need of updating to show the effects of human interference, according to new analysis by an international team of hydrology experts.

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To protect kids and teens from firearm harm, answer these question first, experts

Firearm injuries kill more American children and teens than anything else, except automobile crashes. But research on how those injuries happen, who's most likely to suffer or die from one, or what steps would prevent them, has lagged behind research on other causes of death. Now, as more researchers and funders appear interested in pediatric firearm injury research, a team of experts has publishe

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Exposure to artificial light at night while sleeping and women's weight

Exposure to artificial light at night, especially sleeping with a light or television on in the room, was associated with increased risk of weight gain and overweight and obesity among a large group of women studied.

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Astronomers determine mass of small black hole at center of nearby galaxy

If astronomers want to learn about how supermassive black holes form, they have to start small — really small, astronomically speaking.

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Mount Sinai study reports asthma control in older patients and shows lower ED visits

Mount Sinai was part of the largest clinical trial for asthma self-management support in older patients, which resulted in improved control and quality of life, and fewer emergency department visits.

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Study finds macrophages' pathway to nurture PTEN-deficient glioblastoma

A common genetic deficiency empowers glioblastoma to broadcast a molecular message to the wrong type of immune cell, summoning macrophages that protect and nurture the brain tumor instead of attacking it, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Cancer Cell.

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AI software reveals the inner workings of short-term memory

Research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows how short-term, working memory uses networks of neurons differently depending on the complexity of the task at hand.

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Scientists discover gene that could help us grow crops faster

Plant scientists at the universities of Cambridge and Bordeaux have discovered a gene that they hope can be used to widen a nutrient trafficking bottleneck and potentially increase crop yields.

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Deceptively simple: Minute marine animals live in a sophisticated symbiosis with bacteria

Trichoplax, one of the simplest animals on Earth, lives in a highly specific and intimate symbiosis with two types of bacteria. One, Grellia, is related to parasitic bacteria that cause typhus and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. However, it does not appear to harm Trichoplax. The other, Ruthmannia, sits inside the cells Trichoplax uses to digest its food. This symbiosis provides a window into microb

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Technique pulls interstellar magnetic fields within easy reach

A new, more accessible and much cheaper approach to surveying the topology and strength of interstellar magnetic fields — which weave through space in our galaxy and beyond, representing one of the most potent forces in nature — has been developed by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Ancient DNA from Roman and medieval grape seeds reveal ancestry of wine making

A grape variety still used in wine production in France today can be traced back 900 years to just one ancestral plant, scientists have discovered.

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Light energy and biomass can be converted to diesel fuel and hydrogen

A research group led by Professor WANG Feng at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed a method to produce diesel fuel and hydrogen by exploiting light energy (solar energy or artificial light energy) and biomass-derived feedstocks.

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Safe to breastfeed while on bipolar meds? Jury's still out

Women taking lithium to treat their bipolar disorder frequently ask if breastfeeding while on the medication will harm their babies. Those fears are largely rooted in sparse studies that have not addressed critical factors, reports a new Northwestern Medicine systematic review.

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Judicial Review Solves a Problem of Power

Progressives do not want Donald Trump, Mitch McConnell, or other powerful Republicans to ignore the Supreme Court when they disagree with its rulings. Doing so would upend a constitutional order that has prevailed for more than 200 years . Under judicial review––the courts’ ability to check the constitutional validity of laws that legislative majorities pass and executives sign––the postwar Supre

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Fiat Chrysler in talks with Aurora on autonomous vehicles

Fiat Chrysler is in talks to produce self-driving commercial vehicles with Aurora, an autonomous vehicle company led by former Google, Tesla and Uber executives.

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Ancient DNA Study Reveals Deep Roots of Modern Grapevines

New research into the genetic backstory of ancient French grapevines reveals that some varieties cultivated today haven't changed for centuries. (Credit: Victor Grigas/Wikimedia Commons) Consider …

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Ancient DNA Study Reveals Deep Roots of Modern Grapevines

New research into the genetic backstory of ancient French grapevines reveals that some varieties cultivated today haven't changed for centuries. (Credit: Victor Grigas/Wikimedia Commons) Consider this the next time you toast a friend and wish them long life: The wine swishing around your glass may have come from grapevines with very long-lived lineages indeed. Researchers analyzing genetic materia

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Steak made from insect meat? Yum!

Nexus Media News One scientist’s quest to turn lab-grown insect protein into burgers and bratwursts. The meat industry is a major contributor to climate pollution. One scientist has a buggy idea for how to change that.

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‘Frightening’ number of plant extinctions found in global survey

Study shows 571 species wiped out, and scientists say figure is likely to be big underestimate Human destruction of the living world is causing a “frightening” number of plant extinctions, according to scientists who have completed the first global analysis of the issue. They found 571 species had definitely been wiped out since 1750 but with knowledge of many plant species still very limited the

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900-year-old grape pips reveal unbroken history of French wine variety

DNA testing shows 900-year-old savagnin blanc vines identical to modern plants Today’s drinkers might have more in common with medieval boozers than simply a hangover: research suggests they could be quaffing wine made from identical grapes. Grapevines are often grown from cuttings of existing plants or by techniques such as grafting, rather than being planted from seeds, since this offers far gr

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Indian team treks to find missing climbers on Himalayan slope

Indian mountaineers on Monday began a dangerous trek toward an isolated Himalayan slope in a bid to find the bodies of eight climbers feared killed by an avalanche.

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Type A blood converted to universal donor blood with help from bacterial enzymes

Approach could revolutionize blood donation and transfusion

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Twice as many plants have gone extinct than birds, mammals, and amphibians combined

In the past 250 years, nearly 600 species of plant have vanished from the wild

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Antennas of flexible nanotube films an alternative for electronics

Antennas made of carbon nanotube films are just as efficient as copper for wireless applications, according to researchers at Rice University's Brown School of Engineering. They're also tougher, more flexible and can essentially be painted onto devices.

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A $12 pill test could save the lives of first-timers

Pill testing services at music festivals may be most effective in reducing harm for people trying ecstasy for the first time, but less so for prior users.

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Study counters narrative that street homeless are 'service resistant'

A team of researchers finds that personal resistance isn't the reason many street persons reject outreach workers' offers of shelter. Instead, it's bureaucratic hurdles that stand in the way.

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BU researchers develop new metamaterial that can improve MRI quality and reduce scan time

New magnetic metamaterial could be used as an additive technology to increase the imaging power of lower-strength MRI machines, increasing the number of patients seen by clinics and decreasing associated costs, without any of the risks that come with using higher-strength magnetic fields.

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Antarctic offshore polynyas linked to Southern Hemisphere climate anomalies

Nature, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1294-0 Measurements collected during recent polynya events in the Southern Ocean reveal that these sea ice openings formed as a result of weakened stratification and severe storms and were sustained by deep overturning.

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Off-target RNA mutation induced by DNA base editing and its elimination by mutagenesis

Nature, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1314-0 Off-target RNA mutation induced by DNA base editing and its elimination by mutagenesis

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A Medieval Grape Is Still Used to Make Wine

In a medieval cesspit in central France, archaeologists dug up a small, hard grape seed. They believed it to be 900 years old, based on the artifacts found nearby. When geneticists crushed up the grape seed, extracted its DNA, and compared it with modern grapes, they found a perfect genetic match in Savagnin Blanc—a grape still grown, still picked, and still made into wine in Europe today. This g

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Machine learning approach for low-dose CT imaging yields superior results

Machine learning has the potential to vastly advance medical imaging, particularly computerized tomography (CT) scanning, by reducing radiation exposure and improving image quality.

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Mysterious holes in Antarctic sea ice explained by years of robotic data

The winter ice on the surface of Antarctica's Weddell Sea occasionally forms an enormous hole. A hole that appeared in 2016 and 2017 drew intense curiosity from scientists and reporters. Though even bigger gaps had formed decades before, this was the first time oceanographers had a chance to truly monitor the unexpected gap in Antarctic winter sea ice.

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Deceptively simple: Minute marine animals live in a sophisticated symbiosis with bacteria

Trichoplax is one of the simplest animals, resembling a shapeless blob. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Germany, the University of Hawaii and North Carolina State University have now discovered that Trichoplax is not as simple as it looks. It lives in a remarkably sophisticated symbiosis with highly unusual bacteria.

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Ancient DNA from Roman and medieval grape seeds reveal ancestry of wine making

A grape variety still used in wine production in France today can be traced back 900 years to just one ancestral plant, scientists have discovered.

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Technique pulls interstellar magnetic fields within easy reach

A new, more accessible and much cheaper approach to surveying the topology and strength of interstellar magnetic fields—which weave through space in our galaxy and beyond, representing one of the most potent forces in nature—has been developed by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Astronomers determine mass of small black hole at center of nearby galaxy

If astronomers want to learn about how supermassive black holes form, they have to start small—really small, astronomically speaking.

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Scientists discover gene that could help us grow crops faster

Plant scientists at the Universities of Cambridge and Bordeaux have discovered a gene that they hope can be used to widen a nutrient trafficking bottleneck and potentially increase crop yields.

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Our water cycle diagrams give a false sense of water security

Pictures of the earth's water cycle used in education and research throughout the world are in urgent need of updating to show the effects of human interference, according to new analysis by an international team of hydrology experts.

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Fiber-optic probe can see molecular bonds

In "Avengers: Endgame," Tony Stark warned Scott Lang that sending him into the quantum realm and bringing him back would be a "billion-to-one cosmic fluke."

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London leads Europe for tech investment: study

London is the top choice in Europe for venture capital investment in technology firms, according to a study by the promotion agency for the British capital.

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The cholera bacterium's 3-in-1 toolkit for life in the ocean

Bacteria are the most abundant form of life on Earth. The ocean is highly abundant with small particles and debris, some inert, some highly nutritious. But researchers want to know how bacteria differentiate between these surfaces, how they hold onto them in moving water, and how they recognize each other so that they can work together.

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Canada Announces Ban on Single-Use Plastics

Last Straw The Canadian government has announced it will ban single-use plastics as soon as 2021. According to the CBC ‘s government source , things like straws, drink stirrers, plates, cutlery and balloon sticks are on the lengthy list of items that will be banned — though the government has given itself more time to examine evidence to identify the most harmful single-use plastic products. Thin

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Why Big Organizations Need to Hack Their Cultures to Become More Innovative

Big established companies know they must innovate to survive, but often fail to do so. Startups, meanwhile, are born innovating. While it’s tempting to apply the startup model to legacy corporations, the truth is they face wildly different challenges. Given the right model, however, big companies can draw on their vast resources to match startup innovation. In his new book, Transforming Legacy Co

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Deceptively simple: Minute marine animals live in a sophisticated symbiosis with bacteria

Trichoplax is one of the simplest animals, resembling a shapeless blob. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Germany, the University of Hawaii and North Carolina State University have now discovered that Trichoplax is not as simple as it looks. It lives in a remarkably sophisticated symbiosis with highly unusual bacteria.

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Ancient DNA from Roman and medieval grape seeds reveal ancestry of wine making

A grape variety still used in wine production in France today can be traced back 900 years to just one ancestral plant, scientists have discovered.

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Scientists discover gene that could help us grow crops faster

Plant scientists at the Universities of Cambridge and Bordeaux have discovered a gene that they hope can be used to widen a nutrient trafficking bottleneck and potentially increase crop yields.

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The cholera bacterium's 3-in-1 toolkit for life in the ocean

Bacteria are the most abundant form of life on Earth. The ocean is highly abundant with small particles and debris, some inert, some highly nutritious. But researchers want to know how bacteria differentiate between these surfaces, how they hold onto them in moving water, and how they recognize each other so that they can work together.

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Locust swarm decimates crops in Sardinia

Millions of locusts have devastated at least 2,000 hectares of crops in Sardinia, Italian farmers union Coldiretti said Monday, with experts calling the invasion the worst in six decades.

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Canada to ban single-use plastics in 2021: Trudeau

Canada will ban single-use plastics from 2021, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Monday, declaring it a "global challenge" to phase out the bottles, straws and plastic bags clogging the world's oceans.

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Locust swarm decimates crops in Sardinia

Millions of locusts have devastated at least 2,000 hectares of crops in Sardinia, Italian farmers union Coldiretti said Monday, with experts calling the invasion the worst in six decades.

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Media group study finds Google makes billions from news

Google took in some $4.7 billion in revenue in 2018 from "crawling and scraping" news websites without paying publishers, according to a media industry-sponsored study released Monday.

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Fiat Chrysler in talks with Aurora on autonomous vehicles

Fiat Chrysler is in talks to produce self-driving commercial vehicles with Aurora, an autonomous vehicle company led by former Google, Tesla and Uber executives.

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Netherlands vegetable seed developer wins World Food Prize

A seed developer from the Netherlands credited with introducing high quality disease-resistant vegetable seeds to more than 60 countries including the Philippines, Thailand and Indonesia was awarded the 2019 World Food Prize on Monday.

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The mysterious microbes living deep inside the earth — and how they could help humanity | Karen Lloyd

The ground beneath your feet is home to a massive, mysterious world of microbes — some of which have been in the earth's crust for hundreds of thousands of years. What's it like down there? Take a trip to the volcanoes and hot springs of Costa Rica as microbiologist Karen Lloyd shines a light on these subterranean organisms and shows how they could have a profound impact on life up here.

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AI study in London offers hope for MS treatment

Researchers use computer algorithms to track changes in hundreds of MRI brain scans

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Netherlands vegetable seed developer wins World Food Prize

A seed developer from the Netherlands credited with introducing high quality disease-resistant vegetable seeds to more than 60 countries including the Philippines, Thailand and Indonesia was awarded the 2019 World Food Prize on Monday.

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On the Tarragona coast, 57% of plastic waste is clothing fibers from washing machines

The sea water, beaches and sediments on the Tarragona coast contain quantities of plastic similar to those in a big city like Barcelona. And more than half are clothing fibres from washing machines. This is one of the main findings of a study carried out by researchers from the URV's research group Tecnatox and presented last week at a congress in Helsinki. They are not referring exclusively to th

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Settling the debate: Solving the electronic surface states of samarium hexaboride

A team led by Osaka University used angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to probe the unusual surface conductivity of samarium hexaboride crystals. They showed that the material is a co-existing phase of "topological insulator" in which electrical current can flow along the surface but not through the bulk of the sample, a "Kondo insulator," which undergoes a metal-to-insulator transition due

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The Neolithic precedents of gender inequality

Researchers from the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology at the University of Seville have studied the archaeological evidence of prehistoric societies in the Neolithic Period in the Iberian Peninsula from the perspective of gender. According to the results of their work, which addresses the analysis from the point of view of bioarchaeology and funerary archaeology, it was in the Neolithic th

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A Premium Version of Firefox Is Coming, Mozilla CEO Says—Would You Pay for It?

For more than a decade, we’ve been able to count on one crucial piece of software being available entirely for free: web browsers. But that may soon change. Kind of. In an interview with German …

5h

2019 'dead zone' may be the second largest on record

A recent forecast of the size of the "Dead Zone" in the northern Gulf of Mexico for late July 2019 is that it will cover 8,717-square-miles of the bottom of the continental shelf off Louisiana and Texas. The unusually high Mississippi River discharge in May controls the size of this zone, which will likely be the second largest zone since systematic measurements began in 1985. The water mass with

5h

Lettuce have it: Machine learning for cr-optimization

At Earlham Institute (EI), artificial intelligence based techniques such as machine learning is moving from being merely an exciting premise to having real-life applications, where it's needed most: improving efficiency and precision on the farm.

5h

'First light' achieved on upgraded planet-finding instrument to search for Earth-like planets in nearest star system

Newly-built planet-finding instrument installed on Very Large Telescope, Chile, begins 100-hour observation of nearby stars Alpha Centauri A and B, aiming to be first to directly image a habitable exoplanet

5h

Unique case of cannabis hyperemesis syndrome in palliative care

The medical use of cannabis is growing. Medical marijuana may improve symptoms including pain and anorexia. While it may improve nausea and vomiting, it can rarely cause a hyperemesis syndrome with chronic use.

5h

Do magazines exaggerate fertility at advanced reproductive age?

A new study has shown that popular magazines commonly feature older pregnant celebrities on their covers with no mention of the risks of advanced maternal age pregnancy or the advanced reproductive technologies and methods needed to achieve these pregnancies. By downplaying fertility decline with advancing age, these magazines likely contribute to women's belief that they can safely put off pregna

5h

2019 'dead zone' may be the second largest on record

A recent forecast of the size of the 'Dead Zone' in the northern Gulf of Mexico for late July 2019 is that it will cover 8,717-square-miles of the bottom of the continental shelf off Louisiana and Texas. The unusually high Mississippi River discharge in May controls the size of this zone, which will likely be the second largest zone since systematic measurements began in 1985.

5h

Predicting seizures before they happen

A new study has found a pattern of molecules that appear in the blood before a seizure happens. This discovery may lead to the development of an early warning system, which would enable people with epilepsy to know when they are at risk of having a seizure.

5h

ESA Plans ‘Space Rider’ Reusable Spacecraft

The European Space Agency (ESA) has decided to move forward with its Space Rider project, an uncrewed orbital vehicle that will mate with the Ariane and Vega families of rockets. The post ESA Plans ‘Space Rider’ Reusable Spacecraft appeared first on ExtremeTech .

5h

Do Brains Operate at a Tipping Point? New Clues and Complications

A team of Brazilian physicists analyzing the brains of rats and other animals has found the strongest evidence yet that the brain balances at the brink between two modes of operation, in a precarious yet versatile state known as criticality. At the same time, the findings challenge some of the original assumptions of this controversial “critical brain” hypothesis. Understanding how the huge netwo

5h

Engineers use graph networks to accurately predict properties of molecules and crystals

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new deep learning models that can accurately predict the properties of molecules and crystals. By enabling almost instantaneous property predictions, these deep learning models provide researchers the means to rapidly scan the nearly-infinite universe of compounds to discover potentially transformative materials for various tec

6h

Last-ditch attempt to warn of coalmine harm

Groundwater experts from around Australia have repeated calls for further investigations into the potential effects on heritage groundwater reserves in central Queensland if the giant Adani Carmichael coalmine gets the final regulatory go-ahead.Concerns the ancient Doongmabulla Springs face a 'reasonable threat of extinction' from Adani's proposed Galilee Basin coalmine are raised in a new positio

6h

Attitudes to gender and sexual diversity: Changing global trends

Changes in geopolitical forces are sweeping rapidly across the world, affecting the lives of many, for better and for worse. In much the same way, attitudes towards gender and sexual diversity are dynamic. They are moving towards greater acceptance in some parts of the world, while in others there is push back against this diversity.

6h

What psychotherapy can do for the climate and biodiversity crises

Apologies in advance, but I'm hoping that reading this will help you feel depressed—about biodiversity loss and our lack of progress over the climate crisis. The thing is, in these extreme circumstances, a bit of depression about the environment could be precisely what we need—it's the only sane response.

6h

The Case for Boring Office Clothes

A recent Saturday Night Live sketch featured a parody store called Fashion Coward, “the only store for people who hate shopping and feel lost and scared.” Contrasting its neutral cardigans with the edgy jackets worn by the truly fashionable, the fake commercial proudly announced that “we keep it safe with things like ‘brown sweater’ and ‘pants for the legs.’” At one point, the actor Emma Stone, p

6h

Unhealthy gut promotes spread of breast cancer, study finds

An unhealthy, inflamed gut causes breast cancer to become much more invasive and spread more quickly to other parts of the body, new research from the University of Virginia Cancer Center suggests.

6h

Does obesity increase risk of being a bullying victim, perpetrator, or both?

A new study has shown that obese adolescents are not only significantly more likely to experience bullying, but they are also more likely to be both victims and perpetrators of bullying compared to their healthy weight peers.

6h

New microneedle technique speeds plant disease detection

Researchers have developed a new technique that uses microneedle patches to collect DNA from plant tissues in one minute, rather than the hours needed for conventional techniques. DNA extraction is the first step in identifying plant diseases, and the new method holds promise for the development of on-site plant disease detection tools.

6h

Study drug delays type 1 diabetes in high risk children and adults

A drug that targets the immune system can delay the onset of type 1 diabetes an average of two years in children and adults at high risk, according to findings from TrialNet's Teplizumab (anti-CD3) Prevention Study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

6h

Using tumor biomarkers to tailor therapy in metastatic pancreatic cancer

A new pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of using molecular tumor markers as the basis for selecting the chemotherapeutic agents to use in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer.

6h

Xpert Ultra test for diagnosing TB now included in Cochrane Review

Tuberculosis causes more deaths globally than any other infectious disease and is a top 10 cause of death worldwide. Globally in 2017, of the estimated 10 million people with TB, 3.6 million were not reported to national TB programs, many of whom were not being diagnosed with their disease. If detected early and effectively treated, TB is largely curable, but in 2017, around 1.6 million people die

6h

Lettuce have it! Machine learning for cr-optimization

At Earlham Institute, artificial intelligence-based techniques such as machine learning is moving from being merely an exciting premise to having real-life applications, where it's needed most: improving efficiency and precision on the farm.

6h

Breakthrough Watch and the European Southern Observatory achieve 'first light' on upgraded planet-finding instrument to search for Earth-like planets in nearest star system

Newly-built planet-finding instrument installed on Very Large Telescope, Chile, begins 100-hour observation of nearby stars Alpha Centauri A and B, aiming to be first to directly image a habitable exoplanet.

6h

Type 1 diabetes may have an impact on the developing brain in children

A study co-led by Dr. Nelly Mauras at Nemours Children's Health System in Jacksonville, Fla., found that children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have slower growth in brain areas associated with mild cognitive deficits compared to children without T1D. The study, presented yesterday at the American Diabetes Association's® (ADA's) 79th Scientific Sessions®, found significant differences in total brain

6h

New study dramatically narrows the search for advanced life in the universe

Scientists may need to rethink their estimates for how many planets outside our solar system could host a rich diversity of life. In a new study, a UC Riverside-led team discovered that a buildup of toxic gases in the atmospheres of most planets makes them unfit for complex life as we know it.

6h

Drinking alcohol even at conception damages placenta development

Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can have disastrous consequences for the developing fetus, leading to low birth weight and fetal alcohol syndrome. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Queensland, Australia, publishes their discovery that drinking alcohol around the time of conception markedly restricts the growth of the placenta in soon-to-be rat mums, providing potential new clues

6h

Kokain och syntetiska droger allt vanligare

– Vi kan konstatera att drog- och narkotikamarknaden har en fortsatt ganska stor påverkan på befolkningen, särskilt på utsatta grupper i samhället, säger Joakim Strandberg på Folkhälsomyndigheten. Att kokain är på frammarsch i Europa märks framför allt på att antalet beslag har ökat. Sedan 2014 har också antalet personer som söker behandling för kokainproblem i Europa ökat med 35 procent. Det kons

6h

Scorpions adapt their stinging, stingers and sting contents to minimize costs of venom use

Replenishing venom takes time and energy—so it pays to be stingy with stings.

6h

Sådan afslører jord under skoene, hvor du har været

PLUS. Danske forskere har udviklet værktøjet SoilTracker, der skal fortælle, om det er sandsynligt, at jord under en sko eller et bildæk stammer fra Jylland eller Sjælland, fra skov eller mark.

6h

Arbetslösa ungdomar startar arbetslivet senare med A-kassa

Mellan 1998 och 2007 hade ungdomar som avslutat gymnasie- eller högskolestudier rätt till grundbeloppet i a-kassan när de fyllde 20 år och var arbetslösa. Det så kallade studerandevillkoret. Mathias von Buxhoeveden vid IFAU och Uppsala universitet jämför i en rapport individer med liknande egenskaper som blev arbetslösa samtidigt, men där den ena individen var född en månad senare och därför fick

6h

Why some plastic packaging is necessary to prevent food waste and protect the environment

There has been a surge in awareness of the damage that plastic pollution does to our planet in recent years. It has spurred a number of campaigns to remove single-use plastics from our daily lives. This extends to food packaging, with a Waitrose supermarket in the city of Oxford recently launching a package-free trial.

6h

Car ownership is likely to become a thing of the past—and so could public transport

The car is set to undergo a massive transformation in the coming years, as automation gradually eliminates the need for drivers, and electric and hybrid vehicles occupy a growing share of the global market. But, in a future where autonomous cars arrive on demand to take you where you need to go, there seems little point in owning one.

6h

Undetected diabetes linked to heart attack and gum disease

People with undetected glucose disorders run a higher risk of both myocardial infarction and periodontitis, according to a new study. The results demonstrate the need of greater collaboration between dentistry and healthcare, say the researchers, and possibly of screening for diabetes at dental clinics.

6h

Waning potency of pertussis vaccine a significant contributor to recent whooping cough outbreaks

A new study suggests under-vaccination is only one factor contributing to whooping cough outbreaks.

6h

Chickenpox vaccination lowers risk of pediatric shingles

A study of more than 6 million children showed routine varicella vaccine considerably lessened likelihood of painful shingles disease.

6h

Three public health interventions could prevent 94 million premature deaths

Lowering blood pressure, reducing sodium intake, and eliminating trans fat could prevent 94 million early deaths around the world, according to a new study.

6h

Site of biggest ever meteorite collision in the UK discovered

Scientists believe they have discovered the site of the biggest meteorite impact ever to hit the British Isles.

6h

Thumbs up? Map shows Europe’s hitchhiking landscape

A popular means of transportation from the 1920s to the 1980s, hitchhiking has since fallen in disrepute However, as this map shows, thumbing a ride still occupies a thriving niche – if at great geographic variance In some countries and areas, you'll be off the street in no time. In other places, it's much harder to thumb your way from A to B From freighthopping to hitchhiking Hitchhiking has a l

6h

Encounters with wolves

Across Europe and North America wolf populations are growing, pushing the animals into contact with humans – often to their detriment. Lauren Fuge reports.

6h

Spintronics moves from two dimensions into three

Advances in managing the movement of electrons herald a major breakthrough in computing technology. Amalio Fernandez-Pacheco from Scotland's University of Glasgow reports.

6h

Wings may all be universal. Smarts, not so much.

Whether we are alone in the universe is one of the oldest and deepest questions of existence. It was once the province of philosophy and religion, but Paul Davies suggests science has begun to make a contribution too.

6h

Selfie-flagellation

New technique provides clues to efficient sperm motility.

6h

Thomas Cook shares take off on Fosun bid approach

Embattled travel company Thomas Cook on Monday said it had received a takeover approach from Chinese tourism group Fosun for the British group's tour operator business, sending its shares surging.

6h

Salesforce buying Tableau Software in $15.7B all-stock deal

Customer-management software developer Salesforce is buying Tableau Software in an all-stock deal valued at $15.7 billion.

6h

Forget the Bahamas. China's Cruises Are Where It's At

As China's middle class grows, cruise companies are seeing dollar signs.

6h

Biotechnology: Using wireless power to light up tiny neural stimulators

""Implantable optical devices that target neurons can be improved using miniature coils smaller than a grain of rice using optogenetic technology. Scientists can propagate pulses of light using the method to turn protein expression on or off in genetically modified neurons. Neuroscientists have used bulky cables and batteries to control and collect data from such experimental setups so far. In a r

6h

New research could help predict seizures before they happen

A new study has found a pattern of molecules that appear in the blood before a seizure happens. This discovery may lead to the development of an early warning system, which would enable people with epilepsy to know when they are at risk of having a seizure.

6h

The Neolithic precedents of gender inequality

Inequality between men and women was not generally consolidated in Iberia during the Neolithic. However, situations progressively appeared that indicate dominance of men over women. Four important lines in which inequality between men and women can be investigated through successive historical periods are their access to funeral rites, the material conditions of their existence, the appearance of

6h

Settling the debate: Solving the electronic surface states of samarium hexaboride

Researchers at Osaka University show that samarium hexaboride is a topological insulator, which allows electrons to flow only along its exterior surface. Together with its strong electron correlations, this material has potential to be used in future spintronic quantum devices that utilize the spins of individual electrons.

6h

Tart cherry shown to decrease joint pain, sore muscles in some breast cancer patients

Tart cherry reduces the musculoskeletal effects of aromatase inhibitors in patients with non-metastatic breast cancer, according to new findings from a clinical trial by researchers at Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center.

6h

Snow monitoring at the Sierra Nevada peaks offer the first medium-term data sets

A research group at the University of Cordoba published 14 years of weather monitoring in the Sierra Nevada along with photographs of snow distribution.

6h

Dramatic change in ancient nomad diets coincides with expansion of networks across Eurasia

Strengthening of political networks coincided with the intensification of agricultural production, resulting in the widespread adoption of millet by populations across Eurasia.

6h

The case for adding a midday nap to sixth grade

A study of nearly 3,000 fourth, fifth, and sixth graders links a mid-day nap with greater academic achievement. The findings show a connection between 30 to 60 minutes of sleep in the middle of the day and higher IQ; greater happiness, self-control, and grit; and fewer behavioral problems. The higher IQ finding was particularly evident in sixth graders, scientists report in the study of 10- to 12

6h

This Cool Artificial Reef Was Just Deployed in Sydney Harbor

Earth’s oceans have seen better days. They’re inundated with plastic waste, both whole single-use plastics and tons of plastic microparticles that find their way back into our food and drinking water. Their water temperatures are rising due to climate change, causing coral bleaching and other harmful phenomena. Overfishing has depleted multiple marine species. Organizations and individuals around

6h

Climate change may shift timing of summer thunderstorms

Climate change could affect the regularity of summer afternoon thunderstorms in some parts of the world, according to new research.

6h

Biotechnology: Using wireless power to light up tiny neural stimulators

""Implantable optical devices that target neurons can be improved using miniature coils smaller than a grain of rice using optogenetic technology. Scientists can propagate pulses of light using the method to turn protein expression on or off in genetically modified neurons. Neuroscientists have used bulky cables and batteries to control and collect data from such experimental setups so far. In a r

6h

Optimizing operations for an unprecedented view of the universe

Under construction on a remote ridge in the Chilean Andes, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will boast the world's largest digital camera, helping researchers detect objects at the solar system's edge and gain insights into the structure of our galaxy and the nature of dark energy.

6h

There's only a 1 in 7000 chance an asteroid will hit the Earth in September

Whenever scientists announce an upcoming close encounter with an asteroid, certain corners of the internet light up like the synaptic rush that accompanies a meth binge, with panicky headlines shouted straight from the brain stem. But never mind that. We're not that corner of the internet. We're sober, yo!

6h

Some fungi trade phosphorus with plants like savvy stockbrokers

New views show how fungi shift their stores of phosphorus toward more favorable markets where the nutrient is scarce.

6h

Watch: NASA’s Mars Helicopter ready to fly

The space agency releases footage of final preparations for a historic test of the laws of physics.

6h

Do Brain Games Really Work?

You've probably seen ads for apps promising to make you smarter in just a few minutes a day. But can simply clicking away on your phone really help you improve your brain functions?

6h

Study identifies most promising feedstocks for pyrolysis-based biorefinery

A study into the composition and processability of different biomass feedstocks has found sunflower seed husks and poplar wood slabs to be the most suitable for producing bio-based products via fast pyrolysis conversion. The study was conducted by Capax Biobased Development and BTG Biomass Technology Group as part of the Horizon 2020 project Bio4Products, which is testing the feasibility of a fast

6h

Researchers find a way to make Casimir effect attract or repulse depending on gap size

A team of researchers from the University of California at Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found a way to make the Casimir effect attract or repulse depending on the size of the gap between two objects. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their technique and possible applications.

6h

Hayabusa2 drops target marker at asteroid Ryugu

The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has made some impressive feats in recent years. Roughly one year ago, and following in the footsteps of its predecessor, the Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully rendezvoused with a near-Earth asteroid (NEA) called 162173 Ryugu. Since then, it has been collecting samples from the surface in the hopes of learning more about the formation and evolution o

6h

For hydrogen power, mundane materials might be almost as good as pricey platinum

As anyone who has purchased jewelry can attest, platinum is expensive. That's tough for consumers but also a serious hurdle for a promising source of electricity for vehicles: the hydrogen fuel cell, which relies on platinum.

6h

Trophies made from human skulls hint at regional conflicts around the time of Maya civilization's mysterious collapse

Two trophy skulls, recently discovered by archaeologists in the jungles of Belize, may help shed light on the little-understood collapse of the once powerful Classic Maya civilization.

6h

Telescope designed to study mysterious dark energy keeps Russia’s space science hopes alive

Spektr-RG x-ray mission will be nation’s only space observatory

6h

What's your poison? Scrupulous scorpions tailor venom to target

Replenishing venom takes time and energy — so it pays to be stingy with stings. According to researchers scorpions adapt their bodies, their behavior and even the composition of their venom, for efficient control of prey and predators. Writing in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, they say it's not just the size of the stinger, but also how it's used that matters.

6h

Opinion: California can't compromise on cars

America's car companies have a long history of being on the wrong side of regulation, and when the Trump team arrived they miscalculated as they always do. This is an industry that opposed seat belts when Ralph Nader advocated for them over a half century ago in his book Unsafe at Any Speed. They opposed using the catalytic converter to reduce air pollution, fought airbags, and have tried to stop

6h

Techathlon podcast: Classic messenger sounds, Apple’s fanciest Mac, and the week’s biggest tech news

Technology Have fun and learn about tech at the same time. The most fun you can have with a podcast that doesn't have anyone famous on it.

6h

White House official wants to delay Huawei ban, report says – CNET

He reportedly wants another two years before the company is completely banned.

6h

Moto Z4 is both a midrange phone and a Verizon 5G early-adopter machine – CNET

Motorola's new phone aims to be a solid alternative to the Google Pixel 3A XL and Samsung Galaxy S10 5G.

6h

Eksperimentel israelsk robotdrone kan både flyve og kravle

På en konference i Canada fremviste to forskere fra Ben-Gurion University deres Flying Star-drone, der ligner en almindelig quadcopter, men som også kan køre langs jorden på samme motor.

6h

Trump’s Russia Ambassador Wants to Come Home

Donald Trump’s man in Moscow may soon be coming home. Jon Huntsman, who has served as U.S. ambassador to Russia since 2017, is expected to leave his job by the end of the year and is seriously considering a run for governor of Utah, according to four sources familiar with the situation. Huntsman’s potential interest in the governorship—which he previously held from 2004 to 2009—has been a point o

6h

Working dogs may have done less heavy lifting for humans than previously thought

The 30,000-year historical relationship between humans and dogs has been primarily defined by work, but new research indicates our four-legged companions may have had a lighter burden than we thought.

6h

Catastrophic fires shape cities for centuries—Grenfell Tower is no exception

It's been two years since a disastrous fire broke out at Grenfell Tower, a residential block of flats in North Kensington, London, on June 14, 2017. The fire is believed to have started on the fourth floor, "in and around" a fridge freezer. It escaped through a kitchen window, traveled rapidly upwards through the cladding—which had been fitted during recent regeneration efforts—and ultimately clai

6h

How satellites can improve the health of city dwellers

Most people get a health boost from exercise. But for those with heart disease or a lung condition such as asthma, exercising during periods of high urban air pollution can exacerbate rather than improve their condition.

6h

New online tool helps communities prepare for coastal flooding

If you live along the coast, flooding can endanger lives, property, businesses, and even bring communities and commerce to a standstill. To help people prepare for and manage the effects of coastal flooding, NOAA has brought together data from its over 200 coastal water level stations into one easy-to-use web tool.

6h

Researchers find connectivity more important that thought for specialized optimizing machines

A team of researchers with members affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and Japan reports that connectivity is more important than thought when building specialized optimizing machines. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how they tested connectivity importance on two kinds of specialized optimizing machines.

6h

New look at old data leads to cleaner engines

New insights about how to understand and ultimately control the chemistry of ignition behavior and pollutant formation have been discovered in research led by Sandia National Laboratories. The discovery eventually will lead to cleaner, more efficient internal combustion engines.

6h

New microneedle technique speeds plant disease detection

Researchers have developed a new technique that uses microneedle patches to collect DNA from plant tissues in one minute, rather than the hours needed for conventional techniques. DNA extraction is the first step in identifying plant diseases, and the new method holds promise for the development of on-site plant disease detection tools.

6h

Website tracks China’s huge grave relocation effort

An interactive website shows the locations of thousands of gravesites that have been relocated in China over the past two decades. In what may be the largest grave relocation in human history so far, more than 10 million corpses have been exhumed. The website, The Chinese Deathscape: Grave Reform in Modern China , depicts this relocation effort, which makes way for new development projects. The s

6h

57% of the plastic waste on the Tarragona coast is clothing fibers from washing machines

The sea water, beaches and sediments on the Tarragona coast contain quantities of plastic similar to those in a big city like Barcelona. And more than half are clothing fibres from washing machines. This is one of the main findings of a study carried out by researchers from the URV's research group Tecnatox and presented at a congress in Helsinki.

6h

The common wisdom about marketing cocreated innovations is wrong

A new study in the Journal of Marketing finds that companies can improve consumer adoption and accelerate product takeoff of cocreated innovations through a novel communication strategy that creates inconsistency or a mismatch between the creator's and the company's messages.

6h

Mass anomaly detected under the moon's largest crater

A mysterious large mass of material has been discovered beneath the largest crater in our solar system — the Moon's South Pole-Aitken basin — and may contain metal from the asteroid that crashed into the Moon and formed the crater, according to a Baylor University study.

6h

Cognitive behavioral therapy delivered by telemedicine is effective for insomnia

Preliminary findings from two analyses of an ongoing study suggest that cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia delivered by telemedicine is as effective as face-to-face delivery.

6h

Hubble survey captures iconic spiral galaxy NGC 2903

The iconic appearance of a spiral galaxy is exemplified here in the form of the stunning NGC 2903, imaged by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. It shows off whirling, pinwheeling arms with scatterings of sparkling stars, glowing bursts of gas, and dark, weaving lanes of cosmic dust.

6h

Long-standing puzzle about black holes’ influence is settled

Nature, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01812-4 Ultra-high-resolution models of a black hole confirm a hypothesis proposed more than 40 years ago.

6h

Heated crystal flakes can be sewn into clothing for thermotherapy

Heated gloves, bracelets, and even rings are some of the potential applications of highly conductive MXene, a 2-D material made of alternating atomic layers of titanium and carbon. In a new study, researchers have fabricated MXene flakes, then electrostatically adhered the flakes to threads, and finally sewed the threads into ordinary fabrics that can be safely heated under a low voltage.

6h

Clarifying the economic value of adjusting the power consumption

The economic value of demand response that adjusts the power consumption has not been clarified. A control method for maximizing cost-effectiveness of demand response is developed. Using this method, the optimal power consumption can be calculated based on the prediction of the power generation cost and the demand.

7h

Last-ditch attempt to warn of coalmine harm

Groundwater experts from around Australia have repeated calls for further investigations into the potential effects on heritage groundwater reserves in central Queensland if the giant Adani Carmichael coalmine gets the final regulatory go-ahead this week.

7h

Engineers use graph networks to accurately predict properties of molecules and crystals

Nanoengineers at UC San Diego have developed new deep learning models that can accurately predict the properties of molecules and crystals. The models can enable researchers to rapidly scan the nearly-infinite universe of compounds to discover potentially transformative materials for various applications, cush as high-energy density Li-ion batteries, warm-white LEDs, and better photovoltaics.

7h

Cyber of the fittest: Researchers develop first cyber agility framework to measure attacks

The framework proposed by the researchers will help government and industry organizations visualize how well they out-maneuver attacks over time. This groundbreaking work will be published in an upcoming issue of IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security, a top cybersecurity journal.

7h

Study illustrates gaps in knowledge and lack of support for girls during puberty

A study examined girls' transitions through puberty in Madagascar and ways in which menstruation influences their educational experiences and future sexual and reproductive health. Findings revealed gaps in the girls' knowledge and an absence of support during puberty. Until this study little had been known about girls' experiences of puberty in Madagascar, which has among the highest rates of ado

7h

When it comes to food, one size doesn't fit all: world's largest scientific nutrition research project reveals even identical twins have different responses to food

The first results were revealed from the largest ongoing scientific nutrition study of its kind today, led by an international team of leading scientists including researchers from King's College London, Massachusetts General Hospital and nutritional science company ZOE, showing that individual responses to the same foods are unique, even between identical twins.

7h

USC study: Exposure to videos of race-based violence online may be spurring mental-health issues

Viral videos of the detainment of undocumented immigrants in cages and police killings of unarmed citizens are two of the most pressing traumatic events facing adolescents of color. However, little is known about whether these online experiences are linked to mental health outcomes. This study examines the association between exposure to such events online and mental health in a sample of African

7h

Fast Pain Relief – In Only Seven Million Years

Here’s a chemical descriptor that I didn’t know: algogen , meaning a molecule that causes pain. I would have classified the natural product I did my PhD work on as one, since it caused me substantial pain at the time, but this term refers more properly to physical nociceptive types of pain, rather than the intellectual and psychological kinds. So this means things like capsaicin (from hot peppers

7h

Post-Apocalyptic Survival Skills: How to Measure Acceleration

Before the internet or any electronics at all, people used a gadget called the Atwood machine. It might come in handy should modern society take a hit.

7h

Genes play little part in people’s response to food, study shows

Research into metabolic differences between twins supported by UK nutritional start-up Zoe

7h

How toxic people wage emotional warfare on others

High-conflict emotional warfare exists everywhere there are high-conflict people. Their strategy is usually to seduce someone get other people to agree with them on attacking someone else. In mental health terms, this is called "splitting," where you split people into all good and all bad. Splitting is linked to borderline and narcissistic personality disorders. High-conflict people dominate by s

7h

Observations unveil chemical structure of the protoplanetary disk Oph-IRS 67

Using the Submillimeter Array (SMA), astronomers have conducted a molecular line study of the protoplanetary disk Oph-IRS 67, uncovering essential information about its chemical structure. Results of this study were presented in a paper published June 3 on the arXiv pre-print server.

7h

What if dark matter is lighter? Report calls for small experiments to broaden the hunt

Theorized dark matter particles haven't yet shown up where scientists had expected them. So Berkeley Lab researchers are now designing new and nimble experiments that can look for dark matter in previously unexplored ranges of particle mass and energy, and using previously untested methods.

7h

What's your poison? Scrupulous scorpions tailor venom to target

Replenishing venom takes time and energy — so it pays to be stingy with stings.According to researchers at the Australian National Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, scorpions adapt their bodies, their behavior and even the composition of their venom, for efficient control of prey and predators.Writing in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, they say it's not just the size of the stinger,

7h

UNM scientist makes case for stabilizing forest carbon to help mitigate climate change

There's no doubt that climate change is affecting ecosystems as well as the lifestyles of plants and animals around the globe. As temperatures rise, so do the complexity of the issues. Scientists, both in the United States and around the world, are actively pursuing mitigation solutions while providing governments with the understanding of natural hazards to help stem the effects of climate change

7h

Carnivorous pitcher plants are regularly eating vertebrate animals

A survey in August and September 2018 revealed that a fifth of the pitcher plants growing in one bog in Ontario had caught at least one juvenile salamander

7h

Final Fantasy VII Remake finally gets a release date

Game director Tetsuya Nomura confirmed the news Sunday night at a Final Fantasy VII concert in Los Angeles, just ahead of Square Enix's E3 press conference scheduled for Monday, June 10. Additionally, …

7h

'Green Revolution' in RNAi tools and therapeutics

A team from Nanjing University in China reported that the small silencing RNA sequences against HBsAg generated in edible lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) can specifically bind and inhibit gene expression in p21-HBsAg knock-in transgenic mice and improve liver injury at a relatively low level when compared to synthetic siRNAs. This work may also be helpful to the treatment of hepatitis C and other infe

7h

Machine behavior: A field of study to explore intelligent machines as independent agents

In 1969, artificial-intelligence pioneer and Nobel laureate Herbert Simon proposed a new science, one that approached the study of artificial objects just as one would study natural objects.

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Getting the oil out of befouled water

Oil and water are famously reluctant to mix fully together. But separating them completely—for example, when cleaning up an oil spill or purifying water contaminated through fracking—is a devilishly hard and inefficient process that frequently relies on membranes that tend to get clogged up, or "fouled."

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Finding and fixing natural gas leaks quickly and economically

As it flows through pipelines from wells to stovetops, natural gas is prone to leaking, threatening not only human safety and health but also the health of the planet.

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Training robots to relieve chronic pain

Researchers at Swinburne have developed a collaborative robot system to automatically treat back, neck and head pain caused by soft tissue injury.

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New insect species discovered on the slopes of the Maungatua Range

A team of zoologists from the University Otago has discovered a new species of insect—the Maungatua stonefly—from the slopes of the Maungatua Range, on the doorstep of Dunedin.

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Scorpions adapt their stinging, stingers and sting contents to minimize costs of venom use

Replenishing venom takes time and energy—so it pays to be stingy with stings.

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The Groups Where Thousands of Facebook Users Ask for Money

About a month ago, Heather Wiley, a new mom, was scrolling through a Facebook group for mothers when she came across a post that made her heart break. A woman needed basic items for her kids—formula, diapers, and the like—but didn’t have the money. In the comment thread below, people began tagging other Facebook groups, known as “blessings groups,” dedicated solely to handling cases of small but

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New insect species discovered on the slopes of the Maungatua Range

A team of zoologists from the University Otago has discovered a new species of insect—the Maungatua stonefly—from the slopes of the Maungatua Range, on the doorstep of Dunedin.

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Scorpions adapt their stinging, stingers and sting contents to minimize costs of venom use

Replenishing venom takes time and energy—so it pays to be stingy with stings.

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Ian Craft obituary

Gynaecologist and IVF pioneer whose methods often proved controversial The early days of assisted reproduction were fraught with controversy, as media commentators and religious figures denigrated its practitioners for playing God or interfering with nature. Louise Brown, the world’s first baby to be conceived through in vitro fertilisation ( IVF ), arrived in 1978. By 2018, eight million babies w

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Patients Blinded by Stem Cell Therapy: FDA (and consumers) win a legal victory!

The Food and Drug Administration just won a court case supporting the agency's ability to regulate stem cell clinics that rely on client-derived adipose tissues. This is a win for consumer protection, though too late to help those already harmed.

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How Qantas and other airlines decide whether to fly near volcanoes

Mount Agung volcano in Bali, Indonesia, has been erupting intermittently since November 2017. The volcano erupted six times in the last month and resulted in the cancellation and delay of some flights in and out of Bali's Ngurah Rai International Airport.

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NASA’s Mars Helicopter Enters Final Testing

After completing its flight test early this year, the Mars Helicopter Scout (MHS) is undergoing final preparation and could join the rover this summer. The post NASA’s Mars Helicopter Enters Final Testing appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Op-ed: When did GMO become a dirty word?

Do you know someone with diabetes? While most people may associate GMOs with food products, their use actually began in the medical field with insulin, an important part of diabetes treatment.

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Answering Questions About Nuclear Power

It seems every time I write even tangentially about nuclear power the same comments crop up, with the same objections. So I want to explore, as best I can, the answers to those objections. First here are a few caveats. On this topic I am acting as a science journalist, not an expert. This is my personal synthesis of publicly available information. I also consider blogs to be as much conversations

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Empathy is a skill. Here’s how to cultivate it

The apparent trend toward division and away from empathy isn’t irreversible, according to new research. Empathy is a skill that one can cultivate over time, Stanford University psychologist Jamil Zaki finds, and with the right practices, anyone—even the most close-minded individuals—can come to care about other people in healthy and sustainable ways. While empathy offers numerous social benefits—

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How to improve care for patients with disabilities? We need more providers like them

When it comes to patients with disabilities, the chance of getting a clinician 'like them' is extremely low, which may lead to patients' reluctance to seek care or follow prescribed interventions and treatments. Meanwhile, without adequate scientists with disabilities bringing perspectives to patient-centered research, the ability to improve care for patients with disabilities is limited.

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Op-ed: When did GMO become a dirty word?

Do you know someone with diabetes? While most people may associate GMOs with food products, their use actually began in the medical field with insulin, an important part of diabetes treatment.

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Enzymes that detoxify marine toxins

Nature, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01742-1 Potent microbial toxins found in shellfish are possible starting points for drug discovery, but analogues are needed for biological testing. Toxin-modification enzymes now suggest a new approach for producing these analogues.

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Evolution Should Be Taught as a 'Sensitive Issue', But Not Because of The Facts

"The way the subject is typically taught … can force religious children to choose between their faith and evolution."

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This star system could help us understand how baby planets grow up

Space Scientists directly imaged two embryonic exoplanets 370 light-years away. A team of astronomers announced the discovery of a two-planet star system 370 light-years away. It’s one of the only multi-planet systems scientists have ever directly…

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The U.S. is still using many pesticides that are banned in other countries

In 2016, the United States used millions of kilograms of pesticides that are banned or being phased out in the European Union, Brazil and China.

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Image of the Day: Stale Cereal

Archaeologists find ring-shaped objects made from grains at a site in Austria thought to date back to 960 BCE.

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Better Schools Won’t Fix America

Long ago, I was captivated by a seductively intuitive idea, one many of my wealthy friends still subscribe to: that both poverty and rising inequality are largely consequences of America’s failing education system. Fix that, I believed, and we could cure much of what ails America. This belief system, which I have come to think of as “educationism,” is grounded in a familiar story about cause and

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Instant Pot Ace Multi-Use Cooking & Beverage Blender Review: Excellent, But Only With the Right Cookbook

This versatile appliance from the multicooker giant is excellent—if you buy the right cookbook to go with it.

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Civil War plant guide reveals 3 plants with antibiotic properties

To tackle the antibiotic resistance crisis, researchers have turned to plants that people used for treating infections during the American Civil War.

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“Is it unethical to not tell my employer I’ve automated my job?”

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Editorial: A study in surveillance

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Widespread use of hydrogen energy essential for decarbonized society

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Lawmakers raise concerns about facial recognition technology

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Solving Air Force issues with artificial intelligence

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How Far Are We From Achieving Artificial General Intelligence?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Mystery hominin had sex with ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovans

A strange signal in ancient and modern human DNA suggests the ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovans must have mated with an unknown species of human

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Trump Has Killed Democrats’ Sense of the Possible

To former Vice President Joe Biden’s benefit, electability has become the unofficial buzzword of the 2020 presidential campaign. While it’s still early, most polls show Biden as the clear front-runner among Democrats. A CNN/ Des Moines Register /Mediacom poll was just the latest to give him a solid lead. Among Iowa’s likely Democratic caucus-goers, 24 percent named Biden their first choice for pr

9h

Two distinct physical mechanisms identified for how simple foams collapse

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered two distinct mechanisms by which foams can collapse, yielding insight into the prevention/acceleration of foam rupture in industrial materials, e.g., foods, cosmetics, insulation and stored chemicals. When a bubble breaks, they found that a collapse event propagates via impact with the receding film and tiny scattered droplets breaking

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How acids behave in ultracold interstellar space

A research group from Ruhr-Universität Bochum has investigated how acids interact with water molecules at extremely low temperatures. Using spectroscopic analyses and computer simulations, they investigated the question of whether hydrochloric acid (HCl) does or does not release its proton in conditions like those found in interstellar space. The answer depends on the order in which the water and

9h

The Problem with Quantum Computers

It’s called decoherence—but while a breakthrough solution seems years away, there are ways of getting around it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How your body processes food is only partially down to your genes

Everyone processes food differently — even identical twins. A study found just half of our response to glucose and 20 percent of our response to fat is genetic

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The Math Trick Behind MP3s, JPEGs, and Homer Simpson’s Face – Facts So Romantic

Over a decade ago, I was sitting in a college math physics course and my professor spelt out an idea that kind of blew my mind. I think it isn’t a stretch to say that this is one of the most widely applicable mathematical discoveries, with applications ranging from optics to quantum physics, radio astronomy, MP3 and JPEG compression, X-ray crystallography, voice recognition, and PET or MRI scans.

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Dear Therapist: I Don’t Understand Why My Son Won’t Talk to Me

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My husband and I have two adult children: a 39-year-old son who is married with three children and lives 15 minutes away, and a 33-year-old daughter who is single and lives out of state. My daughter-in-law’s p

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Porsche's 911 Goes Hybrid With Vonnen's Shadow Drive

The aftermarket system adds an electric motor—and a whole lot of power—to the venerable sports car.

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Big Tech Can Stay Ahead of Regulators by Breaking Itself Up

Regulators are coming after Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google, and it could get ugly. The companies would benefit by acting pre-emptively.

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The Heady, Thorny Journey to Decriminalize Magic Mushrooms

The movement to decriminalize psilocybin is progressing so quickly it’s even surprised psychedelics advocates. The potential complications, though, are plenty.

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Pre-orders now available for “The Field Guide to Citizen Science”

Coming Soon! “The Field Guide to Citizen Science,” from the experts at SciStarter , published by Timber Press. Citizen science is the public involvement in the discovery of new scientific knowledge. A citizen science project can involve one person or millions of people collaborating towards a common goal. The citizen science movement is approachable and inclusive, making it an excellent option for

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The Problem with Quantum Computers

It’s called decoherence—but while a breakthrough solution seems years away, there are ways of getting around it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Interview: The Once and Future Moon

Oliver Morton discusses his new book about how art, science and politics have shaped past, present and planned voyages to Earth’s nearest celestial neighbor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Interview: The Once and Future Moon

Oliver Morton discusses his new book about how art, science and politics have shaped past, present and planned voyages to Earth’s nearest celestial neighbor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Southern Baptists’ Midlife Crisis

In the summer of 1979, conservatives within the Southern Baptist Convention gathered in Houston for their annual meeting with the goal of seizing control of the nation’s largest Protestant denomination. These conservatives claimed that theological liberalism had taken root in the denomination’s seminaries and agencies, and was taking the group down the path of heresy. Seminary professors were ope

9h

Korsbandsskadade hoppar annorlunda

– För att undvika framtida skador på grund av rörelsekompensation bör större fokus läggas på bål- och höftrörelser när man utvärderingar rörelsekvaliteten efter en främre korsbandsskada, säger Jonas Markström, doktorand vid Umeå universitet. Främre korsbandsskada i knät är en vanlig idrottsskada som ofta uppstår i situationer utan kontakt med annan spelare och till följd av en tillfälligt dålig r

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Techtopia #109: Er atomkraft fremtiden?

Verdenssamfundet skal handle hurtigt, hvis vi skal have en chance for at holde de globale temperaturstigninger på 1,5 grad. Er små decentrale atomkraftværker en løsning, eller er det ren vanvid?

10h

A Friends-and-Family Intervention for Preventing Teen Suicide

Teens who have been hospitalized for a suicide attempt or suicidal ideation are at heightened risk of dying by suicide. To help ensure their safety once they return home, researchers are enlisting the help of trusted adults, who they train to provide ongoing support throughout the recovery process.

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Democrats Are Avoiding the China Question

Listening to the Democratic candidates for president, you would probably not know that globalization, as it has existed for the past several decades, may soon cease to exist. Since at least the turn of the century, the close ties between the United States and China, which together constitute 40 percent of the world’s GDP, have bound the world economy together. But this deep interdependence—which

10h

Study of a “nudge” to use hand sanitizer retracted

A group of researchers in the United States and China have retracted their 2018 paper on hand hygiene, admitting that they can’t account for “data anomalies” in their work. The article in question, “The decoy effect as a nudge: Boosting hand hygiene with a worse option,” appeared in Psychological Science last May. Led by Meng … Continue reading Study of a “nudge” to use hand sanitizer retracted

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Carbon plays a starring role in the new book ‘Symphony in C’

In Symphony in C, geophysicist Robert Hazen explores carbon’s ancient origins, its role in life and its importance in the modern world.

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Trend Micro: Prepare for the age of IIoT security

submitted by /u/MaikeruShogun [link] [comments]

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Hunden speglar ägarens stress

Forskare vid Linköpings universitet har tittat närmare på hur hundars stressnivåer påverkas av livsstilsfaktorer och av människorna som hundarna lever ihop med. Det är känt att individer inom samma art kan spegla varandras känslomässiga tillstånd. Till exempel har tidigare forskning visat på samband mellan långtidsstress hos barn och deras mödrar. I den nya studien undrade forskarna om liknande s

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Hydrogen has a dirty secret – let's not think it's always a green fuel

Produced the right way, hydrogen can be a cleaner, greener alternative to fossil fuels powering our transport and elsewhere. But too often that's not the case

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Rif1 S-acylation mediates DNA double-strand break repair at the inner nuclear membrane

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10349-z Rif1 is involved in different processes such as telomere homeostasis, DNA replication timing, and DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice. Here, the authors reveal that Rif1 S-acylation facilitates the accumulation of Rif1 at DSBs, attenuation of DNA end-resection, and DSB repair by non-homologous en

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MRI-guided robotic arm drives optogenetic fMRI with concurrent Ca2+ recording

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10450-3 Fiber optic implantation in deep areas of the rodent’s brain for MRI combined with optogenetics is challenging. Here the authors use an MRI-guided robotic arm as the navigation method for accurate fiber optic placement and precise microinjection during multi-modal fMRI, optogenetics and calcium recordings.

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Modeling the electrical resistivity of polymer composites with segregated structures

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10514-4 Carbon nanotube–polymer composites containing secondary fillers are thought to possess enhanced electrical and mechanical properties. Here the authors combine Monte Carlo calculations with resistivity experiments to study the effect of filler size and shape on electrical conductivity.

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Neuronal cell-subtype specificity of neural synchronization in mouse primary visual cortex

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10498-1 Synchronised neuronal activity is essential for cortical function, yet mechanistic insights into this process remain limited. Here, authors use a combination of in vivo imaging and targeted whole-cell recordings to demonstrate that Somatostatin neurons, in the superficial layers of the mouse primary visual corte

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Single-site glycine-specific labeling of proteins

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10503-7 Single-site labelling of proteins is desirable, e.g., for analytical purposes. Here, the authors developed a method in which they use an aldol-type reaction to modify proteins at N-terminal glycine residues in an efficient and selective manner, which is also applicable to cell lysates.

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SHOC2 phosphatase-dependent RAF dimerization mediates resistance to MEK inhibition in RAS-mutant cancers

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10367-x Targeted inhibition of the ERK-MAPK pathway is challenged by the development of resistance and toxicity. Here, the authors show that SHOC2 genetic inhibition impairs lung tumour development and improves MEK inhibitor efficacy in RAS- and EGFR-mutant cells.

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Structural insights into substrate recognition by the SOCS2 E3 ubiquitin ligase

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10190-4 The suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2) is a component of the Cullin5 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Here the authors provide insights into substrate recognition and specificity of SOCS2 by determining the crystal structures of the SOCS2-ElonginB-ElonginC in complex with phosphorylated peptides from two of

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Feather moult and bird appearance are correlated with global warming over the last 200 years

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10452-1 Most passerine bird species replace part of their plumage within the first year of life. Here, using data from 4,012 individuals of 19 species, Kiat et al. find that the extent of post-juvenile moult has increased over the past 212 years and this correlated with the global temperature increase in this period.

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Three public health interventions could prevent 94 million premature deaths

Lowering blood pressure, reducing sodium intake, and eliminating trans fat could prevent 94 million early deaths around the world according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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IκBζ facilitates protective immunity against Salmonella infection via Th1 differentiation and IgG production

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44019-3 IκBζ facilitates protective immunity against Salmonella infection via Th1 differentiation and IgG production

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Wide and Deep Imaging of Neuronal Activities by a Wearable NeuroImager Reveals Premotor Activity in the Whole Motor Cortex

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44146-x Wide and Deep Imaging of Neuronal Activities by a Wearable NeuroImager Reveals Premotor Activity in the Whole Motor Cortex

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Progesterone decreases gut permeability through upregulating occludin expression in primary human gut tissues and Caco-2 cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44448-0 Progesterone decreases gut permeability through upregulating occludin expression in primary human gut tissues and Caco-2 cells

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Impacts of changes in vegetation on saturated hydraulic conductivity of soil in subtropical forests

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44921-w Impacts of changes in vegetation on saturated hydraulic conductivity of soil in subtropical forests

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Insight into the structural stability of wild-type and histidine mutants in Pin1 by experimental and computational methods

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44926-5 Insight into the structural stability of wild-type and histidine mutants in Pin1 by experimental and computational methods

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lncRNA PSORS1C3 is regulated by glucocorticoids and fine-tunes OCT4 expression in non-pluripotent cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44827-7 lncRNA PSORS1C3 is regulated by glucocorticoids and fine-tunes OCT4 expression in non-pluripotent cells

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Reciprocal cortical activation patterns during incisal and molar biting correlated with bite force levels: an fMRI study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44846-4 Reciprocal cortical activation patterns during incisal and molar biting correlated with bite force levels: an fMRI study

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Brain activity sustaining the modulation of pain by empathetic comments

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44879-9 Brain activity sustaining the modulation of pain by empathetic comments

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Three to launch 5G service in August

The firm will launch a home broadband service in London before expanding to 25 towns and cities.

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To Map a Coral Reef, Peel Back the Seawater

This scientist couple created an airborne observatory to map tropical forests. Now they’re using it to identify threatened reefs.

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Diet for One? Scientists Stalk the Dream of Personalized Nutrition

No single food regimen works for everyone. A new study is the most comprehensive effort yet to understand why.

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Biologiska processer påverkar hur arktiska vattendrag avger koldioxid

Utsläpp av koldioxid till atmosfären utgör stora utmaningar för mänskligheten då de påverkar vårat klimat. När vi hör begreppet ”koldioxidutsläpp” associerar vi det oftast med utsläpp från bilar, flygplan eller fabriker drivna av fossila bränslen, men det senaste årtiondet har forskare upptäckt att sjöar och älvar avger en betydande mängd koldioxid. – Nuvarande uppskattningar visar att bäckar, äl

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Can You Reshape Your Brain's Response To Pain?

Changing how the mind reacts to pain can reduce the discomfort experienced, according to scientists who study brain pathways that regulate pain. A new type of therapy aims to enhance that effect. (Image credit: Jessica Pons for NPR)

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Democrats by the Dozen in Iowa

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa—When Winston Churchill said democracy was “the worst form of government except for all those other forms,” he did not foresee the tailgate party that descended on northwest Iowa yesterday morning. Former Representative Beto O’Rourke’s campaign rented a taco truck and dished out free chorizo. Senator Amy Klobuchar’s gang rattled little white bells. Former Representative John Del

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Livsmedelsverket: Inte tillräckligt med stöd för att jordnötter och ägg till spädbarn minskar risken för matallergi

Det finns inte tillräckligt med stöd i forskningen för att säga om risken för att utveckla matallergi minskar om barn tidigt får pröva exempelvis jordnötter, mjölk, fisk och ägg. Det slår Livsmedelsverket och Barnläkarföreningens delförening för allergi och lungmedicin fast.

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Facebook’s AI system can speak with Bill Gates’s voice

The company’s AI researchers have developed a speech synthesizer capable of copying anybody’s voice with uncanny accuracy.

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Undetected diabetes linked to heart attack and gum disease

People with undetected glucose disorders run a higher risk of both myocardial infarction and periodontitis, according to a study published in the journal Diabetes Care by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. The results demonstrate the need of greater collaboration between dentistry and healthcare, say the researchers, and possibly of screening for diabetes at dental clinics.

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Study finds bias in postdoctoral hiring

Could your name help you or keep you from getting a job?

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Kim Dotcom fights US extradition in New Zealand's top court

Internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom and three of his former colleagues on Monday took their fight against being extradited to the U.S. to New Zealand's top court.

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'Homework gap' shows millions of students lack home internet

With no computer or internet at home, Raegan Byrd's homework assignments present a nightly challenge: How much can she get done using just her smartphone?

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Testing shows these waves are sick, in totally the wrong way

Most surfers know it's best to avoid surfing near pipes that dump storm water into the ocean soon after a storm, due to the increased chance of getting sick from bacteria that enter the surf.

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Psykiske problemer rammer oftere krigs-veteraner, der har set andre lide

Afghanistan-veteraner, der har været vidne til andres lidelse, er i højere grad ramt på psyken end dem, der selv har været i livsfare.

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Bioengineered salmon won't come from US's biggest farm state

Genetically engineered salmon is heading to store shelves in the U.S., but it won't be coming from the biggest salmon farming state in the country.

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Renault warns Nissan it will block governance reshuffle

French carmaker Renault has warned its alliance partner Nissan that it will block the Japanese auto firm's plan to overhaul its governance structure, Nissan confirmed Monday, a move it called "regrettable."

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Bioengineered salmon won't come from US's biggest farm state

Genetically engineered salmon is heading to store shelves in the U.S., but it won't be coming from the biggest salmon farming state in the country.

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Låg risk för missbildningar hos barn till fäder behandlade för testikelcancer

I en ny registerstudie från Lunds universitet har forskarna studerat barn till fäder behandlade för testikelcancer. Resultaten i studien visar att själva cancerbehandlingen inte medför en ökad risk att få barn med missbildningar.

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Courts' sentencing of Hispanic defendants differs by destination, citizenship, year

In the United States, heightened hostility toward Hispanic immigrants is common in contemporary public discourse, as are fears about Hispanic immigrants and crime. We know that the treatment of Hispanic immigrants differs depending on whether they come to areas of the United States that have historically welcomed Hispanic immigrants or to new destinations that have recently started welcoming Hispa

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Site of biggest ever meteorite collision in the UK discovered

Evidence for the ancient, 1.2 billion years old, meteorite strike, was first discovered in 2008 near Ullapool, NW Scotland by scientists from Oxford and Aberdeen Universities. The thickness and extent of the debris deposit they found suggested the impact crater—made by a meteorite estimated at 1km wide—was close to the coast, but its precise location remained a mystery.

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'They broke my mental shackles': could magic mushrooms be the answer to depression?

New trials have shown the drug psilocybin to be highly effective in treating depression, with Oakland the latest US city to in effect decriminalise it last week. Some researchers say it could become ‘indefensible’ to ignore the evidence – but how would it work as a reliable treatment? Lying on a bed in London’s Hammersmith hospital ingesting capsules of psilocybin, the active ingredient of magic

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More than a third of Europe's fastest-growing tech firms are in UK – study

Government research suggests British tech ‘unicorns’ are only surpassed by US and ChinaBritain is creating more technology companies worth at least £786m ($1bn) than any other company in Europe, …

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Conservatives should change how they think about global warming. I did | Jerry Taylor

The uncertainty of climate change is an argument for – not against – decarbonizing the economy as quickly as possible For 23 years, I worked at a libertarian thinktank, arguing against climate action. But my views have changed. I now embrace decarbonization . Why? For one thing, I’ve come to better understand risk management. The raucous political debate with denialists aside, the real debate in

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Alpernas glaciärer fortsätter smälta: ”Sedan 20 år har vi bara förluster”

Vädret i de schweiziska Alperna har gett ovanligt riklig snö den här våren. Men sett över flera år fortsätter glaciärerna att smälta och krympa. Förra året var ett år med rekordavsmältning. Experter säger att de schweiziska glaciärerna kan vara dömda att försvinna på sikt.

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The maths problem that could bring the world to a halt

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Stort studie: Så mange kommer til skade på elløbehjul

PLUS. En ny undersøgelse fra Austin i Texas viser årsagerne til ulykker ved brug af elektriske løbehjul. Og biler er sjældent involveret.

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Animal crackers: inside the world's most madcap menagerie

With its Frankenstein fauna and cosmopolitan chickens, Belgian artist Koen Vanmechelen’s eco-park puts the perverse into biodiversity A huge steel cage pokes up through the trees on the edge of Genk in eastern Belgium. It emerges from a long, dark brick building that has the fortified look of a high-security laboratory. Through narrow windows, you can make out the inanimate bodies of pigs, chicke

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The Post-Brexit Paradox of ‘Global Britain’

LONDON—Brexit is an all-consuming maelstrom of political dysfunction, one that has compelled Britain’s eyes inward. Yet amid the chaos, Prime Minister Theresa May has been steadfast in her determination that the country’s international role should not succumb to the same myopic fate as its departure from the European Union has. In the febrile early months following the June 2016 referendum when B

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Supportive families and schools help prevent substance use among trans youth: UBC study

Strong family and school connections are helping prevent transgender youth from smoking cigarettes and using marijuana, even among those targeted by violence. That's the key finding of a new national study led by researchers in the Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre in the school of nursing at the University of British Columbia.

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Chickenpox vaccination lowers risk of pediatric shingles

Kaiser Permanente-led study of more than 6 million children showed routine varicella vaccine considerably lessened likelihood of painful shingles disease.

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Waning potency of pertussis vaccine a significant contributor to recent whooping cough outbreaks

New Kaiser Permanente study suggests under-vaccination is only one factor contributing to whooping cough outbreaks.

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Rheumatoid arthritis — can its onset be delayed or prevented?

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder that leads to significant health issues as well as high treatment costs. In this themed issue of Clinical Therapeutics, published by Elsevier, experts review multiple aspects of RA detection and intervention with the overall goal of moving the field closer to developing effective preventive measures. Identifying people before

16h

Survey: Majority of current gun owners support the sale of personalized guns

A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that almost four out of five current gun owners support the sale of both traditional and personalized guns through licensed dealers. However, only 18% of gun owners reported being likely to purchase a personalized gun for themselves when considering the additional costs.

16h

Body fat distribution linked to higher risk of aggressive prostate cancer

In the first prospective study of directly measured body fat distribution and prostate cancer risk, investigators found that higher levels of abdominal and thigh fat are associated with an increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer.

16h

Marijuana and fertility: Five things to know

For patients who smoke marijuana and their physicians, 'Five things to know about … marijuana and fertility' provides useful information for people who may want to conceive. The practice article is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

16h

Canadian pediatric emergency department crowding not linked to death, serious adverse outcomes

Visiting a crowded pediatric emergency department in Canada may increase the likelihood of being hospitalized but is not linked to delayed hospitalization or death in children, according to research in CMAJ.

16h

Courts' sentencing of Hispanic defendants differs by destination, citizenship, year

A new study examined whether federal courts in areas where Hispanics have historically immigrated handed out sentences differently than federal courts in areas that are new destinations for Hispanic immigration, and how those sentences differed by citizenship. It found that disparities were lowest in areas that have traditionally welcomed Hispanic immigrants and where Hispanic immigrants were nume

16h

Bethesda's E3 2019 conference recap: Elder Scrolls, Fallout, Doom Eternal and more – CNET

Big B dropped a ton of trailers, a Doom Eternal release date and some shiny, new games.

17h

The 9 biggest announcements from Bethesda’s E3 2019 keynote

While we didn’t learn any more about Starfield or The Elder Scrolls VI — both of which were teased last year — Bethesda’s E3 keynote today still had some great reveals. Fallout …

17h

Bethesda says its Orion tech can make all cloud gaming better, faster

More efficient rendering/encoding leads to lower latency and bandwidth usage.

18h

The 14 biggest announcements for Microsoft Xbox at E3 2019

The first major E3 2019 keynote kicked things off with a bang. With Sony absent from the show, Microsoft used the opportunity to make a number of big announcements, including detailing …

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Thoughts on a Freight Bullet Train in the Future?

How would one combine a bullet train (I literally just read about a train in Japan reaching 200mph or something, so that's pretty wild) with a freight train. What types of materials could we see ourselves using 70-100 years from now for these trains? ​ How long would it take to build a new railroad systems to account for the new trains. Would the rails be the same as a more citizen or military fo

18h

Fallout 76 Aims For Redemption With Nuclear Winter Battle Royale Mode And Human NPCs

Bethesda was at E3 2019, and during its showcase, it offered up a pair of trailers that show all the gaming goodness coming to Fallout 76 this year. Gamers have been very critical of Fallout …

19h

Site of biggest ever meteorite collision in the UK discovered

Scientists believe they have discovered the site of the biggest meteorite impact ever to hit the British Isles.

20h

Amber lump holds surprising 100M-year-old creature

The discovery of a 100-million-year-old ammonite—a distant relative of modern squid and octopuses—in amber is significant and surprising, researchers say. Scientists say the lump of fossilized tree resin, from the mines of northern Myanmar, sheds light on ancient sea life. The fossil is surprising, researchers say, because amber forms on land from resin-producing plants, so it is rare to find mar

20h

The Lancet journals: Papers at American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2019

The following papers will be presented at the ADA conference in San Francisco and published simultaneously in either The Lancet or The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journals. All papers are under embargo until the stated time. Contact details for corresponding authors are provided in the Articles and linked Comments. Funding information is listed on the first page of each Article.

20h

Large international study finds diabetes drug cuts cardiovascular and kidney problems

A clinical trial that followed more than 9,900 people in 24 countries has found that the drug dulaglutide reduced cardiovascular events and kidney problems in middle-aged and older people with type 2 diabetes.During more than five years of follow-up, cardiovascular events like heart attacks and strokes were reduced by 12% in people taking dulaglutide compared to people taking a placebo. This effec

20h

Abortion narratives reveal sources of stress

Storytelling offers a new way to understand the undue stress that people experience in relation to abortion. Public narratives are an increasingly popular form of person-centered advocacy offering a forum for sharing previously untold stories. The Tennessee Stories Project—a regional initiative that provides space for people with Tennessee-related experiences to find affirmation and form communit

21h

Night owls can 'retrain' their body clocks to improve mental well-being and performance

A simple tweak to the sleeping patterns of 'night owls' — people with extreme late sleeping and waking habits — could lead to significant improvements in sleep/wake timings, improved performance in the mornings, better eating habits and a decrease in depression and stress.

21h

Hydrogel scaffold lures stem cells to wounds

Biomolecules in a hydrogel scaffold lure microscopic stem cells and will seed the growth of new tissue to heal wounds, report bioengineers. The team has developed modular, injectable hydrogels enhanced by bioactive molecules anchored in the chemical crosslinkers that give the gels structure. Hydrogels for healing have until now been biologically inert and require growth factors and other biocompa

21h

How plastic bottles are paying for lessons in Nigeria

A school in Nigeria is accepting empty plastic bottles in exchange for payment of school fees.

21h

Scientists close in on hidden Scottish meteorite crater

Evidence points to a 1.2-billion-year-old impact structure lying hidden off Scotland's north-west coast.

21h

Ancient asteroid crater located off coast of Scotland

Space object about a mile wide believed to have crashed into Earth around 1.2bn years ago The location of an ancient impact crater made by the biggest asteroid ever to hit Britain has been traced to a spot under the sea between mainland Scotland and the Outer Hebrides. Researchers at Oxford and Aberdeen universities found signs of the violent collision in Scotland on a field trip in 2008, but hav

21h

Female nurse who played crucial role in IVF ignored on plaque

Despite a senior colleague’s protests, Jean Purdy’s name was not included on memorial The name of a female nurse and embryologist who played a crucial role in developing the world’s first test-tube baby was excluded from a plaque honouring the pioneers of IVF despite objections from her colleagues, newly released letters reveal. Jean Purdy was one of three scientists whose groundbreaking work led

21h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Tariffs + Negotiations + Building a Wall = Border Security?

We’re trying something new: a once-a-week national-security-focused edition of The Atlantic ’s signature politics newsletter. Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. The Top Story A U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agent talks to people who are on the Mexican side of the border near San Diego. (Chris Wattie / Reuters) 5% tariff + negoti

21h

Predatory loans and the schools that get students to take them

Student debt is a major issue facing Americans. The problem is made worse when factoring the large number of predatory schools that exist. Students that go to these schools often take out massive loans but get little out of it. There is a student loan crisis in the United States. The massive amount of debt held by students is now the second leading cause of indebtedness in the country. The effect

22h

We Can't Stop Taking About This Robot Tank (Sitting on Russia's Doortstep)

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

22h

Podcast: Let’s Talk Restaurant Robots

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Microsoft’s Next-Gen Xbox Will Be Four Times More Powerful Than The Xbox One X

The Microsoft Xbox One X is supposed to be one of the most powerful consoles available at the moment. It has the ability to play games at a native 4K, which is pretty impressive when you consider …

22h

The Future of Xbox Is Project Scarlett and Keanu Reeves at E3 2019

The days of E3 press conferences full of dudes in suits reading off sales figures are long over. Seeing as everyone, not just journalists and shareholders, now tunes into the big event, publishers …

22h

E3: Microsoft Flight Simulator coming to Xbox, PC – CNET

The photorealistic flight sim was revealed during Microsoft's E3 conference Sunday and it's coming in 2020.

22h

Double Fine Productions is Microsoft’s latest Xbox acquisition

Kickstarter funders will still get Psychonauts 2 on their chosen platform.

23h

MRI scans to be trialled as test for prostate cancer

Simple scans ‘could revolutionise the way that we diagnose disease’, says professor Hundreds of men will be given MRI scans in a groundbreaking clinical trial that scientists say could transform screening for prostate cancer. The £5m trial, which begins in August, is pioneering a simple, 10-minute scan that scientists hope could provide the first reliable method for identifying dangerous tumours

23h

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