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nyheder2019juni17

Sleep history predicts late-life Alzheimer's pathology

Sleep patterns can predict the accumulation of Alzheimer's pathology proteins later in life, according to a new study of older men and women published in JNeurosci. These findings could lead to new sleep-based early diagnosis and prevention measures in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

5h

Enzymes that can transform blood type A to O found in human gut biome

A team of researchers at the University of British Columbia has found two types of enzymes that together, can transform type A blood to type O blood in the human gut biome. In their paper published in the journal Nature Microbiology, the group describes their metagenomic study of bacteria in human feces and what they found.

9h

Permafrost tør nu i et tempo først forventet i 2090

Usædvanligt varme somre får permafrost i canadiske Arktis til at tø op og forandre landskabet, viser nyt studie. Lige nu oplever Grønland rekordvarme.

9h

The evolution of puppy dog eyes

Dogs have evolved new muscles around the eyes to better communicate with humans. New research comparing the anatomy and behavior of dogs and wolves suggests dogs' facial anatomy has changed over thousands of years specifically to allow them to better communicate with humans.

6min

NASA's Cassini reveals New Sculpting in Saturn Rings

As NASA's Cassini dove close to Saturn in its final year, the spacecraft provided intricate detail on the workings of Saturn's complex rings, new analysis shows.

6min

3D printed tissues and organs without the scaffolding

A research team has developed a process that enables 3D printing of biological tissues without scaffolds using 'ink' made up of only stem cells.

6min

Seaweed feed additive cuts livestock methane but poses questions

Supplementing cattle feed with seaweed could result in a significant reduction in methane belched by livestock, according to researchers, but they caution that the practice may not be a realistic strategy to battle climate change.

6min

RNR 'switch' offers hope in battling antibiotic resistant bacteria

New research offers a new pathway for targeting pathogens in the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria.

6min

Climate change threatens commercial fishers from Maine to North Carolina

Most fishing communities from North Carolina to Maine are projected to face declining fishing options unless they adapt to climate change by catching different species or fishing in different areas, according to a new study.

6min

Bees required to create an excellent blueberry crop

Getting an excellent rabbiteye blueberry harvest requires helpful pollinators — particularly native southeastern blueberry bees — although growers can bring in managed honey bees to do the job. This is especially true for commercial rabbiteye blueberry producers in Mississippi and Louisiana. With sufficient pollinators, they have been able to increase the percentage of flowers setting fruit from

6min

'Self-healing' polymer brings perovskite solar tech closer to market

A protective layer of epoxy resin helps prevent the leakage of pollutants from perovskite solar cells (PSCs), report scientists. Adding a 'self-healing' polymer to the top of a PSC can radically reduce how much lead it discharges into the environment. This gives a strong boost to prospects for commercializing the technology.

6min

Performance improves when the enemy of an enemy is a friend

New research finds that balanced professional networks are more important than individual talent when it comes to high-risk decision-making.

6min

Possible targets to help tackle Crohn's disease

There is no precise cure for digestive condition Crohn's disease, and causes are believed to vary. But one indicator of the condition — an abnormal reaction of the immune system to certain bacteria in the intestines — has had new light shed on it.

6min

Farm-like indoor microbiota may protect children from asthma also in urban homes

A child's risk of developing asthma is the lower the more the microbiota of the child's home resembles that of a farm house. This was shown by a study conducted by the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare that analysed indoor microbiota from 400 Finnish and 1,000 German homes.

6min

Scientists unearth green treasure — albeit rusty — in the soil

New research helps explain how iron in the soil may unlock naturally occurring phosphorus bound in organic matter, which can be used in fertilizer, so that one day farmers may be able to reduce the amount of artificial fertilizers applied to fields.

20min

Poor oral health linked to a 75% increase in liver cancer risk

Poor oral health is associated with a 75% increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer, new research has found.

20min

Wheat myth debunked

Common opinion has it that modern wheat is so reliant on fertilizer and crop protection agrochemicals that the plants now lack the hardiness needed to remain productive under harsher environmental conditions. But comprehensive new research shows that modern wheat varieties out-perform older varieties even when grown under unfavorable conditions that include low agrochemical inputs and drought stre

20min

Tracking life's first step: Two molecules 'awaken' brand new genome

Within hours after fertilization, a unique genome forms from chromosomes contributed by the egg and sperm. However, this new genome is initially inactive and must be 'awakened' to begin the transcription of its DNA and start embryonic development. How life's first step happens has long fascinated developmental biologists.

20min

How certain antibiotic combinations could defeat 'superbugs'

In hospitalized patients with bacterial infections, heteroresistance is more widespread than previously appreciated. This finding — alarming on one level — could also reveal ways to defeat apparently invincible bacteria.

20min

Do video games drive obesity?

Are children, teenagers and adults who spend a lot of time playing video games really more obese? A meta study has looked into this question. The cliché is true — but only for adults.

20min

Testing ways to make aspen-dominated forests resilient to climate change

In an aspen-dominated hardwood forest at the northern tip of the state's Lower Peninsula, scientists are testing ways to make the region's forests more resilient to climate change.

20min

Publisher Correction: In vitro and in vivo evidences for innate immune stimulators lactic acid bacterial starters isolated from fermented camel dairy products

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42891-7 Publisher Correction: In vitro and in vivo evidences for innate immune stimulators lactic acid bacterial starters isolated from fermented camel dairy products

27min

Author Correction: The pleasantness of sensory dissonance is mediated by musical style and expertise

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44427-5 Author Correction: The pleasantness of sensory dissonance is mediated by musical style and expertise

27min

Publisher Correction: Revealing membrane alteration in cells overexpressing CA IX and EGFR by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45208-w Publisher Correction: Revealing membrane alteration in cells overexpressing CA IX and EGFR by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

27min

Author Correction: Differences in the fecal microbiota of neonates born at home or in the hospital

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44426-6 Author Correction: Differences in the fecal microbiota of neonates born at home or in the hospital

27min

Your Google Calendar Isn't Safe, an Eye-Controlled TV, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

30min

'Flesh-Eating' Bacteria May Be Spreading to Beaches Once Thought Off-Limits. Here's Why.

"Flesh-eating" bacteria that live in the ocean may be spreading to previously unaffected beach waters thanks to climate change, according to a new report.

42min

How to easily share Wi-Fi passwords

"Help, I can't find the Wi-Fi password. Or the way out." (Andrew Neel via Unsplash/) When a friend asks for your Wi-Fi password, how long is your explanation? Saying "Oh, it's a mess of letters and numbers taped to the router behind the refrigerator in the rental unit upstairs" doesn't make things easy for them. There are better ways to share your Wi-Fi. First: create a guest network Ideally, you

53min

The Next Wave of Climate Refugees

“We were so terrified with the water coming into the house and the sound of the storm. In front of my eyes, the walls of our house collapsed.” That’s Geeta Maiti, a resident of Mousuni Island, which is part of the Indian Sundarbans—a 4,000-square-mile archipelago that has been designated a World Heritage site . Sitting on the Bay of Bengal, shared by India and Bangladesh, the region has a rich ec

56min

Boost Both Mind and Mood With This Special Blend of Advanced Nootropics

Everybody wants their brain to work better. Coffee may be delicious, but that’s not the main reason 60 percent of Americans drink it every single day. What we really want is the jolt of caffeine that makes us more alert and focused and ready to take on the day. But what if there was a better way to get a “better” brain, a more holistic approach that doesn’t just keep you awake, but elevates overa

57min

Lawyers in a Murder Trial Clash Over a DNA Forensics Method

The first trial in which genetic genealogy helped identify a suspect is now underway, and the two sides are sparring over the limits of the new technique.

1h

Here’s Your Chance to Name an Exoplanet and Its Star

Looking Up It used to be that you needed to actually discover something in space if you wanted the thrill of naming it — but a new competition is ensuring astronomers don’t get to have all the fun. The International Astronomical Union (IAU), the group officially responsible for naming celestial bodies, recently announced the IAU100 NameExoWorlds competition , which gives every country on Earth th

1h

3rd Shark Attack in North Carolina This Month Injures 8-Year-Old

Only three shark attacks were reported in the state in all of 2018, according to the International Shark Attack File. But experts say there is often year-to-year variation.

1h

Experts cast doubt over Highlands spaceport plan

Concerns have been raised over the suitability of a site in Sutherland aiming to become the UK's first major spaceport.

1h

The globe just experienced its second warmest March through May since at least 1880

Overall, the global mean temperature during March through May was 1.02 °C warmer than the 1951-1980 average. This made it the second warmest such period in records dating back to 1880. (Source: NASA GISS) March through May — spring in the Northern Hemisphere — was the second warmest such period in records dating back to 1880, according to a new analysis out today from NASA. On its own, the month o

1h

46 percent off cast iron Cuisinart cookware and other good deals happening today

For more deals and product chatter, check out our exclusive Facebook group . Deals for the workplace (Amazon/) Today, save over 20 percent on select office products like printers, calendars, and even a projector for presentations. The 3,300-lumen Optoma DLP Ultra Short Throw Projector has a contrast ratio of 18,000:1, supports 3D projections, and features a 6,500-hour lamp life. It can project a

1h

Gender bias continues in recognition of physicians and nurses

A new study has shown that patients are significantly more likely to correctly identify male physicians and female nurses, demonstrating continuing gender bias in the health care environment. These lingering perceptions may slowly be changing, though, as younger patients were more likely to correctly identify female physicians and male nurses, according to the study published in Journal of Women's

1h

Promising esophageal reconstruction based on engineered constructs

The loss of complete segments of the esophagus often results from treatments for esophageal cancer or congenital abnormalities, and current methods to re-establish continuity are inadequate. Now, working with a rat model, researchers have developed a promising reconstruction method based on the use of 3D-printed esophageal grafts.

1h

Penn engineers demonstrate superstrong, reversible adhesive that works like snail slime

Snails can anchor themselves in place using a structure known as an epiphragm. The snail's slimy secretion works its way into the pores found on even seemingly smooth surfaces, then hardens, providing strong adhesion that can be reversed when the slime softens. Penn Engineers have developed a new material that works in a similar way.

1h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Kirsten’s Best-Laid Plans

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, June 17. ‣ In what will likely be an advantage for Virginia Democrats, the Supreme Court today dismissed the Republican-controlled state legislature’s appeal of a lower-court ruling striking down parts of the state’s legislative map because of racial gerrymandering. Here’s what else we’re watching: Iran Responds: Today, Iran announced plans to start breakin

1h

NASA Discovers Brand-New Crater on Mars

New Look Sometime in the last three years, Mars got nailed by some sort of space rock — and NASA just found the brand-new crater. NASA didn’t get to watch the impact in real time; the crater was spotted and photographed by the space agency’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, which last checked that area in September 2016, Space.com reports . And the unusually colorful crater — more on that later — is

1h

Scientists Want to Jack Astronauts Up On Steroids

Asteroid Rage A team of scientists from the the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have suggested a new way to minimize muscle loss for space travelers: a treatment plan of hormones , including testosterone, plus plenty of exercise. Keeping physically fit is extremely important when living in a microgravity environment. Astronauts aboard the International Space Station have specializ

1h

How to think like Sherlock Holmes: Understand the 'brain attic'

"I consider that a man's brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose," Sherlock Holmes famously remarked. In this lesson, Maria Konnikova, author of Mastermind: How to think like Sherlock Holmes , teaches you how to optimize memory, Holmes style. The goal is to expand one's limited "brain attic," so that what used to be a small space c

1h

Stunning Photographs Created With a Flashlight Lightsaber

"Liquid light painter" Denis Smith invented his own LED tools to shoot these photographs.

1h

UN: World population expected to rise to 9.7 billion in 2050

The world's population is getting older and growing at a slower pace but is still expected to increase from 7.7 billion currently to 9.7 billion in 2050, the United Nations said Monday.

1h

Scientists find sun's history buried in moon's crust

The Sun is why we're here. It's also why Martians or Venusians are not.

1h

Researchers report longest duration of therapeutic gene expression

A therapeutic gene delivered into the spinal canal of infant rhesus monkeys was still being expressed after nearly 4 years, with no evidence of acute or chronic neuronal tox-icity, according to a new study published in Human Gene Therapy.

2h

Soaring Temperatures Speed Up Spring Thaw on Greenland’s Ice Sheet

Temperatures in Greenland have been as much as 40 degrees Fahrenheit above normal, helping fuel a pulse of melting across much of the ice sheet surface.

2h

Recognize the role of subjectivity when evaluating risk

Our ability to behave rationally depends not just on our ability to use the facts, but on our ability to give those facts meaning. To be rational, we need both facts and feelings. We need to be subjective. In this lesson, risk communication expert David Ropeik teaches you how human rationality influences our perception of risk. By the end of it, you'll understand the pitfalls of your subjective r

2h

TV Viewers Can Now Change the Channel With Just Their Eyes

Mission: Control On Monday, Comcast launched Xfinity X1 eye control , a feature that pairs with existing eye-tracking systems to let customers use their eyes like they would a remote control — with a well-placed glance, they can now change the channel, set a show to record, or search for a program. The initial hope is that the system will make it easier for people with physical disabilities to en

2h

Up-regulation of FOXO1 and reduced inflammation by {beta}-hydroxybutyric acid are essential diet restriction benefits against liver inȷury [Medical Sciences]

Liver ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major challenge in liver surgery. Diet restriction reduces liver damage by increasing stress resistance; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the preventive effect of 12-h fasting on mouse liver IRI. Partial warm hepatic IRI model in wild-type male C57BL/6…

2h

A symmetric geometry of transmembrane domains inside the B cell antigen receptor complex [Immunology and Inflammation]

B lymphocytes have the ability to sense thousands of structurally different antigens and produce cognate antibodies against these molecules. For this they carry on their surface multiple copies of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) comprising the membrane-bound Ig (mIg) molecule and the Igα/Igβ heterodimer functioning as antigen binding and…

2h

Small-molecule allosteric activators of PDE4 long form cyclic AMP phosphodiesterases [Biochemistry]

Cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) enzymes degrade cAMP and underpin the compartmentalization of cAMP signaling through their targeting to particular protein complexes and intracellular locales. We describe the discovery and characterization of a small-molecule compound that allosterically activates PDE4 long isoforms. This PDE4-specific activator displays reversible, noncompetitive kine

2h

Conflicting functional effects of xylem pit structure relate to the growth-longevity trade-off in a conifer species [Plant Biology]

Consistent with a ubiquitous life history trade-off, trees exhibit a negative relationship between growth and longevity both among and within species. However, the mechanistic basis of this life history trade-off is not well understood. In addition to resource allocation conflicts among multiple traits, functional conflicts arising from individual morphological traits…

2h

Asymmetries between achromatic and chromatic extraction of 3D motion signals [Neuroscience]

Motion in depth (MID) can be cued by high-resolution changes in binocular disparity over time (CD), and low-resolution interocular velocity differences (IOVD). Computational differences between these two mechanisms suggest that they may be implemented in visual pathways with different spatial and temporal resolutions. Here, we used fMRI to examine how…

2h

Synaptic crosstalk conferred by a zone of differentially regulated Ca2+ signaling in the dendritic shaft adjoining a potentiated spine [Neuroscience]

Patterns of postsynaptic activity that induce long-term potentiation of fast excitatory transmission at glutamatergic synapses between hippocampal neurons cause enlargement of the dendritic spine and promote growth in spine endoplasmic reticulum (ER) content. Such postsynaptic activity patterns also impact Ca2+ signaling in the adjoining dendritic shaft, in a zone centered…

2h

Compartmentalized biosynthesis of mycophenolic acid [Biochemistry]

Mycophenolic acid (MPA) from filamentous fungi is the first natural product antibiotic to be isolated and crystallized, and a first-line immunosuppressive drug for organ transplantations and autoimmune diseases. However, some key biosynthetic mechanisms of such an old and important molecule have remained unclear. Here, we elucidate the MPA biosynthetic pathway…

2h

The constrained architecture of mammalian Hox gene clusters [Developmental Biology]

In many animal species with a bilateral symmetry, Hox genes are clustered either at one or at several genomic loci. This organization has a functional relevance, as the transcriptional control applied to each gene depends upon its relative position within the gene cluster. It was previously noted that vertebrate Hox…

2h

Direct delivery of adenoviral CRISPR/Cas9 vector into the blastoderm for generation of targeted gene knockout in quail [Agricultural Sciences]

Zygotes at the 1-cell stage have been genetically modified by microinjecting the CRISPR/Cas9 components for the generation of targeted gene knockout in mammals. In the avian species, genetic modification of the zygote is difficult because its unique reproductive system limits the accessibility of the zygote at the 1-cell stage. To…

2h

Correction for Derrien et al., Degradation of the antiviral component ARGONAUTE1 by the autophagy pathway [Corrections]

PLANT BIOLOGY Correction for “Degradation of the antiviral component ARGONAUTE1 by the autophagy pathway,” by Benoît Derrien, Nicolas Baumberger, Mikhail Schepetilnikov, Corrado Viotti, Julia De Cillia, Véronique Ziegler-Graff, Erika Isono, Karin Schumacher, and Pascal Genschik, which was first published September 10, 2012; 10.1073/pnas.1209487109 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 15942–15946)..

2h

Restoring universality to the pinch-off of a bubble [Applied Physical Sciences]

The pinch-off of a bubble is an example of the formation of a singularity, exhibiting a characteristic separation of length and time scales. Because of this scale separation, one expects universal dynamics that collapse into self-similar behavior determined by the relative importance of viscous, inertial, and capillary forces. Surprisingly, however,…

2h

Polar bear evolution is marked by rapid changes in gene copy number in response to dietary shift [Evolution]

Polar bear (Ursus maritimus) and brown bear (Ursus arctos) are recently diverged species that inhabit vastly differing habitats. Thus, analysis of the polar bear and brown bear genomes represents a unique opportunity to investigate the evolutionary mechanisms and genetic underpinnings of rapid ecological adaptation in mammals. Copy number (CN) differences…

2h

Pak2 kinase promotes cellular senescence and organismal aging [Biochemistry]

Cellular senescence defines an irreversible cell growth arrest state linked to loss of tissue function and aging in mammals. This transition from proliferation to senescence is typically characterized by increased expression of the cell-cycle inhibitor p16INK4a and formation of senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (SAHF). SAHF formation depends on HIRA-mediated nucleosome assembly…

2h

Low cationicity is important for systemic in vivo efficacy of database-derived peptides against drug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens [Medical Sciences]

As bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics continues to emerge, new alternatives are urgently needed. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important candidates. However, how AMPs are designed with in vivo efficacy is poorly understood. Our study was designed to understand structural moieties of cationic peptides that would lead to their successful use…

2h

The E3 ligase HOIL-1 catalyses ester bond formation between ubiquitin and components of the Myddosome in mammalian cells [Biochemistry]

The linear ubiquitin assembly complex (LUBAC) comprises 3 components: HOIP, HOIL-1, and Sharpin, of which HOIP and HOIL-1 are both members of the RBR subfamily of E3 ubiquitin ligases. HOIP catalyses the formation of Met1-linked ubiquitin oligomers (also called linear ubiquitin), but the function of the E3 ligase activity of…

2h

Morphine tolerance is attenuated in germfree mice and reversed by probiotics, implicating the role of gut microbiome [Medical Sciences]

Prolonged exposure to opioids results in analgesic tolerance, drug overdose, and death. The mechanism underlying morphine analgesic tolerance still remains unresolved. We show that morphine analgesic tolerance was significantly attenuated in germfree (GF) and in pan-antibiotic−treated mice. Reconstitution of GF mice with naïve fecal microbiota reinstated morphine analgesic tolerance. We…

2h

Drainage network position and historical connectivity explain global patterns in freshwater fishes’ range size [Ecology]

Identifying the drivers and processes that determine globally the geographic range size of species is crucial to understanding the geographic distribution of biodiversity and further predicting the response of species to current global changes. However, these drivers and processes are still poorly understood, and no ecological explanation has emerged yet…

2h

Role of cerebellar GABAergic dysfunctions in the origins of essential tremor [Neuroscience]

Essential tremor (ET) is among the most prevalent movement disorders, but its origins are elusive. The inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has been hypothesized as the prime generator of tremor because of the pacemaker properties of ION neurons, but structural and functional changes in ION are unlikely under ET. Abnormalities have…

2h

Reactive school closure weakens the network of social interactions and reduces the spread of influenza [Applied Physical Sciences]

School-closure policies are considered one of the most promising nonpharmaceutical interventions for mitigating seasonal and pandemic influenza. However, their effectiveness is still debated, primarily due to the lack of empirical evidence about the behavior of the population during the implementation of the policy. Over the course of the 2015 to…

2h

Intrinsically reversible superglues via shape adaptation inspired by snail epiphragm [Applied Physical Sciences]

Adhesives are ubiquitous in daily life and industrial applications. They usually fall into one of two classes: strong but irreversible (e.g., superglues) or reversible/reusable but weak (e.g., pressure-sensitive adhesives and biological and biomimetic surfaces). Achieving both superstrong adhesion and reversibility has been challenging. This task is particularly difficult for hydrogels…

2h

Correction for Davis et al., In vivo evidence for dysregulation of mGluR5 as a biomarker of suicidal ideation [Corrections]

NEUROSCIENCE, PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for “In vivo evidence for dysregulation of mGluR5 as a biomarker of suicidal ideation,” by Margaret T. Davis, Ansel Hillmer, Sophie E. Holmes, Robert H. Pietrzak, Nicole DellaGioia, Nabeel Nabulsi, David Matuskey, Gustavo Angarita-Africano, Richard E. Carson, John H. Krystal, and Irina Esterlis, which…

2h

Molecular basis for enantioselective herbicide degradation imparted by aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenases in transgenic plants [Biochemistry]

The synthetic auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is an active ingredient of thousands of commercial herbicides. Multiple species of bacteria degrade 2,4-D via a pathway initiated by the Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate (Fe/αKG)-dependent aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenases (AADs). Recently, genes encoding 2 AADs have been deployed commercially in herbicide-tolerant crops. Some AADs can also…

2h

Shigella promotes major alteration of gut epithelial physiology and tissue invasion by shutting off host intracellular transport [Microbiology]

Intracellular trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells are essential to maintain organelle identity and structure, and to regulate cell communication with its environment. Shigella flexneri invades and subverts the human colonic epithelium by the injection of virulence factors through a type 3 secretion system (T3SS). In this work, we report the…

2h

Evolution of facial muscle anatomy in dogs [Evolution]

Domestication shaped wolves into dogs and transformed both their behavior and their anatomy. Here we show that, in only 33,000 y, domestication transformed the facial muscle anatomy of dogs specifically for facial communication with humans. Based on dissections of dog and wolf heads, we show that the levator anguli oculi…

2h

An ATR and CHK1 kinase signaling mechanism that limits origin firing during unperturbed DNA replication [Cell Biology]

DNA damage-induced signaling by ATR and CHK1 inhibits DNA replication, stabilizes stalled and collapsed replication forks, and mediates the repair of multiple classes of DNA lesions. We and others have shown that ATR kinase inhibitors, three of which are currently undergoing clinical trials, induce excessive origin firing during unperturbed DNA…

2h

Stability of the A15 phase in diblock copolymer melts [Applied Physical Sciences]

The self-assembly of block polymers into well-ordered nanostructures underpins their utility across fundamental and applied polymer science, yet only a handful of equilibrium morphologies are known with the simplest AB-type materials. Here, we report the discovery of the A15 sphere phase in single-component diblock copolymer melts comprising poly(dodecyl acrylate)−block−poly(lactide). A…

2h

Correction for McKenzie et al., Caspase-1 inhibition prevents glial inflammasome activation and pyroptosis in models of multiple sclerosis [Corrections]

NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Caspase-1 inhibition prevents glial inflammasome activation and pyroptosis in models of multiple sclerosis,” by Brienne A. McKenzie, Manmeet K. Mamik, Leina B. Saito, Roobina Boghozian, Maria Chiara Monaco, Eugene O. Major, Jian-Qiang Lu, William G. Branton, and Christopher Power, which was first published June 12, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1722041115…

2h

Correction for Dvir et al., Deciphering the rules by which 5'-UTR sequences affect protein expression in yeast [Corrections]

BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Deciphering the rules by which 5′-UTR sequences affect protein expression in yeast,” by Shlomi Dvir, Lars Velten, Eilon Sharon, Danny Zeevi, Lucas B. Carey, Adina Weinberger, and Eran Segal, which was first published July 5, 2013; 10.1073/pnas.1222534110 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, E2792–E2801)….

2h

A hypothesis linking the energy demand of the brain to obesity risk [Anthropology]

The causes of obesity are complex and multifactorial. We propose that one unconsidered but likely important factor is the energetic demand of brain development, which could constrain energy available for body growth and other functions, including fat deposition. Humans are leanest during early childhood and regain body fat in later…

2h

Anomalous phonon relaxation in Au333(SR)79 nanoparticles with nascent plasmons [Chemistry]

Research on plasmons of gold nanoparticles has gained broad interest in nanoscience. However, ultrasmall sizes near the metal-to-nonmetal transition regime have not been explored until recently due to major synthetic difficulties. Herein, intriguing electron dynamics in this size regime is observed in atomically precise Au333(SR)79 nanoparticles. Femtosecond transient-absorption spectroscopy revea

2h

Solar thermal desalination as a nonlinear optical process [Applied Physical Sciences]

The ever-increasing global need for potable water requires practical, sustainable approaches for purifying abundant alternative sources such as seawater, high-salinity processed water, or underground reservoirs. Evaporation-based solutions are of particular interest for treating high salinity water, since conventional methods such as reverse osmosis have increasing energy requirements for higher c

2h

{beta}II-spectrin promotes mouse brain connectivity through stabilizing axonal plasma membranes and enabling axonal organelle transport [Neuroscience]

βII-spectrin is the generally expressed member of the β-spectrin family of elongated polypeptides that form micrometer-scale networks associated with plasma membranes. We addressed in vivo functions of βII-spectrin in neurons by knockout of βII-spectrin in mouse neural progenitors. βII-spectrin deficiency caused severe defects in long-range axonal connectivity and axonal degeneration….

2h

Correction for Amundson and Biardeau, Opinion: Soil carbon sequestration is an elusive climate mitigation tool [Corrections]

OPINION Correction for “Opinion: Soil carbon sequestration is an elusive climate mitigation tool,” by Ronald Amundson and Léopold Biardeau, which was first published November 13, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1815901115 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 115, 11652–11656). The authors note that, on page 11652, left column, line 9, “10 Gt CO2” should instead…

2h

Correction for Wolfe et al., Mapping hydroxyl variability throughout the global remote troposphere via synthesis of airborne and satellite formaldehyde observations [Corrections]

EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND PLANETARY SCIENCES Correction for “Mapping hydroxyl variability throughout the global remote troposphere via synthesis of airborne and satellite formaldehyde observations,” by Glenn M. Wolfe, Julie M. Nicely, Jason M. St. Clair, Thomas F. Hanisco, Jin Liao, Luke D. Oman, William B. Brune, David Miller, Alexander Thames, Gonzalo…

2h

Jean Bourgain, problem solver [Retrospectives]

Jean Bourgain, a truly exceptional and prolific problem solver who transformed multiple areas of mathematics, died on December 22, 2018, aged 64, after a prolonged battle with cancer. Jean Bourgain, 1954–2018. Image courtesy of Institute for Advanced Study/Andrea Kane. Jean received almost every award in the field of mathematics, ranging…

2h

Bioarchaeology of Neolithic Catalhoyuk reveals fundamental transitions in health, mobility, and lifestyle in early farmers [Anthropology]

The transition from a human diet based exclusively on wild plants and animals to one involving dependence on domesticated plants and animals beginning 10,000 to 11,000 y ago in Southwest Asia set into motion a series of profound health, lifestyle, social, and economic changes affecting human populations throughout most of…

2h

{alpha}2-Chimaerin is essential for neural stem cell homeostasis in mouse adult neurogenesis [Neuroscience]

Adult hippocampal neurogenesis involves the lifelong generation of neurons. The process depends on the homeostasis of the production of neurons and maintenance of the adult neural stem cell (NSC) pool. Here, we report that α2-chimaerin, a Rho GTPase-activating protein, is essential for NSC homeostasis in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Conditional deletion…

2h

Membrane perforation by the pore-forming toxin pneumolysin [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Pneumolysin (PLY), a major virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, perforates cholesterol-rich lipid membranes. PLY protomers oligomerize as rings on the membrane and then undergo a structural transition that triggers the formation of membrane pores. Structures of PLY rings in prepore and pore conformations define the beginning and end of this…

2h

Profile of Clark Spencer Larsen [Profiles]

The Ohio State University biological anthropologist Clark Spencer Larsen has conducted pioneering research on biocultural adaptation that occurred during the last 10,000 years of human evolution. He was among the first to apply multidisciplinary approaches to the study of temporal trends in diet, health, mobility, and interpersonal conflict. Elected to…

2h

Borrelia burgdorferi peptidoglycan is a persistent antigen in patients with Lyme arthritis [Immunology and Inflammation]

Lyme disease is a multisystem disorder caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. A common late-stage complication of this disease is oligoarticular arthritis, often involving the knee. In ∼10% of cases, arthritis persists after appropriate antibiotic treatment, leading to a proliferative synovitis typical of chronic inflammatory arthritides. Here, we provide evidence…

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Pattern of dopamine signaling during aversive events predicts active avoidance learning [Neuroscience]

Learning to avoid aversive outcomes is an adaptive strategy to limit one’s future exposure to stressful events. However, there is considerable variance in active avoidance learning across a population. The mesolimbic dopamine system contributes to behaviors elicited by aversive stimuli, although it is unclear if the heterogeneity in active avoidance…

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Regulation of nuclear architecture, mechanics, and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of epigenetic factors by cell geometric constraints [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cells sense mechanical signals from their microenvironment and transduce them to the nucleus to regulate gene expression programs. To elucidate the physical mechanisms involved in this regulation, we developed an active 3D chemomechanical model to describe the three-way feedback between the adhesions, the cytoskeleton, and the nucleus. The model shows…

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A fully resolved backbone phylogeny reveals numerous dispersals and explosive diversifications throughout the history of Asteraceae [Evolution]

The sunflower family, Asteraceae, comprises 10% of all flowering plant species and displays an incredible diversity of form. Asteraceae are clearly monophyletic, yet resolving phylogenetic relationships within the family has proven difficult, hindering our ability to understand its origin and diversification. Recent molecular clock dating has suggested a Cretaceous origin,…

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Complete reconstitution of bypass and blocking functions in a minimal artificial Fab-7 insulator from Drosophila bithorax complex [Genetics]

Boundaries in the bithorax complex (BX-C) delimit autonomous regulatory domains that drive parasegment-specific expression of the Hox genes Ubx, abd-A, and Abd-B. The Fab-7 boundary is located between the iab-6 and iab-7 domains and has two key functions: blocking cross-talk between these domains and at the same time promoting communication…

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A new chip lets robots “imagine” their actions before they make a move

Robots that can rapidly plan out their movements could accelerate factory automation—and help keep fragile humans safe.

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NASA scientists find sun's history buried in moon's crust

The Sun's rotation rate in its first billion years is unknown.Yet, this spin rate affected solar eruptions, influencing the evolution of life.A team of NASA scientists think they've figured it out by using the Moon as critical evidence.

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How the keto diet could give Navy SEALs a tactical advantage

The U.S. military has been funding research exploring how the keto diet might benefit soldiers during deep-diving missions. The technology that Navy SEALs use to stay hidden underwater can lead to seizures. Studies suggest ketosis might prevent these seizures. Still, ethical and legal questions remain, and researchers hope to continue learning more about how ketosis might yield advantages on the

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Tesla driver seen asleep at the wheel. Is self-driving tech ready for sleeping drivers?

The video shows a man sleeping at the wheel of his Tesla. Another driver said that the driver traveled more than 30 miles asleep at the wheel. It's not the first time a Tesla driver has been spotted dozing off at the wheel. In April, Tesla CEO Elon Musk said its cars would achieve full autonomy by the end of 2019, though it's unclear whether that's a realistic timeline. None A new video shows a m

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Researchers study how climate change affects crops in India

Kyle Davis is an environmental data scientist whose research seeks to increase food supplies in developing countries. He combines techniques from environmental science and data science to understand patterns in the global food system and develop strategies that make food-supply chains more nutritious and sustainable.

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RNR 'switch' offers hope in battling antibiotic resistant bacteria

New research from Cornell University offers a new pathway for targeting pathogens in the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria.

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Scientists unearth green treasure—albeit rusty—in the soil

Cornell University engineers have taken a step in understanding how iron in the soil may unlock naturally occurring phosphorus bound in organic matter, which can be used in fertilizer, so that one day farmers may be able to reduce the amount of artificial fertilizers applied to fields.

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The Plastic We 'Recycle' Is Actually Horrible for the Environment

When you drop your plastic waste into the recycling bin, where does it go?

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RNR 'switch' offers hope in battling antibiotic resistant bacteria

New research from Cornell University offers a new pathway for targeting pathogens in the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria.

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Columbia researcher studies how climate change affects crops in India

In a paper published in Environmental Research Letters, Columbia Researcher Kyle Davis found that the yields from grains such as millet, sorghum, and maize are more resilient to extreme weather in India; their yields vary significantly less due to year-to-year changes in climate and generally experience smaller declines during droughts. But yields from rice, India's main crop, experience larger de

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Scientists unearth green treasure — albeit rusty — in the soil

Cornell University engineers have taken a step in understanding how iron in the soil may unlock naturally occurring phosphorus bound in organic matter, which can be used in fertilizer, so that one day farmers may be able to reduce the amount of artificial fertilizers applied to fields.

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RNR 'switch' offers hope in battling antibiotic resistant bacteria

New research from Cornell University offers a new pathway for targeting pathogens in the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria.

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Lumping all Hispanic Americans together masks the differences in cancer outcomes

When separated out, the data can help tailor better screening and treatment programs, especially for stomach and liver cancers.

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds dry air affecting Tropical Cyclone Vayu

Tropical Cyclone Vayu was fading as it neared the coast of southwestern Pakistan and northwestern India. Dry air and wind shear were preventing development the development of thunderstorms, making the clouds on the storm's western side appear wispy in an image from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite.

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How Does Insulin Work in Our Bodies?

What is insulin and how do our bodies use it? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ocean advocates are increasingly concerned about climate change

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Daisy Simmons SACRAMENTO, Calif. – The world’s oceans are deeply affected by climate change – and vice versa. But until recent years, ocean advocates throughout California had long tackled issues like over-fishing and coastal pollution without as much emphasis on the broad-reaching relationship between climate and oceans. That’s all changed, as e

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The U.S. military emits more greenhouse gases than Sweden and Denmark

A new study shows how the United States' Military is the largest institutional emitter of greenhouse gasses in the world. These emissions come from both combat and non-combat operations. The use of some of the fossil fuels the military burns to protect the supply of oil creates an interesting paradox. None Unless you've been living under a rock, you probably know that climate change is the greate

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Biting backfire: Some mosquitoes actually benefit from pesticide application

The common perception that pesticides reduce or eliminate target insect species may not always hold. Jennifer Weathered and Edd Hammill report that the impacts of agricultural pesticides on assemblages of aquatic insects varied resulting in distinct ecological winners and losers within aquatic communities. While pesticides reduced many species, the evolution of pesticide resistance allowed the mos

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds dry air affecting Tropical Cyclone Vayu

Tropical Cyclone Vayu was fading as it neared the coast of southwestern Pakistan and northwestern India. Dry air and wind shear were preventing development the development of thunderstorms, making the clouds on the storm's western side appear wispy in an image from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite.

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Biting backfire: Some mosquitoes actually benefit from pesticide application

The common perception that pesticides reduce or eliminate target insect species may not always hold. Jennifer Weathered and Edd Hammill report that the impacts of agricultural pesticides on assemblages of aquatic insects varied resulting in distinct ecological winners and losers within aquatic communities. While pesticides reduced many species, the evolution of pesticide resistance allowed the mos

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London looks to install as many as 50,000+ EV charge points by 2025

submitted by /u/toyota_tacoma_black [link] [comments]

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The U.S. Navy Is Activating Robot Squads (with Stealth Destroyers)

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Adobe's experimental AI tool can tell if something's been Photoshopped

submitted by /u/FederalTeam [link] [comments]

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Scientists Envision 20-Fold Increase in Solar PV Power by 2030

submitted by /u/toyota_tacoma_black [link] [comments]

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Protecting your household from pollution starts with one simple step at the door

Some ingredients in those tiny particles can have big impacts. (Yaroslau Mikheyeu/Shutterstock.com/) You vacuum it, sweep it and wipe it off your furniture. But do you know what it actually is—and how it may affect your health? Don't feel bad if you're clueless about your dust. Scientists are not that far ahead of you in terms of understanding the sources and health risks of indoor air and partic

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Nvidia pushes ARM supercomputing

ARM CPUs? In my supercomputer? It's more likely than you think.

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Tanning industry uses promos, cheap prices to lure adolescents and young adults

Everyone knows cigarette smoking causes cancer and as a result, prices and advertising are closely regulated to discourage youth from starting. But another cancer risk, indoor tanning, which has been shown to cause melanoma, lags in regulation. Researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health have found that the tanning industry uses marketing strategies that appeal to adolescents and young adu

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Biting backfire: Some mosquitoes actually benefit from pesticide application

The common perception that pesticides reduce or eliminate target insect species may not always hold. Jennifer Weathered and Edd Hammill report that the impacts of agricultural pesticides on assemblages of aquatic insects varied resulting in distinct ecological winners and losers within aquatic communities.

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3-D printed tissues and organs without the scaffolding

Engineered tissues and organs have been grown with various degrees of success in labs for many years. Many of them have used a scaffolding approach where cells are seeded onto biodegradable supportive structures that provide the underlying architecture of the organ or tissue desired.

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The Italian Donald Trump Visits Washington

Matteo Salvini, a social-media-savvy populist, Italy’s interior minister, and its deputy prime minister, is the most vivid example of the “Trumpification” of politics in Europe. His League party, known for its tough stance against illegal immigration, may still be the junior partner in Italy’s year-old populist coalition government, but it’s long been clear that Salvini is the one calling the sho

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Seaweed feed additive cuts livestock methane but poses questions

Supplementing cattle feed with seaweed could result in a significant reduction in methane belched by livestock, according to Penn State researchers, but they caution that the practice may not be a realistic strategy to battle climate change.

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Dundee lab solves HOIL-1 mystery

The mysterious function of a key protein has been revealed following a breakthrough by University of Dundee scientists.

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NASA's Webb Sunshield undergoes rocket fitting, more testing

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope's spacecraft element, which consists of the observatory's spacecraft bus and the sunshield, was put in the same folded-up configuration that it will be in when mounted on atop a rocket for launch in 2021.

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Scientists reveal reversible super-glue inspired by snail mucus

Snails secrete a mucous that acts like super-glue, allowing them to adhere to rough surfaces like rocks.

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Study reveals new genomic roots of ecological adaptation in polar bear evolution

Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Vanderbilt University and Clark University have shed new light on the genomic foundation of the polar bear's ecological adaption by pinpointing rapid changes in the bear's gene copy numbers in response to a diet shifting from vegetation to meat.

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Study reveals new genomic roots of ecological adaptation in polar bear evolution

Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Vanderbilt University and Clark University have shed new light on the genomic foundation of the polar bear's ecological adaption by pinpointing rapid changes in the bear's gene copy numbers in response to a diet shifting from vegetation to meat.

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Dundee lab solves HOIL-1 mystery

The mysterious function of a key protein has been revealed following a breakthrough by University of Dundee scientists.

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Interview: Airbus is ready for pilotless jets – are you?

The chief salesman for Airbus says his company already has the technology to fly passenger planes without pilots at all—and is working on winning over regulators and travelers to the idea.

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Dogs evolved a special muscle that lets them make puppy dog eyes

It’s their “puppy dog eyes” that really help dogs melt our hearts – now we know they are created by a facial muscle that is lacking in the closely related wolf

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Seaweed feed additive cuts livestock methane but poses questions

Supplementing cattle feed with seaweed could result in a significant reduction in methane belched by livestock, according to Penn State researchers, but they caution that the practice may not be a realistic strategy to battle climate change.

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3D printed tissues and organs without the scaffolding

A research team led by Eben Alsberg, the Richard and Loan Hill Professor of Bioengineering and Orthopaedics at the University of Illinois at Chicago, has developed a process that enables 3D printing of biological tissues without scaffolds using 'ink' made up of only stem cells.

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Scientists reveal reversible super-glue inspired by snail mucus

Inspired by snail biology, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania, Lehigh University and the Korea Institute of Science and Technology have created a super-glue-like material that is 'intrinsically reversible.' In other words, it can easily come unglued. They have reported their findings in a paper published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Underenrollment in clinical trials: Patients not the problem

The authors of the study published this month in the Journal of Clinical Oncology investigated why many cancer clinical trials fail to enroll enough patients. The researchers sought to identify potential interventions – i.e., solutions – to improve the situation.

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Study reveals new genomic roots of ecological adaptation in polar bear evolution

Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Vanderbilt University and Clark University have shed new light on the genomic foundation of the polar bear's ecological adaption by pinpointing rapid changes in the bear's gene copy numbers in response to a diet shifting from vegetation to meat.

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Dundee lab solves HOIL-1 mystery

The mysterious function of a key protein has been revealed following a breakthrough by University of Dundee scientists.

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Repurposing existing drugs or combining therapies could help in the treatment of autoimmune diseases

Research has found that re-purposing already existing drugs or combining therapies could be used to treat patients who have difficult to treat autoimmune diseases.

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Breakthrough in understanding how human eyes process 3D motion

Scientists at the University of York have revealed that there are two separate 'pathways' for seeing 3D motion in the human brain, which allow people to perform a wide range of tasks such as catching a ball or avoiding moving objects.

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The evolution of puppy dog eyes

Dogs have evolved new muscles around the eyes to better communicate with humans. New research comparing the anatomy and behavior of dogs and wolves suggests dogs' facial anatomy has changed over thousands of years specifically to allow them to better communicate with humans.

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Researchers solve mystery of how gas bubbles form in liquid

Findings show how to make confined bubbles develop uniformly, instead of in their usual scattershot way.

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Boaty McBoatface mission gives new insight into warming ocean abyss

The first mission involving the autonomous submarine vehicle Autosub Long Range (better known as 'Boaty McBoatface') has for the first time shed light on a key process linking increasing Antarctic winds to rising sea temperatures. Data collected from the expedition, published today in the scientific journal PNAS, will help climate scientists build more accurate predictions of the effects of climat

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Breakthrough paves way for new Lyme disease treatment

Virginia Tech biochemist Brandon Jutras has discovered the cellular component that contributes to Lyme arthritis, a debilitating and extremely painful condition that is the most common late stage symptom of Lyme disease.

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The brain consumes half of a child's energy — and that could matter for weight gain

In a new paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 'A hypothesis linking the energy demand of the brain to obesity risk,' co-authors Christopher Kuzawa of Northwestern University and Clancy Blair of New York University School of Medicine, propose that variation in the energy needs of brain development across kids — in terms of the timing, intensity and durati

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9,000 years ago, a community with modern urban problems

Some 9,000 years ago, residents of one of the world's first large farming communities were also among the first humans to experience some of the perils of modern urban living. Scientists studying the ancient ruins of Çatalhöyük, in modern Turkey, found that its inhabitants — 3,500 to 8,000 people at its peak — experienced overcrowding, infectious diseases, violence and environmental problems.

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Dogs’ Eyes Have Changed Since Humans Befriended Them

Dogs, more so than almost any other domesticated species, are desperate for human eye contact. When raised around people, they begin fighting for our attention when they’re as young as four weeks old. It’s hard for most people to resist a petulant flash of puppy-dog eyes—and according to a new study, that pull on the heartstrings might be exactly why dogs can give us those looks at all. A paper p

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China reveals scientific experiments for its next space station

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01913-0 Projects will probe topics including DNA mutation, fire behaviour and the birth of stars.

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Late Stone Age Settlement Reveals Stresses of Early Urban Living

Late Stone Age Settlement Reveals Stresses of Early Urban Living Violence and disease — but also art and culture — accompanied humanity's movement into increasingly populated areas. Catalhoyuk_topNteaser.jpg A researcher excavating an adult skeleton at the Neolithic site of Catalhoyuk in Turkey. Image credits: Scott Haddow Culture Monday, June 17, 2019 – 15:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Insi

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Someone Used a Neural Network to Draw Doom Guy in High-Res

Doom Guy Finally, the HD remake we’ve all been waiting for: a series of neural nets took the classic pixelated mug of the space marine from seminal 1993 first-person shooter “Doom” and churned out an almost photorealistic portrait. The face, which looks sort of like a beefier Nathan Fillion, was posted to Reddit on Sunday. And while the resulting thread reveals that the process wasn’t as straight

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The Woman Who Revealed the Missing Link Between Viruses and Cancer

Today, vaccinating against cervical cancer is routine. But before Sarah Stewart, scientists dismissed the idea of a cancer-preventing vaccine as ludicrous

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Reversible superglue proves strong enough to hold average man

Snail slime-like substance appears to solve problem of weak and reversible or strong and irreversible adhesive A reversible superglue that mimics the under-appreciated properties of dried snail mucus has proved strong enough to bear the weight of an average man. Scientists who tested the slime-inspired product found that two sticky squares the size of postage stamps were sufficient to hold an 87k

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How canines capture your heart: scientists explain puppy dog eyes

Study finds animals developed a facial muscle to wield emotional power over humans In a project that has all the makings of a Roald Dahl classic, scientists have hit on an answer to the mystery of how man’s best friend got its puppy dog eyes. The sad, imploring expression held such power over humans during 33,000 years of canine domestication that the preference for dogs that could pull off the l

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We may have helped give our canine pals ‘puppy dog eyes’

Humans may have selected early dogs for the irresistible facial expression

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“Fully Sleeping” Tesla Driver Cruises 30 Miles on Autopilot

Scheduled Sleep Yet another Tesla driver has been caught on camera asleep behind the wheel — and this time, it clearly wasn’t an accident. On Friday, Los Angeles’ NBC4 reported that a driver spotted a man “fully sleeping” in his Tesla while the car’s Autopilot system drove it for 30 miles down the busy 405 Freeway. A sleeping Tesla driver isn’t as uncommon of a sight as it should be. But while pa

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The evolution of puppy dog eyes

Dogs have evolved new muscles around the eyes to better communicate with humans.

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Boaty McBoatface mission gives new insight into warming ocean abyss

The first mission involving the autonomous submarine vehicle Autosub Long Range (better known as "Boaty McBoatface") has for the first time shed light on a key process linking increasing Antarctic winds to rising sea temperatures. Data collected from the expedition, published today in the scientific journal PNAS, will help climate scientists build more accurate predictions of the effects of climat

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Researchers solve mystery of how gas bubbles form in liquid

The formation of air bubbles in a liquid appears very similar to its inverse process, the formation of liquid droplets from, say, a dripping water faucet. But the physics involved is actually quite different, and while those water droplets are uniform in their size and spacing, bubble formation is typically a much more random process.

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Çatalhöyük: 9,000 years ago, a community with modern urban problems

Some 9,000 years ago, residents of one of the world's first large farming communities were also among the first humans to experience some of the perils of modern urban living.

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Those Puppy Dog Eyes You Can’t Resist? Thank Evolution

Dogs have a muscle that lets them make a face to melt a human’s heart.

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The evolution of puppy dog eyes

Dogs have evolved new muscles around the eyes to better communicate with humans.

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The Queasy Double Message of Taylor Swift’s ‘You Need to Calm Down’

Since it debuted Friday, Taylor Swift’s “You Need to Calm Down” has bounced around in my head for exactly the reason a pop song should: the way it sounds. I like that the beat’s something a great beast might march to, slowly from one side to another, rumbling with each footfall. I like that the “oh-oh” swell of the chorus takes yummy harmonies, typically the key side dish in pop, and makes them t

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3D reconstruction of craniums elucidates the evolution of New World monkeys

Computed tomography scans of fossils from two extinct species point to evolutionary adaptations and kinship with extant howler, spider and woolly monkeys.

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Researchers identify enzyme that suppresses immune system in breast cancer

Duke Cancer Institute researchers outlined a potential way to uncloak breast cancer tumors to the body's immune system. Publishing in the journal Nature Communications, the researchers identified an enzyme in cells involved in regulating the growth and spread of breast cancers. Testing in mice, they demonstrated a way to shut down the enzyme's activity to allow T-cells to mount an immune attack.

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Immuno-PET precisely diagnoses IBD inflammation without invasive procedures

Inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease can be quickly and precisely diagnosed using a new type of nuclear medicine scan. In addition, immuno-PET has high potential for theranostic diagnosis and precision treatment of IBD and other inflammatory diseases. The research is featured in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

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Researchers call for personalized approach to aging brain health

University of Arizona psychologist Lee Ryan and her collaborators have proposed a precision aging model designed to help researchers better understand and treat age-related cognitive decline on an individual level.

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Two hours of nature per week is critical to your wellbeing, Exeter Medical School researchers say

New research from Exeter Medical School shows that 120 minutes a week in nature increases wellbeing. Nearly 20,000 urban-dwelling British citizens took part in this large-scale study. Health benefits associated with being in nature include lowered risk of obesity, diabetes, and mental distress. None As with much health advice, the simplest prescriptions seem to be the most effective. Common sense

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Domestication Made Dogs' Facial Anatomy More Fetching to Humans

Wolves lack the muscles that allow dogs to raise their eyebrows and make puppy dog eyes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Domestication Made Dogs' Facial Anatomy More Fetching to Humans

Wolves lack the muscles that allow dogs to raise their eyebrows and make puppy dog eyes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Watch a Satellite Piece Melt Into a Puddle of Metal

Liquid Metal Satellite The European Space Agency (ESA) just placed a piece of a satellite in an extremely hot plasma wind tunnel to melt it into a ball of liquid metal. The agency designed the test to demonstrate how parts of satellites burn up upon reentering Earth’s atmosphere but plenty of material still makes it down to Earth — and it could lead to new satellite designs that ensure total burn

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Why Trump Offers Every Possible Answer

Chris Wallace’s question for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo wasn’t complicated, or at least it shouldn’t have been. “Is accepting oppo research from a foreign government right or wrong?” the Fox News Sunday host asked . Yet it had the nation’s top diplomat sputtering. “Chris, you asked me not to call any of your questions today ridiculous. You came really close right there. President Trump has be

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Why the Anthony Davis and LeBron James Pairing Will Be Different

Saturday afternoon, the other size-17 shoe dropped. Anthony Davis, the all-everything center who had spent his first six professional seasons with the New Orleans Pelicans, was sent to the Los Angeles Lakers. In return, the Lakers parted ways with some mid-tier players—including Lonzo Ball, once a sports-media fixture, but now just another guard with a shaky jump shot—and a bundle of future draft

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Genius Used a Typography Trick to Bust Google For Stealing Lyrics

Scrub Your Metadata Genius, a website of annotated song lyrics, used a neat typographic trick to show that Google has been stealing its content. Since 2017, the company has accused Google of pilfering its lyrics to display as part of Google’s search results. Now, The Wall Street Journal reports that a coded message — specifically hidden in the lyrics by Genius — has shown up on Google searches, l

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Facebook posts better at predicting diabetes, mental health than demographic info

Analyzing language shows that identifying certain groups of words significantly improves upon predicting some medical conditions in patients

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Cognitive decline may accelerate after heart attack, angina

Adults with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) are at higher risk for faster cognitive decline in the long-term, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Study finds bleeding after minimally invasive pad treatments can increase risk of death

Major bleeding occurs in about 4% of surgical procedures to treat blockages in the arteries of the lower leg and leads to an increased risk of in-hospital deaths, according to a new study published in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. The study found several risk factors that increase the chance of bleeding, which researchers said can help guide future efforts to reduce bleeding complications. T

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More heart failure patients may benefit from CRT defibrillator

Certain groups of heart failure patients may see improved heart function with cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) if traditional implantable cardioverter defibrillator treatment does not work, according to research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Researchers question implanting IVC filters on prophylactic basis before bariatric surgery

Temple's Dr. Riyaz Bashir led a research team that sought to compare the outcomes associated with patients receiving prophylactic inferior vena cava filters (IVCF) prior to bariatric surgery to those who did not receive IVCFs. The team's findings suggest the practice of implanting the IVCFs on a prophylactic basis prior to bariatric surgery is associated with worse clinical outcomes and increased

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A red tide devastated Florida marine life for 16 months. Why?

The toxic red tide that plagued Florida for more than a year left many unsolved mysteries in its wake, including how climate change might be fueling killer algae around the world. (illustration by Zohar Lazar/) The Florida Problem: A Special Report. Struggling crops. Salty aquifers. Invading wildlife. Piles of dead fish. The Sunshine State feels the squeeze of environmental change on its beaches,

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Security firm Cellebrite says it can unlock any iPhone – CNET

Apple seemingly can't stop law enforcement from getting into its phones.

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Pete Buttigieg Enlists a Silicon Valley Vet to Bring in the Money

Swati Mylavarapu worked at Square and Kleiner Perkins before pivoting to progressive startups. Now she applies lessons from the tech world to Pete Buttigieg's campaign.

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Balancing data protection and research needs in the age of the GDPR

Scientific journals and funding bodies often require researchers to deposit individual genetic data from studies in research repositories in order to increase data sharing with the aim of enabling the reproducibility of new findings, as well as facilitating new discoveries. However, the introduction of new regulations such as the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) can complicate this.

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Terrifying 'Fly-Pocalypse' Descends Upon Russian Village

Swarms worthy of a horror movie may have emerged from illegal fertilizer.

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Cancer-sniffing dogs 97% accurate in identifying lung cancer, according to study in JAOA

The next step will be to further fractionate the samples based on chemical and physical properties, presenting them back to the dogs until the specific biomarkers for each cancer are identified. The goal is to develop an over-the-counter screening product, similar to a pregnancy test, in terms of cost, simplicity and availability. Dr. Quinn envisions a device that someone can breathe into and see

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Past climate change: A warning for the future?

A new study of climate changes and their effects on past societies offers a sobering glimpse of social upheavals that might happen in the future. The prehistoric groups studied lived in the Amazon Basin of South America hundreds of years ago, before European contact, but the disruptions that occurred may carry lessons for our time.

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A Clearer Map For Aging: 'Elderhood' Shows How Geriatricians Help Seniors Thrive

Physician Louise Aronson treats patients who are in their 60s — as well as those who are older than 100. She writes about changing approaches to elder health care in her book Elderhood. (Image credit: Robert Lang Photography/Getty Images)

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A ‘Hunger Games’ Prequel Novel Is Coming Next Year

The Panem madness is returning: Scholastic announced that Suzanne Collins’ new Hunger Games prequel novel is coming on May 19, 2020. The prequel novel, which doesn’t have a title …

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Global commodities trade and consumption place the world's primates at risk of extinction

A recent study highlights the fact that the economic benefits of commodity export for primate habitat countries has been limited relative to the extreme environmental costs of pollution, habitat degradation, loss of biodiversity, continued food insecurity and the threat of emerging diseases.

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Does people power make a difference? The truth about protests

From Extinction Rebellion to the Hong Kong marches, protesters are regularly taking to the streets. But what really works to change people's minds

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Techathlon podcast: Secret product codenames, historical video game reviews, and the week’s biggest tech news

Listen to the latest episode in the player embedded below. (Techathlon/) Most of us will never get to work on a secret project with a clandestine codename. Sure, we can make up our own—I’m planning to sneak out an hour early on Friday and I’ve been referring to the plan as “operation walrus,” all month. But, engineers and developers who work on new gadgets get the real deal. Last week, Microsoft

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Harvard’s Drastic Decision

In March, Kyle Kashuv got the news he’d been waiting for: He’d been admitted to Harvard. The Parkland-shooting survivor, who had become a conservative rising star, had spent his senior year as a school-safety and gun-rights activist, traveling the country as the high-school outreach director for the right-wing group Turning Point USA. He planned to take a gap year before enrolling in the fall of

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Photos: Hong Kong Protesters Return to the Streets

Hundreds of thousands of Hong Kong citizens filled the city’s streets for a second weekend of protest against a controversial extradition bill that would allow authorities to send suspected criminals to China. The demonstration took place despite an earlier statement from Chief Executive Carrie Lam indicating that the proposed bill would be suspended indefinitely. Marchers were calling for Hong K

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The Melting Arctic Is Releasing Poison, Disease and Nuclear Waste

Wakey Wakey As rising temperatures cause Arctic ice to melt, it’s freeing many things that we would be better off keeping trapped. Alongside the ancient fossils now peeking up from the disappearing permafrost lie frozen toxins, nuclear waste, and enough sequestered carbon to double the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere today, according to BBC News . It’s a dire situation — failing to a

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Bright lights outdoors may help treat lazy eye in children

Amblyopia, also known as lazy eye, is a loss of vision that affects two to five percent of children across the world and originates from a deficit in visual cortical circuitry. Against current models, SUNY Optometry researchers demonstrate that amblyopia affects the ON visual pathway more than the OFF, a finding that could have implications for new amblyopia treatments targeted at strengthening a

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Healthy blood vessels may delay cognitive decline

High blood pressure may affect conditions such as Alzheimer's disease by interfering with the brain's waste management system, according to new research in rats published in JNeurosci. Maintaining blood vessel health could therefore help stave off cognitive decline.

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How to Measure Time — From the Very Beginning of Time

Scientists still define astronomical time in years, with some recent refinements.

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Climate talks held as Arctic ice melts, concerns grow

Diplomats and climate experts gathered Monday in Germany for U.N.-hosted talks on climate change amid growing public pressure for governments to act faster against global warming.

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Looming insect invasion threatens California wine and avocados

UC Riverside is testing whether a sesame seed-sized wasp can control a pest that could seriously damage California crops including wine, walnuts, and avocados.

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Looming insect invasion threatens California wine and avocados

UC Riverside is testing whether a sesame seed-sized wasp can control a pest that could seriously damage California crops including wine, walnuts, and avocados.

5h

Dinoflagellate plankton glow so that their predators won't eat them

Some dinoflagellate plankton species are bioluminescent, with a remarkable ability to produce light to make themselves and the water they swim in glow. Now, researchers have found that for one dinoflagellate species (Lingulodinium polyedra), this bioluminescence is also a defense mechanism that helps them ward off the copepod grazers that would like to eat them.

5h

LGBTQ awareness lacking among American neurologists, new survey finds

A first-of-its-kind survey of American neurologists reveals that more than half carry the mistaken belief that a patient's sexual orientation and gender identity have no bearing on treatment of neurologic illness. That belief can have damaging repercussions for patients seeking care, according to a study published in the journal Neurology.

5h

Three quarters of Americans concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals

Nearly three-quarters (74%) of Americans are concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals, according to new survey data released today by ASHP (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists). The results follow a 2018 study in the American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy (AJHP) that found 53 percent of pharmacists self-reported a high degree of burnout caused by increasing stresses and

5h

Poor oral health linked to a 75% increase in liver cancer risk, new study finds

Poor oral health is associated with a 75% increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer, new research published in UEG Journal has found.

5h

Canada drug store chain to use blockchain to trace cannabis

Canada's biggest drug store chain said Monday it plans to use blockchain technology to trace the source of the cannabis it distributes, as part of an effort to set standards for the flourishing industry.

5h

JFK Library launches app to celebrate Apollo 11 mission

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing with a new app that helps users relive the 1969 launch of the Apollo 11 mission.

5h

Modern milkman: Company offers delivery and pickup of no-waste household supplies and groceries

It's the stuff everyone tries to get rid of but that never really goes away:

5h

Dinoflagellate plankton glow so that their predators won't eat them

Some dinoflagellate plankton species are bioluminescent, with a remarkable ability to produce light to make themselves and the water they swim in glow. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 17 have found that for one dinoflagellate species (Lingulodinium polyedra), this bioluminescence is also a defense mechanism that helps them ward off the copepod grazers that would like to eat t

5h

Proposed Energy Efficiency Rules Could Slow Emissions Reductions

More efficient appliances and stricter building codes have driven significant declines in U.S. emissions to date — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Dinoflagellate plankton glow so that their predators won't eat them

Some dinoflagellate plankton species are bioluminescent, with a remarkable ability to produce light to make themselves and the water they swim in glow. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 17 have found that for one dinoflagellate species (Lingulodinium polyedra), this bioluminescence is also a defense mechanism that helps them ward off the copepod grazers that would like to eat t

5h

Tracking life's first step: Two molecules 'awaken' brand new genome

Within hours after fertilization, a unique genome forms from chromosomes contributed by the egg and sperm. However, this new genome is initially inactive and must be "awakened" to begin the transcription of its DNA and start embryonic development. How life's first step happens has long fascinated developmental biologists.

5h

Grow Faster, Grow Stronger: Speed-Breeding Crops to Feed the Future

Plant breeders are fast-tracking genetic improvements in food crops to keep pace with global warming and a growing human population.

5h

5h

Tracking life's first step: Two molecules 'awaken' brand new genome

Within hours after fertilization, a unique genome forms from chromosomes contributed by the egg and sperm. However, this new genome is initially inactive and must be "awakened" to begin the transcription of its DNA and start embryonic development. How life's first step happens has long fascinated developmental biologists.

5h

Coat the ravens evermore? To protect tortoises, officials test spraying oil into birds' nests

The sun was rising over the Mojave Desert as crews prepared to demonstrate a devastating new weapon in the war among man, bird and reptile.

5h

Adobe's Fresco app will bring real painting physics to iPad art – CNET

The tool, formerly Project Gemini, arrives later in 2019.

5h

Coat the ravens evermore? To protect tortoises, officials test spraying oil into birds' nests

The sun was rising over the Mojave Desert as crews prepared to demonstrate a devastating new weapon in the war among man, bird and reptile.

5h

Atlantic Re:think and Lincoln Launch Interactive Art Installation in New York City’s Seaport District

A new immersive, public art installation opens today in Lower Manhattan’s Seaport District, part of a first-of-its-kind collaboration from Atlantic Re:think and Lincoln. The installation, titled The Nautilus , is free to the public, and is meant to serve as both a destination and an experience for visitors to the seaport throughout the summer. “With this public art installation, we were able to u

6h

Watch a Robot Take Revenge in Brutal Boston Dynamics Parody

Turn the Tables Boston Dynamics is known for releasing impressive videos of its robots doing everything from dancing to mastering parkour courses . And sometimes, it’ll share a video showing how the company’s engineers test its bots’ “robustness” — by whacking them with hockey sticks , for example. Now, Los Angeles-based production studio Corridor Digital has released a parody robot video imagini

6h

Vaporizing Meteors are Making Clouds on Mars

These clouds snapped by the Curiosity rover on Mars are much lower and thicker than the meteor-generated clouds the study looked at. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Justin Cowart) No matter what planet you’re on, physics remains the same. For clouds, that means they follow a peculiar law – they form only around a seed of some sort, usually a fleck of dust or salt. On Earth, with its thick atmosphere and

6h

What's So Special About Our Moon, Anyway?

Moonrise over the Wasatch Mountains. NASA. This summer is really the summer of the Moon. As we approach the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing, many people are thinking about our past and future relationship with our celestial partner. It is the only object in space whose surface can be seen with the naked eye (without going blind … sorry Sun), yet only two dozen people have even been the

6h

Tuning into the LCDs of tomorrow: Exploring the novel IGZO-11 semiconductor

In 1985, Noboru Kimizuka of the National Institute for Research in Inorganic Materials, Japan had pioneered the idea of polycrystalline indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) ceramics, with the general chemical formula (InGaO3)m(ZnO)n (m, n = natural number; hereafter referred to as IGZO-mn). Little would he have thought that its curious electrical properties would bring the electronics industry to lice

6h

Researchers testing ways to make aspen-dominated forests resilient to climate change

In an aspen-dominated hardwood forest at the northern tip of the state's Lower Peninsula, University of Michigan scientists are testing ways to make the region's forests more resilient to climate change.

6h

Samsung: Scan Your Smart TV for Viruses Every Week or Else

Virus Killed the TV Star Korean electronics giant Samsung just tweeted a warning reminding owners of its TVs to “prevent malicious software attacks on your TV by scanning for viruses on your TV every few weeks,” as The Verge reports . Samsung’s Support USA account has since deleted the tweet, but it raises some obvious questions: Should we have been scanning our TVs for malware all along and why?

6h

Researchers testing ways to make aspen-dominated forests resilient to climate change

In an aspen-dominated hardwood forest at the northern tip of the state's Lower Peninsula, University of Michigan scientists are testing ways to make the region's forests more resilient to climate change.

6h

New study shows gender pay gap is still issue for airline staff

High-flying careers in the airline industry don't mean sky-high salaries for women, according to new research by Swansea University.

6h

Frontera named 5th fastest supercomputer in the world

The Frontera supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) earned the #5 spot on the twice-annual Top 500 list , which ranks the world's most powerful non-distributed computer systems. Located at The University of Texas at Austin, the National Science Foundation (NSF)-supported Frontera is the fastest university supercomputer in the world.

6h

Gender pay gap shrinking for some female university presidents

While serious economic and societal issues continue to swirl around the gender pay gap, new research published in the INFORMS journal Organization Science shows one area where this inequality is starting to disappear—higher education. Researchers have found that the gender pay gap disappears at more prestigious universities.

6h

A new 2-D magnet draws future devices closer

We are all familiar with the image of electrons zipping around an atom's nucleus and forming chemical bonds in molecules and materials. But what is less known is that electrons have an additional unique property: spin. It is difficult to make an analogy, but one could crudely describe electron spin as a spinning-top rotating around its axis. But what is even more interesting is that when spins of

6h

China Clamps Down on Foreign Use of Chinese Genetic Material and Data

New rules, which require international scientists to have a Chinese collaborator, go into effect July 1.

6h

Top analyst claims that 2020 iPhone will have 5G – CNET

Next year's iPhone update could be a big one.

6h

Daily briefing: How it feels to be scooped on a great discovery

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01930-z Is ego or curiosity the main motivation in science? Plus: the caterpillar threatening China’s huge corn crop and how to adapt to a new working language.

6h

Hackers Are Threatening Elections Around the World

All Your Base Every day, there are 6.5 trillion attempted hacks around the world, millions of which target political systems, elections, and governments. Aided in part by the prevalence of cheap hacking tools sold online, cybercrime is expected to become a $6 trillion industry by 2022, CNET reports . The attacks are occurring at such an unfathomable scale that law enforcement is struggling to sta

6h

Bees required to create an excellent blueberry crop

Getting an excellent rabbiteye blueberry harvest requires helpful pollinators—particularly native southeastern blueberry bees—although growers can bring in managed honey bees to do the job, according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists.

6h

Did you solve it? Are you in the smartest 1 per cent (of 13-year-olds)?

The solutions to today’s problems Earlier today I set you the following puzzles: 1. In this word-sum, each letter stands for one of the digits 0–9, and stands for the same digit each time it appears. Different letters stand for different digits. No number starts with 0. Continue reading…

6h

Bees required to create an excellent blueberry crop

Getting an excellent rabbiteye blueberry harvest requires helpful pollinators—particularly native southeastern blueberry bees—although growers can bring in managed honey bees to do the job, according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists.

6h

Trump Issues Executive Order that Could Reduce Scientific Advice

The president wants to terminate at least a third of all federal advisory committees by the end of September.

6h

Gene Increases Risk for Pot Addiction

First gene associated with cannabis abuse likely affects how people respond to the drug — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Gene Increases Risk for Pot Addiction

First gene associated with cannabis abuse likely affects how people respond to the drug — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Gene Increases Risk for Pot Addiction

First gene associated with cannabis abuse likely affects how people respond to the drug — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Here's One More Political Assault on Public Health

Corporate interests, including the fossil fuel, auto and tobacco industries, are searching for ways to undermine the science that says particulate pollution kills — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Managing the risk of aggressive dog behavior

Aggressive behaviour in pet dogs is a serious problem for dog owners across the world, with bite injuries representing a serious risk to both people and other dogs. New research by the University of Bristol has explored the factors that in?uence how owners manage aggressive behaviour in their dogs. The study found that clinical animal behaviourists should focus on helping dog owners to feel confid

6h

The moon's south pole is hiding something massive and mysterious

Elevation data for the South Pole-Aitken Basin (blues are low, with high mountains are in red and yellow) (NASA/GSFC/University of Arizona/) It's been 50 years since Apollo 11, but our knowledge of the moon is still remarkably scant. We've only just scratched the surface of what there is to know, quite literally. A recent paper published in Geophysical Research Letters outlines the discovery of a

6h

Opinion: Agriculture Must Replace Small Science with Big Science

Agronomic sciences should follow the lead of genetics and other disciplines in sharing data.

6h

Managing the risk of aggressive dog behavior

Aggressive behaviour in pet dogs is a serious problem for dog owners across the world, with bite injuries representing a serious risk to both people and other dogs. New research by the University of Bristol has explored the factors that in?uence how owners manage aggressive behaviour in their dogs. The study found that clinical animal behaviourists should focus on helping dog owners to feel confid

6h

Gender pay gap shrinking for some female university presidents

While serious economic and societal issues continue to swirl around the gender pay gap, new research published in the INFORMS journal Organization Science shows one area where this inequality is starting to disappear — higher education. Researchers have found that the gender pay gap disappears at more prestigious universities.

6h

Farm-like indoor microbiota may protect children from asthma also in urban homes

A child's risk of developing asthma is the lower the more the microbiota of the child's home resembles that of a farm house. This was shown by a study conducted by the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare that analysed indoor microbiota from 400 Finnish and 1,000 German homes.

6h

Adversity in early childhood sets off snowball effect

New research clarifies how adversity early in life affects the ways children develop, including their executive function skills. Experiences such as poverty, residential instability, or parental divorce or substance abuse can lead to changes in a child’s brain chemistry, muting the effects of stress hormones—those that rise to help us face challenges, stress, or to simply “get up and go.” Togethe

6h

Here's One More Political Assault on Public Health

Corporate interests, including the fossil fuel, auto and tobacco industries, are searching for ways to undermine the science that says particulate pollution kills — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Our dark, quiet skies could be dazzled by satellite pollution

An extraterrestrial turf war is pitting astronomers against operators and stress-testing space governance

6h

Catholic medical journal pulls paper on conversion therapy over statistical problems

The journal for a religious medical group is retracting a paper that supported the discredited practice of conversion therapy for homosexuals over concerns about the statistical analyses — or lack thereof — in the research. The paper, “Effects of therapy on religious men who have unwanted same-sex attraction,” was published last year in The Lincare … Continue reading Catholic medical journal pulls

6h

Study shows 70% of patients lack advance directives before elective surgery

Only 30% of elective surgery patients in a recent study had Advance Directives documenting their wishes regarding emergency medical care. Only 16% had one on file in their electronic medical record (EMR) where a clinician could access it at the time of surgery.

6h

Spørg Fagfolket: Indtager vi mikroplast gennem de fisk, vi spiser?

En læser er bekymret for, at mikroplasten i verdenshavene ender i vores maver, når vi spiser fisk. Professor fra DTU Aqua har haft plasten under mikroskopet.

6h

Enterovirus Might be Behind Kids' Paralysis: Preprint

Researchers identify a possible driver of acute flaccid myelitis, a polio-like disease diagnosed in more than 500 children over the last few years.

6h

Managing the risk of aggressive dog behavior

Aggressive behavior in pet dogs is a serious problem for dog owners across the world, with bite injuries representing a serious risk to both people and other dogs. New research has found that clinical animal behaviorists should focus on helping dog owners to feel confident in the effectiveness of the behavior modification techniques that they recommend and, in their ability, to actually use them s

7h

Introduced a new paradigm of cell transplantation with scaffold microrobots

Scientists developed a microrobot that can precisely transplant stem cells in various in vivo and vitro environments. Expects to improve the efficiency of treating degenerative neural disorders such as Alzheimer by accurately and safely delivering to a desired location.

7h

'Men in Black: International' Disappoints at the Box Office

Also, Taylor Swift dropped a video for "You Need to Calm Down." Watch it here.

7h

Iran Has Options and It’s Starting to Use Them

For almost a year, Iran looked set to hunker down and take the Trump administration’s repeated punches—the withdrawal from the nuclear deal, the escalating sanctions, the intensified threats. But now Iran is punching back. On Monday Tehran announced a clear and rapid plan to start breaching the nuclear deal—which Iran and all the original signatories have stayed in without the United States—unles

7h

UCF is part of NASA Cassini mission that reveals new details about Saturn's rings

In a new paper that appeared in Science on Friday and includes two University of Central Florida co-authors, researchers are offering glimpses into the nature and composition of Saturn's legendary rings by using data from some of the closest observations ever made of the main rings.

7h

Bees required to create an excellent blueberry crop

Getting an excellent rabbiteye blueberry harvest requires helpful pollinators — particularly native southeastern blueberry bees — although growers can bring in managed honey bees to do the job, according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists.This is especially true for commercial rabbiteye blueberry producers in Mississippi and Louisiana. With sufficient pollinators, they have been a

7h

Stem cells reprogrammed into neurons could reveal drugs harmful to pregnancy

Soham Chanda, an assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has designed a new experimental system that can rapidly assess the pathogenic effects of a drug on a baby's developing brain. His system uses embryonic stem cells reprogrammed into neurons, offering a powerful tool for probing genetic and molecular underpinnings of drug-induced neurodevelopmental disorder

7h

Antioxidant puts up fight, but loses battle against protein linked to Alzheimer's disease

New research may explain why an antioxidant that protects the brain is also associated with deterioration in areas susceptible to Alzheimer's disease. The antioxidant, superoxide dismutase or SOD1, improves cognition, but an Iowa State University research team found SOD1's protective benefits dramatically weaken when levels of tau proteins — a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease — increase.

7h

Researchers from IKBFU study nanoparticles synthesized by method of electric explosion

Physicists from the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University conduct a study on nanomaterials that have been synthesized by the method of the electric explosion. Research group of the Laboratory of Novel Magnetic Materials has studied the magnetic and structural properties of metallic α-Fe magnetic nanoparticles, which were covered with non-magnetic iron oxide.

7h

Research highlights possible targets to help tackle Crohn's disease

There is no precise cure for digestive condition Crohn's disease, and causes are believed to vary. But one indicator of the condition — an abnormal reaction of the immune system to certain bacteria in the intestines — has had new light shed on it thanks to scientists at the University of Plymouth.

7h

U of Guelph study finds health professionals need to be cautious on social media

Posting a single negative comment to Facebook may hinder health professionals' credibility with current or potential patients, a new University of Guelph study reveals.

7h

Performance improves when the enemy of an enemy is a friend

New research from Northwestern University finds that balanced professional networks are more important than individual talent when it comes to high-risk decision-making.

7h

Young adults who live near medical marijuana dispensaries use more often

Medical marijuana is legal in some form in 33 states, but relatively little is known about the availability of marijuana and use among younger people. A new study finds that younger adults who live in neighborhoods with more medical marijuana dispensaries use marijuana more frequently than their peers and have more-positive views about the drug. The associations were strongest among young adults w

7h

Your circle of friends, not your Fitbit, is more predictive of your health

To get a better reading on your overall health and wellness, you'd be better off looking at the strength and structure of your circle of friends, according to a new study in the Public Library of Science journal, PLOS ONE.

7h

A new 2D magnet draws future devices closer

EPFL scientists have discovered a new type of 2D magnetic material that can be integrated into spintronic devices.

7h

Science snapshots: New nitrides, artificial photosynthesis, and TMDC semiconductors

From Berkeley Lab: groundbreaking study maps out paths to new nitride materials; new framework for artificial photosynthesis; TMDCs don't have to be perfect to shine bright.

7h

Climate change had significant impact on Amazon communities before arrival of Europeans

Climate change had a significant impact on people living in the Amazon rainforest before the arrival of Europeans and the loss of many indigenous groups, a new study shows.

7h

A single gut enterotype linked to both inflammatory bowel disease and depression

In 2012, Professor Jeroen Raes (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology) launched the Flemish Gut Flora Project. Sequencing fecal samples of over 3,000 healthy volunteers, Professor Raes and his team defined the boundaries of a normal, health-associated gut microbiota. Next, the team turned to patient groups to identify microbiome alterations associated with diseases. Recently, they described the so

7h

Most metastatic colorectal cancers have spread before diagnosis, Stanford researchers say

Up to 80% of metastatic colorectal cancers are likely to have spread to distant locations in the body before the original tumor has exceeded the size of a poppy seed, according to a study of nearly 3,000 patients by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

7h

Wheat myth debunked

Common opinion has it that modern wheat is so reliant on fertiliser and crop protection agrochemicals that the plants now lack the hardiness needed to remain productive under harsher environmental conditions. But comprehensive new research shows that modern wheat varieties out-perform older varieties even when grown under unfavourable conditions that include low agrochemical inputs and drought str

7h

How to reinvigorate exhausted immune cells and stop cancer along the way

In cancer and chronic infections immune balance can be disrupted, resulting in immune system dysfunction or 'exhaustion.' An important protein called TOX, which varies in amount in different immune cell types, controls the identity of the cells that become exhausted. With this knowledge, investigators now have a way to accurately identify immune cells that are exhausted in a tumor or site of an in

7h

First lung map uncovers new insights into asthma

For the first time, researchers have mapped the building blocks of the human lungs and airways, in both asthma patients and normal people. Reported in Nature Medicine, the first draft Human Cell Atlas of the lung reveals differences between asthmatic and normal airways and identifies how lung cells communicate with each other. Understanding the cells and their signals could lead to finding new dru

7h

'Self-healing' polymer brings perovskite solar tech closer to market

A protective layer of epoxy resin helps prevent the leakage of pollutants from perovskite solar cells (PSCs), report scientists from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST). Adding a 'self-healing' polymer to the top of a PSC can radically reduce how much lead it discharges into the environment. This gives a strong boost to prospects for commercializing the techn

7h

Study compares cognitive outcomes in patients with MS based on disease onset

Adults who had pediatric-onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) before they were 18 were more likely to have greater cognitive consequences than patients who developed MS as adults. This study used Swedish registry data and included 5,704 patients with MS (300 of whom had pediatric-onset of the disease), and it compared test scores reflective of information-processing efficiency.

7h

Is sexting associated with sexual behaviors, mental health among teens?

This study, called a systematic review and meta-analysis, combined the results of 23 studies with nearly 42,000 participants to summarize associations between sexting by adolescents, sexual behavior and mental health risk factors. The results suggest sexting was associated with sexual activity, multiple sex partners, a lack of contraception use, delinquent behavior, anxiety/depression, alcohol and

7h

Rules of brain architecture revealed in large study of neuron shape & electrophysiology

A new study from the Allen Institute for Brain Science describes a large profile of mouse neuron types based on two important characteristics of the cells: their 3D shape and their electrical behavior. The researchers hope a better understanding of cell types in a healthy mammalian brain will lay the foundation for uncovering the cell types that underlie human brain disorders and diseases.

7h

From function to form

Researchers use new method to predict structures for four proteins and one RNA molecule from humans, bacteria and yeastIn a marked departure from previous work, the new method uses synthetic mutations in the DNA sequence rather than naturally occurring variations in DNA3D structures of biomolecules yield valuable clues about protein function that can illuminate the effects of individual genetic di

7h

Climate change threatens commercial fishers from Maine to North Carolina

Most fishing communities from North Carolina to Maine are projected to face declining fishing options unless they adapt to climate change by catching different species or fishing in different areas, according to a study in the journal Nature Climate Change.

7h

Meteors help Martian clouds form

Researchers think they've solved the long-standing mystery of how Mars got all of its clouds.

7h

Breastmilk antibody protects preterm infants from deadly intestinal disease

Human and mouse experiments show that an antibody in breastmilk is necessary to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis — an often deadly bacterial disease of the intestine.

7h

How certain antibiotic combinations could defeat 'superbugs'

In hospitalized patients with bacterial infections, heteroresistance is more widespread than previously appreciated. This finding — alarming on one level — could also reveal ways to defeat apparently invincible bacteria.

7h

Tracking life's first step: Two molecules 'awaken' brand new genome

Within hours after fertilization, a unique genome forms from chromosomes contributed by the egg and sperm. However, this new genome is initially inactive and must be 'awakened' to begin the transcription of its DNA and start embryonic development. How life's first step happens has long fascinated developmental biologists.

7h

Dinoflagellate plankton glow so that their predators won't eat them

Some dinoflagellate plankton species are bioluminescent, with a remarkable ability to produce light to make themselves and the water they swim in glow. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 17 have found that for one dinoflagellate species (Lingulodinium polyedra), this bioluminescence is also a defense mechanism that helps them ward off the copepod grazers that would like to eat t

7h

Neolithic People Made Fake Islands More Than 5,600 Years Ago

Hundreds of tiny islands around Scotland didn't arise naturally. They're fakes that were constructed out of boulders, clay and timbers by Neolithic people about 5,600 years ago, a new study finds.

7h

Fridykning kan rädda liv från bilar under vatten

− I Sverige dör 5-6 personer per år i den här typen av olyckor och tusentals personer drunknar instängda i bilar årligen globalt sett. Personerna kan inte själva ta sig ut på grund av vattentrycket när bilen hamnat under vattnet. Studien gav mycket positiva resultat och vår förhoppning är att brandmän som idag är ytlivräddare ska kunna tränas i upprepad fridykning så att denna räddningsmetod kan

7h

Massive 3D Dataset Helps Robots Understand What Things Are

PartNet is a new semantic database of common objects that brings a new level of real-world understanding to robots

7h

Epoxy resin solves solar tech pollution problems

Addition to perovskite cell manufacture makes them environmentally friendly. Andrew Masterson reports.

7h

Samsung Deletes Tweet Warning Users to Virus-Scan Their Smart TVs

Samsung deleted a tweet warning its users to virus scan their smart TVs. Bad idea. The post Samsung Deletes Tweet Warning Users to Virus-Scan Their Smart TVs appeared first on ExtremeTech.

7h

Microbes from farms may protect children from asthma even in cities

Children who grow up on farms have a lower risk of developing asthma, and now it seems that may be due to microbes that can be in urban homes as well

7h

Cold weather increases the risk of fatal opioid overdoses

While the precise reasons are unclear, an analysis of overdose deaths in Rhode Island and Connecticut showed that cold snaps raised the risk of fatal opioid overdoses by 25%.

7h

A new 2D magnet draws future devices closer

Scientists have discovered a new type of 2D magnetic material that can be integrated into spintronic devices.

7h

Topical cream shows promise in treatment of skin pigmentation disease, vitiligo

A US nationwide phase II clinical trial has found that a topical cream was extremely effective in reversing the effects of vitiligo, a relatively common autoimmune disease that causes loss of skin pigmentation. Topical application of the medicated cream, ruxolitinib, which is currently used as an oral treatment for certain blood disorders, resulted in substantial improvement of facial vitiligo sym

7h

Introduced a new paradigm of cell transplantation with scaffold microrobots

Scientists developed a microrobot that can precisely transplant stem cells in various in vivo and vitro environments. Expects to improve the efficiency of treating degenerative neural disorders such as Alzheimer by accurately and safely delivering to a desired location.

7h

Scientists use machine learning to improve gut disease diagnosis

A study says machine learning algorithms applied to biopsy images can shorten the time for diagnosing and treating a gut disease that often causes permanent physical and cognitive damage in children.

7h

Cell biology: Preventing drugs from being transported out of the cell

A research team has investigated the transport mechanism of a bacterial membrane protein using an artificially produced antibody fragment. The transport proteins, called ABC exporters, are present, for instance, in the cell membranes of bacteria and in large quantities in cancer cells and are responsible for transporting small molecules out of the cells. Some transporters can pump antibiotics or c

7h

Rinsing system in stomach protects the teeth of ruminants

When they graze, goats, sheep and cows often ingest bits of earth that can be damaging to their teeth. Researchers have now shown how the animals protect themselves against dental abrasion: their stomach system rinses dust and sand off the ingested food before it is chewed for the second time.

7h

Tuning into the LCDs of tomorrow: Exploring the novel IGZO-11 semiconductor

Indium-gallium-zinc oxide ceramics are used as the backplane for flat-panel displays. A team of researchers reports the synthesis of centimeter-scale single crystals of a particular type of these semiconductors, InGaZnO4 (IGZO-11), with attractive characteristics such as wide band gap and high electrical mobility and conductivity, which make it promising candidates for transparent optoelectronic d

7h

TOX is a critical regulator of tumour-specific T cell differentiation

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1324-y TOX is a critical regulator of tumour-specific T cell differentiation

7h

Global analysis of streamflow response to forest management

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1306-0 Analysis of forest-management studies finds that forest removal is more likely to increase streamflow in areas with greater water storage between the surface and bedrock, and that forest planting is more likely to decrease streamflow in drier climates.

7h

TOX reinforces the phenotype and longevity of exhausted T cells in chronic viral infection

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1326-9 TOX reinforces the phenotype and longevity of exhausted T cells in chronic viral infection

7h

TOX transcriptionally and epigenetically programs CD8+ T cell exhaustion

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1325-x TOX transcriptionally and epigenetically programs CD8 + T cell exhaustion

7h

Author Correction: Single-cell transcriptomic analysis of Alzheimer’s disease

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1329-6 Author Correction: Single-cell transcriptomic analysis of Alzheimer’s disease

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7h

Watch “MythBusters” Host Adam Savage Fly a Titanium Iron Man Suit

Titanium Man Former “MythBusters” co-host Adam Savage just showed off an incredible-looking, 3D-printed titanium Iron Man suit — and yes, it can fly, just like Tony Stark’s fictional model. The jetpack behind the suit comes courtesy of Gravity Industries, a startup run by UK inventor Richard Browning, and uses five 1,000 horsepower mini jet engines . Honestly, you have to see it to believe it: Sa

7h

Most of the World to Face Record-High Temperatures Every Year Without Serious Climate Action

About 60% of the world will face record-high temperatures every year for the next 100 years if we don't tackle climate change now, a new study suggests.

7h

Icy Martian Clouds Are Formed from the 'Smoke' of Dead Meteors, Study Claims

The wispy, blue ice clouds of Mars are actually made of pulverized meteors, a new study claims.

7h

Wheat myth debunked by a major new study

The myth that modern wheat varieties are more heavily reliant on pesticides and fertilisers is debunked by new research published in Nature Plants today.

7h

Climate change threatens commercial fishers from Maine to North Carolina

Most fishing communities from North Carolina to Maine are projected to face declining fishing options unless they adapt to climate change by catching different species or fishing in different areas, according to a study in the journal Nature Climate Change.

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How certain antibiotic combinations could defeat 'superbugs'

A sneaky form of antibiotic resistance called "heteroresistance" is more widespread than previously appreciated, scientists at the Emory Antibiotic Resistance Center report.

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Latest in health: Robots make surgery easier for everyone involved

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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U.S. Navy expands its metal 3D printing capabilities – 3D Printing Industry

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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5 challenges we could solve by designing new proteins | David Baker

Proteins are remarkable molecular machines: they digest your food, fire your neurons, power your immune system and so much more. What if we could design new ones, with functions never before seen in nature? In this remarkable glimpse of the future, David Baker shares how his team at the Institute for Protein Design is creating entirely new proteins from scratch — and shows how they could help us

7h

Wheat myth debunked by a major new study

The myth that modern wheat varieties are more heavily reliant on pesticides and fertilisers is debunked by new research published in Nature Plants today.

7h

How certain antibiotic combinations could defeat 'superbugs'

A sneaky form of antibiotic resistance called "heteroresistance" is more widespread than previously appreciated, scientists at the Emory Antibiotic Resistance Center report.

7h

Epoxy resin solves solar tech pollution problems

Addition to perovskite cell manufacture makes them environmentally friendly. Andrew Masterson reports.

7h

Tiny probe that senses deep in the lung set to shed light on disease

A hair-sized probe that can measure key indicators of tissue damage deep in the lung has been developed by scientists.

7h

The Man With 17 Kids (And Counting)

When Tim Gullicksen began donating to a sperm bank in 1989, he never expected to meet his biological children. He never imagined renting a 15-passenger van to take them to California’s Bass Lake every summer. Or envisioned the kids hiking, playing pranks, and competing viciously over silly games they invented together. But this July, Tim will—as has now become an annual tradition—rent that van, f

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Scientists use sound to see around corners

Echoes could help autonomous cars—or spies

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Climate change had significant impact on Amazon communities before arrival of Europeans

Climate change had a significant impact on people living in the Amazon rainforest before the arrival of Europeans and the loss of many indigenous groups, a new study shows.

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Meteors help Martian clouds form

How did the Red Planet get all of its clouds? CU Boulder researchers may have discovered the secret: just add meteors.

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Researchers develop new method for deriving 3-D protein structures from lab-designed DNA sequences, mutant genes

Sequencing the first human genome was a herculean effort that took 13 years, hundreds of researchers around the globe and billions of dollars.

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600 people on Monsanto 'watch lists' in Germany, France: Bayer

US seeds and pesticides maker Monsanto kept lists of around 600 key pro- and anti-pesticides figures in Germany and France alone, its German parent company Bayer said Monday amid a widening probe.

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EU leaders to debate push for zero emissions by 2050

EU leaders will this week discuss setting a target of zero net greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, European officials said Monday, following elections that highlighted climate change fears.

7h

Rescued bear cub goes missing in southwest France

A malnourished bear cub found wandering alone through a French village last week has escaped from the home of its appointed carer, triggering a major search, local authorities said Monday.

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Jet Airways lenders to go to bankruptcy court

Lenders to crippled Jet Airways said Monday they would start bankruptcy court proceedings after failing to find someone to take over the Indian carrier.

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Europe takes new step toward future combat jet

France, Germany and Spain on Monday unveiled a next-generation combat jet for European air forces, an ambitious project aimed at bringing together the continent's disparate military forces while offering an alternative to American planes.

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Elon Musk claims he's deleting his Twitter account

Elon Musk says he's deleting his Twitter account 10 months after his use of the social media site landed him in trouble with U.S. regulators.

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A 53-Year-Old Network Coloring Conjecture Is Disproved

A paper posted online last month has disproved a 53-year-old conjecture about the best way to assign colors to the nodes of a network. The paper shows, in a mere three pages, that there are better ways to color certain networks than many mathematicians had supposed possible. Network coloring problems, which were inspired by the question of how to color maps so that adjoining countries are differe

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Social media use contributing to poor mental health in Indonesia

Social media use is contributing to poor mental health in Indonesia, new research suggests.

7h

Gold for iron nanocubes

Hybrid Au/Fe nanoparticles can grow in an unprecedentedly complex structure with a single-step fabrication method.

7h

A new tool makes it possible to adapt treatment for patients with cardiogenic shock

Cardiogenic shock is a possible complication of serious heart attack involving an associated mortality rate of approximately 50% of all cases. The combination of this new tool with existing methods renders precise and patient-specific decision-making possible.

7h

Personalized medicine: Testing therapies on mini-tumors of head and neck cancer

Head and neck cancer is an aggressive type of cancer that often recurs, despite patients undergoing harsh treatments. Researchers have succeeded in growing mini-tumors (or organoids) of head and neck cancers, that can be kept alive in the petri-dish for a long time. These mini-tumor were shown to predict patient response to therapy. Thus, this technique holds promise to identify the right therapy

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Vest helps athletes keep their cool

A new cooling vest for sports athletes may ensure everyone can compete safely in sweltering summer conditions such as the upcoming 2020 Summer Olympics.

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Lynx in Turkey: Noninvasive sample collection provides insights into genetic diversity

A team of scientists collected data and samples (feces, hair) from the Caucasian Lynx (Lynx lynx dinniki), in a region of Anatolian Turkey over several years. The results of the genetic analyses indicated an unexpectedly high genetic diversity and lack of inbreeding despite the recent isolation of the study population.

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Study underscores role of menthol cigarettes in smoking cessation

Researchers cite Big Tobacco's marketing stronghold on African-American smokers among reasons why this group is 12% less likely to quit.

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Managing the risk of aggressive dog behavior

Aggressive behavior in pet dogs is a serious problem for dog owners across the world, with bite injuries representing a serious risk to both people and other dogs. New research by the University of Bristol has found that clinical animal behaviorists should focus on helping dog owners to feel confident in the effectiveness of the behavior modification techniques that they recommend and, in their ab

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Topical cream shows promise in treatment of skin pigmentation disease, vitiligo

A nationwide phase II clinical trial, coordinated out of Tufts Medical Center in Boston, has found that a topical cream was extremely effective in reversing the effects of vitiligo, a relatively common autoimmune disease that causes loss of skin pigmentation. Topical application of the medicated cream, ruxolitinib, which is currently used as an oral treatment for certain blood disorders, resulted

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Cold weather increases the risk of fatal opioid overdoses

While the precise reasons are unclear, an analysis of overdose deaths in Rhode Island and Connecticut showed that cold snaps raised the risk of fatal opioid overdoses by 25%.

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New study shows gender pay gap is still issue for airline staff

The gender pay gap within airlines is often attributed to the fact that men frequently carry out high technically skilled jobs such as pilots and mechanics, whereas women commonly work in customer service roles like cabin crew.But a new paper by Swansea University researchers has revealed that the gap exists for cabin crew after controlling for contract type.

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Do video games drive obesity?

Are children, teenagers and adults who spend a lot of time playing video games really more obese? A meta study conducted with the the University of Würzburg has looked into this question. The cliché is true — but only for adults.

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Researchers develop new method for deriving 3-D protein structures from lab-designed DNA sequences, mutant genes

Sequencing the first human genome was a herculean effort that took 13 years, hundreds of researchers around the globe and billions of dollars.

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600 people on Monsanto 'watch lists' in Germany, France: Bayer

US seeds and pesticides maker Monsanto kept lists of around 600 key pro- and anti-pesticides figures in Germany and France alone, its German parent company Bayer said Monday amid a widening probe.

7h

Rescued bear cub goes missing in southwest France

A malnourished bear cub found wandering alone through a French village last week has escaped from the home of its appointed carer, triggering a major search, local authorities said Monday.

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Distant processes influence marine heatwaves around the world

The frequency of marine heatwave days increased by 50% over the past century but our ability to predict them has been limited by a lack of understanding around the key global processes that cause and amplify these events.

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Lynx in Turkey: Noninvasive sample collection provides insights into genetic diversity

Little is known about the biology and the genetic status of the Caucasian Lynx (Lynx lynx dinniki), a subspecies of the Eurasian lynx distributed across portions of Turkey, the Caucasus region and Iran. To collect baseline genetic, ecological, and behavioural data and assist future conservation efforts, a team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) col

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Lynx in Turkey: Noninvasive sample collection provides insights into genetic diversity

Little is known about the biology and the genetic status of the Caucasian Lynx (Lynx lynx dinniki), a subspecies of the Eurasian lynx distributed across portions of Turkey, the Caucasus region and Iran. To collect baseline genetic, ecological, and behavioural data and assist future conservation efforts, a team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) col

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Gut bacteria foil a potent treatment for a devastating disease

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01887-z Bacteria reduce the effectiveness of a remedy for Parkinson’s disease — and might amplify the drug’s side effects.

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The information arms race can’t be won, but we have to keep fighting

Arms races happen when two sides of a conflict escalate in a series of ever-changing moves intended to outwit the opponent. In biology, a classic example comes from cheetahs and gazelles. Over time, these species have evolved for speed, each responding to the other's adaptations. A host of weirder examples come from the biology of sex, where males and females evolve bizarre adaptations to control

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Race, ethnicity and exclusionary discipline practices

Discipline and how it is administered in schools across the US continues to be a hotly debated topic. A new project analyzed how ethnicity and race are associated with school exclusionary discipline practices, which refer to students being removed from school as a form of punishment. Previous studies have found ethnic and racial disparities in the rates of school discipline actions, where ethnic a

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Personal care products send a child to the emergency room every two hours

A new study found that 64,686 children younger than five years of age were treated in US emergency departments for injuries related to personal care products from 2002 through 2016 — that is the equivalent of about one child every two hours.

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Tiny probe that senses deep in the lung set to shed light on disease

A hair-sized probe that can measure key indicators of tissue damage deep in the lung has been developed by scientists.

7h

Immune system can slow degenerative eye disease

A new study shows that the complement system, part of the innate immune system, plays a protective role to slow retinal degeneration in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited eye disease. This surprising discovery contradicts previous studies of other eye diseases suggesting that the complement system worsens retinal degeneration.

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Social media use contributing to poor mental health in Indonesia, research finds

Social media use is contributing to poor mental health in Indonesia, research presented in a paper by Sujarwoto Sujarwoto, Gindo Tampubolon and Adi Cilik Pierewan has found.

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U-M researchers testing ways to make aspen-dominated forests resilient to climate change

In an aspen-dominated hardwood forest at the northern tip of the state's Lower Peninsula, University of Michigan scientists are testing ways to make the region's forests more resilient to climate change.

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VINO's O2Amp Oxy-Iso glasses ineffective at curing colour-blindness

In their new study, they find that the O2Amp 'Oxy-Iso' glasses, marketed by the US company VINO Optics, neither improve the color vision of people with color-blindness nor correct their color-blindness.

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Tuning into the LCDs of tomorrow: Exploring the novel IGZO-11 semiconductor

Indium-gallium-zinc oxide ceramics are used as the backplane for flat-panel displays, this was made possible through substantial synergistic contributions coming from the powerhouse that is Japan. A team of researchers from Japan reports the synthesis of centimeter-scale single crystals of a particular type of these semiconductors, InGaZnO4 (IGZO-11), with attractive characteristics such as wide b

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Molecular analysis could improve the early detection and prevention of endometrial cancer

Researchers from IDIBELL and ICO lead the proposal to evaluate genomic analyzes in cervical cytologies to improve the detection of cancer of the uterine cavity.

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Facebook gets more diversity into gene studies

Researchers believe they have found a way to harness the power of Facebook to recruit a large, diverse participant pool they hope will help provide quick, reliable data for genetic studies. “The ability to study very large groups of individuals is a key challenge in human genetics, which is using very rare genetic changes—each present in very few individuals—to understand human biology and health

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Drones for early detection of forest fires

The UC3M's researchers coordinating the scientific part of the project, Fernando García y Abdulla al-Kaff, from the Department of Systems Engineering and Automation, have developed the complete automatic flight system, as well as the interface with which the emergency service can access information about what is occurring in real time.

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Preventing drugs from being transported

A research team has investigated the transport mechanism of a bacterial membrane protein using an artificially produced antibody fragment. The transport proteins, called ABC exporters, are present, for instance, in the cell membranes of bacteria and in large quantities in cancer cells and are responsible for transporting small molecules out of the cells. Some transporters can pump antibiotics or c

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Gold for iron nanocubes

Hybrid Au/Fe nanoparticles can grow in an unprecedentedly complex structure with a single-step fabrication method.

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Introduced a new paradigm of cell transplantation with scaffold microrobots

Professor Hongsoo Choi's team developed a microrobot that can precisely transplant stem cells in various in vivo and vitro environments. Expects to improve the efficiency of treating degenerative neural disorders such as Alzheimer by accurately and safely delivering to a desired location.

8h

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, June 17, 2019

New builders' tool by ORNL assesses design performance before construction begins; new pressure technique to manipulate magnetism in thin films could enhance electronic devices; ORNL outlines quantum sensing advances for better airport scanning, other applications.

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Rinsing system in stomach protects the teeth of ruminants

When they graze, goats, sheep and cows often ingest bits of earth that can be damaging to their teeth. Researchers from the University of Zurich have now shown how the animals protect themselves against dental abrasion: their stomach system rinses dust and sand off the ingested food before it is chewed for the second time.

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Elbiler uden krog får den næppe senere

Typegodkendelser gælder ikke med tilbagevirkende kraft. Det er derfor få af de nuværende elbiler, der kommer til at kunne trække campingvogne og haveaffald.

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Safety and pollution top of the agenda as Paris Air Show opens

Aviation executives descended on the Paris Air Show on Monday with pledges to improve transparency over plane safety in the wake of the Boeing 737 MAX crisis and to reduce emissions.

8h

Schizophrenia: Adolescence is the game-changer

Schizophrenia may be related to the deletion syndrome. However, not everyone who has the syndrome necessarily develops psychotic symptoms. What triggers the illness? Researchers (UNIGE) have provided an initial answer after analysing several years of patients with deletion syndrome. They found that the size of the hippocampus was smaller than normal but followed the same developmental curve as in

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Innovation, at Universities and in Industry

Some thoughts this morning on universities and industry and their contributions to research – and for once, this isn’t going to be another long screed on drug research in particular. No, I’m particularly talking about what each of these brings to R&D in general, and about the places (both conceptual and physical) where they seem to intersect the most productively. The last ten or twenty years hav

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Clues from stevia promise sweetness without aftertaste

Knowing the molecular machinery that gives stevia its intense sweetness could help engineer artificial sweeteners without a nasty aftertaste, researchers say. Although scientists know a lot about the genes and proteins in the biochemical pathway responsible for stevia synthesis, researchers say this is the first time anyone has published the 3D structure of the proteins that make rebaudioside A—o

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Gold for iron nanocubes

One of the major challenges in nanotechnology is the precise control of shape, size and elemental composition of every single nanoparticle. Physical methods are able to produce homogeneous nanoparticles free of surface contamination. However, they offer limited opportunity to control the shape and specific composition of the nanoobjects when they are being built up.

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Just like their mothers: in cat breeds, behaviour is inherited

Research shows different types of cat have predictable ways of behaving. Nick Carne reports.

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Virus controls wing growth in aphids

Surprising finding reveals genetic hitchhiker determines when and if insects fly. Andrew Masterson reports.

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New sunspot cycle promises to be mild, but not harmless

Link between space weather and El Niño comes under the spotlight. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Rocket science and selfies

NASA techs take a break to mark a milestone.

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Bird deaths and climate link questioned

Fresh analysis red flags earlier findings that suggested Arctic nestlings were being preyed upon at record rates. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Norovirus close-ups might help fight stomach flu

Detailed views of a common stomach virus that causes vomiting and diarrhea could aid vaccine and disinfectant development.

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How much of the solar system should be designated wilderness?

Most of it, say astrophysicists, if we want to guarantee the future of humanity.

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Lynx in Turkey: Noninvasive sample collection provides insights into genetic diversity

A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) collected data and samples (feces, hair) from the Caucasian Lynx (Lynx lynx dinniki), in a region of Anatolian Turkey over several years. The results of the genetic analyses indicated an unexpectedly high genetic diversity and lack of inbreeding despite the recent isolation of the study population.

8h

Vest helps athletes keep their cool

A new cooling vest for sports athletes may ensure everyone can compete safely in sweltering summer conditions such as the upcoming 2020 Summer Olympics, reports a new paper published in Frontiers in Physiology.

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UVA scientists use machine learning to improve gut disease diagnosis

A study published by scientists at the University of Virginia says machine learning algorithms applied to biopsy images can shorten the time for diagnosing and treating a gut disease that often causes permanent physical and cognitive damage in children.

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The Rise of AI Art—and What It Means for Human Creativity

Artificially intelligent systems are slowly taking over tasks previously done by humans, and many processes involving repetitive, simple movements have already been fully automated. In the meantime, humans continue to be superior when it comes to abstract and creative tasks. However, it seems like even when it comes to creativity, we’re now being challenged by our own creations. In the last few y

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Large classes make it hard to notice 'off-task' kids with bigger questions

The benefits of having smaller classes, particularly in the early elementary school years, are well-documented. My work as a researcher of language and literacy has examined what takes place on the edges of the classroom—precisely the places that are more difficult to notice when classes are large.

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‘I’ll work on it over the weekend’: high workload and other pressures faced by early-career researchers

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01914-z Stress and long working hours are regrettably common among early-career researchers, reveals a survey by the Young Academy of Europe.

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Elon Musk claims he's deleting his Twitter account

Elon Musk says he's deleting his Twitter account 10 months after his use of the social media site landed him in trouble with U.S. regulators.

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New time-banking system utilizes blockchain tech to measure one's value to society

Citizens from the island of Aneityum in the Republic of Vanuatu are working with faculty from Binghamton University, State University of New York to test their true value as humans.

8h

Study looks at pain relief for piglets from medicated mother's milk

New findings by researchers at the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine suggest potential pain relief for piglets by administering medicine through the act of nursing.

8h

Rinsing system in stomach protects the teeth of ruminants

When they graze, goats, sheep and cows often ingest bits of earth that can be damaging to their teeth. Researchers from the University of Zurich have now shown how the animals protect themselves against dental abrasion: Their stomach system rinses dust and sand off the ingested food before it is chewed for the second time.

8h

Study looks at pain relief for piglets from medicated mother's milk

New findings by researchers at the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine suggest potential pain relief for piglets by administering medicine through the act of nursing.

8h

Rinsing system in stomach protects the teeth of ruminants

When they graze, goats, sheep and cows often ingest bits of earth that can be damaging to their teeth. Researchers from the University of Zurich have now shown how the animals protect themselves against dental abrasion: Their stomach system rinses dust and sand off the ingested food before it is chewed for the second time.

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Benchmarks to better catch the sun

Simulations unveil efficiency targets and design rules to maximize the conversion of light into electricity using organic solar cells.

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Satellites assisting look into hurricanes

A mission to probe winds deep inside hurricanes, where most satellites cannot see and few aircraft venture, is showing signs of success despite an unexpected obstacle linked to tensions in the Middle East.

9h

Turning up the heat on pathogenic bacteria

Pathogenic bacteria come alive at the metabolic level when they enter the warmth of the human gut, firing up genes that encode toxins and other compounds harmful to our bodies. A KAUST-led study shows how a critical bacterial protein senses changes in temperature to slacken DNA strands and boost gene expression in diarrhea-inducing bugs.

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For children, charity is about more than money

The proportion of people giving money to charity either by donating or via sponsorship saw a steady decline between 2016 and 2018. Some commentators suggest this is due to a decrease in donor trust in charities, and the latest UK giving report found there had been a drop in the number of people that said they believe charities to be trustworthy. This is likely to have led to this decrease in chari

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Testing therapies on mini-tumors of head and neck cancer

Head and neck cancer is an aggressive type of cancer that often recurs, despite patients undergoing harsh treatments. Researchers of the Hubrecht Institute and UMC Utrecht succeeded in growing mini-tumors (or organoids) of head and neck cancers, that can be kept alive in the petri-dish for a long time. These mini-tumor were shown to predict patient response to therapy. Thus, this technique holds p

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Turning up the heat on pathogenic bacteria

Pathogenic bacteria come alive at the metabolic level when they enter the warmth of the human gut, firing up genes that encode toxins and other compounds harmful to our bodies. A KAUST-led study shows how a critical bacterial protein senses changes in temperature to slacken DNA strands and boost gene expression in diarrhea-inducing bugs.

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Stupid Humans

If we’re a dud cosmic experiment, is there hope? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Woman Who Requested Mariah Carey Cake Got Marie Curie Instead

The birthday girl was probably feeling emotions when she saw what the baker had done.

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Inducing an osteoarthritic (OA) phenotype in a cartilage-on-a-chip (COC) model

In an aging population, the social impact of osteoarthritis (OA) can dramatically increase to become the most common musculoskeletal disease. However, at present, therapies are limited to palliative treatments or surgical intervention alone, since disease-modifying OA (DMOA) drugs are scarce, primarily due to the absence of relevant preclinical models of the disease. As a result, tissue engineers

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Inducing an osteoarthritic (OA) phenotype in a cartilage-on-a-chip (COC) model

In an aging population, the social impact of osteoarthritis (OA) can dramatically increase to become the most common musculoskeletal disease. However, at present, therapies are limited to palliative treatments or surgical intervention alone, since disease-modifying OA (DMOA) drugs are scarce, primarily due to the absence of relevant preclinical models of the disease. As a result, tissue engineers

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A new tool makes it possible to adapt treatment for patients with cardiogenic shock

Cardiogenic shock is a possible complication of serious heart attack involving an associated mortality rate of approximately 50% of all cases. The combination of this new tool with existing methods renders precise and patient-specific decision-making possible. The research is being led by Dr. Antoni Bayés at Germans Trias and the Proteomics Unit of the CRG and UPF, under Dr. Eduard Sabidó.

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Schizophrenia: Adolescence is the game-changer

Schizophrenia may be related to the deletion syndrome. However, not everyone who has the syndrome necessarily develops psychotic symptoms. What triggers the illness? Researchers (UNIGE) have provided an initial answer after analysing several years of patients with deletion syndrome. They found that the size of the hippocampus was smaller than normal but followed the same developmental curve as in

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Nurses more likely to test for HIV when practice setting supports routine screening

Nurse practitioners are more likely to conduct HIV screenings if they feel that their colleagues support routine screenings, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. This comes in advance of National HIV Testing Day, taking place June 27, 2019.

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New time-banking system utilizes blockchain tech to measure one's value to society

Citizens from the island of Aneityum in the Republic of Vanuatu are working with faculty from Binghamton University, State University of New York to test their true value as humans.

9h

Immune system can slow degenerative eye disease, NIH-led mouse study shows

A new study shows that the complement system, part of the innate immune system, plays a protective role to slow retinal degeneration in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited eye disease. This surprising discovery contradicts previous studies of other eye diseases suggesting that the complement system worsens retinal degeneration. The research was performed by scientists at the Nation

9h

Melting a satellite, a piece at a time

Researchers took one of the densest parts of an Earth-orbiting satellite, placed it in a plasma wind tunnel then proceeded to melt it into vapour. Their goal was to better understand how satellites burn up during reentry, to minimise the risk of endangering anyone on the ground.

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Image: Instant space selfies

How many times have you taken a selfie and posted it instantly to your favourite social media channel? The Mercury Transfer Module of the BepiColombo spacecraft, currently en route to Mercury, is equipped with three 'selfie-cams' and this morning captured a series of snapshots and subsequently posted them to its Twitter account.

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Depicting animals as friends makes people feel guilty about eating pork but not beef

People find the idea of eating pork less appealing after being exposed to the idea that pigs have some human-like characteristics, but are not put off of eating beef when cows are depicted in similar ways, according to new research by the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

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Ethiopian Airlines rejects 'pilot error' claim in US

A US politician who blamed pilot error for contributing to the deadly crash of a Boeing 737 MAX flown by Ethiopian Airlines was "seriously misinformed", the carrier's boss has said.

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Renewable transportation fuels from water and carbon dioxide

The transition from fossil to renewable fuels is one of the most important challenges of the future. The SUN-to-LIQUID project takes on this challenge by producing renewable transportation fuels from water and CO2 with concentrated sunlight: The project, which is funded by the EU and Switzerland, now succeeded to demonstrate the first synthesis of solar kerosene. "The SUN-to-LIQUID core solar tech

9h

Comcast unveils accessibility feature that will let users control the TV using only their EYES

By partnering with makers of eye-gaze hardware, Comcast said its feature will let users do just about anything that can a physical remote can do, including using the guide and change channels.

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Domino’s will start delivering pizzas via an autonomous robot this fall

Domino's plans to start delivering pizzas using an autonomous, unmanned vehicle. The announcement is the latest example of technology companies using robots to deliver food.

9h

Why These Hong Kong Protests Are Different

HONG KONG—Bonnie Leung and members of the Civil Human Rights Front have reason to feel triumphant. Demonstrations organized by the group in recent days have brought hundreds of thousands of people at a time to the skyscraper-lined streets of Hong Kong, chanting and marching through the city in defiance of a proposed law that would allow extradition to mainland China. Any belief that the people of

9h

Preventing drugs from being transported from cells

An international research team has investigated the transport mechanism of a bacterial membrane protein using an artificially produced antibody fragment. The transport proteins, called ABC exporters, are present, for instance, in the cell membranes of bacteria and in large quantities in cancer cells and are responsible for transporting small molecules out of the cells. Some transporters can pump a

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Enzymes that can transform blood type A to O found in human gut biome

A team of researchers at the University of British Columbia has found two types of enzymes that together, can transform type A blood to type O blood in the human gut biome. In their paper published in the journal Nature Microbiology, the group describes their metagenomic study of bacteria in human feces and what they found.

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Preventing drugs from being transported from cells

An international research team has investigated the transport mechanism of a bacterial membrane protein using an artificially produced antibody fragment. The transport proteins, called ABC exporters, are present, for instance, in the cell membranes of bacteria and in large quantities in cancer cells and are responsible for transporting small molecules out of the cells. Some transporters can pump a

9h

Safety and pollution top of the agenda as Paris Air Show opens

Aviation executives descended on the Paris Air Show on Monday with pledges to improve transparency over plane safety in the wake of the Boeing 737 MAX crisis and to reduce emissions.

9h

Det bruger de sundhedfaglige organisationer på folkemødet

Årligt bruger sundhedsorganisationerne flere hundredetusinde kroner på at deltage i folkemødet på Bornholm. Det er en god investering, mener lægeformand.

9h

Where do atoms come from? Billions of years of cosmic fireworks.

Michelle Thaller's "absolute favorite fact in the universe" is that we are made of dead stars. The Big Bang, when it went off, produced basically three elements: hydrogen, helium, and lithium. Every atom more complex had to be formed inside a star. Over time, stars such as the sun produce things like carbon and oxygen. They don't really get much more far off the periodic table than that. If you w

9h

Neptune Is a Windy, Chilly, and Baffling Planet. Let's Go!

Scientists are building a case for a mission to Neptune, an ice giant that's only been visited by a spacecraft once. But the window to act is closing.

9h

Hey Alexa, Why Is Voice Shopping So Lousy?

A new study suggests smart speaker owners aren’t using those devices to buy things on the internet—because it’s a bad shopping experience.

9h

'Star Wars' News: 'The Rise of Skywalker' Got Made On the Run

One of the movie's editors was cutting it together while it was being shot.

9h

Comcast’s Xfinity X1 Eye-Tracking Remote Lets You Control a TV With Your Eyes

The new web-based interface for Comcast's television software was developed for people with visual or physical impairments.

9h

Stressed sheep fleeced for their genes

Genetics play a large factor in determining the temperament of sheep and how they react to stress, a study carried out by The University of Western Australia has found.

9h

100-year-old physics model replicates modern Arctic ice melt

A nearly 100-year-old physics model captures the essential mechanism of pattern formation and geometry of Arctic melt ponds.

9h

Two genes implicated in development of prostate enlargement, Stanford study finds

In a new study, scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered a molecular pattern that flags prostate enlargement, also called benign prostatic hyperplasia, and have even identified two genes that likely play a role in the development of the condition.

9h

Distant processes influence marine heatwaves around the world

An international team has produced the first global assessment of the major drivers of marine heatwaves.

9h

Stressed sheep fleeced for their genes

Genetics play a large factor in determining the temperament of sheep and how they react to stress, a study carried out by The University of Western Australia has found.

9h

100-year-old physics model replicates modern Arctic ice melt

A nearly 100-year-old physics model captures the essential mechanism of pattern formation and geometry of Arctic melt ponds.

9h

Distant processes influence marine heatwaves around the world

An international team has produced the first global assessment of the major drivers of marine heatwaves.

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Building a better electron gun

The successful test of the LCLS-II electron gun (see related article) marks the culmination of an R&D effort spanning more than a decade at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

9h

Expert discusses observing cognitive triggers for extremist violence through brain scans

In a new journal article, a team of scientists led by Scott Atran, an adjunct research professor at the University of Michigan's Ford School and Institute for Social Research, reveals insights into the psychology of radicalization and terrorist violence, gained by scanning the brains of men who support a terror organization associated with Al Qaeda.

9h

Quantum physics experiment shows Heisenberg was right about uncertainty, in a certain sense

The word uncertainty is used a lot in quantum mechanics. One school of thought is that this means there's something out there in the world that we are uncertain about. But most physicists believe nature itself is uncertain.

9h

Designing a crystallization chamber

Marialucia Longo and Tobias Schrader at the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS) based at FRM II in Garching, Germany have been designing and testing a crystallization chamber to grow large protein crystals.

10h

Sequencing the almond reveals how it went from bitter to sweet

A team of researchers with members from Spain, Switzerland, Denmark and Italy has found the genetic difference between bitter wild almonds and the sweet domesticated variety. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they sequenced the almond genome and then compared sections of it in bitter and sweet varieties until they found the sequence that was different.

10h

Australia's pristine beaches have a poo problem

Australians love our iconic coastal lifestyle. So many of our settlements are spread along our huge coastline. Real estate prices soar where we can catch a view of the water.

10h

This is what the ground looked like after inSight landed on Mars

When InSight landed on Mars on Nov. 26th, 2018, it deployed a parachute to slow its descent through the thin Martian atmosphere. As it approached the surface, it fired its retro rocket to slow it even more, and then gently touched down on the surface. As it did so, its retro rockets excavated two small pits in the Martian soil.

10h

SMOS joins forces with top weather forecasting system

As of 11 June 2019, measurements from ESA's SMOS mission are being fully integrated into ECMWF's forecasting system, allowing for a more accurate description of water content in soil.

10h

Sequencing the almond reveals how it went from bitter to sweet

A team of researchers with members from Spain, Switzerland, Denmark and Italy has found the genetic difference between bitter wild almonds and the sweet domesticated variety. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they sequenced the almond genome and then compared sections of it in bitter and sweet varieties until they found the sequence that was different.

10h

Researchers capture microscopic manufacturing flaws via high-speed X-ray movies

Microscopic defects that occur in laser-based manufacturing of metal parts can lead to big problems if undetected, and the process of fixing these flaws can increase the time and cost of high-tech manufacturing. But new research into the cause of these flaws could lead to a remedy.

10h

Performance improves when the enemy of an enemy is a friend

New research from Northwestern University finds that balanced professional networks are more important than individual talent when it comes to high-risk decision making.

10h

MIT's new robot can identify things by sight and by touch

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Upgrade your memory with a surgically implanted chip

submitted by /u/dopdecada [link] [comments]

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The poisons released by melting Arctic ice

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Saying this may help young men prevent sexual violence

Appealing to a shared sense of morality can help young men successfully intervene to prevent sexual violence against women, a new study shows. “There’s a new focus, especially on college campuses, on studying bystander intervention in preventing sexual violence,” says psychology professor Dominic Parrott, director of Georgia State University’s Center for Research on Interpersonal Violence. “This

10h

Boris Johnson's full fibre plan needs more detail says industry

Broadband providers say it will take more than money to achieve a "full fibre for all" by 2025 pledge.

10h

Fake Skepticism About Psychics

I was recently sent a link to a site purporting to advise – “ 5 Easy Ways To Tell If Your Psychic Is The Real Deal Or A Fraud. ” The title itself is a red flag. A better title might be – 5 ways we can know that all psychics are frauds. So of course I can replace these five ways with one even simpler more surefire way – they are giving you a psychic reading. If they are doing that while taking you

10h

What if all humanity had to do to save itself was listen?

Many of the things that we experience, are our imagination manifesting into this physical realm, avers artist Dustin Yellin. People need to completely rethink the way they work together, and learn from one another, so that we can build better systems. If not, things may get "really dark" soon. The first step to enabling cooperation is figuring out where the common ground is. Through this method,

10h

Everything you need to know about the hospital food listeria outbreak

Two more people are reported to have died after eating contaminated sandwiches at a UK hospital. Here’s everything you need to know about the listeria outbreak

10h

Dyrelivet udviklede sig allerede før den kambriske eksplosion

PLUS. Ny forskning viser, at dyrelivet mindst 30 millioner år før den såkaldt kambriske eksplosion var begyndt en rivende udvikling.

10h

Six tips for adapting to a new language and culture

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01915-y Moving abroad for a career opportunity can be stressful and difficult. But there are ways to navigate the minefields.

10h

Murray Gell-Mann (1929–2019)

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01907-y Theoretical physicist who won a Nobel for codifying fundamental particles.

10h

Anæstesiafdeling får ny ledende overlæge

Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital finder ny ledende overlæge til Anæstesiafdelingen i egne rækker. Det bliver 50-årige Anne Lindhardt, som kommer fra en stilling som afsnitsansvarlig overlæge for Intensiv Terapiafsnit.

10h

Modified enzyme can increase second-generation ethanol production

One of the main challenges of second-generation biofuel production is identifying enzymes produced by microorganisms for use in a cocktail of enzymes to catalyze biomass hydrolysis in which the enzymes act together to break down the carbohydrates in sugarcane trash and bagasse, for example, and convert them into simple sugars for fermentation.

10h

Harvard chemists' breakthrough in synthesis advances a potent anti-cancer agent

Chemists have achieved what a new article calls a 'landmark in drug discovery' with the total synthesis of 11.5g of halichondrin. Known to be a potent anti-cancer agent in mouse studies, and found naturally in sea sponges — though only ever in minuscule quantities — the halichondrin class of molecule is so fiendishly complex that it had never been synthesized on a meaningful scale in the lab.

10h

Innovative technique uses sensory nanoparticles to detect disease

Like dipping a donut hole in powdered sugar, nanoparticles collect a unique coating of proteins from the blood. In a new study, researchers present a nanoparticle sensor array that they are developing as an early detection test for cancer and other diseases.

10h

Introducing The Atlantic’s Daily Idea

The Atlantic today introduces The Atlantic’s Daily Idea, a new smart-speaker skill for Amazon Echo and Google Home that intends to delight and surprise listeners with something unconventional: a single, illuminating idea. The skill will deliver a different story every weekday, drawn from among The Atlantic’s most memorable and compelling recent reporting. Every weekday, when people queue their sm

10h

Instagrammers Are Exploiting the Sudan Crisis

As the political crisis in Sudan deepens, Instagram users are flocking to accounts that claim to be helping. @SudanMealProject , the largest of these accounts, racked up nearly 400,000 followers in less than a week; it is joined by hundreds of similar accounts with copycat names such as @SudanMealProjectOfficial, @SudanMealOfficial, @sudan.meals.project, @mealsforsudan, and @Sudanmealprojec.t, ea

10h

Diamond detectors could aid the search for dark matter

Elusive dark matter particles could be spotted when they slam into electrons or atomic nuclei within diamond, scientists say.

10h

100-year-old physics model replicates modern Arctic ice melt

The Arctic is melting faster than we thought it would. In fact, Arctic ice extent is at a record low. When that happens—when a natural system behaves differently than scientists expect—it's time to take another look at how we understand the system. University of Utah mathematician Ken Golden and atmospheric scientist Court Strong study the patterns formed by ponds of melting water atop the ice. Th

10h

Global commodities trade and consumption place the world's primates at risk of extinction

A recent study published in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ—the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences highlights the fact that the economic benefits of commodity export for primate habitat countries has been limited relative to the extreme environmental costs of pollution, habitat degradation, loss of biodiversity, continued food insecurity and the threat of emerging diseases.

10h

Image of the Day: Phantom Limbs

Researchers study how oxygen around an embryo helps shape the way feet and digits form in amphibians and chickens.

10h

New Space Telescope Will Map the Universe in High-Energy X-rays

A German-Russian mission called SRG will detect millions of supermassive black holes, many new to science, and hundreds of thousands of stars — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Using DNA to tailor medicine

Technology is making it possible to tailor treatments to ever smaller groups of patients.

10h

Parasites affect host responses to environmental change

Ignoring the role of parasites may lead to a misinterpretation of organism responses to environmental change, according to an Innovative Viewpoints article by ecologists from the University of Georgia. Their paper, "To improve ecological understanding, collect infection data," presents case studies in which host-parasite relationship and infection data affected the interpretation of ecological out

10h

Using waves to move droplets

Controlling individual droplets leads to more efficient self-cleaning surfaces and lab-on-a-chip implementations. University of Groningen professor Patrick Onck and colleagues from Eindhoven University of Technology have shown that this is possible by using a technique named mechanowetting. The researchers report a way of transporting droplets by using transverse surface waves, which even works on

10h

Modified enzyme can increase second-generation ethanol production

One of the main challenges of second-generation biofuel production is identifying enzymes produced by microorganisms for use in a cocktail of enzymes to catalyze biomass hydrolysis in which the enzymes act together to break down the carbohydrates in sugarcane trash and bagasse, for example, and convert them into simple sugars for fermentation.

10h

Developmental disorders: Discovery of new mutations

In the largest study to date on developmental delay, researchers analyzed genomic data from over 31,000 parent-child trios and found more than 45,000 de novo mutations, and 40 novel genes. This will provide valuable information to clinicians and to drug developers.

10h

Parasites affect host responses to environmental change

Ignoring the role of parasites may lead to a misinterpretation of organism responses to environmental change, according to an Innovative Viewpoints article by ecologists from the University of Georgia. Their paper, "To improve ecological understanding, collect infection data," presents case studies in which host-parasite relationship and infection data affected the interpretation of ecological out

10h

To help the bees, protect the prairie

California almond farmers who depend on commercial bee hives to pollinate their lucrative crops would benefit from increased efforts to protect essential bee foraging territory in northern prairie states, according a University of California, Berkeley, researcher.

10h

A vegan meat revolution could save the planet

A few years ago, convincing meat-free "meat" was nothing more than a distant dream for most consumers. Meat substitutes in supermarkets lacked variety and quality. Plant-based burgers were few and far between in major fast food outlets—and meaty they were not.

10h

To help the bees, protect the prairie

California almond farmers who depend on commercial bee hives to pollinate their lucrative crops would benefit from increased efforts to protect essential bee foraging territory in northern prairie states, according a University of California, Berkeley, researcher.

10h

Selective killing of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from within

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01852-w Some bacteria naturally transfer pieces of their DNA within and between species. Such a piece of DNA has been engineered to act as a molecular ‘Trojan horse’ that unleashes a toxin to selectively kill antibiotic-resistant Vibrio cholerae bacteria.

11h

A simple formula that could be useful for air purification, space propulsion, and molecular analyses

When a raindrop falls through a thundercloud, it is subject to strong electric fields that pull and tug on the droplet, like a soap bubble in the wind. If the electric field is strong enough, it can cause the droplet to burst apart, creating a fine, electrified mist.

11h

Hedgehog sign warns drivers of small wildlife hazards

It aims to protect drivers from accident hazards and reverse a decline in small wildlife numbers.

11h

Cutting potentially harmful chemicals like PFAS from consumer goods

Human exposure to unnecessary and potentially harmful chemicals could be greatly reduced if manufacturers add chemicals only when they are truly essential in terms of health, safety and functioning of society.

11h

The complex fate of Antarctic species in the face of a changing climate

Researchers have presented support for the theory that marine invertebrates with larger body size are generally more sensitive to reductions in oxygen than smaller animals, and so will be more sensitive to future global climate change. However, evolutionary innovation can to some extent offset any respiratory disadvantages of large body size.

11h

Hypertension drug may hold promise for Alzheimer's disease

The blood pressure drug nilvadipine increased blood flow to the brain's memory and learning center, without affecting other brain regions among people with Alzheimer's disease. These findings indicate that the known decrease in cerebral blood flow in patients with Alzheimer's can be reversed in some regions. However, it is unclear if this translates to clinical benefits.

11h

Harvard chemists' breakthrough in synthesis advances a potent anti-cancer agent

Chemists have achieved what a new article calls a 'landmark in drug discovery' with the total synthesis of 11.5g of halichondrin. Known to be a potent anti-cancer agent in mouse studies, and found naturally in sea sponges — though only ever in minuscule quantities — the halichondrin class of molecule is so fiendishly complex that it had never been synthesized on a meaningful scale in the lab.

11h

Innovative technique uses sensory nanoparticles to detect disease

Like dipping a donut hole in powdered sugar, nanoparticles collect a unique coating of proteins from the blood. In a new study, researchers present a nanoparticle sensor array that they are developing as an early detection test for cancer and other diseases.

11h

Controlling temperatures for inexpensive plant experiments

Inexpensive, easy-to-use temperature controllers are able to provide reliable set temperatures for the detailed observation of developmental rates in response to different temperature treatments.

11h

Researchers urge reduced use of PFAS chemicals in consumer products

Human exposure to unnecessary and potentially harmful chemicals could be greatly reduced if manufacturers add chemicals only when they are truly essential in terms of health, safety and functioning of society. That's the conclusion of a study published today in Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, a peer-reviewed journal published by the Royal Society of Chemistry.

11h

Microbes make metabolic mischief by targeting drugs

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01851-x Tests of whether a range of gut bacteria can metabolize a diverse group of drugs has revealed that all the microbes metabolized some drugs and that more than half of the drugs were metabolized.

11h

Caterpillar’s devastating march across China spurs hunt for native predator

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01867-3 Scientists hope that insects such as stink bugs could keep the fall armyworm in check.

11h

Radiocarbon revolution: the story of an isotope

Nature, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01895-z Chris Turney applauds a book on carbon-14 and its key applications in archaeology, climatology and oceanography.

11h

The hidden structure of the periodic system

The periodic table of elements that most chemistry books depict is only one special case. This tabular overview of the chemical elements, which goes back to Dmitri Mendeleev and Lothar Meyer and the approaches of other chemists to organize the elements, involve different forms of representation of a hidden structure of the chemical elements. This is the conclusion reached by researchers at the Max

11h

Innovative technique uses sensory nanoparticles to detect disease

Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital are taking advantage of a unique phenomenon of nanoparticles to develop a test for early detection of different types of diseases, including cancer.

11h

Global commodities trade and consumption place the world's primates at risk of extinction

A recent study published in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ — the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences highlights the fact that the economic benefits of commodity export for primate habitat countries has been limited relative to the extreme environmental costs of pollution, habitat degradation, loss of biodiversity, continued food insecurity and the threat of emerging diseases.

11h

Pea Burgers Taste Fantastic. They Can Also Help Save the Planet. (Op-Ed)

I ate a burger last night and it surprised me. It was delicious. So what was surprising? It was made from peas.

11h

Did Van Gogh Shoot Himself? Auction of Pistol Reignites Debate.

Did Van Gogh commit suicide, or was he shot by someone else?

11h

Replacing Plastic: Can Bacteria Help Us Break The Habit?

Entrepreneurs are eager to find substitutes for plastic that naturally degrade. One option is a "natural" plastic made by microbes and then eaten by them. But the process is still in the early days. (Image credit: Chris Joyce/NPR)

11h

Semi-Autonomous, Nuclear Decommissioning Robot Sees With Microsoft Kinect

There are various "levels" of nuclear waste, but none of them is something anyone ought to handle in person. That's why remotely operated robots have become the standard tool to decommission nuclear facilities and process radioactive materials. The post Semi-Autonomous, Nuclear Decommissioning Robot Sees With Microsoft Kinect appeared first on ExtremeTech .

11h

Which Should Come First in Physics: Theory or Experiment?

Plans for giant particle accelerators of the future focus attention on how scientific discoveries are really made — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Our galaxy's central black hole is oddly quiet – now we may know why

The supermassive black hole at the Milky Way’s centre is relatively calm and peaceful, which may be because magnetic fields keep gas and dust just out of reach

11h

Efterforskning: Lækage var grund til eksplosion på norsk brint-tankstation

Det var en sky af brint fra en lækage, der eksploderede i fri luft i sidste uge. Hverken tanke eller andre enheder eksploderede under branden ifølge NEL's eksperter.

11h

Dear Therapist: The Child My Daughter Put Up for Adoption Is Now Rejecting Her

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My daughter gave a child up for adoption about 25 years ago. She already had one child, and although I offered to help her raise both children, she felt it wouldn't be fair to us or to the baby, so she gave he

11h

Tricky Scam Plants Phishing Links in Your Google Calendar

Scammers are taking advantage of default calendar settings to try to trick users into clicking malicious links.

11h

Tidy the F*ck Up: A Conversation With Messie Condo

It’s time to put some big girl pants on and deal with your crap.

11h

Change Your Life: Bestride the Bidet

A cheap bottom-washer from Tushy transformed my relationship to my nethers.

11h

Tame Your Picture Overload With These Google Photos Hacks

There are dozens of life-transforming features hidden inside the unassuming image-keeper—features you're likely not using.

11h

Are Rare Earths the Next Pawn in the US-China Trade War?

China is the world's largest producer, and processor, of 17 elements that are key ingredients in smartphones, airplanes, medical devices, and military gear.

11h

The Best Cleaning Products, Supplies, and Tech (2019)

Your house is a mess, and everything is a disaster. Start by vacuuming your floors.

11h

These Protein Picker-Uppers Keep Your Cells Clean and Healthy

New drugs based on proteasomes could treat previously undruggable diseases.

11h

Which Should Come First in Physics: Theory or Experiment?

Plans for giant particle accelerators of the future focus attention on how scientific discoveries are really made — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Baby Pterosaurs Could Fly. So, Did They Need Their Parents?

Newly hatched pterosaurs may have been more independent than once thought.

11h

In the Wiggle of an Ear, a Surprising Insight into Bat Sonar

It could lead to drones that fly like bats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Instagram adds new way of fighting account hacks to counter 'distressing experience' of getting profiles stolen

Hackers often steal accounts and change usernames, leaving people unable to get them back

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In the Wiggle of an Ear, a Surprising Insight into Bat Sonar

It could lead to drones that fly like bats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In the Wiggle of an Ear, a Surprising Insight into Bat Sonar

It could lead to drones that fly like bats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Bæredygtigt Landbrug til vandmiljøprofessor: Træk i land, eller vi sagsøger dig

Interesseorganisationen Bæredygtigt Landbrug betragter bl.a. en kronik, som professor Stiig Markager skrev til Ingeniøren, som injurier. Professoren afviser.

12h

Udløbet certifikat: Browsere advarer om sikkerheden på ministeriums hjemmeside

Hos Finansministeriet har man tilsyneladende glemt at forny certifikatet for fm.dk.

12h

Dust storms on Mars

Dust is a critical component in the Martian atmosphere. It influences the atmosphere's circulation by heating or cooling it and is in turn redistributed around the planet by atmospheric winds. In this dust cycle, dust storms play a particularly important role. Storms are traditionally classified into local, regional and planet-encircling dust storms, with small, local storms occurring throughout t

12h

An author told a journal their institution had no one who handled allegations. Turns out that wasn’t true.

Should journals always take authors at their word? Take the case of a recent expression of concern in the Journal of Cell Science following concerns about image manipulation in a 2006 paper, “Inhibition of TPO-induced MEK or mTOR activity induces opposite effects on the ploidy of human differentiating megakaryocytes.” Here’s the notice: Journal of Cell … Continue reading An author told a journal t

12h

“Good Night. Malaysian Three-Seven-Zero.”

Malaysia Airlines Flight 370’s disappearance in March 2014 instantly become a global news phenomenon, as multiple countries joined the search for the Boeing 777 and its 239 passengers and crew. With the mystery still swirling five years on, The Atlantic ’s July cover story brings together all of the known evidence about how MH370 vanished into the Indian Ocean to deliver the clearest picture to d

12h

Innovative technique uses sensory nanoparticles to detect disease

Like dipping a donut hole in powdered sugar, nanoparticles collect a unique coating of proteins from the blood. In a new study published in the Royal Society of Chemistry's peer-reviewed journal Nanoscale Horizons, researchers present a nanoparticle sensor array that they are developing as an early detection test for cancer and other diseases.

12h

Teaching artificial intelligence to connect senses like vision and touch

In Canadian author Margaret Atwood's book The Blind Assassin, she says that "touch comes before sight, before speech. It's the first language and the last, and it always tells the truth."

12h

Florida law lets autonomous vehicles drive without humans

Self-driving vehicles will be able to operate in Florida without a human on board under a bill signed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis.

12h

Quantum simulation could help flights run on time

A powerful new form of computing could help scientists design new types of materials for nanoelectronics, allow airlines to solve complex logistical problems to ensure flights run on time, and tackle traffic jams to keep cars flowing more freely on busy roads.

12h

Researchers share their protocol for handling carbon nanotubes

In collaboration with a Rice University laboratory, the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University has developed and shared a low-cost method to safely handle the transfer of bulk carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials. It doesn't take much more than 10 minutes, a couple of bags and a big bucket to keep the nanomaterials in their place.

12h

Boeing says 'sorry' for Max crashes, seeks renewed trust

Boeing executives apologized Monday to airlines and families of victims of 737 Max crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia, as the U.S. plane maker struggles to regain the trust of regulators, pilots and the global traveling public.

12h

Techtopia #110: Science fiction design

Hos Google laver de små science fiction-film af fremtidens mulige produkter og viser dem for hinanden. Den erfaring bringer dansk Google-designer med til Index:Award.

12h

Lufthansa shares plunge after profit warning

Shares in German airline giant Lufthansa plunged more than 12 percent on Monday after the group posted a profit warning.

12h

Big Little Lies and the Painful Truths of a Parent-Child Talk

This article contains spoilers through Season 2, Episode 2 of Big Little Lies. In the fall of 2017, in response to the expansion of the #MeToo movement, a series of articles sprang up advising parents how to talk to their children about sexual assault. Start the conversations when the kids are young , the articles commonly advised . Acknowledge that the conversations might make the kids feel unco

12h

It’s a Winner-Take-All World, Whether You Like It or Not

Not long ago, I reached out to a writer I respect, and posed the uncomfortable question authors find themselves forced to ask: Would she write a blurb—the endorsement you see on the back cover—for my new book about how a person can navigate a career in the winner-take-all economy of the 21st century? She declined. She felt strongly that this winner-take-all dynamic needs to be fought, not embrace

12h

Debunking the Court’s Latest Death-Penalty Obsession

On March 29, 1994, the Texas lawyer Mandy Welch rose to argue before the Supreme Court on behalf of a condemned prisoner named Frank McFarland. Justice Antonin Scalia, however, wanted to put Welch’s law firm, the Texas Resource Center, on trial. McFarland’s petition, Scalia said, had been filed late in the process, disrupting Court procedure. He was not interested in her explanation: Her firm had

12h

What Really Happened to Malaysia’s Missing Airplane

Updated at 10:25 a.m. ET on June 17, 2019. 1. The Disappearance At 12:42 a.m. on the quiet, moonlit night of March 8, 2014, a Boeing 777-200ER operated by Malaysia Airlines took off from Kuala Lumpur and turned toward Beijing, climbing to its assigned cruising altitude of 35,000 feet. The designator for Malaysia Airlines is MH. The flight number was 370. Fariq Hamid, the first officer, was flying

12h

Is a long-dormant Russian volcano waking up? It’s complicated

Scientists debate how to interpret seismic activity near Bolshaya Udina on the remote Kamchatka Peninsula.

12h

In Courtrooms, Climate Change Is No Longer Up for Debate

Judges in the United States and abroad now regularly hear about the effects of global warming and the threats it poses. Meanwhile, petitioners are testing out various legal strategies to try to force recalcitrant governments and companies to cut their emissions faster and to get compensation for damages.

13h

Det kan handle om liv eller død, at vi kender hinanden

Det er på tide, at man fra politisk hold uforbeholdent anerkender og udviser tillid til institutionen 'egen læges' kvaliteter og faglighed, hvis man vil bevare, fastholde og rekruttere familielægen.c

13h

Who should pay when medical drugs become too expensive to buy?

We depend on private companies to develop new drugs and treatments, but their need to profit has far-reaching consequences

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Quantum simulation could help flights run on time

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Harvard chemists' breakthrough in synthesis advances a potent anti-cancer agent

Chemists at Harvard University and Eisai have achieved what a new paper calls a 'landmark in drug discovery' with the total synthesis of 11.5g of halichondrin. Known to be a potent anti-cancer agent in mouse studies, and found naturally in sea sponges — though only ever in minuscule quantities — the halichondrin class of molecule is so fiendishly complex that it had never been synthesized on a m

13h

Hypertension drug may hold promise for Alzheimer's disease

The blood pressure drug nilvadipine increased blood flow to the brain's memory and learning center, without affecting other brain regions among people with Alzheimer's disease.These findings indicate that the known decrease in cerebral blood flow in patients with Alzheimer's can be reversed in some regions.However, it is unclear if this translates to clinical benefits.

13h

Sjögurkor städar i fiskodlingarna

I vattenbruk av fisk och skaldjur är det viktigt att minimera odlingarnas negativa påverkan på miljön. Odling av makroalger (tång) används för att ta upp de lösta näringsämnen som fiskar och skaldjur släpper ut. Ett annat sätt är samodling med filtrerande djur som musslor och ostron, vilka tar upp näring i form av små partiklar i vattnet. Kompletterande städpatrull Men även sjögurkor kan bidra ti

13h

In-situ fabrication of a novel anisotropic PC-matrix light-scattering materials containing spindle-shaped core-shell particles

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45030-4 In-situ fabrication of a novel anisotropic PC-matrix light-scattering materials containing spindle-shaped core-shell particles

13h

Simulating human exposure to indoor airborne microplastics using a Breathing Thermal Manikin

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45054-w Simulating human exposure to indoor airborne microplastics using a Breathing Thermal Manikin

13h

Optimization and control of the light environment for greenhouse crop production

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44980-z Optimization and control of the light environment for greenhouse crop production

13h

Prenatal diagnosis of hypospadias with 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional ultrasonography

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45221-z Prenatal diagnosis of hypospadias with 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional ultrasonography

13h

Short exposure to cold atmospheric plasma induces senescence in human skin fibroblasts and adipose mesenchymal stromal cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45191-2 Short exposure to cold atmospheric plasma induces senescence in human skin fibroblasts and adipose mesenchymal stromal cells

13h

Recombinant production, purification, crystallization, and structure analysis of human transforming growth factor β2 in a new conformation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44943-4 Recombinant production, purification, crystallization, and structure analysis of human transforming growth factor β2 in a new conformation

13h

Tipping phenomena in typical dynamical systems subjected to parameter drift

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44863-3 Tipping phenomena in typical dynamical systems subjected to parameter drift

13h

Contribution of DNA methylation to the expression of FCGRT in human liver and myocardium

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45203-1 Contribution of DNA methylation to the expression of FCGRT in human liver and myocardium

13h

Strømnedbrud i kæmpeskala efterlod 48 millioner uden strøm

Et massivt strømnedbrud mørklagde søndag Argentina og Uruguay og satte store dele af den offentlige transport ud af drift.

13h

Ran promotes membrane targeting and stabilization of RhoA to orchestrate ovarian cancer cell invasion

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10570-w Ran, a nucleus-cytoplasm shuttle protein, is implicated in cancer development and survival. Here, the authors show that Ran binds RhoA to impair its degradation and allow its localisation to the plasma membrane of ovarian cancer cells for tumour invasion.

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Chemists' breakthrough in synthesis advances a potent anti-cancer agent

It's a feat three decades in the making: Harvard University chemists have achieved what a new paper calls a "landmark in drug discovery" with the total synthesis of halichondrin. Known to be a potent anti-cancer agent in mouse studies, and found naturally in sea sponges—though only ever in minuscule quantities—the halichondrin class of molecule is so fiendishly complex that it had never been synth

13h

Chemists' breakthrough in synthesis advances a potent anti-cancer agent

It's a feat three decades in the making: Harvard University chemists have achieved what a new paper calls a "landmark in drug discovery" with the total synthesis of halichondrin. Known to be a potent anti-cancer agent in mouse studies, and found naturally in sea sponges—though only ever in minuscule quantities—the halichondrin class of molecule is so fiendishly complex that it had never been synth

13h

A bridge made of grass

The annual remaking of the last remaining Inca rope bridge at Q'eswachaka in Peru.

13h

Huawei says U.S. ban hurting more than expected, to wipe $30 billion off revenue

China's Huawei Technologies Co Ltd has taken a harder-than-expected hit from a U.S. ban, the company's founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei said, and slashed revenue expectations for the year.

13h

Krydstogtskibe i Norge forurener fem gange mere end resten af landets skibe

110 krydstogtskibe har tilsammen fem gange højere svovludledning end al indenrigs transport til havs i Norge, viser ny rapport.

14h

Force-driven reversible liquid–gas phase transition mediated by elastic nanosponges

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10511-7 Conventional cooling systems rely on environmentally harmful halocarbons, while alternatives based on solid–solid transitions do not reach the required performance. Here the authors demonstrate using water and alcohol as refrigerants, through their confinement in nanosponges and their release by mechanical press

14h

This Odd Bacterium Appears to Protect Its Host From The Damaging Effects of Stress

It could be the key to building a human 'stress vaccine'.

14h

Dubious for-profit stem cell clinics: Co-opting ClinicalTrials.gov as a marketing tool

Over twenty years ago, cancer quack Stanislaw Burzynski pioneered the abuse of the clinical trial process as a marketing tool to sell his antineoplastons. Now, for-profit stem cell clinics are using ClinicalTrials.gov as a marketing tool for their unproven therapies by listing dubious and scientifically worthless trials in this government database. What can be done?

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From surfer shorts to surgical drapes

Human exposure to unnecessary and potentially harmful chemicals could be greatly reduced if manufacturers add chemicals only when they are truly essential in terms of health, safety and functioning of society. That's the conclusion of a study published today in Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, a peer-reviewed journal published by the Royal Society of Chemistry.

15h

Interest free loans could prevent homelessness and save councils millions, according to a new study

A homeless prevention interest free loan scheme in Lewisham, which has helped over 300 families escape eviction and saved the council over £1 million, could be replicated across the UK a new …

15h

New study examines the association between race, ethnicity and exclusionary discipline practices

Discipline and how it is administered in schools across the U.S. continues to be a hotly debated topic. Now a University of Kentucky doctoral graduate's expansive research on the subject has …

15h

Huawei founder says revenue will be billions below forecast

Huawei's founder said Monday that the Chinese telecom giant's revenue will be $30 billion less than forecast over the next two years, as he compared the company to a "badly damaged plane" as a result of U.S. government actions against it.

15h

'I refuse to regret waking up a day older': Ashton Applewhite's fight for age pride

The activist on her manifesto to empower older people, how to challenge age prejudice – and why she dyes her hair grey When Ashton Applewhite hit 55 years old, she dyed her hair. So what? That’s what women the world over do, you might think: dye grey hair to hide their age. But what Applewhite did was different: she dyed her hair grey. Not Kim Kardashian-platinum grey, but defiantly uncool, bog-s

15h

The complex fate of Antarctic species in the face of a changing climate

Oxygen concentrations in both the open ocean and coastal waters have declined by 2-5% since at least the middle of the 20th century.

15h

New study examines the association between race, ethnicity and exclusionary discipline practices

Discipline and how it is administered in schools across the U.S. continues to be a hotly debated topic. Now a University of Kentucky doctoral graduate's expansive research on the subject has been published in the Journal of School Psychology and is gaining widespread attention from teachers, administrators, and researchers.

15h

The complex fate of Antarctic species in the face of a changing climate

Oxygen concentrations in both the open ocean and coastal waters have declined by 2-5% since at least the middle of the 20th century.

15h

Tiny probe that senses deep in the lung set to shed light on disease

A hair-sized probe that can measure key indicators of tissue damage deep in the lung has been developed by scientists.

15h

Interest free loans could prevent homelessness and save councils millions, according to a new study

A homeless prevention interest free loan scheme in Lewisham, which has helped over 300 families escape eviction and saved the council over £1 million, could be replicated across the UK a new study suggests.

15h

Alibaba proposes share split ahead of reported $20B Hong Kong IPO

Alibaba is being heavily linked with a public listing in Hong Kong, which could reportedly happen in Q3 and raise up to $20 billion. The firm is keeping quiet on those rumors, but it did let …

15h

Palau changes ocean sanctuary plan to allow Japan fishing

The Pacific nation of Palau has amended plans to create a huge marine reserve so Japanese fishing boats still have partial access to its waters.

16h

Palau changes ocean sanctuary plan to allow Japan fishing

The Pacific nation of Palau has amended plans to create a huge marine reserve so Japanese fishing boats still have partial access to its waters.

16h

Can you solve it? Are you in the smartest 1 per cent (of 13-year-olds)?

The test given to the UK’s maths prodigies UPDATE: The solutions are now up here. Today you are pitting yourselves against the best 13-year-old mathematicians in the UK. The questions below are taken from last week’s Junior Mathematical Olympiad , a competition aimed at children up to Year 8 (in England) who score in roughly the top half per cent of mathematical ability. Continue reading…