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nyheder2019juni11

Breakthrough in the discovery of DNA in ancient bones buried in water

Fresh evidence rewrites the understanding of the most intriguing archaeological burial site in western Finland. New DNA technology gives significant information on the bones buried in water. The DNA matches present day Sámi people, who nowadays live far from the site. The question why the bones were buried in water remains a mystery and demands further investigation.

8h

Association between medical cannabis laws and opioid overdose mortality has reversed over time [Medical Sciences]

A 2014 study by Bachhuber et al. (1) created a sensation by showing that state medical cannabis laws were associated with lower-than-expected opioid overdose mortality rates from 1999 to 2010. Cited by more than 350 scientific articles to date, the study attracted national and international media attention and was hailed…

1d

Ulovligt høje NOX-udledninger: EU-Kommissionen skjulte resultater fra test af Porsche

Kommissionens undersøgelsesenhed tilbageholdte rapport, der viste ulovligt høje NOX-udledninger hos en bilmodel fra Porsche. Kommissionen havde ingen juridisk forpligtelse til at tilbageholde denne information, men gjorde det alligevel efter forespørgsel fra Porsche.

11h

UK commits to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050

In a legally binding move, the UK government will agree this week to an ambitious target on climate change: to create a net zero UK economy by 2050

11min

Here’s what we know about the next Playstation and Xbox video game consoles

Gadgets 2020 is going to be an exciting year for video games. Next year is going to be gangbusters for new video game consoles.

20min

LGBTQ+ Youth Prefer to Seek Mental Health Help Digitally

Today, The Trevor Project published a massive survey on the lives of young LGBTQ+ people, shedding light on a mental health crisis.

20min

Here’s What a $52 Million Ticket to the ISS Will Get You

A tourist's jaunt to the ISS is the most expensive camping trip possible, complete with sleeping bag and dehydrated food. But the views are out of this world.

20min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Justin and the Giant Impeach

What We’re Following Today It’s Tuesday, June 11. Brothers K: North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un’s half-brother Kim Jong Nam, killed in a chemical-weapons attack two years ago in a Malaysia airport, was a CIA informant, according to two new accounts. In comments at the White House, President Donald Trump said, “I wouldn’t let that happen under my auspices.” “The context of his remarks makes clear th

33min

Los Angeles's homeless population up 16 percent from 2018

Los Angeles County claims nearly 59,000 homeless, a 12 percent increase, while the city itself is up 16 percent. It's not only LA: Orange County is up 42 percent; Alameda County, 43 percent; Kern County, 50 percent; and San Francisco, 17 percent. Angelenos need to make $47.52 an hour to afford the median rent price in the city. None Skid Row is unlike any other sight you'll witness in America. Th

41min

​Amazon becomes world’s most valuable brand, beating Google and Apple

Amazon's brand is valued at $315.5 billion, according to BrandZ Top 100 Most Valuable Global Brand ranking 2019. Apple comes second at $309.5 billion, and Google is third at $309 billion. "There is something going on in terms of monopoly," President Donald Trump said on Monday, referring to big tech companies. None With a brand value of $315.5 billion, Amazon is now more valuable than Apple and G

43min

Models suggest faults are linked through California's Imperial Valley

New mechanical modeling of a network of active strike-slip faults in California's Imperial Valley suggests the faults are continuously linked, from the southern San Andreas Fault through the Imperial Fault to the Cerro Prieto fault further to the south of the valley.

43min

The sun may have a dual personality, simulations suggest

A deep dive into the sun's interior provides new clues to the forces that govern that star's internal clock.

43min

Women caught in a pickle by their own immune systems

A team of scientists at Arizona State University is presenting a new hypothesis to explain why there are differences between women and men when it comes to human diseases. Called 'The Pregnancy Compensation Hypothesis,' the theory sets the stage for novel research avenues focused specifically on treating autoimmune diseases and cancer.

43min

India Just Announced That It’s Developing Space Weapons

New Challenger India announced Tuesday that it will develop new weapons systems for combat in outer space. The government approved plans to launch a weapons research agency called the Defense Space Research Agency, according to Business Standard , further establishing India’s militarized interests in space. Org Chart The scientists and engineers building space weapons for the Indian government wo

44min

How A Bird Became Flightless Through Evolution — Twice

More than 100,000 years ago, a bird flew from Madagascar to an island chain, where it lost the ability to fly. The seas rose and then fell and the bird flew back, only to become flightless again.

45min

Ebola outbreak crosses border into Uganda

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01864-6 A five-year-old boy is the first confirmed case there linked to the ongoing epidemic in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

48min

Rare 'superflares' could one day threaten Earth

New research shows that the sun could experience a massive burst of energy called a superflare sometime in the next several thousand years.

1h

Brain activation provides individual-level prediction of bipolar disorder risk

Patterns of brain activation during reward anticipation may help identify people most at risk for developing bipolar spectrum disorders (BPSD), according to a study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier. Mania in people with BPSD is often accompanied by impulsivity, including impulsive responses to potential rewards. In the study, patterns of neur

1h

Watch Deepfaked Mark Zuckerberg Rant About How He Controls You

Omnipotent Zuck UK artists Bill Posters and Daniel Howe, with the help of ad agency Canny, just uploaded a video of a deepfaked Mark Zuckerberg to Instagram. The video has a grim message, reminiscent of “Black Mirror”: Zuckerberg, the all-powerful, rants about how he holds control over billions of people. “Imagine this for a second: One man, with total control of billions of people’s stolen data,

1h

Ebola makes much-feared jump into Uganda

Boy from the Democratic Republic of the Congo who crossed border with family has a confirmed infection

1h

New Book: The US Is in a “Shadow War.” Space Is the Battlefield.

Covert Combat Jim Sciutto is CNN’s chief national security correspondent, meaning he knows a thing or two about military strategy and warfare. And right now, he believes the United States is engaged in — and losing — a war most citizens don’t even know is taking place. He calls it “the shadow war,” which also happens to be the title of his latest book . The moniker alludes to the covert nature of

1h

Kickstart a career in project management with this $39 Agile training bundle

Raise your earning potential with official accreditation Raise your earning potential with official accreditation and kickstart a career in project management with this $39 Agile training bundle.

1h

The Biggest News You Missed at E3 So Far

The 'Final Fantasy VII' remake looks, frankly, incredible. Also, everyone's launching subscription services, apparently.

1h

State Attorneys General Sue to Block T-Mobile/Sprint Merger

Nine states and the District of Columbia say the deal will reduce competition and lead to higher prices for wireless service.

1h

How Safe Is Sunscreen And How Much Should We Wear?

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Trisha Calvo of Consumer Reports about a study that finds the active ingredients in sunscreen may be absorbed into the bloodstream.

1h

Gravity ‘Anomaly’ at Moon’s South Pole Could Be Buried Metallic Asteroid

A large crater in the southern polar region appears to contain a large deposit of dense material, possibly the remains of an ancient metallic asteroid. The post Gravity ‘Anomaly’ at Moon’s South Pole Could Be Buried Metallic Asteroid appeared first on ExtremeTech .

1h

GPS is changing your brain (and it's not good)

Journalist M.R. O'Connor writes that our dependence on GPS is damaging our hippocampus, which has deleterious effects on mental health. The initial signs of dementia are short-term memory loss and disorientation; both deal with spatial orientation in some capacity. While getting lost is no fun, visual landmarking is an extremely important skill. None The bar to entry to becoming an Uber driver is

1h

American Airlines cancels 737 MAX flights through September 3

American Airlines has canceled all scheduled flights with Boeing 737 MAX jets through September 3, extending the grounding of its fleet after two crashes involving the same aircraft model killed 346 people.

1h

Two giraffes killed by lightning in Florida: park

Two giraffes were killed instantly when they were struck by lightning in the southeastern US state of Florida, the park where they resided said on Tuesday.

1h

Not Eating Enough Fruits and Veggies Could Kill Millions Every Year

(Credit: Alexander Raths/Shutterstock) An apple a day may not keep the doctor away, but several could do the trick. Millions of cardiovascular deaths around the world may be linked to a lack of fruit and vegetable consumption, according to preliminary results from a Tufts University study. Vitamins and minerals like potassium, fiber and magnesium and antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables can

1h

Global Astronomy Groups Say They're Concerned About SpaceX's Starlink Satellites

Telescopes at Lowell Observatory in Arizona captured this image of galaxies on May 25, their images marred by the reflected light from more than 25 Starlink satellites as they passed overhead. (Credit: Victoria Girgis/Lowell Observatory) Elon Musk’s company SpaceX launched 60 small satellites on May 23 as the beginning of the company's Starlink program. They're the vanguard of a planned 12,000-sat

1h

There's An Enormous, Mysterious Mass Under the Moon's Largest Crater

The South Pole-Aitken basin shows up clearly as low-lying blue in a topographical map of the moon, with the newly discovered mass located underneath the dotted line. (Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/University of Arizona) Buried under the largest, oldest crater on the moon, scientists have discovered an enormous mass of dense material, possibly the remains of the asteroid that formed the

1h

You Can Talk to Plants. Maybe You Should Listen.

An installation at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden ponders the sounds made by plants.

1h

Two giraffes killed by lightning in Florida: park

Two giraffes were killed instantly when they were struck by lightning in the southeastern US state of Florida, the park where they resided said on Tuesday.

1h

Research reveals sustainable method to produce lifesaving opiate antidotes at reduced cost

Overdose from opiates has skyrocketed. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, on average, 130 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.1 The high cost of antidotes such as NARCAN prevents many first responders from having access to lifesaving antidotes when they need it most.2 Researchers at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center have identified a new method of producing

1h

‘Ex-offenders Are Excellent Entrepreneurs’

After Maryam Henderson-Uloho was convicted of obstruction of justice, she was sentenced to 25 years in a Louisiana prison. Ultimately, she served 13 years—spending more than half of that time in solitary confinement. When she was released, she felt dehumanized. “You see, in prison, you’re broken—mentally, emotionally, and physically,” Henderson-Uloho says in the short documentary Sister Hearts .

1h

Research reveals sustainable method to produce lifesaving opiate antidotes at reduced cost

Overdose from opiates has skyrocketed. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, on average, 130 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.1 The high cost of antidotes such as NARCAN prevents many first responders from having access to lifesaving antidotes when they need it most.2 Researchers at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center have identified a new method of producing

1h

Why you may be prone to hiring a liar, and not even know it

We all say we don't like liars. But when it comes time to negotiating a big sale, it turns out we tolerate people stretching the truth, and even expect it.

1h

An unnatural way to make natural products

From medicine to fragrances, nature provides many of the key chemical compounds needed in an endless number of pharmaceuticals and consumer products. Now, a cutting-edge technique engineered by researchers at University of South Florida is changing the way scientists isolate these precious molecules.

1h

An unnatural way to make natural products

From medicine to fragrances, nature provides many of the key chemical compounds needed in an endless number of pharmaceuticals and consumer products. Now, a cutting-edge technique engineered by researchers at University of South Florida is changing the way scientists isolate these precious molecules.

1h

Superweed resists another class of herbicides, study finds

We've all heard about bacteria that are becoming resistant to multiple types of antibiotics. These are the so-called superbugs perplexing and panicking medical science. The plant analogue may just be waterhemp, a broadleaf weed common to corn and soybean fields across the Midwest. With resistance to multiple common herbicides, waterhemp is getting much harder to kill.

1h

Superweed resists another class of herbicides, study finds

We've all heard about bacteria that are becoming resistant to multiple types of antibiotics. These are the so-called superbugs perplexing and panicking medical science. The plant analogue may just be waterhemp, a broadleaf weed common to corn and soybean fields across the Midwest. With resistance to multiple common herbicides, waterhemp is getting much harder to kill.

1h

Engineers design nanostructured diamond metalens for compact quantum technologies

At the chemical level, diamonds are no more than carbon atoms aligned in a precise, three-dimensional (3-D) crystal lattice. However, even a seemingly flawless diamond contains defects: spots in that lattice where a carbon atom is missing or has been replaced by something else. Some of these defects are highly desirable; they trap individual electrons that can absorb or emit light, causing the var

1h

The 2019 Worldwide Fitness Trends

The annual survey of worldwide fitness trends is now in its 13th year — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Mysterious, Gaping Holes in Antarctic Ice Explained

The bizarre holes have been popping up sporadically in the sea ice since the 1970s.

1h

The ‘Platform’ Excuse Is Dying

Technology companies have long had a simple answer to anyone who did not like what was happening on, in, or through them: Services like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter were platforms, which merely provided the tools for free expression, and not publishers or broadcasters responsible for the content they distributed. It was in that spirit that the head of policy at Facebook, Monica Bickert, defende

1h

An unnatural way to make natural products

Researchers have developed an innovative new process for synthesizing isoprenoids, which are chemical compounds used in countless pharmaceutical and consumer products.

2h

The new Science of constructed Emotions (Video)

submitted by /u/BrainsandBehavior [link] [comments]

2h

New pathogens in beef and cow's milk products

Researchers have presented findings on new infection pathogens that go by the name of 'Bovine Milk and Meat Factors' (BMMF). According to these findings, the previously unknown pathogen can cause inflammations.

2h

Life in Antarctica's ice mirrors human disease

Mapping tens of thousands of genes from a group of Antarctic fishes called notothenioids, a team of researchers has discovered that the massive amount of genetic change required for life in the Antarctic occurred long before the Antarctic cooled. These genetic changes not only have major implications for understanding the evolution of Antarctica's unusual animals, but also highlight that some key

2h

A new candidate for dark matter and a way to detect it

Two theoretical physicists have a new candidate for dark matter and a possible way to detect it.

2h

Russian Biologist Plans More CRISPR-Edited Babies

The proposal follows a Chinese scientist who claimed to have created twins from edited embryos last year — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

To Save The Science Poster, Researchers Want To Kill It And Start Over

Scientists often share their latest research on posters displayed at big conferences. Posters are a long-standing tradition, but one reformer says they're mostly terrible and need to change. (Image credit: Courtesy of Mike Morrison )

2h

Superweed resists another class of herbicides, study finds

We've all heard about bacteria that are becoming resistant to multiple types of antibiotics. These are the so-called superbugs perplexing and panicking medical science. The plant analogue may just be waterhemp, a broadleaf weed common to corn and soybean fields across the Midwest. With resistance to multiple common herbicides, waterhemp is getting much harder to kill.

2h

Genetic marker linked to increased risk of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

This is the first real effort to have a genome wide search for genes predisposing to diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

2h

Depolarization of multidomain ferroelectric materials

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10530-4 The depolarization dynamics in ferroelectric materials is important for applications as it governs data loss. Here, the authors find a universal constant in ferroelectric materials that gives the boundary between a depolarizing and thermodynamically stable regime.

2h

Two HEPN domains dictate CRISPR RNA maturation and target cleavage in Cas13d

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10507-3 Cas13d is a class 2 type VI-D CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided RNase. Here the authors present the high-resolution crystal structure of the uncultured Ruminococcus sp. Cas13d (UrCas13d)-crRNA complex and by combining structural, mutational and biochemical studies provide mechanistic insights into the CRISPR-Cas13d system.

2h

In situ observations of an active MoS2 model hydrodesulfurization catalyst

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10526-0 Although hydrodesulfurization is a key process in the chemical industry, a deep understanding of the catalyst structure under real reaction conditions is lacking. Here, the authors combine theoretical calculations with high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy to elucidate the MoS2 catalyst structure under rea

2h

Functional traits and phenotypic plasticity modulate species coexistence across contrasting climatic conditions

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10453-0 The response of traits and their plasticity to different environments within plant communities is incompletely understood. Here, the authors use field experiments under two climatic conditions to describe the dynamic relationship between ten annual plant species in association with 19 functional traits.

2h

Record of low-temperature aqueous alteration of Martian zircon during the late Amazonian

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10382-y When liquid water was present on Mars is still debated. The authors here date the age of aqueous alteration experienced by zircons from a Martian meteorite and show that liquid water was present on Mars during the Late Amazonian, thus, in a recent past.

2h

Exploiting interconnected synthetic lethal interactions between PARP inhibition and cancer cell reversible senescence

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10460-1 Senescence induction is known to induce stable proliferation arrest. Here, the authors show that sustained PARP inhibition promotes a reversible p53-independent senescence, and that PARP inhibition is synthetic lethal when combined with senolytic agents in pre-clinical models of ovarian and breast cancer.

2h

Author Correction: The temporal dynamics and infectiousness of subpatent Plasmodium falciparum infections in relation to parasite density

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10790-0 Author Correction: The temporal dynamics and infectiousness of subpatent Plasmodium falciparum infections in relation to parasite density

2h

Tumor-associated reactive astrocytes aid the evolution of immunosuppressive environment in glioblastoma

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10493-6 Astrocytes play important roles in neuroinflammatory diseases. Here the authors characterize human glioblastoma-associated astrocytes by gene expression and demonstrate their immunosuppressive role promoted by interactions with tumor and microglia cells in an organotypic model.

2h

Malware Shut Down Philadelphia Court System for Weeks

Virus Shutdown First, the city of Baltimore was held hostage by cybercriminals. Now it’s Philadelphia’s turn. A computer virus has completely brought Philadelphia’s online court system to its knees since May 21, The Verge reports . Document filing systems, email servers, and the court’s website were taken down as a precautionary measure . Little other information has come to light — likely an att

2h

This Swedish Mining Town Is Sinking—So It's Being Moved

Austrian photographer Gregor Kallina documents Kiruna, an Arctic city in the process of relocation.

2h

A Murder Trial Will Allow DNA Evidence From a Genealogy Site

The trial, which hinges on a lead found using DNA on a genealogy site, will not address whether the new sleuthing method is legal, however.

2h

How can governments fight antimicrobial resistance with policy?

Governments have a wide variety of policy options at their disposal to respond to the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance, but many of these approaches have not been rigorously evaluated, according to a new study.

2h

Engineers design nanostructured diamond metalens for compact quantum technologies

By finding a certain kind of defect inside a block of diamond and fashioning a pattern of nanoscale pillars on the surface above it, engineering researchers can now control the shape of individual photons emitted by the defect. Because those photons carry information about the spin state of an electron, such a system could be used as the basis for compact quantum technologies.

2h

Sustainable method to produce lifesaving opiate antidotes at reduced cost

Overdose from opiates has skyrocketed. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, on average, 130 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose. The high cost of antidotes such as NARCAN® prevents many first responders from having access to lifesaving antidotes when they need it most. Researchers have identified a new method of producing these compounds using a microorganism discove

2h

Why you may be prone to hiring a liar, and not even know it

Researchers find that people don't always disapprove of deception. In fact, they perceive the ability to deceive as an asset in occupations that are stereotyped as high in 'selling orientation.'

2h

New vulnerability found in major human viruses

Discovery of a new feature of a large class of pathogenic viruses may allow development of new antiviral medications for the common cold, polio, and other illnesses, according to a new study.

2h

Veteran-directed care program is effective

A new study finds that a program that gives veterans flexible budgets for at-home caregivers is at least as effective as other veteran purchased-care services.

2h

Alabama Moves to State-Ordered Castration

Today Alabama enacted a law that will require, as a condition of parole, that some convicted child sex offenders undergo “chemical castration.” The new law will mean that those who abused children under the age of 13 will be injected with hormone-blocking drugs before leaving prison. The medication will have to be administered until a judge, not a doctor, deemed it no longer necessary. A similar

2h

Trump Sides With North Korea Against the CIA

For the second time in two weeks, President Donald Trump interrupted a busy schedule of trashing Joe Biden to say nice things about the North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un. But Trump’s decision, during remarks in Japan in May , to side with Kim over Biden was a brazen but unsurprising violation of the tradition that “politics ends at the water’s edge,” whereas his comments today were far more baffl

2h

A Russian Journalist’s Arrest Counters the Image of Putin the Puppet Master

MOSCOW—In the days following the arrest of Ivan Golunov, an investigative journalist detained on drug charges, dozens of reporters and public figures began lining up—quite literally—to take part in a peculiarly Russian form of protest: the “single picket.” Demonstrations here require an official permit, and with authorities often loath to sanction critical rallies, protesters, in an effort to eva

2h

Electronic inhaler monitoring reduces hospitalizations, ER visits in patients with COPD

In one of the first-of-its-kind studies, Cleveland Clinic researchers found that the use of electronic inhaler monitoring, in combination with a disease management program, is associated with reduced healthcare utilization in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper was published May 16, 2019 in the Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare.

2h

Behind the magic: Making moving photos a reality

UW researchers have figured out how to take a person from a 2D photo or a work of art and make them run, walk or jump out of the frame. The system also allows users to view the animation in three dimensions using augmented reality tools.

2h

How nurses bring clarity to the nature of social change

History provides an enhanced understanding of the factors that inform social policy. In the wider arena of public health and its influence on social change, the political and healing import of nursing cannot be ignored.

2h

Consequences of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Marine snow is the phenomena of flakes of falling organic material and biological debris cascading down a water column like snowflakes. But an oil spill like Deepwater Horizon will add oil and dispersants to the mix, making marine oil snow that is can be toxic to organisms in deep-sea ecosystems.

2h

New Subreddit Celebrates Bizarre Fake News Written by AI

Fake News A bizarre new subreddit called “ newsbyAI ” popped up Monday night. The idea is to post totally fake news articles written by sophisticated artificial intelligence algorithms. The posts, which range from celebrity gossip to business reporting, read almost like the real thing — further illustrating how effective artificial intelligence can be at spreading convincing fake news and propaga

2h

Drug to treat malaria could mitigate hereditary hearing loss

The ability to hear depends on proteins to reach the outer membrane of sensory cells in the inner ear. But in certain types of hereditary hearing loss, mutations in the protein prevent it from reaching these membranes. Using a zebrafish model, researchers have found that an anti-malarial drug called artemisinin may help prevent hearing loss associated with this genetic disorder.

2h

Electronic consultations can streamline, simplify care in allergy and immunology

A study finds that electronic consultations in allergy and immunology can simplify the process of providing the most appropriate care, often reducing the need for in-person specialist visits.

2h

Motorized scooter head injuries on the rise

Facial and head injuries from riding electric scooters have tripled over the past decade, according to a study.

2h

Electric vehicles would be a breath of fresh air for Houston

Researchers are expressing hope for the future of Houston's breathable air, despite the city's poor rankings in the American Lung Association's 2019 'State of the Air' report. The report, released in April, ranked Houston ninth nationally for worst ozone pollution and 17th for particle pollution. Researchers say replacing at least 35 percent of Houston's gasoline cars and diesel trucks with electr

2h

Consequences of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Marine snow is the phenomena of flakes of falling organic material and biological debris cascading down a water column like snowflakes. But an oil spill like Deepwater Horizon will add oil and dispersants to the mix, making marine oil snow that is can be toxic to organisms in deep-sea ecosystems.

2h

Catalog of north Texas earthquakes confirms continuing effects of wastewater disposal

A comprehensive catalog of earthquake sequences in Texas's Fort Worth Basin, from 2008 to 2018, provides a closer look at how wastewater disposal from oil and gas exploration has changed the seismic landscape in the basin.

2h

In wake of Trump’s fetal tissue clampdown, scientists strain to adjust

Controversial policy could entangle funding proposals in lengthy new ethical reviews

2h

Study: Gut Microbes Transform Type A Into Universal Donor Blood

Not Your Type Each person is born with one blood type — A, B, AB, and O — and it determines the type of blood they can receive in a transfusion. Inject them with the “wrong” type, and the reaction can be fatal . However, anyone can receive type O blood in a transfusion. That makes it incredibly valuable, and now researchers have discovered a way to convert type A blood into this universal donor t

2h

Why you may be prone to hiring a liar, and not even know it

Researchers find that people don't always disapprove of deception. In fact, they perceive the ability to deceive as an asset in occupations that are stereotyped as high in 'selling orientation.'

2h

Research reveals sustainable method to produce lifesaving opiate antidotes at reduced cost

Overdose from opiates has skyrocketed. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, on average, 130 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose. The high cost of antidotes such as NARCAN® prevents many first responders from having access to lifesaving antidotes when they need it most. Researchers at the Danforth Center have identified a new method of producing these compounds using

2h

'Shield' of sea creature inspires materials that can handle their own impact

Engineers have discovered what allows the tail appendage of the mantis shrimp to absorb the blows of its feisty self, with the goal of applying these lessons to protective gear.

2h

Dozing off in a meeting? It could be the air.

Health Greenhouse gases aren't great for us indoors, either. Ever sit in a meeting or lecture wondering why time slows down to an agonizing pace and your eyelids suddenly feel as if they weigh two tons? You’re not alone, and you…

3h

Dropbox is getting a massive overhaul, wants to be the center of your workflow

Like its competitors, Dropbox used to be a simple concept — a folder on your computer that seamlessly syncs with the cloud, meaning you always have a backup of your files and an …

3h

3h

If You’re Looking for an Excuse to Buy a Raspberry Pi Mini PC, Here It Is

If you’ve been thinking about getting a Raspberry Pi because you’ve heard about the all the cool things it can do, but you haven’t been quite sure where to start, today is your lucky day. Right now you can get an awesome deal on a comprehensive Raspberry Pi starter kit and training course bundle that will teach you everything you need to know, and provide you with all the hardware you need to get

3h

Penn engineers design nanostructured diamond metalens for compact quantum technologies

By finding a certain kind of defect inside a block of diamond and fashioning a pattern of nanoscale pillars on the surface above it, Penn Engineering researchers can now control the shape of individual photons emitted by the defect. Because those photons carry information about the spin state of an electron, such a system could be used as the basis for compact quantum technologies.

3h

'Sandwich' structure key to thin LSMO films retaining magnetic properties

The oxide ceramic material lanthanum strontium manganite (LSMO) retains its magnetic properties in atomically thin layers if it is 'sandwiched' between two layers of a different ceramic oxide, lanthanum strontium chromium oxide (LSCO).

3h

How fathers, children should spend time together

Fathers who spend lots of time helping out with child care-related tasks on workdays are developing the best relationships with their children.

3h

How bosses react influences whether workers speak up

Speaking up in front of a supervisor can be stressful — but it doesn't have to be, according to new research. How a leader responds to employee suggestions can impact whether or not the employee opens up in the future.

3h

Hawks' pursuit of prey has implications for capturing rogue drones

Hawks steer their pursuit of evasive prey using a feedback system that differs fundamentally from the missile-like interception system of falcons, according to a new study. This mixed guidance law allows hawks to pursue agile prey through cluttered habitats without being thrown off the pursuit by the prey's erratic escape manoeuvres.

3h

Genetics influence how protective childhood vaccines are for individual infants

A genome-wide search in thousands of children in the UK and Netherlands has revealed genetic variants associated with differing levels of protective antibodies produced after routine childhood immunizations. The findings may inform the development of new vaccine strategies and could lead to personalized vaccination schedules to maximize vaccine effectiveness.

3h

Research moves closer to brain-machine interface autonomy

A biomedical engineer reports that a brain-computer interface, a form of artificial intelligence, can sense when its user is expecting a reward by examining the interactions between single-neuron activities and the information flowing to these neurons. The work represents a significant step forward for prosthetics that perform more naturally.

3h

First cyber agility framework to train officials developed to out-maneuver cyber attacks

To help train government and industry organizations on how to prevent cyberattacks scientists developed the first framework to score the agility of cyber attackers and defenders.

3h

Early life stress plus overexpressed FKBP5 protein increases anxiety behavior

A new preclinical study finds that anxiety-like behavior increases when early life adversity combines with high levels of FKBP5 — a protein capable of modifying hormonal stress response. Moreover, the researchers demonstrate this genetic-early life stress interaction amplifies anxiety by selectively altering signaling of the enzyme AKT in the dorsal hippocampus, a portion of the brain primarily r

3h

Tracking major sources of energy loss in compact fusion facilities

Analysis of energy loss in low-aspect ratio tokamaks opens a new chapter in the development of predictions of transport in such facilities.

3h

The surprising role fibrinogen plays in regulating the body's response to disease

A finding is shining new light on the role fibrinogen has in regulating a natural defense mechanism in the body. The discovery is hoped to contribute to improved diagnosis and treatments for patients in a variety of diseases ranging from inflammation, to heart failure, to cancer.

3h

Citizen scientists re-tune Hubble's galaxy classification

Hundreds of thousands of volunteers have helped to overturn almost a century of galaxy classification, in a new study using data from the longstanding Galaxy Zoo project. The new investigation uses classifications of over 6000 galaxies to reveal that 'well known' correlations between different features are not found in this large and complete sample.

3h

Plot twist: Straightening single-molecule conductors improves their performance

Researchers have synthesized nanowires made of a single molecule of oligothiophene up to 10 nanometers in length. By forcing the molecular chain to adopt a planar conformation, they were able to significantly enhance its electrical conductivity. The findings have many potential applications for consumer electronics, especially OLED TVs and smartphone screens.

3h

Cancer survivors predicted to number over 22 million by 2030

There were more than 16.9 million Americans with a history of cancer on Jan. 1, 2019, a number that is projected to reach more than 22.1 million by 2030 based on the growth and aging of the population alone.

3h

Breakthrough in chronic wasting disease research reveals distinct deer, elk prion strains

Researchers have developed a new gene-targeted approach to study chronic wasting disease in mice, allowing opportunities for research that has not previously existed.

3h

New family on the block: A novel group of glycosidic enzymes

A group of researchers has recently discovered a novel enzyme from a soil fungus. In their study, they speculate that this enzyme plays important roles in the soil ecosystem, and then describe its structure and action.

3h

More Scientists Now Think Geoengineering May Be Essential

With carbon emissions soaring, plans to study and develop geoengineering technologies are gaining traction as a last resort.

3h

Buttigieg’s New Foreign-Policy Tune

“Basically, my entire adult life has been one where it’s a little bit illegible where you’re supposed to be as a Democrat on foreign policy,” Pete Buttigieg told me last weekend. He was preparing to give his first speech on the subject, today at Indiana University. So far, most of the Democratic candidates have avoided the question of how they’d conduct foreign policy, and the voters and the pres

3h

Kevin Durant’s Disastrous Comeback

Entering last night’s fifth game of the NBA Finals, the Golden State Warriors needed Kevin Durant . They faced elimination, trailing the Toronto Raptors three games to one in the best-of-seven series, and injuries had hampered them along the way. Durant himself had missed more than a month of the playoff run with what was termed a “calf strain,” but the team’s problems went beyond that. The shoot

3h

Good leaders don’t give advice — they coach

All managers want to see their employees thrive, but it can be tricky to maintain a balance between guiding and hand-holding. While some managers might think the best way to lead is to constantly offer their employees advice, recent research suggests that coaching employees, or helping employees maximize their own performance potential, is a more effective leadership style. Unfortunately, the per

3h

Ancient Climate Change Pushed Tropical Birds South From Canada

A Knysna Turaco (Tauraco corythaix) in South Africa. (Credit: Daniel J. Field) Many of the birds we see only in the tropics today once lived as far north as Canada and Russia. A warmer climate millions of years ago gave them free reign over more northern habitats, before gradual climatic shifts pushed them southwards, a new study shows. Now, the climate is changing again, but birds may not be able

3h

Plantearter uddør 500 gange hurtigere end det naturlige niveau

Det registrerede antal uddøde plantearter er dog meget lavere end prognoserne og relativt lavere end for fugle og pattedyr.

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Burt's Bees presents research on the proven power of naturals at the 2019 WCD

Burt's Bees, a leading provider of personal care products committed to natural skin care solutions, today announced research supporting new findings related to the skin's composition and the role of nature-based regimens to protect the skin against common environmental stressors. The studies will be presented at the 24th World Congress of Dermatology (WCD) Meeting in Milan, Italy, June 10-15, 2019

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How can governments fight antimicrobial resistance with policy?

Governments have a wide variety of policy options at their disposal to respond to the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance, but many of these approaches have not been rigorously evaluated, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Susan Rogers Van Katwyk of the University of Ottawa, Canada, and colleagues.

3h

Women with obesity prior to conception are more likely to have children with obesity

A systematic review and meta-analysis identified significantly increased odds of child obesity when mothers have obesity before conception, according to a study published June 11, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Nicola Heslehurst of Newcastle University in the UK, and colleagues.

3h

New vulnerability found in major human viruses

Discovery of a new feature of a large class of pathogenic viruses may allow development of new antiviral medications for the common cold, polio, and other illnesses, according to a new study publishing June 11, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Rana Abdelnabi and Johan Neyts of the University of Leuven, Belgium, and James Geraets and Sarah Butcher of the University of Helsinki and th

3h

Checkmate for hepatitis B viruses in the liver

Researchers have for the first time succeeded in conquering a chronic infection of the hepatitis B virus in a mouse model. The team showed in its publication, that T-cell therapy can provide a permanent cure.

3h

An hour or two of outdoor learning every week increases teachers' job satisfaction

A study has revealed how as little as an hour a week of outdoor learning has tremendous benefits for children and also boosts teachers' job satisfaction.

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Tiny light box opens new doors into the nanoworld

Researchers have discovered a completely new way of capturing, amplifying and linking light to matter at the nanolevel. Using a tiny box, built from stacked atomically thin material, they have succeeded in creating a type of feedback loop in which light and matter become one. The discovery opens up new possibilities in the world of nanophotonics.

3h

Big picture genetic scoring approach reliably predicts heart disease

Polygenic risk scores — genetic risk scores that take into account variations in a person's entire DNA — are able to predict coronary artery disease in those who have not yet had heart attacks. Polygenic risk scores are not as accurate at predicting second heart attacks. With further research and refinement, polygenetic risk scores could help individualize and target lifestyle modifications and

3h

A 'one-two punch' to wipe out cancerous ovarian cells

Researchers have developed a two-step combination therapy to destroy cancer cells. They show the superior therapeutic effectiveness of the 'one-two punch' on cells of ovarian cancer patients, based on manipulation of the state of cellular aging.

3h

Genetically Modified Wheat Found in a Field in Washington State

The unapproved crop is resistant to glyphosate in the weedkiller Roundup, but doesn't seem to have entered the food supply.

3h

A Toolmaker

Meet the University of Toronto's Yu Sun, who's work developing magnetic tweezers is featured in our Modus Operandi column.

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Knight on the Microbiome

See the University of California, San Diego’s Rob Knight give a TED Talk on the emerging importance of our microbial hitchhikers.

3h

Microbial Motors

Watch a type IV pilus, which powers some bacterial species' movement, in action.

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New vulnerability found in major human viruses

Discovery of a new feature of a large class of pathogenic viruses may allow development of new antiviral medications for the common cold, polio, and other illnesses, according to a new study publishing June 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Rana Abdelnabi and Johan Neyts of the University of Leuven, Belgium, and James Geraets and Sarah Butcher of the University of Helsinki and their co

3h

Fracking causes some songbirds to thrive while others decline

A new study finds that some songbird species benefit from the spread of fracking infrastructure while others suffer.

4h

Skinny cod and grey seal reveals troubling changes to food web in the Baltic Sea

The prime predators of the Baltic Sea at the top of the food web are losing weight, according to a new study that links the deteriorating health of gray seals and cod with changes in bottom-living crustaceans, isopods and amphipods.

4h

Novel agent reactivates an immune call by LIF blockade

Promising new therapy with a dual mechanism of action to eliminate cancer stem cells and activate the immune system now in clinical development. Findings show a reactivation of the anti-cancer alarm system and draw parallels between embryogenesis and cancer. Combining LIF-neutralizing antibodies with immunotherapy promotes tumor regression, triggers immune memory, and increases survival in animal

4h

Three parent factors that heighten the prevalence of childhood physical abuse

Adults who had parents who struggled with addiction, intimate partner violence and mental illness are more than 30 times more likely to have been victims of childhood physical abuse, new study finds.

4h

Iron may not improve fertility

A new study finds that there is no consistent association between consuming iron and becoming pregnant.

4h

A bubbly new way to detect the magnetic fields of nanometer-scale particles

The method provides manufacturers with a practical way to measure and improve their control of the properties of magnetic nanoparticles for a host of medical and environmental applications.

4h

Cornelia Marie Hits the Crab Jackpot | Deadliest Catch

With a huge winter storm closing in, Josh and Casey haul in a massive crab return. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitt

4h

A tiny crater on viruses behind the common cold may be their Achilles’ heel

Researchers have discovered a potential new drug target in a family of viruses responsible for the common cold and more serious infections.

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New vulnerability found in major human viruses

Discovery of a new feature of a large class of pathogenic viruses may allow development of new antiviral medications for the common cold, polio, and other illnesses, according to a new study publishing June 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Rana Abdelnabi and Johan Neyts of the University of Leuven, Belgium, and James Geraets and Sarah Butcher of the University of Helsinki and their co

4h

Common acne drug could prevent artery hardening

Scientists have identified the mechanism that causes artery hardening and have shown that the antibiotic minocycline can prevent the process in rats.

4h

Scientists discover gene that could help us grow crops faster

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NYT calls for "fully automated luxury communism"

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How Self-Driving Cars Could Disrupt the Airlines

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Amazon is descending on New York with another cashier-free store

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Robots in the kitchen: Automation quickly creates an American classic

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

4h

Scientists Make Fake, Biodegradable Plastic From Cactus Juice

Reduce Engineers figured out a way to cut down on the amount of single-use plastics clogging our landfills and polluting the oceans — replacing them with a material made from prickly pear cactus. The new plastic alternative, mostly comprised of juiced cactus leaves, rapidly biodegrades and doesn’t require crude oil like traditional plastics do, according to BBC News — a potentially less harmful w

4h

Radiohead Dropped 18 Hours of Unreleased Music to Screw Pirates

You can listen to the _OK Computer_–era tracks right here.

4h

State attorneys general sue to block merger between Sprint and T-Mobile

Nine states and the District of Columbia filed a lawsuit Tuesday to block the proposed merger of T-Mobile and Sprint, believing that the combination of the country’s third- and fourth-largest …

4h

Physical activity in preschool years can affect future heart health

Physical activity in early childhood may have an impact on cardiovascular health later in life, according to new research, where scientists followed the activity levels of hundreds of preschoolers over a period of years. They found that physical activity in children as young as three years old benefits blood vessel health, cardiovascular fitness and is key to the prevention of early risk indicator

4h

New family on the block: A novel group of glycosidic enzymes

A group of researchers from Japan has discovered a novel enzyme from a soil fungus. In their study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, they speculate that this enzyme plays important roles in the soil ecosystem, and then describe its structure and action. Once the usefulness of the main product of this enzyme is better understood in the future, this enzyme could also be exploited for

4h

Leatherback sea turtles likely to go extinct under Trump administration policy, lawsuit argues

Leatherback sea turtles are likely to be "effectively extinct within 20 years" if two new federal permits for fishing off the coast of California go into effect, environmental groups claim in a new lawsuit.

4h

Expert: Doctors Will Soon Prescribe Sex Robots to Patients

Alternative Medicine Not only are sex robots on the horizon, but they might one day be covered by your health insurance, according to clinical psychologist and sex therapist Marianne Brandon. During her presentation at the Applied Evolutionary Psychology Society’s Mental Health Symposium on June 4, Brandon argued that doctors might one day prescribe hyper-realistic sex robots to patients diagnose

4h

Leatherback sea turtles likely to go extinct under Trump administration policy, lawsuit argues

Leatherback sea turtles are likely to be "effectively extinct within 20 years" if two new federal permits for fishing off the coast of California go into effect, environmental groups claim in a new lawsuit.

4h

Research Institute Investigates Possible Image Manipulation in Papers

PubPeer commenters have flagged more than 100 papers from branches of the Council of Scientific & Industrial Research for apparent image duplication and other issues.

4h

What a bottled-water habit means for intake of ‘microplastics’

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01828-w People in the United States could be taking in more than 100,000 plastic particles a year in food, drink and air.

4h

India to evacuate 300,000 from cyclone

Almost 300,000 people are set to be evacuated in the western Indian state of Gujarat out of the path of a severe cyclonic storm due in two days, authorities said Tuesday.

4h

In hot water? Study says warming may reduce sea life by 17%

The world's oceans will likely lose about one-sixth of their fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says.

4h

Uber will test unmanned aircraft at Fort Worth Alliance Airport's new technology zone

Uber and other companies have a new place to test their driverless—and pilotless—technology in Fort Worth.

4h

Steven Spielberg is writing a scary series you can only stream after midnight

Renowned director, producer and writer Steven Spielberg is working on a horror series that’ll only be available to stream after midnight.

4h

The Atari VCS retro console can now be preordered from GameStop and Walmart

The long-awaited Atari VCS retro console is up for preorder starting today from GameStop, Walmart, and the company directly. It’s still months away from shipping, mind you: Indiegogo …

4h

New microorganism for algae biomass to produce alternative fuels

Biorefinery technology uses biomass as a feedstock and converts it to energy and other beneficial byproducts. It is drawing attention as an eco-friendly and sustainable technology to prepare for depletion of fossil fuels. However, the types of biomass that can be used for this technology are very limited. Starch crops such as corn are utilized as biomass (mainly glucose), but they are easily consu

4h

Inside the audacious mission to map every microbe in Australia

Billions of viruses, bacteria, and other tiny organisms live in Australia. A bold project hopes to use DNA sequencing to identify all of them – can it be done?

4h

A drug may prevent Alzheimer’s but there are no plans to find out

A treatment for rheumatoid arthritis may also cut the risk of developing Alzheimer’s, but drug companies aren’t interested in finding out if it really works

4h

En trold fra 4chan: Carl er vokset op i internettets lovløse klubhus

I dag er hjemmesiden 4chan kendt som opholdssted for ekstremister og racister. Sådan har det ikke altid været.

4h

The 10 worst insect stings in the wild

Animals Ranked by a guy who let a spider-hunting wasp sting him––in the name of science. You have to respect a guy who’s willing to let a two-inch long spider wasp sink a stinger into his arm. Scientist and author Justin O. Schmidt gets stung for a living,…

4h

New microorganism for algae biomass to produce alternative fuels

Biorefinery technology uses biomass as a feedstock and converts it to energy and other beneficial byproducts. It is drawing attention as an eco-friendly and sustainable technology to prepare for depletion of fossil fuels. However, the types of biomass that can be used for this technology are very limited. Starch crops such as corn are utilized as biomass (mainly glucose), but they are easily consu

4h

New family on the block: A novel group of glycosidic enzymes

A group of researchers from Japan has discovered a novel enzyme from a soil fungus. In their study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, they speculate that this enzyme plays important roles in the soil ecosystem, and then describe its structure and action. Once the usefulness of the main product of this enzyme is better understood in the future, this enzyme could also be exploited for

4h

New technology will significantly enhance energy harvest from PV modules

The world is inevitably moving towards a more sustainable lifestyle. Sustainability of the environment requires changes in the current way of life and introduction of new, more sustainable solutions in our everyday consumption.

4h

Chester Zoo elephant calf's EEHV survival 'momentous'

The survival of a calf which had a "lethal" virus will help the global fight against it, a zoo says.

4h

Oxidation of PKGI{alpha} mediates an endogenous adaptation to pulmonary hypertension [Medical Sciences]

Chronic hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension (PH), vascular remodeling, right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy, and cardiac failure. Protein kinase G Iα (PKGIα) is susceptible to oxidation, forming an interprotein disulfide homodimer associated with kinase targeting involved in vasodilation. Here we report increased disulfide PKGIα in pulmonary arteries from mice with hypoxic PH…

4h

Drought suppresses soil predators and promotes root herbivores in mesic, but not in xeric grasslands [Ecology]

Precipitation changes among years and locations along gradients of mean annual precipitation (MAP). The way those changes interact and affect populations of soil organisms from arid to moist environments remains unknown. Temporal and spatial changes in precipitation could lead to shifts in functional composition of soil communities that are involved…

4h

On the psychology and economics of antisocial personality [Economic Sciences]

How do fundamental concepts from economics, such as individuals’ preferences and beliefs, relate to equally fundamental concepts from psychology, such as relatively stable personality traits? Can personality traits help us better understand economic behavior across strategic contexts? We identify an antisocial personality profile and examine the role of strategic context…

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The isoprenoid alcohol pathway, a synthetic route for isoprenoid biosynthesis [Applied Biological Sciences]

The more than 50,000 isoprenoids found in nature are all derived from the 5-carbon diphosphates isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP). Natively, IPP and DMAPP are generated by the mevalonate (MVA) and 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathways, which have been engineered to produce compounds with numerous applications. However, as these pathways…

4h

Common neural code for reward and information value [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Adaptive information seeking is critical for goal-directed behavior. Growing evidence suggests the importance of intrinsic motives such as curiosity or need for novelty, mediated through dopaminergic valuation systems, in driving information-seeking behavior. However, valuing information for its own sake can be highly suboptimal when agents need to evaluate instrumental benefit…

4h

Endothelial cell Piezo1 mediates pressure-induced lung vascular hyperpermeability via disruption of adherens junctions [Medical Sciences]

Increased pulmonary microvessel pressure experienced in left heart failure, head trauma, or high altitude can lead to endothelial barrier disruption referred to as capillary “stress failure” that causes leakage of protein-rich plasma and pulmonary edema. However, little is known about vascular endothelial sensing and transduction of mechanical stimuli inducing endothelial…

4h

Global ensemble projections reveal trophic amplification of ocean biomass declines with climate change [Ecology]

While the physical dimensions of climate change are now routinely assessed through multimodel intercomparisons, projected impacts on the global ocean ecosystem generally rely on individual models with a specific set of assumptions. To address these single-model limitations, we present standardized ensemble projections from six global marine ecosystem models forced with…

4h

Massively parallel screening of synthetic microbial communities [Engineering]

Microbial communities have numerous potential applications in biotechnology, agriculture, and medicine. Nevertheless, the limited accuracy with which we can predict interspecies interactions and environmental dependencies hinders efforts to rationally engineer beneficial consortia. Empirical screening is a complementary approach wherein synthetic communities are combinatorially constructed and ass

4h

Exploration of the chemical space and its three historical regimes [Chemistry]

Chemical research unveils the structure of chemical space, spanned by all chemical species, as documented in more than 200 y of scientific literature, now available in electronic databases. Very little is known, however, about the large-scale patterns of this exploration. Here we show, by analyzing millions of reactions stored in…

4h

Quantifying the sensing power of vehicle fleets [Environmental Sciences]

Sensors can measure air quality, traffic congestion, and other aspects of urban environments. The fine-grained diagnostic information they provide could help urban managers to monitor a city’s health. Recently, a “drive-by” paradigm has been proposed in which sensors are deployed on third-party vehicles, enabling wide coverage at low cost. Research…

4h

Mechanism of CAP1-mediated apical actin polymerization in pollen tubes [Plant Biology]

Srv2p/CAP1 is an essential regulator of actin turnover, but its exact function in regulating actin polymerization, particularly the contribution of its actin nucleotide exchange activity, remains incompletely understood. We found that, although Arabidopsis CAP1 is distributed uniformly in the cytoplasm, its loss of function has differential effects on the actin…

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NAD+-capped RNAs are widespread in the Arabidopsis transcriptome and can probably be translated [Plant Biology]

As the most common RNA cap in eukaryotes, the 7-methylguanosine (m7G) cap impacts nearly all processes that a messenger RNA undergoes, such as splicing, polyadenylation, nuclear export, translation, and degradation. The metabolite and redox agent, nicotinamide adenine diphosphate (NAD+), can be used as an initiating nucleotide in RNA synthesis to…

4h

Genetic and molecular analysis of trichome development in Arabis alpina [Plant Biology]

The genetic and molecular analysis of trichome development in Arabidopsis thaliana has generated a detailed knowledge about the underlying regulatory genes and networks. However, how rapidly these mechanisms diverge during evolution is unknown. To address this problem, we used an unbiased forward genetic approach to identify most genes involved in…

4h

Music in premature infants enhances high-level cognitive brain networks [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Neonatal intensive care units are willing to apply environmental enrichment via music for preterm newborns. However, no evidence of an effect of music on preterm brain development has been reported to date. Using resting-state fMRI, we characterized a circuitry of interest consisting of three network modules interconnected by the salience…

4h

Correction for Rasmussen et al., Primitive Old World monkey from the earliest Miocene of Kenya and the evolution of cercopithecoid bilophodonty [Corrections]

ANTHROPOLOGY Correction for “Primitive Old World monkey from the earliest Miocene of Kenya and the evolution of cercopithecoid bilophodonty,” by D. Tab Rasmussen, Anthony R. Friscia, Mercedes Gutierrez, John Kappelman, Ellen R. Miller, Samuel Muteti, Dawn Reynoso, James B. Rossie, Terry L. Spell, Neil J. Tabor, Elizabeth Gierlowski-Kordesch, Bonnie F….

4h

Correction for Colon-Gonzalez et al., Limiting global-mean temperature increase to 1.5-2 {degrees}C could reduce the incidence and spatial spread of dengue fever in Latin America [Corrections]

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE Correction for “Limiting global-mean temperature increase to 1.5–2 °C could reduce the incidence and spatial spread of dengue fever in Latin America,” by Felipe J. Colón-González, Ian Harris, Timothy J. Osborn, Christine Steiner São Bernardo, Carlos A. Peres, Paul R. Hunter, and Iain R. Lake, which…

4h

Correction for Beraki et al., Divergent kinase regulates membrane ultrastructure of the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole [Correction]

MICROBIOLOGY Correction for “Divergent kinase regulates membrane ultrastructure of the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole,” by Tsebaot Beraki, Xiaoyu Hu, Malgorzata Broncel, Joanna C. Young, William J. O’Shaughnessy, Dominika Borek, Moritz Treeck, and Michael L. Reese, which was first published March 8, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1816161116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 6361–6370). The…

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Spider webs and power amplification Hyptiotes holding trap line (connected to main web). The human ability to use constructed devices such as catapults and ballistae to achieve power amplification in movement is considered unique. S. Han et al. (pp. 12060–12065) demonstrate how spider webs use power amplification to catch prey…

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Do cluster roots of red alder play a role in nutrient acquisition from bedrock? [Biological Sciences]

Perakis and Pett-Ridge (1) recently reported in PNAS that N2-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) trees obtain significantly more rock-derived strontium than 5 codominant nonfixing trees in a mixed temperate rainforest in the Oregon Coast Range. The authors ascribe this to the fact that excess fixed N generates acidity, accelerating leaching…

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Reply to Lambers et al.: How does nitrogen-fixing red alder eat rocks? [Biological Sciences]

The symbiotic nitrogen (N)-fixing tree red alder (Alnus rubra) is an ecologically and economically important species that has been studied for over 50 y (1, 2). Our recent finding that red alder can preferentially access rock-derived nutrients provides additional insight into the ecology of this N-fixing tree. Our manuscript evaluates…

4h

QnAs with Alexander Levitzki [QnAs]

Alexander Levitzki has made significant contributions to the fields of enzymology, signal transduction, and cancer research. Early in his career, Levitzki studied allosteric enzymes, followed by key discoveries about the signal transduction of G protein-coupled receptors, particularly the coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors with G proteins, which are central to cellular…

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Profile of Junying Yuan [Profiles]

Cell biologist Junying Yuan vividly remembers the moment when, during her second year of graduate school at Harvard University in 1983, a thin, restless Huntington’s disease patient was wheeled into her “Neurobiology of Disease” class. “I was appalled that modern medicine could do little for him,” she says. “He and…

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Searching for the emergence of stone tool making in eastern Africa [Anthropology]

Modern humans rely entirely on technology for their subsistence, and the interaction between technological and biological adaptations has played a key role in the evolution of our lineage. When exactly technology emerged in the fossil record and thus started to shape primate evolution has appealed to researchers since the beginnings…

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On the origin and evolution of germline chromosomes in songbirds [Evolution]

In addition to the normal set of chromosomes, eukaryote genomes sometimes also contain chromosomes that do not follow the Mendelian law of inheritance. These chromosomes, called B chromosomes, were detected in the early 20th century (1) and are believed to consist of selfish genetic elements that have parasitized the genome…

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Shift in temporal and spatial expression of Hox gene explains color mimicry in bees [Evolution]

Few insects exhibit the striking color pattern radiation found in bumble bees (Bombus) (1, 2) and some wasps (3, 4). Bumble bees have diversified globally into an unusually wide range of color patterns, many of which converge into high-fidelity Müllerian mimetic complexes across a wide geographic range. Despite extensive documentation…

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Laser- and cryogenic probe-assisted NMR enables hypersensitive analysis of biomolecules at submicromolar concentration [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Solution-state NMR typically requires 100 μM to 1 mM samples. This limitation prevents applications to mass-limited and aggregation-prone target molecules. Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization was adapted to data collection on low-concentration samples by radiofrequency gating, enabling rapid 1D NMR spectral acquisition on aromatic amino acids and proteins bearing aromatic…

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Stabilization of reactive Co4O4 cubane oxygen-evolution catalysts within porous frameworks [Chemistry]

A major challenge to the implementation of artificial photosynthesis (AP), in which fuels are produced from abundant materials (water and carbon dioxide) in an electrochemical cell through the action of sunlight, is the discovery of active, inexpensive, safe, and stable catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Multimetallic molecular catalysts,…

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Implantable multireservoir device with stimulus-responsive membrane for on-demand and pulsatile delivery of growth hormone [Engineering]

Implantable devices for on-demand and pulsatile drug delivery have attracted considerable attention; however, many devices in clinical use are embedded with the electronic units and battery inside, hence making them large and heavy for implantation. Therefore, we propose an implantable device with multiple drug reservoirs capped with a stimulus-responsive membrane…

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Archaeological evidence that a late 14th-century tsunami devastated the coast of northern Sumatra and redirected history [Environmental Sciences]

Archaeological evidence shows that a predecessor of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami devastated nine distinct communities along a 40-km section of the northern coast of Sumatra in about 1394 CE. Our evidence is the spatial and temporal distribution of tens of thousands of medieval ceramic sherds and over 5,000 carved…

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The emergence of the formal category “symmetry” in a new sign language [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Logical properties such as negation, implication, and symmetry, despite the fact that they are foundational and threaded through the vocabulary and syntax of known natural languages, pose a special problem for language learning. Their meanings are much harder to identify and isolate in the child’s everyday interaction with referents in…

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Multifunctional graphene supports for electron cryomicroscopy [Biochemistry]

With recent technological advances, the atomic resolution structure of any purified biomolecular complex can, in principle, be determined by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM). In practice, the primary barrier to structure determination is the preparation of a frozen specimen suitable for high-resolution imaging. To address this, we present a multifunctional specimen…

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Structural determinants for peptide-bond formation by asparaginyl ligases [Biochemistry]

Asparaginyl endopeptidases (AEPs) are cysteine proteases which break Asx (Asn/Asp)–Xaa bonds in acidic conditions. Despite sharing a conserved overall structure with AEPs, certain plant enzymes such as butelase 1 act as a peptide asparaginyl ligase (PAL) and catalyze Asx–Xaa bond formation in near-neutral conditions. PALs also serve as macrocyclases in…

4h

Replisome activity slowdown after exposure to ultraviolet light in Escherichia coli [Biochemistry]

The replisome is a multiprotein machine that is responsible for replicating DNA. During active DNA synthesis, the replisome tightly associates with DNA. In contrast, after DNA damage, the replisome may disassemble, exposing DNA to breaks and threatening cell survival. Using live cell imaging, we studied the effect of UV light…

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SCFFBXO22 targets HDM2 for degradation and modulates breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis [Biochemistry]

Human homolog of mouse double minute 2 (HDM2) is an oncogene frequently overexpressed in cancers with poor prognosis, but mechanisms of controlling its abundance remain elusive. In an unbiased biochemical search, we discovered Skp1-Cullin 1-FBXO22-ROC1 (SCFFBXO22) as the most dominating HDM2 E3 ubiquitin ligase from human proteome. The results of…

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Coupling of COPII vesicle trafficking to nutrient availability by the IRE1{alpha}-XBP1s axis [Cell Biology]

The cytoplasmic coat protein complex-II (COPII) is evolutionarily conserved machinery that is essential for efficient trafficking of protein and lipid cargos. How the COPII machinery is regulated to meet the metabolic demand in response to alterations of the nutritional state remains largely unexplored, however. Here, we show that dynamic changes…

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Multipotent fetal-derived Cdx2 cells from placenta regenerate the heart [Cell Biology]

The extremely limited regenerative potential of adult mammalian hearts has prompted the need for novel cell-based therapies that can restore contractile function in heart disease. We have previously shown the regenerative potential of mixed fetal cells that were naturally found migrating to the injured maternal heart. Exploiting this intrinsic mechanism…

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Quantitative proteomics of MDCK cells identify unrecognized roles of clathrin adaptor AP-1 in polarized distribution of surface proteins [Cell Biology]

The current model of polarized plasma membrane protein sorting in epithelial cells has been largely generated on the basis of experiments characterizing the polarized distribution of a relatively small number of overexpressed model proteins under various experimental conditions. Thus, the possibility exists that alternative roles of various types of sorting…

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Biological composition and microbial dynamics of sinking particulate organic matter at abyssal depths in the oligotrophic open ocean [Ecology]

Sinking particles are a critical conduit for the export of organic material from surface waters to the deep ocean. Despite their importance in oceanic carbon cycling and export, little is known about the biotic composition, origins, and variability of sinking particles reaching abyssal depths. Here, we analyzed particle-associated nucleic acids…

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A homeotic shift late in development drives mimetic color variation in a bumble bee [Evolution]

Natural phenotypic radiations, with their high diversity and convergence, are well-suited for informing how genomic changes translate to natural phenotypic variation. New genomic tools enable discovery in such traditionally nonmodel systems. Here, we characterize the genomic basis of color pattern variation in bumble bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Bombus), a group that…

4h

Predicting disease-causing variant combinations [Genetics]

Notwithstanding important advances in the context of single-variant pathogenicity identification, novel breakthroughs in discerning the origins of many rare diseases require methods able to identify more complex genetic models. We present here the Variant Combinations Pathogenicity Predictor (VarCoPP), a machine-learning approach that identifies pathogenic variant combinations in gene pairs (calle

4h

Single-cell RNA sequencing unveils the shared and the distinct cytotoxic hallmarks of human TCRV{delta}1 and TCRV{delta}2 {gamma}{delta} T lymphocytes [Immunology and Inflammation]

γδ T lymphocytes represent ∼1% of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and even more cells in most tissues of vertebrates. Although they have important anticancer functions, most current single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) studies do not identify γδ T lymphocytes because their transcriptomes at the single-cell level are unknown. Here we…

4h

The long noncoding RNA Morrbid regulates CD8 T cells in response to viral infection [Immunology and Inflammation]

The transcriptional programs that regulate CD8 T-cell differentiation and function in the context of viral infections or tumor immune surveillance have been extensively studied; yet how long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and the loci that transcribe them contribute to the regulation of CD8 T cells during viral infections remains largely unexplored….

4h

Caspase-8 promotes c-Rel-dependent inflammatory cytokine expression and resistance against Toxoplasma gondii [Immunology and Inflammation]

Caspase-8 is a key integrator of cell survival and cell death decisions during infection and inflammation. Following engagement of tumor necrosis factor superfamily receptors or certain Toll-like receptors (TLRs), caspase-8 initiates cell-extrinsic apoptosis while inhibiting RIPK3-dependent programmed necrosis. In addition, caspase-8 has an important, albeit less well understood, role in…

4h

GABA-stimulated adipose-derived stem cells suppress subcutaneous adipose inflammation in obesity [Immunology and Inflammation]

Accumulating evidence suggests that subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues are differentially associated with metabolic disorders. In obesity, subcutaneous adipose tissue is beneficial for metabolic homeostasis because of repressed inflammation. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) sensitivity is crucial in determining fat depot

4h

Human cGAS catalytic domain has an additional DNA-binding interface that enhances enzymatic activity and liquid-phase condensation [Immunology and Inflammation]

The cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS)–cGAMP–STING pathway plays a key role in innate immunity, with cGAS sensing both pathogenic and mislocalized DNA in the cytoplasm. Human cGAS (h-cGAS) constitutes an important drug target for control of antiinflammatory responses that can contribute to the onset of autoimmune diseases. Recent studies have established…

4h

Conformational plasticity of the intracellular cavity of GPCR-G-protein complexes leads to G-protein promiscuity and selectivity [Medical Sciences]

While the dynamics of the intracellular surface in agonist-stimulated GPCRs is well studied, the impact of GPCR dynamics on G-protein selectivity remains unclear. Here, we combine molecular dynamics simulations with live-cell FRET and secondary messenger measurements, for 21 GPCR−G-protein combinations, to advance a dynamic model of the GPCR−G-protein interface. Our…

4h

Gene-edited stem cells enable CD33-directed immune therapy for myeloid malignancies [Medical Sciences]

Antigen-directed immunotherapies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), such as chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-Ts) or antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), are associated with severe toxicities due to the lack of unique targetable antigens that can distinguish leukemic cells from normal myeloid cells or myeloid progenitors. Here, we present an approach to…

4h

Mechanisms by which sialylated milk oligosaccharides impact bone biology in a gnotobiotic mouse model of infant undernutrition [Medical Sciences]

Undernutrition in children is a pressing global health problem, manifested in part by impaired linear growth (stunting). Current nutritional interventions have been largely ineffective in overcoming stunting, emphasizing the need to obtain better understanding of its underlying causes. Treating Bangladeshi children with severe acute malnutrition with therapeutic foods reduced plasma…

4h

Histone deacetylase 4 promotes type I interferon signaling, restricts DNA viruses, and is degraded via vaccinia virus protein C6 [Microbiology]

Interferons (IFNs) represent an important host defense against viruses. Type I IFNs induce JAK-STAT signaling and expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which mediate antiviral activity. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) perform multiple functions in regulating gene expression and some class I HDACs and the class IV HDAC, HDAC11, influence type I IFN…

4h

Motor primitives are determined in early development and are then robustly conserved into adulthood [Neuroscience]

Motor patterns in legged vertebrates show modularity in both young and adult animals, comprising motor synergies or primitives. Are such spinal modules observed in young mammals conserved into adulthood or altered? Conceivably, early circuit modules alter radically through experience and descending pathways’ activity. We analyze lumbar motor patterns of intact…

4h

PSD-95 binding dynamically regulates NLGN1 trafficking and function [Neuroscience]

PSD-95 is a scaffolding protein that regulates the synaptic localization of many receptors, channels, and signaling proteins. The NLGN gene family encodes single-pass transmembrane postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that are important for synapse assembly and function. At excitatory synapses, NLGN1 mediates transsynaptic binding with neurexin, a presynaptic cell adhesion molecule,…

4h

TIMELESS mutation alters phase responsiveness and causes advanced sleep phase [Neuroscience]

Many components of the circadian molecular clock are conserved from flies to mammals; however, the role of mammalian Timeless remains ambiguous. Here, we report a mutation in the human TIMELESS (hTIM) gene that causes familial advanced sleep phase (FASP). Tim CRISPR mutant mice exhibit FASP with altered photic entrainment but…

4h

Adverse organogenesis and predisposed long-term metabolic syndrome from prenatal exposure to fine particulate matter [Agricultural Sciences]

Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) during pregnancy is associated with high risks of birth defects/fatality and adverse long-term postnatal health. However, limited mechanistic data are available to assess the detailed impacts of prenatal PM exposure. Here we evaluate fine PM exposure during pregnancy on prenatal/postnatal organogenesis in offspring and…

4h

Earliest known Oldowan artifacts at >2.58 Ma from Ledi-Geraru, Ethiopia, highlight early technological diversity [Anthropology]

The manufacture of flaked stone artifacts represents a major milestone in the technology of the human lineage. Although the earliest production of primitive stone tools, predating the genus Homo and emphasizing percussive activities, has been reported at 3.3 million years ago (Ma) from Lomekwi, Kenya, the systematic production of sharp-edged…

4h

My journey from tyrosine phosphorylation inhibitors to targeted immune therapy as strategies to combat cancer [Applied Biological Sciences]

Since the 1980s there has been a drive toward personalized targeted therapy for cancer. “Targeted cancer therapy” originally focused on inhibiting essential tumor survival factors, primarily protein tyrosine kinases. The complexity and rapid mutability of tumors, however, enable them to develop resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), even when these…

4h

Self-sustaining thermophotonic circuits [Applied Physical Sciences]

Photons represent one of the most important heat carriers. The ability to convert photon heat flow to electricity is therefore of substantial importance for renewable energy applications. However, photon-based systems that convert heat to electricity, including thermophotovoltaic systems where photons are generated from passive thermal emitters, have long been limited…

4h

Role of Polo-like kinase 1 in the regulation of the action of p31comet in the disassembly of mitotic checkpoint complexes [Biochemistry]

The Mad2-binding protein p31comet has important roles in the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint system, which delays anaphase until chromosomes attach correctly to the mitotic spindle. The activation of the checkpoint promotes the assembly of a Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC), which inhibits the action of the ubiquitin ligase APC/C (Anaphase-Promoting…

4h

Cardiac myosin binding protein-C phosphorylation regulates the super-relaxed state of myosin [Biochemistry]

Phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) accelerates cardiac contractility. However, the mechanisms by which cMyBP-C phosphorylation increases contractile kinetics have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that phosphorylation of cMyBP-C releases myosin heads from the inhibited super-relaxed state (SRX), thereby determining the fraction of…

4h

Torque-dependent remodeling of the bacterial flagellar motor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Multisubunit protein complexes are ubiquitous in biology and perform a plethora of essential functions. Most of the scientific literature treats such assemblies as static: their function is assumed to be independent of their manner of assembly, and their structure is assumed to remain intact until they are degraded. Recent observations…

4h

Adjustment in tumbling rates improves bacterial chemotaxis on obstacle-laden terrains [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The mechanisms of bacterial chemotaxis have been extensively studied for several decades, but how the physical environment influences the collective migration of bacterial cells remains less understood. Previous models of bacterial chemotaxis have suggested that the movement of migrating bacteria across obstacle-laden terrains may be slower compared with terrains without…

4h

A neural network protocol for electronic excitations of N-methylacetamide [Chemistry]

UV absorption is widely used for characterizing proteins structures. The mapping of UV spectra to atomic structure of proteins relies on expensive theoretical simulations, circumventing the heavy computational cost which involves repeated quantum-mechanical simulations of excited-state properties of many fluctuating protein geometries, which has been a long-time challenge. Here we…

4h

Direct high-resolution mapping of electrocatalytic activity of semi-two-dimensional catalysts with single-edge sensitivity [Chemistry]

The catalytic activity of low-dimensional electrocatalysts is highly dependent on their local atomic structures, particularly those less-coordinated sites found at edges and corners; therefore, a direct probe of the electrocatalytic current at specified local sites with true nanoscopic resolution has become critically important. Despite the growing availability of operando imaging…

4h

Using attribution to decode binding mechanism in neural network models for chemistry [Chemistry]

Deep neural networks have achieved state-of-the-art accuracy at classifying molecules with respect to whether they bind to specific protein targets. A key breakthrough would occur if these models could reveal the fragment pharmacophores that are causally involved in binding. Extracting chemical details of binding from the networks could enable scientific…

4h

Fate plasticity and reprogramming in genetically distinct populations of Danio leucophores [Developmental Biology]

Understanding genetic and cellular bases of adult form remains a fundamental goal at the intersection of developmental and evolutionary biology. The skin pigment cells of vertebrates, derived from embryonic neural crest, are a useful system for elucidating mechanisms of fate specification, pattern formation, and how particular phenotypes impact organismal behavior…

4h

Decadal trends in the ocean carbon sink [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Measurements show large decadal variability in the rate of CO2 accumulation in the atmosphere that is not driven by CO2 emissions. The decade of the 1990s experienced enhanced carbon accumulation in the atmosphere relative to emissions, while in the 2000s, the atmospheric growth rate slowed, even though emissions grew rapidly….

4h

Low-gradient, single-threaded rivers prior to greening of the continents [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The Silurian-age rise of land plants is hypothesized to have caused a global revolution in the mechanics of rivers. In the absence of vegetation-controlled bank stabilization effects, pre-Silurian rivers are thought to be characterized by shallow, multithreaded flows, and steep river gradients. This hypothesis, however, is at odds with the…

4h

Multiphase reactivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is driven by phase separation and diffusion limitations [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a key polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) often associated with soot particles coated by organic compounds, is a known carcinogen and mutagen. When mixed with organics, the kinetics and mechanisms of chemical transformations of BaP by ozone in indoor and outdoor environments are still not fully elucidated. Using direct…

4h

Role of sociality in the response of killer whales to an additive mortality event [Ecology]

In highly social top predators, group living is an ecological strategy that enhances individual fitness, primarily through increased foraging success. Additive mortality events across multiple social groups in populations may affect the social structure, and therefore the fitness, of surviving individuals. This hypothesis was examined in a killer whale (Orcinus…

4h

Reverse engineering field-derived vertical distribution profiles to infer larval swimming behaviors [Ecology]

Biophysical models are well-used tools for predicting the dispersal of marine larvae. Larval behavior has been shown to influence dispersal, but how to incorporate behavior effectively within dispersal models remains a challenge. Mechanisms of behavior are often derived from laboratory-based studies and therefore, may not reflect behavior in situ. Here,…

4h

Opinion: The proposed change to the definition of “waters of the United States” flouts sound science [Environmental Sciences]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Army Corps of Engineers (hereafter, “the agencies”) have issued a proposed rule (1) that would remove Clean Water Act (CWA) protections from more than half of wetlands and one-fifth of streams in the United States (2). This move sharply contrasts with reports indicating…

4h

Mechanistic evidence for tracking the seasonality of photosynthesis with solar-induced fluorescence [Environmental Sciences]

Northern hemisphere evergreen forests assimilate a significant fraction of global atmospheric CO2 but monitoring large-scale changes in gross primary production (GPP) in these systems is challenging. Recent advances in remote sensing allow the detection of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) emission from vegetation, which has been empirically linked to GPP at…

4h

Historical and genomic data reveal the influencing factors on global transmission velocity of plague during the Third Pandemic [Environmental Sciences]

Quantitative knowledge about which natural and anthropogenic factors influence the global spread of plague remains sparse. We estimated the worldwide spreading velocity of plague during the Third Pandemic, using more than 200 years of extensive human plague case records and genomic data, and analyzed the association of spatiotemporal environmental factors…

4h

Genomic divergence and adaptive convergence in Drosophila simulans from Evolution Canyon, Israel [Evolution]

Biodiversity refugia formed by unique features of the Mediterranean arid landscape, such as the dramatic ecological contrast of “Evolution Canyon,” provide a natural laboratory in which local adaptations to divergent microclimate conditions can be investigated. Significant insights have been provided by studies of Drosophila melanogaster diversifying along the thermal gradient…

4h

Germline-restricted chromosome (GRC) is widespread among songbirds [Evolution]

An unusual supernumerary chromosome has been reported for two related avian species, the zebra and Bengalese finches. This large, germline-restricted chromosome (GRC) is eliminated from somatic cells and spermatids and transmitted via oocytes only. Its origin, distribution among avian lineages, and function were mostly unknown so far. Using immunolocalization of…

4h

Comparative transcriptomics of 3 high-altitude passerine birds and their low-altitude relatives [Evolution]

High-altitude environments present strong stresses for living organisms, which have driven striking phenotypic and genetic adaptations. While previous studies have revealed multiple genetic adaptations in high-altitude species, how evolutionary history (i.e., phylogenetic background) contributes to similarity in genetic adaptations to high-altitude environments is largely unknown, in particular in

4h

Why haploinsufficiency persists [Genetics]

Haploinsufficiency describes the decrease in organismal fitness observed when a single copy of a gene is deleted in diploids. We investigated the origin of haploinsufficiency by creating a comprehensive dosage sensitivity data set for genes under their native promoters. We demonstrate that the expression of haploinsufficient genes is limited by…

4h

Gain-of-function mutations in a member of the Src family kinases cause autoinflammatory bone disease in mice and humans [Genetics]

Autoinflammatory syndromes are characterized by dysregulation of the innate immune response with subsequent episodes of acute spontaneous inflammation. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an autoinflammatory bone disorder that presents with bone pain and localized swelling. Ali18 mice, isolated from a mutagenesis screen, exhibit a spontaneous inflammatory paw phenotype that…

4h

BCL6 modulates tissue neutrophil survival and exacerbates pulmonary inflammation following influenza virus infection [Immunology and Inflammation]

Neutrophils are vital for antimicrobial defense; however, their role during viral infection is less clear. Furthermore, the molecular regulation of neutrophil fate and function at the viral infected sites is largely elusive. Here we report that BCL6 deficiency in myeloid cells exhibited drastically enhanced host resistance to severe influenza A…

4h

Role of thyroid dysimmunity and thyroid hormones in endometriosis [Immunology and Inflammation]

Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of ectopic endometrial cells outside the uterine cavity. Thyroid autoimmunity has been associated with endometriosis. This work investigated the potential pathophysiological link between endometriosis and thyroid disorders. Transcripts and proteins involved in thyroid metabolism are dysregulated in eutopic and ectopic endometrium of endometriotic pati

4h

Insights into IgM-mediated complement activation based on in situ structures of IgM-C1-C4b [Immunology and Inflammation]

Antigen binding by serum Ig-M (IgM) protects against microbial infections and helps to prevent autoimmunity, but causes life-threatening diseases when mistargeted. How antigen-bound IgM activates complement-immune responses remains unclear. We present cryoelectron tomography structures of IgM, C1, and C4b complexes formed on antigen-bearing lipid membranes by normal human serum at…

4h

An activatable PET imaging radioprobe is a dynamic reporter of myeloperoxidase activity in vivo [Medical Sciences]

Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a critical proinflammatory enzyme implicated in cardiovascular, neurological, and rheumatological diseases. Emerging therapies targeting inflammation have raised interest in tracking MPO activity in patients. We describe 18F-MAPP, an activatable MPO activity radioprobe for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The activated radioprobe binds to proteins and accumulate

4h

Perfluorocarbon nanoparticle-mediated platelet inhibition promotes intratumoral infiltration of T cells and boosts immunotherapy [Medical Sciences]

Cancer immunotherapy can stimulate and enhance the ability of the immune system to recognize, arrest, and eliminate tumor cells. Immune checkpoint therapies (e.g., PD-1/PD-L1) have shown an unprecedented and durable clinical response rate in patients among various cancer types. However, a large fraction of patients still does not respond to…

4h

Photocontrollable mononegaviruses [Microbiology]

Mononegaviruses are promising tools as oncolytic vectors and transgene delivery vectors for gene therapy and regenerative medicine. By using the Magnet proteins, which reversibly heterodimerize upon blue light illumination, photocontrollable mononegaviruses (measles and rabies viruses) were generated. The Magnet proteins were inserted into the flexible domain of viral polymerase, and…

4h

Kinase pathway inhibition restores PSD95 induction in neurons lacking fragile X mental retardation protein [Neuroscience]

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading monogenic cause of autism and intellectual disability. FXS is caused by loss of expression of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein that regulates translation of numerous mRNA targets, some of which are present at synapses. While protein synthesis deficits have…

4h

Analysis of phototoxin taste closely correlates nucleophilicity to type 1 phototoxicity [Neuroscience]

Pigments often inflict tissue-damaging and proaging toxicity on light illumination by generating free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the molecular mechanism by which organisms sense phototoxic pigments is unknown. Here, we discover that Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1-A isoform [TRPA1(A)], previously shown to serve as a receptor for…

4h

High sensitivity and interindividual variability in the response of the human circadian system to evening light [Neuroscience]

Before the invention of electric lighting, humans were primarily exposed to intense (>300 lux) or dim (<30 lux) environmental light—stimuli at extreme ends of the circadian system’s dose–response curve to light. Today, humans spend hours per day exposed to intermediate light intensities (30–300 lux), particularly in the evening. Interindividual differences…

4h

Variable G protein determinants of GPCR coupling selectivity [Pharmacology]

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) activate four families of heterotrimeric G proteins, and individual receptors must select a subset of G proteins to produce appropriate cellular responses. Although the precise mechanisms of coupling selectivity are uncertain, the Gα subunit C terminus is widely believed to be the primary determinant recognized by…

4h

Quantum phase-sensitive diffraction and imaging using entangled photons [Physics]

We propose a quantum diffraction imaging technique whereby one photon of an entangled pair is diffracted off a sample and detected in coincidence with its twin. The image is obtained by scanning the photon that did not interact with matter. We show that when a dynamical quantum system interacts with…

4h

External power amplification drives prey capture in a spider web [Physiology]

Power amplification allows animals to produce movements that exceed the physiological limits of muscle power and speed, such as the mantis shrimp’s ultrafast predatory strike and the flea’s jump. However, all known examples of nonhuman, muscle-driven power amplification involve anatomical structures that store energy from a single cycle of muscular…

4h

Direct visualization of cAMP signaling in primary cilia reveals up-regulation of ciliary GPCR activity following Hedgehog activation [Physiology]

The primary cilium permits compartmentalization of specific signaling pathways, including elements of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway. Hh transcriptional activity is thought to be negatively regulated by constitutively high ciliary cAMP maintained by the Gα(s)-coupled GPCR, GPR161. However, cilia also sequester many other Gα(s)-coupled GPCRs with unknown potential to regulate Hh….

4h

NAD tagSeq reveals that NAD+-capped RNAs are mostly produced from a large number of protein-coding genes in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

The 5′ end of a eukaryotic mRNA transcript generally has a 7-methylguanosine (m7G) cap that protects mRNA from degradation and mediates almost all other aspects of gene expression. Some RNAs in Escherichia coli, yeast, and mammals were recently found to contain an NAD+ cap. Here, we report the development of…

4h

Individual differences in visual salience vary along semantic dimensions [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

What determines where we look? Theories of attentional guidance hold that image features and task demands govern fixation behavior, while differences between observers are interpreted as a “noise-ceiling” that strictly limits predictability of fixations. However, recent twin studies suggest a genetic basis of gaze-trace similarity for a given stimulus. This…

4h

Historical roots of implicit bias in slavery [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Implicit racial bias remains widespread, even among individuals who explicitly reject prejudice. One reason for the persistence of implicit bias may be that it is maintained through structural and historical inequalities that change slowly. We investigated the historical persistence of implicit bias by comparing modern implicit bias with the proportion…

4h

A scarcity mindset alters neural processing underlying consumer decision making [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Not having enough of what one needs has long been shown to have detrimental consequences for decision making. Recent work suggests that the experience of insufficient resources can create a “scarcity” mindset; increasing attention toward the scarce resource itself, but at the cost of attention for unrelated aspects. To investigate…

4h

Veteran-directed care program is effective

A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System researchers finds that a program that gives veterans flexible budgets for at-home caregivers is at least as effective as other veteran purchased-care services.

5h

Team investigates consequences of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

If you were able to stand on the bottom of the seafloor and look up, you would see flakes of falling organic material and biological debris cascading down the water column like snowflakes in a phenomenon known as marine snow.

5h

Want effective policy? Ask the locals

As multinational organizations such as the United Nations strive to improve life for people across the globe through initiatives like the Sustainable Development Goals, there is a tendency to look for indicators that can be used across the board to drive policy aimed at achieving these objectives. However, analysis of a survey conducted across 37 nations by researchers at Kyushu University in Japa

5h

21st century archaeology has rediscovered historical Cordoba

On the land where Cordoba is located in the 21st century, two cities coexisted in the past, each on a hill. An Iberian city was located where Cruz Conde Park lies today, and a Roman city, which was founded at a later time, was located about 500 meters away. Archaeology has had to depend upon geological studies up to now in order to determine how the city developed throughout history, but now, than

5h

Breakthrough in the discovery of DNA in ancient bones buried in water

Fresh evidence rewrites the understanding of the most intriguing archaeological burial site in western Finland. New DNA technology gives significant information on the bones buried in water. The DNA matches that of present day Sámi people, who nowadays live far from the site. The question of why the bones were buried in water remains a mystery and demands further investigation.

5h

Father’s Day gifts for perfect pops

Gadgets Give them a big hug. With presents. Father's Day is your chance to be extra nice to your dad. In other words, give them a great gift.

5h

Beewolves use a gas to preserve food

Scientists from the Universities of Regensburg and Mainz and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology discovered that the eggs of the European beewolf produce nitric oxide. The gas prevents the larvae's food from getting moldy in the warm and humid brood cells. The results were published in the journal eLife.

5h

Tube anemone has the largest animal mitochondrial genome ever sequenced

The tube anemone Isarachnanthus nocturnus is only 15 cm long but has the largest mitochondrial genome of any animal sequenced to date, with 80,923 base pairs. The human mitochondrial genome (mitogenome), for example, comprises 16,569 base pairs.

5h

Beewolves use a gas to preserve food

Scientists from the Universities of Regensburg and Mainz and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology discovered that the eggs of the European beewolf produce nitric oxide. The gas prevents the larvae's food from getting moldy in the warm and humid brood cells. The results were published in the journal eLife.

5h

Tube anemone has the largest animal mitochondrial genome ever sequenced

The tube anemone Isarachnanthus nocturnus is only 15 cm long but has the largest mitochondrial genome of any animal sequenced to date, with 80,923 base pairs. The human mitochondrial genome (mitogenome), for example, comprises 16,569 base pairs.

5h

Saturn's moon Mimas, a snowplow in the planet's rings

The Solar System's second largest planet both in mass and size, Saturn is best known for its rings. These are divided by a wide band, the Cassini Division, whose formation was poorly understood until very recently. Now, researchers from the CNRS, the Paris Observatory—PSL and the University of Franche-Comté have shown that Mimas, one of Saturn's moons, acted as a kind of remote snowplough, pushing

5h

Study: Plant Species Lost at Alarming Rate

The most extensive global survey of plant extinctions to date reveals cause for concern.

5h

Foxconn Says Production Of US iPhones Can Be Moved Outside China

There has been a lot of speculation about what the ongoing trade war between the United States and China might mean for iPhones that are destined for Apple’s home country. The units …

5h

Tracking major sources of energy loss in compact fusion facilities

A key obstacle to controlling on Earth the fusion that powers the sun and stars is leakage of energy and particles from plasma, the hot, charged state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei that fuels fusion reactions. At the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), physicists have been focusing on validating computer simulations that forecast e

5h

Catalog of north Texas earthquakes confirms continuing effects of wastewater disposal

A comprehensive catalog of earthquake sequences in Texas's Fort Worth Basin, from 2008 to 2018, provides a closer look at how wastewater disposal from oil and gas exploration has changed the seismic landscape in the basin.

5h

WSF19: Can We Cure Deafness and Blindness?

Marlee Matlin. Photo: World Science Festival When Marlee Matlin won an Academy Award for “Best Actress” in 1987 at age 21, it was groundbreaking for a few reasons. Not only was it her first role in a movie, but Matlin was (and still is) the youngest nominee to receive an Oscar in the Best Actress category. She also made Hollywood history that year for being the first deaf person to ever receive t

5h

Touted as 'development,' land grabs hurt local communities, and women most of all

Large-scale land transactions in which nations sell huge, publicly owned parcels to foreign and domestic corporations negatively affect local women more than men, a new study by Oregon State University shows.

5h

Researchers reveal key role of pressure-sensing protein in lung edema

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago describe for the first time the role of a unique, pressure-sensing protein in the development of lung edema — a condition in which chronic high vascular pressure in the lungs causes fluid from the bloodstream to enter the air spaces of the lungs.

5h

Tracking major sources of energy loss in compact fusion facilities

Analysis of energy loss in low-aspect ratio tokamaks opens a new chapter in the development of predictions of transport in such facilities.

5h

Early life stress plus overexpressed FKBP5 protein increases anxiety behavior

A new preclinical study by University of South Florida neuroscientists finds that anxiety-like behavior increases when early life adversity combines with high levels of FKBP5 — a protein capable of modifying hormonal stress response. Moreover, the researchers demonstrate this genetic-early life stress interaction amplifies anxiety by selectively altering signaling of the enzyme AKT in the dorsal

5h

Emissions rose an 'unsustainable' 2% in 2018: study

Global carbon emissions grew by 2.0 percent last year, the highest rate since 2010-2011, a closely-watched review by energy giant BP said Tuesday, calling the trend "unsustainable".

5h

Ryanair buys Malta Air startup to target African markets

Irish no-frills airline Ryanair said Tuesday that it will buy Maltese startup Malta Air, forming a new division that reaches more markets in north Africa from the Mediterranean island.

5h

Uber hurt by political 'market swirl' after IPO, CEO says

Uber chief executive Dara Khosrowshahi said Tuesday the company's slump following its share offering last month was due to a "market swirl" over tariffs that won't affect its long-term performance.

5h

Planet Plates, Metal Moon, and Comet Cocktails

A roundup of some recent astrobiology-related science news — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

New Law: Alabama Will Chemically Castrate Pedophiles

Bama Some Alabama prisoners who committed sexual crimes against minors will be chemically castrated, according to a new law signed by Governor Kay Ivey on Monday. This makes Alabama the seventh U.S. state with a chemical castration law, according to BBC News . The law dictates that sex offenders seeking parole will need to take drugs meant to block testosterone production and eliminate sex drive

5h

Catalog of north Texas earthquakes confirms continuing effects of wastewater disposal

A comprehensive catalog of earthquake sequences in Texas's Fort Worth Basin, from 2008 to 2018, provides a closer look at how wastewater disposal from oil and gas exploration has changed the seismic landscape in the basin.

5h

Researchers develop tool to predict postoperative delirium severity

A new tool seeks to predict the severity of patients' postoperative delirium and help practitioners more effectively care for patients as they recover from elective surgery. Regenstrief Institute postdoctoral scholar Heidi Lindroth will discuss in a symposium at upcoming American Delirium Society Annual Meeting. Research and details on the tool are published in International Journal of Geriatric P

5h

Motorized scooter head injuries on the rise, Rutgers study finds

Facial and head injuries from riding electric scooters have tripled over the past decade, according to a Rutgers study.

5h

Electronic consultations can streamline, simplify care in allergy and immunology

A study from Massachusetts General Hospital researchers finds that electronic consultations in allergy and immunology can simplify the process of providing the most appropriate care, often reducing the need for in-person specialist visits.

5h

New research shows dramatic increase in Ontario teens visiting an ED for self-harm

Adolescents who intentionally harm themselves by poisoning or injuring themselves are at risk for repeated self-harm or suicide. A new CHEO and uOttawa study released today in the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry shows a dramatic increase in the number of Ontario adolescents who presented to an emergency department for self-harm between 2009 and 2017.

5h

Too many businesses failing to properly embrace AI into processes, not reaping benefits

Businesses actively embracing artificial intelligence and striving to bring technological advancements into their operations are reaping dividends not seen by companies who fail to properly adapt and adopt.

5h

How bosses react influences whether workers speak up

Speaking up in front of a supervisor can be stressful—but it doesn't have to be, according to new research from a Rice University psychologist. How a leader responds to employee suggestions can impact whether or not the employee opens up in the future.

5h

Too many businesses failing to properly embrace AI into processes, not reaping benefits

Businesses actively embracing artificial intelligence and striving to bring technological advancements into their operations are reaping dividends not seen by companies who fail to properly adapt and adopt.

5h

Penn State researchers to boost endangered Chesapeake logperch population

As fishes go, the Chesapeake logperch is hardly impressive.

5h

States sue to stop $26.5 billion Sprint-T-Mobile deal

A group of state attorneys general led by New York and California filed a federal lawsuit Tuesday to block T-Mobile's $26.5 billion bid for Sprint, citing consumer harm.

5h

How to have better, more productive disagreements with people

When you find yourself in a disagreement with someone – whether you are discussing politics or football – you probably tend to view the experience as a waste of time. Humans are stubborn creatures because we need to validate our own egos. That means no one wants to "give in." We all want to "win" the argument. However, as Julia Galef, President of the Center for Applied Rationality, demonstrates

5h

Penn State researchers to boost endangered Chesapeake logperch population

As fishes go, the Chesapeake logperch is hardly impressive.

5h

Bilden av Sverige som alliansfritt stämmer inte längre

Stödet för Natomedlemskap har ökat i Sverige under senare år. Samtidigt är alliansfriheten och bilden av Sverige som ett neutralt land något som många svenskar värnar om. Detta är en omöjlig kombination, skriver tre forskare i en artikel i den vetenskapliga tidskriften Defence Studies. De tre forskarna, Joakim Berndtsson (Göteborgs universitet), Karl Ydén (Chalmers tekniska högskola) och Magnus P

5h

Samsung's New Galaxy A-Series Phones Bring Mid-Range Flair To US Starting At $179

Earlier this year, Samsung rolled out its Galaxy S10 family of devices which include the Galaxy S10e, Galaxy S10, Galaxy S10+ and Galaxy S10 5G. However, those are rather expensive flagships …

5h

Radiohead Is Selling Its 'Hacked' Archives In the Name of Climate Change

If you hate climate change but love Radiohead, man do I have a two-for-one deal for you. The band has released 18 hours of OK Computer-era recordings it says were being held for ransom after …

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'Sandwich' structure key to thin LSMO films retaining magnetic properties

Researchers at North Carolina State University have found that the oxide ceramic material lanthanum strontium manganite (LSMO) retains its magnetic properties in atomically thin layers if it is "sandwiched" between two layers of a different ceramic oxide, lanthanum strontium chromium oxide (LSCO). The findings have implications for future use of LSMO in spintronic-based computing and storage devic

5h

Daily briefing: Fertilize oceans or seed clouds? No one knows

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01854-8 We lack even basic scientific evidence about marine geoengineering, the largest plant survey ever reveals an alarming extinction rate and a molecular biologist plans more CRISPR babies.

5h

Are McMansions Making People Unhappy?

American homes are a lot bigger than they used to be. In 1973, when the Census Bureau started tracking home sizes, the median size of a newly built house was just over 1,500 square feet ; that figure reached nearly 2,500 square feet in 2015. This rise, combined with a drop in the average number of people per household, has translated to a whole lot more room for homeowners and their families: By

5h

Why Meryl Streep’s Sly Matriarch Works So Well on Big Little Lies

This article contains spoilers through Season 2, Episode 1 of Big Little Lies . Guilt has always loomed over the women of Big Little Lies , even before they got away with murder. In its first season, HBO’s adaptation of Liane Moriarty’s best seller augmented the novel’s sharp observations about motherhood with an invented subplot following Madeline (Reese Witherspoon) and her efforts to put on a

5h

Drug to treat malaria could mitigate hereditary hearing loss

The ability to hear depends on proteins to reach the outer membrane of sensory cells in the inner ear. But in certain types of hereditary hearing loss, mutations in the protein prevent it from reaching these membranes. Using a zebrafish model, researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have found that an anti-malarial drug called artemisinin may help prevent hearing loss ass

5h

'Sandwich' structure key to thin LSMO films retaining magnetic properties

The oxide ceramic material lanthanum strontium manganite (LSMO) retains its magnetic properties in atomically thin layers if it is 'sandwiched' between two layers of a different ceramic oxide, lanthanum strontium chromium oxide (LSCO).

5h

Cancer Survivors Deserve Coordinated Care

I know, because I’m a survivor too — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Cancer Survivors Deserve Coordinated Care

I know, because I’m a survivor too — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Record Rain Is Drowning Fields in the Midwest — Is It Climate Change?

Heavy rains and flooding through the winter and spring have left fields across the Midwest too wet to plant. (Credit: Matauw/Shutterstock) Every spring, farmers across the Midwest take to the fields to plant their crops. Here, corn and soybeans will reign supreme over tens of millions of acres, as soon as conditions are right to plant. Not too wet, not too dry – just right. But the U.S. had an exc

6h

Opera launches the 'world's first gaming browser'

Usually, when we think of E3 announcements, we think of big gaming companies like Square Enix, Bethesda, EA, and others wowing us with their newest game releases. Sony and Microsoft have often …

6h

The True Price of Privatizing Space Travel

On New Year’s Day 2001, the first crew of the International Space Station spent a quiet day in orbit. The commander, U.S. Navy Captain William Shepherd, decided to honor a naval New Year’s tradition, in which the person at the helm recites a poem. Shepherd had written something for the occasion, which included the following, recorded in the ship’s log: Though star trackers mark Altair and Vega /

6h

Study: Intelligence community benefits from collaborations, but can do better

An analysis of U.S. intelligence programs aimed at collaborating with academic and industry partners finds that these collaborations are valuable for addressing complex intelligence challenges. The study also notes that institutional silos, lack of information sharing and lack of trust are obstacles to getting the most out of these collaborative efforts.

6h

From face to DNA: New method aims to improve match between DNA sample and face database

Predicting what someone's face looks like based on a DNA sample remains a hard nut to crack for science. It is, however, getting easier to use such a sample to filter the right face from a face database, as an international team led by KU Leuven has shown. Their findings were published in Nature Communications.

6h

From face to DNA: New method aims to improve match between DNA sample and face database

Predicting what someone's face looks like based on a DNA sample remains a hard nut to crack for science. It is, however, getting easier to use such a sample to filter the right face from a face database, as an international team led by KU Leuven has shown. Their findings were published in Nature Communications.

6h

NYT Calls For “Fully Automated Luxury Communism”

One For All Lab-grown meat could feed the world. Renewable energy could power it. Automation could save us from mind-numbing jobs. But only if capitalism is replaced with a form of communism that deploys these technologies to the benefit of the many. At least, that’s the argument in a new New York Times op-ed , where author Aaron Bastani makes the case for what he calls “fully automated luxury co

6h

The surprising role fibrinogen plays in regulating the body's response to disease

A finding from University of Alberta researchers is shining new light on the role fibrinogen has in regulating a natural defence mechanism in the body. The discovery is hoped to contribute to improved diagnosis and treatments for patients in a variety of diseases ranging from inflammation, to heart failure, to cancer.

6h

Marine oil snow

Marine snow is the phenomena of flakes of falling organic material and biological debris cascading down a water column like snowflakes. But an oil spill like Deepwater Horizon will add oil and dispersants to the mix, making marine oil snow that is can be toxic to organisms in deep-sea ecosystems.

6h

NASA takes Tropical Cyclone's Vayu's temperature

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean and took the temperature of Tropical Cyclone Vayu as it moved northward in the Arabian Sea. NASA found the storm intensifying/ Warnings are now in effect for India's Gujarat coast.

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NASA takes Tropical Cyclone's Vayu's temperature

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean and took the temperature of Tropical Cyclone Vayu as it moved northward in the Arabian Sea. NASA found the storm intensifying/ Warnings are now in effect for India's Gujarat coast.

6h

Electric vehicles would be a breath of fresh air for Houston

Cornell University researchers are expressing hope for the future of Houston's breathable air, despite the city's poor rankings in the American Lung Association's 2019 "State of the Air" report.

6h

First study of world's largest marine stingray reveals long-distance migration

Smalleye stingrays are the largest marine stingrays on record, reaching disc widths of up to 222 cm, and yet almost nothing is known about them. Scientists from the Marine Megafauna Foundation have for the first time used photo IDs to study this elusive animal in southern Mozambique, one of the only locations where it is regularly seen in the wild. Their findings are published today in the journal

6h

First study of world's largest marine stingray reveals long-distance migration

Smalleye stingrays are the largest marine stingrays on record, reaching disc widths of up to 222 cm, and yet almost nothing is known about them. Scientists from the Marine Megafauna Foundation have for the first time used photo IDs to study this elusive animal in southern Mozambique, one of the only locations where it is regularly seen in the wild. Their findings are published today in the journal

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Space telescope to chart first map of the Universe in high-energy X-rays

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01831-1 A German–Russian mission called SRG will detect millions of supermassive black holes, many new to science, and hundreds of thousands of stars.

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All växtutrotning i världen kartlagd för första gången

Minst 571 växter har utrotats de senaste 250 åren och flest har försvunnit från öar, där ekosystemen är mest känsliga för förändring. Det visar en ny studie från bland annat Stockholms Universitet.

6h

12,000-Year-Old 'Headless' Horse Engraving Discovered in France

Archaeologists have discovered 12,000-year-old engravings of a horse and four other animals etched by Stone Age artists into sandstone in what is now southwestern France.

6h

Can you really choose to be happy? 'Yes', says neuroscience.

We live in our emotions, explains renowned medical researcher Dr. Rudolph Tanzi. Our emotions and overall outlook on life correspond to different parts of the brain. How you decide to approach your life determines which parts of your brain become activated. If you allow fear and worry to rule you, the brain stem is exercised. If you embrace things like creativity, empathy, and community, you acti

6h

I Wrote This on a 30-Year-Old Computer

Everything about this computer is loud: The groan of the power supply is loud. The hum of the cooling fan is loud. The whir of the hard disk is loud. The clack of the mechanical keyboard is loud. It’s so loud I can barely think, the kind of noise I usually associate with an airline cabin: whoom , whoom , whoom , whoom . This is the experience a computer user would have had every time she booted u

6h

NASA Head: Trump’s Moon Tweet Doesn’t Change Anything

Moon Tweet Beat On Friday, U.S. President Donald Trump gave NASA an order that left much of the space-loving community — Futurism included — scratching their heads . “NASA should NOT be talking about going to the Moon,” he asserted in a tweet , before charging that the agency should instead be focused on “Mars (of which the Moon is a part).” Now, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine has stepped up

6h

Act now on CRISPR babies

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01786-3 Another researcher has announced controversial plans to gene edit babies. The scientific community must intervene.

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How bosses react influences whether workers speak up

Speaking up in front of a supervisor can be stressful — but it doesn't have to be, according to new research from a Rice University psychologist. How a leader responds to employee suggestions can impact whether or not the employee opens up in the future.

6h

Saturn's moon Mimas, a snowplough in the planet's rings

The Solar System's second largest planet both in mass and size, Saturn is best known for its rings. These are divided by a wide band, the Cassini Division, whose formation was poorly understood until very recently. Now, researchers have shown that Mimas, one of Saturn's moons, acted as a kind of remote snowplough, pushing apart the ice particles that make up the rings.

6h

First cyber agility framework to train officials developed to out-maneuver cyber attacks

To help train government and industry organizations on how to prevent cyberattacks, as part of a research project for the US Army, scientists at The University of Texas at San Antonio, developed the first framework to score the agility of cyber attackers and defenders.

6h

Research moves closer to brain-machine interface autonomy

A University of Houston biomedical engineer reports in eNeuro that a brain-computer interface, a form of artificial intelligence, can sense when its user is expecting a reward by examining the interactions between single-neuron activities and the information flowing to these neurons. The work represents a significant step forward for prosthetics that perform more naturally.

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How fathers, children should spend time together

Fathers who spend lots of time helping out with child care-related tasks on workdays are developing the best relationships with their children.

6h

Lower rates of opioid prescriptions in states that implemented medical cannabis use laws

Using data from privately-insured adults, new findings from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston revealed that there is a lower level of opioids prescribed in states that have allowed the use of medical marijuana.

6h

Electric vehicles would be a breath of fresh air for Houston

Cornell University researchers are expressing hope for the future of Houston's breathable air, despite the city's poor rankings in the American Lung Association's 2019 'State of the Air' report. The report, released in April, ranked Houston ninth nationally for worst ozone pollution and 17th for particle pollution. Researchers say replacing at least 35 percent of Houston's gasoline cars and diesel

6h

Indoor tanning may be an addiction abetted by both genetic and psychiatric factors

A combination of elevated symptoms of depression along with modifications in a gene responsible for dopamine activity, important to the brain's pleasure and reward system, appear to influence an addiction to indoor tanning in young, white non-Hispanic women.

6h

Want effective policy? Ask the locals

Based on a survey of over 100,000 respondents in 37 countries, researchers at Kyushu University in Japan report that regional economic, developmental, and cultural factors greatly influence the relationships among self-reported levels of energy affordability, life satisfaction, health, and economic inequality. The findings indicate that policy should be culturally aware with respect to each nation

6h

Red blood cell donor pregnancy history not tied to mortality after transfusion

A new study has found that the sex or pregnancy history of red blood cell donors does not influence the risk of death among patients who receive their blood. The study adds to a growing body of literature examining whether blood donor characteristics such as sex, age, and pregnancy history affect the survival of transfused patients.

6h

Hawks' pursuit of prey has implications for capturing rogue drones

Hawks steer their pursuit of evasive prey using a feedback system that differs fundamentally from the missile-like interception system of falcons, according to a new study led by scientists at the University of Oxford, Department of Zoology, published today in Nature Communications. This mixed guidance law allows hawks to pursue agile prey through cluttered habitats without being thrown off the pu

6h

Holistic view of planning energy self-sufficient communities

By using energy-efficient buildings and distributing means of energy generation throughout buildings, sustainable communities can achieve a yearly net zero energy balance. However, this glosses over the local energy fluctuations that can challenge the supporting power grid. Researchers have now integrated power grid considerations into the model of a planned net zero energy district and examined e

6h

Hybrid device may help doctors treat strokes more quickly

Stroke, one of the leading causes of death worldwide, is normally caused by poor blood flow to the brain, or cerebral ischemia. This must be diagnosed within the first few hours of the stroke for treatment to be effective. Researchers have developed a device that uses near-infrared light to monitor blood flow. The hybrid instrument, which relies on the combination of two light measurement techniqu

6h

Cause of hardening of the arteries — and potential treatment — identified

A team of UK scientists have identified the mechanism behind hardening of the arteries, and shown in animal studies that a generic medication normally used to treat acne could be an effective treatment for the condition.

6h

Are blood donor sex, pregnancy history and death of transfusion recipients associated?

Whether blood donors' sex and pregnancy history were associated with death for red blood cell transfusion recipients was investigated in this study that analyzed data from three study groups totaling more than 1 million transfusion recipients.

6h

USPSTF recommendation on screening for HIV infection

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for HIV infection in adolescents and adults ages 15 to 65; in those younger or older at increased risk of infection; and in all pregnant people. The USPSTF routinely makes recommendations about the effectiveness of preventive care services and this statement is an update of its 2013 recommendation.

6h

USPSTF recommends PrEP to prevent HIV infection in people at high risk

In a new recommendation, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends clinicians offer preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with effective antiretroviral therapy to people at high risk of acquiring HIV to decrease their risk of infection with the virus that causes AIDS.

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Heart valve procedure safe for patients with common heart defect

A new analysis conducted by investigators at the Cedars-Sinai Smidt Heart Institute shows for the first time that patients with a common heart defect who undergo catheter-based valve replacement procedures have the same survival and complication rates as patients without the defect who undergo the same procedure.

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New energy-efficient algorithm keeps UAV swarms helping longer

A new energy-efficient data routing algorithm could keep unmanned aerial vehicle swarms flying longer, report an international team of researchers this month in the journal Chaos. UAV swarms are cooperative, intercommunicating groups of UAVs used for a wide and growing variety of civilian and military applications. In disaster response, UAV swarms linked to one or more local base stations act as e

6h

Genetics influence how protective childhood vaccines are for individual infants

A genome-wide search in thousands of children in the UK and Netherlands has revealed genetic variants associated with differing levels of protective antibodies produced after routine childhood immunizations. The findings, appearing June 11, 2019 in the journal Cell Reports, may inform the development of new vaccine strategies and could lead to personalized vaccination schedules to maximize vaccine

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Eating more vitamin K found to help, not harm, patients on warfarin

When prescribed the anticoagulant drug warfarin, many patients are told to limit foods rich in vitamin K, such as green vegetables. The results of a new clinical trial call that advice into question and suggest patients on warfarin actually benefit from increasing their vitamin K intake — as long as they keep their intake levels consistent.

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Fisk och säl magrar – djuren på havsbotten påverkar Östersjön

– Det är viktigt att man förstår hur näringsvävarna fungerar när man ska förvalta fisket. Det räcker inte att se till hur fisken och fisket förändras. Tillgången och kvaliteten på fiskens föda är minst lika viktiga, säger Lena Bergström, forskare vid institutionen för akvatiska resurser vid Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU. I ett samarbete mellan flera universitet har forskarna undersökt hur dj

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Etårig død og 62 indlagt efter norsk vandforurening

En forurening med tarmbakterier i et fjeldbassin med drikkevand på Askoy ved Bergen har udløst den største forureningssag i Norge i 12 år.

6h

Uber rival Bolt relaunches in London after quick 2017 exit

Estonian ride-hailing service Bolt has launched service in London two years after a short-lived attempt to expand in the British capital.

6h

Hackers Stole Old Radiohead Demos — Then Got Owned

Radiohack Legendary English rock band Radiohead got hacked — but its members called the hacker’s bluff. The hacker allegedly stole an “OK Computer”-era MiniDisc archive “and reportedly demanded $150,000 on threat of releasing it,” a note published today on the band’s official Instagram read. So Radiohead did the sensible thing: took all 18 hours of the archive and put it on sale on Bandcamp for r

6h

Cloud gaming may be great for gamers but bad for energy consumption

Cloud gaming services like Google Stadia and Microsoft xCloud are hot topics at the gaming show E3, but a switch to streaming games could have huge ramifciations for internet traffic and gaming's energy use

6h

Crisp packets made of a new material could be much easier to recycle

Crisp packets are currently hard to recycle, but a new material made of extremely thin sheets of plastic could make them more environmentally friendly

6h

Depression: Derfor føles alt ligegyldigt

Under en depression er der områder i hjernen, der ikke samarbejder som normalt.

6h

Hawks' pursuit of prey has implications for capturing rogue drones

Previous research has shown that falcons intercept prey using the same guidance law as homing missiles, called proportional navigation. This guidance law is optimal against smoothly-manoeuvring aerial targets, but is prone to being thrown off by the zigzagging manoeuvres of terrestrial prey like hares or jackrabbits, and will not necessarily lead to a feasible flight path through the cluttered hab

6h

Mystery of why arteries harden may have been solved, say scientists

Study finds calcium deposits are triggered by molecule produced by damaged cells The mysterious mechanism behind the hardening of arteries may have been solved, researchers have revealed, in a study that also suggests the first potential preventive drug for the condition linked to heart attack, dementia and stroke. Arteries harden as calcium becomes deposited in the elastic walls of the vessels,

6h

Are Facebook Ads Discriminatory? It’s Complicated

The company’s system for targeting ads is under fire for gender and ethnic bias. In some cases, the cure could be worse than the disease.

7h

Hawks' pursuit of prey has implications for capturing rogue drones

Previous research has shown that falcons intercept prey using the same guidance law as homing missiles, called proportional navigation. This guidance law is optimal against smoothly-manoeuvring aerial targets, but is prone to being thrown off by the zigzagging manoeuvres of terrestrial prey like hares or jackrabbits, and will not necessarily lead to a feasible flight path through the cluttered hab

7h

Hybrid device may help doctors treat strokes more quickly

Stroke, one of the leading causes of death worldwide, is normally caused by poor blood flow to the brain, or cerebral ischemia. This condition must be diagnosed within the first few hours of the stroke for treatment to be effective, according to the Mayo Clinic.

7h

Author Correction: A new Jurassic scansoriopterygid and the loss of membranous wings in theropod dinosaurs

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1297-x Author Correction: A new Jurassic scansoriopterygid and the loss of membranous wings in theropod dinosaurs

7h

Almost 400 medical practices found ineffective in analysis of 3,000 studies

Scientists have identified nearly 400 established medical practices that have been found to be ineffective by clinical studies published across three top medical journals.

7h

Bringing mental health care into pediatricians' offices works, finds 5-year study

A five-year study at Boston Children's Hospital reports success with a program it started in 2013 to bring much-needed behavioral health services directly into primary care pediatricians' offices. As reported today in Pediatrics, the program improved children's access to behavioral health care, with only minor increases in cost, and got high marks from participating pediatric practices.

7h

Tube anemone has the largest animal mitochondrial genome ever sequenced

Discovery by Brazilian and US researchers could change the classification of two species, which appear more akin to jellyfish than was thought.

7h

Finnish healthcare and social welfare system provides a variety of e-services to citizens

Major progress has been made in the range of available eHealth services in Finland. In addition to electronic appointment bookings, and advisory services, citizens can view their own data and communicate with health services.

7h

Novel denoising method generates sharper photorealistic images faster

A global team of computer scientists from MIT, Adobe, and Aalto University has developed an innovative method for producing higher-quality images and scene designs in much less time by using a deep-learning-based approach that considerably cuts the noise in images.

7h

Beewolves use a gas to preserve food

Scientists from the Universities of Regensburg and Mainz and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology discovered that the eggs of the European beewolf produce nitric oxide. The gas prevents the larvae's food from getting moldy in the warm and humid brood cells. The results were published in the Journal eLife.

7h

The Estée Lauder companies showcases skin metabolomics at world congress of dermatology

The Estée Lauder Companies Inc. (NYSE: EL) Research & Development (R&D) team will present data focused on new findings in skin metabolomics, skin defense, ingredient science, and anti-aging research at the 2019 World Congress of Dermatology (WCD) in Milan, Italy from June 10 -15, 2019.

7h

Storms, Salty Water Caused Mystery Hole in Antarctic Sea Ice

Robotic floats and elephant seals helped solve the mystery of the formation of features called polynyas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Experts list 26 urgent questions about child firearm injuries

Impartial studies need to address 26 pressing questions about children and teen firearm injuries, say experts. Firearm injuries kill more American children and teens than anything else, except automobile crashes. But research on how those firearm injuries happen, who’s most likely to suffer or die from one, or what steps would prevent the deaths, has lagged behind research on other causes of fata

7h

Mind-altering drugs: The magical history of LSD and mushrooms

In the '60s drugs escape the lab and become a very important ingredient In the creation of the counterculture. Timothy Leary, a psychologist at Harvard in 1960, has something to do with this. In Cambridge, he starts the Harvard Psilocybin Project which focuses its research into learning more about this promising drug. Because of its medicinal properties, and apparent positive effect on mental hea

7h

Hackers Steal 100,000 Traveler Photos from U.S. Customs

Border Hack Bad news, travelers. Hackers have stolen up to 100,000 images and license plate numbers stored by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), The New York Times reports . It’s not a good look for the federal government, raising questions about its ability to keep citizens’ data private — and it’s not the first data breach of its kind. License Plate Leak The breach occurred when a CB

7h

A Close Look at Newborn Planets Reveals Hints of Infant Moons

Astronomers have spent decades, if not centuries, hoping to see embryonic planets. As of a year ago, the closest they had come was the discovery of gaps, thought to be caused by budding planets , in the spinning disks of gas and dust that surround young stars. But they weren’t sure how to interpret these indirect clues. What a difference a year makes. Increasingly detailed observations of a star

7h

How toxic people wage emotional warfare on others

High-conflict emotional warfare exists everywhere there are high-conflict people. Their strategy is usually to seduce someone get other people to agree with them on attacking someone else. In mental health terms, this is called "splitting," where you split people into all good and all bad. Splitting is linked to borderline and narcissistic personality disorders. High-conflict people dominate by s

7h

From face to DNA: New method aims to improve match between DNA sample and face database

Predicting what someone's face looks like based on a DNA sample remains a hard nut to crack for science. It is, however, getting easier to use such a sample to filter the right face from a face database, as an international team led by KU Leuven has shown. Their findings were published in Nature Communications.

7h

First study of world's largest marine stingray reveals long-distance migration

Smalleye stingrays are the largest marine stingrays on record, reaching disc widths of up to 222 cm, and yet almost nothing is known about them. Scientists from the Marine Megafauna Foundation have for the first time used photo IDs to study this elusive animal in southern Mozambique, one of the only locations where it is regularly seen in the wild. Their findings are published today in the journal

7h

Study: Intelligence community benefits from collaborations, but can do better

An analysis of US intelligence programs aimed at collaborating with academic and industry partners finds that these collaborations are valuable for addressing complex intelligence challenges. The study also notes that institutional silos, lack of information sharing and lack of trust are obstacles to getting the most out of these collaborative efforts.

7h

Gender affects the correlation between depression and weight in children and adolescents

The results of a large community-based study have shown that the probability of major depressive disorder in children and adolescents with high, low, or normal body mass index differs according to gender. Underweight boys and overweight girls have an increased risk of depression, according to the study published in Childhood Obesity.

7h

Education, intelligence may protect cognition, but don't prevent Alzheimer's disease

In a search for clues to what may delay or prevent Alzheimer's disease, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report that smarter, more educated people aren't protected from the disease, but do get a cognitive 'head start' that may keep their minds functioning better temporarily.

7h

Inducing seizures to stop seizures

Surgery is the only way to stop seizures in 30 per cent of patients with focal drug-resistant epilepsy. A new study finds that inducing seizures before surgery may be a convenient and cost-effective way to determine the brain region where seizures are coming from.

7h

New pathogens in beef and cow's milk products: More research required

In February 2019, the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ) presented findings on new infection pathogens that go by the name of 'Bovine Milk and Meat Factors' (BMMF). According to these findings, the previously unknown pathogen can cause inflammations.

7h

Efter 11 års søgen: Forskere finder meteor-krater ud for Skotland

De første spor efter et 1,2 milliarder år gammelt meteornedslag dukkede op i 2008.

7h

Learning from nature's bounty: New libraries for drug discovery

Natural products, or their close derivatives, make some of our most potent medicines, among which macrocycles with their large carbon-rich ring systems are one class. The size and complexity of macrocycles has made it difficult to emulate and build on nature's success in the laboratory. By completing a complex molecular synthesis of these compounds attached to a unique identifying DNA strand, the

7h

Brazil wins legal fight over 100-million-year-old fossil bounty

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01781-8 A French court has ordered the return of 45 dinosaur and animal fossils to Brazil, and will soon rule on the fate of a spectacular pterosaur skeleton.

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3 steps to turn everyday get-togethers into transformative gatherings | Priya Parker

Why do some gatherings take off and others don't? Author Priya Parker shares three easy steps to turn your parties, dinners, meetings and holidays into meaningful, transformative gatherings.

7h

iPhone plus nanoscale porous silicon equals cheap, simple home diagnostics

The simplest home medical tests might look like a deck of various silicon chips coated in special film, one that could detect drugs in the blood, another for proteins in the urine indicating infection, another for bacteria in water and the like. Add the bodily fluid you want to test, take a picture with your smart phone, and a special app lets you know if there's a problem or not.

7h

An hour or two of outdoor learning every week increases teachers' job satisfaction

A Swansea University study has revealed how as little as an hour a week of outdoor learning has tremendous benefits for children and also boosts teachers' job satisfaction.

7h

Google Investigates Cold Fusion

This unusual article recently appeared in Nature: a team funded by Google (and involving researchers from a number of very well-respected research institutions) has spent some substantial effort revisiting the various reports of “cold fusion” (commentary pieces here and here ). That might seem like an odd way to spend one’s money and time, but I was actually pleased to hear about the work. As I’v

7h

Is nationalism ever a force for good?

Nationalism isn't always a bad thing. When a country doesn't have self-confidence, and a collective sense of identity, that is also a problem. The optimal situation, in the case of nationalism, is that a nation's citizens have a healthy amount of it. For instance, as Jared Diamond points out in this video, Finland seems to have a nationalism based in reality — and largely founded on their unique

7h

An hour or two of outdoor learning every week increases teachers' job satisfaction

A Swansea University study has revealed how as little as an hour a week of outdoor learning has tremendous benefits for children and also boosts teachers' job satisfaction.

7h

The new technology will significantly enhance energy harvest from PV modules

The whole world is inevitably moving towards a more sustainable lifestyle. Sustainability of the environment requires changes in the current way of life and introduction of new, more sustainable solutions in our everyday consumption.

7h

Checkmate for hepatitis B viruses in the liver

Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich, working in collaboration with researchers at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf and the University Hospital Heidelberg, have for the first time succeeded in conquering a chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus in a mouse model. The team showed in its publication, that T-cell therapy can provide a per

7h

Cancer survivors predicted to number over 22 million by 2030

There were more than 16.9 million Americans with a history of cancer on Jan. 1, 2019, a number that is projected to reach more than 22.1 million by 2030 based on the growth and aging of the population alone.

7h

From the archive

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01795-2 How Nature reported plans for Mars missions in 1969, and the need for surgery near the battlefield during the First World War.

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Craft beautiful equations in Word with LaTeX

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01796-1 Manufacturers are ditching equation editors in word-processing software in favour of the LaTeX typesetting language. Here’s how to get started.

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Soot, sulfate, dust and the climate — three ways through the fog

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01791-6 How much have aerosol particles slowed warming? Joyce Penner sets out priorities for a coordinated campaign of observations and modelling.

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From Brueghel to Warhol: AI enters the attribution fray

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01794-3 Can artificial intelligence crack long-standing puzzles in art history? David Adam finds out.

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Sudanese academics defiant as revolution turns bloody

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01818-y A brutal crackdown has killed more than 100 pro-democracy protestors, but the activists are not giving up.

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Daily briefing: White House blocks climate science testimony

Nature, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01835-x Proposed cuts included a rejection of the value of peer-reviewed evidence. Plus: the first coronal mass ejection from another star and what it’s like to discover a fossil T. Rex.

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Indian initiatives aim to break science’s language barrier

Nature, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01815-1 Drive for accessibility sees research relayed in regional tongues instead of English.

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Russian biologist plans more CRISPR-edited babies

Nature, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01770-x The proposal follows a Chinese scientist who claimed to have created twins from edited embryos last year.

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World’s largest plant survey reveals alarming extinction rate

Nature, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01810-6 Since 1900, nearly 3 species of seed-bearing plants have disappeared per year ― 500 times faster than they would naturally.

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When English is not your mother tongue

Nature, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01797-0 Seven researchers discuss the challenges posed by science’s embrace of one global language.

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Selskab bag eksploderet tankstation: Vi vil konkurrere med diesel i Danmark

Norske Nel gik kort inden weekendens ulykke i Norge sammen med blandt andet den irske busproducent Wrightbus om at levere udledningsfrie brintbusser til Europa.

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Preparing scientific applications for exascale computing

Exascale computers are soon expected to debut, including Frontier at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) and Aurora at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), both DOE Office of Science User Facilities, in 2021. These next-generation computing systems are projected to surpass the speed of today's most powerful supercomputers by five to 10

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Artificial intelligence-enhanced journalism offers a glimpse of the future of the knowledge economy

Much as robots have transformed entire swaths of the manufacturing economy, artificial intelligence and automation are now changing information work, letting humans offload cognitive labor to computers. In journalism, for instance, data mining systems alert reporters to potential news stories, while newsbots offer new ways for audiences to explore information. Automated writing systems generate fi

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Learning from nature's bounty: New libraries for drug discovery

Natural products, or their close derivatives, make some of our most potent medicines, among which macrocycles with their large carbon-rich ring systems are one class. The size and complexity of macrocycles has made it difficult to emulate and build on nature's success in the laboratory. By completing a complex molecular synthesis of these compounds attached to a unique identifying DNA strand, the

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Major Europe-wide youth research project publishes findings

A major 3-year project which investigated young people's responses to conflict with authority has now published its findings in four bitesize online publications.

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Borgmestre til kommende regering: Udligningsreform før alt andet

Skal sundhedsindsatsen ensrettes og styrkes i alle landets kommuner bør et opgør med den kommunale udligningsmodel og medfinansiering gøres til politisk førsteprioritet. Sådan lyder budskabet fra to af landets borgmestre til den kommende regering.

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Old bread becomes new textiles

Is it possible to create textiles from old bread? Akram Zamani, senior lecturer in resource recycling at the University of Borås, wants to find out. And she has already come a long way.

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Mature, shapely, and with some beautiful bars

Distant galaxy give clues to the structure of the Milky Way.

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ET ‘habitable zone’ much smaller than previously thought

Modelling shows many exoplanets likely have toxic atmospheres, limiting possibilities. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Egg temperatures govern the way chicks walk

Incubation settings have surprisingly large effects on motor control, research reveals. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Astronomers warn over Musk’s planned satellite constellation

The bold Starlink comms network could severely impact research. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Hawking’s chaotic contribution to revolutionary physics

Thinking about entropy gave us the link between the physics of black holes and of quantum particles. Katie Mack explains.

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Common statin shows promise for Fragile X treatment

Rodent model shows early dosage reduces cognitive decline. Biplab Das reports.

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Arizona suffering from several large wildfires

There are several wildfires burning in Arizona as the wildfire season in the West begins in earnest. This natural-color satellite image was collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra satellite on June 08, 2019 and highlights two of the ongoing fires. The fire in the upper right portion of the image is the Coldwater Fire which began on May 30, 2019 with

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Secondhand horror: Indirect predator odor triggers reproductive changes in bank voles

Reproducing in a fearful world is tricky. How do rodents get information of prevailing risk of death, and how do they respond to the information? A research team of evolutionary biologists from University of Jyväskylä, Finland and University of Vienna, Austria reported that rodent mothers are more likely to become pregnant after smelling odors produced by conspecific males frightened by predators.

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Solvent pH controls interactions of gold nanoclusters, offers potential applications in drugs and imaging

The properties of gold in nanoscale are significantly different to those of bulk gold. Of special interest are gold nanoclusters, that are composed of between tens to some hundreds of gold atoms. Numerous of such cluster structures are known and synthesizable to atomic precision. The aim of this thesis was to apply molecular dynamics simulations on investigating properties of gold nanoclusters in

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New to science New Zealand moths link mythological deities to James Cameron's films

In an unexpected discovery from the South Island (New Zealand), two species of narrowly distributed macro-moths were described as new species. Interestingly, both Arctesthes titanica and Arctesthes avatar were named after mythological deities and top-grossing blockbusters by famous filmmaker James Cameron: Titanic and Avatar, respectively.

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New family on the block: A novel group of glycosidic enzymes

A group of researchers from Japan has recently discovered a novel enzyme from a soil fungus. In their study, they speculate that this enzyme plays important roles in the soil ecosystem, and then describe its structure and action.

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Citizen scientists re-tune Hubble's galaxy classification

Hundreds of thousands of volunteers have helped to overturn almost a century of galaxy classification, in a new study using data from the longstanding Galaxy Zoo project. The new investigation, published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, uses classifications of over 6000 galaxies to reveal that 'well known' correlations between different features are not found in th

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An innovative electron microscope overturning common knowledge of 88 years history

In conventional electron microscopes, performing atomic-resolution observations of magnetic materials is particularly difficult because high magnetic fields are inevitably exerted on samples inside the magnetic objective lens. Newly developed magnetic objective-lens system provides a magnetic-field-free environment at the sample position. This enables direct, atom-resolved imaging of magnetic mate

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Breakthrough in the discovery of DNA in ancient bones buried in water

Fresh evidence rewrites the understanding of the most intriguing archaeological burial site in western Finland. New DNA technology gives significant information on the bones buried in water. The DNA matches present day Sámi people, who nowadays live far from the site. The question why the bones were buried in water remains a mystery and demands further investigation.

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What’s Behind the International Rush to Write an AI Rulebook?

There’s no better way of ensuring you win a race than by setting the rules yourself. That may be behind the recent rush by countries, international organizations, and companies to put forward their visions for how the AI race should be governed. China became the latest to release a set of “ethical standards” for the development of AI last month, which might raise eyebrows given the country’s well

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Secondhand horror: Indirect predator odor triggers reproductive changes in bank voles

Reproducing in a fearful world is tricky. How do rodents get information of prevailing risk of death, and how do they respond to the information? A research team of evolutionary biologists from University of Jyväskylä, Finland and University of Vienna, Austria reported that rodent mothers are more likely to become pregnant after smelling odors produced by conspecific males frightened by predators.

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New to science New Zealand moths link mythological deities to James Cameron's films

In an unexpected discovery from the South Island (New Zealand), two species of narrowly distributed macro-moths were described as new species. Interestingly, both Arctesthes titanica and Arctesthes avatar were named after mythological deities and top-grossing blockbusters by famous filmmaker James Cameron: Titanic and Avatar, respectively.

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Plot twist: Straightening single-molecule conductors improves their performance

A team at Osaka University has created single-molecule nanowires, complete with an insulation layer, up to 10 nanometers in length. When they measured the electrical properties of these nanowires, the researchers found that forcing the ribbon-like chains to be flat significantly improved their conductivity compared with a twisted conformation. The findings may allow for a new generation of inexpen

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Could floating cities help people adapt to rising sea levels?

By end of the century, rising seas will flood more than 500 coastal cities, affecting 1.5 billion people worldwide. Some estimates predict surging sea level rise of two meters by 2100.

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Twin NASA satellites to study signal disruption from space

NASA's twin E-TBEx CubeSats—short for Enhanced Tandem Beacon Experiment—are scheduled to launch in June 2019 aboard the Department of Defense's Space Test Program-2 launch. The launch includes a total of 24 satellites from government and research institutions. They will launch aboard a SpaceX Falcon Heavy from historic Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

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NASA's SET mission to study satellite protection is ready for launch

NASA's Space Environment Testbeds, or SET, will launch in June 2019 on its mission to study how to better protect satellites in space. SET will get a ride to space on a U.S. Air Force Research Lab spacecraft aboard a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

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The atmosphere of a new ultra hot Jupiter is analyzed

The combination of observations made with the CARMENES spectrograph on the 3.5m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Almería), and the HARPS-N spectrograph on the National Galileo Telescope (TNG) at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Garafía, La Palma) has enabled a team from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) to reveal new details about this extrasolar planet, which has a surface

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How NASA prepares spacecraft for the harsh radiation of space

In a small, square room walled by four feet of concrete, the air smells as if a lightning storm just passed through—crisp and acrid, like cleaning supplies. Outside, that's the smell of lightning ripping apart oxygen in the air, which readily reshuffles into ozone. But belowground in one of the rooms at NASA's Radiation Effects Facility, the smell of ozone lingers after high-energy radiation tests

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Citizen scientists re-tune Hubble's galaxy classification

Hundreds of thousands of volunteers have helped to overturn almost a century of galaxy classification, in a new study using data from the longstanding Galaxy Zoo project. The new investigation, published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, uses classifications of over 6000 galaxies to reveal that "well known" correlations between different features are not found in th

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Forest fire pushes imperilled parrot closer to the brink

A devastating forest fire in Nicaragua has destroyed a vitally important nesting and roosting site of the yellow-naped amazon, one of the most endangered parrots in Central America.

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How iPads and iPhones are different now

DIY Things will change when iPadOS splits with iOS 13. Apple's iPhones and iPads have been diverging in terms of software for a while now—here are the iPad-only features already available, and those still to come.

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Forest fire pushes imperilled parrot closer to the brink

A devastating forest fire in Nicaragua has destroyed a vitally important nesting and roosting site of the yellow-naped amazon, one of the most endangered parrots in Central America.

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Amazon To Shut Down Its Restaurants Delivery Service

Amazon is reportedly going to shut down its Amazon Restaurants delivery service in the United States by the end of this month. The service was already closed in London last year so it won’t …

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We Need Fully Automated Luxury Communism

submitted by /u/imitationcheese [link] [comments]

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Pengarna är fortfarande männens värld

En enkätstudie och en experimentell studie från Linköpings universitet, visar att män generellt har större kunskap om grundläggande ekonomi. Thérese Lind, doktor i beteendeekonomi, har bland annat studerat folks kännedom om viktiga begrepp som inflation, avkastning och finansiell risk. Differensen är relativt stor – ungefär en poäng på en åtta-gradig skala. – Jag är förvånad över den stora skilln

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Team puts an ancient spin on a new digital currency

Cryptocurrency might seem like a next-generation idea, but two University of Oregon researchers say it has roots in the past.

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Fisheries outcomes maximized through traditional practice

A new study led by a University of Rhode Island doctoral student and published in the Journal of Applied Ecology has found a possible solution to one of the biggest conservation and livelihood challenges in the marine realm.

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Why Cry for the Cryosphere?

The headline is actually a sentence that comes toward the end of Vanishing Ice, a new book that answers the question in encyclopedic detail. For those unfamiliar with the term, the cryosphere is the earth's natural ice in all its forms. Author Vivien Gornitz, a NASA science collaborator and retired special research scientist at Columbia University's Center for Climate Systems Research, takes reade

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Plot twist: Straightening single-molecule conductors improves their performance

Researchers at Osaka University synthesized nanowires made of a single molecule of oligothiophene up to 10 nanometers in length. By forcing the molecular chain to adopt a planar conformation, they were able to significantly enhance its electrical conductivity. The findings have many potential applications for consumer electronics, especially OLED TVs and smartphone screens.

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Learning from nature's bounty: New libraries for drug discovery

Natural products make some of our most potent medicines, among which macrocycles with their large carbon-rich ring systems are one class. Their size and complexity has made it difficult to emulate on Nature's success in the laboratory. By completing a complex molecular synthesis of these compounds attached to a unique identifying DNA strand, Chemists of the University of Basel have built a rich co

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Laboratory testing suggests human lung tissue unimpacted by blu vapor

A new study by Imperial Brands, owners of leading vape brand blu, contributes to the increasing evidence base substantiating vaping's harm reduction potential compared to smoking. The research, presented at the 58th annual meeting of the Society of Toxicology earlier this year, compared the in-vitro toxicological responses of a 3D model of human lung tissue to myblu vapour and cigarette smoke acro

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Promising treatment option for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

A study, published today in PNAS, has found a potential treatment for patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS).

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Uncovering the hidden history of a giant asteroid

A massive 'hit-and-run' collision profoundly impacted the evolutionary history of Vesta, the brightest asteroid visible from Earth. This finding, by a team of researchers from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan's National Institute of Polar Research and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, deepens our understanding of protoplanet formation more than 4.5 billion years ago, in the early infancy of the Solar S

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Researchers find triple as many Legionnaire's cases as previously reported

The first New Zealand-wide study of the burden of Legionnaire's disease has found triple the number of cases of this form of pneumonia than previously reported.

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Breakthrough in chronic wasting disease research reveals distinct deer, elk prion strains

Researchers have developed a new gene-targeted approach to study chronic wasting disease in mice, allowing opportunities for research that has not previously existed.

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iPhone plus nanoscale porous silicon equals cheap, simple home diagnostics

A Vanderbilt researchers is combining her research on low-cost, nanostructured thin films with a device most American adults already own.

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New look at old data leads to cleaner engines

New insights about how to understand and ultimately control the chemistry of ignition behavior and pollutant formation have been discovered in research led by Sandia National Laboratories. The discovery eventually will lead to cleaner, more efficient internal combustion engines.

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WHO's 'Treat All' HIV recommendation led to increases in ART initiation in Africa

A new study by CUNY SPH researchers found that the adoption of the WHO's 2015 'Treat All' recommendation was followed by large increases in rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in six sub-Saharan African countries.

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Sex, lice and videotape

University of Utah biologists demonstrated real-time adaptation in their lab that triggered reproductive isolation in just four years. They began with a single population of parasitic feather lice, split the population in two and transferred them onto different-sized hosts — pigeons with small feathers, and pigeons with large feathers. The pigeons preened at the lice and populations adapted quick

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Fisheries outcomes maximized through traditional practice

A new study led by a University of Rhode Island doctoral student and published in the Journal of Applied Ecology has found a possible solution to one of the biggest conservation and livelihood challenges in the marine realm.

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New microorganism for algae biomass to produce alternative fuels

Scientists utilized algae that grow three times faster than starch crops and succeeded in producing biofuel and biochemicals. They developed a new artificial microorganism as a microbial platform for the biorefinery of brown macroalgae which is possible to accelerate biochemical production rate.

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Alarming AI Clones Both a Person’s Voice and Their Speech Patterns

Gates Keeper Engineers at Facebook’s AI research lab created a machine learning system that can not only clone a person’s voice, but also their cadence — an uncanny ability they showed off by duplicating the voices of Bill Gates and other notable figures. This system, dubbed Melnet, could lead to more realistic-sounding AI voice assistants or voice models, the kind used by people with speech impa

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Intelligent cities can address the roots of urban challenges

The term "smart city" has gained in popularity, but the label still conjures the use the technologies to solve operational problems. Rather, cities are complex and need intelligent, transformative and engaged efforts.

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Climate change may be putting beluga whales out of their depths

An international team of researchers has found that the physical condition of beluga whales affects their capacity to store oxygen in their blood and muscle tissues, likely impacting their ability to dive. In a paper published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, concentrations of muscle myoglobin and blood hemoglobin, proteins responsible for the storage and delivery of oxygen, were found to b

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Amid Science Cuts, Brazil's National Museum Tries to Recover

Nine months after a fire destroyed priceless collections, scientists are working restore the archives and keep their research afloat.

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Climate change may be putting beluga whales out of their depths

An international team of researchers has found that the physical condition of beluga whales affects their capacity to store oxygen in their blood and muscle tissues, likely impacting their ability to dive. In a paper published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, concentrations of muscle myoglobin and blood hemoglobin, proteins responsible for the storage and delivery of oxygen, were found to b

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For-profit education is the leading cause of America's student debt crisis

As of February 2019, student debt in the United States was more than $1.5 trillion. The rapid growth of America's student debt is a cause for concern for numerous observers, who fear the outbreak of a financial crisis.

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Using a selective light absorber to build a photothermal catalysis system

Researchers at Hebei University in China and Hakkaido University in Japan have recently used a selective light absorber to construct a photothermal system that can generate temperatures up to 288°C under weak solar irradiation (1 kW m-2). This system, presented in Nature Communications, achieved a temperature three times higher than that generated by traditional phototermal catalysis systems.

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Young ‘hot Jupiter’ offers clues to how planets form

CI Tau b is a paradoxical planet, but new research is starting to answer questions about how a planet so large could have formed around a star that’s only 2 million years old. Researchers conducted a four-year near-infrared spectroscopic analysis of light from the close-orbiting giant exoplanet, or “hot Jupiter,” in a nine-day orbit around its parent star about 450 light years from Earth in the c

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Happiness may be a choice—except that it's constrained by vested economic interests

Our knowledge about what it is that people need to feel happy and satisfied with in their lives keeps growing, yet the extent to which people actually feel happy and satisfied with their lives has largely stagnated. There might be small shifts each year that may enable one country to claim it is "happier" than another, but these shifts rest on narrow definitions of happiness and are rarely the res

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Gravitational data from Dawn suggests dome on Ceres is made of volcanic mud

An international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests the large dome found on the surface of the dwarf planet Ceres is made of slurry—a mix of salty brine and solid particles. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the group describes their study of data from the Dawn spacecraft and what it revealed.

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Singapore research team finds info in a third of eczema apps inconsistent with guidelines

A third of eczema management mobile applications provide information that does not agree with international treatment and condition guidelines, a study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found.The study, published online this week in the British Journal of Dermatology, highlights the need for mechanisms and guidelines to ensure app quality, and to guide personal

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Immunotherapy and diabetes: A game of hide and seek?

Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) are emerging as an effective treatment for certain cancers, but in rare cases can cause autoimmune diseases. Researchers at Osaka University explored a unique case of a patient with cancer whose pancreas was removed, and who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (an autoimmune disease) after receiving ICIs. The researchers stained tissue samples from the pancreas,

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New microorganism for algae biomass to produce alternative fuels

Professor Gyoo Yeol Jung and his research team utilized algae that grow three times faster than starch crops and succeeded in producing biofuel and biochemicals. They developed a new artificial microorganism as a microbial platform for the biorefinery of brown macroalgae which is possible to accelerate biochemical production rate.

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The circadian-hypoxia link in cardioprotection

Throughout the evolutionary time, all organisms and species on Earth evolved with an adaptation to consistent oscillations of sunlight and darkness, now recognized as circadian rhythm. Single-cellular to multisystem organisms use circadian biology to synchronize to the external environment and provide predictive adaptation to changes in cellular homeostasis.

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LED-ing the way: A clean and convenient method to oxidize plastic surfaces for industry

A Japanese research team at Osaka University used chlorine dioxide to oxidize polypropylene. Under LED irradiation, ClO2* radicals attacked the methyl groups of polypropylene, converting them to carboxylic acid. The C-H bond-breaking was selective to the side chain. The oxidized surface could be stained with cationic dyes. Surface oxidation of plastics is industrially important, but existing metho

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Cardiovascular diseases — Promoting self-healing after heart attack

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers led by Oliver Söhnlein have shown that a protein which stimulates the resolution of inflammatory reactions enhances cardiac repair following heart attack in both mice and pigs.

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21st century archaeology has rediscovered historical Cordoba

University of Cordoba researcher Antonio Monterroso Checa applied aerial laser LiDAR technology to draw out the ancient geomorphology of the city of Cordoba

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New to science New Zealand moths link mythological deities to James Cameron's films

In an unexpected discovery, two species of macro-moths were described as new species endemic to the South Island, New Zealand. Each is restricted to only a couple of subalpine/alpine localities, which makes them particularly vulnerable to extinction, point out the scientists. Described in the open-access journal Alpine Entomology, the insects were named A. titanica and A. avatar simultaneously in

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Secondary students' sexual health survey

Sexually active Australian secondary students tend to engage in responsible sexual behaviour but there is still room to improve knowledge and education for this group, according to a nationwide survey conducted by La Trobe University.

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Touted as 'development,' land grabs hurt local communities, and women most of all

Large-scale land transactions in which nations sell huge, publicly owned parcels to foreign and domestic corporations negatively affect local women more than men, a new study shows.

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Apple dropper datacenter-planer i Aabenraa

Efter planerne skulle byggearbejdet med Apples enorme datacenter udenfor Aabenraa allerede være undervejs. Det er dog blevet forsinket og nu forlyder det, at it-giganten helt dropper at bygge datacentret.

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The urgent need for media literacy in an age of annihilation

From fictitious organizations posting polarizing messages on Facebook to robustly researched news stories being labelled "fake," the pervasive power and importance of the media are clear.

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Here's what supermarkets should do to help the planet

It was inspiring to read about the launch of Waitrose's trial in Oxford offering consumers a range of products free of packaging. Their system isn't revolutionary—smaller supermarkets have been doing the same thing for quite some time, as have many committed people. But it's the first time that a major supermarket has made a big move away from the packaging-dependent model that has dominated major

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Action is needed to save west Africa's critically endangered chimpanzees

In 2016, the International Union for Conservation of Nature listed the western African subspecies of chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) as "Critically Endangered". It had previously been listed as "Endangered."

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Study of mesosiderite zircons suggests Vesta was struck by a very large rock

A team of researchers from Australia, Switzerland and Japan has found evidence suggesting that the asteroid Vesta was stuck by a very large rock approximately 4.5 billion years ago. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the group describes their study of the asteroid and what they believe is material from it.

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Action is needed to save west Africa's critically endangered chimpanzees

In 2016, the International Union for Conservation of Nature listed the western African subspecies of chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) as "Critically Endangered". It had previously been listed as "Endangered."

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Your Cadillac Can Now Drive Itself More Places

Cadillac's Super Cruise will shut itself off when the car reaches a tricky spot where a driver needs to pay attention.

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The Wild-West Era of Streaming TV Is Ending

As details of the subscription services planned by each of America’s corporate-media powerhouses have trickled out, something has become clear: The past decade or so of online-streaming television was the medium’s wild-west era, a time when you could watch thousands of hours of content from every major studio for a fraction of the cost of cable. Between Netflix and Hulu, subscribers could watch m

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The solar-power charged electric cars making money

The new cars being tried out in Porto Santo can sell solar power electricity back to the island grid.

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Driverless cars are going to disrupt the airline industry

As driverless cars become more capable and more common, they will change people's travel habits not only around their own communities but across much larger distances. Our research has revealed just how much people's travel preferences could shift, and found a new potential challenge to the airline industry.

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A French Wine With a 900-Year-Old Vintage

Once wine growers find a variety that works, the study reinforces, they’ll stick with it for centuries, or even millenniums.

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What if dark matter is lighter? Report calls for small experiments to broaden the hunt

Theorized dark matter particles haven't yet shown up where scientists had expected them. So researchers are now designing new and nimble experiments that can look for dark matter in previously unexplored ranges of particle mass and energy, and using previously untested methods.

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Ljusdosan som öppnar nya dörrar i nanovärlden

Fotonik handlar om hur ljus kan användas på olika sätt. Kommunikation genom optiska fibrer är ett exempel på fotonik, liksom tekniken bakom fotodetektorer och solceller. När fotonikkomponenterna är så små att de mäts i nanometer, kallas det för nanofotonik. För att tänja på gränserna för vad som är möjligt i det lilla formatet är framsteg inom grundforskningen avgörande. Chalmersforskarnas nyskap

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"Dampe" får piloter iført iltmasker til at sikkerhedslande i København

Cockpit-mandskabet måtte en tur på hospitalet efter hændelsen på et British Airways-fly, som fandt sted lørdag under indflyvning. Flyet har ikke fløjet med passagerer siden.

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A platform for Africa's mobile innovators

Sam Gikandi '05 SM '06 and Eston Kimani '05 have always believed in the potential of Africa's entrepreneurial community. Their years at MIT, beginning in 2001 when they left their home country of Kenya, only reinforced that belief.

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Shazam on Android Can Now Identify Songs Even When You're Using Headphones

Not long after Apple acquired music recognition app Shazam last fall, the music-ID service introduced a new feature called Pop-up that allowed it to identify songs being played on the device …

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Study shows recent plant extinctions much more extensive than thought

A team of researchers with the Royal Botanic Gardens in the U.K. and Stockholm University has found that plant extinctions over the past two and a half centuries have been more extensive than …

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Online sellers prefer buyers from swanky neighborhoods

People selling stuff on classified ad websites prefer dealing with buyers from affluent neighborhoods, research finds. Max Besbris, an assistant professor of sociology at Rice University and the study’s lead author, tested whether the home addresses of prospective buyers affected transactions taking place through online resale websites. He also studied the role that race and ethnicity play. “For

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Climate catastrophe has happened before—and it's teaching us about the future

Predicting how animals, plants and humans might cope with climate catastrophe over the coming decades and centuries is not an easy task. Studying the effects of past changes can guide us.

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LED-ing the way: A clean and convenient method to oxidize plastic surfaces for industry

Polypropylene (PP) is everywhere, being one of the most widely used plastics in human life. A versatile material, its naturally inert surface can be modified for specific applications. Researchers at Osaka University have now developed a convenient light-driven process for oxidizing PP without harmful waste.

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Direct atom-resolved imaging of magnetic materials

In conventional electron microscopes, performing atomic-resolution observations of magnetic materials is particularly difficult because high magnetic fields are inevitably exerted on samples inside the magnetic objective lens. Newly developed magnetic objective-lens system provides a magnetic-field-free environment at the sample position. This enables direct, atom-resolved imaging of magnetic mate

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Big brands break pledge to not destroy forests: report

A rainforest area the size of Spain will have been destroyed by firms growing consumer staples like palm oil in the decade to 2020—industry's self-imposed deadline to end deforestation, Greenpeace said Tuesday.

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NASA and space tourists might be in our future but first we need to decide who can launch from Australia

In a sign the Australian Space Agency is already opening up new doors for Australian industry, NASA says it will be launching rockets from Arnhem Space Centre, in Nhulunbuy in the Northern Territory, in 2020.

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How do you teach kids about texting? Bring in the teenagers

How do you teach tech-savvy kids to safely navigate the digital world? In Germany, you bring in the teenagers.

9h

Uber rival Bolt relaunches in London after quick 2017 exit

Estonian ride-hailing service Bolt has launched service in London two years after a short-lived attempt to expand in the British capital.

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Four passengers die in 'unbearable' heat on Indian train

Four people died in 'unbearable' heat while travelling by train in northern India, which has been in the grip of a heatwave for two weeks, officials and passengers said Tuesday.

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AIs seem to be much worse at recognising objects from poorer countries

Artificial intelligence is much worse at recognising objects from poorer countries than richer ones, according to an analysis by Facebook

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Study shows recent plant extinctions much more extensive than thought

A team of researchers with the Royal Botanic Gardens in the U.K. and Stockholm University has found that plant extinctions over the past two and a half centuries have been more extensive than previous estimates suggested. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the group describes their exhaustive study of plants and which have gone extinct, and what it might mean for

9h

Study shows recent plant extinctions much more extensive than thought

A team of researchers with the Royal Botanic Gardens in the U.K. and Stockholm University has found that plant extinctions over the past two and a half centuries have been more extensive than previous estimates suggested. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the group describes their exhaustive study of plants and which have gone extinct, and what it might mean for

9h

Two-toed sloths belong to an ‘extinct’ family

The two-toed sloth appears to be the last survivor of an ancient lineage previously thought extinct, research finds. Meanwhile, the three-toed sloth is more closely related to a large family that included ancient elephant-sized ground sloths, say the researchers. Sloths once roamed the Americas, ranging from tiny, cat-sized animals that lived in trees all the way up to massive ground sloths that

9h

Hitting snooze confuses your brain more than waking up

Health Proper sleep is vital to optimal health. To sleep or to snooze? You probably know the answer, but you don’t prefer it. Most of us probably use the snooze function on our alarm clocks at some point in our lives.

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Hundratals växtarter har utrotats i modern tid

Studien bygger på unika data från fältarbete, litteraturstudier och herbarier som sammanställts under tre decennier av Kew-forskaren Rafaël Govaerts. Den visar att 571 växtarter har försvunnit i modern tid, det vill säga de senaste 250 åren. Det är fyra gånger fler arter än de som finns listade i den nuvarande förteckningen av utdöda växter. Det är också mer än dubbelt så många som de arter av få

9h

Three parent factors that heighten the prevalence of childhood physical abuse: New study

Adults who had parents who struggled with addiction, intimate partner violence and mental illness are more than 30 times more likely to have been victims of childhood physical abuse, new study finds.

9h

Matrimonial website profiles show Indians more open to intercaste marriage

By examining data from a modern matchmaking website, University of Michigan researchers have found that many Indians—in their native country and the United States—are beginning to change their attitudes about intercaste marriage.

9h

Study examines why student-athletes access fewer academic supports, services

The NCAA is quick to point out that the word "student" comes first in the term student-athlete and that the vast majority of them will not go pro in their chosen sport. It stands to reason, then, that student-athletes would have access to all the same services and supports as other students, such as study abroad, internships, learning communities and more. However, that's not always the case, and

9h

Hypersonic matterwaves for ultrafast atomtronics

Atomtronics manipulates atoms much in the way that electronics manipulates electrons. It carries the promise of highly compact quantum devices which can measure incredibly small forces or tiny rotations. Such devices might one day be used to monitor Earth's status by sensing water levels in the desert or in the search for minerals and oil. They will also be used in navigation, when GPS fails on pl

9h

The Future of Marketing Is Bespoke Everything

Although there are billions of people in the world, it’s always tempting to believe your existence is unprecedented in some way. For me it’s my hair, which I’ve long suspected poses an uncanny challenge to the world of follicular maintenance. It’s curly yet fine, frizzy yet flat, oily at the roots yet dry as kindling at the ends. Everything I do to it only makes it worse, including bleaching the

9h

People Who Pay People to Kill People

M egan Danielczak couldn’t stand living with her husband, but couldn’t afford to live without him. So she came up with a plan that was boilerplate noir: Hire a killer to murder him, and collect the life-insurance payout. She met the hit man in a Walmart parking lot on Valentine’s Day last year, and gave him a down payment of three gold rings and $402 in cash, and a promise of another $4,500 on th

9h

Two-for-One: Chickenpox Vaccine Lowers Shingles Risk in Children

Immunization reduces the likelihood of a painful reemergence of the virus in kids — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Deploying high-frequency radar in the Straits of Mackinac

As Great Lakes water levels rise to record heights, remotely monitoring currents and waves grows in importance.

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Sex, lice and videotape

A few years ago, Scott Villa of Emory University had a problem. Then a graduate student at the University of Utah, he was stumped with an issue never addressed in school: How does one film lice having sex?

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Sex, lice and videotape

A few years ago, Scott Villa of Emory University had a problem. Then a graduate student at the University of Utah, he was stumped with an issue never addressed in school: How does one film lice having sex?

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Large boulders help shape huge canyons, researchers find

Anyone who enjoys whitewater rafting in places like the Colorado River owes a debt of gratitude to the enormous boulders that create the foaming undulation known as rapids, and new research appears to shed more light on how these big rocks help shape the towering canyons around them.

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Image of the Day: Stockpile

See photographs from a project documenting seed vaults around the world.

10h

New tool can pinpoint origins of the gut's bacteria

A UCLA-led research team has developed a faster and more accurate way to determine where the many bacteria that live in, and on, humans come from. Broadly, the tool can deduce the origins of any microbiome, a localized and diverse community of microscopic organisms.

10h

Two-for-One: Chickenpox Vaccine Lowers Shingles Risk in Children

Immunization reduces the likelihood of a painful reemergence of the virus in kids — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Changes in pressure, more so than temperature, strongly influence how quickly liquids turn to gas

It's a process so fundamental to everyday life—in everything from your morning coffeemaker to the huge power plant that provides its electricity—that it's often taken for granted: the way a liquid boils away from a hot surface.

10h

New tool can pinpoint origins of the gut's bacteria

A UCLA-led research team has developed a faster and more accurate way to determine where the many bacteria that live in, and on, humans come from. Broadly, the tool can deduce the origins of any microbiome, a localized and diverse community of microscopic organisms.

10h

Why people will beat machines in recognizing speech for a long time

Imagine a world in which Siri always understands you, Google Translate works perfectly, and the two of them create something akin to a Doctor Who style translation circuit. Imagine being able to communicate freely wherever you go (not having to mutter in school French to your Parisian waiter). It's an attractive, but still distant prospect. One of the bottlenecks in moving this reality forward is

10h

Växternas kemiska krigföring ökar vid varmare klimat

Växter släpper ut många olika kemiska ämnen som med ett samlingsnamn kallas BVOC:er, biologiska flyktiga organiska ämnen. Växterna producerar dessa ämnen av olika anledningar, bland annat i försvarssyfte, det vill säga som ett kemiskt vapen mot angripande insekter. Ämnena kan också fungera som en varningssignal för andra växter, i ett slags kommunikation dem emellan. Insektsangrepp på björk i Abi

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Author Correction: Mitochondria-specific drug release and reactive oxygen species burst induced by polyprodrug nanoreactors can enhance chemotherapy

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10186-0 Author Correction: Mitochondria-specific drug release and reactive oxygen species burst induced by polyprodrug nanoreactors can enhance chemotherapy

10h

How to design a superfast car… in the real world

Land Speed Record holder Andy Green explains why the design of a superfast car can't just be done in a computer.

10h

Lightning Strikes and Kills Motorcyclist. Why Rubber Tires Didn't Protect Him.

Here's why a motorcycle's rubber tires didn't protect the rider when lightning struck.

10h

In Search of Life's Beginnings

Scientists are resurrecting a long-neglected century-old prediction about how biology began — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Svensk elbåt styrs som ett JAS-plan

Båten flyger fram – bokstavligen. Mjukt och tyst skär den svallvågorna i stället för att skumpa över dem som en vanlig fritidsbåt. – Det här blir en betydligt lugnare båtupplevelse, säger Gustav Hasselborg medan han rattar den drygt sju meter långa elbåten i 24 knop.

10h

Bioinspired Materials—Graphene-enabled nickel composites

Bioinspired engineering strategies rely on achieving the combined biological properties of strength and toughness inherent in nature. Tissue engineers and materials scientists therefore aim to construct intelligent, hierarchical biomimetic structures from limited resources. As a representative material, natural nacre maintains a brick-and-mortar structure that allows many viable toughening mechani

10h

Shape memory alloy technology leads to energy-efficient CubeSat

A team of University of North Texas College of Engineering seniors have created an energy efficient system for controlling solar panels on CubeSats using a nickel-titanium shape memory alloy.

10h

Researchers determine ideal areas and timing for biological control of invasive stink bug

Biological control of the brown marmorated stink bug, an invasive pest that devastates gardens and crops, would be more effective in natural areas bordering crops or at times when certain insecticides aren't being applied, according to a new Oregon State University study.

10h

Researchers determine ideal areas and timing for biological control of invasive stink bug

Biological control of the brown marmorated stink bug, an invasive pest that devastates gardens and crops, would be more effective in natural areas bordering crops or at times when certain insecticides aren't being applied, according to a new Oregon State University study.

10h

Fans Are Better Than Tech at Organizing Information Online

Archive of Our Own, the fanfiction database recently nominated for a Hugo, has perfected a system of tagging that the rest of the web could emulate.

10h

New Space Telescopes Could Look Like Giant Beach Balls

Inflatable balloon reflectors could peer into deep space, scanning for signs of water, at a fraction of the cost of a traditional telescope.

10h

Beyond Madonna: A More Colorful Picture of Queer History

From Pose to Tales of the City, there's a slew of content telling new stories about the LGBTQ+ rights movement.

10h

This Is Exactly What Privacy Experts Said Would Happen

U.S. Customs and Border Protection announced yesterday afternoon that hackers had stolen an undisclosed number of license-plate images and travelers’ ID photos from a subcontractor. Privacy and security activists have long argued that as law enforcement vacuums up more data without legal limits, the damage of a possible breach scales up. The lack of restrictions on data collection is why, for man

10h

One Day, All of This Will Be Embarrassing

I was at home on a recent Sunday when one of my twin 6-year-old sons did something absolutely adorable, but you’ll have to take my word for it. I’m not showing you the picture. He had spent the whole morning making a complete superhero costume out of paper, and when it was time for him to try it on, I pointed my phone at him, as so many 21st-century parents do. He immediately—and definitively—tol

10h

These knotted cords may hide the first evidence that the Incas collected taxes

Some knotted string devices point to crop levies imposed by the Incan empire, researchers say. But other khipus continue to evade description.

11h

Night Owls and Morning Larks, Make Room for 'Afternoon People' and 'Nappers'

If you're not a morning person or a night person, but more like a midday person, don't feel left out.

11h

In Search of Life's Beginnings

Scientists are resurrecting a long-neglected century-old prediction about how biology began — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

In Search of Life's Beginnings

Scientists are resurrecting a long-neglected century-old prediction about how biology began — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Researchers reject APC-based OA publishing as promoted by Plan S

Lynn Kamerlin, Bas de Bruin and their colleagues have been the most vocal critics of Plan S from the very beginning, braving continuous opposition from certain OA leaders. Now that final Plan S guidelines were released, the chemists publish this Open Letter expressing their worry about a possible dystopian OA future.

11h

Why Trump's Tweet About (Not) Going to the Moon Is a Problem for Space Exploration

NASA's still on track to send humans to the moon. But confusion doesn't help.

11h

Are People with ADHD More Creative?

A look at whether people whose minds drift away easily, such as those with the disorder, are more likely to come up with original ideas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Are People with ADHD More Creative?

A look at whether people whose minds drift away easily, such as those with the disorder, are more likely to come up with original ideas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Medie: Ansatte i flere tech-virksomheder må ikke snakke med Huawei efter USA-forbud

Efter det amerikanske forbud mod Huawei har flere store tech-virksomheder fra blandt andet USA og Sydkorea begrænset eller afbrudt kontakten den kinesiske televirksomhed.

11h

Computere for seks mia: EU klar til at købe otte nye gigantiske supercomputere

PLUS. Der er blevet udvalgt otte supercomputercentre på tværs af EU, hvor de første europæiske supercomputere skal installeres med et samlet budget på over seks milliarder kroner. De danske universiteter er med i et konsortium bestående af otte europæiske lande, der skal bygge en ny supercomputer i Fin…

11h

Skinny cod and grey seal reveals troubling changes to food web in the Baltic Sea

The prime predators of the Baltic Sea at the top of the food web are losing weight, according to a new study that links the deteriorating health of gray seals and cod with changes in bottom-living crustaceans, isopods and amphipods.

11h

AI Listened to People's Voices. Then It Generated Their Faces.

Successful results matched some of the speakers' physical characteristics.

11h

Are People with ADHD More Creative?

A look at whether people whose minds drift away easily, such as those with the disorder, are more likely to come up with original ideas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tiny light box opens new doors into the nanoworld

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a completely new way of capturing, amplifying and linking light to matter at the nano level. Using a tiny box, built from stacked atomically thin material, they have succeeded in creating a type of feedback loop in which light and matter become one. The discovery, which was recently published in Nature Nanotechnology, opens

11h

Skinny cod and grey seal reveals troubling changes to food web in the Baltic Sea

The prime predators of the Baltic Sea at the top of the food web are losing weight, according to a new study that links the deteriorating health of gray seals and cod with changes in bottom-living crustaceans, isopods and amphipods.

11h

Rare 'superflares' could one day threaten Earth

Astronomers probing the edges of the Milky Way have in recent years observed some of the most brilliant pyrotechnic displays in the galaxy: superflares.

11h

Asteroid mining not a million miles away

Work by a team of University of Adelaide scientists to perfect metal and mineral extraction processes is bringing the possibility of mining the wealth contained within asteroids closer to reality. But science fiction won't become fact until asteroid mining becomes economically as well as technically viable.

11h

EU publishes Europe-wide rules on drone operation

The European Union has published EU-wide rules on drones to provide a clear framework for what is and isn't allowed, improve safety and make it easier for drone users to operate their craft in another European country.

11h

Egypt demands Christie's halt auction of King Tut statue

Egypt has tried to halt the auction of a 3,000-year-old stone sculpture of the famed boy pharaoh Tutankhamun at Christie's in London, while the auction house said its sale was legal.

11h

Aldi to charge 'symbolic' cent for produce bags in Germany

Supermarket giant Aldi said Tuesday it is replacing free plastic produce bags in its German stores for ones made from recyclable material—sold for a "symbolic" single cent—to go more green.

11h

Tech on trial: House panel begins review of market power

Big Tech is about to become big politics in Washington.

11h

Evidence Behind ‘Brain Training’ Games Remains Lacking

Do simple games and apps promising to sharpen your brain actually work? Studies aimed at finding out have been undermined by inadequate control groups, placebo effects, participant expectations, and the lack of evidence that getting better at a specific game translates to broader cognitive improvement.

11h

Quantum—a double-edged sword for cryptography

Quantum computers pose a big threat to the security of modern communications, deciphering cryptographic codes that would take regular computers forever to crack. But drawing on the properties of quantum behaviour could also provide a route to truly secure cryptography.

11h

Parker Solar Probe aims to solve a hot mystery

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe will help solve a long-running mystery (literally) surrounding our sun: Why is its outer atmosphere hotter than its surface? In roughly two years, the probe will be the first human-made craft to enter the zone surrounding the sun where heating looks fundamentally different that what has previously been seen in space. This will allow researchers to test their theory that

11h

A Community Within a Community

During our years of reporting for Our Towns , I’ve visited YMCAs all across the country. My quest began as a way to keep fit while traveling. I bought day passes to swim in Burlington, Vermont; Columbus, Mississippi; Redlands, California; Allentown, Pennsylvania; Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Duluth, Minnesota; and Wichita, Kansas. If I couldn’t find a Y, I would swim at a local public pool, like in

11h

What Nancy Pelosi Wants to Do Before Impeachment

In the conference room Nancy Pelosi once used as Democratic minority leader, she displayed only one item on the walls. She positioned it strategically, just behind and above her seat at the head of a long mahogany table that could accommodate about 30 people. Anyone sitting at the table couldn’t avoid seeing it, and it stared back at them. It was a portrait of Abraham Lincoln, on the floor of the

11h

Inside the Head of an Aging Serial Killer

When Jeff Lindsay first wrote his Dexter novels, about a blood-spatter analyst who kills bad people in his spare time, he unintentionally kicked off a modern love affair with the fictionalized serial killer. In the years following Dexter Morgan’s televised debut on Showtime, humanizing portrayals of murderous antiheroes have increased. There’s the protagonist of Hannibal , whose artistic refineme

11h

Why I Didn’t Tolerate Hairsplitting in War

Joshua Wheeler became famous as the first American soldier to die in the fight against the Islamic State—ISIS. But there’s more to his story than most people know. Wheeler grew up in a poor, troubled family in rural eastern Oklahoma, the oldest of five kids. After high school, he faced the same choice as most of his fellow graduates: He could look for work in the oil business, or he could join th

11h

Hollywood and hyper-surveillance: the incredible story of Gorgon Stare

Nature, Published online: 11 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01792-5 Sharon Weinberger commends a book on how a film inspired the United States to develop technology to capture everyone’s every move.

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New Portal Hardware Coming From Facebook This Year

The Facebook Portal smart speaker, which does video calls as well, was launched by the company in November last year. The obvious question that some of you might have is whether the company …

12h

E-journaler bättre för patienter än förutspått

– Jag tycker att man genom studien tydligt ser hur läkare och patienter har olika perspektiv på användningen av e-journaler. Eftersom att deras upplevelse är så olika behöver man aktivt inkludera båda dessa grupper vid utveckling och införande av eHälsotjänster för patienter, säger Åsa Cajander, professor vid institutionen för informationsteknologi vid Uppsala universitet, i forskargruppen Hälsa,

12h

Nya gener från ingenting

Hur uppstår och utvecklas nya gener och funktionella proteiner? Det är en av de mest fundamentala frågorna inom evolutionsbiologin. Två olika typer av mekanismer har föreslagits: (1) nya gener med nya funktioner uppstår från existerande gener, samt (2) evolution av nya gener och proteiner från slumpmässiga DNA-sekvenser som inte har någon likhet med existerande gener och proteiner. Forskare vid U

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