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nyheder2019juni14

Gun violence lower in states that require licenses, study finds

The paper was published by the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research. It shows how states with gun licensing laws have relatively lower gun violence than states with lax gun laws. Most Americans said they'd support stricter background checks for prospective gun buyers, with about 75% saying they'd also support gun licensing laws. None Gun violence is lower in U.S. states where people m

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Cellebrite Now Says It Can Unlock Any iPhone for Cops

In a strangely public product announcement, the phone-cracking firm revealed a powerful new device.

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'Power shift' needed to improve gender balance in energy research

Women still face significant barriers in forging successful and influential careers in UK energy research, a new high-level report has revealed.

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Special fibroblasts help pancreatic cancer cells evade immune detection

A subpopulation of fibroblasts called apCAFs can interact with the immune system to help pancreatic cancer cells avoid detection. Understanding how they work can be key in developing therapeutics for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

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Forskere fra KU vil finde opskriften på bæredygtige superafgrøder

Behovet for at producere fødevarer på en smartere måde end i dag bliver mere og mere kritisk…

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'Power shift' needed to improve gender balance in energy research, report says

Women still face significant barriers in forging successful and influential careers in UK energy research, a new high-level report has revealed.

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Light Pollution From Satellites Will Get Worse. But How Much?

An artist's depiction of space junk. (Credit: ESA) SpaceX’s ambitious Starlink project could eventually launch more than 10,000 satellites into orbit and rewrite the future of the internet. But Elon Musk’s company has been taking heat from the astronomical community after an initial launch in late May released the first 60 satellites. The 500 pound (227 kg) satellites were clearly visible in Earth

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Human Skull Trophies Help Uncover the Maya's Mysterious Collapse

Temple 1 at the ancient Maya city of Tikal in Guatemala. (Credit: Rob Crandall/Shutterstock) Two trophy skulls, recently discovered by archaeologists in the jungles of Belize, may help shed light on the little-understood collapse of the once powerful Classic Maya civilization. The defleshed and painted human skulls, meant to be worn around the neck as pendants, were buried with a warrior over a th

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Plastic pollution: Bangor divers cleaning up the seabed

A group of divers are taking beach clean ups to the next level by diving for litter under water.

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Listen to the soothing sounds of an explosive ASMR experiment

Jacob Strickling, an Australian science teacher, has ASMR down to a science. (Digg/) Whether you think videos of people whispering into high-quality microphones are creepy or soothing, you’ve probably never seen ASMR content as explosive as this. Jacob Strickling, an Australian science teacher who runs the YouTube channel “Make Science Fun,” often does “Tiny Science Videos” using small lab equipm

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Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for fetal sickle cell disease moves a step closer

Sickle cell disease is a form of anemia that is inherited when both parents are carriers of a mutation in the hemoglobin gene. Currently, it can only be diagnosed in pregnancy by carrying out an invasive test that has a small risk of miscarriage and is therefore sometimes declined by parents. Now, researchers have developed a non-invasive prenatal test for the disease.

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Discovery of new mutations may lead to better treatment

In the largest study to date on developmental delay, researchers analyzed genomic data from over 31,000 parent-child trios and found more than 45,000 de novo mutations, and 40 novel genes. This will provide valuable information to clinicians and to drug developers.

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Australia's oldest things: how mind-boggling timelines meet the climate emergency | Jeff Sparrow

They were here before us and should live on long afterwards. With 12 years to avert catastrophe, we need to imagine the aeons to come and consider the creatures that outlive us Wilbur the tortoise has, in all probability, lived more than a hundred years. “From his size and weight and general health,” says Adam Lee, a reptile keeper at the Melbourne zoo, “we put him at about 110 but there’s no rea

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Bald Eagle Caught Elegantly … Swimming?

A viral video shows another side of the U.S. national bird. As it turns out, bald eagles frequently swim, moving through the water using an avian-style butterfly stroke. (Image credit: Becky Bohrer/AP)

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Last week in tech: Google’s Pixel 4 Smartphone, DJI’s new robot, and E3

Well, since there seems to be some interest, here you go! Wait 'til you see what it can do. #Pixel4 pic.twitter.com/RnpTNZXEI1 — Made by Google (@madebygoogle) June 12, 2019 Tech rumors are fun to follow, but sometimes they break your heart. Early “leaks” can promise features and specs that never appear in the real product and you’re left feeling disappointed because someone made a promise that w

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Pioneering Immunologist Teruko Ishizaka Dies

With her husband, she studied allergic reactions and identified antibodies that set off itching, wheezing, and rashes.

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So Long, Exoplanet HD 17156b. Hello … Sauron?

Astronomers have announced a global contest to rename dozens of extrasolar planets. The nominees are pouring in.

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What’s wrong with the internet? We’d rather “display” than communicate.

Disruptive technologies tend to regress humanity back to our default mode: deeply ingrained tribalism. Rather than using the internet to communicate, many people use it to display their colors or group affinity, like tribespeople wearing face paint. Fake news spreads faster than truth in these tribal environments. How can we solve this problem without censorship? Platforms like Facebook and Googl

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The challenges of North American specialty cut flowers

Cut flower production in the United States and Canada has increased in recent years. Due to this resurgence, more information is needed regarding current production and postharvest issues.

2h

No direct link between North Atlantic currents, sea level along New England coast

A new study clarifies what influence major currents in the North Atlantic have on sea level along the northeastern United States.

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Small cluster of neurons is off-on switch for mouse songs

Researchers have isolated a cluster of neurons in a mouse's brain that are crucial to making the squeaky, ultrasonic 'songs' a male mouse produces when courting a potential mate.

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Is Adam Savage's Iron Man Suit Bulletproof? | Savage Builds

Adam Savage has recreated an Iron Man suit and now it's time to test if the suit is bulletproof. Don't miss the premiere of Savage Builds tonight at 10p! Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery From: Discovery

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High tunnels for specialty crops: The hope and the hinderance

Research on the application of season-expanding growing technique provides an in-depth understanding of farm-level challenges associated with high tunnel adoption and usage.

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Controlling temperatures for inexpensive plant experiments

Inexpensive, easy-to-use temperature controllers are able to provide reliable set temperatures for the detailed observation of developmental rates in response to different temperature treatments.

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Drug Makers Sue to Block Requirement for Listing Prices in TV Ads

The rule, set to take effect July 9, is one of the most visible efforts by the Trump administration to try to address high drug prices.

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ThinkGeek.com to close, replaced as a section of GameStop

Sad news for anyone who loves geeky goods and top-notch April Fools’ jokes: ThinkGeek.com, the 20 year old online retailer known for selling more geek-centric gadgets and peripherals than …

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What drives Yellowstone's massive elk migrations?

Every spring, tens of thousands of elk follow a wave of green growth up onto the high plateaus in and around Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks, where they spend the summer calving and fattening on fresh grass. And every fall, the massive herds migrate back down into the surrounding valleys and plains, where lower elevations provide respite from harsh winters.

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Snack peppers find acceptance with reduced seed count

Small/miniature sweet and hot peppers, such as snack peppers, are a rapidly growing class of specialty peppers. As with grapes and watermelons and certain other fruits, low seed count is an important attribute for consumer acceptance of small-fruited specialty peppers.

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NASA finds Tropical Cyclone's Vayu getting stretched

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean, it captured an infrared image that revealed Tropical Cyclone Vayu was elongating. That's never a good sign for a tropical cyclone, because they need a circular rotation to maintain strength.

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No direct link between north Atlantic currents, sea level along New England coast

A new study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) clarifies what influence major currents in the North Atlantic have on sea level along the northeastern United States. The study, published June 13 in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, examined both the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC)—a conveyor belt of currents that move warmer waters north an

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What it takes for green businesses to advertise online

The green industry in the United States is comprised of production and wholesale nurseries and wholesale/retail distribution centers, as well as related marketing interests. While the green industry traditionally has been among the fastest growing business sectors in the U.S. national economy, recently some of its segments have become stagnant or have declined in economic health.

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The challenges of North American specialty cut flowers

Across the United States and Canada, demand for local specialty cut flowers is increasing, and production has correspondingly jumped. To accurately assess the needs of the industry, John Dole, Cristian Loyola, and Rebecca Dunning electronically surveyed 1098 cut flower producers and handlers regarding their current cut flower production and postharvest problems and customer issues.

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What drives Yellowstone's massive elk migrations?

Every spring, tens of thousands of elk follow a wave of green growth up onto the high plateaus in and around Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks, where they spend the summer calving and fattening on fresh grass. And every fall, the massive herds migrate back down into the surrounding valleys and plains, where lower elevations provide respite from harsh winters.

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The challenges of North American specialty cut flowers

Across the United States and Canada, demand for local specialty cut flowers is increasing, and production has correspondingly jumped. To accurately assess the needs of the industry, John Dole, Cristian Loyola, and Rebecca Dunning electronically surveyed 1098 cut flower producers and handlers regarding their current cut flower production and postharvest problems and customer issues.

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The Right to Sexuality

Paul and Hava met at a performing-arts social event for people with intellectual disabilities. With the assistance of their parents, they went on a few successful dates. The connection was immediate. After some time, they decided to make their strong, loving bond official. The couple made each other so happy that their parents saw no good reason to deny the proposal. The group homes where Paul an

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Adobe AI Can Detect Manipulated Photos

The company worked with UC Berkeley scientists to develop a neural network that can spot fake photos and work backward to restore their original appearance. The post Adobe AI Can Detect Manipulated Photos appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Small cluster of neurons is off-on switch for mouse songs

Researchers at Duke University have isolated a cluster of neurons in a mouse's brain that are crucial to making the squeaky, ultrasonic 'songs' a male mouse produces when courting a potential mate. They understand these neurons well enough to be able to make a mouse sing on command or to silence it so that it can't sing, even when it wants to, a key advancement in studying how humans form speech.

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What it takes for green businesses to advertise online

The internet has facilitated the growth of online advertising over the past decade, and online advertising has moved from being a peripheral to a central advertising medium because of its unique targeting capabilities. Yet, green industry firms struggle to integrate online advertising into their existing advertising strategy.

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No direct link between north Atlantic currents, sea level along New England coast

A new study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) clarifies what influence major currents in the North Atlantic have on sea level along the northeastern United States. The study, published June 13, 2019 in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, examined both the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) — a conveyor belt of currents that move warmer waters

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WHO unexpectedly declines, again, to call Ebola outbreak a global emergency

Despite disease’s spread to Uganda, a World Health Organization panel says declaration would hurt more than help

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Hackers Target US Power, Amazon Clones a Neighborhood, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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The best gear for event photographers

We love these pieces of gear when we are covering summertime events. (Jeanette D. Moses/) Summertime is here and that means that photographers who specialize in event coverage schedules are starting to fill up. The coming months will be filled with graduations, weddings, music festivals, parades, sporting events, and every other kind of photogenic event you can imagine. While shooting in the summ

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Help Wanted; Inquire Within

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, June 14. Color Wars: The Democratic National Committee finally announced the breakdown of the first primary debates. The first night features the likes of Senators Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker, and Amy Klobuchar; on the second night, Biden and Bernie go head-to-head. Check out our cheat sheet to remind yourself who’s who. + Thought exercise: If there were

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These gut enzymes could save lives by converting Type A blood to Type O

With the help of newly found enzymes, chemists in Vancouver might be able to convert Type A blood into Type O blood. (Deposit Photos/) Every day the United States pumps 36000 units—that’s 40,000 pints—of blood into people in need according to the American Red Cross. And while the organization can use blood from most healthy people, some of the life-saving fluid is more valuable than others. Type

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What drives Yellowstone's massive elk migrations?

Yellowstone's migratory elk rely primarily on environmental cues, including a retreating snowline and the greening grasses of spring, to decide when to make the treks between their winter ranges and summer ranges, researchers show. Their study combined GPS tracking data from more than 400 animals in nine major Yellowstone elk populations with satellite imagery to create a comprehensive model of wh

3h

The challenges of North American specialty cut flowers

Cut flower production in the United States and Canada has increased in recent years. Due to this resurgence, more information is needed regarding current production and postharvest issues.

4h

Using waves to move droplets

Using a technique called mechanowetting, researchers have come up with a way of transporting droplets by using transverse surface waves.

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Electron (or 'hole') pairs may survive effort to kill superconductivity

The emergence of unusual metallic state supports the role of 'charge stripes' in the formation of charge-carrier pairs essential to resistance-free flow of electrical current.

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Satellite observations improve earthquake monitoring, response

Researchers report data gathered by orbiting satellites can yield more information about destructive earthquakes and can improve aid and humanitarian response efforts. The researchers looked at satellite data from several recent, large-magnitude earthquakes.

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Beyond Queen's stomp-stomp-clap: Concerts and computer science converge in new research

New research suggests how to get large numbers of people engaged in participating during a live performance like a concert — or a lecture — and channel that energy for a sustained time period.

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Google CEO begs regulators not to split company up

Google's massive size allows it to invest in future technologies without worrying about 'short-term profits,' CEO Sundar Pichai said in an interview with CNN Business on Thursday.

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Modified enzyme can increase second-generation ethanol production

Using a protein produced by a fungus that lives in the Amazon, Brazilian researchers developed a molecule capable of increasing glucose release from biomass for fermentation.

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Don’t Overthink a Climate-Change Debate

For the past week, the Democratic Party’s presidential candidates, grassroots organizers, and national committee have fought over whether it would be a good idea to have a “climate-change debate.” Governor Jay Inslee of Washington, whose presidential campaign is focused on climate change, started the fight a few weeks ago when he demanded that Democrats devote one of its dozen scheduled primary d

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Hackers Have Spent Months Trying to Breach America’s Power Plants

Threat Detected Hackers from the group Xenotime, which made news for compromising a Saudi oil facility in 2017, have now targeted American electrical utilities. For the past several months, Xenotime has been probing power plants in the U.S., looking for vulnerabilities, according to a blog post by Dragos , the cybersecurity firm that first noticed Xenotime’s efforts. Though Dragos didn’t see any

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Better prognosticating for dogs with mammary tumors

For dogs with mammary tumors, deciding a course of treatment can depend on a variety of factors, some of which may seem to contradict one another. With a new, practical system developed by veterinarians, determining a prognosis and making treatment decisions should be an easier task.

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Discovery could lead to improved therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Researchers found that the protein sarcospan can play a major role in combating heart failure in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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Researchers find genes that could help create more resilient chickens

Scientists have identified genes that may help farmers, especially ones in low- and middle-income countries, breed chickens that can resist one of the biggest disease threats facing poultry today.

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FDA Halts Fecal Transplant Trials After Patient Dies

Deadly Infection Fecal transplants are experimental procedures in which doctors use stool from a healthy donor to treat a person whose own microbiome has been thrown off balance. The procedure has shown significant promise for treating various health issues. But now an immuno-compromised patient who received a fecal transplant for an undisclosed reason has died following the procedure and another

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NASA finds Tropical Cyclone's Vayu getting stretched

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean, it captured an infrared image that revealed Tropical Cyclone Vayu was elongating. That's never a good sign for a tropical cyclone, because they need a circular rotation to maintain strength.

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Researchers identify traits linked to better outcomes in HPV-linked head and neck cancer

University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers identified characteristics that could be used to personalize treatment for patients with a type of head and neck cancer linked to HPV infection.

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Language-savvy parents improve their children's reading development, study shows

Parents with higher reading-related knowledge are not only more likely to have children with higher reading scores but are also more attentive when those children read out loud to them.

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Virus genes help determine if pea aphids get their wings

Researchers shed light on the important role that microbial genes, like those from viruses, can play in insect and animal evolution.

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Why Jessica Biel Is Wrong

One morning in 1934, panicked passengers jumped from the deck of the SS Morro Castle as it sank just off the coast of New Jersey. The ocean liner had caught fire, and the passengers had rushed to grab personal flotation devices. But some improperly wrapped the life preservers around their necks. As they fell and hit the water, the torque snapped some some of their spines. Personal flotation devic

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For the Third Time, W.H.O. Declines to Declare the Ebola Outbreak an Emergency

Even with more than 1,400 dead, the W.H.O. says the risk of the disease spreading beyond the region remains low and declaring an emergency could have backfired.

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The Oddball Delights of ‘Los Espookys’

HBO's horror-comedy speaks to viewers in a whole new way.

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Hackers behind the world’s deadliest code are probing US power firms

A group called Xenotime, which began by targeting oil and gas facilities in the Middle East, now has electrical utilities in the US and Asia in its sights.

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Stepping Up the Search for Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

Astronomers think the galaxy NGC1313 may be home to an intermediate-mass black hole. Credit: Gemini Observatory/AURA) (Inside Science) — If you have a computer and a few spare moments, you can help search the cosmos for an elusive breed of black hole that astronomers once thought didn't exist. Black holes come in two main types: stellar-mass black holes, which generally have about 10-24 times the

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Did Dark Matter Punch a Hole in the Milky Way?

An artist's rendition shows the dark matter halo (blue) that astronomers believe surrounds the Milky Way. (Credit: ESO/L. Calçada) A massive clump of dark matter may have plowed through a conga line of stars streaming around the Milky Way, according to new research presented Tuesday at the 234th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society. The research, led by Ana Bonaca of the Harvard-Smithsonia

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Amazing Site Uses AI to Turn Your Scribbles into Lovely Landscapes

Paint By Numbers With a little help from AI, you can now create a Bob Ross-style landscape in seconds. In March, researchers from NVIDIA unveiled GauGAN , a system that uses AI to transform images scribbled onto a Microsoft Paint-like canvas into photorealistic landscapes — just choose a label such as “water,” “tree,” or “mountain” the same way you’d normally choose a color, and the AI takes care

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As The 50th Anniversary Of Apollo 11 Nears, New Books Highlight The Mission's Legacy

These works make apparent how singular an achievement America's moon landing was — and show that half a century later we're still grappling to understand its long-term meaning. (Image credit: NASA/Getty Images)

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A shady spot may protect species against rapid climate warming

A shady refuge on a hot day could be more than a simple comfort in a warming world. Finding a cooler spot might save several species that would otherwise go extinct due to global warming, according to a new analysis.

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This Dissolvable CBD Tincture is Tailor-Made to Enhance Your Favorite Drinks

More and more people are turning to CBD for natural, gentle relief from pain, anxiety, and sleeplessness, among other things. Unfortunately, this increase in demand means a lot of so-called wellness companies have flooded the CBD marketplace with low-quality products in an attempt to make a quick buck. However, one brand you can trust is Mellowment. They’ve built a reputation for producing indust

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FDA Suspends Clinical Trials Involving Fecal Transplants

The agency issued a safety warning after two patients contracted antibiotic resistant infections and one of the patients died.

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AI-Aided Video Surveillance Will Watch and Silently Judge Us

Panopticon Gone are the days when a store’s security cameras only mattered to shoplifters. Now, with the rising prevalence of surveillance systems constantly monitored by artificial intelligence, ubiquitous security systems can watch, learn about, and discriminate against shoppers more than ever before. That’s the gist of a new ACLU report titled “The Dawn of Robot Surveillance,” about how emergi

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Volcano's Shadow Forms an Eerie, Perfect Triangle

The shadow's pointy tip is a matter of perspective.

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Using waves to move droplets

Self-cleaning surfaces and laboratories on a chip become even more efficient if we are able to control individual droplets. University of Groningen professor Patrick Onck, together with colleagues from Eindhoven University of Technology, have shown that this is possible by using a technique named mechanowetting. 'We have come up with a way of transporting droplets by using transverse surface waves

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Electron (or 'hole') pairs may survive effort to kill superconductivity

Scientists seeking to understand the mechanism underlying superconductivity in 'stripe-ordered' cuprates — copper-oxide materials with alternating areas of electric charge and magnetism — discovered an unusual metallic state when attempting to turn superconductivity off. They found that under the conditions of their experiment, even after the material loses its ability to carry electrical curren

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Hackers behind the world’s deadliest code are probing US power firms

A group called Xenotime, which began by targeting oil and gas facilities in the Middle East, now has electrical utilities in the US and Asia in its sights.

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Eager to Limit Exemptions to Vaccination, States Face Staunch Resistance

Legislators trying to curb the numbers of unvaccinated children have been met with vigorous opposition from upset parents.

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Manipulation of eight-dimensional Bell-like states

High-dimensional Bell-like states are necessary for increasing the channel capacity of the quantum protocol. However, their preparation and measurement are still huge challenges, especially for the latter. Here, we prepare an initial eight-dimensional Bell-like state based on hyperentanglement of spin and orbital angular momentum (OAM) of the first and the third orders. We design simple unitary o

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Asymmetric hot-carrier thermalization and broadband photoresponse in graphene-2D semiconductor lateral heterojunctions

The massless Dirac electron transport in graphene has led to a variety of unique light-matter interaction phenomena, which promise many novel optoelectronic applications. Most of the effects are only accessible by breaking the spatial symmetry, through introducing edges, p-n junctions, or heterogeneous interfaces. The recent development of direct synthesis of lateral heterostructures offers new o

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Tuning from failed superconductor to failed insulator with magnetic field

Do charge modulations compete with electron pairing in high-temperature copper oxide superconductors? We investigated this question by suppressing superconductivity in a stripe-ordered cuprate compound at low temperature with high magnetic fields. With increasing field, loss of three-dimensional superconducting order is followed by reentrant two-dimensional superconductivity and then an ultraquan

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Observing momentum disturbance in double-slit "which-way" measurements

Making a "which-way" measurement (WWM) to identify which slit a particle goes through in a double-slit apparatus will reduce the visibility of interference fringes. There has been a long-standing controversy over whether this can be attributed to an uncontrollable momentum transfer. Here, by reconstructing the Bohmian trajectories of single photons, we experimentally obtain the distribution of mo

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Climbing droplets driven by mechanowetting on transverse waves

Many applications in modern technology, such as self-cleaning surfaces and digital microfluidics, require control over individual fluid droplets on flat surfaces. Existing techniques may suffer from side effects resulting from high electric fields and high temperatures. Here, we introduce a markedly different method, termed "mechanowetting," that is based on the surface tension–controlled droplet

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Exciton funneling in light-harvesting organic semiconductor microcrystals for wavelength-tunable lasers

Organic solid-state lasers are essential for various photonic applications, yet current-driven lasing remains a great challenge. Charge transfer (CT) complexes formed with p-/n-type organic semiconductors show great potential in electrically pumped lasers, but it is still difficult to achieve population inversion owing to substantial nonradiative loss from delocalized CT states. Here, we demonstr

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Ultrafast sub-30-fs all-optical switching based on gallium phosphide

Gallium phosphide (GaP) is one of the few available materials with strong optical nonlinearity and negligible losses in the visible ( > 450 nm) and near-infrared regime. In this work, we demonstrate that a GaP film can generate sub–30-fs (full width at half maximum) transmission modulation of up to ~70% in the 600- to 1000-nm wavelength range. Nonlinear simulations using parameters measured by th

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Shear-solvo defect annihilation of diblock copolymer thin films over a large area

Achieving defect-free block copolymer (BCP) nanopatterns with a long-ranged orientation over a large area remains a persistent challenge, impeding the successful and widespread application of BCP self-assembly. Here, we demonstrate a new experimental strategy for defect annihilation while conserving structural order and enhancing uniformity of nanopatterns. Sequential shear alignment and solvent

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Intrinsic magnetic topological insulators in van der Waals layered MnBi2Te4-family materials

The interplay of magnetism and topology is a key research subject in condensed matter physics, which offers great opportunities to explore emerging new physics, such as the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect, axion electrodynamics, and Majorana fermions. However, these exotic physical effects have rarely been realized experimentally because of the lack of suitable working materials. Here, we pre

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Trimethylamine N-oxide-derived zwitterionic polymers: A new class of ultralow fouling bioinspired materials

Materials that resist nonspecific protein adsorption are needed for many applications. However, few are able to achieve ultralow fouling in complex biological milieu. Zwitterionic polymers emerge as a class of highly effective ultralow fouling materials due to their superhydrophilicity, outperforming other hydrophilic materials such as poly(ethylene glycol). Unfortunately, there are only three ma

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NASA Needs $20 Billion in Additional Funding to Reach Moon by 2024

Under the current administration, NASA has been told to push up its timeline and get a crewed mission to the moon by 2024 instead of 2028. That's just five years away, and the agency now says it will need at least $20 billion in additional funding to make it happen. The post NASA Needs $20 Billion in Additional Funding to Reach Moon by 2024 appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Electron (or 'hole') pairs may survive effort to kill superconductivity

Scientists seeking to understand the mechanism underlying superconductivity in "stripe-ordered" cuprates—copper-oxide materials with alternating areas of electric charge and magnetism—discovered an unusual metallic state when attempting to turn superconductivity off. They found that under the conditions of their experiment, even after the material loses its ability to carry electrical current with

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What drives Yellowstone's massive elk migrations?

Yellowstone's migratory elk rely primarily on environmental cues, including a retreating snowline and the greening grasses of spring, to decide when to make the treks between their winter ranges and summer ranges, shows a new study led by University of California, Berkeley, researchers. The study combined GPS tracking data from more than 400 animals in nine major Yellowstone elk populations with s

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WVU researcher studies new treatment for pancreatic cancer

If the American Cancer Society's projections prove accurate, more people will die from pancreatic cancer than from breast, brain, ovarian or prostate cancer this year. WVU researcher Brian Boone was part of a team that studied a new combination of drugs to treat pancreatic cancer. In their meta-analysis, the drug combination — FOLFIRINOX — was associated with better surgical options and longer o

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The Family Weekly: How the American Dream Leads Straight to McMansion Hell

(Wernerimages 2018 / Shutterstock) Editor’s note: The Family Weekly will go on hiatus after this week while we figure out how to improve the newsletter. We’ll miss you while we’re gone, but you can continue to get Atlantic stories through The Atlantic Daily or our other newsletters by signing up here (at a frequency that works for you). Feedback fatigue is real, but we’d appreciate it if you coul

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The mast is raised for NASA's Mars 2020 rover

In this image, taken on June 5, 2019, engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, take a moment after attaching the remote sensing mast to the Mars 2020 rover in the Spacecraft Assembly Facility's High Bay 1 clean room. Full integration of the mast—a process that includes installation of science instrument sensors, electrical wiring and checkout—continued into the follow

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Multiple Sclerosis: Symptoms, Management & New Research

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a potentially incapacitating disease that poses unpredictable challenges, but does not signal a shorter lifespan.

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Kamala Harris’s Mistake

No president of the United States has ever been prosecuted. Richard Nixon, who likely came the closest, was rescued from the threat of criminal charges by a pardon bestowed by his successor, Gerald Ford. But now, in the wake of the Mueller report’s account of potential obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump, Democratic politicians are beginning to weigh the possibility that Trump will b

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NOAA: 279 dolphins dead on Gulf Coast, triple usual number

At least 279 dolphins have stranded across much of the U.S. Gulf Coast since Feb. 1, triple the usual number, and about 98 percent of them have died, scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Friday.

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Grounding of Boeing plane hovers over big air show in Paris

Uncertainty over a Boeing jet and apprehension about the global economy hover over the aircraft industry as it prepares for next week's Paris Air Show.

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With lions, elephants, Airbnb goes all-in on adventure tours

A new category of adventure travel—from tracking lions in Kenya to walking with elephants in Thailand—is now on the menu at Airbnb as the home-sharing startup expands its offerings.

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NOAA: 279 dolphins dead on Gulf Coast, triple usual number

At least 279 dolphins have stranded across much of the U.S. Gulf Coast since Feb. 1, triple the usual number, and about 98 percent of them have died, scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Friday.

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'Poop Transplants' Can Transmit Deadly Superbugs, FDA Warns

The FDA is warning that these transplants may come with a risk of spreading superbugs.

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Virus genes help determine if pea aphids get their wings

Many of an organism's traits are influenced by cues from the organism's environment. These features are known as phenotypically plastic traits and are important in allowing an organism to cope with unpredictable environments.

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Beyond Queen's stomp-stomp-clap: Concerts and computer science converge in new research

The iconic "stomp-stomp-clap" of Queen's "We Will Rock You" was born out of the challenge that rock stars and professors alike know all too well: How to get large numbers of people engaged in participating during a live performance like a concert—or a lecture—and channel that energy for a sustained time period.

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Better prognosticating for dogs with mammary tumors

Mammary tumors in dogs are the equivalent of breast cancers in people, and, as in the human disease, the canine tumors can manifest in a variety of ways. Some are diagnosed early, others late, and they can be either slow growing or aggressive.

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Satellite observations improve earthquake monitoring, response

Researchers at the University of Iowa and the U.S. Geological Survey have found that data gathered from orbiting satellites can provide more accurate information on the impact of large earthquakes, which, in turn, can help provide more effective emergency response.

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Selvkørende biler og fake porno: Se hvad spilteknologi også bruges til

Grafikkort rykker ud af gameruniverset og ind i den mest avancerede teknologi.

6h

Virus genes help determine if pea aphids get their wings

Many of an organism's traits are influenced by cues from the organism's environment. These features are known as phenotypically plastic traits and are important in allowing an organism to cope with unpredictable environments.

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Better prognosticating for dogs with mammary tumors

Mammary tumors in dogs are the equivalent of breast cancers in people, and, as in the human disease, the canine tumors can manifest in a variety of ways. Some are diagnosed early, others late, and they can be either slow growing or aggressive.

6h

World Health Organization resists declaring Ebola emergency — for third time

Nature, Published online: 13 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01893-1 Outbreak worsens in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as virus spreads into Uganda.

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NASA finds tropical cyclone Vayu off India's Gujarat coast

NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Vayu still lingering near the northwestern coast of India, and its cloud-filled eye remained offshore.

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Adobe Built an AI to Spot Photoshopped Faces

Control Z Adobe, the company behind the ubiquitous photo-editing program Photoshop, just unveiled a new artificial intelligence tool capable of spotting whether images have been manipulated. The research, which sprang from a partnership with scientists from UC Berkeley and funding from DARPA , focuses on edits made with Photoshop’s “liquify” tool, which can subtly reshape and touch up parts of an

6h

Hubble sets sights on an explosive galaxy

When massive stars die at the end of their short lives, they light up the cosmos with bright, explosive bursts of light and material known as supernovae. A supernova event is incredibly energetic and intensely luminous—so much so that it forms what looks like an especially bright new star that slowly fades away over time.

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A shady spot may protect species against rapid climate warming

Finding a shady refuge to cool off on a hot day could be more than a lifesaver in a warming world. It might save several species that would otherwise go extinct due to global warming, according to an analysis by ecologists at a dozen institutions.

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Flickering sky islands generate andean biodiversity

A new video shows how climate change connected and disconnected Andean "sky islands" during the past million years. The innovative mathematical model used to make the video was based on fossil pollen records and shows how the entire páramo habitat shifted. The model can predict climate change effects in mountainous regions around the world, according to an international team of scientists includin

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Researchers find genes that could help create more resilient chickens

An international team of scientists, led by Penn State researchers, have identified genes that may help farmers, especially ones in low- and middle-income countries, breed chickens that can resist one of the biggest disease threats facing poultry today.

6h

Pixel 4 appears days after Google confirms its existence – CNET

When the Pixel 4 leaks start coming not even Google can control them.

6h

A shady spot may protect species against rapid climate warming

Finding a shady refuge to cool off on a hot day could be more than a lifesaver in a warming world. It might save several species that would otherwise go extinct due to global warming, according to an analysis by ecologists at a dozen institutions.

6h

Flickering sky islands generate andean biodiversity

A new video shows how climate change connected and disconnected Andean "sky islands" during the past million years. The innovative mathematical model used to make the video was based on fossil pollen records and shows how the entire páramo habitat shifted. The model can predict climate change effects in mountainous regions around the world, according to an international team of scientists includin

6h

Researchers find genes that could help create more resilient chickens

An international team of scientists, led by Penn State researchers, have identified genes that may help farmers, especially ones in low- and middle-income countries, breed chickens that can resist one of the biggest disease threats facing poultry today.

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Largest world stock of animal-killing virus destroyed by UK lab

Scientists destroy final UK laboratory samples of rinderpest, the disease that wiped out most of the cattle in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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Superweeds are on the brink of becoming resistant to all weedkillers

The most damaging weed in the UK is evolving resistance to the powerful herbicide glyphosate – and many more superweeds are evolving worldwide

6h

To Mock Elon Musk, Russia Just Launched a Toy Car Into Space

Comic Timing In February 2018, SpaceX launched its Falcon Heavy for the first time — and at the behest of CEO Elon Musk, the massive rocket’s payload was a cherry-red Tesla Roadster . It appears that the stunt made a lasting impression on a team of Russian scientists, who’ve now responded by sending their own red car into space — but the details of their project make it seem more like a mockery o

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Pope to Oil Execs: “Energy Use Must Not Destroy Civilization”

Carbon Pricing During a closed-doors audience at the Vatican, Pope Francis told a number of oil executives that they need to find an energy solution that doesn’t sacrifice the environment — in order to avoid “perpetrating a brutal act of injustice” against future generations. “Civilization requires energy, but energy use must not destroy civilization,” the Pope told the executives, as quoted by t

7h

How the Gut Microbiome Could Provide a New Tool to Treat Autism

A growing body of evidence suggests the behavioral symptoms of autism spectrum disorder could be linked to bacteria in the gut

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Daily briefing: Fecal transplant linked to patient’s death

Nature, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01898-w FDA halts fecal transplant clinical trials, how to break science’s language barrier and Neolithic farmers built artificial islands.

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Adobe unveils new AI that can detect if an image has been 'deepfaked'

The tool is able to detect edits to images, such as those that would go unnoticed to the naked eye, especially in doctored deepfake videos. What's more, it can also 'revert' them back to normal.

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Flickering sky islands generate andean biodiversity

As the climate changed over the past million years, areas of paramo around Andean peaks in Colombia grew and contracted, giving rise to species unique to this habitat. Today paramos continue to shrink, putting these species at risk.

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Moonwalk and 9/11 photographs part of 'global visual memory'

Results of 12-nation survey show that some ‘iconic’ images are better known than others From the spacesuit-clad form of Buzz Aldrin on the moon to the middle-distance gaze of Che Guevara, some photographs really are seared into the public’s mind all over the world, research suggests. While some images have long been hailed as “iconic”, experts say there has been little research to show that certa

7h

New Robots Can Safely Decommission Nuclear Reactors

Going In A new semi-autonomous robot is capable of traveling into a decommissioned nuclear reactor and safely dismantling it, piece by piece. Typically, the robots that handle nuclear waste, like the one sent into the Fukushima reactor after it was destroyed by a tsunami, need to be remote-controlled every step of the way. This new robot, described in research published in the journal Robotics ,

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How to make your outdoor gear last longer

That's the self-satisfied look of someone who just repaired a whole bunch of stuff. (Pixabay/) When it comes to quality outdoor gear, every piece is an investment. You pay for shiny new items you hope will last for years, but sometimes, parts and pieces get worn out. So what’s one to do when an otherwise functional piece of equipment has a malfunctioning feature? It’s not always necessary to tras

7h

Volvo’s sporty looking Vera self-driving electric truck will go to work in Sweden

The Vera autonomous, electric truck from Volvo’s trucking subsidiary is not what you might expect in a transport truck – it looks like a road-hugging sportscar, something emphasized by …

7h

Biden Promises to 'Cure Cancer' If Elected. Here's Why That's Laughable.

Biden's promise may be easier said than done, according to experts.

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Artificial nose identifies malignant tissue in brain tumours during surgery

An artificial nose developed in Finland helps neurosurgeons to identify cancerous tissue during surgery and enables the more precise excision of tumors.

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We Live in the Wreckage of an Epic Galactic Collision, Says Study

Ghost Encounter A collision with a “ghost of a galaxy” millions of years ago is still haunting the Milky Way. In November, astronomers announced the discovery of Antlia 2 , a low-density but relatively massive galaxy orbiting the Milky Way. Now, a team from the Rochester Institute of Technology has provided evidence that a past galactic collision with Antlia 2 is to blame for large ripples in the

7h

Citing National Security, Researchers Race to Foil ‘Deepfake’ Videos

As next year’s presidential election inches closer, researchers are working to develop systems to more accurately detect “deepfakes” — digitally-altered videos that can be used to make it appear as though politicians or other high-profile individuals are saying whatever the creator dreams up.

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New Laser Zaps And Destroys Cancer Cells In Real Time

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A simple online system that could end plastic pollution [BBC]

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Proterra CEO: Electric buses are close to inevitable

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Some Compelling Reasons Not to Give Up on Solving Climate Change

submitted by /u/m8r-jfqbw21 [link] [comments]

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Plastic bags are still bad for the environment, despite misleading reports

Full of questions? (Deposit Photos/) Among the banned plastics, perhaps no item is as villainized as grocery bags. Canadian officials recently announced that the country would move to ban single-use plastics, by as early as 2021, and they're just one of at least 32 other countries that have implemented similar policies. That seems to be for good reason. Somewhere between 500 billion and a trillio

8h

‘Uh Oh, We Shouldn’t Have This’

In his interview with George Stephanopoulos on Wednesday, President Donald Trump tried to imagine a scenario in which someone involved with a presidential campaign would call the FBI if that person was offered dirt from a foreign government on the opposition. “Okay, let’s put yourself in a position,” the president begins . “You’re a congressman. Somebody comes up and says, ‘Hey, I have informatio

8h

Artificial intelligence sees construction site accidents before they happen

Construction companies are developing an AI system that predicts worksite injuries—an example of the growing use of workplace surveillance.

8h

NASA Budget Billions Short to Return Americans to the Moon

Massive Price Tag NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine told CNN Business on Thursday that the space agency will need an additional “$20 to $30 billion” over a span of five years to return American astronauts to the Moon by 2024. NASA asked the Trump administration for an additional $1.6 billion in funding — what Bridenstine described as a “down payment,” according to CNN — for the mission, now call

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White House physicist sought aid of rightwing thinktank to challenge climate science

William Happer contacted Heartland Institute, one of the most prominent groups to dispute that fossil fuels cause global heating A member of the Trump administration ’s National Security Council has sought help from advisers of a conservative thinktank to challenge the reality of a human-induced climate crisis , a trove of his emails show. William Happer , a physicist appointed by the White House

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No evidence for increased egg predation in the Arctic

Climate and ecosystems are changing, but predation on shorebird nests has changed little across the globe over the past 60 years, finds an international team of 60 researchers. The study published in Science on 14 June 2019 challenges a recent claim that shorebird eggs are more often eaten by predators due to climate change, and more so in the Arctic compared to the tropics. The research shows tha

8h

Phantom sensations: When the sense of touch deceives

Without being aware of it, people sometimes wrongly perceive tactile sensations. A new study shows how healthy people can sometimes mis-attribute touch to the wrong side of their body, or even to a completely wrong part of the body.

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Researchers' discovery could lead to improved therapies for duchenne muscular dystrophy

Researchers found that the protein sarcospan can play a major role in combating heart failure in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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Better prognosticating for dogs with mammary tumors

For dogs with mammary tumors, deciding a course of treatment can depend on a variety of factors, some of which may seem to contradict one another. With a new, practical system developed by University of Pennsylvania veterinarians and colleagues, determining a prognosis and making treatment decisions should be an easier task.

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High-tech vertical farming is on the rise – but is it any greener?

Online supermarket Ocado is investing £17 million in vertical farming in the UK. The approach uses no pesticides, but it can still have a hefty carbon footprint

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Why Did the Moon Landing Matter? A Slew of New Books Offer Answers

Jill Lepore explores the many new accounts of the Apollo 11 mission on its 50th anniversary, including Douglas Brinkley’s “American Moonshot.”

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Why Trump Uses Mock Spanish

When Donald Trump tweeted Thursday morning that Democrats “have gone absolutely ‘Loco,’” the most surprising thing about it was that he had never called anyone loco on Twitter before. There was a time last fall when Trump couldn’t stop using the Spanish loanword for crazy in speeches and interviews. As the Factba.se database of presidential statements reveals, from late September to early Novembe

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A Historic NBA Championship for the Raptors

Midway through last night’s sixth and deciding game of the NBA Finals against the Golden State Warriors, the Toronto Raptors’ star forward Kawhi Leonard sized things up from the top of the three-point arc. Leonard—6 feet 7 inches tall and 230 pounds, with wide hands and a stony expression—took two hard dribbles to the rim, jump-stopped, and rose for a layup, but the Warriors center Kevon Looney a

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Inside the Controversial World of Composting Toilets

Inside the Controversial World of Composting Toilets Alternative sanitation systems are making use of creatures that find homes in human poop. pooping-person-feet-cropped.jpg Image credits: Erin McGrady/ Shutterstock Human Friday, June 14, 2019 – 11:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Big, black wasplike things living in your toilet may sound more like a horror scene than a sanitatio

8h

Better Memory through Electrical Brain Ripples

A study in mice shows improved cognitive performance when these bursting signals move around memory circuits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists develop 'mini-brain' model of human prion disease

Scientists have used human skin cells to create what they believe is the first cerebral organoid system, or 'mini-brain,' for studying sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). CJD is a fatal neurodegenerative brain disease of humans believed to be caused by infectious prion protein. The researchers hope the human organoid model will enable them to evaluate potential CJD therapeutics and provide g

8h

Artificial nose identifies malignant tissue in brain tumours during surgery

An artificial nose developed in Finland helps neurosurgeons to identify cancerous tissue during surgery and enables the more precise excision of tumors.

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Elon Musk: If Reality Is a Simulation, “The Plot Is Terrible”

Low-Budget Production Elon Musk, who has long argued that our universe is actually a big simulation , has some complaints about the storyline. “If reality was a video game, the graphics are great, the plot is terrible and the spawn time is really long,” Musk said on stage at the gaming conference E3, per Engadget . Musk, who previously expressed a desire to escape the simulation , didn’t clarify

8h

The Carnivorous Plant Named 'Turtle Socks' Has Been Eating Baby Salamanders for Lunch

These carnivorous Canadian plants don't just eat bugs — they eat vertebrates, too.

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Beyond Queen's stomp-stomp-clap: Concerts and computer science converge in new research

How to get large numbers of people engaged in participating during a live performance like a concert — or a lecture — and channel that energy for a sustained time period.

8h

A shady spot may protect species against rapid climate warming

A shady refuge on a hot day could be more than a simple comfort in a warming world. Finding a cooler spot might save several species that would otherwise go extinct due to global warming, according to an analysis by ecologists at a dozen institutions.

8h

NASA finds tropical cyclone Vayu off India's Gujarat coast

NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Vayu still lingering near the northwestern coast of India, and its cloud-filled eye remained offshore.

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How was Medicaid expansion associated with rates of child maltreatment?

State-level data were analyzed to determine whether Medicaid expansion was associated with changes in rates of physical abuse and neglect of children younger than 6. Medicaid expansion was part of the the Affordable Care Act and prior research suggests it was associated with better financial stability for families and parents' access to mental health care, both risk factors for child maltreatment.

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Better Memory through Electrical Brain Ripples

A study in mice shows improved cognitive performance when these bursting signals move around memory circuits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Life’s innovations, the enigma of gravity, and how to feed 8 billion: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01897-x Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

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Pope warns oil bosses of climate threat

Oil company bosses have been rapped by the Pope for seeking more of the fossil fuels that are damaging the climate.

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Authenticity Under Fire

Researchers are calling into question authenticity as a scientifically viable concept. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pumping Breast Milk at 50 Below

Field research can be essential to a successful scientific career—but when you’re a woman, there are some unique challenges — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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There Is No White House Press Secretary

It may now seem quaint, but there was a time in recent history when White House press secretaries played a dual role: protecting the president’s image and advocating for the interests of a free press. The very layout of the West Wing suggests that’s the way it’s supposed to be. When they leave their office through the back door, press secretaries stand in a hallway equidistant from the Oval Offic

8h

Elon Musk reveals Tesla has designs for a submarine car

Elon Musk said at a shareholder meeting that Tesla has designed a car that drives under water. The design was inspired by a James Bond movie. There are no immediate plans for the car's production. None You knew that sooner or later, Elon Musk, the closest person we have to a James Bond villain or Tony Stark, will attempt to build some next-level gadgetry straight from the movies. Not one to disap

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Better Memory through Electrical Brain Ripples

A study in mice shows improved cognitive performance when these bursting signals move around memory circuits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Table salt may be hiding in Europa’s underground sea

Observations of Europa by the Hubble Space Telescope suggest that the moon’s ice-covered ocean may hold sodium chloride, or common table salt.

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Strange fat cells in our bones grow rather than shrink when we starve

A special kind of fat cell in our bones grows when other cells shrink – a finding that could help explain the benefits of a calorie-restricted diet

9h

Virus genes help determine if pea aphids get their wings

Researchers from the University of Rochester shed light on the important role that microbial genes, like those from viruses, can play in insect and animal evolution.

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Language-savvy parents improve their children's reading development, Concordia study shows

Parents with higher reading-related knowledge are not only more likely to have children with higher reading scores but are also more attentive when those children read out loud to them.

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Russer vil også skabe CRISPR-babyer: »Eugenik er uundgåeligt«

PLUS. En russisk mikrobiolog vil være den næste, der bringer CRISPR-babyer til verden. Denis Rebrikov tror på en fremtid, hvor vi fremmer intelligens og fysiske egenskaber med genredigering.

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NASA Orbiter Spots “Star Trek” Starfleet Insignia on Mars

Beam Me Up NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been boldly going where no one has gone before — completing its 60,000th trip around the Red Planet last month. But its on board HiRise high-resolution camera has never seen anything like this before: now it’s spotted a dune in the shape of the Starfleet insignia, from the fictional television show “Star Trek.” Perhaps Captain Kirk got there befor

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Pumping Breast Milk at 50 Below

Field research can be essential to a successful scientific career—but when you’re a woman, there are some unique challenges — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Discovery could lead to better maternal vaccines

A newly identified cellular process could lead to safer and more effective vaccines that protect pregnant women and newborns from dangerous infections, researchers say. A new study in Cell describes a previously unidentified route for antibodies to transfer from the mother to the fetus, illuminating a potential way to capitalize on the process to control when and how certain antibodies are shared

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The political power of being a good neighbor | Michael Tubbs

Michael Tubbs is the youngest mayor in American history to represent a city with more than 100,000 people — and his policies are sparking national conversations. In this rousing talk, he shares how growing up amid poverty and violence in Stockton, California shaped his bold vision for change and his commitment to govern as a neighbor, not a politician. "When we see someone different from us, they

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Working in the last 6 months before haemodialysis is associated with a better survival

In a study published in CKJ, 26% of patients were employed 6 months prior to dialysis start — but this fell to 15% when dialysis began. The study also showed that being made redundant increased mortality. Although no causal relationship can be inferred, Professor Alberto Ortiz, CKJ´s editor-in-chief concludes, 'We should encourage our CKD patients to stay employed while on dialysis and support th

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Satellite observations improve earthquake monitoring, response

Researchers at the University of Iowa and the United States Geologic Survey report data gathered by orbiting satellites can yield more information about destructive earthquakes and can improve aid and humanitarian response efforts. The researchers looked at satellite data from several recent, large-magnitude earthquakes.

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Hubble sets sights on an explosive galaxy

When massive stars die at the end of their short lives, they light up the cosmos with bright, explosive bursts of light and material known as supernovae. A supernova event is incredibly energetic and intensely luminous — so much so that it forms what looks like an especially bright new star that slowly fades away over time.

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Researchers find genes that could help create more resilient chickens

An international team of scientists, led by Penn State researchers, have identified genes that may help farmers, especially ones in low- and middle-income countries, breed chickens that can resist one of the biggest disease threats facing poultry today.

9h

American football: The first quarter is crucial

Researchers from Dartmouth College, New Hampshire have found evidence that players born in the first quarter of the year are more likely to play in the National Football League.

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Artificial nose identifies malignant tissue in brain tumours during surgery

An artificial nose developed at Tampere University, Finland, helps neurosurgeons to identify cancerous tissue during surgery and enables the more precise excision of tumours.

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Moral emotions, a diagnotic tool for frontotemporal dementia?

A study conducted by Marc Teichmann and Carole Azuar at the Brain and Spine Institute in Paris (France) and at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital shows a particularly marked impairment of moral emotions in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The results, published in the Journal of Alzheimer'sDisease, open a new approach for early, sensitive and specific diagnosis of FTD.

9h

Researchers take two steps toward green fuel

Researchers have developed a two-step method to more efficiently break down carbohydrates into their single sugar components, a critical process in producing green fuel.

9h

Immortal quantum particles

Decay is relentless in the macroscopic world: broken objects do not fit themselves back together again. However, other laws are valid in the quantum world: new research shows that so-called quasiparticles can decay and reorganize themselves again and are thus become virtually immortal. These are good prospects for the development of durable data memories.

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Bluebird Bio prices gene therapy at nearly $1.8m

Boston-based biotech start-up will only seek full payment if the treatment works

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How Siberian hamsters lose half their weight each year

Siberian hamsters lose half their weight every winter. Scientists have now sequenced their DNA to figure out how. The Siberian hamster is a model organism for studying seasonal biological rhythms, researchers say. They breed during the spring and early summer, but as fall approaches, their bodies change dramatically. They mostly lose the weight through fat and limit food intake by 30 percent to 4

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Remembering Gabriele Grunewald, Who Ran For Herself and Others

Gabe Grunewald wanted to help scientists working to fight the rare cancers that strike so many of us. She died on Tuesday, at the age of 32.

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The Books Briefing: Books From Our Fathers

This Sunday, families in the United States will celebrate fatherhood—a role that, like motherhood , carries the weight of personal and cultural legacies both poignant and fraught. In Laila Lalami’s novel The Other Americans , a young woman wrestles with complex feelings of grief, fear, and resentment after her father, a Moroccan immigrant, is killed in a hit-and-run. A short story by Saul Bellow

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Researchers take two steps toward green fuel

Researchers have developed a two-step method to more efficiently break down carbohydrates into their single sugar components, a critical process in producing green fuel.

9h

Immortal quantum particles

Decay is relentless in the macroscopic world: broken objects do not fit themselves back together again. However, other laws are valid in the quantum world: new research shows that so-called quasiparticles can decay and reorganize themselves again and are thus become virtually immortal. These are good prospects for the development of durable data memories.

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Exciting plant vacuoles

Researchers have filled two knowledge gaps: The vacuoles of plant cells can be excited and the TPC1 ion channel is involved in this process. The function of this channel, which is also found in humans, has been a mystery so far.

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Good hemp seed or 'garbage'? Growers say standards needed

A unit of wheat is called a bushel, and a standard weight of potatoes is called a century. But hemp as a fully legal U.S. agricultural commodity is so new that a unit of hemp seed doesn't yet have a universal name or an agreed-upon quantity.

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Scientists investigate climate and vegetation drivers of terrestrial carbon fluxes

A better understanding of terrestrial flux dynamics will come from elucidating the integrated effects of climate and vegetation constraints on gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (ER), and net ecosystem productivity (NEP), according to Dr. Shutao Chen, Associate professor at Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology.

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Researchers take two steps toward green fuel

An international collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) , Japan, has developed a two-step method to more efficiently break down carbohydrates into their single sugar components, a critical process in producing green fuel.

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No evidence for increased egg predation in the Arctic

Climate and ecosystems are changing, but predation on shorebird nests has changed little around the globe over the past 60 years, according to a study by an international team of 60 researchers. The study, published in Science on 14 June 2019, challenges a recent claim that shorebird eggs are more often eaten by predators due to climate change, and more so in the Arctic compared to the tropics. Th

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USC study finds e-cigarette cartoon ads may increase likelihood of vaping

The use of cartoon characters in ads for e-cigarettes and e-liquids may be attracting young people to use the products in the future, according to a new USC study.

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Nephrology and Public Policy Committee (NPPC) aims to intensify research activity

Epidemiological and clinical research and public policy in Europe are generally considered to be comprehensive and successful – and the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) is playing a key role in the field of nephrology research. But, of course, there is room for improvement. Therefore, the Nephrology and Public Policy Committee (NPPC) has presented

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Human contact plays big role in spread of some hospital infections, but not others

An observational study conducted in a French hospital showed that human contact was responsible for 90 percent of the spread of one species of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to new patients, but less than 60 percent of the spread of a different species. These findings suggest hand hygiene is a key, but more methods are needed to fight multidrug-resistant infection. Audrey Duval of the Versailles Sa

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Can we still have fun if the UK goes carbon neutral?

Will Britain going carbon neutral mean no more fun? Experts from the University of Surrey have urged local policy makers to put in place infrastructure that will enable people to enjoy recreation and leisure while keeping their carbon footprint down.

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Is This Invisible Magnetic Field Smothering Our Nearest Supermassive Black Hole?

The monster black hole at the center of the Milky Way is eerily quiet, and now astronomers think they know why.

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Good hemp seed or 'garbage'? Growers say standards needed

A unit of wheat is called a bushel, and a standard weight of potatoes is called a century. But hemp as a fully legal U.S. agricultural commodity is so new that a unit of hemp seed doesn't yet have a universal name or an agreed-upon quantity.

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No evidence for increased egg predation in the Arctic

Climate and ecosystems are changing, but predation on shorebird nests has changed little around the globe over the past 60 years, according to a study by an international team of 60 researchers. The study, published in Science on 14 June 2019, challenges a recent claim that shorebird eggs are more often eaten by predators due to climate change, and more so in the Arctic compared to the tropics. Th

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When You Give a Friend a Kidney

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week, she talks with a trio of friends about the time one of them gave another his kidney. Scott Moore was diagnosed with a life-threatening kidney disorder in 2015. Dustin Lehmann offered up his kidney from the mom

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Huawei, like Samsung, delays its foldable smartphone

Huawei claims the Galaxy Fold, not the export ban, is to blame for the delay. Right…

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It's not easy being green

Despite how essential plants are for life on Earth, little is known about how parts of plant cells orchestrate growth and greening. By creating mutant plants, researchers have uncovered a cellular communication pathway sought by scientists for decades.

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Excess weight and body fat cause cardiovascular disease

In the first Mendelian randomization study to look at this, researchers have found evidence that excess weight and body fat cause a range of heart and blood vessel diseases, rather than just being associated with it.

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'Hidden' phases of matter revealed through the power of light

New chemistry research demonstrates how 'hidden' phases of matter can be activated by extremely fast pulses of light. This fundamental scientific breakthrough paves the way for creating materials that can be imbued with new properties, such as conducting electricity or making it magnetic.

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Scientists report the first family of extracellular Rickettsia-like bacteria

Microbiologists of St Petersburg University, together with researchers from the University of Milan, the University of Pisa, and the University of Pavia, have discovered a new family of bacteria of the order Rickettsiales—Deianiraeaceae. This is the first report of the Rickettsia-like bacteria that display a unique extracellular lifestyle and are in fact predators.

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A new paradigm of material identification based on graph theory

Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) and National Materials Genome Project have been launched by American and Chinese government in the past decade. One of the major goals of these missions is to facilitate the identification of materials data to speed material discovery and development. Current methods are promising candidates to identify structures effectively, but have limited ability to deal with

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Scientists report the first family of extracellular Rickettsia-like bacteria

Microbiologists of St Petersburg University, together with researchers from the University of Milan, the University of Pisa, and the University of Pavia, have discovered a new family of bacteria of the order Rickettsiales—Deianiraeaceae. This is the first report of the Rickettsia-like bacteria that display a unique extracellular lifestyle and are in fact predators.

9h

The art of money: New Paris museum puts economy centre stage

Do consumers make rational choices? It might not sound like the title of an art exhibit, but it's one of the questions visitors can contemplate at France's first museum aimed at revealing the arcane theories and systems underpinning the global economy.

9h

Using prevalent technologies and 'Internet of Things' data for atmospheric science

The use of prevalent technologies and crowdsourced data may benefit weather forecasting and atmospheric research, according to a new paper authored by Dr. Noam David, a visiting scientist at the Laboratory of Associate Professor Yoshihide Sekimoto at the Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan. The paper, published in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences, reviews a number of re

9h

Fester och presenter skapade allianser under järnåldern

Kungshögen i Sunnerby som ligger på Kållandsö i Vänern grävdes ut 2000 – 2012 av Annelie Nitenberg och Anna Nyqvist Thorsson vid Göteborgs universitet. De grävde också ut en stor hall och en storgård intill högen, som visar att platsen varit säte för en lokal elit som visade sin makt genom exklusiva vanor och monument. Både storhögen och hallen har daterats till 600-talet e Kr, det vill säga Vende

9h

German railways to stop using glyphosate on tracks

German state-owned rail operator Deutsche Bahn is to stop using glyphosate on its tracks and is looking for substitutes to replace the controversial weedkiller, one of its board members said in an interview Friday.

9h

As the Hunt Drags Out, Physicists Start Searching for the Lightest Dark Matter

The Large Underground Xenon experiment in South Dakota is one of many projects searching for dark matter and coming up empty. (Credit: LUX Collaboration) Dark matter, the invisible material that so far shows itself only through the pull of its gravity, was first proposed nearly a century ago. It took another half-century to truly ignite the physics community. But at this point, a plethora of highl

9h

How Sweden went from 'least democratic' to welfare state

In a new study, Lund University economic historian Erik Bengtsson debunks the myth that Sweden was destined to become a social democratic country. Instead, he argues that it was actually against all odds, as Sweden in the early 1900s was one of the western world's most unequal countries—and the least democratic in western Europe.

9h

German railways to stop using glyphosate on tracks

German state-owned rail operator Deutsche Bahn is to stop using glyphosate on its tracks and is looking for substitutes to replace the controversial weedkiller, one of its board members said in an interview Friday.

9h

Development of durable MTJ under harsh environment for STT-MRAM at 1Xnm technology node

Researchers at Tohoku University have announced the development of a new magnetic tunnel junction, by which the team has demonstrated an extended retention time for digital information without an increase of the active power consumption.

9h

The current Nor­we­gian Bar­ents Sea oil spill risk governance frame­work would need con­sid­er­able re­mod­el­ling

A recent case study from the University of Helsinki examines different ways of framing oil spill risks with regard to the Norwegian Barents Sea where new areas have been recently opened for oil exploration and exploitation. The study demonstrates that there is an urgent need for new ways of integrating different risk frames and multiple ways of knowing into the risk governance processes of complex

9h

Oscillating quasiparticles: the cycle of decay and rebirth

Decay is relentless in the macroscopic world: Broken objects do not fit themselves back together again. However, other laws are valid in the quantum world: New research shows that so-called quasiparticles can decay and reorganize themselves again and are thus become virtually immortal. These are good prospects for the development of durable data memories.

9h

Small steps, big leaps – how marram grass builds dunes

The size and shape of dunes varies greatly around the world: in Europe they're tall and narrow, while in the US they're low and wide. A new study has found that this is partly because dunes are constructed by plants with different 'movement strategies' determining the shape of the dune. The study was carried out by ecologists from Radboud University, the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Researc

9h

As Cars Become Increasingly Driverless, People Are Already Seeking Analogue Motoring Experiences

According to those in the industry, and researchers too, driverless cars will totally revolutionize the way we think about individual transport. They will change the way we work and rest . They could herald the end of traffic jams , and have the potential to change the lives of disabled people, to give a few examples. But as the push to get autonomous vehicles on the roads accelerates , there is

9h

Small steps, big leaps – how marram grass builds dunes

The size and shape of dunes varies greatly around the world: in Europe they're tall and narrow, while in the US they're low and wide. A new study has found that this is partly because dunes are constructed by plants with different 'movement strategies' determining the shape of the dune. The study was carried out by ecologists from Radboud University, the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Researc

10h

10h

Black holes and The Flash: new book explores why people fear particle accelerators

A US academic finds surprising roots for a widespread public unease about the Large Hadron Collider and similar facilities. Andrew Masterson reports.

10h

The past and promise of Cassini’s legacy

Almost two years after it ended, NASA’s most successful probe is still proving answers, and generating fresh questions. Richard A Lovett reports.

10h

A rapid, easy-to-use DNA amplification method at 37 Celcius

Scientists in Japan have developed a way of amplifying DNA on a scale suitable for use in the emerging fields of DNA-based computing and molecular robotics. By enabling highly sensitive nucleic acid detection, their method could improve disease diagnostics and accelerate the development of biosensors, for example, for food and environmental applications.

10h

SPbU scientists have discovered the first family of extracellular Rickettsia-like bacteria

Microbiologists of St Petersburg University, together with researchers from the University of Milan, the University of Pisa, and the University of Pavia, have discovered a new family of bacteria belonging to the order Rickettsiales — Deianiraeaceae. This is the first report of the Rickettsia-like bacteria that display a unique extracellular lifestyle and are in fact predators.

10h

No evidence for increased egg predation in the Arctic

Climate and ecosystems are changing, but predation on shorebird nests has changed little across the globe over the past 60 years, finds an international team of 60 researchers. The study published in Science on 14 June 2019 challenges a recent claim that shorebird eggs are more often eaten by predators due to climate change, and more so in the Arctic compared to the tropics. The research shows tha

10h

How Sweden went from 'least democratic' to welfare state

In a new study, Lund University economic historian Erik Bengtsson debunks the myth that Sweden was destined to become a social democratic country. Instead, he argues that it was actually against all odds, as Sweden in the early 1900s was one of the western world's most unequal countries — and the least democratic in western Europe.

10h

Overweight men are inhibiting childbirth

About 15% of couples in fertile age have experienced fertility problems. Men contribute to 50% of the cases when a couple cannot achieve the desired pregnancy. The proportion of overweight men has tripled in parallel with the increase in fertility problems worldwide. The doctoral thesis conducted at the University of Tartu Institute of Clinical Medicine confirmed that central obesity affects ferti

10h

Part of the immune strategy of the strawberry plant is characterized

A University of Cordoba research group classified a gene family responsible for partial control of strawberry defense mechanisms when attacked by common pathogens in crop fields

10h

International experts call for action for world's 450 million scabies sufferers

An alignment of researchers, health ministries and the World Health Organization has outlined the steps to develop a global program to control scabies — the parasitic disease affecting 450 million people annually in mainly low-income countries. The paper published in The Lancet journal was led by Murdoch Children's Research Institute, in collaboration with the International Alliance for the Contr

10h

Phantom sensations: When the sense of touch deceives

Without being aware of it, people sometimes wrongly perceive tactile sensations. A new study in the scientific journal 'Current Biology' shows how healthy people can sometimes misattribute touch to the wrong side of their body, or even to a completely wrong part of the body. The study was conducted by researchers at Bielefeld University's Cluster of Excellence CITEC, the University of Hamburg, and

10h

Indigestion remedy slows kidney function decline and improves survival in late-stage CKD

As chronic kidney disease (CKD) progresses, the kidneys become less able to maintain a healthy balance of acids in the body. To maintain healthy acid levels, people with CKD are treated with alkaline substances such as sodium bicarbonate, also commonly used to neutralize heartburn and indigestion. The UBI study shows that sodium bicarbonate halves the risk of kidney disease progression, the likeli

10h

Student creates portable wallet to keep medication cool after being inspired by girlfriend's story

A student from Loughborough University has designed a portable wallet to keep medication cool after being inspired by his girlfriend who was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

10h

Can we still have fun if the UK goes carbon neutral?

Will Britain going carbon neutral mean no more fun? Experts from the University of Surrey have urged local policy makers to put in place infrastructure that will enable people to enjoy recreation and leisure while keeping their carbon footprint down.

10h

American football: the first quarter is crucial

Researchers from Dartmouth College, New Hampshire have found evidence that players born in the first quarter of the year are more likely to play in the National Football League.

10h

Divorced dads often dissed by schools

By the time Father's Day takes place, the school year is usually over.

10h

A rapid, easy-to-use DNA amplification method at 37 Celcius

Scientists in Japan have developed a way of amplifying DNA on a scale suitable for use in the emerging fields of DNA-based computing and molecular robotics. By enabling highly sensitive nucleic acid detection, their method could improve disease diagnostics and accelerate the development of biosensors, for example, for food and environmental applications.

10h

Power shift needed to improve gender balance in energy research, report says

Women still face significant barriers in forging successful and influential careers in UK energy research, a new high-level report has revealed.

10h

Forsøg med førerløse busser udstiller teknologiske mangler

PLUS. I lande som USA, Østrig og Norge har de førerløse shuttle-busser tilbagelagt talrige kilometer. Men meget foregår stadig manuelt.

10h

Lawyers suggest better labeling on prophetic patent applications

A pair of lawyers, one with Fordham University, the other, Stanford Law School, have published a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science in which they decry the use of poor labeling on prophetic …

10h

Not All Military Bases Plan for Warming, Watchdog Finds

The Defense Department recognizes the risks posed by climate change, but needs to do more to protect its facilities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

From rain to flood

Extreme weather events such as thunderstorms, heavy rainfall and resulting floods, influence Earth and environmental systems in the long term. To study the impacts of hydrological extremes holistically—from precipitation to water entering the ground to discharge to flow into the ocean—a measurement campaign at Müglitztal/Saxony is about to start under the MOSES Helmholtz Initiative. The measuremen

10h

Understanding social structure is important to rewilding

Increasing the success of wildlife translocations is critical, given the escalating global threats to wildlife. A study published in May 2019 in the journal Global Ecology and Conservation highlights the influence of a species' social structure on translocation success, and it provides a template for incorporating social information in the rehabilitation and release planning process. Using elephan

10h

Oldest axial fossils discovered for the genus Australopithecus

Scientists have published an article describing the oldest axial fossils yet discovered for the genus Australopithecus. Dated 4.2 million years ago, these and other fossils recovered from the Assa Issie site in the Middle Awash extend the known range of A. anamensis into northeastern Ethiopia. The fossils from the Assa Issie are extremely fragmentary, but each represents an important element previ

10h

One class in all languages

Advances in communication technology have had a major impact in all sorts of industries, but perhaps none bigger than in education. Now, anyone from around the world can listen live to a Nobel Prize laureate lecture or earn credits from the most reputable universities via internet access. However, the possible information to be gained from watching and listening online is lost if the audience cann

10h

Immortal quantum particles

Decay is relentless in the macroscopic world: broken objects do not fit themselves back together again. However, other laws are valid in the quantum world: new research shows that so-called quasiparticles can decay and reorganize themselves again and are thus become virtually immortal. These are good prospects for the development of durable data memories.

10h

The current Nor­we­gian Bar­ents Sea risk governance frame­work would need con­sid­er­able

A recent case study from the University of Helsinki examines different ways of framing oil spill risks with regard to the Norwegian Barents Sea where new areas have been recently opened for oil exploration and exploitation. The study demonstrates that there is an urgent need for new ways of integrating different risk frames and multiple ways of knowing into the risk governance processes of complex

10h

Benefits beyond fracture risk reduction? Results of the VITALE study

While a kidney transplant can restore healthy kidney function, recipients remain at increased risk of fractures, heart disease, diabetes and some cancers. The VITALE study shows that, compared with currently recommended doses, high doses of oral vitamin D? (cholecalciferol) lower the risk of fractures, but have no effect on the risks of heart disease, diabetes or cancer after a kidney transplant [

10h

Dickkopf-related protein 3 (DKK3) predicts AKI

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after cardiac surgery. The severity fluctuates from subclinical AKI, an increase in biochemical markers, to severe AKI requiring dialysis. Furthermore, AKI impacts hospitalization and mortality. AKI is often diagnosed late – therefore the search for reliable biomarkers for its prediction is important. A new study published in 'The Lancet' showed t

10h

Linagliptin improved albuminuria but effect on eGFR and CV risk in patients with diabetes

In the CARMELINA trial nearly 10% of all patients with diabetes had nephrotic-range proteinuria at baseline. This was associated with a high incidence of cardiovascular/kidney disease but this secondary disease burden could not be lowered by linagliptin. The antidiabetes drug reduced albuminuria and HbA1c in all patients, but did not affect the cardiovascular (CV) risk over 2.2 years. Additionally

10h

Researchers take two steps toward green fuel

An international collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT),Japan, has developed a two-step method to more efficiently break down carbohydrates into their single sugar components, a critical process in producing green fuel.

10h

Using prevalent technologies and 'Internet of Things' data for atmospheric science

The use of prevalent technologies and crowdsourced data may benefit weather forecasting and atmospheric research. The data from these new 'sensors' could be assimilated into high-resolution numerical prediction models, and thus may lead to improvements in forecasting capabilities. The contribution to public health and safety as a result could potentially be of significant value.

10h

Butting out: Researchers gauge public opinion on tobacco product waste

Requiring cigarettes to contain biodegradable filters, fining smokers who litter cigarette butts and expanding smoke free outdoor areas are measures the public considers are most likely to reduce tobacco product waste, new University of Otago research reveals.

10h

Understanding social structure is important to rewilding

Increasing the success of wildlife translocations is critical, given the escalating global threats to wildlife. A study published in May 2019 in the journal Global Ecology and Conservation highlights the influence of a species' social structure on translocation success, and it provides a template for incorporating social information in the rehabilitation and release planning process. Using elephan

10h

A Look Inside the Deep-Sea Graveyard for Dead Spacecraft

Watery Grave Deep beneath the Pacific Ocean at Point Nemo, the region between New Zealand and South America farthest from any landmass, lies a mass grave containing hundreds of discarded carcasses. These bodies, often shattered into several pieces as they descended , were once satellites, rockets, space stations, and other spacecraft carefully steered into the remote patch of ocean, dubbed the Sp

10h

A metal-free, sustainable approach to carbon dioxide reduction

Researchers in Japan have presented an organic catalyst for carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction that is inexpensive, readily available and recyclable. As the level of catalytic activity can be tuned by the solvent conditions, their findings could open up many new directions for converting CO2 to industrially useful organic compounds.

10h

A new method for the generation of intense X-ray and gamma-ray radiation

International group of researchers including scientists from Skoltech have invented a new method for the generation of intense X-ray and gamma-ray radiation based on nonlinear Compton scattering. Their results were published in Physical Review Letters.

10h

Brain signals can reveal how “awake” a fly’s brain is

A new test for measuring awareness in fruit flies could change the way neuroscientists think about and measure consciousness.

10h

Autonomous Mobility »Vores kunder forstår teknologiens begrænsninger«

PLUS. Importøren af de franske Navya-busser, Autonomous Mobility, afviser at have skruet forventningerne unødigt højt i vejret.

10h

Raising fluid walls around living cells

Cell culture plates that are in everyday use in biology can be effectively transformed into microfluidic devices, opening paths for biologists to miniaturize cell-based workflows. In a recent report, Ph.D. researcher Cristian Soitu and co-workers in the departments of Engineering Science and Pathology at the University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K., described a simple method to create microfluidic arran

10h

Artificial intelligence improves seismic analyses

The challenge to analyze earthquake signals with optimum precision grows along with the amount of available seismic data. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), researchers have deployed a neural network to determine the arrival-time of seismic waves and thus precisely locate the epicenter of the earthquake. In their report in the Seismological Research Letters journal, they point out tha

10h

Life on Jupiter's moon Europa? Discovery of table salt on the surface boosts hopes

Europa, a frozen moon around Jupiter, is believed to be one of the most habitable worlds in the solar system. It was first imaged in detail by the Voyager 1 probe in 1979, revealing a surface almost devoid of large craters. This suggested that water regularly floods up from inside, resurfacing the satellite. Europa is also criss-crossed with long troughs, folds and ridges, potentially made of iceb

10h

Electron beam strengthens recyclable nanocomposite

Carbon fiber-enhanced thermoplastic polymer mechanical properties improve when irradiated with an electron beam, report researchers at Kanazawa University in the journal Composites Part A.

10h

Heritable behavioral differences between cat breeds

Cat breeds differ from each other in behavior with regard to activity, aggressiveness, shyness, sociability and stereotypical behavior. A study conducted at the University of Helsinki discovered that behavioral traits are highly heritable. Heritability of behavior explains differences between breeds.

10h

Scientists investigate climate and vegetation drivers of terrestrial carbon fluxes

A better understanding of terrestrial flux dynamics will come from elucidating the integrated effects of climate and vegetation constraints on gross primary productivity, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem productivity.

10h

Online shopping interventions may help customers buy healthier foods

Altering the default order in which foods are shown on the screen, or offering substitutes lower in saturated fat could help customers make healthier choices when shopping for food online, according to a study published in the open access International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

10h

Baby socks found to contain traces of bisphenol A and parabens

A study conducted by scientists from the UGR and the San Cecilio Clinical Hospital in Granada, Spain, has discovered traces of these two toxic chemicals in fabrics used in babywear. The hormonal activity of these chemicals can lead to serious illnesses. Baby socks purchased at a bargain store were found to contain an amount of bisphenol A 25 times higher than in those of a low-cost international r

10h

NIAID scientists develop 'mini-brain' model of human prion disease

Scientists have used human skin cells to create what they believe is the first cerebral organoid system, or 'mini-brain,' for studying sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). CJD is a fatal neurodegenerative brain disease of humans believed to be caused by infectious prion protein. The researchers, from NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, hope the human organoid model wi

10h

Development of durable MTJ under harsh environment for STT-MRAM at 1Xnm technology node

Researchers at Tohoku University have announced the development of a new magnetic tunnel junction, by which the team has demonstrated an extended retention time for digital information without an increase of the active power consumption.

10h

A new paradigm of material identification based on graph theory

Automatic deduplication for big materials database is achieved for the first time. Feng Pan and his colleagues, from Peking Univerisy Shenzhen Graduate School, propose a new paradigm based on graph theory (GT scheme) to improve the efficiency and accuracy of material identification, which focuses on processing the 'topological relationship.'

10h

Understanding social structure is important to rewilding

Increasing the success of wildlife translocations is critical, given the escalating global threats to wildlife. The study highlights the influence of a species' social structure on translocation success, and it provides a template for incorporating social information in the rehabilitation and release planning process. Using elephants as a model, the study highlights the need to include animal soci

10h

Hot Wheels goes digital with smart tracks and NFC cars, exclusively at Apple Stores

Mattel is introducing Hot Wheels id, which lets kids race their NFC-enabled Hot Wheels on its Smart Track, and scan their collections into a free iOS app. In the app, which acts …

10h

New record: 3-D-printed optical-electronic integration

Optoelectronic integration offers a promising strategy to simultaneously obtain the merits of electrons and photons when they serve as information carriers, including high-density communication and high-speed information processing, paving the way for the next-generation integrated circuits (ICs).

10h

Racial abuse is rife in junior sports—and little is being done to address it

The AFL and its clubs have finally issued an apology to two-time Brownlow Medallist Adam Goodes for their handling of the relentless racist booing that marred his last year of football in 2015. This apology is welcome, though certainly overdue.

10h

Lawyers suggest better labeling on prophetic patent applications

A pair of lawyers, one with Fordham University, the other, Stanford Law School, have published a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science in which they decry the use of poor labeling on prophetic patent applications. In their paper, Janet Freilich and Lisa Larrimore Ouellette point out that it is possible to apply for and receive a patent on an invention that has not yet been demonstrated. They n

10h

Making the 'human-body internet' more effective

Wireless technologies such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth have made remote connectivity easier, and as electronics become smaller and faster, the adoption of "wearables" has increased. From smart watches to implantables, such devices interact with the human body in ways that are very different from those of a computer. However, they both use the same protocols to transfer information, making them vulnerab

10h

Lilly’s Virtual Med-Chem Assistant

Here’s an interesting new paper from Lilly (brought to my attention by Ash Jogalekar on Twitter). “Creating a virtual assistant for medicinal chemistry” is the title, but fear not: this is not something that’s come to elbow you aside at the bench. Well, not yet. What they’re talking about is a software agent that is taking on the job of handing around information around the project as it’s genera

10h

The Dead Don’t Die Is Awfully Lifeless

In Jim Jarmusch’s The Dead Don’t Die , a terrible calamity engulfs the world: Zombies rise from the grave and start indiscriminately consuming the flesh of the living. The townspeople of Centerville, the fictional sleepy burg where the film’s action is set, react as one might imagine, by running in terror, barricading themselves in their homes, and praying for survival. Some of them hope against

10h

Gaining a better understanding of what happens when two atoms meet

An international team of researchers has demonstrated a new way to gain a detailed understanding of what happens when two atoms meet. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their experiments, which involved observing closely as two atoms came into contact with one another.

10h

Database helps put Canadian tornadoes on the map

No longer will important information about severe storms across the country—information that could save countless lives—be simply gone with the wind.

10h

A rapid, easy-to-use DNA amplification method at 37°C

Scientists have developed a way of amplifying DNA on a scale suitable for use in the emerging fields of DNA-based computing and molecular robotics. By enabling highly sensitive nucleic acid detection, their method could improve disease diagnostics and accelerate the development of biosensors, for example, for food and environmental applications.

10h

Golf's Longest Drives Are Creeping Up and Changing the Sport

The average distance of PGA drives has been rising steadily due to changes in equipment and training. But it's still almost impossible to hit 450 yards.

10h

Many of the world’s rivers are flush with dangerous levels of antibiotics

Antibiotic pollution can fuel drug resistance in microbes. A global survey of rivers finds unsafe levels of antibiotics in 16 percent of sites.

10h

Researchers developing new treatment that could protect people with cardiovascular disease

New research is paving the way for the first medical treatment to help protect people from cardiovascular disease by boosting the body's natural defences. Researchers have found a link between a peptide called apelin and a reduction of abdominal aortic aneurysms that dramatically reduced mortality in mice. The team is hoping to replicate those results in patients suffering from, or at risk for, ca

11h

Novel communications architecture for future ultra-high speed wireless networks

SEARCHLIGHT project radically rethinks wireless architectures for highly scalable ultra-dense millimeter-wave networks. Millimeter-wave technology will achieve data rates previously only possible with optical fiber.

11h

The rise of the grey vote: cultural backlash?

Explanations of why people voted for Brexit, Donald Trump or so-called populist parties in the EU are often characterised as either 'cultural' or 'economic' – that is, values or identity-based, versus social class or economic, explanations. One of the most important recent examples of the former is the work of Ronald Inglehart and Pippa Norris. Their 'cultural backlash' thesis maintains that recen

11h

New satellites show worrying view of droughts and ice loss

Data from new satellites reveal the alarming extent of the recent drought in Australia and confirms a significant loss of ice in Antarctica, say ANU scientists.

11h

Using carbon nanotubes to strengthen graphene-based membranes used for desalination

A team of researchers from China, the U.S. and Japan has developed a way to strengthen graphene-based membranes intended for use in desalination projects—by fortifying them with nanotubes. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they created their fortified membranes and how well the membranes worked when tested. Baoxia Mi, with the University of California, has pu

11h

Researchers create virtual model based on recovered blue wall

Researchers at Dalhousie have scanned the skeleton of a young blue whale, giving them a trove of data on the endangered marine giant and creating a unique virtual 3D model of the largest animal on the planet.

11h

Translating university lectures in multiple languages

Researchers report a new machine translation system that outputs subtitles in multiple languages for archived university lectures. As countries like China and Japan expand their international student cohort, this system could relax language demands and allow the students to study in their mother tongue.

11h

Vagus nerve stimulation study shows significant reduction in rheumatoid arthritis symptoms

The results of a pilot study suggest that electro stimulation of one of the nerves connecting the brain to the body (the vagus nerve), could provide a novel treatment approach for patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

11h

A rapid, easy-to-use DNA amplification method at 37°C

Scientists have developed a way of amplifying DNA on a scale suitable for use in the emerging fields of DNA-based computing and molecular robotics. By enabling highly sensitive nucleic acid detection, their method could improve disease diagnostics and accelerate the development of biosensors, for example, for food and environmental applications.

11h

Discovery of new genetic causes of male infertility

The man is implicated in about half of all cases of infertility. Despite the known importance of genetic factors in the non-production of sperm, only about 25% of these cases can be explained currently. Now a study has uncovered new potential genetic causes, and this discovery will help to develop better diagnostic tests for male infertility.

11h

Leddegigtpatienter værdsætter viden om rygning

Stor interesse for viden om rygnings betydning blandt patienter med reumatoid artrit, viser interviewundersøgelse

11h

Psoriasisgigt giver fortsat høj risiko for ledkirurgi

Stort dansk registerstudie præsenteret på EULAR peger på, at mange psoriasisartritpatienter fortsat gennemgår et ledkirurgisk indgreb tidligt i sygdomsforløbet.

11h

MR-fund forbedrer forudsigelse af sygdomsprogression

MR-scanninger af betændelse omkring sener og knoglemarvsinflammation kan bruges til at forudsige øget risiko for fremadskridende ledødelæggelse hos leddegigtpatienter, hvor sygdommen tilsyneladende er i ro, viser undersøgelse som Signe Møller-Bisgaard har præsenteret på EULAR

11h

Original og biosimilær etanercept er lige gode

Patienter med rygsøjlegigt bliver lige så godt fastholdt i behandlingen med den biosimilære- som med den originale version af etanercept, viser nordisk undersøgelse præsenteret på EULAR

11h

Skærpet opmærksomhed om neurologiske følger af biologisk behandling

Dansk-svensk studie peger på øget risiko for visse neurologiske sygdomme blandt patienter med psoriasisartrtit og spondylartrit, der behandles med TNF-alfahæmmere

11h

Saturn’s Largest Moon Would Make an Unbelievable Vacation Spot

If you’re looking for a scenic lakeside destination for your summer vacation, you have two options: Earth, and a moon of Saturn called Titan. These are the only two places in the solar system with bodies of liquid on the surface. Like Earth, Titan has an atmosphere, weather, and a natural cycle in which drops fall from puffy clouds onto the surface, before evaporating back up to start again. But

11h

OSIRIS-REx breaks another orbit record

On June 12, NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft performed another significant navigation maneuver—breaking its own world record for the closest orbit of a planetary body by a spacecraft.

11h

Laser trick produces high-energy terahertz pulses

A team of scientists from DESY and the University of Hamburg has achieved an important milestone in the quest for a new type of compact particle accelerator. Using ultra-powerful pulses of laser light, they were able to produce particularly high-energy flashes of radiation in the terahertz range having a sharply defined wavelength (color). Terahertz radiation is to open the way for a new generatio

11h

Study reveals everyday technology helps fight loneliness

A new report suggests that people feel less lonely when they have access to everyday technology such as a radio, television or tablet. The research, co-produced by the University of York and the loneliness charity WaveLength, looked at data collected from 445 people over two years and found that they rated their health more positively after being given new technology.

11h

Researchers create virtual model based on recovered blue wall

Researchers at Dalhousie have scanned the skeleton of a young blue whale, giving them a trove of data on the endangered marine giant and creating a unique virtual 3D model of the largest animal on the planet.

11h

The dancing species: How moving together in time helps make us human

Dancing is a human universal, but why? It is present in human cultures old and new; central to those with the longest continuous histories; evident in the earliest visual art on rock walls from France to South Africa to the Americas, and enfolded in the DNA of every infant who invents movements in joyful response to rhythm and song, long before she can walk, talk or think of herself as an 'I'. Da

11h

Datatilsynet undersøger stor hotelkæde: Mistanke om strafbare forhold

Datatilsynet undersøger om Arp-Hansen Hotel Group har slettet persondata i henhold til loven, fremgår det af tilsynets årsberetning for 2018.

11h

Heritable behavioral differences between cat breeds

Cat breeds differ from each other in behavior with regard to activity, aggressiveness, shyness, sociability and stereotypical behavior. A study conducted at the University of Helsinki discovered that behavioral traits are highly heritable. Heritability of behavior explains differences between breeds.

11h

"You Are Not Alone" / "Extraordinary Being" / "Shine" | Emeli Sandé

"We are intricately connected by the most glorious of energies," says singer-songwriter Emeli Sandé. Accompanied by Ray Angry on piano, Sandé sings three soaring ballads: "You Are Not Alone," "Extraordinary Being" and "Shine."

11h

Heritable behavioral differences between cat breeds

Cat breeds differ from each other in behavior with regard to activity, aggressiveness, shyness, sociability and stereotypical behavior. A study conducted at the University of Helsinki discovered that behavioral traits are highly heritable. Heritability of behavior explains differences between breeds.

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Cold Quasars Could Change Our Understandings of Galactic Death

Scientists have long believed that the formation of a quasar in a galaxy would spell the end of star formation there. A new analysis suggests that may not be the case. The post Cold Quasars Could Change Our Understandings of Galactic Death appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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How to handle wildlife in your yard

I heard a local story of a man who, in his excitement to kill a rattlesnake, used the only thing he had available—his thermos bottle. The next scene in this drama has the man in the hospital receiving anti-venom to treat a snake bite.

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How to handle wildlife in your yard

I heard a local story of a man who, in his excitement to kill a rattlesnake, used the only thing he had available—his thermos bottle. The next scene in this drama has the man in the hospital receiving anti-venom to treat a snake bite.

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Germs and geothermals: A uniquely New Zealand collaboration

Dr. Rob Keyzers from the School of Chemical and Physical Sciences is leading a long-running, uniquely New Zealand research project to help find new sources of antibiotics.

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Germs and geothermals: A uniquely New Zealand collaboration

Dr. Rob Keyzers from the School of Chemical and Physical Sciences is leading a long-running, uniquely New Zealand research project to help find new sources of antibiotics.

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Apple trak stikket i tide: Aabenraa-aflysning er billigt sluppet

Hverken byggeri, overskudsvarme, elnet eller grøn energiforsyning i Aabenraa var nået langt nok til, at Apples pludselige aflysning af et datacenter bliver dyr.

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Does hitting the snooze button really help you feel better?

To sleep or to snooze? You probably know the answer, but you don't prefer it. Most of us probably use the snooze function on our alarm clocks at some point in our lives. Just a few more minutes under the covers, a time to gather our thoughts, right? While such snoozing might seem harmless, it may not be. For starters, it is important to understand why we are using the snooze button in the first p

11h

Store mangler i leddegigtbehandlingen i Europa

Det kniber gevaldigt med at stille en diagnose indenfor seks uger, viser studie, der har undersøgt patienter fra 27 europæiske lande.

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Tarmsygdom og diabetes øger risiko for leddegigt

Der er øget forekomst af type 1-diabetes og inflammatorisk tarmsygdom blandt patienter, der udvikler leddegigt, viser nyt amerikansk studie.

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Gigtsyge rammes af selvmordstanker

En ud af ti patienter med smerter i forbindelse med gigt- eller muskoloskeletale sygdomme har selvmordstanker, viser dansk studie. Samtidig er der alvorlig mangel på psykologbistand.

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Ny ledende overlæge til spareramt hjerteafdeling

Matias Greve Lindholm bliver ny ledende overlæge på hjerteafdelingen på Sjællands Universitetshospital. Den tidligere sagde op efter flere år med topstyring og besparelser.

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Despite dire predictions, levels of social support remain steady in the U.S.

Although Americans have faced waves of social, technological and economic disruption over the last few decades, a new study indicates that their perceptions of available social support have remained steady and, in some cases, may even be strengthening.

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Huawei Digs A Deeper Hole By Delivering Lock Screen Ads To Phones

Huawei might be facing an uncertain financial future in the wake of a recent ban imposed by the US government, but that is no reason to turn people's phones into billboards. Yet that is exactly …

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Minnena från Kubakrisen får nytt liv

Den så kallade Kubakrisen var en av de allvarligaste händelserna under det Kalla kriget. I oktober 1962 befann sig de två supermakterna USA och Sovjetunionen på gränsen till ett kärnvapenkrig. Krisen löstes på diplomatisk väg i slutet av oktober och de kärnvapenmissiler som Sovjetunionen placerat, på nio platser runtom på den kubanska landsbygden, fraktades tillbaka. Krisens förlopp och betydelse

11h

What Lost Treasure Would You Most Like to Find?

Christopher Benfey, author, If: The Untold Story of Kipling’s American Years Vermeer’s The Concert , taken from its frame in the Gardner Museum in 1990 and never recovered. A painting about life’s fugitive joys—music, friendship, the changing light—it turned out to be a fleeting joy itself. Graham Roumieu James Grant, author, Bagehot: The Life and Times of the Greatest Victorian We have Matthew’s

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Vietnam's first homegrown car to be delivered in days

Vietnam's homegrown carmaker VinFast will deliver its first cars on June 17, the company said Friday as it showcased a factory in one of Asia's fastest growing economies.

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Study looks to put engaged-learning to test

Despite the presence of engaged learning in classrooms for almost a decade, neither professors nor administrators truly know the impact of it has on post-graduation career paths—until now.

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Phase-change materials from smartphones may lead to higher data storage, energy efficiency

Phase-change materials that are used in the latest generation of smartphones could lead to higher storage capability and more energy efficiency. Data is recorded by switching between glassy and crystalline material states by applying a heat pulse. However, to date it has not been possible to study what happens at the atomic level during this process.

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Robots put on scrubs and help out at Danish hospitals

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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VR / AR as entertainment in 2040 – a possible hypothetical scenario [told from perspective of a future version of me]

The idea for this article was inspired by https://www.quantumrun.com/prediction/your-addictive-magical-augmented-life-future-internet-p6 and A Day in the Life of Loic de Meur in 2030 . Here I am focusing on one aspect of life in 2040 – VR as entertainment. It is August 2040, and I am 54 years old. I have decided to select an app on my VR set which allows me to virtually time travel and select the

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Billionaire: Future music will be AI generated to match our moods

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Rapid-response damage assessment gives new insight into recent Kansas tornado

Homes torn apart, outbuildings shattered, trees uprooted and power lines ripped from poles.

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YouTube Testimonials Lure Patients to Shady Stem-Cell Clinics

Emotional videos, often paid for by clinics, are attracting desperate patients to unproven stem-cell treatments that can be dangerous—or even deadly.

11h

What Is Ray Tracing? The Latest Gaming Buzzword Explained

If you're still in the dark about the latest advancement in videogame graphics, we're here to show you the light.

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Female Representation in Videogames Isn't Getting Any Better

The number of female protagonists in games showcased at E3 has remained low for years.

11h

Steroid binding to metabolic enzyme

The human cytochrome P450 enzymes are responsible for metabolizing a variety of substances—from lipids (fats) and steroid hormones to drugs and toxic chemicals.

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Proposal to mine fossil-rich site in New Zealand sparks campaign to protect it

An Australian company's application to mine a fossil-rich site in the south of New Zealand has been met with fierce criticism and a campaign to protect it in perpetuity.

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How a cyber attack hampered Hong Kong protesters

Massive public protests taking place in Hong Kong over the past week are aimed at a new extradition law, known as the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance, that would see accused criminals extradited to mainland China to face prosecution.

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Steroid binding to metabolic enzyme

The human cytochrome P450 enzymes are responsible for metabolizing a variety of substances—from lipids (fats) and steroid hormones to drugs and toxic chemicals.

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Seaweed and sea slugs rely on toxic bacteria to defend against predators

Plants, animals and even microbes that live on coral reefs have evolved a rich variety of defense strategies to protect themselves from predators. Some have physical defenses like spines and camouflage. Others have specialized behaviors—like a squid expelling ink—that allow them to escape. Soft-bodied or immobile organisms, like sponges, algae and sea squirts, often defend themselves with noxious

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Image of the Day: Hot Stripes

Biologists study how a zebra's hair helps it keep cool.

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Seaweed and sea slugs rely on toxic bacteria to defend against predators

Plants, animals and even microbes that live on coral reefs have evolved a rich variety of defense strategies to protect themselves from predators. Some have physical defenses like spines and camouflage. Others have specialized behaviors—like a squid expelling ink—that allow them to escape. Soft-bodied or immobile organisms, like sponges, algae and sea squirts, often defend themselves with noxious

12h

Exciting plant vacuoles: Researchers shed new light on plant communication via electrical signals

Many biological processes in plants are similar to humans: Cells and tissues in grain plants, including maize, also communicate through electrical signals. The shape and frequency of these signals communicate different things. For example, they signal plants to respond to heat and cold, excessive light intensities or insect pests.

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Cassini reveals new sculpting in Saturn rings

As NASA's Cassini dove close to Saturn in its final year, the spacecraft provided intricate detail on the workings of Saturn's complex rings, new analysis shows.

12h

Did your primary school teacher lie to you about color?

At primary school you were taught that there are three primary colors: red, yellow and blue, and that you can mix these to make all other colors. This is not true. Or rather, it is only a rough approximation to the truth. My recent article, published in the Journal of Perceptual Imaging, digs into the history of color wheels and color mixing to find that the truth is more complex and more interest

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This diseased spine may hold clues to early dog-human relationship

Study debunks popular archaeological idea, but reveals something equally interesting about our oldest friends

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Big changes needed to fight harassment, group tells US biomedical agency

Nature, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01886-0 Advisory panel says US National Institutes of Health should treat sexual harassment more seriously and do more to help affected researchers.

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Exciting plant vacuoles: Researchers shed new light on plant communication via electrical signals

Many biological processes in plants are similar to humans: Cells and tissues in grain plants, including maize, also communicate through electrical signals. The shape and frequency of these signals communicate different things. For example, they signal plants to respond to heat and cold, excessive light intensities or insect pests.

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Ny behandling af leddegigt

Stimulering af vagusnerven reducerer symptomer på leddegigt.

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New technology aims to improve taste, shelf life, production of beer, food

Just in time for summer—a new technology to improve the taste, quality and shelf life of juice and other beverages, and help craft brewers make more beer.

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Discovery of light-induced ferroelectricity in strontium titanate

Light can be used not only to measure materials' properties, but also to change them. Especially interesting are those cases in which the function of a material can be modified, such as its ability to conduct electricity or to store information in its magnetic state. A team led by Andrea Cavalleri from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg have used terahertz

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Viewing the volcanoes of Bali—from orbit

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the island of Bali, one of the 27 provinces of Indonesia.

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Understanding and preparing for wildfire season

The recipe for disaster is simple. Throughout Western North America, millions of people live in high-risk wildfire zones thanks to increasingly dry, hot summers and abundant organic fuel in nearby wildlands.

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Researchers report efficient platform technology for producing cephalosporin antibiotics

Antibiotics save countless human lives—modern medicine without them is unimaginable. The largest proportion by volume of industrially produced antibiotics today are cephalosporins, structural variants of the first antibiotic, penicillin. Unfortunately, their production generates a considerable amount of waste products, some of which are questionable. In the European Journal of Organic Chemistry, s

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Former Defense Secretary Ash Carter Talks Iran, China, and Trump’s Late-Night Tweets

Former Secretary of Defense Ash Carter sat down with The Atlantic ’s editor in chief, Jeffrey Goldberg, yesterday to talk about his upcoming book, Inside the Five-Sided Box: Lessons From a Lifetime of Leadership in the Pentagon . The two also discussed Iran, China, and the tenure of President Donald Trump’s former defense secretary, Jim Mattis, Carter’s close friend. The conversation that follows

12h

The ‘Death Penalty’s Dred Scott’ Lives On

Curtis Flowers has faced six separate trials for a 1996 quadruple murder. Two ended in a mistrial; three others resulted in him being convicted and sentenced to death, but all three sentences were later overturned by the Mississippi Supreme Court on the basis of prosecutorial misconduct. In its third such ruling, the court found that the prosecutor had unconstitutionally struck African Americans

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'Star Trek' Logo Spotted on Mars

It looks like Starfleet is literally embedded on the planet next door.

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The Fish Egg That Traveled Through a Swan’s Gut, Then Hatched

These fish turn up in many surprising location, but this was one place scientists didn’t expect to find them.

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The Search for Habitable Alien Worlds in Earth's Backyard Heats Up

A new instrument designed to find potentially habitable alien worlds in the nearest star system to our own sun just revved up.

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Breaks in the Perfect Symmetry of the Universe Could Be a Window Into Completely New Physics

If this fundamental symmetry of the universe doesn’t hold, it could break open new physics.

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Twitter releases new trove of banned state propaganda

Social media giant Twitter on Thursday released a new archive of state-backed propaganda from accounts it has banned based in Iran, Russia, Spain and Venezuela.

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Researchers report efficient platform technology for producing cephalosporin antibiotics

Antibiotics save countless human lives—modern medicine without them is unimaginable. The largest proportion by volume of industrially produced antibiotics today are cephalosporins, structural variants of the first antibiotic, penicillin. Unfortunately, their production generates a considerable amount of waste products, some of which are questionable. In the European Journal of Organic Chemistry, s

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Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer

Chemists at EPFL have developed an efficient process for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, a key ingredient of synthetic fuels and materials.

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Længe ventet Skoleintra-afløser udskudt

Forældre må vente på Aula til på den anden side af efterårsferien.

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The Cannabis Culture Wars

Engaging with enthusiasts and alarmists alike can take its toll on one’s patience — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New quantum dot microscope shows electric potentials of individual atoms

A team of researchers from Jülich in cooperation with the University of Magdeburg has developed a new method to measure the electric potentials of a sample at atomic accuracy. Using conventional methods, it was virtually impossible until now to quantitatively record the electric potentials that occur in the immediate vicinity of individual molecules or atoms. The new scanning quantum dot microscop

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Britain bans 'harmful' gender stereotypes from ads

Ads featuring "harmful gender stereotypes" which are likely to cause offence will be banned in Britain from Friday under new rules that could have a major impact on the industry.

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Thai vets nurture lost baby dugong with milk and sea grass

A baby dugong that has developed an attachment to humans after being separated from its mother and getting lost in the ocean off southern Thailand is being nurtured by marine experts in hopes that it can one day fend for itself.

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Under fire over Monsanto's glyphosate, Bayer vows 'transparency'

Pharmaceutical giant Bayer announced Friday plans to invest five billion euros ($5.6 billion) over the next decade in a new generation of herbicides and promised more transparency after the Monsanto "watch list" scandal.

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Belief in Homeopathy Results in the Death of a 7-Year-Old Italian Child

Yet another child has suffered and died because of belief in pseudomedical nonsense, this time when his parents chose homeopathy rather than appropriate medical evaluation.

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Massive superflares have been seen erupting from stars like the sun

Older stars, like the sun, can still send out massive bursts of energy that can be seen from light-years away.

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Thai vets nurture lost baby dugong with milk and sea grass

A baby dugong that has developed an attachment to humans after being separated from its mother and getting lost in the ocean off southern Thailand is being nurtured by marine experts in hopes that it can one day fend for itself.

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Under fire over Monsanto's glyphosate, Bayer vows 'transparency'

Pharmaceutical giant Bayer announced Friday plans to invest five billion euros ($5.6 billion) over the next decade in a new generation of herbicides and promised more transparency after the Monsanto "watch list" scandal.

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We may be witnessing the birth of an exomoon around a distant world

A planet 370 light years away appears to be surrounded by a disc of dust the like of which we’ve never seen before. It may eventually turn into rings or moons

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The Highly Dangerous 'Triton' Hackers Have Probed the US Grid

The same hackers behind a potentially lethal 2017 oil refinery cyberattack are now sniffing at US electrical utility targets.

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Blame Utilities for Wildfires, But Blame Everyone Else Too

California is built to burn—explosively. Given we can’t depopulate the entire state, what has made the wildfire problem so bad, and how do we fix it?

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Why You Can't Look Away From #CursedImages

Cursed images, a meme genre that began on Tumblr, don't just titillate us in an ew-lol way. They also bind us together.

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How Amazon Cloned a Neighborhood to Test Its Delivery Robots

Amazon used cameras, lidar, and aerial photography to build a highly detailed digital map of a Seattle suburb, where it is testing Scout, its delivery robot.

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The Cannabis Culture Wars

Engaging with enthusiasts and alarmists alike can take its toll on one’s patience — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Humans Are Growing Weird, Bone Spikes on Their Skulls. Smartphones May Be the Culprit.

The hours we spend scrolling through our smartphones appear to be changing our skulls. This may be the reason why some people — especially the younger crowd — are developing a weird, bony spike just above their necks.

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Sciences recruiter SThree reaps benefits from strategy beyond UK

London-based specialist agency reports double-digit growth in international markets

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A Head Full of Fluid and Burning Eyes: NASA Astronaut Talks about His Year Living in Space

Scientific American spoke with Scott Kelly about the hardships of life in zero gravity and what it was like coming back to Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nordjysk software mindsker fejlbehandling af hjertepatienter

PLUS. Hjerteforskere fra Aalborg Universitet har udviklet en ny type software, der bruger data fra hjertemålinger så præcist, at kostbare og livstruende fejlbehandlinger med pacemakere kan undgås.

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Beasts of Burden: The Planet’s Other Imperiled Elephants

In rural Asian communities, elephants are lifelines, providing a means for earning a living through logging and a method for transporting people and goods through difficult terrain. A new book, "Giants of the Monsoon Forest," explores the long and mutually beneficial relationship between the two populations.

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The Illiberal Right Throws a Tantrum

By the tail end of the Obama administration, the culture war seemed lost. The religious right sued for détente, having been swept up in one of the most rapid cultural shifts in generations. Gone were the decades of being able to count on attacking its traditional targets for political advantage. In 2013, Chuck Cooper, the attorney defending California’s ban on same-sex marriage, begged the justic

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Braininess Is Now the Brand

Among the biggest surprises of the Democratic presidential campaign so far are the rise of Pete Buttigieg and the resurgence of Elizabeth Warren, both of whom, according to a new Des Moines Register poll , have moved into a virtual tie for second place in Iowa with Bernie Sanders. In many ways, the Buttigieg and Warren phenomena are distinct: Buttigieg promises generational change; Warren is almo

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The Marvel-Netflix Universe’s Final Hero

L ike the superhero-turned-private-investigator she brought to life with the Netflix drama Marvel’s Jessica Jones , Melissa Rosenberg prefers not to overstay her welcome. So, before the third season began filming in the summer of 2018, she chose to make it her last as the series’ showrunner. She signed a deal to develop projects at Warner Bros. Television. She told her cast, her fellow writers, a

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Snooping on Foreigners’ Facebook Feeds Is Ineffective and Creepy

Late last month, the State Department rolled out new rules that require nearly all foreigners applying for U.S. visas—about 15 million people each year—to disclose the handles they’ve used over the past five years on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest, Myspace, and 14 other social-media platforms. The program is unlikely to help identify people who pose a threat to the United States

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When Parents Try to Do It All, They Do It Poorly

Last week, a pediatrician sent me an email with a link to a paper she just published with several co-authors. “I thought you might like this!” The paper discusses baby formula, and the pediatrician figured I would find it interesting—which I did—because I’m an economist who writes about child care. As many new parents may (or may not) know, official guidelines suggest that parents boil water befo

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Louis C.K., #MeToo, and accountability: Why binary thinking doesn't help

The collective suffering society is going through with the #MeToo movement is the earmark that real change is happening, says comedian Pete Holmes. Abusers need to acknowledge their wrongdoing and, where possible, be open about their evolution and growth. Comedian Louis C.K.'s abuses and return to the stage have divided the comedy community and society on a broader scale. The debate predominately

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Hør ugens podcast: "Førerløse" busser må ofte styres manuelt

De kaldes "selvkørende", men teknologien er endnu ikke klar til at fragte passagerer uden en fører i bussen. Og så er Danmark med i et europæisk samarbejde om otte nye supercomputere.

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Make, Think, Imagine by John Browne — engineering a better world

Former boss of BP calls for greater imagination in planning and design to advance society at large

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Forensics Friday: Notice anything odd about this figure?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the sixth in a series, Forensics Friday. Take a look at the image below, and then take our … Continue reading Foren

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China announces hefty fines for unauthorized collection of DNA

Nature, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01868-2 A new law formalizes restrictions on the collection and use of people's genetic data.

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Her er Java 13: Ny funktion gør indlejret kode lettere at læse

Strenge, der løber over flere linjer og nemme arkiver, der giver hurtigere opstart, er blandt nyhederne i den næste udgave af Java.

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Future Toyota Cars Will Have Automatic Engine Shut Off And Automatic Parking

Leaving your car idling is probably one of the worst things you could do as far as fuel consumption is concerned. Perhaps in a bid to help improve on energy efficiency, Toyota has announced …

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Norwegians træplantning for klimaet visner

Flyselskabet Norwegian lancerede i 2017 kampagnen »Plant for planeten«, der skulle bekæmpe klimaændringer og kompensere for en del af CO2-udledningen fra sine fly. I dag er meget få træer plantet og størstedelen er døde.

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History of tea in China

The history of Chinese tea is a story of refinement and passion. The current methods of preparing and drinking Chinese tea took a very long time to develop. It started as a loyal drink for emperors and evolved to become of the best and loved beverage in the Chinese tradition and all over the world. It is difficult to exclude the impact of tea has on the culture of Chinese people. At various point

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Multiferroicity in atomic van der Waals heterostructures

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10693-0 Low dimensional multiferroic materials promise the technological advances in next generation spintronic and microwave magnetoelectric devices. Here the authors propose the multiferroicity in the atomically thin ferromagnetic Cr2Ge2Te6/ferroelectric In2Se3 van der Waals heterostructure due to the crosslayer magne

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Direct band-gap crossover in epitaxial monolayer boron nitride

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10610-5 Insulating hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is theoretically expected to undergo a crossover to a direct bandgap in the monolayer limit. Here, the authors perform optical spectroscopy measurements on atomically thin epitaxial hBN providing indications of the presence of a direct gap of energy 6.1 eV in the single a

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Domain-interface dynamics of CFTR revealed by stabilizing nanobodies

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10714-y The leading cause of cystic fibrosis is the deletion of phenylalanine 508 (F508del) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Here authors we develop nanobodies targeting NBD1 of human CFTR and demonstrate their ability to stabilize both isol

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Voltage-dependent gating of SV channel TPC1 confers vacuole excitability

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10599-x Electrical excitability in animals and plants is associated with voltage-gated Shaker-type K+ channels at the plasma membrane. Here, Jaślan et al. show that electrical excitability of the central organelle of plant cells, the vacuole, is based on the action of Ca2+-activated and K+-conducting TPC1 and TPK channe

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Structural basis for the inhibition of translation through eIF2α phosphorylation

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10606-1 During stress, protein synthesis is inhibited through phosphorylation of the initiation factor eIF2 on its alpha subunit and its interaction with eIF2B. Here the authors describe a structure of the yeast eIF2B in complex with its substrate – the GDP-bound phosphorylated eIF2, providing insights into how phosphor

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XX sex chromosome complement promotes atherosclerosis in mice

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10462-z Men and women differ in their risk of developing coronary artery disease, in part due to differences in their levels of sex hormones. Here, AlSiraj et al. show that the XX sex genotype regulates lipid metabolism and promotes atherosclerosis independently of sex hormones in mice.

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Mechanistic basis of L-lactate transport in the SLC16 solute carrier family

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10566-6 The transport of L-lactate across plasma membranes is catalyzed by proton-driven monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) of the SLC16 solute carrier family. Here, the authors present the crystal structures of a bacterial SLC16 homologue with the bound substrate L-lactate and ligand thiosalicylate both in an outward-

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Chromoselective access to Z- or E- allylated amines and heterocycles by a photocatalytic allylation reaction

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10441-4 Tsuji–Trost allylation is a traditional method for selective C-C bond formation that involves the use of palladium-based catalysts. Here, the authors report a metal-free, photocatalytic allylation of several heterocycles, amines and alcohols, which can be easily tuned towards the Z- or E- allylated product.

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Exciting plant vacuoles

Researchers have filled two knowledge gaps: The vacuoles of plant cells can be excited and the TPC1 ion channel is involved in this process. The function of this channel, which is also found in humans, has been a mystery so far.

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It's not easy being green

Despite how essential plants are for life on Earth, little is known about how parts of plant cells orchestrate growth and greening. By creating mutant plants, UC Riverside researchers have uncovered a cellular communication pathway sought by scientists for decades.

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Higher coronary artery calcium levels in middle-age may indicate higher risk for future heart problems

Middle-aged patients with higher levels of coronary artery calcium buildup were more likely to have higher left ventricular mass and worse left ventricular function of the heart, particularly among blacks.Higher coronary artery calcium scores may be a marker for future heart failure.Coronary artery calcium testing may help detect asymptomatic abnormalities among at-risk populations.

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Low connectivity compromises the conservation of reef fishes by marine protected areas in the tropical South Atlantic

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45042-0 Low connectivity compromises the conservation of reef fishes by marine protected areas in the tropical South Atlantic

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miR-29c overexpression and COL4A1 downregulation in infertile human endometrium reduces endometrial epithelial cell adhesive capacity in vitro implying roles in receptivity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45155-6 miR-29c overexpression and COL4A1 downregulation in infertile human endometrium reduces endometrial epithelial cell adhesive capacity in vitro implying roles in receptivity

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Functional roles of hnRNPA2/B1 regulated by METTL3 in mammalian embryonic development

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44714-1 Functional roles of hnRNPA2/B1 regulated by METTL3 in mammalian embryonic development

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Altered conformational structures of nervous necrosis virus surface protrusions and free coat proteins after incubation at moderate-low temperatures

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45094-2 Altered conformational structures of nervous necrosis virus surface protrusions and free coat proteins after incubation at moderate-low temperatures

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High-throughput sequencing of IgG B-cell receptors reveals frequent usage of the rearranged IGHV4–28/IGHJ4 gene in primary immune thrombocytopenia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45264-2 High-throughput sequencing of IgG B-cell receptors reveals frequent usage of the rearranged IGHV4–28/IGHJ4 gene in primary immune thrombocytopenia

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Shallow landslide disposition in burnt European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forests

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45073-7 Shallow landslide disposition in burnt European beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) forests

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Catfish capitals? Alaska tops the states where your online romance may be a scam

Summer romance is in the air and the special someone you just met at an online dating site or on social media seems too good to be true. The sad truth is the person just might turn out to be.

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Happiness and Harmony: 'Big step forward' as twin pandas grow

Born to a wild father and captive mother, nearly one-year-old twin pandas roll on the grass in a conservation base in southwest China, marking an important achievement in the preservation of the country's beloved animal.

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VW aims to raise up to 1.9bn euros by floating Traton

Volkswagen aims to raise between 1.6 billion and 1.9 billion euros ($2.1 billion) by listing between 10 and 11.5 percent of the capital for its truck division Traton on the stock market.

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Terrifying AI matches DNA to facial recognition databases

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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UK government invests $194M to commercialize quantum computing

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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one guy made a blockbuster quality animated short series

For anyone interested in futurology I can strongly advise Netflix's Love, Death & Robots which is a bit like animated Black Mirror. Or like the Animatrix. Either way these shorts must have cost a lot of money and a large team of people to make happen. But I follow this guy who makes animated shorts based on Warhammer 40K. They're just a minute or so long, and it takes him many months to create, b

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Happiness and Harmony: 'Big step forward' as twin pandas grow

Born to a wild father and captive mother, nearly one-year-old twin pandas roll on the grass in a conservation base in southwest China, marking an important achievement in the preservation of the country's beloved animal.

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Elon Musk says Teslas to get games 'Beach Buggy Racing 2,' 'Fallout Shelter'

Coming soon to a Tesla screen near you: A racing game that uses the car's steering wheel.

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Photos of the Week: Mammoth Swing, Stanley Cup, Frog Wedding

Art Basel displays in Switzerland, a volcanic eruption in North Sumatra, massive protests in Hong Kong, the L.A. Pride Festival in California, Fashion Week in London, jackaroo and jillaroo school in Australia, Women’s World Cup soccer in France, preparing for Cyclone Vayu in Pakistan, and much more

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Why Democrats Ditched the Hyde Amendment

Despite promises from 2020 presidential candidates and efforts from left-wing Democrats, the ban on federal funding for most abortions remains in place. This week, amid spending negotiations in the House, a freshman representative from Massachusetts, Ayanna Pressley, pushed a proposal to eliminate the Hyde Amendment , which bans reimbursement for most abortions through programs such as Medicaid,

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Harassment Common for National Institutes of Health Employees

More than 20 percent of survey respondents said they had experienced some form of harassment within the last 12 months.

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More Evidence In Office Temperature Battles

A recent study finds that the temperature of the workplace could be affecting productivity, and women might be getting the worst of it.

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Research uncovers elusive process essential to plant greening

Despite how essential plants are for life on Earth, little is known about how parts of plant cells orchestrate growth and greening. By creating mutant plants, UC Riverside researchers have uncovered a cellular communication pathway sought by scientists for decades.

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How do you go online? More of you are choosing phone over home broadband, Pew survey says

You get your internet at home by subscribing to a high speed broadband service, as do a majority of your fellow Americans. That is unless you're among the 1 in 4 adults who've ditched or passed on home broadband. And many of you who've come to that decision have found what you deem a suitable substitute: your smartphone.

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Research uncovers elusive process essential to plant greening

Despite how essential plants are for life on Earth, little is known about how parts of plant cells orchestrate growth and greening. By creating mutant plants, UC Riverside researchers have uncovered a cellular communication pathway sought by scientists for decades.

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Kunstig bugspytkirtel skal forbedre livskvaliteten for diabetikere

Kombinationen af to danske opfindelser skal give en bedre livskvalitet for mennesker med type 1-diabetes. Lykkes projektet, er det et gennembrud inden for diabetesbehandling, siger forsker.

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Sundhedspolitikeren Mette Frederiksen

Som tiltrædende statsminister er det Mette Frederiksens (S) opgave at sætte retningen for de kommende fire års sundhedspolitik. Men hvad er Mette Frederiksens vinkel på sundhed, og kan hun forene de røde partier og de Radikale om at løfte sundhedsvæsenet? Dagens Medicin tegner et billede af Mette Frederiksen dilemmaer.

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Det har Mette Frederiksen og dem, hun forhandler med, lovet på sundhedsområdet

Få et overblik over, hvad Socialdemokratiet, Radikale, SF og Enhedslisten vil på sundhedsområdet.

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Ny behandling af type 2-diabetes øger ikke risikoen for hjertekarsygdomme

En ny tablet mod diabetes øger ikke risikoen for hjertekarsygdomme. Det viser et nyt studie, som blev offentliggjort på ADA’s konference.

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Immunterapi forsinker type 1-diabetes med to år

Nyt studie viser, at immunterapeutisk behandling kan reducere eller forsinke risikoen for at udvikle type 1-diabetes hos patienter i høj risiko med mindst to år.

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Huawei-telefoner viser pludselig reklamer i låseskærm

Flere typer Huawei-telefoner begyndte for et par dage siden af afspille reklamer i låseskærmen, når ejerne af telefonerne have funktionen Magazine Unlock aktiveret.

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2018 var endnu et rekordår for verdens forbrug af gas

Det Internationale Energiagenturs seneste prognose forudser stigende produktion og forbrug af gas frem mod 2024. USA vil producere mere, og Kina vil forbruge mere.

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Publisher Correction: Enhanced food-related responses in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex in narcolepsy type 1

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44073-x Publisher Correction: Enhanced food-related responses in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex in narcolepsy type 1

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UK could use hydrogen instead of natural gas – if it can make enough

The UK can safely switch to using hydrogen for heating, power and manufacturing, but doing so will require a 10-fold production increase, says a new report

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To the Moon and back: 50 years on, a giant leap into the unknown

The first four days of Apollo 11's journey to the Moon had gone according to plan, but just twenty minutes before landing, the atmosphere grew tense as the crew encountered a series of problems.

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Revealing 'hidden' phases of matter through the power of light

Most people think of water as existing in only one of three phases: Solid ice, liquid water, or gas vapor. But matter can exist in many different phases—ice, for example, has more than ten known phases, or ways that its atoms can be spatially arranged. The widespread use of piezoelectric materials, such as microphones and ultrasound, is possible thanks to a fundamental understanding of how an exte

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Amid privacy firestorm, Facebook curbs research tool

Facebook has curbed access to a controversial feature allowing searches of the vast content within the social network—a tool which raised privacy concerns but was also used for research and investigative journalism.

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A rapid, easy-to-use DNA amplification method at 37°C

Scientists in Japan have developed a way of amplifying DNA on a scale suitable for use in the emerging fields of DNA-based computing and molecular robotics. By enabling highly sensitive nucleic acid detection, their method could improve disease diagnostics and accelerate the development of biosensors, for example, for food and environmental applications.

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Vagus nerve stimulation study shows significant reduction in rheumatoid arthritis symptoms

The results of a pilot study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) suggest that electro stimulation of one of the nerves connecting the brain to the body (the vagus nerve), could provide a novel treatment approach for patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

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Study reveals significant gaps in essential rheumatoid arthritis care across Europe and between European countries

The results of a large pan-European survey presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) investigated significant gaps in rheumatoid arthritis care across 16 patient-centered Standards of Care in rheumatoid arthritis.

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Inflammatory bowel disease and type I diabetes increase chances of developing rheumatoid arthritis

The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate increased rates of type I diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients that go on to develop rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

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Tildrakizumab shows promising efficacy and safety in psoriatic arthritis

The results of a phase 2B study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate superior efficacy and comparable safety of tildrakizumab versus placebo in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

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Suicidal thoughts related to pain in 1 in 10 patients with rheumatic or musculoskeletal disease

The results of a survey presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) highlight the significant impact of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) on mental health and a worrying lack of psychological care.

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Patient organization challenges government to bring vital support to people with rheumatic diseases in Cyprus

The campaign presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) reports how the Cyprus League Against Rheumatism (CYPLAR) successfully took on the Ministry of Health after authorization was denied to introduce specialized rheumatology nurses due to a perceived lack of interest in rheumatology education.

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'Deepfakes' called new election threat, with no easy fix

"Deepfake" videos pose a clear and growing threat to America's national security, lawmakers and experts say. The question is what to do about it, and that's not easily answered.

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Instagram, PlayStation hit with outages

An Instagram outage on Thursday left users of the Facebook-owned social network flocking to Twitter to vent frustration.

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'Hundreds' of elephants being poached each year in Botswana: report

A leading conservation group has warned of surging elephant poaching in parts of Botswana and estimated nearly 400 were killed across the country in 2017 and 2018, according to a report published Thursday, adding to conservation concerns.

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When the world stopped to watch Armstrong's moonwalk

When Neil Armstrong walked on the Moon, he became the biggest live television star in history.

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'Deepfakes' called new election threat, with no easy fix

"Deepfake" videos pose a clear and growing threat to America's national security, lawmakers and experts say. The question is what to do about it, and that's not easily answered.

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USDA plan to move offices sparks concerns about research

The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Thursday that it will relocate two research agencies' headquarters to the Kansas City area, delighting Kansas and Missouri officials but intensifying critics' fears that research will suffer and be less accessible to federal policymakers.

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'Hundreds' of elephants being poached each year in Botswana: report

A leading conservation group has warned of surging elephant poaching in parts of Botswana and estimated nearly 400 were killed across the country in 2017 and 2018, according to a report published Thursday, adding to conservation concerns.

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The AI tool that lets you turn basic paintbrush strokes into photorealistic images is now available to the public to try.

Here's a demo video teaching you the basics and here's the live demo app . submitted by /u/TransPlanetInjection [link] [comments]

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Uber to start delivering McDonald's by drone this summer

submitted by /u/Altrizmo [link] [comments]

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The benefits of open-source and what it can do for graphene

submitted by /u/davidwholt [link] [comments]

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Hyundai self-driving deal points to industry-wide pattern

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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How Close Are We to Launching the James Webb Space Telescope?

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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The fight against HIV: then and now – Science Weekly podcast

Earlier this year, the UK government announced it wanted to end new HIV transmissions in England by 2030. Hannah Devlin looks at the history of the epidemic, including its impact on the gay community, recent promising drug trials and whether Britain can meet its target Continue reading…

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A Turkish Opposition Leader Is Fighting Erdoğan With ‘Radical Love’

ISTANBUL—Consider the following scenario: You are an opposition leader in a deeply divided nation. Against all odds, you narrowly win a local election against a ruling party that controls the public space and censors the media, becoming mayor of the country’s largest city. Under government pressure, however, the authorities rule that the vote was rigged, deposing you from office and triggering a

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The fight against HIV: then and now – Science Weekly podcast

Earlier this year, the UK government announced it wanted to end new HIV transmissions in England by 2030. Hannah Devlin looks at the history of the epidemic, including its impact on the gay community, recent promising drug trials and whether Britain can meet its target. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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One class in all languages

Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report a new machine translation system that outputs subtitles in multiple languages for archived university lectures. As countries like China and Japan expand their international student cohort, this system could relax language demands and allow the students to study in their mother tongue.

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New research on the prevalence of JUUL use and awareness amongst US youth age 13 to 17

The Centre for Substance Use Research estimate the prevalence of awareness and use of the JUUL e-cigarette among adolescents in the United States.

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Study develops updated national birth weight reference

A new paper provides an updated national birth weight reference for the United States using the most recent, nationally representative birth data. The study, '2017 US reference for singleton birth weight percentiles using obstetric estimates of gestation,' led by the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, appears in the June 14, 2019 issue of Pediatrics online.

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Homing by Jon Day — pigeons and the sense of home

Day’s book melds nature writing with urban grit to examine our urge to take root

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The long-shot science that attracted Brad Pitt and Neil Woodford

Promise of abundant nuclear power propelled ‘cold fusion’ company to $918m valuation

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What got us to the Moon (and back) in 1969?

Fifty years on, it is time to reappraise the audacity and political will behind Apollo 11

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Trods store løfter: ‘Førerløse’ busser må ofte styres manuelt

PLUS. De kaldes selvkørende, men teknologien er endnu ikke klar til at fragte passagerer uden en fører i bussen. Producenter overdriver, hvad køretøjerne er i stand til, mener forsker.

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Can bluetooth headsets alleviate depression and insomnia?

Brain Machine Interfaces are wearable tech that probe the brain’s electrical circuitry

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NIH should ask both institutions and investigators to report sexual harassment findings, advisory group says

Proposed policies would go further than the National Science Foundation’s, but could face legal obstacles

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How the avidity of polymerase binding to the -35/-10 promoter sites affects gene expression [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Although the key promoter elements necessary to drive transcription in Escherichia coli have long been understood, we still cannot predict the behavior of arbitrary novel promoters, hampering our ability to characterize the myriad sequenced regulatory architectures as well as to design new synthetic circuits. This work builds upon a beautiful…

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Up-regulation of FOXO1 and reduced inflammation by {beta}-hydroxybutyric acid are essential diet restriction benefits against liver inȷury [Medical Sciences]

Liver ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major challenge in liver surgery. Diet restriction reduces liver damage by increasing stress resistance; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the preventive effect of 12-h fasting on mouse liver IRI. Partial warm hepatic IRI model in wild-type male C57BL/6…

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Two deep-mantle sources for Paleocene doming and volcanism in the North Atlantic [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) erupted in two major pulses that coincide with the continental breakup and the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean over a period from 62 to 54 Ma. The unknown mantle structure under the North Atlantic during the Paleocene represents a major missing link in…

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Social evolution leads to persistent corruption [Economic Sciences]

Cooperation can be sustained by institutions that punish free-riders. Such institutions, however, tend to be subverted by corruption if they are not closely watched. Monitoring can uphold the enforcement of binding agreements ensuring cooperation, but this usually comes at a price. The temptation to skip monitoring and take the institution’s…

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Treg-mediated prolonged survival of skin allografts without immunosuppression [Immunology and Inflammation]

Injection of Interleukin-2 (IL-2) complexed with a particular anti–IL-2 monoclonal antibody (mab) JES6-1 has been shown to selectively expand CD4+Foxp3+ T regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo. Although the potency of this approach with regard to transplantation has already been proven in an islet transplantation model, skin graft survival could…

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Region-specific and activity-dependent regulation of SVZ neurogenesis and recovery after stroke [Neuroscience]

Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. Neurogenesis after stroke is associated with repair; however, the mechanisms regulating poststroke neurogenesis and its functional effect remain unclear. Here, we investigate multiple mechanistic routes of induced neurogenesis in the poststroke brain, using both a forelimb overuse manipulation that models a clinical…

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Reversible silencing of endogenous receptors in intact brain tissue using 2-photon pharmacology [Pharmacology]

The physiological activity of proteins is often studied with loss-of-function genetic approaches, but the corresponding phenotypes develop slowly and can be confounding. Photopharmacology allows direct, fast, and reversible control of endogenous protein activity, with spatiotemporal resolution set by the illumination method. Here, we combine a photoswitchable allosteric modulator (alloswitch) and.

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HIF-1{alpha} is required for development of the sympathetic nervous system [Developmental Biology]

The molecular mechanisms regulating sympathetic innervation of the heart during embryogenesis and its importance for cardiac development and function remain to be fully elucidated. We generated mice in which conditional knockout (CKO) of the Hif1a gene encoding the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is mediated by an Islet1-Cre transgene…

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Spotting plants’ microfilament morphologies and nanostructures [Applied Physical Sciences]

The tracheary system of plant leaves is composed of a cellulose skeleton with diverse hierarchical structures. It is built of polygonally bent helical microfilaments of cellulose-based nanostructures coated by different layers, which provide them high compression resistance, elasticity, and roughness. Their function includes the transport of water and nutrients from…

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Topology on a new facet of bismuth [Physics]

Bismuth-based materials have been instrumental in the development of topological physics, even though bulk bismuth itself has been long thought to be topologically trivial. A recent study has, however, shown that bismuth is in fact a higher-order topological insulator featuring one-dimensional (1D) topological hinge states protected by threefold rotational and…

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‘Virtual biopsy’ device detects skin tumors in 15 minutes

A new “virtual biopsy” device uses sound vibrations and pulses of near-infrared light instead of a scalpel to quickly determine a skin lesion’s depth and potential malignancy, a new study reports. The ability to analyze a skin tumor non-invasively could make biopsies much less risky and distressing to patients, researchers say. Currently, physicians who perform surgical biopsies often don’t know

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Cutting back on beef can lengthen your lifespan, but by how much?

If this steak looks delicious to you, it's okay—you can still eat beef as part of a healthy diet. (Deposit Photos/) By now you know you're not supposed to eat loads of red meat . But for plenty of us, it's hard to look a juicy steak in the eye and say "no." Change is hard. And how much would it really impact things anyway? Nutritionists asked themselves the same question. So they tested it. And i

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Scientists are still straightening out the history of zebra stripes

Many scientists have taken a stance on what zebra stripes do, but no one has been able to zero in on the mechanisms involved. (Tom McNamara/) The zebra’s striking black and white stripes have long mystified biologists. Over the past few decades, scientists have devised numerous theories to explain the pattern’s bizarre existence: Maybe the wildly printed coat is essential to keep the animal cool

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DJI’s first STEM toy is a tank that teaches coding

RoboMaster S1 robots sit at the starting line for an intense race (that I lost badly). (Stan Horaczek/) When it comes to consumer-grade aerial drones , no one does it better than DJI. But the company designed its latest robot not to fly around the sky, but to cruise around on the ground. The DJI RoboMaster S1 has four burly wheels and a rotating turret on top. It looks like a scaled-down version

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These bowls suggest humans were already smoking weed by 420 BC

How humans encountered mind-altering cannabis remains a hotly contested debate among archaeologists. (Pixabay/) New research shows that humans might have been blazing it even earlier than we thought. A study published today in Science Advances analyzed chemical residue from 2,500 year-old wooden bowls in Central Asia and found what they believe is the oldest evidence of psychoactive cannabis smok

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Bitcoin mining’s carbon emissions are on-par with that of a small country

Bitcoin isn't a physical currency, but it still impacts the planet. (DepositPhotos/) Mining around the world is noted for its environmental impact: that’s true of Bitcoin mining as well. A new analysis from researchers at MIT and the University of Munich reveals that the computations required to produce this cryptocurrency take as much energy annually as an American city of more than 400,000 peop

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This frankencopter could be Uber’s flying taxi of the future

Jaunt's vision for an air taxi that could whisk four people and a pilot around cities. (Jaunt/) As Uber sees it, someday we might cruise around cities in small shareable electric aircraft. Yesterday and today, the ride-hailing company has been hosting a conference to discuss just that future, which Uber wants to roll out in Los Angeles, Dallas, and Melbourne as soon as 2023. The company’s newest

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Selling tickets to the space station is actually decades overdue

The space station is open for business. (NASA/) NASA announced last week that it would open the International Space Station up to new opportunities in the commercial sector, giving businesses the ability to send private astronauts into space for up to $35,000 a night. The move comes as part of a grander effort in U.S. space policy to hand the reins of low-Earth operations over to the commercial s

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The weirdest things we learned this week: labor-inducing salads and cat-eating coyotes

The solution to coyote-eating cats is simple. (DepositPhotos/) What's the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you'll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci's hit podcast . The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week hits Apple , Anchor , and everywhere else you listen to podcasts every Wednesday morning. It's your new favorite source for the strangest sc

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How to make an open office more quiet

Don't you hate it when you're trying to focus on entering numbers into a spreadsheet, but Samantha is watching sports highlights without headphones, Monique is describing her bowel issues to her doctor, and Ted is just… grunting? (Deposit Photos/) The open office is the most popular workplace layout of the 21st century, but it has a dark side. When everybody can see each other, the lack of priv

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Scientists are putting antibiotics into the ocean—on purpose. And it’s our only hope.

"Where we are with coral disease is about where we were with human health in the 1800s." (Illustration by Zohar Lazar/) The Florida Problem: A Special Report. Struggling crops. Salty aquifers. Invading wildlife. Piles of dead fish. The Sunshine State feels the squeeze of environmental change on its beaches, farms, wetlands, and cities. But what afflicts the peninsula predicts the perils that will

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The best tips and tricks for Amazon Music Unlimited

Just two cool friends sittin' on the ground next to a car, jammin' to some sweet tunes. (Wesley Tingey via Unsplash/) Amazon Music Unlimited is the tech giant's version of Spotify: a catalog of more than 50 million songs available to stream on demand, for one flat monthly fee. If you're an Amazon Prime member, that fee is $8 a month , but if you're not, it'll cost you $10 per month. To help you g

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Everything you need to know about DIY sunscreen

You may be in for a surprise. (Suzanne Tucker/Shutterstock/) Using natural and organic products for skin care is increasingly popular—and that includes sunscreen. Many websites, including Pinterest and Instagram , feature users' recipes for homemade sunscreens. Judging from the commentary, the surge in interest for homemade sunscreens is because some people fear the chemicals in shop-bought sunsc

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Car gear for the person who might love their car more than you

Have everything you need in your car. (Samuel Foster via Unsplash/) People love their automobiles. Depending on where you live, you might feel like you spend more time in your car than you do at home. If you’re a vehicle fanatic—or you know someone that is—here are some sweet accessories to ease traffic pain, keep your car tidy, or just flat-out pimp your ride. Charge your phone and ask Alexa to

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Saving Greenland could save the world

Icebergs float in a Greenland Fjord in June. (Paul Bierman/) Every year, about half of Greenland’s ice losses happen on the edges, through glaciers like Jakobshavn. But another half is lost through melting on its surface. This melting comprises turquoise lakes and rushing aquamarine rivers and thin lapis creeks. Unlike the island’s biggest glaciers, we already know a fair amount about how much th

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Here’s what we know about the next Playstation and Xbox video game consoles

The E3 video game conference started this past weekend and continues to roll along with a stream of new trailers, announcements, and even some hardware. And while there are no new consoles to talk about at this year’s event, it’s looking like next year’s show will be a blockbuster one for new hardware. Here in 2019, we received a considerable information dump about both machines, which should arr

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Dozing off in a meeting? It could be the air.

2 CO 2 may be a reason why board meetings often turn into "bored" meetings. (Deposit Photos/) Ever sit in a meeting or lecture wondering why time slows down to an agonizing pace and your eyelids suddenly feel as if they weigh two tons? You’re not alone, and you just might be able to pin your suffering on the 21st Century’s most infamous molecule. Carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas we love to hate

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The 10 worst insect stings in the wild

The honey bee doesn't have the most painful sting, but it still hurts. And they're almost all over the world. (Deposit Photos/) This article was originally published on Field & Stream Snakes aren't the only critters with poison potential. Insects also evolved to use venom as a weapon for warding off attackers or immobilizing prey. But instead of using their fangs as a delivery device, insects use

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Father’s Day gifts for perfect pops

We love our dads. (Derek Thomson vis Unsplash/) Father's Day is your chance to be extra nice to your dad. In other words, drop the 'tude and give them a present if you're sick of them asking to borrow your headphones. All dads are different, which makes buying a Father's Day gift tough. But, before you go reaching for the same car wash gift card or panic-buying a hammer at the hardware store like

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How iPads and iPhones are different now

Apple unveils iPadOS on stage at its 2019 Worldwide Developers Conference. (Apple/) For the first time, Apple is giving the iPad its very own operating system, distinct from the iOS software it's been sharing with the iPhone since its debut. It's called iPadOS, and is slated to arrive in the fall with iOS 13. In fact, this split between iPhones and iPads has been going on for several years, and p

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Hitting snooze confuses your brain more than waking up

Is it best to just get up? (Deposit Photos/) To sleep or to snooze? You probably know the answer, but you don’t prefer it. Most of us probably use the snooze function on our alarm clocks at some point in our lives. Just a few more minutes under the covers, a time to gather our thoughts, right? While such snoozing might seem harmless, it may not be. For starters, it is important to understand why

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Antarctica's mysterious ice holes are finally making sense

Researchers equipped seals with satellite tags to understand how water conditions might lead to large holes in Antarctic sea ice. (Dan Costa/University of California, Santa Cruz/) Winter in Antarctica is frigid, persistently dark, violently stormy, and, at least in some years, home to puzzling holes in the sea ice. Known as polynyas, these strange pits "have been this enduring mystery in polar oc

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How to make the perfect french fry, according to science

There’s nothing quite like a perfect french fry. It’s that magic combination: crispy on the outside, pillowy on the inside, and just the right amount of seasoning. What happens during the cooking process that turns the humble potato into a tasty treat? Celebrity chef Jet Tila and food scientist Dr. Arielle Johnson break down the recipe and science of french fries that you can make at home. Double

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Smart ways to manage updates on Windows and macOS

We see you about to click "remind me tomorrow" for the 4,384th time. Don't do it. (Etienne Boulanger via Unsplash/) The operating systems running our computers are constantly evolving, regularly maintained pieces of software that (in theory) improve and adapt over time. The updates developers use to keep things working smoothly are important for adding new features, improving speed and performanc

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Steak made from insect meat? Yum!

Lab-grown cricket cells could serve up a healthier alternative to chicken, beef and pork. (Pexels/) Edible insects are a great source of protein. But it’s probably folly to think that more than a few people want to swap crickets for steak on the dinner plate. Chomping on a sautéed cricket or savoring a spoonful of caterpillar stew just wouldn’t be the same. Natalie Rubio, a doctoral student and r

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Techathlon podcast: Classic messenger sounds, Apple’s fanciest Mac, and the week’s biggest tech news

Listen in the player below! (Techathlon/) Internet notifications play a worryingly crucial role in our lives. Maybe you even got one from the Podcasts app to let you know that the latest Techathlon episode is live. Most of those notifications manifest as simple phone buzzes, but that wasn’t always the case. In the earlier internet days, notification sounds were crucial, They were the Pavlovian st

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How to make and print your first 3D model

Gaze into the unblinking eyes of your creation and understand that you cannot 3D print a soul. (Jeremy S. Cook/) If you're using a 3D printer , you'll need something to print. There are a wide variety of 3D-printable models to choose from online, but if you want to make something truly your own, you'll need to design it yourself. Learning how to do so will immensely increase your DIY potential, a

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How duct tape can help you survive almost anything

The wonder tape that can fix just about anything. (Tim MacWelch/) This article was originally published on Outdoor Life During the past 75 years of its existence, duct tape has become a staple product for "fix-it-yourselfers" from every walk of life. This wonder tape has been used for jobs that the original duct tape developers never imagined. The versatile product can mend, bind, patch, repair,

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Last week in tech: A bushel of Apple announcements, Google’s gaming service, and Xbox body wash

E3 is one of the biggest video game events of the year. It's happening this weekend, which means we're expecting a landslide of gaming announcements including games, hardware, and even some upcoming e-sports events. One of the biggest stories on the topic this past week, however, was the introduction of Xbox branded body wash . The soap doesn't actually smell like Xboxes—it's mostly lemon and lim

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Nigeria's polio eradication campaign could help the U.S. tackle measles

Two women sell roadside refreshments in rural Kano in 2011. (Shobana Shankar, CC BY-SA/) In the early 2000s, anti-vaxx campaigns in northern Nigeria lead to polio outbreaks that affected more than 1,500 people in 20 countries Today, the country's response to the public health crisis may offer lessons for Americans facing a historic outbreak of measles, a disease once declared eliminated . As a re

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Watch a digitally-upgraded Black Hawk helicopter fly for the first time

The Black Hawk's flight on May 29. (Sikorsky/) An old Black Hawk helicopter took off in West Palm Beach, Florida on May 29. Black Hawk helicopters, the famous aircraft used by the US Army, have been flying for decades—and while this craft looked normal on the outside, there was something very different about its guts: Helicopter-maker Sikorsky had installed the first part of a system that may som

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Fecal Transplant Is Linked to a Patient’s Death, the F.D.A. Warns

The agency said two patients received donated stool that had not been screened for drug-resistant germs, leading it to halt clinical trials until researchers prove proper testing procedures are in place.

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Fecal Transplant Is Linked to a Patient’s Death, the F.D.A. Warns

The agency said two patients received donated stool that had not been screened for drug-resistant germs, leading it to halt clinical trials until researchers prove proper testing procedures are in place.

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Harry Potter star Bonnie Wright joins kids' plastic toy push

Actress Bonnie Wright, who played Ginny Weasley, meets children who are upcycling their toys.

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Bagsiden: Er dobbelt så koldt = halvt så varmt?

Nu er begrebet ”dobbelt så koldt” defineret, fortæller vor finskkyndige læser fra omegnen af Lyngby og henviser til en pressemeddelelse på dr.dk om et program, hvor de digre Price-­brødre laver mad i minus 34 grader i Finland. Madlavningen foregik nemlig ”i en kulde, der er dobbelt så kold som en…

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Bagsiden: Nyt mysterium – oplukkelig messingdåse

Fra Høruphav på Sydals er ankommet billeder af endnu et stykke antik teknik, hvis formål og funktion I måske lige kan nå at opklare, inden vi snart lukker papiravisen ned for sommeren (hvis I er lidt kvikke):

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Tænkeboks – løsning: Stigen når 6 meter op ad muren

I sidste uges opgave fra professor Lars Døvling Andersen, Institut for matematiske Fag ved Aalborg Universitet, spurgte han, hvor højt en 7,5 m lang stige kan nå op på en mur, når den står udenpå et 2 m højt skur, der rager 3 m uden for muren.

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Google Releases Free Drag-And-Drop Tool That Lets You Build 3D Games

Developers of video games have a pretty tough job. This is because there’s really no way to fully satisfy each and every single gamer out there, where even highly-rated games will always …

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Sarah Sanders Broke the News

“I know it’s hard for you to understand even short sentences, I guess, but please don’t take my words out of context.” It was June of 2018, and they were fighting again, the White House press secretary and the White House press. This time , Sarah Sanders was sparring with CNN’s Jim Acosta. This time, the subject at hand was the Trump administration’s newly implemented “zero tolerance” policy when

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Uncovering the Control of Speech and Song

Figure 1: In this study, the authors found that increases in synchronous neuronal activity in the dorsal lateral motor cortex (dLMC) control pitch by increasing tension of the vocal folds in the larynx. Have you ever wondered how singers like Adele and Beyonce are able to hit high and low notes with such flexibility and accuracy? Well, this ability to control pitch as we speak or sing is somethin

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Half of Ebola outbreaks undetected

An estimated half of Ebola virus disease outbreaks have gone undetected since it was discovered in 1976, according to new research. Although these tend to affect fewer than five patients, the study highlights the need for improved detection and rapid response, in order that outbreaks of Ebola and other public health threats are detected early and consistently.

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Studies show vapor and THPs cause minimal teeth, skin and wallpaper staining

Studies by scientists at British American Tobacco have shown that aerosol from potentially reduced-risk products (PRRPs), such as vapor and tobacco heating products (THPs), cause significantly less staining to tooth enamel, skin, cloth and wallpaper than does the smoke from conventional cigarettes.

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Excess weight and body fat cause cardiovascular disease

In the first Mendelian randomization study to look at this, researchers have found evidence that excess weight and body fat cause a range of heart and blood vessel diseases (rather than just being associated with it). The study is published in the European Heart Journal.

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9 questions and answers about the vasectomy

A vasectomy, or male sterilization, is a very effective, relatively simple option for permanent birth control. It requires only a minor surgical procedure and has one of the lowest failure rates across all birth control. Robert Pope, primary care physician with the Texas A&M Family Medicine Residency Program and clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine, performs vasectomi

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New dads who get more sleep face different trouble

New moms and dads both need sleep and exercise, but getting them affects their relationship and stress levels in different ways, say researchers. In a study looking at the daily lives of new parents, a team finds that in general, getting more physical activity and more sleep from day to day was linked with more personal well-being, a better couple relationship, and more closeness with their baby.

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Dr. Henry Lynch, 91, Dies; Found Hereditary Link in Cancer

To a doubting medical world, he found compelling evidence that some cancers are passed along genetically. His work was ultimately widely embraced.

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BrainEx: Restoring Brain Circulation After Death

In May of 2018, headlines across the internet warned of a creepy new “brain in a bucket” experiment, in which scientists had “reanimated” the disembodied brains of pigs from slaughterhouses, and surely promised a “living hell” for humans. Very little was known about this study at the time, as the lead scientist, Nenad Sestan, declined […]

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Please see special handling

A personalized active lifestyle program for employees with metabolic syndrome (who are at high risk of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes) that uses wearable activity trackers, a smartphone app, and face-to-face sessions with exercise coaches, can reduce disease severity in both men and women in various occupations, according to a randomized trial of over 300 workers published in The Lance

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Radio Atlantic: The Reelection Battle Begins

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) The 2020 race is on. The Atlantic staff writer Edward-Isaac Dovere, who covers Democratic politics, was in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, for the unofficial kickoff of the fight to replace Donald Trump. Elaina Plott, who covers the White House, will be in Orlando on Tuesday, when the president officially announces his reelec

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After Hurricane Maria, these lizards got a serious grip

After Hurricane Maria, anole species on the island of Dominica developed super strong grips. This development may be one of the fasted rates of evolutionary change ever recorded. Climate change will likely to result in more intense hurricanes, but not all species will adapt so quickly. None In September 2017, Hurricane Maria slammed into the island of Dominica. The category 5 storm then tore acro

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Author Correction: Quinoxaline protects zebrafish lateral line hair cells from cisplatin and aminoglycosides damage

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44366-1 Author Correction: Quinoxaline protects zebrafish lateral line hair cells from cisplatin and aminoglycosides damage

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Publisher Correction: Probing tumor microenvironment in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma during chemoradiation and adjuvant temozolomide with functional MRI

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44365-2 Publisher Correction: Probing tumor microenvironment in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma during chemoradiation and adjuvant temozolomide with functional MRI

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How Kevin Durant Got Hurt, Why Coffee May Soon Be Gone, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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As Pollinator Populations Drop, Hoverflies May Offer Britain Hope

A hoverfly on a cluster of yellow mustard flowers. (Credit: Dave Hansche/Shutterstock) Billions of hoverflies from Europe descend on southern Britain each spring. The black and yellow striped bugs are no more than half an inch in length but make the long trek to Britain for the summer. Once they arrive, the hoverflies pollinate flowers and lay eggs. The fly populations have remained stable unlike

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The Milky Way Has Battle Scars from Colliding With a Ghostly Galaxy

Our Milky Way, shown here in an artist's concept, has strange "ripples" in its outlying regions. New research indicates those ripples were caused by a collision with a dwarf galaxy called Antlia 2. (Credit: ESA) The Milky Way likely collided with a recently discovered dwarf galaxy called Antlia 2 less than a billion years ago, according to new research presented Wednesday at the 234th Meeting of t

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Two Hours in Nature Each Week Could Be All You Need to See Health Benefits

(Credit: photo-nic.co.uk nic/Unsplash) By now, you probably know that spending time in nature — hiking through a forest, walking through a park, even hanging out on a beach — is good for your health. There has been many a study on how outside time can lower a person’s risk for developing things like Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and can alleviate symptoms of some mood and mental diso

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NASA is Retiring Its Legendary Spitzer Space Telescope

The Iris Nebula is captured here by Spitzer. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech) NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was launched in 2003 on a mission to spend five years exploring the cosmos in infrared light. That means it excels at capturing images and chemical signatures of warm objects, like the glow of gas in nebulas and galaxies, or the composition of planets in still-forming alien solar systems. It even

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Russian geneticist answers challenges to his plan to make gene-edited babies

Denis Rebrikov will use CRISPR on the same gene a China team did, but he has a different rationale

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Street In Front Of NASA Headquarters Renamed To Honor 'Hidden Figures'

The name pays tribute to the legacy of African American women who played a major role in the space race but were long overlooked by history. (Image credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky)

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