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nyheder2019juni12

14h

Ny forskning: Blodpropper hos yngre rammer især rygere

Tre ud af fire danskere mellem 30 og 50 år, der får en stor akut blodprop i hjertet, er rygere.

10h

Samtlige brinttankstationer i Danmark lukker efter norsk ulykke

Mandag eksploderede en ny brint-tankstation i Sandvika nær Oslo. Årsagen er endnu ikke kendt, men alle danske brinttankstationer er lukket over det seneste døgn.

6h

Venus, Earth's Evil Twin, Beckons Space Agencies

Once a water-rich Eden, the hellish planet could reveal how to find habitable worlds around distant stars — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2min

Habitat Restoration Isn't Just for Professionals

Communities can take it on themselves—and they must — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3min

Discovery of field-induced pair density wave state in high temperature superconductors

Superconductors are quantum materials that are perfect transmitters of electricity and electronic information. Although they form the technological basis of solid-state quantum computing, they are also its key limiting factor because conventional superconductors only work at temperatures near -270 °C. This has motivated a worldwide race to try to discover higher temperature superconductors. Materi

4min

Emma Thompson Tried to Be in 'Star Wars'

The actress's agent inquired about a part for her, but was rebuffed. This is a travesty.

10min

Researchers develop semi-liquid metal anode for next-generation batteries

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Mellon College of Science and College of Engineering have developed a semiliquid lithium metal-based anode that represents a new paradigm in battery design. Lithium batteries made using this new electrode type could have a higher capacity and be much safer than typical lithium metal-based batteries that use lithium foil as anode.

10min

Interdisciplinary research takes time

Interdisciplinarity is becoming increasingly important in research. Yet there are structures in place that make careers in science more difficult for interdisciplinary researchers, according to Ruth Müller, Professor of Science and Technology Policy at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). In this interview, she talks about her study on a research center in Sweden and about how existing hurdle

10min

Algorithm to transform investment banking with higher returns

A University of Bath researcher has created an algorithm which aims to remove the elements of chance, bias or emotion from investment banking decisions, a development which has the potential to reduce errors in financial decision making and improve financial returns in global markets.

10min

Large summer 'dead zone' forecast for Chesapeake Bay after wet winter and spring

Ecologists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and the University of Michigan are forecasting a large Chesapeake Bay "dead zone" in 2019 due to well-above-average river flows associated with increased rainfall in the watershed since last fall.

10min

Emory scientist was told to vacate his office. He says move is reprisal for activism on Asian ties

University says relocation plans are not connected to scientist’s letter or nationality

14min

Daily briefing: An X-ray map of the Universe

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01875-3 Space telescope marks a “return to world-class science” for Russia, mouse lemurs might be the next big thing in genetics and an open-access publishing model in which journals compete for funding.

15min

Wind tunnel tests could help kites become a clean energy high-flier

The use of kites to capture wind energy and turn it into cost-effective 'green' electricity could be coming within reach, with EPSRC-funded research at Imperial College London playing an important role in making it possible.

15min

A heart failure drug to treat leukemia: A promising new therapeutic approach

Researchers followed their intuition that a drug initially intended for heart failure could be effective in treating cancer.

16min

Hybrid nanostructure steps up light-harvesting efficiency

Energy is transferred through the structure in a way that boosts its response to light, showing promise for solar cell applications.

16min

First blood-brain barrier chip using stem cells developed by Ben-Gurion University researchers

"By combining organ-chip technology and human iPSC-derived tissue, we have created a neurovascular unit that recapitulates complex BBB functions, provides a platform for modeling inheritable neurological disorders, and advances drug screening, as well as personalized medicine," Ben-Gurion University researcher Dr. Vatine says.

16min

Pre-qualifying education and training helps health workers tackle gender based violence

Gender-based violence (GBV) could be tackled more effectively by giving healthcare students wider and more practical education and training in identifying and responding to the 'warning signs' presented among patients they will encounter in professional life, according to a new study.

16min

Researchers determine ideal areas and timing for biological control of invasive stink bug

Biological control of the brown marmorated stink bug, an invasive pest that devastates gardens and crops, would be more effective in natural areas bordering crops or at times when certain insecticides aren't being applied.

16min

Overdose, suicide among leading reasons for deaths of new moms

Overdoses and suicides were among the most common reasons for mothers dying within a year of giving birth in California, according to a new study from Michigan State University and the University of California, Merced.

16min

The brains of birds synchronize when they sing duets

Vocal control areas in the brain of weaver birds fire in time when they sing together.

16min

New web-based tool accelerates research on conditions such as dementia, sports concussion

A new new cloud-computing web platform created by scientists in the United States, Europe and South America will allow researchers to track data and analyses on the brain, potentially reducing delays in discovery.

16min

Habitat Restoration Isn't Just for Professionals

Communities can take it on themselves—and they must — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16min

Construction kit for custom-designed products

Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to product assembly lines. Certain enzymes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), play a key role in this process. Biotechnologists have now succeeded in changing these enzymes so that entirely new natural products, or even libraries of natural products, can be produced by microorganisms.

17min

A homing beacon for chemotherapy drugs

Killing tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts is a central challenge of cancer chemotherapy. If scientists could put a 'homing beacon' in tumors, they could attract these medicines and reduce side effects caused by the drugs acting on healthy cells. Now, researchers have made a hydrogel that, when injected near tumors in mice, recruits drugs to shrink the tumor with fewer side effect

17min

Astronomers may have spotted the ghost galaxy that hit the Milky Way long ago

Astronomers think they’ve identified a galaxy that hit the Milky Way and ruffled its edges millions of years ago.

18min

Beekee box: A network without the internet or electricity

How can you send documents, watch educational videos or work collaboratively in regions where there is no internet coverage or electricity? These were the challenging questions taken up by researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, who have developed a standalone box, known as the Beekee Box, that can generate a wireless network so users can log onto a learning platform without

22min

Future tsunamis possible in the Red Sea's Gulf of Elat-Aqaba

Researchers who took a closer look at a 1995 tsunami in the Gulf of Elat-Aqaba, at the northeastern tip of the Red Sea, say that the gulf's surrounding countries should prepare for future tsunami hazards in the economically developing vital region.

22min

Ants maintain essential interactions despite environmental flux

Ants adjust their social interactions to accommodate changes in population density, according to researchers at Penn State and Georgetown University. The findings suggest that ant colonies are capable of maintaining their sophisticated social organization despite potentially drastic changes in their environments.

22min

Ants maintain essential interactions despite environmental flux

Ants adjust their social interactions to accommodate changes in population density, according to researchers at Penn State and Georgetown University. The findings suggest that ant colonies are capable of maintaining their sophisticated social organization despite potentially drastic changes in their environments.

24min

Rescuers often driven by emotion

Scientists have found reason can go out the window when people's family members, children and pets are in trouble in the water, and people should be better trained in water rescue skills.

27min

New tool can pinpoint origins of the gut's bacteria

A research team has developed a faster and more accurate way to determine where the many bacteria that live in, and on, humans come from. Broadly, the tool can deduce the origins of any microbiome, a localized and diverse community of microscopic organisms.

27min

Community knowledge can be as valuable as ecological knowledge in environmental decision-making

An understanding of community issues can be as valuable as knowing the ecology of an area when making environmental decisions, according to new research.

27min

How the cell protects itself

The cell contains transcripts of the genetic material, which migrate from the cell nucleus to another part of the cell. This movement protects the genetic transcripts from the recruitment of 'spliceosomes'. If this protection does not happen, the entire cell is in danger: meaning that cancer and neurodegenerative diseases can develop. Researchers have demonstrated the underlying mechanism in the c

27min

Fifty years later, DDT lingers in lake ecosystems

To control pest outbreaks, airplanes sprayed more than 6,280 tons of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) onto forests in New Brunswick, Canada, between 1952 and 1968, according to Environment Canada. By 1970, growing awareness of the harmful effects of DDT on wildlife led to curtailed use of the insecticide in the area. However, researchers have now shown that DDT lingers in sediments from New B

27min

A homing beacon for chemotherapy drugs

Killing tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts is a central challenge of cancer chemotherapy. If scientists could put a 'homing beacon' in tumors, they could attract these medicines and reduce side effects caused by the drugs acting on healthy cells. Now, researchers have made a hydrogel that, when injected near tumors in mice, recruits drugs to shrink the tumor with fewer side effect

27min

Brain activation provides individual-level prediction of bipolar disorder risk

Patterns of brain activation during reward anticipation may help identify people most at risk for developing bipolar spectrum disorders (BPSD), according to a new study. Mania in people with BPSD is often accompanied by impulsivity, including impulsive responses to potential rewards. In the study, patterns of neural activation during a reward task predicted the severity of the mania symptom in you

27min

Scientists Built a Robot With a Sense of Irony. It’s Insufferable

TeenBot A new robot was programmed to have a sense of irony, allowing it to approach conversations with all the tact of a surly teenager. Irony Man, as the device was aptly dubbed by its Augsburg University creators, is supposed to come across as more nonchalant and casual than more, well, robotic inventions . But the engineers who built Irony Man told New Scientist that Irony Man doesn’t know wh

29min

ISS Astronaut Will Deliver First DJ Set From Space

Off-World Premiere Here’s something they probably don’t prepare you for in astronaut school. On August 13, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano will make history by delivering the first ever DJ set from space — a futuristic marriage between off-world exploration and EDM . Cruise News As if the set’s location aboard the International Space Station (ISS) weren’t extra enough, promoter Big

29min

Tocilizumab muliggør glukokortikoid-nedtrapning

Alle patienter kan opnå lav sygdomsaktivitet eller helbredelse med tocilizumab, hvis de tilbydes glukokortikoid-nedtrapning, siger tysk forsker.

30min

Cyklosporiner en hjælp til at komme sig over lupus nefritis

Italiensk studie først til at sammenligne disse lægemidler som vedligeholdelsesterapi på den lange bane til patienter med lupus nefritis.

30min

Overvægt giver mere alvorlig psoriasisgigt

Vigtigt at angribe sygdommen ud fra et livsstilssynspunkt parallelt med behandlinger, der fokuserer på led og hud, siger forsker.

30min

Støv kan give kvinder podegra

Uorganisk støv på arbejdspladsen øger kvinders risiko for podagra med 27 pct.

30min

Discovery of field-induced pair density wave state in high temperature superconductors

Superconductors are quantum materials that are perfect transmitters of electricity and electronic information. Presently, cuprates are the best candidate for highest temperature superconductivity at ambient pressure, operating at approximately -120 °C. Improving this involves understanding competing phases, one of which has now been identified.

30min

Framgångsfaktorerna bakom framgångsrika företag

Vad är det som gör att många business-to-business-företag i gränsregionen Fyrbodal-Östfold lyckas så bra? Beror det på närheten till gränsen eller helt andra faktorer? 25 framgångsrika företag har deltagit i forskningsstudien Framfor. Forskningsresultaten presenteras i en ny rapport, som även idéer om hur gränsregionens näringsliv kan bli ännu starkare. – Forskare på Högskolan Väst och Høgskolen

39min

Bacterial Complexity Revises Ideas About ‘Which Came First?’

Open a basic biology textbook published decades ago or one published a few months ago, and both will define the two major categories of cells in the same way: Eukaryotes have membrane-bound compartments called organelles, including a nucleus where they store their genetic information, while prokaryotes do not. The distinction is even embedded in their names: In Greek, the word “eukaryote” means “

40min

Specific multinutrient combination benefits patients with early stage Alzheimer's disease

A new longitudinal study has shown that a nutritional drink designated a 'food for special medical purposes' containing the multinutrient combination Fortasyn Connect® can benefit patients with the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment, who are at risk of progressing to the dementia stage of AD.

42min

Construction kit for custom-designed products

Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to product assembly lines. Certain enzymes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), play a key role in this process. Biotechnologists have now succeeded in changing these enzymes so that entirely new natural products, or even libraries of natural products, can be produced by microorganisms.

42min

Could playing computer games improve your peripheral vision?

Researchers have found a significant improvement in the peripheral awareness of people who played computer games specially designed around using peripheral vision. This finding opens up the possibility that these types of games can be used to help improve players' performance in team sports – so they can spot team-mates quicker – or to help them to identify potential hazards at the side of their v

42min

Bacteria such as E. coli detected in minutes by new tech

Scientists have discovered that healthy bacteria cells and cells inhibited by antibiotics or UV light show completely different electric reactions. These findings could lead to the development of medical devices which can rapidly detect live bacterial cells, evaluate the effects of antibiotics on bacteria colonies, or reveal antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

42min

Why fears over smartphone 'addiction' are based on flawed evidence

Researchers say fears over smartphone 'addiction' are based on flawed evidence. Surveys are often used to understand how people use their smartphone, but these are poorly related to actual smartphone use when measured with an app. This means that existing evidence suggesting that screen time is 'addictive' cannot be used to justify any change of policy. High smartphone usage has been linked to anx

42min

Identifying colorectal cancer subtypes could lead to improved treatment decisions

Identifying a metastatic colorectal cancer patient's Consensus Molecular Subtype could help oncologists determine the most effective course of treatment. For example, Survival for CMS1 patients on bevacizumab was twice that of those on cetuximab, whereas survival for CMS2 patients on cetuximab was six months longer than for bevacizumab.

42min

There’s Nothing Wrong With Posing for Photos at Chernobyl

On Sunday morning a Twitter user named Bruno Zupan posted screenshots of four Instagram photos: A man’s hand holding a geiger counter. A woman posing near a burned-out bus. A woman in a hard hat and face mask. And, most disturbingly, a woman pulling down a hazmat suit to reveal her white thong. All were geotagged Pripyat, Ukraine, the ghost city left in shambles after the disastrous nuclear accid

49min

19 danske NGO’er i fælles front: Giv os en klimalov

Midt i regeringsforhandlingerne bliver Mette Frederiksen mødt med fire krav til klimapolitikken fra 19 grønne NGO’er, fagforeninger og interesseorganisationer.

50min

Ants maintain essential interactions despite environmental flux

Ants adjust their social interactions to accommodate changes in population density, according to researchers at Penn State and Georgetown University. The findings suggest that ant colonies are capable of maintaining their sophisticated social organization despite potentially drastic changes in their environments.

53min

Researchers discover potential new therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease

Apolipoproten E (apoeE) is a major genetic risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, yet it tends to be understudied as a potential druggable target for the mind-robbing neurodegenerative disease. Now a research team led by the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) Morsani College of Medicine reports that a novel apoE antagonist blocks apoE interaction with N-terminal amylo

53min

Nuclear pore complex outer rings: No longer 'one size fits all'

In eukaryotic cells, molecules can only move into or out of the nucleus through specialized channels called nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Each NPC has a ring of nucleoporin proteins flanking either end of the central channel, which usually share an identical structure. But in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, researchers led by Osaka University have found that the NPC outer ring structures

53min

A gut feeling: Microbiome changes may mean early detection of colorectal cancer

Most sporadic colorectal cancers can develop over decades. Recent studies showed that the gut microbiome has possible diagnostic potential for health and disease. Researchers from Osaka University assessed fecal samples from patients who underwent colonoscopy to study the relationship between gut microbiota and colorectal cancer. They found specific markers that could discriminate cases of colorec

53min

Future tsunamis possible in the Red Sea's Gulf of Elat-Aqaba

Researchers who took a closer look at a 1995 tsunami in the Gulf of Elat-Aqaba, at the northeastern tip of the Red Sea, say that the gulf's surrounding countries should prepare for future tsunami hazards in the economically developing vital region.

53min

Not silent at all

The so-called 'silent' or 'synonymous' genetic alterations do not result in altered proteins. But they can nevertheless influence numerous functions of the cell and thus also disease processes. Scientists from the German Cancer Consortium, German Cancer Research Center, and the University of Freiburg have now created a comprehensive database of all synonymous mutations ever found in cancer. This i

53min

Large summer 'dead zone' forecast for Chesapeake Bay after wet winter and spring

Ecologists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and the University of Michigan are forecasting a large Chesapeake Bay 'dead zone' in 2019 due to well-above-average river flows associated with increased rainfall in the watershed since last fall.

53min

Scientists identify a novel neural circuit mediating visually evoked innate defensive responses

Prof. WANG Liping and his colleagues ZHOU Zheng and LIU Xuemei at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed that the VTA (ventral tegmental area) GABAergic neural circuit mediates visually evoked innate defensive responses.

53min

How we tune out distractions

MIT neuroscientists have identified a brain circuit that helps us to filter out unwanted background noise or other distracting sensory stimuli. When this circuit is engaged, the prefrontal cortex selectively suppresses sensory input as it flows into the thalamus, the site where most sensory information enters the brain.

53min

Study shows more effective method for detecting prostate cancer

Each year, 1 million men in the US undergo biopsies for prostate cancer. The biopsy procedure traditionally has been guided by ultrasound, but this method cannot clearly display the location of tumors in the prostate gland. Now, UCLA physicians have found that a new method, which includes biopsy guided by MRI, can be used together with the traditional method to increase the rate of prostate cancer

53min

Empirical energy consumption model quantifies Bitcoin's carbon footprint

Researchers have conducted the first analysis of Bitcoin power consumption based on empirical data from IPO filings and localization of IP addresses. They found that the cryptocurrency's carbon emissions measure up to those of Kansas City — or a small nation. The study, published June 12 in the journal Joule, suggests that cryptocurrencies contribute to global carbon emissions, an issue that must

53min

Gut microbes respond differently to foods with similar nutrition labels

Foods that look the same on nutrition labels can have vastly different effects on our microbiomes, report researchers in a paper publishing June 12 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. The researchers' observations of participants' diets and stool samples over the course of 17 days suggested that the correlation between what we eat and what's happening with our gut microbes might not be as straight

53min

Scientists develop a chemocatalytic approach for one-pot reaction of cellulosic ethanol

Scientists at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a chemocatalytic approach to convert cellulose into ethanol in a one-pot process by using a multifunctional Mo/Pt/WOx catalyst. This approach opens up an alternative avenue for biofuel production.

53min

How Do Scientists Date Fossils?

Geologists Erin DiMaggio and Alka Tripathy-Lang explain techniques for targeting the age of a fossil find

53min

Bitcoin mining may be pumping out as much CO2 per year as Kansas City

The latest attempt to assess the environmental impact of the cryptocurrency finds that mining accounts for about 0.2% of global electricity consumption.

58min

Patienter med urinsyregigt lider under dårligt kontrolleret sygdom

Dårlig kontrol med europæiske urinsyregigtpatienter, viser patientundersøgelse i 14 europæiske lande

1h

Bedre inflammationskontrol reducerer hjertekarbelastning

Færre symptomer på leddegigt giver også markant reduktion af risiko for hjertekarsygdomme, viser italiensk undersøgelse præsenteret på EULAR

1h

Færre smerter efter prednisolinbehandling af slidgigt i hånden

Lavdosis prednisolon giver markant smertereduktion blandt patienter med slidgigt i hånden

1h

Biologisk behandling øger ikke kræftrisiko

Nordisk studie finder ingen generelt øget kræftrisiko blandt patienter med psoriasisgigt i biologisk behandling. Undtagelsen er øget risiko for lymfekræft, som efter forfatternes vurdering bør undersøges nærmere

1h

Canadian Radarsat satellites head to orbit on SpaceX rocket

Three satellites for the Canadian Space Agency's Earth-monitoring Radarsat program are heading toward orbit aboard a SpaceX rocket.

1h

Uber Eats Will Start Making Drone Deliveries This Summer

Drone Burger Uber is officially starting Uber Eats food deliveries by drone as part of a limited trial in San Diego this summer, according to Bloomberg . Uber’s drone-focused subsidiary Uber Elevate showed off a four-foot-long drone that holds its fast food payload close to its underbelly. “We don’t need to get drones direct to our customer, we just have to get it close,” Luke Fischer, Uber Eleva

1h

Bitcoin mining may be pumping out as much CO2 per year as Kansas City

The latest attempt to assess the environmental impact of the cryptocurrency finds that mining accounts for about 0.2% of global electricity consumption.

1h

Britain to intensify fight against climate change

Britain's outgoing prime minister on Wednesday announced plans to eliminate the country's net contribution to climate change by 2050 as Europe's effort to slow global warming picked up speed.

1h

Innehåll viktigare än skärmtid för små barn

Surfplattorna och framförallt de smarta telefonerna har blivit mentala protester, både för barn och vuxna. Orden är Mikael Heimanns, professor emeritus i utvecklingspsykologi och forskare vid Linköpings universitet. De senaste tio årens snabba digitala utveckling har gjort att han börjat intressera sig för hur barn påverkas av vara omgivna av uppkopplad teknik och ett ständigt flöde av underhålln

1h

Ny mjukvara ger kommunerna koll på kusterosionen

Våra sandstränder är inte bara uppskattade tillhåll för sol och bad, promenader och avkoppling. – Stränder och sanddyner är också viktiga översvämningsskydd för bebyggelsen utmed kusten. Stiger havet med en meter innebär det i genomsnitt att sandstränder behöver dra sig tillbaka hundra meter inåt land. På många platser är inte detta möjligt då det ligger hus, vägar och järnvägar i vägen, säger Ca

1h

Construction kit for custom-designed products

Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to product assembly lines. Certain enzymes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), play a key role in this process. Biotechnologists at Goethe University have now succeeded in changing these enzymes so that entirely new natural products, or even libraries of natural products, can be produced by microorganisms.

1h

Gut microbes respond differently to foods with similar nutrition labels

Foods that look the same on nutrition labels can have vastly different effects on our microbiomes, report researchers in a paper publishing June 12 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. The researchers' observations of participants' diets and stool samples over the course of 17 days suggested that the correlation between what we eat and what's happening with our gut microbes might not be as straight

1h

Bullying gets worse as children with autism get older

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to experience bullying than children without ASD and this bullying gets worse with age, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

1h

HIB vaccine linked with better health, cognition, and schooling outcomes in Indian children

Researchers at CDDEP, the University of California, Riverside and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health assessed the long-term associations of the Hib vaccine with anthropometric, cognitive, and schooling outcomes among Indian children.

1h

WVU and NIOSH study ways to prevent lung disease in dentistry professionals

Inhaling dangerous particulates is a hazard of coal mining, mold remediation, sandblasting … and dentistry. Fotinos Panagakos, associate dean of research at the West Virginia University School of Dentistry, is collaborating with a team at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to study how microscopic, airborne particulates and gases might be generated during dental procedures

1h

Bacteria such as E. coli detected in minutes by new technology from Warwick University

University of Warwick scientists have discovered that healthy bacteria cells and cells inhibited by antibiotics or UV light show completely different electric reactions. These findings could lead to the development of medical devices which can rapidly detect live bacterial cells, evaluate the effects of antibiotics on bacteria colonies, or reveal antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The researchers plan

1h

'Interdisciplinary research takes time'

Interdisciplinarity is becoming increasingly important in research. Yet there are structures in place that make careers in science more difficult for interdisciplinary researchers, according to Ruth Müller, Professor of Science and Technology Policy at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). In this interview, she talks about her study on a research center in Sweden and about how existing hurdle

1h

Bitcoin's Climate Impact Is Global. The Cures Are Local.

To measure bitcoin's contribution to global warming, you need to know where it is mined and where those computers get their electricity.

1h

Scientists develop a chemocatalytic approach for one-pot reaction of cellulosic ethanol

Scientists at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a chemocatalytic approach to convert cellulose into ethanol in a one-pot process by using a multifunctional Mo/Pt/WOx catalyst. This approach opens up an alternative avenue for biofuel production. The findings were published in Joule.

1h

Gut microbes respond differently to foods with similar nutrition labels

Foods that look the same on nutrition labels can have vastly different effects on our microbiomes, report researchers in a paper publishing June 12 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. The researchers' observations of participants' diets and stool samples over the course of 17 days suggested that the correlation between what we eat and what's happening with our gut microbes might not be as straight

1h

How the cell protects itself

The cell contains transcripts of genetic material, which migrate from the cell nucleus to another part of the cell. This movement protects the genetic transcripts from the recruitment of "spliceosomes." If this protection does not happen, the entire cell is in danger, meaning that cancer and neurodegenerative diseases can develop. Researchers at the University of Göttingen and the University Medic

1h

Construction kit for custom-designed products

Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to product assembly lines. Certain enzymes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), play a key role in this process. Biotechnologists at Goethe University have now succeeded in changing these enzymes so that entirely new natural products, or even libraries of natural products, can be produced by microorganisms.

1h

A deorbit kit for satellites based on low work-function tethers

Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) coordinates a European research project, called E.T.PACK, whose objective is the development of a new system for deorbiting space satellites without using on board power and fuel. For this purpose, a new experimental technology will be employed: a low work-function tether.

1h

The benefits of being different

Six different colour morphs of the elusive Asiatic golden cat have been discovered in Northeast India—with the findings being hailed as "an evolutionary puzzle—as the world's greatest number of different coloured wild cat species in one area are reported.

1h

Light-powered nano-organisms consume carbon dioxide, create eco-friendly plastics and fuels

Researchers have developed nanobio-hybrid organisms capable of using airborne carbon dioxide and nitrogen to produce a variety of plastics and fuels, a promising first step toward low-cost carbon sequestration and eco-friendly manufacturing for chemicals.

1h

How the cell protects itself

The cell contains transcripts of genetic material, which migrate from the cell nucleus to another part of the cell. This movement protects the genetic transcripts from the recruitment of "spliceosomes." If this protection does not happen, the entire cell is in danger, meaning that cancer and neurodegenerative diseases can develop. Researchers at the University of Göttingen and the University Medic

1h

The benefits of being different

Six different colour morphs of the elusive Asiatic golden cat have been discovered in Northeast India—with the findings being hailed as "an evolutionary puzzle—as the world's greatest number of different coloured wild cat species in one area are reported.

1h

Why we get mad — and why it's healthy | Ryan Martin

Anger researcher Ryan Martin draws from a career studying what makes people mad to explain some of the cognitive processes behind anger — and why a healthy dose of it can actually be useful. "Your anger exists in you … because it offered your ancestors, both human and nonhuman, an evolutionary advantage," he says. "[It's] a powerful and healthy force in your life."

1h

Bronze Age British settlement burned down a year after being built

The burned remains of a late Bronze age settlement in England capture a slice of Bronze Age life, but the settlement had only just been built before its demise

1h

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Specific multinutrient combination benefits patients with early stage Alzheimer's disease

A new longitudinal study has shown that a nutritional drink* designated a 'food for special medical purposes' containing the multinutrient combination Fortasyn Connect® can benefit patients with the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment, who are at risk of progressing to the dementia stage of AD, report scientists in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease Reports.

1h

Our Sun Is Capable of Producing Dangerous 'Superflares', New Study Says

A power superflare fries an exoplanet in the star's system. (Credit: NASA, ESA and D. Player) Astronomers have learned over the past decade that even large solar flares — powerful bursts of radiation — from our Sun are actually small potatoes compared to some of the flares we see around other stars. It’s now common to spot “superflares” hundreds to thousands of times more powerful than the Sun’s f

1h

The Wizard's Hydraulics Go Down | Deadliest Catch

With a major arctic storm approaching, the Wizard's hydraulics go out at the worst possible time. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatc

1h

Elon Musk: Tesla Is Working on a James Bond-Style Submarine Car

Diving Lotus During a Tuesday shareholder meeting, Tesla CEO Elon Musk admitted that the electric car company has a design for a submarine car — and it sounds like something straight out of a 70s James Bond movie. When asked if the company would ever consider such a thing, according to Business Insider , Musk answered: “Funny you should mention that… we do have a design for a submarine car like t

1h

Out of Their Eggs, Into the Sky: How Baby Pterosaurs May Have Taken Flight

Researchers say the flying reptiles didn’t need much parental guidance.

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In the Future, Sex Robots could be Prescribed by your Doctor

submitted by /u/WildberryTart16 [link] [comments]

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Light-powered nano-organisms consume carbon dioxide, create eco-friendly plastics and fuels

Researchers have developed nanobio-hybrid organisms capable of using airborne carbon dioxide and nitrogen to produce a variety of plastics and fuels, a promising first step toward low-cost carbon sequestration and eco-friendly manufacturing for chemicals.

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An unnatural way to make natural products

Researchers have developed an innovative new process for synthesizing isoprenoids, which are chemical compounds used in countless pharmaceutical and consumer products.

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Genetics play strong role in determining age of menopause and overall longevity

If you're wondering why you entered menopause earlier or later than other women, blame your mother. That's because numerous studies have confirmed the role of genetics in determining a woman's age at menopause. A new study not only reconfirms this association but additionally suggests a link to familial longevity. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American M

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Construction kit for custom-designed products

Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to product assembly lines. Certain enzymes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), play a key role in this process. Biotechnologists at Goethe University have now succeeded in changing these enzymes so that entirely new natural products, or even libraries of natural products, can be produced by microorganisms.

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Could playing computer games improve your peripheral vision?

Researchers have found a significant improvement in the peripheral awareness of people who played computer games specially designed around using peripheral vision. This finding opens up the possibility that these types of games can be used to help improve players' performance in team sports – so they can spot team-mates quicker – or to help them to identify potential hazards at the side of their v

1h

An unnatural way to make natural products

Researchers have developed an innovative new process for synthesizing isoprenoids, which are chemical compounds used in countless pharmaceutical and consumer products.

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LED-ing the way: A clean and convenient method to oxidize plastic surfaces for industry

A research team has used chlorine dioxide to oxidize polypropylene. Under LED irradiation, ClO2* radicals attacked the methyl groups of polypropylene, converting them to carboxylic acid. The C-H bond-breaking was selective to the side chain. The oxidized surface could be stained with cationic dyes. Surface oxidation of plastics is industrially important, but existing methods are polluting or poorl

2h

Jigsaw Bought a Russian Twitter Troll Campaign as an Experiment

In a controversial move, the Alphabet-owned tech firm played both sides of an online argument in Russia with the aim of testing disinformation-for-hire services.

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Uber, Volvo Cars launching new self-driving vehicle

Uber is teaming with Volvo Cars to launch its newest self-driving vehicle.

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Ford recalls 1.3M vehicles for suspension, transmission woes

Ford is recalling over 1.3 million vehicles mainly in North America to fix rear suspension and transmission control software problems.

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Pose Lets In the Light

Pose , FX’s vibrant series about ball culture in 1988 New York, is defined by joy and by love, but most of all by presence —the idea that simply being yourself in a specific space can be a revolutionary act. That space can be a dance floor, or it can be the set of a mainstream TV drama. The characters of Pose , the house mothers and queens and LGBTQ voguers who congregated in Season 1 to compete

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Researchers create ‘epigenetic atlas’, heralding leap forward in disease diagnosis

A project 370 times larger than the Human Genome Project bears first fruit. Stephen Fleischfresser reports.

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Binary solvent mixture boosting high efficiency of polymer solar cells

Tremendous progress of organic solar cells (OSCs) has been exemplified by the use of non-fullerene electron acceptors (NFAs) in the past few years. Compared with fullerene derivative acceptors, NFAs show a multitude of advantages including tunable energy levels, broad absorption spectrum and strong light absorption ability, as well as high carrier mobility. To further improve the efficiency of non

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Inducing seizures can also pinpoint their origin

For some people with epilepsy, inducing seizures is just as effective for determining their origin in the brain as those that happen spontaneously, a new study reports. Surgery is the only way to stop seizures in 30 percent of patients with focal drug-resistant epilepsy. People awaiting surgery often stay in hospital for one to two weeks to record medical observations of seizures. Recording the s

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Mathematical tools to study tumors

The results obtained suggest that vitronectin can change the rigidity of the location of the tumorous cells. The changes caused by specific organisation of vitronectin can form 'pathways' that could help the tumor to migrate, with the grave problems that this would cause. For this reason, this 'basic science' study opens a possible new way of combatting this cancer which could be based in modifyin

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The benefits of being different

Six different color morphs of the elusive Asiatic golden cat have been discovered in Northeast India — with the findings being hailed as 'an evolutionary puzzle' — as the world's greatest number of different colored wild cat species in one area are reported.

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Eliminating infamous security threats

Speculative memory side-channel attacks like Meltdown and Spectre are security vulnerabilities in computers. No efficient solutions have been found. Existing solutions only address specific security threats without solving the underlying issue. Now, researchers from University of Murcia, Uppsala University and NTNU have come up with a more appealing solution, which will be presented at the Interna

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The next step in antenna design

Researchers say carbon nanotubes could soon rival copper. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Removing plastic packaging from supermarket fresh food may not be sensible or safe

There are lots of cases where plastic packaging can be beneficial at reducing waste, argue Manoj Dora and Eleni Iacovidou from the UK's Brunel University London.

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Study raises concern for sun ‘superflare’

Research finds it’s not just young stars that behave explosively. Richard A Lovett reports.

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SpaceX’s Starlink Launch and the Race for Global Internet Coverage

I saw two shooting stars last night I wished on them, but they were only satellites it’s wrong to wish on space hardware. – Billy Bragg There’s a mini-constellation of new satellites in the sky. SpaceX has launched the first wave of its planned Starlink fleet into low earth orbit. The sixty satellites, weighing 13.6 tons in total, were deposited 400km above the Earth’s surface by a Falcon 9 rocke

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Learning from nature's bounty: New libraries for drug discovery

Natural products make some of our most potent medicines, among which macrocycles with their large carbon-rich ring systems are one class. Their size and complexity has made it difficult to emulate on Nature's success in the laboratory. By completing a complex molecular synthesis of these compounds attached to a unique identifying DNA strand, Chemists have built a rich collection of natural product

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Her finder norsk radar fem mennesker i det iskolde hav

En ny teknik skal finde en 'mand over bord' hurtigere i iskolde farvande, hvor hvert minut er afgørende.

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Facebook debuts US blood donation tool, its latest public health move

Facebook is no longer just a place to connect with former high school buddies; the social media giant now wants to make it easier for you to connect with blood banks, too.

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Community knowledge can be as valuable as ecological knowledge in environmental decision-making

An understanding of community issues can be as valuable as knowing the ecology of an area when making environmental decisions, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School.

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Community knowledge can be as valuable as ecological knowledge in environmental decision-making

An understanding of community issues can be as valuable as knowing the ecology of an area when making environmental decisions, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School.

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Energy use climbs with age and temperature, research shows

New research links two of the biggest drivers of global change today: the population's rapid aging and the planet's rising heat.

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Magnetic field may be keeping Milky Way's black hole quiet

Supermassive black holes exist at the center of most galaxies, and our Milky Way is no exception. But many other galaxies have highly active black holes, meaning a lot of material is falling into them, emitting high-energy radiation in this "feeding" process. The Milky Way's central black hole, on the other hand, is relatively quiet. New observations from NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infra

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Monkeys face climate change extinction threat

Monkeys living in South America are highly vulnerable to climate change and face an "elevated risk of extinction," according to a new University of Stirling-led study.

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Apollo 11 anniversary puts focus on historic achievements and returning to the moon, says Baker Institute's Abbey

With the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing on July 20, a new paper by George Abbey, a senior fellow in space policy at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy and the former director of NASA's Johnson Space Center, traces America's race to the moon and describes what it took to be the first there.

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Detecting bacteria such as E. coli in minutes

A discovery by researchers at the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick offers a new technology for detecting bacteria in minutes by 'zapping' the bacteria with electricity.

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Three dark fields for Euclid's deep survey

Scientists in the Euclid Consortium have selected three extremely dark patches of the sky that will be the subject of the mission's deepest observations, aiming at exploring faint and rare objects in the Universe. The position of the Euclid Deep Fields – one in the northern sky and two in the southern sky – was announced last week, during the annual consortium meeting in Helsinki, Finland.

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Public say they are relying more on 'reputable' news brands to counter misinformation

Public concern about misinformation is making some people more careful about the brands they choose and the content they share online, according to the eighth annual Digital News Report from the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford.

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Cementing our place in space

As your dog drags you around the block for his morning walk, you're probably not thinking about the wonders of the neighborhood sidewalk. But that concrete is pretty great. Next to water, it's the most widely used material on Earth. In the future, concrete may be equally useful off the planet—when humans construct a permanent base on the moon. They'll need sturdy stuff that can weather bombardment

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Monkeys face climate change extinction threat

Monkeys living in South America are highly vulnerable to climate change and face an "elevated risk of extinction," according to a new University of Stirling-led study.

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Detecting bacteria such as E. coli in minutes

A discovery by researchers at the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick offers a new technology for detecting bacteria in minutes by 'zapping' the bacteria with electricity.

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Fond støtter konstruktiv sundhedsjournalistik med millioner

Novo Nordisk Fonden har skudt seks mio. kr. i konstruktiv journalistik på sundhedsområdet. God ide, siger lægeformand.

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An innovative electron microscope overturning common knowledge of 88 years history

In conventional electron microscopes, performing atomic-resolution observations of magnetic materials is particularly difficult because high magnetic fields are inevitably exerted on samples inside the magnetic objective lens. Newly developed magnetic objective-lens system provides a magnetic-field-free environment at the sample position. This enables direct, atom-resolved imaging of magnetic mate

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Learning from nature's bounty: New libraries for drug discovery

Natural products make some of our most potent medicines, among which macrocycles with their large carbon-rich ring systems are one class. Their size and complexity has made it difficult to emulate on Nature's success in the laboratory. By completing a complex molecular synthesis of these compounds attached to a unique identifying DNA strand, Chemists have built a rich collection of natural product

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Indoor tanning may be an addiction abetted by both genetic and psychiatric factors

A combination of elevated symptoms of depression along with modifications in a gene responsible for dopamine activity, important to the brain's pleasure and reward system, appear to influence an addiction to indoor tanning in young, white non-Hispanic women.

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From face to DNA: New method aims to improve match between DNA sample and face database

Predicting what someone's face looks like based on a DNA sample remains a hard nut to crack for science. It is, however, getting easier to use such a sample to filter the right face from a face database.

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As cars become increasingly driverless, people are already seeking analogue motoring experiences

According to those in the industry, and researchers too, driverless cars will totally revolutionise the way we think about individual transport. They will change the way we work and rest. They could herald the end of traffic jams, and have the potential to change the lives of disabled people, to give a few examples. But as the push to get autonomous vehicles on the roads accelerates, there is one

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Japan sets carbon-neutral goal as UK plans climate laws

Japan has joined Britain in pledging to become carbon neutral later this century, as the world races to prevent catastrophic climate change, but critics blasted Tokyo's plan as unambitious.

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Lions sometimes suffer if they attack a porcupine. So why do they do it?

Not much can mess with a lion. They're powerful top predators that can bring down large prey like wildebeest, zebra, and even buffalo.

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Online shopping: Why its unstoppable growth may be coming to an end

Many people probably assume that online stores are making a fortune, without all the costly bricks and mortar. But the reality is rather different. Many e-commerce activities are, in fact, unprofitable; if people had to pay the true cost of what they bought online, they would probably buy less. In fact, we think there is an inflection point approaching, when consumers will either have to pay more

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Monkeys face climate change extinction threat

Monkeys living in South America are highly vulnerable to climate change and face an "elevated risk of extinction", according to a new University of Stirling-led study.

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Sweating for science: A sauna session is just as exhausting as moderate exercise

Your blood pressure does not drop during a sauna visit – it rises, as well as your heart rate. This increase is even comparable to the effect of a short, moderate workout. This is the result of a new study conducted by researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Medical Center Berlin (MCB). For their study, the researchers placed their participants both in a sauna and on

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Reaching and grasping — Learning fine motor coordination changes the brain

When we train the reaching for and grasping of objects, we also train our brain. In other words, this action brings about changes in the connections of a certain neuronal population in the red nucleus, a region of the midbrain. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have discovered this group of nerve cells in the red nucleus. They have also shown how fine motor tasks promote plastic

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The atmosphere of a new ultra hot Jupiter is analyzed

The combination of observations made with the CARMENES spectrograph on the 3.5m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Almería), and the HARPS-N spectrograph on the National Galileo Telescope (TNG) at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Garafía, La Palma) has enabled a team from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and from the University of La Laguna (ULL) to reveal new details about

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Baby pterodactyls could fly from birth

A breakthrough discovery has found that pterodactyls, extinct flying reptiles also known as pterosaurs, had a remarkable ability — they could fly from birth. No other living vertebrates today, or in the history of life as we know it, have been able to replicate this. This revelation has a profound impact on our understanding of how pterodactyls lived, which is critical to understanding how the di

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Rescuers often driven by emotion

Scientists from James Cook University and Royal Life Saving Society — Australia have found reason can go out the window when people's family members, children and pets are in trouble in the water, and people should be better trained in water rescue skills.

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Lions sometimes suffer if they attack a porcupine. So why do they do it?

Not much can mess with a lion. They're powerful top predators that can bring down large prey like wildebeest, zebra, and even buffalo.

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A robot has learned to use irony and now people like it more

Irony Man is a small robot with deadpan delivery. By incorporating irony into its dialogue, its creators found people thought it was more likable

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New Research Reveals That Black Holes Can Die

Goliath It’s hard to imagine anything that could kill a black hole. The ultra-dense celestial vacuums consume everything in their paths — but that cosmic appetite could theoretically be their undoing as well. That’s according to research from the Israel Institute of Technology, Live Science reports . A new model shows that a steady diet of bizarre particles with negative energy could gradually ch

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Why Freud Should Be Dead

Freud’s most implacable modern critic recounts the flaws of psychoanalysis and its founder and deplores their persistent influence. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The weirdest things we learned this week: labor-inducing salads and cat-eating coyotes

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s hit podcast.

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How to make an open office more quiet

DIY Dull the roar of all those clicks, clacks, and workplace chats. The open office is the most popular workplace layout of the 21st century, but it has a dark side. When everybody can see each other, the lack of privacy and overall…

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Vegan is the new vegetarian—why supermarkets need to go 'plant-based' to help save the planet

Veganism is arguably the biggest food trend of the moment. This has led to a massive expansion of meat-free brands and own-label offerings. In fact, the UK is now the nation with the highest number of vegan food products launched. And with major news outlets such as The Economist and Forbes declaring 2019 the "year of the vegan", the trend promises to continue—a third of people in the UK have alre

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Diffusing wave paradox may be used to design micro-robotics

Amoeba are unusual creatures that form when a dispersed population of cells spontaneously comes together and reorganizes itself into a multicellular macroscopic organism. To do this, a few leader cells emit chemical pulses that cause the other individual cells to move in the direction opposite to that of the traveling pulses, leading to the formation of dense clusters.

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Swedish start-up secures funds for battery 'gigafactory'

Swedish start-up Northvolt Wednesday announced it had secured funding, in large part from Volkswagen, for Europe's biggest car battery factory, set to rival electric carmaker Tesla's US "Gigafactory".

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India unveils spacecraft for moon-landing mission

India on Wednesday unveiled a spacecraft which is expected to take off for the moon next month, making the country only the fourth to achieve the feat.

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Education, intelligence may protect cognition, but don't prevent Alzheimer's disease

In a search for clues to what may delay or prevent Alzheimer's disease, scientists report that smarter, more educated people aren't protected from the disease, but do get a cognitive 'head start' that may keep their minds functioning better temporarily.

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Beewolves use a gas to preserve food

Scientists have discovered that the eggs of the European beewolf produce nitric oxide. The gas prevents the larvae's food from getting moldy in the warm and humid brood cells.

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Genetic marker linked to increased risk of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

This is the first real effort to have a genome wide search for genes predisposing to diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

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Superweed resists another class of herbicides

We've all heard about bacteria that are becoming resistant to multiple types of antibiotics. These are the so-called superbugs perplexing and panicking medical science. The plant analogue may just be waterhemp, a broadleaf weed common to corn and soybean fields across the Midwest. With resistance to multiple common herbicides, waterhemp is getting much harder to kill.

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Curbing your enthusiasm for overeating

Signals between our gut and brain control how and when we eat food. But how the molecular mechanisms involved in this signaling are affected when we eat a high-energy diet and how they contribute to obesity are not well understood. Using a mouse model, a research team led by a biomedical scientists has found that overactive endocannabinoid signaling in the gut drives overeating in diet-induced obe

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Buttigieg Splits From the Progressives on Foreign Policy

Pete Buttigieg’s foreign-policy speech started with a thinly veiled jab at President Barack Obama and his vice president, Joe Biden. For “the better part of my lifetime,” Buttigieg said, “it has been difficult to identify a consistent foreign policy in the Democratic Party.” “We need a strategy. Not just to deal with individual threats, rivalries, and opportunities, but to manage global trends,”

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France's Dassault to acquire Medidata for $5.8 billion

French software company Dassault Systems says it will buy U.S.-based Medidata Solutions for $5.8 billion in cash.

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Facebook opens UK engineering hub to fight harmful content

Facebook is opening an engineering center in London that will build tech tools aimed at keeping harmful content off its site.

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Renault boss battles to keep carmaker on track

When he was tapped to succeed fallen auto titan Carlos Ghosn as head of Renault in January, Jean-Dominique Senard was touted as a steady hand at the wheel who would shore up the French carmaker's frayed alliance with Nissan.

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New tool can pinpoint origins of the gut's bacteria

A UCLA-led research team has developed a faster and more accurate way to determine where the many bacteria that live in, and on, humans come from. Broadly, the tool can deduce the origins of any microbiome, a localized and diverse community of microscopic organisms.

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A matter of fine balance

How does the brain's circuitry adjust itself to make sense of the world despite the hugely different signals it receives? Scientists from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore, believe that they have discovered the root causes of this phenomenon–called normalization–to be based on two properties of brain circuits that they have demonstrated in mouse brains.

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How the cell protects itself

The cell contains transcripts of the genetic material, which migrate from the cell nucleus to another part of the cell. This movement protects the genetic transcripts from the recruitment of 'spliceosomes'. If this protection does not happen, the entire cell is in danger: meaning that cancer and neurodegenerative diseases can develop. Researchers at the University of Göttingen and the University M

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Community knowledge can be as valuable as ecological knowledge in environmental decision-making

An understanding of community issues can be as valuable as knowing the ecology of an area when making environmental decisions, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School.

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Binary solvent mixture boosting high efficiency of polymer solar cells

CB, CF and their mixture were selected as solvents to regulate molecular order and the nanoscale morphology of the photoactive layer. The casting solvents with different boiling points change the molecular organization time, therefore can optimize molecular ordering and phase separation. As a result, the efficiency of PBDB-T:INPIC-4F non-fullerene OSCs was improved from 8.1% to 13.1%.

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Persistent poverty affects one in five UK children

Persistent poverty affects one in five children in the UK, and is associated with poor physical and mental health in early adolescence, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Mouse study finds BPA exposure has transgenerational effects on gene linked to autism

Transgenerational bisphenol A (BPA) exposure may contribute to autism, according to a mouse study published in the Endocrine Society's journal Endocrinology.

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Researchers identify human protein that aids development of malaria parasite

Researchers in Japan have discovered that the Plasmodium parasites responsible for malaria rely on a human liver cell protein for their development into a form capable of infecting red blood cells and causing disease. The study, which will be published June 12 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this human protein, known as CXCR4, could be a way to block the parasite's

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Hybrid nanostructure steps up light-harvesting efficiency

To absorb incoming sunlight, plants and certain kinds of bacteria rely on a light-harvesting protein complex containing molecules called chromophores. This complex funnels solar energy to the photosynthetic reaction center, where it is converted into chemical energy for metabolic processes.

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Genetic basis for extended lifespan and cancer resistance discovered in long-lived bats

Scientists have identified genes that may give long-lived bat species their extraordinary lifespans and cancer resistance compared to other animals.

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Amazon launches Alexa device for kids but privacy issues will still scare some parents – CNET

Amazon Echo Dot Kids Edition is meant to be more colorful, easy to use and age appropriate.

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Genetic basis for extended lifespan and cancer resistance discovered in long-lived bats

Scientists have identified genes that may give long-lived bat species their extraordinary lifespans and cancer resistance compared to other animals.

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The neuroscience of terrorism: How we convinced a group of radicals to let us scan their brains

The young man sitting in the waiting room of our neuroimaging facility wearing skinny jeans and trainers looked like a typical Spanish 20-year-old of Moroccan origin. Yassine was bouncy, chatting up the research assistants, and generally in good spirits. (All names in this article have been changed.) He was like so many other Barcelona youths, except he openly expressed a desire to engage in viole

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It's been exactly one year since Opportunity sent this final message home—on its 5,111th Martian day

Opportunity's final message home is not much to look at on its own. If you're old enough to remember film cameras, it looks like the final exposure on a roll of film, developed but partly missing. It's a suitable epitaph for Opportunity's mission.

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Gender-Swap Filter Fools Cop Who Tried to Prey on Underage Girl

Pretend Profile A California police officer has found himself on the other side of the handcuffs after trying to hook up with a 16-year-old girl he met on Tinder. But the girl wasn’t actually 16. In fact, she wasn’t actually a girl. “Esther” was actually Ethan, a 20-year-old college student who used Snapchat’s popular gender-swap filter on himself and then created a dating profile with the image

3h

Men in Black: International Forgets What Made the Original So Great

Men in Black: International is indebted to the blockbuster franchise that started in 1997 in many ways. For example, over the course of the film, the main characters often wear black suits and sunglasses, and sometimes they encounter aliens. Beyond that, though, it would be nearly impossible to watch this movie and recall what was so good about the original Men in Black . The basic ingredients ar

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Svårt förutsäga utförsåkares förmåga med fystest

– Fystest är i sig ett alltför trubbigt instrument för en så komplex sport som utförsåkning. För att testet ska ge praktiskt användbar information om åkarens förmåga måste betydelsen analyseras på individnivå, säger Robert Nilsson, doktorand i idrottsmedicin vid Umeå universitet. Det övergripande syftet med doktorsavhandlingen var att undersöka den prediktiva, det vill säga förutsägande, förmågan

3h

1 swap halves the carbon footprint of your diet

If Americans changed their diets by swapping out just one item each day, they could greatly reduce their carbon footprint from food, according to a new report. “We found that making one substitution of poultry for beef resulted in an average reduction of dietary greenhouse gases by about a half,” says Diego Rose, professor and director of nutrition at Tulane University School of Public Health & T

3h

Lab-grown dairy: The next food frontier

Lab-grown meat is getting a lot of attention along with plant-based meat substitutes. Technology is driving the industry toward providing alternatives to conventionally produced food products. Dairy proteins may be the next product produced in a lab, for use in fluid "milk" production and processed dairy products like yogurt and cheese, to name a few.

3h

Cloudflare’s Five-Year Project to Protect Nonprofits Online

Cloudflare's Project Galileo has helped vulnerable organizations fend off DDoS and other attacks for the last five years.

3h

Canon Ivy Cliq Review: How It Compares to Instax

Canon's latest instant camera prints photos that are a lot of fun, but not fine art.

3h

An interaction of slipping beams

Accelerators generate beams of subatomic particles for cutting-edge science. The greater a beam's intensity, the more opportunities there are to study particle interactions. One way to increase the intensity is to merge two beams with a technique called slip-stacking. However, when combining them, the beams' interaction may cause instability.

3h

X-ray study sheds more light into the nature of a gamma-ray pulsar

Using archival data from ESA's XMM-Newton spacecraft and NASA's Chandra X-ray observatory, astronomers have investigated one of gamma-ray radio-quiet pulsars known as PSR J1826−1256. The study, based on X-ray observations, sheds more light into the nature of this peculiar object and its pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Results of the research were presented in a paper published June 3 on arXiv.org.

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IDIBELL-researchers negatively correlate a neuropeptide with executive functions

Researchers from IDIBELL and the group of Eating Disorders, of the HUB, led by Dr. Fernando Fernández-Aranda, published in Scientific Reports (Nature) a study that negatively correlates the concentration of orexin A (a neuropeptide) with the executive functions in anorexic patients. The study is part of the research program "Neurocognition and extreme weight conditions: from anorexia to obesity",

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Algorithm to transform investment banking with higher returns

A University of Bath researcher has created an algorithm which aims to remove the elements of chance, bias or emotion from investment banking decisions, a development which has the potential to reduce errors in financial decision making and improve financial returns in global markets.

3h

Lab-grown dairy: The next food frontier

Lab-grown meat is getting a lot of attention along with plant-based meat substitutes. Technology is driving the industry toward providing alternatives to conventionally produced food products. Dairy proteins may be the next product produced in a lab, for use in fluid "milk" production and processed dairy products like yogurt and cheese, to name a few.

3h

MagLab scientists discover thermoelectric properties in promising class of materials

Exploring an area overlooked by other scientists, physicists at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have discovered that a class of materials called "1-2-20s" have very promising thermoelectric properties, opening the floodgates for further research into these fascinating materials.

3h

Researcher documents cascading effects of parasites on underwater ecosystems

Research by an evolutionary biologist from Florida State University has shown parasites have important and far-reaching effects on predatory fish and the ecosystems they inhabit.

3h

Injection-molding wood powder for sustainable fabrication

Biomass materials such as wood are environmentally-friendly alternatives to fossil resources. As an example, wood is typically non-toxic and carbon neutral. Furthermore, wood can be produced in a sustainable manner by appropriate planting and trimming of trees. Therefore, the use of wood resources as industrial materials is an important aspect for realizing a sustainable society.

3h

Researcher documents cascading effects of parasites on underwater ecosystems

Research by an evolutionary biologist from Florida State University has shown parasites have important and far-reaching effects on predatory fish and the ecosystems they inhabit.

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3.500 underskriver protest mod besparelser på AUH

Ansatte på Aarhus Universitetshospital har startet en underskriftindsamling som protest mod den igangværende sparerunde. Den vil ikke påvirke besparelserne for i år, fortæller regionsrådsformand.

3h

Eliminating infamous security threats

Speculative memory side-channel attacks are security vulnerabilities in computers for which no efficient solutions have been found. Existing solutions only address specific security threats without solving the underlying issue.

3h

Electron beam strengthens recyclable nanocomposite

Polymers reinforced with carbon fibers combine strength and low weight. They also boast significant green credentials as they are less resource-intensive during production and use, and they are readily recycled. While the mechanical properties of continuous-fiber laminates are sufficiently competitive for applications in aerospace and automobiles, composites reinforced with short carbon fibers cou

3h

Study of olfactory bulb ratio in modern birds suggests dinosaurs may have had strong sense of smell

A team of researchers at University College Dublin has found evidence that suggests some dinosaurs may have had a very strong sense of smell. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the olfactory bulb ratio in modern birds and how they used it to predict possible olfactory strength in certain dinosaurs.

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Study of olfactory bulb ratio in modern birds suggests dinosaurs may have had strong sense of smell

A team of researchers at University College Dublin has found evidence that suggests some dinosaurs may have had a very strong sense of smell. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the olfactory bulb ratio in modern birds and how they used it to predict possible olfactory strength in certain dinosaurs.

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Rise of e-scooters is busting up a lot of faces

Facial and head injuries from riding electric scooters have tripled over the past decade, a new study reports. Electric scooter use has increased in popularity as a more environmentally friendly and efficient alternative to gas vehicles. However, state helmet laws vary—and many people are injured because they don’t wear appropriate protective equipment. For the study in the American Journal of Ot

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A $100M Bet That Online Coaching Can Make a Better Manager

BetterUp wants to bring data to human resources, and create more fulfilled employees.

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This artificial island was built by farmers more than five millennia ago

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01814-2 Rocky outposts are much older than previously supposed and might have served ritual purposes.

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Monogamous fish found to show pessimistic bias when separated from mate

A team of researchers at the University of Burgundy has found that a certain type of monogamous female fish exhibits a pessimistic bias when separated from its mate. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes experiments they conducted with convict cichlid fish and what they found.

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Starshade would take formation flying to extremes

Anyone who's ever seen aircraft engaged in formation flying can appreciate the feat of staying highly synchronized while airborne. In work sponsored by NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP), engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, are taking formation flying to a new extreme.

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Monogamous fish found to show pessimistic bias when separated from mate

A team of researchers at the University of Burgundy has found that a certain type of monogamous female fish exhibits a pessimistic bias when separated from its mate. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes experiments they conducted with convict cichlid fish and what they found.

3h

Sunscreen Prevents Cancer, Right? Well, It’s Complicated.

While it's plausible that sunscreen prevents skin cancer, robust evidence to back that up is scarce. Such is the conclusion of one recent analysis, which found only a handful of studies on the topic. And none of those looked at the efficacy of sunscreen in preventing skin cancer in healthy individuals.

3h

Opposite piezoresistant effects of rhenium disulfide in two principle directions

Using optical and electrical measurements, a two-dimensional anisotropic crystal of rhenium disulfide was found to show opposite piezoresistant effects along two principle axes, i.e. positive along one axis and negative along another. Piezoresistance was also reversible; it appeared upon application of a strain, but the relative resistance returned to its original value on strain removal. This nov

3h

Uber in the air: Flying taxi trials may lead to passenger service by 2023

Uber Air will start test flights of its aerial taxi service in 2020, and move to commercial operations by 2023, the ABC reported today.

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Increase in resolution, scale takes CT scanning and diagnosis to the next level

To diagnose and treat diseases like cancer, scientists and doctors must understand how cells respond to different medical conditions and treatments. Researchers have developed a new way to study disease at the cellular level.

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Kan slim fra vandmænd fjerne mikroplast?

PLUS. Den voksende bestand af vandmænd kan vise sig geniale som gødning, mad og sågar som filter i rensningsanlæg, lyder det fra forskere i GoJelly.

3h

New study shows legacy of DDT to lake ecosystems

New findings of a multi-university research team show the pesticide DDT persists in remote lakes at concerning levels half a century after it was banned, affecting key aquatic species and potentially entire lake food webs.

3h

A homing beacon for chemotherapy drugs

Killing tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts is a central challenge of cancer chemotherapy. If scientists could put a 'homing beacon' in tumors, they could attract these medicines and reduce side effects caused by the drugs acting on healthy cells. Now, researchers have made a hydrogel that, when injected near tumors in mice, recruits drugs to shrink the tumor with fewer side effect

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Fifty years later, DDT lingers in lake ecosystems

To control pest outbreaks, airplanes sprayed more than 6,280 tons of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) onto forests in New Brunswick, Canada, between 1952 and 1968, according to Environment Canada. By 1970, growing awareness of the harmful effects of DDT on wildlife led to curtailed use of the insecticide in the area. However, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology ha

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Scientists are putting antibiotics into the ocean—on purpose. And it's our only hope.

Environment A mysterious new coral epidemic is ravaging reefs across the Florida Keys. A mysterious new coral epidemic is ravaging reefs across the Florida Keys. Antibiotics are just one part of a massive rescue operation with little time to spare.

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NASA's Psyche mission has a metal world in its sights

Designed to explore a metal asteroid that could be the heart of a planet, the Psyche mission is readying for a 2022 launch. After extensive review, NASA Headquarters in Washington has approved the mission to begin the final design and fabrication phase, otherwise known as Phase C. This is when the Psyche team finalizes the system design, develops detailed plans and procedures for the spacecraft an

3h

Pulsed electron beams shed light on plastics production

Plastics are all around us—they make up our water bottles, trash bags, packing materials, toys, containers, and more. About 300 million tons of plastic are produced worldwide each year, yet the details of what goes on at the atomic scale during the plastics production process is still unclear.

3h

Gender goals could ensure diversity on corporate boards

After years of raising awareness about the beneficial impacts of women's presence on corporate boards of directors, fewer than 20 percent of such seats are filled by women.

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Into darkness

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01798-z At the edge of science.

4h

Energy Dept: Geothermal Power Has “Enormous Untapped Potential”

Untapped A new report by the U.S. Department of Energy identifies geothermal energy — in which heat from beneath the Earth’s surface is used to generate electricity — as an underdeveloped source of power. The report, titled GeoVision , found that there’s “enormous untapped potential for geothermal” electricity. It outlines how America’s geothermal energy production could increase 26 times over cu

4h

Workers remain exploited in garment and cocoa industries

The UK's Modern Slavery Act 2015 and anti-slavery commitments by major firms are having little impact on working conditions in the supply chain, and could even push exploitation into even more unregulated markets, according to research carried out by the University of Liverpool.

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The Worst Patients in the World

Gosia Herba I was standing two feet away when my 74-year-old father slugged an emergency-room doctor who was trying to get a blood-pressure cuff around his arm. I wasn’t totally surprised: An accomplished scientist who was sharp as a tack right to the end, my father had nothing but disdain for the entire U.S. health-care system, which he believed piled on tests and treatments intended to benefit

4h

Taking On the Wellness Industry

The wellness industry is just one more manifestation of quackery and pseudoscience in health.

4h

How Ava DuVernay Made Sure the Central Park Five Were Finally ‘Seen’

The filmmaker’s riveting documentary "When They See Us" tells the story of five men convicted—wrongly—of rape. It brings the story to life in new ways.

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The Next Big Privacy Hurdle? Teaching AI to Forget

Opinion: The inability to forget doesn’t only impact personal privacy—it could also lead to real problems for our global security.

4h

Russia Targets Tinder as a Warning to Facebook and Twitter

Tinder last week agreed to store data in Russia and comply with government information requests. Analysts say the regime was sending a message to other online players.

4h

A homing beacon for chemotherapy drugs

Killing tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts is a central challenge of cancer chemotherapy. If scientists could put a "homing beacon" in tumors, they could attract these medicines and reduce side effects caused by the drugs acting on healthy cells. Now, researchers have made a hydrogel that, when injected near tumors in mice, recruits drugs to shrink the tumor with fewer side effect

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If boss shoots down ideas, employees won’t speak up

How a manager responds to an employee’s suggestion can influence whether they open up in the future, according to a new study. Speaking up in front of a supervisor can be stressful—but it doesn’t have to be. A new paper shows how leaders can use language that encourages workers to offer more ideas later, even if the boss doesn’t implement an initial suggestion. After conducting two studies, resea

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Retningslinjer for håndtering af krænkende handlinger kommer i høring

Københavns Universitets Personalepolitiske Udvalg sender nu et nyt forslag til retningslinjer om…

4h

New study shows legacy of DDT to lake ecosystems

New findings of a multi-university research team show the pesticide DDT persists in remote lakes at concerning levels half a century after it was banned, affecting key aquatic species and potentially entire lake food webs.

4h

A homing beacon for chemotherapy drugs

Killing tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts is a central challenge of cancer chemotherapy. If scientists could put a "homing beacon" in tumors, they could attract these medicines and reduce side effects caused by the drugs acting on healthy cells. Now, researchers have made a hydrogel that, when injected near tumors in mice, recruits drugs to shrink the tumor with fewer side effect

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Image of the Day: Motile Swimmers

Scientists track the movement of sperm flagella.

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Bowland hen harrier chicks give 'hope for future'

Chicks hatching for the second year on an estate is good news for the endangered species, the RSPB says.

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UPDATE: Historical Map of (the) cognitive science(s)

submitted by /u/AnnaLeptikon [link] [comments]

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Researchers discover new nanoparticles with exclusively lateral light scattering

An international team of physicists has produced first evidence of particles capable of scattering light in a lateral direction by suppressing forward and backward scattering. The researchers studied the physics behind this phenomenon and confirmed their theoretical results with an experiment in the microwave spectral range, proving that lattices or metasurfaces made of these materials can be comp

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New result in hunt for mysterious magnetic monopoles

Cutting a magnet in half yields two magnets, each with its own north and south pole. This apparent absence of an isolated magnetic pole, or "magnetic monopole," has puzzled physicists for more than a century. It would seem perfectly natural for a magnetic monopole to exist; Maxwell's equations would reflect complete symmetry between electricity and magnetism if particles with magnetic charge were

4h

Bronze Age British settlement burned down a year after being built

The burned remains of a late Bronze age settlement in England capture a slice of Bronze Age life, but the settlement had only just been built before its demise

4h

Artificial Scottish islands are thousands of years older than thought

Ancient inhabitants of Scotland built islands in the country’s lochs, with most thought to be about 2800 years old – but several actually date back 5600 years

4h

Robotic surgery is turning out to be an expensive fad

The rapid rise of robot-aided surgery ignores the fact that high-tech gadgets don’t always improve treatment outcomes but do increase costs

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Scientists Propose New Candidate for Dark Matter

Scientists still don't know what dark matter is, but two theoretical physicists at the University of California Davis have a new hypothesis and a way to test it. The post Scientists Propose New Candidate for Dark Matter appeared first on ExtremeTech .

4h

The Pentagon Emits More Greenhouse Gases Than Any Other Part of the US Gov't.

The Defense Department remains the world's single largest consumer of oil, and as a result, one of the world's top greenhouse gas emitters.

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Tankeläsning pågår!

Läsa någons tankar. Styra omgivningen med tanken. Många forskare runt om i världen jobbar för att dessa hisnande möjligheter ska realiseras. Nya forskningsrön tar det som tidigare var fantasi ett steg närmare verkligheten.

4h

Diet at the docks: Living and dying at the port of ancient Rome

Analysis of plant, animal and human remains from Portus, the maritime port of Imperial Rome, has reconstructed for the first time the diets and geographic origins of its inhabitants, suggesting a shift in food resources following the Vandal sack of Rome in AD 455.

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Hera asteroid mission's brain to be radiation-hard and failure-proof

At the heart of ESA's Hera mission to the double Didymos asteroids will be an onboard computer intended to be failure-proof.

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Facebook to open third London office with 100 new AI roles

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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AI based drone that can evade and pursuit fast moving objects!

submitted by /u/chahatdeep [link] [comments]

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Framework predicts endangered species' pathogen risk

Four years ago, more than 200,000 endangered saiga antelope dropped dead on the remote steppe grassland of Central Asia in the species' worst recorded mass mortality event.

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New photography technique brings hidden history of fossils to light

We've all seen and marveled at them: perfect fossils of gargantuan dinosaurs or other exotic creatures from the ancient world. But the truth is, sometimes there's more than meets the eye. From signs of soft tissue and the remains of million-year-old meals, to delicate fossilized anatomy lost in the surrounding rock, to paint and plaster artfully applied by human preparators—many fossils have scien

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Baby pterodactyls could fly from birth

A breakthrough discovery reveals that pterodactyls, extinct flying reptiles, had a remarkable ability—they could fly from birth. The importance of this discovery is highlighted by the fact that no other living vertebrates today, or those in the history of the fossil record, had this ability. This revelation has a profound impact on our understanding of how pterodactyls lived, which is critical to

5h

Turn-of-the-Century Thinkers Weren’t Sure If Women Could Vote and Be Mothers at the Same Time

A postcard from the turn of the 20th century that reads: "My wife's joined the Suffrage Movement, (I've suffered ever since!)" (Rykoff Collection / CORBIS / Getty) Charles Worcester Clark’s “Woman Suffrage, Pro and Con,” an essay published in the March 1890 issue of The Atlantic, does not read like the kind of thing the author ever expected a woman to see. Over the course of nearly 7,000 words, C

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Extra fingers, often seen as useless, can offer major dexterity advantages

Two people born with six fingers on each hand can control the extra digit, using it to do tasks better than five-fingered hands, a study finds.

5h

Framework predicts endangered species' pathogen risk

Four years ago, more than 200,000 endangered saiga antelope dropped dead on the remote steppe grassland of Central Asia in the species' worst recorded mass mortality event.

5h

'God Plays Dice with the Universe,' Einstein Writes in Letter About His Qualms with Quantum Theory

Three letters written by Einstein are up for auction, and they offer an intriguing view of his thoughts on quantum physics.

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Diet at the docks: Living and dying at the port of ancient Rome

Portus Romae was established in the middle of the first century AD and for well over 400 years was Rome's gateway to the Mediterranean. The port played a key role in funnelling imports—e.g. foodstuffs, wild animals, marble and luxury goods—from across the Mediterranean and beyond to the citizens of Rome and was vital to the pre-eminence of the city in the Roman Mediterranean.

5h

The Cold War Project That Pulled Climate Science From the Ice

A top secret US nuke installation in Greenland was supposed to end with 600 missiles aimed at the USSR. Instead it opened the door to a huge breakthrough in climate research.

5h

These Sumptuous Images Give Deep Space Data an Old-World Look

Eleanor Lutz is a biologist with a knack for producing visually rich data visualizations. She released her latest series, Atlas of Space, this month.

5h

How Nanotech Powers Precision Medicine

It’s behind everything from narrowly targeted drug delivery to microchips you can swallow — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Nanotech Powers Precision Medicine

It’s behind everything from narrowly targeted drug delivery to microchips you can swallow — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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For Sale: 'Haunted' Medieval Prison That Held Accused Witches

The former jail is known by the ominous nickname "The Cage."

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TurboGrafx-16 Mini Is Your Next Retro Console

Forget all of the brand new video games making their debut at E3 2019. Arguably the greatest era of the medium (and certainly the most bloodthirsty when it comes to console wars) was […] The …

5h

Watch a Raging Forest Fire Surround You in 360 Degrees

Nightmarish spherical videos, shot from the center of an inferno, demonstrate how they spread — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Praktiserende læger er blevet bedre til at tage akuttelefonen

En større andel af Region Midtjyllands praktiserende læger tager akuttelefonen inden for fem minutter sammenlignet med i år 2017. Det viser en ny undersøgelse fra Region Midtjylland.

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Watch a Raging Forest Fire Surround You in 360 Degrees

Nightmarish spherical videos, shot from the center of an inferno, demonstrate how they spread — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rare 'Ectopic Breast Tissue' Caused a Woman to Lactate from Her Vulva

Women can experience some odd body changes after pregnancy, but for one mother in Austria, those changes were particularly unusual.

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Flerspråkiga elevers läsförståelse kan utvecklas med lässtrategier

Flerspråkiga elevers läsförståelse har uppmärksammats i ett flertal rapporter den senaste tiden. Elever som har ett annat modersmål än svenska har lägre resultat än infödda svenska elever på läsförståelsetest i internationella undersökningar som exempelvis PISA och PIRLS. Det gäller både för elever som är födda utomlands och för elever som är födda i Sverige. Skillnaderna mellan dessa elevers och

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From mice to mouse lemurs

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01870-8 Could the world's tiniest primate be the next big thing in genetics?

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Skridttæller, puls og hjerterytme: Sundhedsvæsnet vil hente data fra din smartphone

Et nyt samarbejde mellem regionerne og Dansk Industri ser på, hvordan fremtidens digitaliserede sundhedsvæsen skal se ud.

5h

Efter fem måneders test: Bølgerne rummer endnu mere energi end generatoren kan omdanne

PLUS. Bølgeprojektet Crestwing er netop kommet i havn efter fem måneder i havet ud for Frederikshavn. Testanlægget har overlevet påsejling og en enkelt skade og initiativtageren har store håb for projektet.

5h

Identifying colorectal cancer subtypes could lead to improved treatment decisions

Identifying a metastatic colorectal cancer patient's Consensus Molecular Subtype could help oncologists determine the most effective course of treatment. For example, Survival for CMS1 patients on bevacizumab was twice that of those on cetuximab, whereas survival for CMS2 patients on cetuximab was six months longer than for bevacizumab.

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New Cochrane Review assesses evidence on ways to reduce consumption of sugary drinks

Consumption of sugary drinks is considered to be a key driver behind the global obesity epidemic, and is linked with tooth decay, diabetes and heart disease. Many public health bodies including the World Health Organization (WHO) have called upon governments, the food and drink industry, educational institutions, places of work and civil society to support healthier beverage choices.

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Ny aftale for licensklinikker i Region Hovedstaden skal styrke lægedækningen

Praktiserende læger i Region Hovedstaden får nu i videre udstrækning mulighed for at drive ydernummer på licens. Den nye aftale skal være med til at styrke lægedækningen i regionen.

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Small, furry and powerful: are mouse lemurs the next big thing in genetics?

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01789-0 More-human than mice, the world’s tiniest primates may just have what it takes to become the next top model organism.

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Help Audubon Protect Threatened Birds by Participating in the Climate Watch Program

Audubon’s Climate Watch Program needs volunteers to help it spot 12 birds threatened by climate change. Are you in? “Hope is the thing with feathers/ That perches in the soul,” Emily Dickinson wrote. Is there hope for our feathered friends in the era of climate change? Yes, but they need our help. More than 300 North American birds will likely lose over 50 percent of their current geographical ran

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What’s wrong with the internet? We’d rather “display” than communicate.

Disruptive technologies tend to regress humanity back to our default mode: deeply ingrained tribalism. Rather than using the internet to communicate, many people use it to display their colors or group affinity, like tribespeople wearing face paint. Fake news spreads faster than truth in these tribal environments. How can we solve this problem without censorship? Platforms like Facebook and Googl

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Biden’s Message Is Incoherent

Say what you will about Joe Biden, but you can’t accuse him of pessimism. Speaking at a fundraiser on Monday, the former vice president and current Democratic front-runner said that Republicans in Congress will soon be ready to work across the aisle once again. “With Trump gone, you’re going to begin to see things change. Because these folks know better. They know this isn’t what they’re supposed

6h

Free Speech on Campus Is Doing Just Fine, Thank You

Earlier this year, President Donald Trump signed an executive order requiring colleges and universities that receive federal funds to do what they’re already required by law to do: extend free-speech protections to men and women on campus. The executive order was a transparent exercise in politics. Its intent was to validate the collective antipathy that many Trump boosters feel toward institutio

6h

A Once Unthinkable Proposal for Refugee Camps

Tens of millions of people have been forced to flee their home countries in recent years to escape war, famine, deadly persecution, or natural disaster. These refugees spark political controversy wherever they arrive in large numbers. For that reason, governments in Europe, North America, and Oceania have differed in how many refugees they are willing to resettle. Even Angela Merkel, who helped m

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Dagens bilder av vattnets kretslopp invaggar oss i falsk trygghet

I 85 procent av de cirka 450 illustrationer på 10 olika språk som undersöktes (från läroböcker, vetenskaplig litteratur och webbplatser), saknades människans inverkan på vattnets kretslopp helt. Och det var bara i två procent av bilderna som det gjordes några försök att införliva klimatförändringar eller vattenföroreningar i kretsloppet. Dessutom visade nästan alla illustrationer grönskande lands

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Want to check for retractions in your personal library — and get alerts — for free? Now you can

We’re thrilled to announce a collaboration with Zotero, the free and open-source research platform, that will allow its users to be alerted to retractions of any papers in their personal libraries. As Retraction Watch readers know, making that kind of functionality possible has been our goal since we announced plans to create a comprehensive database … Continue reading Want to check for retraction

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Kvinnor utsätts för övergrepp och trakasserier

Resultaten från den största svenska befolkningsstudien av svenska folkets sexuella och reproduktiva hälsa visar på stora skillnader mellan könen. 58 procent av den svenska befolkningen anser att de har ett bra sexliv, men samtidigt säger 42 procent av kvinnorna att de har upplevt sexuella trakasserier och 39 procent att de har blivit utsatta för sexuella övergrepp.

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Tiny flying saucers are actually odd new microbes

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01827-x Single-celled life forms display original movement style.

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High-throughput Discovery of Topologically Non-trivial Materials using Spin-orbit Spillage

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45028-y High-throughput Discovery of Topologically Non-trivial Materials using Spin-orbit Spillage

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Detection of Fine Radiographic Progression in Finger Joint Space Narrowing Beyond Human Eyes: Phantom Experiment and Clinical Study with Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44747-6 Detection of Fine Radiographic Progression in Finger Joint Space Narrowing Beyond Human Eyes: Phantom Experiment and Clinical Study with Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

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Overexpression of miRNA-25-3p inhibits Notch1 signaling and TGF-β-induced collagen expression in hepatic stellate cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44865-1 Overexpression of miRNA-25-3p inhibits Notch1 signaling and TGF-β-induced collagen expression in hepatic stellate cells

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Non-invasive visualization of physiological changes of insects during metamorphosis based on biophoton emission imaging

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45007-3 Non-invasive visualization of physiological changes of insects during metamorphosis based on biophoton emission imaging

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Systemic Outcomes of (Pyr1)-Apelin-13 Infusion at Mid-Late Pregnancy in a Rat Model with Preeclamptic Features

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44971-0 Systemic Outcomes of (Pyr 1 )-Apelin-13 Infusion at Mid-Late Pregnancy in a Rat Model with Preeclamptic Features

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Association between blood pressure and risk of cancer development: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45014-4 Association between blood pressure and risk of cancer development: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

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Reliability and validity of a Central Kurdish version of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45033-1 Reliability and validity of a Central Kurdish version of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory

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Predictors of Mortality in Light Chain Cardiac Amyloidosis with Heart Failure

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44912-x Predictors of Mortality in Light Chain Cardiac Amyloidosis with Heart Failure

6h

Small farms produce more food than statistics show

Small farms sometimes get overlooked as a feasible solution for feeding a growing population, but researchers say they should be given greater support, with some producing more food than official statistics report.

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Opioid alternative? Taming tetrodotoxin for precise painkilling

Alternatives to opioids for treating pain are sorely needed. A study in rats suggests that tetrodotoxin, properly packaged, offers a safe pain block.

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The short life of Must Farm

Extraordinarily well-preserved Late Bronze Age settlement in Cambridgeshire provides exceptional opportunity to investigate the everyday lives of people in the final decades of the Bronze Age in Britain.

6h

Reinforcement learning er e-learning for robotter

PLUS. Reinforcement learning er en af de trends inden for data science, der spås stort potentiale. Med teknikken kan man træne eksempelvis industrirobotter i et virtuelt miljø.

6h

An ode to carbon

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01793-4 Ted Nield mulls over an ambitious opus on the sixth element.

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‘Broken access’ publishing corrodes quality

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01787-2 Funders should award competitive grants directly to journals to underwrite the costs of open access, urges Adriano Aguzzi.

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How to take over your town: the inside story of a local revolution

They are passionate about their community, know what the issues are – and are sick to death of party politics. Meet the independent groups from Devon to London who are seizing control A quiet revolution has begun in the Devon town of Buckfastleigh . Its compact high street, functional-looking industrial estate and population of 3,300 suggest a place modestly getting on with business. But, while i

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Chandrayaan-2: India unveils spacecraft for second Moon mission

If successful Chandrayaan-2 will make India the fourth country to land a spacecraft on the Moon.

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As Bernie Sanders Leans Into Socialism, His Rivals Laugh

WATERLOO, Iowa—Making Elizabeth Warren laugh can be tricky. Throwing her off her talking points is almost impossible. Both happened when she heard that her 2020 opponent Bernie Sanders is scheduled to deliver a “major address” today titled, according to his campaign, “How Democratic Socialism Is the Only Way to Defeat Oligarchy and Authoritarianism.” The Massachusetts senator shook her head. It w

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The short life of Must Farm

Must Farm, an extraordinarily well-preserved Late Bronze Age settlement in Cambridgeshire, in the East of England, drew attention in national and international media in 2016 as 'Britain's Pompeii' or the 'Pompeii of the Fens'. The major excavation was funded by Historic England and Forterra Building Products Ltd, which owns the Must Farm quarry.

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CRISPR pig organs are being implanted in monkeys to see if they’re safe for humans

Gene-editing company eGenesis is now carrying out experiments to help solve a critical shortage of human organs available for transplant.

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We're All Going To Be Moving To Siberia By Century's End

submitted by /u/POMCube [link] [comments]

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New York to London in 90 minutes? These companies think it's possible

submitted by /u/Aeromarine_eng [link] [comments]

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Tom Rapoport (Harvard, HHMI) 2: How are cellular organelles shaped?

https://www.ibiology.org/cell-biology/protein-sorting Eukaryotic cells have many different membrane-bound organelles with distinct functions and characteristic shapes. How does this happen? Dr. Tom Rapoport explains the important role of protein sorting in determining organelle shape and function. In his first talk, Dr. Tom Rapoport explains that eukaryotic cells contain many membrane-bound organ

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Tom Rapoport (Harvard, HHMI) 1: Organelle Biosynthesis and Protein Sorting

https://www.ibiology.org/cell-biology/protein-sorting Eukaryotic cells have many different membrane-bound organelles with distinct functions and characteristic shapes. How does this happen? Dr. Tom Rapoport explains the important role of protein sorting in determining organelle shape and function. In his first talk, Dr. Tom Rapoport explains that eukaryotic cells contain many membrane-bound organ

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Uber names Melbourne as first non-US city for flying car program

Uber on Tuesday selected Melbourne, Australia, as the first non-US city for its aerial ridesharing service that is expected to launch in 2023, as it unveiled new partners for the ambitious initiative.

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Media sector seeks new powers to challenge Big Tech

Big Tech firms are clobbering traditional news organizations, media representatives told lawmakers Tuesday, asking for new authority to allow the struggling sector to team up against online platforms.

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The "Original Bitcoin" Was This Giant Stone Money on a Tiny Pacific Island

The future of money is a lot older than you think.

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Britain sets deadline for carbon neutrality by 2050

The British government on Wednesday outlined legislation to reduce carbon emissions to net zero by 2050 in what it said would be a first for a major economy.

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How do you hug a climate scientist? Follow these simple rules and don't make it weird | First Dog on the Moon

If you think you’re miserable – imagine being one of those long suffering mass extinction Cassandras! Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Get all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading…

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More men undergo plastic surgery as the daddy-do-over trend rises in popularity

Just as women can turn to a suite of procedures, known as the 'Mommy Makeover,' more men are embracing their own set of treatments, the 'Daddy-Do-Over,' to boost their confidence and improve their physical appearance. A new report from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons reveals that more than 1.3 million cosmetic procedures were performed on men last year alone, representing a 29 percent inc

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Uber names Melbourne as first non-US city for flying car program

Uber on Tuesday selected Melbourne, Australia, as the first non-US city for its aerial ridesharing service that is expected to launch in 2023, as it unveiled new partners for the ambitious initiative.

8h

The sun may have a dual personality, simulations suggest

Researchers at CU Boulder have discovered hints that humanity's favorite star may have a dual personality, with intriguing discrepancies in its magnetic fields that could hold clues to the sun's own "internal clock."

8h

86 percent of internet users admit being duped by fake news: survey

Eighty-six percent of internet users have been duped by fake news—most of it spread on Facebook—according to a global survey published Tuesday.

9h

Farmer researchers reap more benefits than just increased crop production

Farmers have been innovators and experimenters for millennia. They developed new types of crops and methods of farming.

9h

Models suggest faults are linked through California's Imperial Valley

New mechanical modeling of a network of active strike-slip faults in California's Imperial Valley suggests the faults are continuously linked, from the southern San Andreas Fault through the Imperial Fault to the Cerro Prieto fault further to the south of the valley.

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Climate change benefits for giant petrels

Giant petrels will be "temporary" winners from the effects of climate change in the Antarctic region—but males and females will benefit in very different ways, a new study shows.

9h

Climate change benefits for giant petrels

Giant petrels will be "temporary" winners from the effects of climate change in the Antarctic region—but males and females will benefit in very different ways, a new study shows.

9h

Tesla CEO lifts shareholder spirits, takes aim at media

Tesla CEO Elon Musk assured shareholders the electric car maker has recovered from a disappointing start this year and promised to counter media coverage that he believes has distorted perceptions about the unprofitable company's long-term prospects.

9h

Do you consume a credit card's worth of plastic every week?

People worldwide could be ingesting five grammes of microscopic plastic particles every week, equivalent in weight to a credit card, researchers said Wednesday.

9h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor er æggeskallen nogle gange svær at få af?

En læser undrer sig – og er måske lidt irriteret – over, at skallen på ægget nogle gange hænger ekstra godt fast. Brancheforeningen Danske Æg forklarer, hvad ægget har gang i.

9h

Here's How You Can Get Enough Nutrients While Eating Less Red Meat

And you can reduce your environmental impact, too.

9h

North Korea taking 'emergency' measures to contain swine fever

North Korea is taking emergency measures to prevent the spread of the highly contagious African swine fever, its state media said Wednesday, weeks after confirming an outbreak in the isolated country.

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North Korea taking 'emergency' measures to contain swine fever

North Korea is taking emergency measures to prevent the spread of the highly contagious African swine fever, its state media said Wednesday, weeks after confirming an outbreak in the isolated country.

9h

Facebook launching app that pays users for data on app usage

Facebook on Tuesday launched an app that will pay users to share information with the social media giant about which apps they're using.

9h

Water tankers prove a lifeline for India's parched villages

As Gajanand Dukre parks the water tanker in a drought-stricken Indian village, dozens of locals—mostly women in saris—come running with jerry cans, buckets and stainless steel pots.

9h

Solo, yet tutti: App puts orchestra in your living room

It's a musician's dream—rehearse alongside a full orchestra, but in your own living room.

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MIMI Artificial Intelligence Interface WIP

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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Beijing builds 4,300 5G stations in core areas

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Do you agree that the biggest motivator for advances in technology is the preparation for a future war?

In 6,000 years of history there are only 200 years without wars. Most of advances in technology were made to created weapons and than used for civilian applications. What really causes advances in technology? submitted by /u/Pit747 [link] [comments]

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Is there a list of technologies crushed by Exxon fro challenging their hegemony?

So I heard this phrase used a lot when talking about green alternative. Are there any specific examples? How quickly could a green alternative come up anyways without obstruction submitted by /u/firsttimeuser12 [link] [comments]

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The Impossible Burger Could Change the Meat Industry Forever

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Being overweight linked to significantly higher disease severity in psoriatic arthritis

The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate significant correlation between body mass index (BMI) and disease severity in psoriatic arthritis.

9h

Disease remission associated with 80% reduction in risk of cardiovascular outcomes

The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate that remission in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is associated with an 80% reduction in risk of cardiovascular outcomes.

9h

Exposure to inorganic dust increases risk of gout in women by 27%

The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate that occupational exposure to inorganic dust is a previously unknown risk factor for gout and also confirm known risk factors, such as alcoholism and obesity.

9h

Gout patients suffer in silence with low expectations of treatment

The results of a 14 country pan-European survey presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) suggest gout is being diagnosed late, is not well controlled, and is not regularly monitored.

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Study supports glucocorticoid tapering in patients achieving disease control on tocilizumab

The results of a randomised controlled trial presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate high levels of treatment success in approximately two thirds of patients despite tapered glucocorticoid (GC) discontinuation, while a small loss of disease control was observed at the total study population level.

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Low-dose prednisolone significantly improves pain symptoms and function in hand osteoarthritis

The results of the low-dose prednisolone in patients with hand osteoarthritis (HOPE) study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) show that low-dose prednisolone significantly improves pain and function in patients with painful hand osteoarthritis.

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Cyclosporine benefits patients through more rapid remission of proteinuria in lupus nephritis

The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) suggest maintenance therapy with cyclosporine (CYA) results in more rapid remission of proteinuria compared to mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or azathioprine (AZA) in patients with lupus nephritis. The efficacy of CYA, MMF and AZA in obtaining and maintaining remission of lupus nephritis (LN) is compar

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UK accused of 'silently eroding' EU pesticide rules in Brexit laws

Analysis finds changes such as removal of blanket ban on hormone-disrupting chemicals The UK has been accused of “silently eroding” key environmental and human health protections in the Brexit-inspired rush to convert thousands of pages of European Union pesticide policy into British law. Despite government claims the process would be little more than a technical exercise, analysis by the Univers

10h

25 gange kraftigere end CO2: Stigende metan-udledning forvirrer forskere

Mængden af metan i atmosfæren stiger. Skyldes det et stadig varmere Arktis, har vi sat gang i farlige processer, siger klimaforsker.

10h

In a ‘Recycled’ House, Details That Will Grow on You

A family of dedicated environmentalists takes design inspiration from spores, mold, fungus and bacteria.

10h

Why fears over smartphone 'addiction' are based on flawed evidence

Researchers say fears over smartphone 'addiction' are based on flawed evidence.Surveys are often used to understand how people use their smartphone, but these are poorly related to actual smartphone use when measured with an app. This means that existing evidence suggesting that screen time is 'addictive' cannot be used to justify any change of policy.High smartphone usage has been linked to anxie

10h

Community pharmacies make a lifestyle impact for patients with prostate cancer

Cardiovascular health and physical activity levels of prostate cancer patients improve following successful interventions by community pharmacies, new research in the British Medical Journal reports.

10h

National Poll: Daddy shaming happens too

For over a quarter of fathers polled, criticism made them feel less confident as a parent and 1 in 5 say it discourages them from being more involved in parenting.

10h

Hit the mute button: why everyone is trying to silence the outside world

Uber is trialling a feature that allows customers to stop their drivers from talking. But there’s growing evidence that cutting ourselves off like this isn’t healthy The mute button was invented in 1956 by Robert Adler, an Austrian-born engineer working for the Zenith Radio Corporation in Chicago. It was one of the four buttons on his Space Command 400, the first commercially viable TV remote con

11h

Farmer researchers reap more benefits than just increased crop production

Participants in research are motivated by learning, teaching opportunities.

11h

New finding: Biomarker indicates tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis in men with prostate cancer

Mortality due to prostate cancer is usually related to its likelihood to metastasize, especially to bone. Prognostic biomarkers are urgently needed to predict disease aggression so that appropriate treatment can be selected. A report in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier, indicates that CCN3, a protein secreted into the extracellular matrix between cells, may be an important

11h

Vitamin D and estradiol help guard against heart disease, stroke, and diabetes

Vitamin D and estrogen have already shown well-documented results in improving bone health in women. A new study from China suggests that this same combination could help prevent metabolic syndrome, a constellation of conditions that increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes in postmenopausal women. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American

11h

Climate change benefits for giant petrels

Giant petrels will be 'temporary' winners from the effects of climate change in the Antarctic region — but males and females will benefit in very different ways, a new study shows.

11h

Cancer survival rates in the young show inconsistent progress

A new study in JNCI Cancer Spectrum finds that dramatic increases in cancer survival in adolescents and young adults are undermined by continuing disparities by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. The patterns here suggest that most of the recent survival increases in this age group were driven by improvements in treatments for HIV/AIDS and related cancers.

11h

Betalte for en anden kundes varer: Nets ændrer funktionalitet i bank-app på iPhone

Fremover skal iPhone-brugere altid aktivt godkende betalinger på visse terminaler i den wallet-app, som Nets leverer til flere banker.

12h

Verdens kraftigste motor til jagerfly: Kom med F-35 på værksted

På det norske F-35-værksted, arbejder mekanikere med verdens kaftigste jagerflymotor. Den er driftssikker, men det gennemgående system Alis skal forbedres.

12h

Baby elephant takes first wobbly steps

The Asian elephant was born at Pairi Daiza zoo in Belgium.

13h

DJI's New Tank Drone Lets Kid Coders Fire Frickin Laser Beams And Beads

DJI is well known for making flying drones, but flying, camera-equipped aircraft isn't all that the company has on its plate. Last month, it unveiled the OSMO Action camera aimed directly at …

13h

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Upgrade Your Memory With a Surgically Implanted Chip

submitted by /u/KalpaX [link] [comments]

13h

NASA Invests in Concepts Aimed at Exploring Craters, Mining Asteroids

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India Just Announced That It’s Creating New Agency To Develop Space Weapons

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

13h

Climate change: UK government to commit to 2050 target

The UK will set a new legally binding target to reach net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

14h

How nanostructures create the hues of the earliest photos

Nature, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01839-7 Microscopic particles give daguerreotypes a reddish cast when viewed from certain angles.

14h

Climate change: sea level rise could displace millions of people within two generations

Jonathan Bamber , Professor of Physical Geography, University of Bristol and Michael Oppenheimer , Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs, Princeton University This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article . Antarctica is further from civilization than any other place on Earth. The Greenland ice sheet is closer to home bu

14h

Lobbying against key US climate regulation ‘cost society $60bn’, study finds

This is a re-post from Carbon Brief by Josh Gabbatiss Political lobbying in the US that helped block the progress of proposed climate regulation a decade ago led to a social cost of $60bn, according to a new study. Environmental economists Dr Kyle Meng and Dr Ashwin Rode have produced what they believe is the first attempt to quantify the toll such anti-climate lobbying efforts take on society. T

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Instagram says it won't delete fake video where Mark Zuckerberg gives bizarre speech

'One man, with total control of billions of people's stolen data, all their secrets, their lives, their futures,' fake version of Facebook CEO brags

14h

Catching A Whiff Of T. Rex's Sense Of Smell

Did Sue the T. rex and other members of the species have a great sense of smell? (Credit: The Field Museum) As fascinating and awe-inspiring as fossils are, the ancient bones tell us only so much about how an animal actually lived. Take T. rex, for example: How did the animal find food, through sharp sight, great hearing or a keen sense of smell? The nose knows, say authors of a new paper on the i

15h

The man who helped feed the world

The crops developed by Norman Borlaug have saved millions of people from starvation.

15h

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Can scorpion venom compounds fight staph and TB?

A type of scorpion venom contains two compounds that could help fight bacterial infections, report researchers. They isolated the compounds in the scorpion’s venom, synthesized them in the lab, and verified that the lab-made versions killed S taphylococcus and drug-resistant tuberculosis bacteria in tissue samples and in mice. The findings, which appear in PNAS , highlight the potential pharmacol

16h

Why is so much of the US under water?

America's heartland has faced months of record-breaking floods. Why is it so bad now and what's the impact?

16h

Baby pterosaurs may have hatched ready to fly right out of the egg

The prehistoric pterosaurs that lived alongside dinosaurs grew well-developed wings while still in their eggs, which may have let them fly soon after hatching

16h

Why Noah's ark won't work

A Noah's Ark strategy will fail. In the roughest sense, that's the conclusion of a first-of-its-kind study that illuminates which marine species may have the ability to survive in a world where temperatures are rising and oceans are becoming acidic.

16h

Why Noah's ark won't work

A Noah's Ark strategy will fail. In the roughest sense, that's the conclusion of a first-of-its-kind study that illuminates which marine species may have the ability to survive in a world where temperatures are rising and oceans are becoming acidic.

16h

Why Noah's ark won't work

Many species will need large population sizes to survive climate change and ocean acidification, a new study finds.

16h

Dolphins form friendships through shared interests just like us, study finds

When it comes to making friends, it appears dolphins are just like us and form close friendships with other dolphins that have a common interest. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B by an international team of researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Zurich and Western Australia, provides further insight into the social habits of these remarkable animals.

16h

Male victims of domestic abuse face significant barriers to getting help

Men who experience domestic violence and abuse face significant barriers to getting help and access to specialist support services, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care and Centre for Gender and Violence Research published in BMJ Open today.

16h

Parents' lenient attitudes towards drinking linked to greater alcohol use among children

Children are more likely to start drinking alcohol, drink more frequently and get drunk if their parents have a lenient attitude towards drinking, finds a study from researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of East Anglia.

16h

Antibodies against HPV16 can develop up to 40 years before throat cancer is diagnosed

An international group of researchers has found that antibodies to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) develop in the body between six to 40 years prior to a clinical diagnosis of throat cancer, and their presence indicates a strong increased risk of the disease. The study is published in Annals of Oncology.

16h

Love songs from paradise take a nosedive

The Galápagos Islands finches named after Charles Darwin are starting to sing a different tune because of an introduced pest on the once pristine environment. New research shows that Darwin's finch males whose beaks and nostril (naris) have been damaged by the parasitic invasion are producing 'sub-par song.'

16h

Lovelorn fish have gloomier outlook, study finds

Female cichlids who lose their mates are measurably more pessimistic, researchers say Inferring the mood of a fish has never been a precise science, but researchers claim at least one species responds the way humans do when separated from their other half. They say central American convict cichlids become glum when they split up. Scientists at the University of Burgundy in Dijon believe they are

17h

Darwin’s finches sing out-of-tune call after parasites deform beaks

Concern over mating as malformed beaks and nostrils lead to ‘subpar songs’ – study Tree finches made famous by Charles Darwin’s visit to the Galápagos islands in the 19th century have gone out of tune because of parasitic infections that damage the birds’ beaks and nostrils. Researchers found that male finches that picked up the fly parasite had malformed beaks and enlarged nostrils that led to “

17h

Love songs from paradise take a nosedive

The Galápagos Islands finches named after Charles Darwin are starting to sing a different tune because of an introduced pest on the once pristine environment.

17h

Dolphins form friendships through shared interests just like us, study finds

When it comes to making friends, it appears dolphins are just like us and form close friendships with other dolphins that have a common interest. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B by an international team of researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Zurich and Western Australia, provides further insight into the social habits of these remarkable animals.

17h

Being Stuck With The Wrong Mate Puts Fish in a Bad Mood

Being Stuck With The Wrong Mate Puts Fish in a Bad Mood Female convict cichlid fish turned from optimists to pessimists when separated from their chosen partners. Convicts_Cichlids_cropped.jpg Image credits: Deanpemberton via Wikimedia Commons Creature Tuesday, June 11, 2019 – 19:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Being stuck with an unwanted romantic partner is enough to put a girl

17h

Climate Change Poses Major Risks to Financial Markets, Regulator Warns

The regulator, who sits on a powerful government panel that oversees major financial markets, likened global warming risks to the 2008 mortgage crisis.

17h

Love songs from paradise take a nosedive

The Galápagos Islands finches named after Charles Darwin are starting to sing a different tune because of an introduced pest on the once pristine environment.

17h

Dolphins form friendships through shared interests just like us, study finds

When it comes to making friends, it appears dolphins are just like us and form close friendships with other dolphins that have a common interest. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B by an international team of researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Zurich and Western Australia, provides further insight into the social habits of these remarkable animals.

17h

Humans' Ability to Hear Harmonic Sounds Might Set Us Apart

(Credit: Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock) The pursuit of science is usually an unending stream of embarrassments for the human ego. No, the sun doesn’t revolve around us. No, we’re not all that different from common animals. No, we’re not even the only humans. But, in some ways at least, our brains really are special. A new study out this week in Nature Neuroscience shows one more way we reall

17h

Radiohead Gets ‘Hacked,’ a T-Mobile/Sprint Hiccup, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

17h

The Lancet: One in five people living in an area affected by conflict has a mental health condition

One in five people (22%) living in an area affected by conflict has depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, and about 9% of conflict-affected populations have a moderate to severe mental health condition, according to an analysis of 129 studies published in The Lancet. The figures are substantially higher than the global estimate for these mental hea

17h

Global burden of mental health in conflict settings

People living in countries that have experienced armed conflict are five times more likely to develop anxiety or depression, a University of Queensland research collaboration has found.

17h

Home care health workers frequently verbally abused by clients and their families

Home care (domiciliary) health workers are frequently verbally abused by clients and their families, finds research published online in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

17h

Strobe lighting at dance music festivals linked to tripling in epileptic fit risk

Strobe lighting at electronic dance music festivals may be linked to a tripling in the risk of epileptic fits in susceptible individuals, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

17h

Persistent poverty affects one in five UK children

Persistent poverty affects one in five children in the UK, and is associated with poor physical and mental health in early adolescence, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

17h

Theresa May commits to net zero UK carbon emissions by 2050

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Anyone can program this cheap robot arm in just 15 minutes

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More than half of the world's population is now online

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Uber’s Path of Destruction – American Affairs Journal

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17h

What makes prions the 'zombie protein'?

Prions don't sound so bad at first blush: they're simply proteins that have the wrong shape. They may sound innocuous, but "catching" prions is always fatal, and there is no cure. Curiously, the most famous case of a prion disease outbreak happened in a cannibalistic tribe in Papua New Guinea. None Until the early 1960s, the Fore people of Papua New Guinea were afflicted with a rare and fatal dis

17h

Publisher Correction: Modeling multiple sea level rise stresses reveals up to twice the land at risk compared to strictly passive flooding methods

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45275-z Publisher Correction: Modeling multiple sea level rise stresses reveals up to twice the land at risk compared to strictly passive flooding methods

18h

Saving Greenland could save the world

Environment Excerpt: Ice at the End of the World Every year, about half of Greenland’s ice losses happen on the edges, through glaciers like Jakobshavn. But another half is lost through melting on its surface. In this…

18h

A Top Voting-Machine Firm Calls for Paper Ballots

The long-awaited shift from paperless ballots could make elections more secure.

18h

The right-wing case for basic income

The idea for a universal basic income, or UBI, is increasingly popular. While it seems like a left-wing handout, many prominent right wing thinkers have endorsed the idea. The libertarian version of UBI does have a few key differences from the more standard version. None We've all heard of it: basic income, the freedom dividend, the income guarantee, or any of the other names for the program that

18h

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