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nyheder2019juni13

Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing

Spending at least two hours a week in nature may be a crucial threshold for promoting health and wellbeing, according to a new large-scale study.

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21h

Mysterious Majorana quasiparticle is now closer to being controlled for quantum computing

As mysterious as the Italian scientist for which it is named, the Majorana particle is one of the most compelling quests in physics.

2h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Run D.N.C.

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, June 13. (Kevin Lamarque / Reuters / Chip Somodevilla / Getty / The Atlantic ) ‣ President Trump announced in a tweet that Sarah Huckabee Sanders is leaving her job as White House press secretary to return to her home state of Arkansas, and encouraged Sanders to run for governor. Her three-and-a-half year tenure has been rocky, to say the least. ‣ The Hou

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‘Recycling Is Like a Band-Aid on Gangrene’

The documentary filmmaker Noah Hutton was at a scientific symposium when he first encountered Max Liboiron. “I kept hearing some of the sharpest, smartest critiques of [scientific] status-quo assumptions I’ve ever heard,” Hutton told me. “She engaged with other’s viewpoints totally empathetically, but would then forcefully challenge their assumptions in a way that wasn’t personal. It was complete

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Just how big is India's 'Mount Everest of Trash'?

The Ghazipur dump in Delhi has become so overgrown that locals refer to it as "Mount Everest." In 2017, a landslide from the dump spilled over onto adjacent roads, killing two locals. The dump is a serious health risk and source of pollution, but it also serves as an example of India's broader challenges with waste management. None Delhi is home to some incredible sights; the Lotus Temple, the Lo

10min

A new study reveals 'hidden' phases of matter through the power of light

New chemistry research from MIT and the University of Pennsylvania demonstrates how 'hidden' phases of matter can be activated by extremely fast pulses of light. This fundamental scientific breakthrough paves the way for creating materials that can be imbued with new properties, such as conducting electricity or making it magnetic.

14min

Spacewatch: Nasa tries to get Martian 'mole' working again

Heat probe was supposed to dig down five metres but it came to standstill just 30cm below surface Scientists and engineers at Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, have a new strategy to get a troubled Mars instrument working again. The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package was provided by the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) for the InSight Mars lander. The instrument’s heat probe,

17min

US House Moves to Block New Reviews of Fetal Tissue Research

An amendment to the 2020 funding bill would prohibit the Trump administration from convening ethics advisory boards to review funding proposals involving the tissues.

24min

These Women Owe Nobody an Apology

It was Megan Rapinoe’s goal in the 79th minute that really seemed to tick people off. Rapinoe, the vivacious U.S. women’s national soccer team forward with pink hair, ran with outstretched arms, spun around a couple times, then slid to the ground and kicked her right heel high in the air several times. A whole lot of people were big mad at Rapinoe, whose goal made it 9–0 over Thailand, a team the

26min

Perfectly preserved head of Ice Age wolf found in Siberia

Russian scientists have found the furry head of an Ice Age wolf perfectly preserved in the Siberian permafrost.

26min

The surprising reason why some lemurs may be more sensitive to forest loss

Duke University scientists have given us another way to tell which endangered lemur species are most at risk from deforestation—based on the trillions of bacteria that inhabit their guts.

26min

Satellite sees tropical cyclone Vayu centered off India coastline

Tropical Cyclone Vayu's eye was just off the western coast of India when the NOAA-20 satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm.

26min

The surprising reason why some lemurs may be more sensitive to forest loss

Duke University scientists have given us another way to tell which endangered lemur species are most at risk from deforestation—based on the trillions of bacteria that inhabit their guts.

29min

New model more accurately predicts choices in classic decision-making task

A new mathematical model that predicts which choices people will make in the Iowa Gambling Task, a task used for the past 25 years to study decision-making, outperforms previously developed models. Romain Ligneul of the Champalimaud Center for the Unknown in Portugal presents this research in PLOS Computational Biology.

29min

Materials informatics reveals new class of super-hard alloys

A new method of discovering materials using data analytics and electron microscopy has found a new class of extremely hard alloys. Such materials could potentially withstand severe impact from projectiles, thereby providing better protection of soldiers in combat. Researchers from Lehigh University describe the method and findings in an article, "Materials Informatics For the Screening of Multi-Pr

32min

New model more accurately predicts choices in classic decision-making task

A new mathematical model that predicts which choices people will make in the Iowa Gambling Task, a task used for the past 25 years to study decision-making, outperforms previously developed models. Romain Ligneul of the Champalimaud Center for the Unknown in Portugal presents this research in PLOS Computational Biology.

32min

'Fallout Shelter' is coming to Tesla cars

Elon Musk showed up on stage at E3 Thursday alongside Bethesda Studios executive producer Todd Howard to announce Fallout Shelter will be coming to Tesla vehicles. The wildly popular …

37min

Materials informatics reveals new class of super-hard alloys

A new method of discovering materials using data analytics and electron microscopy has found a new class of extremely hard alloys. Such materials could potentially withstand severe impact from projectiles, providing better protection for soldiers in combat.

44min

Many choices seems promising until you actually have to choose

People faced with more options than they can effectively consider want to make a good decision, but feel they're unable to do so, according to the results of a novel study. Despite the apparent opportunities presented by a lot of options, the need to choose creates a 'paralyzing paradox,' according to the authors. 'You want to make a good choice, but feel like you can't.'

44min

Salmonella resistant to antibiotics of last resort found in US

Researchers have found a gene that gives Salmonella resistance to antibiotics of last resort in a sample taken from a human patient in the US The find is the first evidence that the gene mcr-3.1 has made its way into the US from Asia.

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Researchers learned how to better combat muscle loss during space flights

A new study has further documented how muscles are affected by reduced gravity conditions during space flight missions and uncovered how exercise and hormone treatments can be tailored to minimize muscle loss for individual space travelers.

44min

The surprising reason why some lemurs may be more sensitive to forest loss

Researchers compared the gut microbes of 12 lemur species across the island of Madagascar, where thousands of acres of forest are cleared each year. The team found that some lemurs harbor microbes that are more specialized than others for the forests where they live.

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'Locking' an arthritis drug may be key to improving it

Attaching a removable lock to an arthritis drug can make it safer and more effective, according to a new study. The findings suggest a new way to improve the efficacy of a drug taken by millions of patients throughout the world.

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Environmental oxygen triggers loss of webbed digits

Free fingers have many obvious advantages on land, such as in locomotion and grasping, while webbed fingers are typical of aquatic or gliding animals. But both amphibians and amniotes — which include mammals, reptiles, and birds — can have webbed digits. Scientists now show that during embryo development, some animal species detect the presence of atmospheric oxygen, which triggers removal of in

44min

The Bitter Truth: Scientists Sequence the Almond Genome

Cracking the nut’s “cyanide problem” could make it easier to cultivate sweeter varieties of this ancient snack — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why Do Zebras Have Stripes? Maybe to Help Keep Cool

(Credit: Ehrman Photographic/Shutterstock) (Inside Science) — A gangrene-inducing bite in Africa, 40 years of curiosity, and backyard experiments her daughters still complain about have all come together to tell Alison Cobb one thing: Stripes help zebras keep their cool. New research published this week in the Journal of Natural History shows stripes may create air flows that give zebras a kind o

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Scientists Are Citing Patents for Things That Don't Actually Exist

(Credit: Willrow Hood/Shutterstock) Let's say I have an idea for a great invention one day — a series of pneumatic tubes that would shoot pods with people inside between cities at hundreds of miles an hour. My "Superloop" sounds like a sure-fire hit, but I don't have the resources to pull the project off, and what's more, the technology to build it isn't actually there yet. But I don't want someon

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Propellers, Waves, and Gaps: Cassini’s Last Looks at Saturn’s Rings

Cassini's view of Saturn on January 2, 2010. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute) Since Cassini plunged into Saturn’s atmosphere in 2017, ending its 13-year mission, scientists have continued to comb through the rich store of data it sent back, especially during its last year, when it dove closer to Saturn’s rings than ever before. Among the findings are a deep look at the complex ri

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“Cold Quasar” Discovery Sheds Light on Galactic Death

New Phase Astronomers believe our universe is home to at least 100 billion galaxies . And just like us, each of those massive collections of stars and other space stuff will eventually die. But also like us , galaxies go through a host of phases between birth and death. Now, a researcher from the University of Kansas has discovered one scientists never knew about before. She calls it the “cold qu

56min

The Bitter Truth: Scientists Sequence the Almond Genome

Cracking the nut’s “cyanide problem” could make it easier to cultivate sweeter varieties of this ancient snack — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

56min

Satellite sees tropical cyclone Vayu centered off India coastline

Tropical Cyclone Vayu's eye was just off the western coast of India when the NOAA-20 satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm.

57min

Study shows that strength and weight training can control diabetes in obese individuals

In experiments with mice, Brazilian scientists demonstrated that a moderate training protocol reduced liver fat and made the organ more sensitive to insulin, even before loss of body weight occurred.

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Arctic Permafrost Is Going Through a Rapid Meltdown — 70 Years Early

It's all happening way faster than anyone expected.

58min

The Bitter Truth: Scientists Sequence the Almond Genome

Cracking the nut’s “cyanide problem” could make it easier to cultivate sweeter varieties of this ancient snack — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

59min

The World's Best Crowdfunding Site Releases Incredible New Rules and Guidelines to Help Protect Amazing Backers

After launching a little over a decade ago, it didn’t take long for Kickstarter to become more than a place for amateur inventors to sell their ideas to the public. It soon became fraught with …

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Scientists Ask the Public to Help Search for a Rare Breed of Black Hole

Scientists Ask the Public to Help Search for a Rare Breed of Black Hole Elusive intermediate mass black holes may hold clues to how their more common supermassive cousins form. IMBH_topNteaser.jpg This image, taken with the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope, shows the central region of galaxy NGC1313, which astronomers have determined is home to an intermediate-mass black hole

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Many choices seems promising until you actually have to choose

People faced with more options than they can effectively consider want to make a good decision, but feel they're unable to do so, according to the results of a novel study from the University at Buffalo. Despite the apparent opportunities presented by a lot of options, the need to choose creates a 'paralyzing paradox,' according to the authors. 'You want to make a good choice, but feel like you ca

1h

Gut microbes eat our medication

Researchers have discovered one of the first concrete examples of how the microbiome can interfere with a drug's intended path through the body. Focusing on levodopa (L-dopa), the primary treatment for Parkinson's disease, they identified which bacteria out of the trillions of species is responsible for degrading the drug and how to stop this microbial interference.

1h

Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer

Chemists have developed an efficient process for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, a key ingredient of synthetic fuels and materials.

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Mysterious Majorana quasiparticle is now closer to being controlled for quantum computing

Using a new approach, researchers detected the elusive Majorana quasiparticle, notable for being its own antiparticle and for its potential as the basis for a robust quantum computing system, in a device built from a superconductor, small magnetic elements, and a topological insulator.

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Fetal genome involved in triggering premature birth

Mutations in the gene that codes for SLIT2, a protein expressed in fetal cells in placentas and involved in directing the growth of the fetal nervous system, may contribute to premature births, possibly by activating the mother's immune system.

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New model more accurately predicts choices in classic decision-making task

A new mathematical model that predicts which choices people will make in the Iowa Gambling Task, a task used for the past 25 years to study decision-making, outperforms previously developed models.

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Taking the 'killer' out of natural killer cells

The virus responsible for chickenpox and shingles employs a powerful strategy of immune evasion, inhibiting the ability of natural killer cells to destroy infected cells and produce molecules that help control viral infection, according to a a new study.

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This Ingenious Home STD Test is Simple, Fast, and Discreet

Sexually transmitted diseases are on the rise across the United States. According to the CDC, the United States is currently in the middle of a major spike in STDs. In some places diseases like gonorrhea, syphilis, and chlamydia at an all-time high. And while 2.3 million new infections were reported in 2017, experts believe the actual number of new infections each year is closer to 20 million . T

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George Church Told Us Why He’s Listing Superhuman Gene Hacks

Gene Hacker’s Field Guide On Wednesday, we wrote about a database of mutations that could give people superhuman characteristics or medical benefits. The database, which reads like a real-life skill tree from a video game, is housed on the website of famed Harvard geneticist George Church . Now Church has opened up, telling Futurism why he assembled the list and how he hopes others will use it as

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Hidden brain signals behind working memory

Making a specific type of brain pattern last longer improves short-term memory in rats, a new study finds.

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Mutant bacterial receptor could point to new therapies against opportunistic pathogen

Researchers have developed a new mutant version of a receptor used by a bacterial pathogen for a chemical communication process called quorum sensing, according to a new study.

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Deadly tick-borne virus cured with experimental flu drug, in mice

An investigational flu drug cures mice infected with the rare but deadly Bourbon virus, according to a new study.

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Migratory hoverflies 'key' as many insects decline

Migratory hoverflies are 'key' to pollination and controlling crop pests amid the decline of many other insect species, new research shows.

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Viruses found to use intricate 'treadmill' to move cargo across bacterial cells

Using advanced technologies to explore the inner workings of bacteria, biologists have provided the first example of cargo within bacteriophage cells transiting along treadmill-like structures. The discovery demonstrates that bacteria have more in common with sophisticated human cells than previously believed.

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Here Is What Jessica Biel Opposes in California’s Vaccine Bill

Lobbying by celebrity opponents has drawn national attention to a measure that would make medical exemptions to vaccination harder to get.

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How Almonds Went From Deadly To Delicious

In a new study, researchers pinpoint the genetic mutation that transformed almonds from toxic and bitter to tasty and sweet. (Image credit: Ekapat Suwanmanee/Getty Images/EyeEm)

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Materials informatics reveals new class of super-hard alloys

A new method of discovering materials using data analytics and electron microscopy has found a new class of extremely hard alloys. Such materials could potentially withstand severe impact from projectiles, providing better protection for soldiers in combat. Researchers from Lehigh University describe the method and findings in an article, 'Materials Informatics For the Screening of Multi-Principal

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Our Eyes Are Always Darting Around, So How Come Our Vision Isn't Blurry?

Our brains manage to construct stable images even as our eyes keep jerking around. Here’s what we know about how that happens.

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Listen to (what’s likely) Frida Kahlo’s voice

Experts at the National Sound Library of Mexico may have discovered the first known voice recording of Frida Kahlo. The tape was found in the archives of a late radio personality. With her unforgettably surreal (and often painful) self-portraits, Kahlo challenged 20th-century notions of sexuality, class and gender. None The National Sound Library of Mexico has discovered what could be the first k

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People using third-party apps to analyze personal genetic data

A new study finds that people who are initially motivated to learn about their ancestry with third-party personal genetics services frequently end up engaging with health interpretations of their genetic data, too.

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Enhanced human Blood-Brain Barrier Chip performs in vivo-like drug and antibody transport

A team has leveraged its microfluidic Organs-on-Chips technology in combination with a developmentally-inspired hypoxia-mimicking approach to differentiate human pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs). The resulting 'hypoxia-enhanced BBB Chip' recapitulates cellular organization, tight barrier functions and transport abilities of the human BBB; and it allo

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Are we using biologic therapy properly?

The introduction of infliximab (Remicade), the first biologic therapy approved for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), did not result in lower rates of hospitalizations or intestinal surgeries among patients living with IBD in Ontario, according to a new study.

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Breaking the code: How is a mother's immunity transferred to her baby?

A study has determined how a pregnant woman's vaccine-induced immunity is transferred to her child, which has implications for the development of more effective maternal vaccines.

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Man Had a Nearly 5-Foot Wire Left in His Body After Heart Procedure, Lawsuit Claims

A Nevada man is suing his doctor for allegedly leaving a nearly 5-food wire in the man's body for more than a decade.

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A Tiny Magnet Just Created the World’s Strongest Magnetic Field

Big Attraction Scientists at the Florida State University-based National High Magnetic Field Laboratory just created what they claim to be the world’s strongest magnetic field using a toilet paper roll-sized magnet that’s less than a centimeter thick. The miniature electromagnet was created by MagLab engineer Seungyong Hahn. It generated a world-record 45.5 tesla magnetic field — more than 20 tim

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Early-season hurricanes result in greater transmission of mosquito-borne infectious disease

The timing of a hurricane is one of the primary factors influencing its impact on the spread of mosquito-borne infectious diseases such as West Nile Virus, dengue, chikungunya and Zika, according to new research.

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Once thought to be asexual, single-celled parasites caught in the act

The single-celled parasite Leishmania can reproduce sexually, according to new research. The finding could pave the way towards finding genes that help the parasite cause disease.

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The Huge Trend That Realigned the Media Industry Is Over

The rise of the internet, and then, right behind it, smartphones, led to a sweeping transformation in how Americans spend their time. Once, we stared up at television screens and down at magazines and newspapers. Now the screens and magazines and newspapers are in our pockets, sucking up ever more of our attention. But people’s eyes moved faster than advertisers’ dollars. A gap opened between the

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A last close-up of Saturn’s rings reveals the mark of its moons

Nature, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01849-5 Despite their small size, some of the planet’s moons create clumps and ripples in its brilliant halo.

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Salmonella resistant to antibiotics of last resort found in US

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a gene that gives Salmonella resistance to antibiotics of last resort in a sample taken from a human patient in the US The find is the first evidence that the gene mcr-3.1 has made its way into the US from Asia.

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People using third-party apps to analyze personal genetic data

The burgeoning field of personal genetics appeals to people who want to learn more about themselves, their family and their propensity for diseases. More and more consumers are using services like 23andMe to learn about their genetic blueprint.

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The surprising reason why some lemurs may be more sensitive to forest loss

Scientists have given us another way to tell which endangered lemurs are most at risk from deforestation — based on the bacteria that inhabit their guts. Researchers compared the gut microbes of 12 lemur species across the island of Madagascar, where thousands of acres of forest are cleared each year. The team found that some lemurs harbor microbes that are more specialized than others for the fo

2h

Frozen wolf's head found in Siberia is 40,000 years old

Fur, teeth and tissue largely intact on remains of animal bigger than a modern wolf The severed head of a wolf that died about 40,000 years ago has been found in Siberia, and because of the freezing conditions, the remains are so well preserved that the fur, teeth, brain and facial tissue are largely intact. Pavel Yefimov, a local resident, discovered the head last summer on the banks of the Tire

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Breathing new life into dye-sensitized solar cells

Researchers are poised to reboot the field of aromatic-fused porphyrin sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells, the most efficient solar efficient solar technology available at present.

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The Cold War Bunkers of Albania

During the Cold War, Enver Hoxha, the hard-line leader of the People’s Socialist Republic of Albania, embraced isolationist and paranoid views, leading to the launch of a massive “bunkerization” project to defend the nation in 1968. Over 20 years, nearly 175,000 reinforced concrete bunkers were built across Albania, lining seashores and lakes, and dotting mountain passes, borders, farmland, and t

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Tyson Foods’ Alt-Meat Nuggets Will Hit Grocery Stores This Summer

Root Cause On Thursday, Tyson Foods announced the launch of Raised & Rooted, a new line featuring the company’s first plant-based protein products, meaning one of the world’s largest — and most controversial — meat producers sees a promising future for alt-meat. “Today’s consumers are seeking more protein options,” Tyson Foods CEO Noel White said in a press release , “so we’re creating new produc

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Downward head tilt can make people seem more dominant

We often look to people's faces for signs of how they're thinking or feeling, trying to gauge whether their eyes are narrowed or widened, whether the mouth is turned up or down. But new findings show that facial features aren't the only source of this information — we also draw social inferences from the head itself.

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How NASA's Spitzer has stayed alive for so long

After nearly 16 years of exploring the cosmos in infrared light, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope will be switched off permanently on Jan. 30, 2020. By then, the spacecraft will have operated for more than 11 years beyond its prime mission, thanks to the Spitzer engineering team's ability to address unique challenges as the telescope slips farther and farther from Earth.

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New model more accurately predicts choices in classic decision-making task

A new mathematical model that predicts which choices people will make in the Iowa Gambling Task, a task used for the past 25 years to study decision-making, outperforms previously developed models. Romain Ligneul of the Champalimaud Center for the Unknown in Portugal presents this research in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer

Chemists at EPFL have developed an efficient process for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, a key ingredient of synthetic fuels and materials.

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UTMB researchers learned how to better combat muscle loss during space flights

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has further documented how muscles are affected by reduced gravity conditions during space flight missions and uncovered how exercise and hormone treatments can be tailored to minimize muscle loss for individual space travelers.

2h

Gut microbes eat our medication

Researchers have discovered one of the first concrete examples of how the microbiome can interfere with a drug's intended path through the body. Focusing on levodopa (L-dopa), the primary treatment for Parkinson's disease, they identified which bacteria out of the trillions of species is responsible for degrading the drug and how to stop this microbial interference.

2h

Mysterious Majorana quasiparticle is now closer to being controlled for quantum computing

Using a new approach, Princeton University researchers detected the elusive Majorana quasiparticle, notable for being its own antiparticle and for its potential as the basis for a robust quantum computing system, in a device built from a superconductor, small magnetic elements, and a topological insulator.

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Half of Ebola outbreaks undetected

An estimated half of Ebola virus disease outbreaks have gone undetected since it was discovered in 1976, according to research published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Although these tend to affect fewer than five patients, the study, led by Emma Glennon at Cambridge University, highlights the need for improved detection and rapid response, in order that outbreaks of Ebola and other public h

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Half of Ebola outbreaks go undetected, study finds

Half of Ebola outbreaks have gone undetected since the virus was discovered in 1976, scientists at the University of Cambridge estimate. The new findings come amid rising concern about Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and highlight the need for improved detection and rapid response to avoid future epidemics.

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More than half of all Ebola outbreaks are going undetected

As the second-largest Ebola epidemic in history spreads into Uganda, a modelling study has suggested that most Ebola outbreaks escape detection by doctors

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Gut microbes interfere with Parkinson's drug – but we could stop them

We have identified organisms in the gut that break down the main drug used to treat Parkinson's disease, a step towards making the therapy more effective

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Scientists Are Baffled by “Huge Mass” Under the Moon’s Surface

A Mass-ive Anomaly The Moon’s largest crater — the 1,240 mile-across and four billion years-old South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin — is hiding something enormous and metallic under its surface, as discovered by researchers from Baylor University and revealed to the world this week. It’s a discovery that continues to puzzle scientists. Where did this 4.8 quintillion pound growth come from? What is it m

2h

Monitoring educational equity

A centralized, consistently reported system of indicators of educational equity is needed to bring attention to disparities in the US education system, says a new report. Indicators — measures used to track performance and monitor change over time — can help convey why disparities arise, identify groups most affected by them, and inform policy and practice measures to improve equity in pre-K thr

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Squid could thrive under climate change

When scientists subjected two-toned pygmy squid and bigfin reef squid to carbon dioxide levels projected for the end of the century, they received some surprising results.

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New imaging modality targets cholesterol in arterial plaque

Researchers demonstrate a new imaging modality that successfully identifies the presence of cholesterol in the arterial plaque.

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Financial vulnerability may discourage positive negotiation strategies

People who feel financially vulnerable may be prone to believing incorrectly their success in negotiations must come at the expense of the other party, leading them to ignore the potential for more cooperative and mutually beneficial options.

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'Safety bubble' expands during third trimester

Women undergo a significant mental as well as physical change during the late stages of pregnancy.

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Epilepsy drugs linked to increased risk of suicidal behavior, particularly in young people

Treatment with gabapentinoids — a group of drugs used for epilepsy, nerve pain and anxiety disorders — is associated with an increased risk of suicidal behavior, unintentional overdose, injuries, and road traffic incidents, finds a new study.

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Increasing red meat intake linked with heightened risk of early death

Increasing red meat intake, particularly processed red meat, is associated with a heightened risk of death, suggests a large US study.

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Breathing new life into dye-sensitized solar cells

Researchers are poised to reboot the field of aromatic-fused porphyrin sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells, the most efficient solar efficient solar technology available at present.

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News at a glance

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Close-range remote sensing of Saturns rings during Cassinis ring-grazing orbits and Grand Finale

Saturn’s rings are an accessible exemplar of an astrophysical disk, tracing the Saturn system’s dynamical processes and history. We present close-range remote-sensing observations of the main rings from the Cassini spacecraft. We find detailed sculpting of the rings by embedded masses, and banded texture belts throughout the rings. Saturn-orbiting streams of material impact the F ring. There are

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The confession

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Mind tricks

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Much ado about method

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Dynamic metasurfaces

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Filming the airways

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A gut-fat axis

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Sensing the stretch

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A charmed violation

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Cassini-Huygens exploration of the Saturn system: 13 years of discovery

The Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn provided a close-up study of the gas giant planet, as well as its rings, moons, and magnetosphere. The Cassini spacecraft arrived at Saturn in 2004, dropped the Huygens probe to study the atmosphere and surface of Saturn’s planet-sized moon Titan, and orbited Saturn for the next 13 years. In 2017, when it was running low on fuel, Cassini was intentionally vap

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Large-area graphene-nanomesh/carbon-nanotube hybrid membranes for ionic and molecular nanofiltration

Nanoporous two-dimensional materials are attractive for ionic and molecular nanofiltration but limited by insufficient mechanical strength over large areas. We report a large-area graphene-nanomesh/single-walled carbon nanotube (GNM/SWNT) hybrid membrane with excellent mechanical strength while fully capturing the merit of atomically thin membranes. The monolayer GNM features high-density, subnan

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Femtosecond x-ray diffraction reveals a liquid-liquid phase transition in phase-change materials

In phase-change memory devices, a material is cycled between glassy and crystalline states. The highly temperature-dependent kinetics of its crystallization process enables application in memory technology, but the transition has not been resolved on an atomic scale. Using femtosecond x-ray diffraction and ab initio computer simulations, we determined the time-dependent pair-correlation function

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Cryo-EM structure of the mammalian ATP synthase tetramer bound with inhibitory protein IF1

The mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase produces most of the ATP required by mammalian cells. We isolated porcine tetrameric ATP synthase and solved its structure at 6.2-angstrom resolution using a single-particle cryo–electron microscopy method. Two classical V-shaped ATP synthase dimers lie antiparallel to each other to form an H-shaped ATP synthase tetramer, as viewed from the

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Metastable ferroelectricity in optically strained SrTiO3

Fluctuating orders in solids are generally considered high-temperature precursors of broken symmetry phases. However, in some cases, these fluctuations persist to zero temperature and prevent the emergence of long-range order. Strontium titanate (SrTiO 3 ) is a quantum paraelectric in which dipolar fluctuations grow upon cooling, although a long-range ferroelectric order never sets in. Here, we s

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Terahertz field-induced ferroelectricity in quantum paraelectric SrTiO3

"Hidden phases" are metastable collective states of matter that are typically not accessible on equilibrium phase diagrams. These phases can host exotic properties in otherwise conventional materials and hence may enable novel functionality and applications, but their discovery and access are still in early stages. Using intense terahertz electric field excitation, we found that an ultrafast phas

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Long-duration hippocampal sharp wave ripples improve memory

Hippocampal sharp wave ripples (SPW-Rs) have been hypothesized as a mechanism for memory consolidation and action planning. The duration of ripples shows a skewed distribution with a minority of long-duration events. We discovered that long-duration ripples are increased in situations demanding memory in rats. Prolongation of spontaneously occurring ripples by optogenetic stimulation, but not ran

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Phase-only transmissive spatial light modulator based on tunable dielectric metasurface

Rapidly developing augmented reality, solid-state light detection and ranging (LIDAR), and holographic display technologies require spatial light modulators (SLMs) with high resolution and viewing angle to satisfy increasing customer demands. Performance of currently available SLMs is limited by their large pixel sizes on the order of several micrometers. Here, we propose a concept of tunable die

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Atomically dispersed Fe3+ sites catalyze efficient CO2 electroreduction to CO

Currently, the most active electrocatalysts for the conversion of CO 2 to CO are gold-based nanomaterials, whereas non–precious metal catalysts have shown low to modest activity. Here, we report a catalyst of dispersed single-atom iron sites that produces CO at an overpotential as low as 80 millivolts. Partial current density reaches 94 milliamperes per square centimeter at an overpotential of 34

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Mutation of a bHLH transcription factor allowed almond domestication

Wild almond species accumulate the bitter and toxic cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin. Almond domestication was enabled by the selection of genotypes harboring sweet kernels. We report the completion of the almond reference genome. Map-based cloning using an F 1 population segregating for kernel taste led to the identification of a 46-kilobase gene cluster encoding five basic helix-loop-helix tran

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New Products

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Teaching ingenuity

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Close Cassini flybys of Saturns ring moons Pan, Daphnis, Atlas, Pandora, and Epimetheus

Saturn’s main ring system is associated with a set of small moons that either are embedded within it or interact with the rings to alter their shape and composition. Five close flybys of the moons Pan, Daphnis, Atlas, Pandora, and Epimetheus were performed between December 2016 and April 2017 during the ring-grazing orbits of the Cassini mission. Data on the moons’ morphology, structure, particle

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Measurement and implications of Saturns gravity field and ring mass

The interior structure of Saturn, the depth of its winds, and the mass and age of its rings constrain its formation and evolution. In the final phase of the Cassini mission, the spacecraft dived between the planet and its innermost ring, at altitudes of 2600 to 3900 kilometers above the cloud tops. During six of these crossings, a radio link with Earth was monitored to determine the gravitational

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Discovery and inhibition of an interspecies gut bacterial pathway for Levodopa metabolism

The human gut microbiota metabolizes the Parkinson’s disease medication Levodopa (-dopa), potentially reducing drug availability and causing side effects. However, the organisms, genes, and enzymes responsible for this activity in patients and their susceptibility to inhibition by host-targeted drugs are unknown. Here, we describe an interspecies pathway for gut bacterial -dopa metabolism. Conver

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A microbial factory for defensive kahalalides in a tripartite marine symbiosis

Chemical defense against predators is widespread in natural ecosystems. Occasionally, taxonomically distant organisms share the same defense chemical. Here, we describe an unusual tripartite marine symbiosis, in which an intracellular bacterial symbiont (" Candidatus Endobryopsis kahalalidefaciens") uses a diverse array of biosynthetic enzymes to convert simple substrates into a library of comple

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Comment on "Global pattern of nest predation is disrupted by climate change in shorebirds"

Kubelka et al . (Reports, 9 November 2018, p. 680) claim that climate change has disrupted patterns of nest predation in shorebirds. They report that predation rates have increased since the 1950s, especially in the Arctic. We describe methodological problems with their analyses and argue that there is no solid statistical support for their claims.

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Response to Comment on "Global pattern of nest predation is disrupted by climate change in shorebirds"

Bulla et al . dispute our main conclusion that the global pattern of nest predation is disrupted in shorebirds. We disagree with Bulla et al .’s conclusions and contest the robustness of their outcomes. We reaffirm our results that provide clear evidence that nest predation has increased significantly in shorebirds, especially in the Arctic.

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Concert of magnetic moments

Researchers have uncovered a new way how the electron spins in layered materials can interact.

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Mutant bacterial receptor could point to new therapies against opportunistic pathogen

Researchers have developed a new mutant version of a receptor used by a bacterial pathogen for a chemical communication process called quorum sensing, according to a study published June 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Bonnie Bassler of Princeton University, and colleagues. As the authors note, the mutant receptor could be used to identify therapeutic compounds that inhibit quorum

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Dynamic metasurfaces

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Filming the airways

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A gut-fat axis

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Mutant bacterial receptor could point to new therapies against opportunistic pathogen

Researchers have developed a new mutant version of a receptor used by a bacterial pathogen for a chemical communication process called quorum sensing, according to a study published June 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Bonnie Bassler of Princeton University, and colleagues. As the authors note, the mutant receptor could be used to identify therapeutic compounds that inhibit quorum

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Gyros Protein Technologies introduces Gyrolab E. coli HCP Kit for automated impurity analysis of biotherapeutics

Ready-to-use immunoassay kit increases analytical output and productivity in bioprocess workflows. Kit developed as part of licensing and supply agreement with Cygnus Technologies

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One-fifth of US surgeons still overusing riskier procedure to create kidney dialysis access

Long-term hemodialysis is a lifesaver for approximately half a million patients in the United States with kidney failure (also known as end-stage renal disease, or ESRD) who are either waiting on or unsuitable for a kidney transplant. But before the external machinery can take over the function of the kidneys — filtering and cleansing wastes from the blood — a minor surgical procedure is needed

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Pre-pregnancy weight affects infant growth response to breast milk

In the first study of its kind, LSU Health New Orleans researchers report that women's pre-pregnancy overweight or obesity produces changes in breast milk, which can affect infant growth.

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Genetic inequity towards endocrine disruptors

Phthalates are used by industry in plastic products. Their toxic effect on the endocrine system is worrying. Indeed, the exposure of male fetuses to phthalates can have devastating consequences for the fertility. However, researchers show that phthalate susceptibility depends largely on the genetic heritage of each individual. These results raise the question of individual vulnerability and the po

3h

Sensing food textures is a matter of pressure

Food's texture affects whether it is eaten, liked or rejected, according to researchers, who say some people are better at detecting even minor differences in consistency because their tongues can perceive particle sizes.

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Stanford’s Latest AI Helps Doctors Diagnose Brain Aneurysms More Accurately

From breast cancer to brain aneurysms, artificial intelligence continues to establish itself as a valuable diagnostic tool. Researchers at Stanford University have created predictive AI to detect the likelihood of aneurysm in brain scans with high accuracy. The post Stanford’s Latest AI Helps Doctors Diagnose Brain Aneurysms More Accurately appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Tensions in the Gulf Are a Geopolitical Black Hole

Updated at 2:24 p.m. ET More ships burned in the Gulf of Oman today, hours after a missile hit a Saudi airport and weeks after explosions hit four other vessels in the region. As threats escalate between the United States and Iran, multiple other countries—whose tankers traverse the strategic waterways, whose oil supplies depend on safe navigation, and whose people and infrastructure are vulnerab

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Scotland's crannogs are older than Stonehenge

Used for building homes on lochs, the artificial islands were previously thought to date from the Iron Age.

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Canada must double its carbon tax to reach emissions target: report

Canada is falling so far behind on its emissions goal under the Paris Agreement that it would have to double its unpopular carbon tax to catch up, a parliamentary budget officer said Thursday.

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Ford opens Israel tech lab in move toward driverless cars

Ford has opened a research center in Israel, joining a legion of major automakers racing to develop new technologies for the world of driverless cars.

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Florida law to allow autonomous cars—when they're ready

Self-driving vehicles with no humans on board will be able to operate in Florida—once they're finally ready for prime time—under a bill signed Thursday by Gov. Ron DeSantis.

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Brazilian government accused of suppressing data that would call its war on drugs into question

Survey by renowned institute contradicts the notion that drug abuse is a widespread, growing problem

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Once thought to be asexual, single-celled parasites caught in the act

The single-celled parasite Leishmania can reproduce sexually, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The finding could pave the way towards finding genes that help the parasite cause disease.

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Parasites are Destroying the Beaks of Darwin's Famous Finches

A Galapagos Finch. (Credit: Ryan M. Bolton/Shutterstock) Nearly 200 years ago Charles Darwin voyaged to the Galapagos islands and began to formulate his theory of evolution — largely thanks to his observations of how finches' beaks varied in shape from island to island. But now, the finches' famous beaks might be in trouble, thanks to a small, blood-sucking visitor. An invasive insect, called Phi

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After a miserable May with unusual warmth, Arctic sea ice hits a record low for early June

Click on this image, acquired by NASA's Aqua satellite, to watch an animation of sea ice flowing through the Nares Strait from April 19 to May 11, 2019. This flow usually doesn't begin until June or July. (Or click on this link. Source: NASA Worldview via NSIDC) With Arctic temperatures running well above average in May, sea ice in the region continued its long-term decline, finishing with the sec

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Once thought to be asexual, single-celled parasites caught in the act

Even single-celled organisms desire partners every now and then.

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Once thought to be asexual, single-celled parasites caught in the act

Even single-celled organisms desire partners every now and then.

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Scotland's crannogs are older than Stonehenge

Used for building homes on lochs, the artificial islands were previously thought to date from the Iron Age.

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Amidst UK Pollinator Declines, Migrant Hoverflies Are Doing Well

A decade-long study tallies the numbers of pest-eating, flower-pollinating hoverflies that travel to the UK every year, and illustrates their important ecological roles in southern Britain.

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New York Is Poised to Bar Religious Exemptions for Vaccinations

New York, where a recent measles outbreak spread in Orthodox Jewish communities, would join California and a handful of other states.

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A Spy Used a Deepfake Photo to Infiltrate LinkedIn Networks

Digital Warfare A LinkedIn user named Katie Jones, who connected with prominent members of the Washington D.C. political sphere, may actually have been a spy’s made up persona — Jones’ picture was almost certainly generated a deepfake by an artificial intelligence algorithm. There are distinct flaws in “Jones'” photo, like how her earring is blurred by an algorithm that can generate facial featur

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House Committee Kills “Space Force” in Favor of “Space Corps”

Dropping Names The United States appears on track to get a Space Force — or a Space something, at least. On Wednesday morning, the House Armed Services Committee (HASC) began debating and revising the 2020 National Defense Authorization Act , the legislation that sets the military’s defense policies and budget for the year. Before the end of the 21-hour-long session, they decided that the U.S. do

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IDT launches ultra-high performance CRISPR Cas12a enzyme

IDT’s new CRISPR Cas12a (Cpf1) Ultra enzyme can target new sites within the genome and with greater efficiency

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Earth's heavy metals result of supernova explosion, research reveals

New research suggests most of Earth's heavy metals were spewed from a largely overlooked kind of star explosion called a collapsar.

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NASA's Fermi mission reveals its highest-energy gamma-ray bursts

For 10 years, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has scanned the sky for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the universe's most luminous explosions. A new catalog of the highest-energy blasts provides scientists with fresh insights into how they work.

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Concert of magnetic moments

Researchers have uncovered a new way how the electron spins in layered materials can interact.

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Married US moms aim to have first baby in the spring

Educated and married American moms are more likely to try to time their pregnancy so that they have their first baby in the spring, according to new research.

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Lowering cholesterol is not enough to reduce hyperactivity of the immune system

Despite treatment with statins, many patients with elevated cholesterol levels will still develop cardiovascular disease. It is apparent that not only cholesterol but also the immune system plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. Researchers now provide a novel potential explanation for this residual cardiovascular risk, related to persistent activation of the immune system

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Genes for Good project harnesses Facebook to reach larger, more diverse groups of people

The Genes for Good project has engaged more than 80,000 Facebook users, collected 27,000 DNA spit-kits, and amassed a trove of health survey data on a more diverse group of participants than has previously been possible.

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Research shows temperature, glyphosate increase probability for dicamba volatility

New research suggests spraying dicamba in warm temperatures and adding glyphosate to a dicamba spray mixture could increase dicamba volatility, potentially leading to increased off-target movement and damage to non-tolerant plants.

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Downward head tilt can make people seem more dominant

We often look to people's faces for signs of how they're thinking or feeling, trying to gauge whether their eyes are narrowed or widened, whether the mouth is turned up or down. But findings published in the June 2019 issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, show that facial features aren't the only source of this information — we also draw social in

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MR af bækkenled finder flere læsioner hos spondylartritpatienter

Højt antal læsioner med knoglemarvsødem kan potentielt skelne patienter med spondylartrit fra patienter med andre tilstande, viser dansk undersøgelse.

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Experts: Spy used AI-generated face to connect with targets

Katie Jones sure seemed plugged into Washington's political scene. The 30-something redhead boasted a job at a top think tank and a who's-who network of pundits and experts, from the centrist …

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Bridging the Internet's Digital Language Divide

Tech companies want to get the next billion people online, but those users may find the internet has little to offer in the languages they speak at home.

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Kellyanne Conway Broke the Law—And Is Going to Get Away With It

Updated at 1:28 p.m. ET on June 13, 2019. The Office of Special Counsel says that Kellyanne Conway, a senior adviser to President Donald Trump, repeatedly violated the Hatch Act and should be fired . OSC says Conway broke the law by disparaging Democratic candidates for president, both while appearing on TV in her official capacity as an adviser to the president and on her Twitter feed. The Hatch

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Why Kevin Durant's Achilles Tendon Was His Achilles Heel

When the Golden State Warriors star limped off the court, his Achilles tendon had been pulled to the point of rupture. Here's how that may have happened.

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Hopes for Cutting Carbon Do Not Yet Match Reality

Prices on carbon are not strict enough to make significant dents in emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Liquid gold on the nanoscale

Researchers have discovered what liquid gold looks like on the nanoscale — and in doing so have mapped the way in which nanoparticles melt, which is relevant to the manufacturing and performance of nanotech devices.

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Research identifies key driver for infanticide among chimpanzees

A new study concludes that the sexual selection hypothesis was the main reason for the high rates of infanticide among a community of chimpanzees in Uganda.

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Low vitamin K levels linked to mobility limitation and disability in older adults

Researchers evaluateD the association between biomarkers of vitamin K status and mobility limitation and disability, and found older adults with low levels of circulating vitamin K were more likely to develop these conditions.

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New research decodes plant defense system, with an eye on improving farming and medicine

The plant circadian clock determines when certain defense responses are activated (often timed with peak activity of pests), and compounds used in defense affect the clock. New findings show how the clock regulates stomata opening/closure for defense, and how the defensive compound jasmonic acid influences the clock. This could lead to plants that are better at defending themselves, reducing the n

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New economic study shows combination of SNAP and WIC improves food security

Forty million Americans are food insecure. Given the extent of food insecurity, a team of economists developed a methodology to analyze potential redundancies between two food assistance programs — SNAP and WIC. Their research shows that participating in both programs compared to SNAP alone increases food security by at least 2 percentage points and potentially as much as 24 percentage points.

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Braces won't always bring happiness

New research overturns the belief that turning your crooked teeth into a beautiful smile will automatically boost your self-confidence.

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Billionaire: Future Music Will Be AI-Generated to Match Our Moods

Final Countdown Music as we know it may be on its way out, with bands and artists making way for personalized playlists and tunes generated by artificial intelligence for each individual listener. That’s a prediction by billionaire Vinod Khosla, the venture capitalist who co-founded Sun Microsystems, TechCrunch reports . It’s a bold idea: that people will live with their own personal soundtracks

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Bølger der opstår helt af sig selv

PLUS. Bølgefænomener i havet og atmosfæren er meget mere komplicerede, end de fleste forestiller sig.

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The formative years: Giant planets vs. brown dwarfs

Based on preliminary results from a new Gemini Observatory survey of 531 stars with the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), it appears more and more likely that large planets and brown dwarfs have very different roots.

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Early-season hurricanes result in greater transmission of mosquito-borne infectious disease

The timing of a hurricane is one of the primary factors influencing its impact on the spread of mosquito-borne infectious diseases such as West Nile Virus, dengue, chikungunya and Zika, according to a study led by Georgia State University.

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Research finds pre-pregnancy weight affects infant growth response to breast milk

In the first study of its kind, LSU Health New Orleans researchers report that women's pre-pregnancy overweight or obesity produces changes in breast milk, which can affect infant growth.

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Encouraging critically necessary blood donation among minorities

Better community education and communication are critical for increasing levels of blood donation among minorities, according to a study by researchers at Georgia State University and Georgia Southern University.

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Ancient 'Loch Ness Monster' from Antarctica Breaks a Record for Body Size

Paleontologists have discovered the remains of an ancient Loch Ness Monster look-alike in freezing Antarctica. And just like the legendary Nessie, it wasn't the runt of the litter.

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Southwest pushes back expected return of troubled Boeing jet

Southwest Airlines is delaying expectations for return of the Boeing 737 Max, which remains grounded after two deadly crashes.

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German state to shut Facebook page over data privacy worries

A German state government announced plans Thursday to shut down the region's Facebook page because of concerns over the company's handling of data protection issues.

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House Democrats move to block part of Trump’s fetal tissue policy

Spending bill amendment would bar the Department of Health and Human Services from convening ethics review boards

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Expansion microscopy and virtual reality illuminate new ways to prevent and treat disease

A combined research team from Carnegie Mellon University and Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason is pairing a nanoscale imaging technique with virtual reality (VR) technology to create a method that allows researchers to "step inside" their biological data.

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Med på en lytter: Spansk fodboldliga idømt bøde for at spionere med telefonapp

I jagten på barer, der viser fodbold uden at have betalt, blev telefonmikrofoner tændt via fjernstyring.

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How a century-old tech giant is making a comeback with AI

IBM is betting that collaboration with universities and other corporations can help it recover its powerhouse status.

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That Sleep Tracker Could Make Your Insomnia Worse

Apps and trackers can flood users with confusing data, doctors say. Some warn against orthosomnia, an obsession with “perfect” sleep.

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Squid could thrive under climate change

Squid will survive and may even flourish under even the worst-case ocean acidification scenarios, according to a new study published this week.

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New imaging modality targets cholesterol in arterial plaque

In an article published in the peer-reviewed SPIE publication Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO), 'Frequency-domain differential photoacoustic radar: theory and validation for ultra-sensitive atherosclerotic plaque imaging,' researchers demonstrate a new imaging modality that successfully identifies the presence of cholesterol in the arterial plaque.

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Earth's heavy metals result of supernova explosion

That gold on your ring finger is stellar—and not just in a complimentary way.

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Sensing food textures is a matter of pressure

Food's texture affects whether it is eaten, liked or rejected, according to Penn State researchers, who say some people are better at detecting even minor differences in consistency because their tongues can perceive particle sizes.

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The War on Terror is Murdering the Environment

Collateral Damage The U.S. Department of Defense is the world’s largest producer of greenhouse gases, with a carbon footprint that surpasses several developed countries. And the ongoing War on Terror accounts for about 35 percent of its carbon emissions. That’s the findings of a new report published Wednesday by Brown University’s Watson Institute that investigated the environmental impact of the

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Why Housing Policy Feels Like Generational Warfare

In his magisterial 2005 history, A Nation of Realtors , Jeffrey Hornstein laid out the country-shaping effect of 20th-century housing policy. In the decades following the Great Depression, the federal government—as well as states and cities—subsidized the creation and consumption of single-family homes. The American dream’s most important archetype became buying a home. “Americans,” Hornstein wro

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How a Negotiation Expert Would Bargain With Kids

One common feature of negotiations is that each party has the ability to walk away. Don’t like the offer the car salesperson is making you? Drive another five minutes to the next dealership. Don’t like the terms a business partner presents you with? Get in touch with another supplier. But every day many people find themselves sitting across the table from a negotiation partner they can’t abandon

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Monitoring educational equity

A centralized, consistently reported system of indicators of educational equity is needed to bring attention to disparities in the U.S. education system, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Indicators—measures used to track performance and monitor change over time—can help convey why disparities arise, identify groups most affected by them, and infor

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Spreading the Word: PLOS Advances Research Through Media Partnerships

Last year, PLOS helped more than 2,300 articles receive media coverage in high-profile outlets including The New York Times, the BBC, National Geographic, Scientific American and The Washington Post. How do we do it? For

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Squid could thrive under climate change

When scientists subjected two-toned pygmy squid and bigfin reef squid to CO2levels projected for the end of the century, they received some surprising results.

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Monitoring educational equity

A centralized, consistently reported system of indicators of educational equity is needed to bring attention to disparities in the US education system, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Indicators — measures used to track performance and monitor change over time — can help convey why disparities arise, identify groups most affected by them, and i

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Genetic inequity towards endocrine disruptors

Phthalates are used by industry in plastic products. Their toxic effect on the endocrine system is worrying. Indeed, the exposure of male foetuses to phthalates can have devastating consequences for the fertility. However, researchers (UNIGE/HUG) show that phthalate susceptibility depends largely on the genetic heritage of each individual. These results raise the question of individual vulnerabili

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Research shows temperature, glyphosate increase probability for dicamba volatility

Higher temperatures and mixing glyphosate with dicamba lead to increased atmospheric concentrations of dicamba, according to scientists with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture.

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Research identifies key driver for infanticide among chimpanzees

Research conducted by the University of Kent has suggested that the sexual selection hypothesis for infanticide may be the key driver for the high rate of infant killings among a community of chimpanzees in Uganda.

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Research shows temperature, glyphosate increase probability for dicamba volatility

Higher temperatures and mixing glyphosate with dicamba lead to increased atmospheric concentrations of dicamba, according to scientists with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture.

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Groundbreaking astronomer Kepler 'may have practised alchemy'

Analysis of Kepler’s manuscripts finds high levels of metals used in a pseudoscience still practised in the 16th and 17th centuries The pioneering astronomer Johannes Kepler may have had his eyes on the heavens, but chemical analysis of his manuscripts suggests he was “willing to get his hands dirty” and may have dabbled in alchemy. A team led by biotechnologist Gleb Zilberstein and chemist Pier

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Daily briefing: Artificial intelligence is cracking long-standing puzzles in art history

Nature, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01881-5 Machine learning is helping experts to figure out who painted what, a modified PET scanner can produce 3D images of the whole body in seconds and the world’s most powerful superconducting magnet.

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Research reveals liquid gold on the nanoscale

The research published in Nature Communications set out to answer a simple question—how do nanoparticles melt? Although this question has been a focus of researchers for the past century, it still is an open problem—initial theoretical models describing melting date from around 100 years, and even the most relevant models being some 50 years old.

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Married US moms aim to have first baby in the spring, new research shows

Educated and married American moms are more likely to try to time their pregnancy so that they have their first baby in the spring, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School in the UK.

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Fermi mission reveals its highest-energy gamma-ray bursts

For 10 years, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has scanned the sky for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the universe's most luminous explosions. A new catalog of the highest-energy blasts provides scientists with fresh insights into how they work.

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Apple Card, beware. Monzo is bringing its 'bank of the future' to the US – CNET

The challenger bank that won hearts and minds in the UK is now heading across the pond.

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Research identifies key driver for infanticide among chimpanzees

Research conducted by the University of Kent has suggested that the sexual selection hypothesis for infanticide may be the key driver for the high rate of infant killings among a community of chimpanzees in Uganda.

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Road-Raging Humans are Bullying Uber’s Self-Driving Cars

Autonomous Target Bullies really have it out for self-driving cars. Head of the Uber’s Advanced Technologies Group Eric Meyhofer said that the company has “seen people bully [Uber’s self-driving] cars. They feel like they can be more aggressive because we won’t take a position on it, or we’ll allow it,” he told the press at Uber’s Elevate conference in Washington DC. Both pedestrians and drivers

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America’s Job Listings Have Gone Off the Deep End

Are you a code sensei ? A customer-service rock star ? Do you have a passion for sales? Will you devote your life to conference calls, leaving your family and friends behind while you camp out under your desk, ready to dial in at any time? If the answer to all those questions is “no”—or even a nervous, hesitant smile—then hopefully you don’t need to look for a new job anytime soon. If you do, get

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The Toy Story Trilogy Gets the Epilogue It Deserves

It was only a matter of time before the Toy Story franchise started asking questions about the very nature of consciousness. It’s a direction I wish more long-running brands would take in their later sequels. Once you’ve completed at least one trilogy’s worth of stories, your next movie should try to dig into the notion of sentience. Toy Story 4 , the latest entry in Pixar’s greatest series, on p

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Trump’s Electoral Shenanigans Are Getting Worse

“I’m actually a very honest guy,” Donald Trump told George Stephanopoulos in an interview aired Monday. And while that claim holds no water in general, Trump was jarringly honest on one topic: his willingness to welcome foreign interference in the 2020 election. “It’s not an interference, they have information—I think I’d take it,” Trump said. “If I thought there was something wrong, I’d go maybe

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Stop Using Phony Science to Justify Transphobia

Actual research shows that sex is anything but binary — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Do You Play with Your Cat? This Online Study Is For You!

Dogs aren't the only ones who can do science. The era of cat science is now. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Stop Using Phony Science to Justify Transphobia

Actual research shows that sex is anything but binary — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Carbon-neutral fuel made from sunlight and air

Researchers have developed a novel technology that produces liquid hydrocarbon fuels exclusively from sunlight and air. For the first time worldwide they demonstrate the entire thermochemical process chain under real field conditions.

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Increase in resolution, scale takes CT scanning and diagnosis to the next level

Researchers have developed a new, 3D tissue imaging technique, called X-ray histotomography. The technique allows researchers to study the details of cells in a zebrafish tissue sample without having to cut it into slices.

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People with mobility issues set to benefit from wearable devices

Researchers are working on a project to develop wearable rehabilitative devices that can help disabled people sit, stand and walk in comfort.

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Growing life expectancy inequality in US cannot be blamed on opioids alone

A new study challenges a popularized view about what's causing the growing gap between the lifespans of more- and less-educated Americans — finding shortcomings in the widespread narrative that the United States is facing an epidemic of 'despair.'

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'Virtual biopsy' device to detect skin tumors

Using sound vibrations and pulses of near-infrared light, a scientist has developed a new 'virtual biopsy' device that can quickly determine a skin lesion's depth and potential malignancy without using a scalpel.

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New quantum dot microscope shows electric potentials of individual atoms

Researchers have developed a new method to measure the electric potentials of a sample at atomic accuracy. The new scanning quantum dot microscopy method could open up new opportunities for chip manufacture or the characterization of biomolecules such as DNA.

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Carboplatin & paclitaxel chemotherapy alone should remain standard treatment for endometrial cancer

The New England Journal of Medicine recently published the primary endpoint of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-GOG 0258, which showed that carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy preceded by radiotherapy with concurrent cisplatin, or combined modality therapy, did not significantly increase recurrence-free survival for women with stage 3-4A endometrial cancer when compared to chemotherapy with

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Stop Using Phony Science to Justify Transphobia

Actual research shows that sex is anything but binary — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bitcoin causing carbon dioxide emissions comparable to Las Vegas or Hamburg

The use of Bitcoin causes around 22 megatons in carbon dioxide emissions annually — comparable to the total emissions of cities such as Las Vegas or Hamburg.

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Rheumatoid arthritic pain could be caused by antibodies

A new study finds that antibodies that exist in the joints before the onset of rheumatoid arthritis can cause pain even in the absence of arthritis. Researchers believe that the finding can represent a general mechanism in autoimmunity and that the results can facilitate the development of new ways of reducing non-inflammatory pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases.

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Interactions between plant and insect-infecting viruses

Aphids and the plant viruses they transmit cause billions of dollars in crop damage every year. Researchers are examining this relationship at the molecular level, which could lead to new methods for controlling the pests. The researchers uncovered what may be the first example of cooperation between a plant virus and an insect virus to increase their likelihood to spread.

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New quantum dot microscope shows electric potentials of individual atoms

Researchers have developed a new method to measure the electric potentials of a sample at atomic accuracy. The new scanning quantum dot microscopy method could open up new opportunities for chip manufacture or the characterization of biomolecules such as DNA.

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Even in young children: Higher weight = higher blood pressure

Overweight 4-year-olds have a doubled risk of high blood pressure by age six, raising the hazard of future heart attack and stroke.

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Lower risk of Type 1 diabetes seen in children vaccinated against 'stomach flu' virus

Vaccinating babies against a virus that causes childhood 'stomach flu' greatly reduces their chance of getting so sick that they need hospital care, a new study shows. But the study also reveals a surprise: Getting fully vaccinated against rotavirus in the first months of life is associated with a lower risk of developing Type 1 diabetes later on.

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Hjertekarsygdom kan have betydning for leddegigt hos kvinder

Tendens til øget risiko for leddegigt blandt kvinder, der tidligere har haft hjertesygdom, viser resultater af kohortestudie, som Asta Linauskas har præsenteret på EULAR.

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Smidig national overgang til biosimilære gigtmidler

Til trods for betydelig stigning i forbrug, gav skift til biosimilære versioner af infliximab og etanercept betydelige besparelser på medicinbudgetterne, viser analyse, som Thomas Bo Jensen præsenterer på EULAR i morgen

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Fokuseret vægttab giver slidgigtpatienter færre knæsmerter

Kostvejledning og diæt kombineret med liraglutidbehandlig giver patienter med slidgigt i knæet stort vægttab og færre smerter, viser forskerinitieret dansk undersøgelse præsenteret på EULAR.

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Brace for a Voter-Turnout Tsunami

Signs are growing that voter turnout in 2020 could reach the highest levels in decades—if not the highest in the past century—with a surge of new voters potentially producing the most diverse electorate in American history. But paradoxically, that surge may not dislodge the central role of the predominantly white and heavily working-class voters who tipped the three Rust Belt states that decided

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Target expands same-day shipping as delivery war heats up

Target Corp on Thursday expanded its same-day delivery options for online shoppers, intensifying the race among retailers to deliver orders faster.

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A Mathematician Whose Only Constant Is Change

Amie Wilkinson is an explorer. Instead of seeking uncharted land, she’s after undiscovered mathematical worlds — complex systems of motion that unfold in unexpected ways. As a professor at the University of Chicago, she’s known for discovering unique types of these “dynamical systems” that had been only conjectured to exist. Wilkinson’s career has proceeded in a dynamical way, too. She now approa

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These Animal Migrations Are Huge — and Invisible

Swarms of insects move across continents each year. Scientists used radar to track one species and discovered a vast ecological force.

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Congress Is Officially Freaking Out About Deepfakes

Deepfake State Congress is worried that deepfakes , or computer-generated videos that depict people saying or doing things that never happened, could severely disrupt the 2020 presidential campaign, the Washington Post reports . The House Intelligence Committee has scheduled a hearing today to discuss the problem with AI experts. But many other experts in the field are worried that the U.S. is no

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Survey: Half of fathers report ‘daddy-shaming’

Half of dads in a new national poll report facing criticism and second-guessing about their parenting choices. For more than a quarter of fathers polled, criticism made them feel less confident as a parent, and 1 in 5 say it discouraged them from being more involved in parenting. Many fathers (43 percent) also thought the criticism was often unfair. Many fathers say they respond to criticism in p

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Bakterier i avloppsvattnet resistenta mot nya antibiotika

Örebroforskare har hittat antibiotikaresistenta bakterier i avloppsvattnet från hushåll och från Universitetssjukhuset i Örebro. Bakterierna finns även i vattnet utanför reningsverket i Svartån. Däremot är proverna från Hemfjärden i Hjälmaren nästan rena. Forskarna fokuserar i sitt sökande inte i första hand på bakterierna utan på deras gener. Specifikt de gener som skyddar bakterier mot antibiot

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Research identifies key driver for infanticide among chimpanzees

Study concludes that the sexual selection hypothesis was the main reason for the high rates of infanticide among a community of chimpanzees in Uganda.

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Research reveals liquid gold on the nanoscale

Swansea University researchers have discovered what liquid gold looks like on the nanoscale – and in doing so have mapped the way in which nanoparticles melt, which is relevant to the manufacturing and performance of nanotech devices such as bio-sensors, nanochips , gas sensors, and catalysts.

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Research shows temperature, glyphosate increase probability for dicamba volatility

New research from the UT Institute of Agriculture suggests spraying dicamba in warm temperatures and adding glyphosate to a dicamba spray mixture could increase dicamba volatility, potentially leading to increased off-target movement and damage to non-tolerant plants.

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NASA's Fermi mission reveals its highest-energy gamma-ray bursts

For 10 years, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has scanned the sky for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the universe's most luminous explosions. A new catalog of the highest-energy blasts provides scientists with fresh insights into how they work.

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Complex Life May Be Much Rarer in the Universe Than Previously Thought

New research indicates the number of planets capable of hosting complex life could be much smaller than we thought. The post Complex Life May Be Much Rarer in the Universe Than Previously Thought appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Zebras' stripes could be used to control their temperature, study reveals

New research indicates that zebras' stripes are used to control body temperature after all — and reveals for the first time a new mechanism for how this may be achieved.

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Small currents for big gains in spintronics

A new low-power magnetic switching component could aid spintronic devices.

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Formation of habitual use drives cannabis addiction

A shift from brain systems controlling reward-driven use to habit-driven use differentiates heavy cannabis users who are addicted to the drug from users who aren't, according to a new study. The findings help explain how the brain becomes dependent on cannabis, and why not all cannabis users develop an addiction, even with long-term regular use.

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New method to rapidly, reliably monitor sickle cell disease

Researchers have developed a rapid and reliable new method to continuously monitor sickle cell disease using a microfluidics-based electrical impedance sensor. This novel technology can characterize the dynamic cell sickling and unsickling processes in sickle blood without the use of microscopic imaging or biochemical markers. The technology is being developed with the hope of providing patients w

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Exercise may have different effects in the morning and evening

Researchers have learned that the effect of exercise may differ depending on the time of day it is performed. In mice they demonstrate that exercise in the morning results in an increased metabolic response in skeletal muscle, while exercise later in the day increases energy expenditure for an extended period of time.

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Pre-qualifying education and training helps health workers tackle gender-based violence

Gender-based violence (GBV) could be tackled more effectively by giving healthcare students wider and more practical education and training in identifying and responding to the 'warning signs' presented among patients they will encounter in professional life, according to a new study.

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Selective logging will not be enough to sustain timber production in Amazonia

Amazonian forests are unlikely to provide enough timber to meet current demand over the long term, even with the use of improved logging practices. That is a key finding of a new study.

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Lack of suitable roads for bicycling

A researcher says a lack of suitable roads is a big reason why cycling participation rates in Australia and Queensland are so low.

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Adjuvant that prevents vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease in RSV identified

A unique adjuvant, a substance that enhances the body's immune response to toxins and foreign matter, can prevent vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease, a sickness that has posed a major hurdle in vaccine development for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), according to a new study.

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Nye data for nedtrapning af denosumab

Sådan forhindrer læger knogleskørhed blandt kvinder efter overgangsalderen.

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Delvis udskiftning af knæ bedre end et helt nyt knæ

Slidgigtpatienter har mindre risiko for veneblodpropper og vedvarende smerter efter delvis mod total udskiftning af knæ.

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Studie afliver myte om vaccination af børn med gigt

Ingen af de 234 børn, der i et israelsk forsøg blev vaccineret med en levende booster-vaccine mod mæslinger, røde hunde og fåresyge, mens de tog immunundertrykkende medicin, oplevede vaccineinfektioner eller udbrud af deres sygdom.

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Nye biomarkører for risiko for hjertekartilfælde

Forskere finder nye biomarkører for risiko for hjertekartilfælde blandt børn og unge med systemisk lupus erytematosus.

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Spotify rolls out new Your Library to showcase podcasts

Spotify has redesigned Your Library for premium users. The new interface now segregates podcasts from music. The change makes sense considering the company’s recent acquisitions of podcast producer …

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Married US moms aim to have first baby in the spring, new research shows

Educated and married American moms are more likely to try to time their pregnancy so that they have their first baby in the spring, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School in the UK.

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Concert of magnetic moments

An international collaboration between researchers from Germany, the Netherlands, and South Korea has uncovered a new way how the electron spins in layered materials can interact. In their publication in the journal Nature Materials, the scientists report a hitherto unknown chiral coupling that is active over relatively long distances. As a consequence, spins in two different magnetic layers that

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Lowering cholesterol is not enough to reduce hyperactivity of the immune system

Despite treatment with statins, many patients with elevated cholesterol levels will still develop cardiovascular disease. It is apparent that not only cholesterol but also the immune system plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. Researchers from the Netherlands now provide a novel potential explanation for this residual cardiovascular risk, related to persistent activation

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Polycomb protein EED plays a starring role in hippocampal development

A team led by Professor Liu Changmei from the State Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, has shown that the PcG protein EED is essential for the proper formation of the DG.

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The power of a love song: Dopamine affects seasonal hearing in fish and facilitates mating

Scientists at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York and Brooklyn College have discovered seasonal changes in dopamine levels in the female plainfin midshipman fish's inner ear helps hearing sensitivity grow in the summer mating season, making her better able to hear the male's mating calls.

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Breaking the code: How is a mother's immunity transferred to her baby?

A study based at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard has determined how a pregnant woman's vaccine-induced immunity is transferred to her child, which has implications for the development of more effective maternal vaccines.

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Identification of protective antibodies may be key to effective malaria vaccine

Researchers from the University of Oxford, along with partners from five institutions around the world, have identified the human antibodies that prevent the malaria parasite from entering blood cells, which may be key to creating a highly effective malaria vaccination. The results of the study were published today in the journal Cell.

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Aging delayed in older mice given blood component from young mice

New research has identified a novel approach to staving off the detrimental effects of aging, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Supplementing older mice with an enzyme called eNAMPT from younger mice extends life spans in the older mice.

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Viruses found to use intricate 'treadmill' to move cargo across bacterial cells

Using advanced technologies to explore the inner workings of bacteria, biologists at UC San Diego have provided the first example of cargo within bacteriophage cells transiting along treadmill-like structures. The discovery demonstrates that bacteria have more in common with sophisticated human cells than previously believed. The type of phage studied in the new paper is the kind that one day coul

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New insight could improve maternal vaccines that also protect newborns

Duke researchers describe a previously unidentified route for antibodies to be transferred from the mother to the fetus, illuminating a potential way to capitalize on this process to control when and how certain antibodies are shared.

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Special fibroblasts help pancreatic cancer cells evade immune detection

A subpopulation of fibroblasts called apCAFs can interact with the immune system to help pancreatic cancer cells avoid detection. Understanding how they work can be key in developing therapeutics for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

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Migratory hoverflies 'key' as many insects decline

Migratory hoverflies are 'key' to pollination and controlling crop pests amid the decline of many other insect species, new research shows.

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Oxygen shapes arms and legs: Origins of a new developmental mechanism called 'interdigital cell death'

Scientists at Tokyo Tech, Yamagata University and Harvard University have discovered that environmental oxygen plays an important role shaping the hands and feet during development. They found that removal of the interdigital membrane by cell death depends on the production of reactive oxygen species, which only occurs in embryos exposed to a high oxygen concentration. This work gives an interesti

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Antibody treatment allows transplant of mismatched stem cells, tissues in mice

A combination of six antibodies can successfully prepare mice to accept blood and immune stem cells from an immunologically mismatched donor, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Environmental oxygen triggers loss of webbed digits

Free fingers have many obvious advantages on land, such as in locomotion and grasping, while webbed fingers are typical of aquatic or gliding animals. But both amphibians and amniotes — which include mammals, reptiles, and birds — can have webbed digits. In new research from Japan, scientists show that during embryo development, some animal species detect the presence of atmospheric oxygen, whic

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Genes for Good project harnesses Facebook to reach larger, more diverse groups of people

In 2015, a group of researchers hypothesized that our collective love of Facebook surveys could be harnessed for serious genetic studies. Today, the Genes for Good project has engaged more than 80,000 Facebook users, collected 27,000 DNA spit-kits, and amassed a trove of health survey data on a more diverse group of participants than has previously been possible. Their work appears June 13 in The

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Science Posters Suck. So Let’s Reinvent Them.

Science Signs Right now, some scientist, somewhere, is almost certainly toiling over a science poster by attempting to fit months’ or perhaps even years’ worth of research onto a single — albeit large — sheet of paper. Eventually, they’ll hang their creation on a temporary wall during some science conference’s poster session, alongside countless others. And if the scientist is lucky, their poster

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Ethnic minority children are exposed to more noise pollution at school

Schoolchildren in the US who are from poorer or ethnic minority backgrounds are much more likely to be exposed to noise pollution from cars and planes

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Letters: Confronting Biological Denialism on Campus

Self-Censorship on Campus Is Bad for Science In May, Luana Maroja—a professor of biology at Williams College— wrote about how, after Donald Trump was elected president, scientific ideas that she had been teaching for years were suddenly met with stiff ideological resistance. Students began to push back on well-established biological concepts, employing an a priori moral commitment to equality, an

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Ny metod täpper till säkerhetshål i datorn

Ett säkerhetshål uppstår när mikroprocessorn i en dator eller mobiltelefon försöker att gissa sig till vad som ska göras härnäst. Sådana gissningar är det vanligaste tillvägagångssättet för att förbättra prestandan hos datamaskiner eftersom det utnyttjar den fulla kapaciteten av mikroprocessorn. När processorn gissar blir det förstås fel gissningar som avfärdas av processorn. – I teorin ska felak

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In the Bronze Age, Bagels Were Tiny

Archaeologists have identified remnants of small, round dough rings at an excavation site in Austria. But no cream cheese.

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Revealed: UK government failing to tackle rise of serious air pollutant

Investigation reveals no plan is in place to tackle increase in levels of agricultural ammonia, a gas contributing to thousands of deaths in UK alone Analysis: dealing with ammonia is an urgent health problem Testing reveals hotspots at UK farms One of the most potent air pollutants is on the rise in the UK, but the government has no comprehensive monitoring, little enforcement, and almost no fun

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The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds 'sound' words predict psychosis

Automated analysis of the two language variables — more frequent use of words associated with sound and speaking with low semantic density, or vagueness — can predict whether an at-risk person will later develop psychosis with 93 percent accuracy.

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Superfast gene sequencing helps diagnose critically ill patients

In an analysis of the real-world impact of a pioneering test called metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS), developed by scientists to diagnose patients with mysterious inflammatory neurological conditions, the technique was shown to identify infections better than any standard clinical method.

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Migratory hoverflies 'key' as many insects decline

Migratory hoverflies are "key" to pollination and controlling crop pests amid the decline of many other insect species, new research shows.

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The power of a love song: Dopamine affects seasonal hearing in fish and facilitates mating

Many people associate dopamine with reward or attention. Some might think of the part it plays in addiction, or Parkinson's disease, which kills off dopamine-making neurons.

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Environmental oxygen triggers loss of webbed digits

Free fingers have many obvious advantages on land, such as in locomotion and grasping, while webbed fingers are typical of aquatic or gliding animals. But both amphibians and amniotes—which include mammals, reptiles, and birds—can have webbed digits. In new research from Japan, scientists show for the first time that during embryo development, some animal species detect the presence of atmospheric

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Viruses found to use intricate 'treadmill' to move cargo across bacterial cells

Countless textbooks have characterized bacteria as simple, disorganized blobs of molecules.

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Elephant poaching spikes in Botswana, endangering the species

Researchers warn illegal killing of animals could prompt population crash. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Half a billion hoverflies migrate to the United Kingdom each year. The benefits to farmers are huge

Scientists used radar to chart the long-distance flights of hoverflies, which pollinate crops and eat pests

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Migratory hoverflies 'key' as many insects decline

Migratory hoverflies are "key" to pollination and controlling crop pests amid the decline of many other insect species, new research shows.

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The power of a love song: Dopamine affects seasonal hearing in fish and facilitates mating

Many people associate dopamine with reward or attention. Some might think of the part it plays in addiction, or Parkinson's disease, which kills off dopamine-making neurons.

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Environmental oxygen triggers loss of webbed digits

Free fingers have many obvious advantages on land, such as in locomotion and grasping, while webbed fingers are typical of aquatic or gliding animals. But both amphibians and amniotes—which include mammals, reptiles, and birds—can have webbed digits. In new research from Japan, scientists show for the first time that during embryo development, some animal species detect the presence of atmospheric

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Viruses found to use intricate 'treadmill' to move cargo across bacterial cells

Countless textbooks have characterized bacteria as simple, disorganized blobs of molecules.

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Twitter releases new trove of banned state propaganda

Social media giant Twitter on Thursday released a new archive of state-backed propaganda from accounts it has banned based in Iran, Russia, Spain and Venezuela.

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Video: What is the chemistry behind ringworm?

Did you know that ringworm is not actually a worm?

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Denis Villeneuve Is Working on a 'Dune' Series

The 'Blade Runner 2049' director, who is also working on a film adaptation of Frank Herbert's work, is going to direct the pilot for series about the Bene Gesserit.

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My life as a work of art | Daniel Lismore

Daniel Lismore's closet is probably a bit different than yours — his clothes are constructed out of materials ranging from beer cans and plastic crystals to diamonds, royal silks and 2,000-year-old Roman rings. In this striking talk, Lismore shares the vision behind his elaborate ensembles and explores what it's like to live life as a work of art. "Everyone is capable of creating their own master

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Earth's heavy metals result of supernova explosion, University of Guelph Research Reveals

New research by a University of Guelph physicist suggests most of Earth's heavy metals were spewed from a largely overlooked kind of star explosion called a collapsar.

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Sensing food textures is a matter of pressure

Food's texture affects whether it is eaten, liked or rejected, according to Penn State researchers, who say some people are better at detecting even minor differences in consistency because their tongues can perceive particle sizes.

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Experts: Spy used AI-generated face to connect with targets

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Researchers: bitcoin's carbon footprint equal to Las Vegas

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Data Centers Struggle To Mitigate Cooling Issues

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Lactation cookies feed on breastfeeding anxieties

There’s little good evidence to say "lactation cookies" do anything at all. If you want cookies, eat cookies. Lactation cookies are an expensive scam.

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Suit alleges Amazon's Alexa violates laws by recording children's voices without consent

A lawsuit filed in Seattle Tuesday alleges Amazon is recording children who use its Alexa devices without their consent, in violation of laws governing recordings in at least eight states, including Washington.

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Search and rescue: Researchers on mission to save the coral reefs of South Florida

A research ship that located the black box of a crashed Air France jet has embarked on a scientific expedition to the Florida Keys, where a mysterious disease is burning through coral reefs.

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Making the 'human-body Internet' more effective

Human body communication (HBC) uses the human body to transmit power and data, much like the internet. Because it's a smaller and closed network, it has the benefit of being more secure and power efficient. In a recent study, a group of Japanese researchers used an equivalent circuit model to examine how different parameters affect HBC transmission characteristics.

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Warming waters in western tropical Pacific may affect West Antarctic Ice Sheet

Warming waters in the western tropical Pacific Ocean have significantly increased thunderstorms and rainfall, which may affect the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and global sea-level rise, according to a new tudy.

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New 'king' of fossils discovered in Australia

Fossils of a giant new species from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites have been found on Kangaroo Island, South Australia.

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Bruce Springsteen Takes His Car to the Old Town Road

When the then-19-year-old rapper and meme-maker Lil Nas X scored a hit by sampling a banjo, pitching his voice parodically low, and singing about “wranglers on my booty,” some in the country establishment took it as an act of mockery . But most of the nation, it appears, wanted to play dress-up too. “Old Town Road” has been the Billboard No. 1 song for 10 weeks running, spurred by a meme in which

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Handgun licensing more effective at reducing gun deaths than background checks alone

A new white paper from the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health concludes that of the approaches used by states to screen out prohibited individuals from owning firearms, only purchaser licensing has been shown to reduce gun homicides and suicides.

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Rheumatoid arthritic pain could be caused by antibodies

Antibodies that exist in the joints before the onset of rheumatoid arthritis can cause pain even in the absence of arthritis, researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report. The researchers believe that the finding, which is published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, can represent a general mechanism in autoimmunity and that the results can facilitate the development of new ways o

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Bitcoin causing CO2 emissions comparable to Hamburg

The use of Bitcoin causes around 22 megatons in CO2 emissions annually — comparable to the total emissions of cities such as Hamburg or Las Vegas. That is the conclusion of the most detailed analysis to date of the cryptocurrency's carbon footprint. For their study, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) analyzed such data as the IPO filings of hardwa

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Cardiac toxicity risk factors identified with relapsed multiple myeloma therapy

More than half of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma treated with carfilzomib experienced cardiac issues during treatment, according to a multi-institutional study published June 12, 2019 in Journal of Clinical Oncology. The study recommends that patients undergo a detailed cardiovascular history before being prescribed carfilzomib and then be monitored with natriuretic peptide testing, an in

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Common conditions keep many patients out of knee cartilage research studies

Issues like age or existing arthritis may preclude patients from participating in clinical studies for new therapies that could benefit them

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Making it personal: How genetic technologies are changing the face of medicine

Doctors at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and other sites show how personalized medicine can be used to pinpoint the source of infection. A study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that genetic testing can lead to higher rates of diagnosis in patients with meningitis and encephalitis.

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The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds 'sound' words predict psychosis

Automated analysis of the two language variables — more frequent use of words associated with sound and speaking with low semantic density, or vagueness — can predict whether an at-risk person will later develop psychosis with 93 percent accuracy.

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New economic study shows combination of SNAP and WIC improves food security

Forty million Americans are food insecure. Given the extent of food insecurity, a team of Iowa State University economists developed a methodology to analyze potential redundancies between two food assistance programs — SNAP and WIC. Their research shows that participating in both programs compared to SNAP alone increases food security by at least 2 percentage points and potentially as much as 24

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Rutgers scientist creates 'virtual biopsy' device to detect skin tumors

Using sound vibrations and pulses of near-infrared light, a Rutgers University scientist has developed a new 'virtual biopsy' device that can quickly determine a skin lesion's depth and potential malignancy without using a scalpel.

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From rain to flood

Extreme weather events, such as thunderstorms or heavy rainfall and the resulting floods, influence Earth and environmental systems in the long term. To holistically study the impacts of hydrological extremes — from precipitation to water entering the ground to discharge to flow into the ocean — a measurement campaign at Müglitztal/Saxony is about to start under the MOSES Helmholtz Initiative. T

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Nation's first hydrogen fuel cell ferry to transport commuters across San Francisco Bay in early 2020

Creators of the nation's first hydrogen fuel cell ferry always dreamed that if they built the zero-emission vessel, commercial interest would soon follow. It didn't take long.

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Hillwood wants to turn AllianceTexas into 'mobility innovation zone' for drones, autonomous vehicles

When Uber announced it would develop and test an urban air taxi service in Dallas, the Perot family's Hillwood was among the first companies to sign on as one of the ride-hailing company's business partners.

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Hubble observes tiny galaxy with big heart

Nestled within this field of bright foreground stars lies ESO 495-21, a tiny galaxy with a big heart. ESO 495-21 may be just 3000 light-years across, but that is not stopping the galaxy from furiously forming huge numbers of stars. It may also host a supermassive black hole; this is unusual for a galaxy of its size, and may provide intriguing hints as to how galaxies form and evolve.

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Google's Push to Close a Major Encrypted Web Loophole

By building security into top-level domains, Google makes it harder for HTTPS to fall short.

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South Australia's droughts are getting worse

Despite Adelaide experiencing its wettest day in more than two years this month, a new study by UniSA shows droughts are becoming longer and more severe in South Australia.

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A Nature Writer for the Anthropocene

Robert Macfarlane has spent the past two decades becoming a nature writer for the Anthropocene. His new book, Underland , culminates a first-half-of-life project in which he has worked to understand the mind’s encounter with nature. What do we look for when we go out to meet landscapes and nonhuman things? What do we find, and how does it change us? In Mountains of the Mind (2003), Macfarlane exp

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Using AI to speed up the processing of space images

Where no neural network has gone before

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Gene editing is back in the spotlight

A better way to edit DNA and a Russian scientist announces plans to make more designer babies

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Zapping the brain improves creativity

Electric currents can help lateral thinking and cognitive flexibility

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KAL’s cartoon

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AirFrance vil give dig hurtigt internet med lys i ti kilometers højde

Franske Oledcomm har indgået en aftale med Air France om at levere internetforbindelser med op til 100 megabit i sekundet ved hjælp af lys og ikke radiobølger. Der er dog endnu uklart hvordan forbindelsen helt præcist etableres og vil fungere.

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VW says cooperation talks with Ford 'close to completion'

Car giant Volkswagen's talks on co-operation with US-based Ford concerning electric vehicles and automated driving are "close to completion", the German company's chief executive Herbert Diess said Thursday.

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Researchers discover interactions between plant and insect-infecting viruses

Aphids and the plant viruses they transmit cause billions of dollars in crop damage around the world every year. Researchers in Michelle Heck's lab at the USDA Agricultural Research Service and Boyce Thompson Institute are examining the relationship at the molecular level, which could lead to new methods for controlling the pests.

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Female CFOs may be better than males at preventing financial fraud

Companies with female chief financial officers are less likely to misreport key data in financial statements, according to research from The University of Alabama.

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Researchers discover interactions between plant and insect-infecting viruses

Aphids and the plant viruses they transmit cause billions of dollars in crop damage around the world every year. Researchers in Michelle Heck's lab at the USDA Agricultural Research Service and Boyce Thompson Institute are examining the relationship at the molecular level, which could lead to new methods for controlling the pests.

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Growing life expectancy inequality in US cannot be blamed on opioids alone

A new University of Michigan study challenges a popularized view about what's causing the growing gap between the lifespans of more- and less-educated Americans — finding shortcomings in the widespread narrative that the United States is facing an epidemic of 'despair.'

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Increase in resolution, scale takes CT scanning and diagnosis to the next level

Researchers have developed a new, 3D tissue imaging technique, called X-ray histotomography. The technique allows researchers to study the details of cells in a zebrafish tissue sample without having to cut it into slices.

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Hubble observes tiny galaxy with big heart

Nestled within this field of bright foreground stars lies ESO 495-21, a tiny galaxy with a big heart. ESO 495-21 may be just 3000 light-years across, but that is not stopping the galaxy from furiously forming huge numbers of stars. It may also host a supermassive black hole; this is unusual for a galaxy of its size, and may provide intriguing hints as to how galaxies form and evolve.

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New quantum dot microscope shows electric potentials of individual atoms

Researchers from Jülich in cooperation with partners from other institutions has developed a new method to measure the electric potentials of a sample at atomic accuracy. Using conventional methods, it was virtually impossible until now to quantitatively record the electric potentials that occur in the immediate vicinity of individual molecules or atoms. The new scanning quantum dot microscopy met

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BTI researchers discover interactions between plant and insect-infecting viruses

Aphids and the plant viruses they transmit cause billions of dollars in crop damage every year. Researchers at Boyce Thompson Institute and USDA-ARS are examining this relationship at the molecular level, which could lead to new methods for controlling the pests. As described in the May 22 issue of Phytobiomes, the researchers uncovered what may be the first example of cooperation between a plant

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Bacterial chemical 'signatures' a sign of damaged gut microbiome in critical illness

Chemicals produced by healthy bacteria could be used to assess the health of the gut microbiome and help identify critically-ill children at greatest risk of organ failure, a study published in Critical Care Medicine has found.

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Smoking may impair body's blood pressure autocorrect system

Smokers may be at a higher risk for developing hypertension, and an overactive response to normal drops in blood pressure may help explain why, according to researchers.

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Trinity study finds over a quarter of adults aged 50+ are deficient in vitamin D

Over a quarter of adults aged 50+ are deficient in vitamin D according to researchers from Trinity College Dublin who announced their findings today (Thursday, June 13, 2019). Over half (57%) had inadequate serum vitamin D levels, of which 26% were classed as vitamin D deficient. Vitamin D has a known role in bone health, with growing evidence for beneficial effects on muscle strength and other no

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MRI plays a role in diagnosis of cocaine-related damage to the heart

Cardiac MRI has a pivotal role to play in the diagnosis of cocaine-induced cardiovascular diseases, according to a new article.

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Experts: Spy used AI-generated face to connect with targets

Katie Jones sure seemed plugged into Washington's political scene. The 30-something redhead boasted a job at a top think tank and a who's-who network of pundits and experts, from the centrist Brookings Institution to the right-wing Heritage Foundation. She was connected to a deputy assistant secretary of state, a senior aide to a senator and the economist Paul Winfree, who is being considered for

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India plans 'very small' space station after 2022

India plans to establish its own "very small" space station in the next decade as the country gears up for a first manned mission beyond earth.

6h

How trustworthy is that website?

The internet is ubiquitous and for many people it is part of every aspect of their everyday lives from news and information to finding their way around a new city and from emailing close friends to finding a partner. But, how do we know which websites on the internet are trustworthy in so many different contexts?

6h

Why Teens Are Selling Clothes Out of Their Closets

A crowd of teenagers waited in the sticky summer heat outside a storefront in New York’s SoHo neighborhood last Friday night. They weren’t in line to meet their favorite YouTube stars, or even beloved Instagrammers. They were there to see influencers who run their own stores on an app called Depop. Depop is a social shopping platform that’s a little bit eBay and a little bit Instagram. In fact, t

6h

NASA trials new safety system before moon launch

Nose-tip abort mechanism can save the crew if the rocket detonates on lift-off.

6h

Probing the intimacies of atom-to-atom contact

Next-level imaging offers insight into quantum computing challenges. Phil Dooley reports.

6h

Herbicide-resistant ‘superweeds’ on the rise

US researchers warn at least one species is unaffected by multiple applications. Nick Carne reports.

6h

Hunting hawks hold clues to catching rogue drones

Studying raptor attack modes has implications for mechanical aerial defence. Nick Carne reports.

6h

Evidence found of galactic collision with massive dark matter ‘clump’

Can the shape of a distant galaxy point to the nature of dark matter? Richard A Lovett reports.

6h

Lack of proof no bar to patent applications

Concerns have been raised regarding the influence of so-called 'prophetic patents'. Nick Carne reports.

6h

The start of a new era in stem cell therapy

A recent study published in the April 8 issue of Nature Chemical Biology improves on the "Cellular Reprogramming" method developed by Nobel Laureate in Medicine and Physiology Prof. Shinya Yamanaka, making it possible to produce cells in a considerably shorter time and with greater success. Yamanaka's method, which is referred to as "Cellular Reprogramming," obtains pluripotent cells, similar to t

6h

Researchers identify the source of asymmetry in RNA-DNA hybrids

A study headed by the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and published in the journal CHEM furthers the understanding of the asymmetry between nucleic acid hybrids. This advance may make a significant contribution to improving gene therapies.

6h

Morning exercise or evening? Both have perks

The benefits of exercise may differ depending on the time of day when you work out, a new study in mice suggests. Too little sleep can have severe health consequences, but researchers are still making discoveries confirming that the body’s circadian clock affects our health. The new research with mice shows that the effect of exercise performed in the beginning of the mouse’ dark/active phase—cor

6h

NASA Invests in Technology to Map the Moon and Mine Asteroids

NASA wants to establish a long-term human presence on and in space around the moon, but that's going to require new technologies. The NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program aims to develop those technologies, and two NAIC projects have just advanced to phase III study, the furthest any of them have gotten. The post NASA Invests in Technology to Map the Moon and Mine Asteroids appeared f

6h

Graphene (With a Twist) Is Helping Scientists Understand Superconductors

Graphene is a highly unconventional substance. After all, how many other Nobel-Prize-winning breakthroughs are made by scientists messing around on a Friday night with some sticky tape ? Since then, graphene—and a whole family of additional 2D materials such as germanene and silicene—have been a source of fascination and excitement due to their fascinating properties. Despite all of the speculati

6h

Using AI technology to prevent cyberbullying

On Sept. 9, 2013, after enduring years of horrific cyberbullying at the hands of her Lakeland, Fla., classmates, 12-year-old Rebecca Sedwick climbed to the top of a water tower and leapt to her death.

6h

Undocumented plant extinctions are a big problem in Australia

A recent survey on the world's plants found a shocking number have gone extinct—571 since 1750. And this is likely to be a stark underestimate. Not all plants have been discovered, so it's likely other plants have gone extinct before researchers know they're at risk, or even know they exist.

6h

The start of a new era in stem cell therapy

A recent study published in the April 8 issue of Nature Chemical Biology improves on the "Cellular Reprogramming" method developed by Nobel Laureate in Medicine and Physiology Prof. Shinya Yamanaka, making it possible to produce cells in a considerably shorter time and with greater success. Yamanaka's method, which is referred to as "Cellular Reprogramming," obtains pluripotent cells, similar to t

6h

Researchers identify the source of asymmetry in RNA-DNA hybrids

A study headed by the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and published in the journal CHEM furthers the understanding of the asymmetry between nucleic acid hybrids. This advance may make a significant contribution to improving gene therapies.

6h

X and gamma rays –Even more powerful

International group of researchers including scientists from Skoltech have invented a new method for the generation of intense X and gamma-ray radiation based on Nonlinear Compton Scattering. Their results were published in the prestigious Physical Review Letters journal and the invention is about to get an international patent.

6h

Still an unmet need: New therapeutic targets in Alport syndrome

Alport syndrome (AS) is a hereditary disease that leads to progressive proteinuria, renal fibrosis, and kidney failure. At present, there is no curative treatment for AS. The only recommended therapy is RAAS (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) blockade. Many drugs are under study, but a specific disease-modifying therapy for AS still remains an unmet need. But this might change: A review publis

6h

Clinical trials and research priorities in dialysis patients: Time for a new approach?

Historically, the number of ESRD RCTs has been very low compared to other subspecialties. Furthermore, several few RCTs have yielded inconclusive or negative results, dampening enthusiasm for future trials. More patient participation in determining research priorities and prioritization of patient-centered outcomes could result in improved recruitment and retention in clinical trials of ESRD patie

6h

PCSK9 inhibitors: Specific studies are mandatory to prove efficacy and safety in CKD

High cardiovascular morbidity and mortality remains a persisting problem in patients with CKDPCSK9 inhibition represents a novel and successful treatment approach to reduce LDL-C in patients with normal to moderately impaired kidney function. As the authors of a review published today in NDT [1] conclude, specific studies in chronic kidney disease patients are mandatory to prove the efficacy and s

6h

Laser trick produces high-energy terahertz pulses

A team of scientists from DESY and the University of Hamburg has achieved an important milestone in the quest for a new type of compact particle accelerator. Using ultra-powerful pulses of laser light, they were able to produce particularly high-energy flashes of radiation in the terahertz range having a sharply defined wavelength (colour). Terahertz radiation is to open the way for a new generati

6h

A metal-free, sustainable approach to CO2 reduction

Researchers in Japan present an organic catalyst for carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction that is inexpensive, readily available and recyclable. As the level of catalytic activity can be tuned by the solvent conditions, their findings could open up many new directions for converting CO2 to industrially useful organic compounds.

6h

Making the 'human-body internet' more effective

Human body communication (HBC) uses the human body to transmit power and data, much like the internet. Because it's a smaller and closed network, it has the benefit of being more secure and power efficient. In a recent study, a group of Japanese researchers used an equivalent circuit model to examine how different parameters affect HBC transmission characteristics.

6h

The use of mobile phone and the development of new pathologies

Professor Raquel Cantero of the University of Malaga (UMA) has identified a generational change in the use of this finger due to the influence of new technologies.

6h

The start of a new era in stem cell therapy

The research of Assoc. Prof. Tamer Önder of Koç University and his team has shortened the time required for producing stem cells from skin cells and increased the success rate of transformation by a ten-fold.

6h

New application can detect Twitter bots in any language

Thanks to fruitful collaboration between language scholars and machine learning specialists, a new application developed by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Linnaeus University in Sweden can detect Twitter bots independent of the language used.

6h

Cardiology medication affordability in Russia studied in a new report

Reliable information on prices and availability of medicines is the main foundation for improving access to medicines through development of public policy and evidence-based programs.

6h

Undocumented plant extinctions are a big problem in Australia

A recent survey on the world's plants found a shocking number have gone extinct—571 since 1750. And this is likely to be a stark underestimate. Not all plants have been discovered, so it's likely other plants have gone extinct before researchers know they're at risk, or even know they exist.

6h

Edit video like it’s text with this algorithm

A new algorithm allows video editors to modify talking head videos as if they were editing text—copying, pasting, or adding and deleting words. In television and film, actors often flub small bits of otherwise flawless performances. Other times they leave out a critical word. For editors, the only solution so far is to accept the flaws or fix them with expensive reshoots. Imagine, however, if tha

7h

AT&T cancels Samsung Galaxy Fold orders

AT&T has cancelled early orders for the Samsung Galaxy Fold. Tom’s Guide first reported the cancellation, noting that AT&T said the Galaxy Fold would be available again to order …

7h

Catalyst Sues the FDA

So now we have another couple of twists in the Catalyst/Jacobus story (for background see these earlier posts ). Jacobus, now that their version of amifampridine (3,4-diaminopyridine) has been approved by the FDA, has announced their price for the drug. And it’s definitely not the price they had before, which was free to the few people who needed it, but it’s still below what Catalyst has been pr

7h

Forest schools: how climbing trees and making dens can help children develop resilience

Despite all the research that tells parents how good it is for their children to spend time playing outside, they are spending more time indoors than ever before. It seems that concerns about the dangers of climbing trees or getting lost means that many parents are nervous about allowing their children to engage in risky play.

7h

Living and breathing while Black: Racial profiling and other acts of violence

Recently, Shelby McPhee, a young Black male graduate student presenting at the largest Canadian academic gathering, the 88th annual Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences and held at the University of British Columbia, was stopped by two white delegates and accused of stealing a laptop. He was photographed and followed. Congr

7h

Understanding intolerance with a better research method

Intolerance has been one of the most discussed topics in Indonesia, a secular country with the world's biggest Muslim majority, due to a rise in cases of intolerance across the country.

7h

Softening the blow for hammerhead sharks and tropical hardwoods

What do spectacular sharks and a priceless tropical timber have in common? The answer is that they are in equally urgent need of conservation attention, and both stand to benefit from the intervention of the latest Conservation Leadership Programme (CLP) award winners.

7h

Secondhand horror: Indirect predator odor triggers reproductive changes in bank voles

The study of University of Jyväskylä and University of Vienna shows that voles are able to determine the difference between the smell of a predator, the smell of a non-stressed vole, and the smell of a vole who encountered a predator.

7h

Cooking vegetables: healthier with extra virgin olive oil

Cooking vegetables in the sofrito (sauté) with extra virgin olive oil favours the absorption and release of bioactive compounds of its traditional ingredients (garlic, onion and tomato), according to the study published in the journal Molecules about the role of gastronomy in the health-improving effects of the Mediterranean Diet.

7h

People with mobility issues set to benefit from wearable devices

Researchers at the University of Bristol are working on a project to develop wearable rehabilitative devices that can help disabled people sit, stand and walk in comfort.

7h

On your bike?

A James Cook University researcher says a lack of suitable roads is a big reason why cycling participation rates in Australia and Queensland are so low.

7h

New 'king' of fossils discovered in Australia

Fossils of a giant new species from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites have been found on Kangaroo Island, South Australia.

7h

Researcher identifies adjuvant that prevents vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease in RSV

A unique adjuvant, a substance that enhances the body's immune response to toxins and foreign matter, can prevent vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease, a sickness that has posed a major hurdle in vaccine development for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), according to a study led by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.

7h

Softening the blow for hammerhead sharks and tropical hardwoods

What do spectacular sharks and a priceless tropical timber have in common? The answer is that they are in equally urgent need of conservation attention, and both stand to benefit from the intervention of the latest Conservation Leadership Programme (CLP) award winners.

7h

Organisms aim to maximize inclusive fitness in order to pass genes to the next generation

New research might change our answer to the question: what goal are plants and animals adapted to achieve? Natural history documentaries marvel at the design-like features of animals: perfect camouflage, stunning speed, incredibly mimicry. The goal is surely survival, but "survival of the fittest" runs into problems for animals who sacrifice their own reproduction, and even lives, to help others.

7h

Researchers develop new method to rapidly, reliably monitor sickle cell disease

Sickle cell disease is a hereditary disorder that affects red blood cells, distorting their natural disc shape into a crescent moon or "sickle" shape. Normal red blood cells move freely through small vessels throughout the body to deliver oxygen. With sickle cell disease, the misshapen red blood cells become hard and sticky, making it difficult for them to move through blood vessels. They eventual

7h

New evidence suggests Scottish crannogs thousands of years older than thought

A pair of archaeologists, one with the University of Reading, the other the University of Southampton, has found evidence that suggests some crannogs in Scotland were built during the Neolithic period, several thousand years ago. The researchers, Duncan Garrow and Fraser Sturt, have written a paper about their findings published in Antiquity.

7h

How fish skins and algae could help solve the plastic pollution crisis

A University of Sussex student has taken inspiration from the seas to find a solution to the man-made plastic pollution contaminating the world's oceans.

7h

NOAA upgrades the U.S. global weather forecast model

NOAA's flagship weather model—the Global Forecast System (GFS)—is undergoing a significant upgrade today to include a new dynamical core called the Finite-Volume Cubed-Sphere (FV3). This upgrade will drive global numerical weather prediction into the future with improved forecasts of severe weather, winter storms, and tropical cyclone intensity and track.

7h

Carbon-neutral fuel made from sunlight and air

Researchers from ETH Zurich have developed a novel technology that produces liquid hydrocarbon fuels exclusively from sunlight and air. For the first time worldwide they demonstrate the entire thermochemical process chain under real field conditions. The new solar mini-refinery is located on the roof of ETH's Machine Laboratory building in Zurich.

7h

Experiencing corruption makes you more likely to protest against it… up to a point

Why do some people take to the streets to protest against corruption in their society.. and others don't? Researchers from the Centre for the Study of Corruption at the University of Sussex have found that people who experience corruption first hand are more likely to protest, but only up to the point where it becomes routine.

7h

Jupiter’s Moon Europa Has Right Kind of Saltwater to Support Life

Salt Juice Europa, the oceanic moon orbiting Jupiter that many hope harbors extraterrestrial life , could have a similar chemical composition in its oceans to Earth’s saltwater. Previous studies suggested that the water in Europa’s oceans contained salt made of sulfates. But now scientists who took a closer look with the Hubble Space Telescope think that the salt is sodium chloride, reports New S

7h

Organisms aim to maximize inclusive fitness in order to pass genes to the next generation

New research might change our answer to the question: what goal are plants and animals adapted to achieve? Natural history documentaries marvel at the design-like features of animals: perfect camouflage, stunning speed, incredibly mimicry. The goal is surely survival, but "survival of the fittest" runs into problems for animals who sacrifice their own reproduction, and even lives, to help others.

7h

Contraceptive injections do not increase risk of contracting HIV, study finds

Research also finds scale of crisis among African women higher than expected A landmark study has ended 30 years of anxiety that hormonal contraceptive injections may increase women’s chances of infection from HIV. But the study found a dramatically higher rate of HIV infection among women in southern Africa than was expected, which one leading campaigning organisation said signified a public hea

7h

How Much Nature Is Enough? 120 Minutes a Week, Doctors Say

Researchers have now quantified the ideal amount of time needed to reap the health benefits of the great outdoors.

7h

Two hours a week spent outdoors in nature linked with better health

Just 2 hours a week spent in nature, such as parks and woodlands, seems to be enough for people to feel healthier and happier

7h

Why old-school climate denial has had its day

The Coalition has been re-elected to government, and after six years in office it has not created any effective policies for reducing greenhouse emissions. Does that mean the Australian climate change debate is stuck in 2013? Not exactly.

7h

New nanosheet coating could replace nonrecyclable metalized films in food packaging

A team of researchers at the University of Oxford, in the U.K., has developed a new type of nanosheet coating for food packaging that could replace the metalized films currently in use. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their process and hopes that their product might make a whole class of food packing more recyclable.

7h

See how humans have redrawn Earth's biological map

Humans are rapidly changing the distinctive biodiversity that evolved in regions of the Earth over millions of years by introducing new species and wiping out others, a new study has shown.

7h

A new way to deliver light-sensitive drugs to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance

Queen's University researcher P. Andrew Evans has uncovered a new process to deliver antibiotics using pollen to shield them.

7h

See how humans have redrawn Earth's biological map

Humans are rapidly changing the distinctive biodiversity that evolved in regions of the Earth over millions of years by introducing new species and wiping out others, a new study has shown.

7h

Rare map found in an attic gives extraordinary glimpse into life in the 18th century

A rare map found in an attic gives an extraordinary glimpse into 18th century life in Exeter before radical changes to the landscape and industry transformed the city.

7h

Parents say their children have tutors to fill gaps, not to charge ahead

When you think about private tutoring, you might imagine parents striving to give their children a competitive edge. But many parents use tutoring to fill gaps in their child's schooling—such as to improve their literacy.

7h

Visualizing a quantum crystal: Imaging the electronic Wigner crystal in 1-D

When electrons that repel each other are confined to a small space, they can form an ordered crystalline state known as a Wigner crystal. Observing the fragile crystal is tricky, since it requires extreme conditions including low temperatures and densities, as well as noninvasive imaging probes. To overcome the challenging conditions of imaging, I. Shapir and a research team in the departments of

7h

Social worker's new book challenges resilience misconceptions

With his new book Change Your World: The Science of Resilience and the True Path to Success, Michael Ungar is challenging misconceptions around the worlds of self-help and resilience.

7h

Flies go all-in to overcome mitochondrial genetic mutation, reach adulthood

New research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has revealed how fruit fly larvae with a seemingly fatal flaw can survive and advance to adulthood.

7h

7h

Flies go all-in to overcome mitochondrial genetic mutation, reach adulthood

New research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has revealed how fruit fly larvae with a seemingly fatal flaw can survive and advance to adulthood.

7h

New application can detect Twitter bots in any language

Thanks to fruitful collaboration between language scholars and machine learning specialists, a new application developed by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Linnaeus University in Sweden can detect Twitter bots independent of the language used.

7h

Perfect diamagnetism observation of high-temperature superconductivity in compressed H2S

The research group of Prof. Tian Cui from Jilin University has made a breakthrough in fulfilling the perfect diamagnetism of sulfur hydride system under high pressure, using a highly sensitive magnetic susceptibility technique adapted for a megabar-pressure diamond anvil cell (DAC).

7h

Exercise may have different effects in the morning and evening

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have learned that the effect of exercise may differ depending on the time of day it is performed. In mice they demonstrate that exercise in the morning results in an increased metabolic response in skeletal muscle, while exercise later in the day increases energy expenditure for an extended period of time.

7h

Can break junction techniques still offer quantitative information at single-molecule level

A conductance histogram is plotted to find the most probable conductance. However, to which extent should we trust the obtained conductance? Can break junction techniques still offer quantitative information at single-molecule level in these systems? Here, an analytic model is established to describe the evolution of the conductance of a single molecule in break junction measurements and offers a

7h

New record: 3D-printed optical-electronic integration

In this work, researchers demonstrate an electrically modulated microlaser module on a 3D-integrated microsystem composed of a dye-doped polymeric microcavity and an underneath microscale electrical heating circuit. The lasing mode was modulated based on electrical heating-assisted thermo-optic response of the polymeric matrices, which were further fabricated into coupled microdisks, yielding wave

7h

Implanted drug 'reservoir' safely reduces injections for people with macular degeneration

In a clinical trial of 220 people with 'wet' age-related macular degeneration, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, collaborators from many sites across the country, and Genentech in South San Francisco have added to evidence that using a new implant technology that continuously delivers medication into the eyes is safe and effective in helping maintain vision and reduces the need for injections in

7h

Researchers develop new method to rapidly, reliably monitor sickle cell disease

Researchers have developed a rapid and reliable new method to continuously monitor sickle cell disease using a microfluidics-based electrical impedance sensor. This novel technology can characterize the dynamic cell sickling and unsickling processes in sickle blood without the use of microscopic imaging or biochemical markers. The technology is being developed with the hope of providing patients w

7h

Financial vulnerability may discourage positive negotiation strategies

People who feel financially vulnerable may be prone to believing incorrectly their success in negotiations must come at the expense of the other party, leading them to ignore the potential for more cooperative and mutually beneficial options, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

7h

Lower risk of Type 1 diabetes seen in children vaccinated against 'stomach flu' virus

Vaccinating babies against a virus that causes childhood 'stomach flu' greatly reduces their chance of getting so sick that they need hospital care, a new study shows. But the study also reveals a surprise: Getting fully vaccinated against rotavirus in the first months of life is associated with a lower risk of developing Type 1 diabetes later on.

7h

Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing

Spending at least two hours a week in nature may be a crucial threshold for promoting health and wellbeing, according to a new large-scale study.

7h

Braces won't always bring happiness

Research undertaken at the University of Adelaide overturns the belief that turning your crooked teeth into a beautiful smile will automatically boost your self-confidence.

7h

A new way to deliver light-sensitive drugs to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance

Queen's University researcher P. Andrew Evans has uncovered a new process to deliver antibiotics using pollen to shield them.

7h

How a 'repair economy' creates a better community

John switches on the power saw he's bought secondhand on eBay. The machine "arcs—shooting out a visible electric charge. So he takes it apart to investigate. He identifies the problem: the field coil, a current-carrying component that generates an electric field. Once fixed, the saw works as new.

7h

Research examines intent behind Facebook posts

Why do we share posts on Facebook?

7h

Simplified, enhanced performance prediction for complex systems

Researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory developed a novel design and training strategy for reversible ResNets that reduces the dimensionality of high-dimensional machine learning models for complex physical systems.

7h

New economic study shows combination of SNAP and WIC improves food security

Forty million Americans, including 6.5 million children, are food insecure, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which means they do not have enough food for an active, healthy life.

7h

New statistical formulas for assigning sex to fossils

The CENIEH researcher Adrián Pablos is co-author of a paper which offers a methodology for assigning the sex to fossils of Homo sapiens and opens up the possibility of applying it to species other than our own, as well as in forensic contexts for the identification of individuals.

7h

Determining the Earth's gravity field more accurately than ever before

The Earth's gravity fluctuates from place to place. Geodesists use this phenomenon to observe geodynamic and climatological processes. Using satellite-supported recordings, they document the strong fluctuations and the associated spatial and seasonal distributions of mass on and in the Earth. From this, gravity field models can be calculated by which researchers can track rising sea levels or melt

7h

Creatives in the country? Blockchain and agtech can create unexpected jobs in regional Australia

Digital technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics are said to make many jobs redundant due to automation. BeefLedger, a QUT research project with a focus on blockchain and agtech (agricultural technology), tells a different story. It turns out the project generates jobs not usually associated with rural and regional Australia.

7h

Despite positive trends, women remain underrepresented in animation

A new study examines the ecosystem of the animation industry and finds pluses and minuses for women in the field.

7h

Online gambling: Children among easy prey for advertisers who face few sanctions

With concerns growing that children and vulnerable people are being targeted by rogue online gambling advertising, my new research suggests the current sanctions aren't enough to change the practices of online advertisers.

7h

Fortnite urged to stop letting players climb electric poles

Epic Games told its hit video game 'encourages players to perform life-threatening activities'

7h

Best Bike Accessories (2019): Helmets, Tools, Apparel, e-Bikes

We tested 11 biking accessories (and one e-bike) that make pedaling more pleasant.

7h

Estimate the Energy of an Utterly Massive Wind Turbine

The Hornsea Wind Farm is expected to be the largest offshore wind farm in the world. Here's how much energy is generated from one rotation of a turbine.

7h

The Glorious Scale of the NBA Finals' Game 5

Game 6 tips off tonight, but for a brief moment earlier this week, it looked as though the the Warriors' reign might already be over.

7h

FEFU scientists to broaden ideas about reactive sintering of transparent ceramics

Green bodies' porous structure, i.e. mesostructure, affects dramatically the functional parameters of the optical ceramics obtained by reactive sintering. Characteristics of the mesostructure are proposed to regulate by pre-annealing of green bodies at temperatures below the phase formation and consolidation. The approach was presented in the article published in Journal of the European Ceramic So

7h

Determining risk of recurrence in triple-negative breast cancer

A personalized prognosis for patients diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer was the goal of a new study by Katherine Varley, Ph.D., researcher at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) and assistant professor of oncological sciences at the University of Utah.

7h

Clues to side effect may prolong prostate cancer survival

Scientists believe they’ve figured out why a common drug for late-stage prostate cancer often loses effectiveness and can even make things worse. The drug, enzalutamide, stops working after four or five months and appears to have a dual function that later turns the cancer into a relentless aggressor. The new research indicates how to block the harmful side effects of the drug, at least in mice.

8h

The Irrepressible Emotion of Lee Krasner

In 1959, Lee Krasner was in crisis. She was still mourning her husband—who’d died in a car crash three years earlier—when her mother died, compounding her grief. An exhibition of her work planned by the critic Clement Greenberg had been canceled when Greenberg decided he didn’t appreciate her newer paintings. Plagued by insomnia, Krasner began painting at night in her husband’s old studio, and si

8h

Politikere er uenige om millionlønninger til læger

Mens SF's sundhedsordfører forarges over lægers millionlønninger, er det ikke noget, der får Dansk Folkeparti til at rynke brynene. Det skal vi ikke gå op i, mener Liselott Blixt.

8h

Depo-Provera, an Injectable Contraceptive, Does Not Raise H.I.V. Risk

The hormone shot — popular among African women who must use birth control in secret — is as safe as other methods, scientists reported.

8h

Climate’s role in armed conflict will likely increase

Intensifying climate change will increase the future risk of violent armed conflict within countries, according to a new study. Synthesizing views across experts, the study in Nature estimates climate has influenced between 3 percent and 20 percent of armed conflict risk over the last century and that the influence will likely increase dramatically. In a scenario with 4 degrees Celsius of warming

8h

The Lancet: First randomised trial finds no substantial difference in risk of acquiring HIV for three different forms of contraception

A randomised trial of more than 7,800 African women found that a type of contraceptive injection (intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone acetate — DMPA-IM) posed no substantially increased risk of HIV acquisition when compared with a copper intrauterine device (IUD) and a levonorgestrel (LNG) implant. The results of this first ever randomised trial in the area, published in The Lancet, counter 3

8h

GSK links up with US university on genome research

Drugmaker will fund 20 scientists in rare partnership with University of CaliforniaS

8h

Harvesters of light

They fan out into lily-pad-shaped disks, branch haphazardly like the antlers of deer, and hold fast to the sea floor in squat little spheres. Corals come in many shapes and sizes—and this diversity in form is driven by sunlight.

8h

New 'king' of fossils discovered on Kangaroo Island

Fossils of a giant new species from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites have been found on Kangaroo Island, South Australia.

8h

Gut microbes react to a meal — but have no use for nutrition labels

Nature, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01850-y Changes in microbial populations are more closely associated with food type than the nutrient profile listed on the packet.

8h

Harvesters of light

They fan out into lily-pad-shaped disks, branch haphazardly like the antlers of deer, and hold fast to the sea floor in squat little spheres. Corals come in many shapes and sizes—and this diversity in form is driven by sunlight.

8h

For food security, SNAP and WIC aren’t redundant

New research provides evidence that two food assistance programs, SNAP and WIC, are in fact complementary, not redundant. Forty million Americans, including 6.5 million children, are food insecure, according to the US Department of Agriculture, which means they do not have enough food for an active, healthy life. Many rely on SNAP (the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program)—the largest food a

8h

Elephants walk more direct paths under risk of poaching

Elephants move faster and straighter when moving through risky areas, researchers have discovered, meandering more when safer.

8h

Verdens energiforbrug og CO2-udledning accelererede i 2018

Efterspørgslen efter energi steg i 2018 hurtigere end på noget tidspunkt siden 2010/11, fremgår det af oliegiganten BP's årlige energirapport.

8h

Chinese tombs yield earliest evidence of cannabis use

Researchers uncover the earliest known evidence of cannabis use, from tombs in western China.

8h

Mindre risk för tarmcancer i norra Sverige

– Vi vet inte exakt vad skillnaden beror på, men det kan handla om att många i Norrland har levt ett i vissa avseenden hälsosammare liv som delvis kompenserar för vissa andra riskfaktorer, säger Olle Sjöström, doktorand vid Umeå universitet. I sin avhandling vid Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper visar Olle Sjöström att risken för kolorektalcancer, det vill säga cancer i tjocktarm eller ändt

8h

Gammalt bröd blir nya textilier

– Vi har sett att mycket av matavfallet från livsmedelsbutiker är bröd och därför ville vi se hur vi kunde omvandla det till en ny produkt, säger Akram Zamani. Försöken går ut på att odla fintrådiga svampar på brödavfall i behållare och förhoppningen är att svampen ska kunna omvandlas och användas till kläder, medicinska applikationer eller möbeltextilier. – När brödet har blivit en biomassa av s

8h

Elephants walk more direct paths under risk of poaching

Elephants move faster and straighter when moving through risky areas, researchers have discovered, meandering more when safer.

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Solar activity forecast for next decade favorable for exploration

The last astronauts of the Apollo program were lucky. Not just because they were chosen to fly to the moon, but because they missed some really bad weather en route. This wasn't a hurricane or heat wave, but space weather—the term for radiation in the solar system, much of which is released by the sun. In August 1972, right in between the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions, a solar storm occurred se

8h

Why do massive (and not-so-massive) stars form?

The Milky Way Project: Probing Star Formation with a New Yellowball Catalog presents a study of 518 infant star-forming regions known as "Yellowballs," drawn from a catalog made possible by the efforts of citizen scientists. The Milky Way Project is one of roughly 100 research initiatives in Zooniverse, the world's largest online platform for citizen science. During 2016-2017, citizen scientists i

8h

NASA's Mars 2020 will blaze a trail for humans

When a female astronaut first sets foot on the moon in 2024, the historic moment will represent a step toward another NASA first: eventually putting humans on Mars. NASA's latest robotic mission to the Red Planet, Mars 2020, aims to help future astronauts brave that inhospitable landscape.

8h

It’s 2016 All Over Again

By this point, no one should be more alert to the danger of accepting campaign help from a foreign power than President Donald Trump. Special Counsel Robert Mueller looked hard at whether top Trump-campaign officials, including the president’s eldest son, had broken the law when they met with a Russian lawyer promising dirt on Hillary Clinton. Mueller ultimately decided that he couldn’t prove a c

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What Lies Beneath

Hokyoung Kim On the shores of Kamilo Point, in Hawaii, geologists have identified a new kind of stone. A sediment of recent history, the agglutinated rock displays milky-blue flecks, iotas of dull green, and fibrous orange twists. It is known, because of its unique properties, as “plastiglomerate.” That the name grinds together two familiar-sounding words is a clue to the stone’s qualities as an

8h

23% of young black women now identify as bisexual

Since 1972, social scientists have studied the General Social Survey to chart the complexities of social change in the United States. The survey, which is conducted every couple years, asks respondents their attitudes on topics ranging from race relations to drug use. In 2008, the survey started including a question on sexual identity. As sociologists who study sexuality, we've noticed how more a

8h

This psychologist explains why people confess to crimes they didn’t commit

Ingenious experiments have shown how standard police questioning applies psychological pressure

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There is No One Energy Solution

This is part 3 of my informal series about our energy infrastructure. My last post was about addressing concerns about nuclear energy, but really can only be understood in the context of our overall energy plan. The comments have been quite fruitful, and I would like to thank all the commenters who provided useful resources for further information, much of which I will synthesize here. That was e

8h

Moon maps, lunar origins and everything between

The moon's consistent appearance in the sky each night may lull earthlings into a sense of familiarity, but the moon is actually a puzzling place. It lacks an atmosphere and is bone-dry; it can hardly claim a central iron core; and it has a lightweight crust that is chemically similar to Earth.

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National MagLab creates world-record magnetic field with small, compact coil

A novel magnet half the size of a cardboard toilet tissue roll usurped the title of "world's strongest magnetic field" from the metal titan that had held it for two decades at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory.

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The Most Delicious Foods Will Fall Victim to Climate Change

Author Amanda Little explains why high-nutrient, high-flavor crops are the most likely to suffer in a less predictable environment.

8h

Review: Eufy's RoboVac 11S Max Cleans Up for Cheap

Eufy’s robot vacuum is small, affordable, and attractive—but bounce navigation is a pain in the butt.

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Send thank-you notes to those who help you along the way

Nature, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01879-z Encouraging a culture of appreciation not only makes for a more pleasant working environment, it can also advance your career, says Abdullah Shihipar.

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When fighting lice, focus on kids’ heads, not hats or toys

Learning a little about lice makes for a more efficient battle against the bugs.

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Image of the Day: Holey Leaves

Scientists use microneedle patches to extract DNA for diagnosing diseases in plants.

8h

Drug makes tumors more susceptible to chemo

Many chemotherapy drugs kill cancer cells by severely damaging their DNA. However, some tumors can withstand this damage by relying on a DNA repair pathway that not only allows them to survive, but also introduces mutations that helps cells become resistant to future treatment. Researchers at MIT and Duke University have now discovered a potential drug compound that can block this repair pathway.

8h

Soon, air pollution could be measured on every street corner

Air pollution is responsible for 550,000 premature deaths a year in Europe and 7 million worldwide, according to the WHO. Measuring it can be a challenge, however, as the equipment tends to be large and expensive. But soon, this may change, thanks to a small, optical nanosensor developed at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, which can be mounted onto an ordinary streetlight.

8h

Solving the mystery of why atmospheric carbon dioxide was lower during ice ages

Since scientists first determined that atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) was significantly lower during ice age periods than warm phases, they have sought to discover why, theorizing that it may be a function of ocean circulation, sea ice, iron-laden dust or temperature.

8h

Those who live longer have fewer children

A long life and lots of children—that was quite a common aspiration until not so long ago. But the world of animals reveals that high fertility and longevity are often mutually exclusive: Particularly animals with shorter lifespans are often very fertile while animals that live longer frequently produce fewer offspring. It seems that organisms with limited resources can be either long-lived or ver

8h

Those who live longer have fewer children

A long life and lots of children—that was quite a common aspiration until not so long ago. But the world of animals reveals that high fertility and longevity are often mutually exclusive: Particularly animals with shorter lifespans are often very fertile while animals that live longer frequently produce fewer offspring. It seems that organisms with limited resources can be either long-lived or ver

8h

Breathing new life into dye-sensitized solar cells

Researchers at the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences at Kyoto University have made a popular type of dye-sensitized solar cell more efficient by adjusting and updating its structure. Published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS), the team report a series of adaptations with a power conversion efficiency of 10.7 percent, the highest yet for this kind of dye-sensitiz

9h

The entire sky in X-rays

The small fleet of X-ray space scouts will soon be expanded to include a flagship. On 21 June 2019, the German telescope eRosita will launch from the Russian Baikonur space-port into space. On a platform on board the Proton M launcher, there is a Russian telescope called Art-XC alongside eRosita. The main goal of the eRosita mission—developed and built by a consortium of German institutes led by t

9h

New 'king' of fossils discovered on Kangaroo Island

Fossils of a giant new species from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites have been found on Kangaroo Island, South Australia.

9h

Google is ending the integration between Drive and Photos

Google says the Drive and Photos integration is "confusing," so now it's dead.

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Mapping our global human footprint

The number of people flocking to cities in search of employment and better prospects is growing at an unprecedented rate. By 2050, the global population is estimated to reach nine billion, 70% of which will be living in urban areas. The World Settlement Footprint 2015 (WSF-2015) is the first map, using mass collections of radar and optical satellite imagery, to provide a global overview of the wor

9h

Researchers create uniform-shape polymer nanocrystals

A team of researchers from the University of Konstanz has demonstrated a new aqueous polymerization procedure for generating polymer nanoparticles with a single chain and uniform shape, which, by contrast to previous methods, involves high particle concentrations. A corresponding paper titled "Uniform shape monodisperse single chain nanocrystals by living aqueous catalytic polymerization" is set f

9h

Small currents for big gains in spintronics

University of Tokyo researchers have created an electronic component that demonstrates functions and abilities important to future generations of computational logic and memory devices. It is between one and two orders of magnitude more power efficient than previous attempts to create a component with the same kind of behavior. This could have applications in the emerging field of spintronics.

9h

Ljud, bild och kroppar i samspel på arenakonserter

I sin avhandling utvecklar och använder Olga Nikolaeva en ny metod för analys av liveframträdanden av rockmusik. Hon fokuserar på tre specifika konserter med avancerad videoteknik och liveframträdanden som har byggt på ett komplext samspel mellan framträdandet på scenen och det visuella innehållet på skärmarna; Ange l av det brittiska bandet Depeche Mode, The Handler av brittiska bandet Muse och

9h

Warming waters in western tropical Pacific may affect West Antarctic Ice Sheet

Warming waters in the western tropical Pacific Ocean have significantly increased thunderstorms and rainfall, which may affect the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and global sea-level rise, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study.

9h

Greenland map captures changing Arctic in fine detail

The British Antarctic Survey produces an exquisite new printed sheet map of Greenland and the European Arctic.

9h

Ny flise køler storbyens varmeøer

I Danmarks hedeste kommune eksperimenterer man med alternative metoder til at dæmpe temperaturen på tæt befolkede arealer. Et af midlerne er en flise, der har en række positive klima- og miljøeffekter.

9h

This Strange Rock Formed on Mars Billions of Years Ago, Possibly from an Explosive Eruption

This is one of the most tangible pieces of evidence yet for the idea that explosive volcanism was more common on early Mars.

9h

Forskere vil knække koden for medicinsk behandling af skizofreni

Det skal være langt lettere for læger at finde den rette medicin til patienter med skizofreni – sådan lyder formålet med et nyt dansk forskningsprojekt. Lundbeckfonden skyder 1,6 mio. kr. i projektet.

9h

Race Matters to the Health of African-American Men

The recent, premature death of director John Singleton is a tragic case in point — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

An X-Ray Showing 100 Bubble Tea Pearls in a Teen's Abdomen Has Doctors Very Confused

Although bubble tea pearls could indeed cause constipation, it's unclear how they could show up on a CT scan, experts say.

9h

Why We Keep Playing the Lottery – Issue 73: Play

To grasp how unlikely it was for Gloria C. MacKenzie, an 84-year-old Florida widow, to have won the $590 million Powerball lottery in 2013, Robert Williams, a professor of health sciences at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, offers this scenario: head down to your local convenience store, slap $2 on the counter, and fill out a six-numbered Powerball ticket. It will take you about 10 second

9h

Let’s Play War – Issue 73: Play

In the spring of 1964, as fighting escalated in Vietnam, several dozen Americans gathered to play a game. They were some of the most powerful men in Washington: the director of Central Intelligence, the Army chief of staff, the national security advisor, and the head of the Strategic Air Command. Senior officials from the State Department and the Navy were also on hand. Players were divided into

9h

WeChat Is Watching – Issue 73: Play

It’s 9 a.m. on a typical morning in Chengdu and I’m awakened by the sound of my phone alarm. The phone is in my study, connected to my bedroom by sliding doors. I turn off the alarm, pick up my phone, and, like millions of people in China, the first thing I do is check my WeChat. At 9:07, I send my first message of the day. WeChat, the brainchild of Tencent—one of China’s big three tech giants—is

9h

The Newest Haven for Cryptocurrency Companies? Wyoming

The nation's least-populous state has enacted 13 laws in the past two years to welcome blockchain and cryptocurrency companies.

9h

20 Last-Minute Father's Day Gift Ideas and Deals (2019)

Whether you just forgot or procrastinated, don't worry. We found some great last-minute deals on gifts Dad will love.

9h

Race Matters to the Health of African-American Men

The recent, premature death of director John Singleton is a tragic case in point — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Er jaguaren køretøj eller kattedyr? Algoritmer pulser CO2 ud for at forstå vores sprog

PLUS. Når forskere i maskinlæring og algoritmer verden over udvikler deres algoritmer, sker det med en enorm mængde beregninger og et tilsvarende stort el-forbrug.

10h

Ecological Detectives Hunt for San Francisco's Vanished Waterways

Recovering “ghost creeks” from past landscapes can help protect the city’s future amid climate chaos — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Phase 3 topline data for ULTOMIRIS® (ravulizumab) in aHUS presented at ERA-EDTA Congress

Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the first conference presentation of the topline Phase 3 data for ULTOMIRIS® (ravulizumab), the first and only long-acting C5 complement inhibitor administered every eight weeks, in adult patients with atypical hemolytic syndrome (aHUS). The previously announced data will be presented at the Annual Congress of the European Renal Association — European

10h

Ecological Detectives Hunt for San Francisco's Vanished Waterways

Recovering “ghost creeks” from past landscapes can help protect the city’s future amid climate chaos — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Undervandsrobot skal trække energi ud af fiskelort

Den amerikanske flåde tester mikrobiel brændselscelle, der kan oplade batteriet på undervandsrobot ved hjælp af sedimenter på havbunden.

10h

EU-valet var 28 olika nationella val

Fler än 70 forskare verksamma vid ett 50-tal lärosäten runtom i Europa har samarbetat kring analyser och reflektioner, i EU-valsrapporten Euroflections. − Den viktigaste övergripande slutsatsen är att valet till Europaparlamentet är att betrakta som 28 olika nationella val snarare än ett övergripande europeiskt val. Det blir tydligt när vi sammanställer de analyser och rapporter som våra forskark

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Bøvl med firewall sendte DMI til tælling under uvejr

Problemer med en firewall gav nedbrud på DMI's app og hjemmeside under uvejr.

10h

Warming waters in western tropical Pacific may affect West Antarctic Ice Sheet

Warming waters in the western tropical Pacific Ocean have significantly increased thunderstorms and rainfall, which may affect the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and global sea-level rise, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study.

10h

CNIO researchers find effective drug combinations for glioblastoma in mice

Glioblastoma is a brain tumour with very poor prognosis. Patients with glioblastoma usually develop resistance to treatments. Combination therapy could be an effective approach.The study carried out at CNIO provides unexpected and valuable information on cancer biology. It revealed that components in the RAS pathway, which is involved in numerous types of cancer, also participates in telomere main

10h

University of California CRISPR researchers form drug discovery alliance with pharma giant

Two academic lab chiefs are forming a new lab with GlaxoSmithKline to use the genome editor to find novel drug targets

10h

No, You’re Not Addicted to Social Media

Whereas addiction is something people experience mostly as individuals, social norms — the invisible rules that guide our social interactions — are shared mental states shaped by the views and beliefs of a societal majority. But with appropriate interventions, social norms can be swiftly overturned.

10h

Welfare Money Is Paying for a Lot of Things Besides Welfare

What do a Christian overnight camp, abstinence-only sex education, and pro-marriage advertisements all have in common? They’ve all been funded with money that used to provide cash assistance to low-income families. In the United States, the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program—often known simply as “welfare”—is administered by the 50 states, which have considerable leeway in ho

10h

Sanders’s Speech About Socialism Was Deeply Unserious

All four of my grandparents were sent to prison for their socialist convictions at some point in the 1920s or 1930s. When I was growing up in Europe, democratic countries from France to Italy were ruled by self-declared socialists. As a young activist in the Jusos, the youth organization of Germany’s Social Democratic Party, I sang along wholeheartedly when my comrades would intone “The Internati

10h

The Reinvention of Danville’s Downtown: Part 1

Factory towns face problems when the factories shut down. Everyone has heard versions of that story—involving steel and auto plants in the Midwest, sawmills in the Northwest, coal mines in Appalachia or copper mines in the Southwest, other facilities in other towns. On a recent visit to Southside Virginia—the part of the state bordering North Carolina, and far from the tech-and-government-driven

10h

Public health journal retracts paper on austerity for “inaccurate and misleading results”

The American Journal of Public Health has retracted a controversial 2018 paper on the effects of economic austerity in Spain because it contained “inaccurate and misleading” results linking those policies to a massive spike in premature deaths. The journal also has published a second piece, by a different group of authors, refuting the central claim … Continue reading Public health journal retract

10h

Some Canadian lakes still store DDT in their mud

Yesterday’s DDT pollution crisis is still today’s problem in some of Canada’s lakes.

10h

Overvågningskameraer med ansigtsgenkendelse skal standse karantæneramte brøndbyfans

Det nye system baserer sig på fodboldklubbens interne karantæneliste, som bliver opdateret før hver kamp. Ifølge Brøndby IF er det kun gæster, der optræder på karantænelisten, som vil blive genkendt og registreret i systemet.

10h

Amazon boosts its UK grocery delivery service

Amazon's UK fresh food delivery service is rolling out to a number of new cities, including Glasgow, Newcastle and Liverpool. Rounding out the list is Sheffield and Portsmouth …

11h

Minnen kan hindra en saklig bedömning

Bedömningar i vitt skilda sammanhang är något vi gör varje dag, ofta utan att närmare reflektera över att det är just det vi gör. Men det har doktoranden Sara Stillesjö gjort, och med hjälp av funktionell hjärnavbildning, fMRI, och kognitiv modellering studerat hur den mänskliga hjärnan arbetar vid bedömningar. Studien visar att minnen av tidigare händelser kan vara något vi alltid påverkas av nä

11h

Torsken i Östersjön är nära en kollaps

Ska torskbestånden kunna återuppbyggas krävs ett helhetsgrepp från förvaltningen, och en större förståelse för det komplexa ekologiska pusslet i Östersjön. Det konstaterar forskare från Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU, i en populärvetenskaplig artikel i tidskriften Fauna och Flora . I Östersjön finns det två bestånd av torsk: det västra och det östra. Båda bestånden mår dåligt, men mest kritis

11h

Tailoring sodium intercalation in graphite for high energy and power sodium ion batteries

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10551-z Graphite is a promising anode material for sodium-ion batteries but suffers from the high co-intercalation potential. Here, the authors examine the factors influencing this potential and tailor the stability of graphite intercalation compound, realizing high energy and power densities.

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Environmental pH and peptide signaling control virulence of Streptococcus pyogenes via a quorum-sensing pathway

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10556-8 The mechanism by which environmental pH controls the virulence of the pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes is unclear. Here, Do et al. show that changes in pH affect the activity of the virulence regulator RopB via its interaction with a quorum-sensing peptide signal.

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Coherent diffractive imaging of microtubules using an X-ray laser

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10448-x XFEL radiation is providing new opportunities for probing biological systems. Here the authors perform nanoscale x-ray imaging of microtubules with helical symmetry, by using imaging sorting and reconstruction techniques.

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Sustainable and recyclable super engineering thermoplastic from biorenewable monomer

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10582-6 Super engineering plastics that utilise bio-derived cyclic monomers rarely offer the same thermal/mechanical properties, scalability and recyclability as petrochemical derived plastics. Here the authors use a phase transfer catalyst to synthesise a transparent, recyclable and tough isosorbide-based polymer with

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COMPASS for rapid combinatorial optimization of biochemical pathways based on artificial transcription factors

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10224-x Metabolic engineering requires the balancing of gene expression to obtain optimal output. Here the authors present COMPASS – COMbinatorial Pathway ASSembly – which uses plant-derived artificial transcription factors and cloning of thousands of DNA constructs in parallel to rapidly optimise pathways.

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The prion-like domain of Drosophila Imp promotes axonal transport of RNP granules in vivo

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10554-w The physiological role of prion-like domains (PLDs) within RNA-binding proteins is not well understood. Here, authors show in Drosophila that the PLD in the protein Imp is required for localization of ribonucleoprotein granules to axons and axonal remodelling.

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An integrative climate change vulnerability index for Arctic aviation and marine transportation

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10347-1 It is important to understand how physical changes in Polar regions influence social systems and populations. Here the authors develop an Arctic Climate Change Vulnerability Index focusing on aviation and marine infrastructure in future climate scenarios and show that transportation system vulnerability varies a

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Atomic-scale mapping of hydrophobic layers on graphene and few-layer MoS2 and WSe2 in water

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10740-w Interfacial water plays a crucial role in mediating hydrophobic interactions. Here, the authors directly image the interfacial water organization in graphene, few-layer MoS2 and WSe2 through 3D-AFM technique to unveil that the distance between adjacent layers is about 0.30 nm larger than theoretically predicted

11h

Bastion of Anti-Vaccine Fervor: Progressive Waldorf Schools

Opposition to vaccines on the left is increasingly worrying the authorities. At one progressive school, 60 percent of the 300 students were not vaccinated against measles and other diseases.

11h

Study shows 'safety bubble' expands during third trimester

New research, published in the journal Scientific Reports, shows that women undergo a significant mental as well as physical change during the late stages of pregnancy.

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University of Konstanz researchers create uniform-shape polymer nanocrystals

Researchers from the University of Konstanz's Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1214 'Anisotropic Particles as Building Blocks: Tailoring Shape, Interactions and Structures' successfully generate uniform-shape nanocrystals using direct polymerization

11h

Small currents for big gains in spintronics

UTokyo researchers have created an electronic component that demonstrates functions and abilities important to future generations of computational logic and memory devices. It is between one and two orders of magnitude more power efficient than previous attempts to create a component with the same kind of behavior. This fact could help it realize developments in the emerging field of spintronics.

11h

Enhanced human Blood-Brain Barrier Chip performs in vivo-like drug and antibody transport

A team at Harvard's Wyss Institute has leveraged its microfluidic Organs-on-Chips technology in combination with a developmentally-inspired hypoxia-mimicking approach to differentiate human pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs). The resulting 'hypoxia-enhanced BBB Chip' recapitulates cellular organization, tight barrier functions and transport abilities o

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Binding and Flip as Initial Steps for BP-100 Antimicrobial Actions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45075-5 Binding and Flip as Initial Steps for BP-100 Antimicrobial Actions

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Precisely Endowing Colloidal Particles with Silica Branches

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44742-x Precisely Endowing Colloidal Particles with Silica Branches

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The purinergic receptor antagonist oxidized adenosine triphosphate suppresses immune-mediated corneal allograft rejection

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44973-y The purinergic receptor antagonist oxidized adenosine triphosphate suppresses immune-mediated corneal allograft rejection

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Grain Boundary Interfaces Controlled by Reduced Graphene Oxide in Nonstoichiometric SrTiO3-δ Thermoelectrics

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45162-7 Grain Boundary Interfaces Controlled by Reduced Graphene Oxide in Nonstoichiometric SrTiO 3-δ Thermoelectrics

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A Scoring System with High-Resolution Computed Tomography to Predict Drug-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Development and Internal Validation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45063-9 A Scoring System with High-Resolution Computed Tomography to Predict Drug-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Development and Internal Validation

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Plasmofluidic Microlenses for Label-Free Optical Sorting of Exosomes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44801-3 Plasmofluidic Microlenses for Label-Free Optical Sorting of Exosomes

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A rapid method for measuring serum oxidized albumin in a rat model of proteinuria and hypertension

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45134-x A rapid method for measuring serum oxidized albumin in a rat model of proteinuria and hypertension

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Vascular tortuosity of the internal carotid artery is related to the RNF213 c.14429G > A variant in moyamoya disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45141-y Vascular tortuosity of the internal carotid artery is related to the RNF213 c.14429G > A variant in moyamoya disease

11h

Buttigieg Backs a Future Criminal Investigation Into Trump

If Pete Buttigieg beats Donald Trump in 2020, he’d support a criminal investigation into the former president. “To the extent that there’s an obstruction case, then yes, DOJ’s got to deal with it,” the South Bend, Indiana, mayor said yesterday, during a meeting with Atlantic editors and reporters. Citing Gerald Ford’s pardon of Richard Nixon after Watergate, Buttigieg said he would not be interes

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Inside the DNC’s Two-Year Mission to Fix the Presidential Debates

Democratic Party organizers have an enormous field of candidates to wrangle, and the ghosts of 2016 are haunting their every move. Next month will mark three years since a Russian email hack humiliated and forced out then–Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz in the middle of a presidential election. Now, as the DNC seeks to find a nominee to challenge President Donald

11h

Women are better than men at remembering words and faces

A new meta-analysis of over 600 studies has found that women are better than men at recalling certain types of memories, such as verbal information.

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Bill Gates just backed a chip startup that uses light to turbocharge AI

Luminous Computing has developed an optical microchip that runs AI models much faster than other semiconductors while using less power.

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Federal Grants Restricted To Fighting Opioids Miss The Mark, States Say

The U.S. government has doled out at least $2.4 billion in state grants since 2017, specifically targeting the opioid epidemic. Yet drug abuse problems seldom involve only one substance. (Image credit: Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP)

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Enhanced human Blood-Brain Barrier Chip performs in vivo-like drug and antibody transport

Like airport security barriers that either clear authorized travelers or block unauthorized travelers and their luggage from accessing central operation areas, the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) tightly controls the transport of essential nutrients and energy metabolites into the brain and staves off unwanted substances circulating in the blood stream. Importantly, it's highly organized structure of th

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Video: Her sætter Volkswagens elektriske sportsvogn rekord på Nürburgring

Volkswagen ID.R har slået den elektriske rekord på den eftertragtede Nürburgring. Og det med hele 40 sekunder.

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Enhanced human Blood-Brain Barrier Chip performs in vivo-like drug and antibody transport

Like airport security barriers that either clear authorized travelers or block unauthorized travelers and their luggage from accessing central operation areas, the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) tightly controls the transport of essential nutrients and energy metabolites into the brain and staves off unwanted substances circulating in the blood stream. Importantly, it's highly organized structure of th

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Zebras' stripes could be used to control their temperature, reveals new study

New research published in the Journal of Natural History indicates that zebras' stripes are used to control body temperature after all—and reveals for the first time a new mechanism for how this may be achieved.

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Zebras' stripes could be used to control their temperature, reveals new study

New research published in the Journal of Natural History indicates that zebras' stripes are used to control body temperature after all—and reveals for the first time a new mechanism for how this may be achieved.

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Video I made about the amygdala

submitted by /u/porterrossi [link] [comments]

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NASA renames street for 'hidden' black women mathematicians

NASA has renamed the street outside its Washington headquarters to honor three black female mathematicians whose pioneering work on the agency's early space program was chronicled in the film "Hidden Figures".

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More research monkeys retire when studies finish

Izzle, Timon, Batman, River and Mars spent years confined to inside of a lab, their lives devoted to being tested for the benefit of human health.

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