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nyheder2019juni18

Female rats face sex bias too

In neurobiological studies, male lab animals tend to outnumber females, which are considered too hormonal. Scientists say it’s time for that myth to go.

3h

Engineers boost output of solar desalination system by 50%

Rice University's solar-powered approach for purifying salt water with sunlight and nanoparticles is even more efficient than its creators first believed.

2h

Knap hver tredje citrusfrugt indeholder forbudt og sundhedsfarligt sprøjtemiddel

Fødevarestyrelsen har fundet det sundhedsskadelige sprøjtemiddel chlorpyrifos på knap hver tredje konventionelle citrusfrugt, der er undersøgt mellem 2016 og 2018. EU-godkendelse undersøges.

6h

Witnessing uncivil behavior

When people witness poor customer service, a manager's intervention can help reduce hostility toward the company or brand, according to WSU research.

7min

Scientists identify plant that flowers in Brazilian savanna one day after fire

Rapid resprouting and flowering of Bulbostylis paradoxa is proof of the Cerrado biome's superb resilience and its capacity to evolve through fire.

7min

Alcohol advertisements influence intentions to intervene in sexual assault situations

College students who viewed alcohol advertisements that included objectified images of women were less likely than others to report intentions to intervene in alcohol-facilitated sexual assault situations.

7min

NRL researchers find insights into the formation of the solar system in ancient comet dust

Researchers at the US Naval Research Laboratory have discovered a remnant of ancient dust inside a primitive meteorite.

7min

A new force for optical tweezers awakens

When studying biological cells using optical tweezers, one main issue is the damage caused to the cell by the tool. Scientists have discovered a new type of force that will greatly reduce the amount of light used by optical tweezers — and improve the study of all kinds of cells and particles.

8min

How Not To Prevent a Cyberwar With Russia

Former cybersecurity officials warn against a path of aggression that could inflame cyberwar rather than deter it.

11min

Harness microbes for humanity’s future

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01903-2 Leading scientists issue a warning: microorganisms will shape our warming world.

12min

Bush tomato defies binary gender norms

Gender is a spectrum, especially in the case of an Australian eggplant cousin. Andrew Masterson reports.

19min

Uncovering hidden protein structures

Combining research-oriented teaching and interdisciplinary collaboration pays off: Researchers at the University of Konstanz develop a novel spectroscopic approach to investigate hitherto difficult-to-observe protein structures. On 'campus.kn', the online magazine of the University of Konstanz, we report on the new approach and its origin at the interface between chemistry and biology.

22min

Parental support is key when autistic adolescents want to learn to drive

Autistic adolescents need the support of their parents or guardians to prioritize independence so that they are prepared for learning to drive, according to a study of specialized driving instructors who have worked specifically with young autistic drivers. Driving instructors also emphasized the need to develop and refine best practices to guide assessment and delivery of highly individualized in

22min

Yale-led study reveals biology of leptin, the hunger hormone

In a new study, Yale researchers offer insight into leptin, a hormone that plays a key role in appetite, overeating, and obesity. Their findings advance knowledge about leptin and weight gain, and also suggest a potential strategy for developing future weight-loss treatments, they said.

22min

Now your phone can become a robot that does the boring work

Purdue University researchers have developed a smartphone app that allows a user to easily program any robot to perform a task, dramatically bringing down the costs of building and programming mobile robots.

22min

Risky business: New data show how manatees use shipping channels

A new publication in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science tracks West Indian manatee movements through nearshore and offshore ship channels in the north-central Gulf of Mexico. A new publication in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science tracks West Indian manatee movements through nearshore and offshore ship channels in the north-central Gulf of Mexico.

22min

Scientists discover a powerful antibody that inhibits multiple strains of norovirus

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health and their colleagues at the University of Texas at Austin and the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center have discovered an antibody that broadly inhibits multiple strains of pandemic norovirus, a major step forward in the development of an effective vaccine for the dreaded stomach

22min

Researchers identify potential modifier genes in patients with charcot-marie-tooth disease

Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited neurological disorder affecting peripheral motor and/or sensory nerves in humans. Monogenic disorders like CMT1A, CMT's most prevalent subtype, are caused by a single gene defect. However, its clinical presentation and severity can vary widely, leading doctors to wonder what factors might be responsible for these differences.

22min

CNIO researchers describe new functions of protein that plays key role in some tumors and rare diseases

Cohesin is a protein complex that plays a key role in cell division; its role in 3D genome structure was described in recent years. Researchers at CNIO have found new functions in the peculiar 3D genome structure of mouse embryonic stem cells. Research on cohesin will help understand how its malfunction contributes to tumorigenesis in some types of cancer, as well as to rare diseases such as Corne

22min

Democrats and Republicans agree: Take politics out of health policymaking

It's no secret that Americans are politically divided, but a new report offers hope that Democrats and Republicans find common ground on at least one issue: the role of 'evidence' in developing and shaping health laws. Strong bipartisan support exists for a greater use of 'evidence' — defined as information based on reliable data and produced by statistical methods — in development of health pol

22min

Scientists challenge notion of binary sexuality with naming of new plant species

A collaborative team of scientists from the US and Australia has named a new plant species from the remote Outback. Bucknell University biology postdoctoral fellow Angela McDonnell and professor Chris Martine led the description of the plant that had confounded field biologists for decades because of the unusual fluidity of its flower form. The discovery, published in the open access journal Phyto

22min

Cell division at high speed

When two proteins work together, this worsens the prognosis for lung cancer patients: their chances of survival are particularly poor in this case.

22min

Leaving microbes out of climate change conversation has major consequences, experts warn

An international group of leading microbiologists have issued a warning, saying that not including microbes — the support system of the biosphere — in the climate change equation will have major negative flow-on effects.

22min

Changes in obesity among low-income children enrolled in WIC

This study looked at changes in overweight and obesity among low-income young children enrolled in the food assistance Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) from 2010 to 2016. The analysis included 12.4 million children 2 to 4 years old. Obesity declined between 2010 and 2016 to 13.9% from 15.9%; overweight and obesity combined declined to 29.1% from 32.5%.

22min

Suicide rates among US adolescents, young adults continue to increase

A detailed analysis of recent national data on suicide rates among young people ages 15 to 24 reports 6,241 suicides in 2017, and suicide rates at ages 15 to 19 and 20 to 24 that have increased to their highest point since 2000. This study used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to take a closer look at suicide rates in the United States among young people and to see if incre

22min

The hunt for hot nuclear matter

In particle physics, a jet is a shower of collimated particles generated by a highly energetic quark or gluon. In a lead-lead collision, jets must traverse through quark gluon plasma, altering their energy, track and consistency.

23min

Google Calendar Is Down With A Hard 404 Not Found

Tuesday is canceled, no work for anyone! Well, not quite. Reports around the globe indicate that Google Calendar is down. Users are being treated with a "Not Found, Error 404" message when …

27min

Gene linked to cannabis abuse

New research shows that a specific gene is associated with an increased risk of cannabis abuse. The gene is the source of a so-called nicotine receptor in the brain, and people with low amounts of this receptor have an increased risk of cannabis abuse.

28min

Food neophobia may increase the risk of lifestyle diseases

Your parents were right: You should always try all foods! Food neophobia, or fear of new foods, may lead to poorer dietary quality and increase the risk factors associated with chronic diseases.

28min

New methods from material sciences in physics find their way into cancer research

A new study on the behavior of water in cancer cells shows how methods usually limited to physics can be of great use in cancer research. The researchers have shown how a combination of neutron scattering and thermal analysis can be used to map the properties of water in breast cancer cells.

28min

Experts: Here’s what to expect from 2019 fire season

Abnormal is the new normal for Western wildfires, with increasingly bigger and more destructive blazes, experts say. But understanding the risks can help avert disaster. Throughout Western North America, millions of people live in high-risk wildfire zones thanks to increasingly dry, hot summers and abundant organic fuel in nearby wildlands. Researchers say that’s a recipe for disaster. This year,

31min

Ny svensk uppfinning kan revolutionera rymdforskning

En svensk uppfinning kan komma att revolutionera röntgenobservationer av universum. Om en ny sorts röntgenlins installeras i ett teleskop kan det byggas mycket mer småskaligt, och fånga in röntgenljus från en uppåt tusen gånger så stor yta som med nuvarande teknik.

34min

Airbus is ready for pilotless jets, are you?

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Inside the urgent battle to stop UK police using facial recognition

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35min

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Cuttlefish Arms Are Not So Different From Yours

Cephalopods, flies and even humans share genes needed to develop limbs, perhaps provided by a common ancestor.

37min

Meet Australia’s New Sex-Changing Tomato: Solanum plastisexum

A plant that grows in the country’s north has been found to exhibit an unpredictable sexual identity, challenging the idea of reproductive norms for other living things.

37min

New methods from material sciences in physics find their way into cancer research

A new study on the behavior of water in cancer cells shows how methods usually limited to physics can be of great use in cancer research. The researchers have shown how a combination of neutron scattering and thermal analysis can be used to map the properties of water in breast cancer cells.

38min

Gold adds the shine of reversible assembly to protein cages

An international team has shown the reversible self-assembly of protein cages using gold ions to direct the process. The team designed protein building blocks that formed 3D structures in the presence of gold ions and could be disassembled in the presence of reducing agents, exhibiting smart behavior attractive for cargo delivery applications. The cages were also found to exhibit an architecture b

38min

YouTube's 'Shitty Robot' Queen Made Her Own Tesla Pickup Truck

Simone Giertz hacked her Model 3 into a ride she calls the "Truckla," and it does donuts.

41min

New drug compound could tackle major life-limiting kidney disease

Scientists are developing a new class of drugs to treat a common genetic kidney disease which is a major cause of kidney failure.

43min

Origin of life: A prebiotic route to DNA

DNA, the hereditary material, may have appeared on Earth earlier than has been assumed hitherto. Chemists now show that a simple reaction pathway could have given rise to DNA subunits on the early Earth.

43min

Antidepressants can reduce empathy for those in pain

Depression is a disorder that often comes along with strong impairments of social functioning. Until recently, researchers assumed that acute episodes of depression also impair empathy, an essential skill for successful social interactions and understanding others. Novel insights show that antidepressant treatment can lead to impaired empathy regarding perception of pain, and not just the state of

43min

Experimental drug can encourage bone growth in children with dwarfism

Researchers report that an experimental drug called vosoritide, which interferes with certain proteins that block bone growth, allowed the average annual growth rate to increase in a study of 35 children and teenagers with achondroplasia, a form of dwarfism.

43min

Key protein: Lab solves HOIL-1 mystery

The mysterious function of a key protein has been revealed.

43min

Scientists challenge notion of binary sexuality with naming of new plant species

A collaborative team of scientists from the US and Australia has named a new plant species from the remote Outback. Bucknell University biology postdoctoral fellow Angela McDonnell and professor Chris Martine led the description of the plant that had confounded field biologists for decades because of the unusual fluidity of its flower form. The discovery, published in the open access journal Phyto

43min

A new force for optical tweezers awakens

When studying biological cells using optical tweezers, one main issue is the damage caused to the cell by the tool. Giovanni Volpe, University of Gothenburg, has discovered a new type of force that will greatly reduce the amount of light used by optical tweezers — and improve the study of all kinds of cells and particles.

45min

How to keep fish in the sea and on the plate

Temporary bans on fishing can be better than permanent ones as a way of allowing fish stocks in an area to recover, while still providing enough to eat, a research team has found. The new research could help revolutionize fisheries management and settle a long-running debate between fisheries management and conservation sectors.

45min

Dark centers of chromosomes reveal ancient DNA

Geneticists exploring the dark heart of the human genome have discovered big chunks of Neanderthal and other ancient DNA. The results open new ways to study both how chromosomes behave during cell division and how they have changed during human evolution.

45min

New methods from material sciences in physics find their way into cancer research

A new study on the behavior of water in cancer cells shows how methods usually limited to physics can be of great use in cancer research. The researchers, Murillo Longo Martins and Heloisa N. Bordallo at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have shown how a combination of neutron scattering and thermal analysis can be used to map the properties of water in breast cancer cells.

45min

Soap bubbles form natural snow-domes

Temperature governs crystal formation and movement in freezing suds. Andrew Masterson reports.

46min

Bush tomato defies binary gender norms

Gender is a spectrum, especially in the case of an Australian eggplant cousin. Andrew Masterson reports.

46min

Leaving microbes out of climate change conversation has major consequences, experts warn

More than 30 microbiologists from 9 countries have issued a warning to humanity—they are calling for the world to stop ignoring an 'unseen majority' in Earth's biodiversity and ecosystem when addressing climate change.

47min

Scientists challenge notion of binary sexuality with naming of new plant species

A collaborative team of scientists from the US and Australia has named a new plant species from the remote Outback. Bucknell University biology postdoctoral fellow Angela McDonnell and professor Chris Martine led the description of the plant that had confounded field biologists for decades because of the unusual fluidity of its flower form. The discovery, published in the open access journal Phyto

47min

49min

Neuromorphic Computing: An overview

submitted by /u/opensourcesblog [link] [comments]

49min

A New Law to Describe Quantum Computing’s Rise?

In December 2018, scientists at Google AI ran a calculation on Google’s best quantum processor. They were able to reproduce the computation using a regular laptop. Then in January, they ran the same test on an improved version of the quantum chip. This time they had to use a powerful desktop computer to simulate the result. By February, there were no longer any classical computers in the building

50min

Feeling the strain: Shear effects in magnetoelectric switching

The high resolution and wealth of data provided by an experiment at Diamond can lead to unexpected discoveries. The piezoelectric properties of the ceramic perovskite PMN-PT (0.68Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3–0.32PbTiO3) are widely used in commercial actuators, where the strain that is generated varies continuously with applied voltage. However, if the applied voltage is cycled appropriately then there are dis

53min

How synthetic biology could wipe out humanity — and how we can stop it | Rob Reid

The world-changing promise of synthetic biology and gene editing has a dark side. In this far-seeing talk, author and entrepreneur Rob Reid reviews the risks of a world where more and more people have access to the tools and tech needed to create a doomsday bug that could wipe out humanity — and suggests that it's time to take this danger seriously.

54min

Immunity: Redundancies in T cells

Researchers have discovered redundancies in the biochemical signalling pathways of immune cells. This finding has important implications for advances in cancer immunotherapy, among other areas.

57min

Sleep history predicts late-life Alzheimer's pathology

Sleep patterns can predict the accumulation of Alzheimer's pathology proteins later in life, according to a new study. These findings could lead to new sleep-based early diagnosis and prevention measures in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

57min

Healthcare workers often care for patients while ill

Large numbers of healthcare workers risk transmitting respiratory viruses to patients and co-workers by attending work even when they have symptoms, according to a new study. The study found that 95% of people working in healthcare settings have worked while sick, most often because the symptoms were mild or started during their workday.

57min

Dormant neural stem cells in fruit flies activate to generate new brain cells

Researchers have discovered the mechanism behind how neural stem cells in fruit flies are activated to stimulate the generation of new brain cells.

57min

Gold adds the shine of reversible assembly to protein cages

An international team has shown the reversible self-assembly of protein cages using gold ions to direct the process. The team designed protein building blocks that formed 3D structures in the presence of gold ions and could be disassembled in the presence of reducing agents, exhibiting smart behavior attractive for cargo delivery applications. The cages were also found to exhibit an architecture b

57min

Molecular switch for 'exhaustion mode' of immune cells discovered

Tumors and certain viral infections pose a challenge to the human body which the immune system typically fails to hand. In these diseases it switches to hypofunctional state that prevent adequate protection. A research team has achieved a major success: They identified the crucial molecular switch that triggers such dysfunctional immune responses. This could make it possible in the future to switc

57min

Rotavirus vaccines may lower kids’ chances of getting type 1 diabetes

Vaccination against rotavirus is associated with a reduced incidence of type 1 diabetes in children, according to an analysis of U.S. insurance data.

59min

A Moby-Dick–Inspired Memoir of Menopause

By Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Jonathan Franzen, Amy Tan, Khaled Hosseini, and more. Doug McLean In her new memoir, Flash Count Diary: Menopause and the Vindication of Natural Life , the author Darcey Steinke renders menopause as “a rupture, a metamorphosis, an all-encompassing and violent change .” Its phys

1h

A Breakthrough in the Mystery of Why Women Get So Many Autoimmune Diseases

About 65 million years ago, shortly after the time of the dinosaurs, a new critter popped up on the evolutionary scene. This “ scampering animal ,” as researchers described it, was likely small, ate bugs, and had a furry tail. It looked, according to artistic renderings , like an especially aggressive New York City rat. And it had a placenta, an organ that grows deep into the maternal body in ord

1h

A device emerges from the fusion of IGZO and ferroelectric-HfO2

As a part of JST PRESTO program, Associate professor Masaharu Kobayashi, Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, has developed a ferroelectric FET (FeFET) with ferroelectric-HfO2 and ultrathin IGZO channel. Nearly ideal subthreshold swing (SS) and mobility higher than poly-silicon channel have been demonstrated.

1h

New Research for Week #24, 2019

A note of appreciation and a changing of the guard For the past over eight years Skeptical Science staff volunteer Ari Jokimäki has produced a weekly list of links to recent academic publications concerning the fundamental science of climate change, global warming and the role of humans in creating this emerging new reality. As our understanding of the theoretical and empirical situation has impr

1h

Food neophobia may increase the risk of lifestyle diseases

Your parents were right: you should always try all foods! Food neophobia, or fear of new foods, may lead to poorer dietary quality and increase the risk factors associated with chronic diseases.

1h

Researchers link gene to cannabis abuse

New research from the national psychiatric project, iPSYCH, shows that a specific gene is associated with an increased risk of cannabis abuse. The gene is the source of a so-called nicotine receptor in the brain, and people with low amounts of this receptor have an increased risk of cannabis abuse.

1h

Hydrogenation of white phosphorus leads way to safer chemical technology

White phosphorus is well-known for being a highly toxic compound with suffocating scent. Its high reactivity is the reason for it to be stored with oxygen access in inert media. It's also infamous for its military use in bombs and grenades.

1h

Antidepressants can reduce the empathic empathy

Depression is a disorder that often comes along with strong impairments of social functioning. Until recently, researchers assumed that acute episodes of depression also impair empathy, an essential skill for successful social interactions and understanding others. Novel insights of an interdisciplinary from the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna show that antidepressant tre

1h

Origin of life – A prebiotic route to DNA

DNA, the hereditary material, may have appeared on Earth earlier than has been assumed hitherto. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich chemists led by Oliver Trapp show that a simple reaction pathway could have given rise to DNA subunits on the early Earth.

1h

New drug compound could tackle major life-limiting kidney disease

Scientists from the University of Sheffield are part of an international collaboration to develop a new class of drugs to treat a common genetic kidney disease which is a major cause of kidney failure.

1h

Gut microbes associated with temperament traits in children

Scientists in the FinnBrain research project of the University of Turku discovered that the gut microbes of a 2.5-month-old infant are associated with the temperament traits manifested at six months of age. Temperament describes individual differences in expressing and regulating emotions in infants, and the study provides new information on the association between behaviour and microbes. A corres

1h

IDIBELL researchers relate the amplification of a chromosomal region with resistance to to a chemotherapeutic drug in breast cancer

IDIBELL researchers relate the amplification of a chromosomal region with resistance to a chemotherapeutic drug in breast cancer. Scientists propose a new way to face this resistance and a first biomarker to predict if it could appear or not. The study was carried out by a team led by IDIBELL researchers, with the participation of Baylor College of Medicine (Houston) and the University Institute o

1h

Adequate protein intake associates with lower risk of frailty

Adequate intake of protein is associated with a reduced risk of frailty and prefrailty in older women, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. Adequate protein intake was defined as at least 1.1 g per kg of body weight. The findings were published in European Journal of Nutrition.

1h

What universities can learn from one of science’s biggest frauds

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01884-2 Detailed analysis of misconduct investigations into huge research fraud suggests institutional probes aren’t rigorous enough.

1h

Dinosaur bones are home to microscopic life

Bad news, Jurassic Park fans—the odds of scientists cloning a dinosaur from ancient DNA are pretty much zero. That's because DNA breaks down over time and isn't stable enough to stay intact for millions of years. And while proteins, the molecules in all living things that give our bodies structure and help them operate, are more stable, even they might not be able to survive over tens or hundreds

1h

eROSITA – the hunt for dark energy begins

On 21 June 2019 the Spektrum-Röntgen-Gamma (Spektr-RG / SRG) spacecraft will be launched from the Kazakh steppe, marking the start of an exciting journey. SRG will be carrying the German Extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array (eROSITA) X-ray telescope and its Russian ART-XC partner instrument. A Proton rocket will carry the spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome towards its dest

1h

Zipingpu Reservoir reveals climate-tectonics interplay around 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

The roles of "climate change" versus "tectonics" that dominate erosion and sediment transport over geological time scales have long been a hot topic in Earth science. How to effectively separate their respective roles is a big challenge, like the famous "chicken or egg" question.

1h

Jake Battles 20-Foot Frozen Seas | Deadliest Catch

Jake looks for a stroke of luck in the southern crab grounds but finds himself fighting for survival against the wrath of Arctic Storm Elsa. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on

1h

Libra: What is Facebook's new cryptocurrency and can we trust it?

Your questions answered on Facebook's cryptocurrency Libra. What will it be used for, can we trust it, and what's the point?

1h

OSIRIS-REx spacecraft captures closest ever image of asteroid Bennu

NASA has captured its closest and most detailed image yet of Bennu, a 78 billion-kilogram asteroid which approaches close to Earth every six years

1h

Inching Towards Abundant Water: New Progress in Desalination Tech

In early 2018, Cape Town, South Africa came dangerously close to being the world’s first major city to run out of water . People lined up for blocks to collect spring water. Stores sold out of receptacles like buckets and bowls. Bottled water was rationed in tourist-heavy parts of the city. April 12 was designated “ Day Zero ”—the day the water was expected to dry up. City officials prepared for

1h

Dinosaur bones are home to microscopic life

Scientists went looking for preserved collagen, the protein in bone and skin, in dinosaur fossils. They didn't find the protein, but they did find huge colonies of modern bacteria living inside the dinosaur bones.

1h

Study shows experimental drug can encourage bone growth in children with dwarfism

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, the Murdoch Children's Research Institute in Australia and seven other medical institutions report that an experimental drug called vosoritide, which interferes with certain proteins that block bone growth, allowed the average annual growth rate to increase in a study of 35 children and teenagers with achondroplasia, a form of dwarfism.

1h

Study shows healthcare workers often care for patients while ill

Large numbers of healthcare workers risk transmitting respiratory viruses to patients and co-workers by attending work even when they have symptoms, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The study found that 95% of people working in healthcare settings have worked while sick, most often

1h

A warming Midwest increases likelihood that farmers will need to irrigate

If current climate and crop-improvement trends continue into the future, Midwestern corn growers who today rely on rainfall to water their crops will need to irrigate their fields, a new study finds. This could draw down aquifers, disrupt streams and rivers, and set up conflicts between agricultural and other human and ecological needs for water, scientists say.

1h

AUH dropper tre spareforslag

Nedlukning af robotkirurgien er et af de spareforslag for AUH, som bliver sløjfet efter dagens forretningsudvalgsmøde i Region Midtjylland. Det betyder dog ikke, at der skal findes besparelser andre steder, bekræfter hospitalet.

1h

Men need not apply: university set to open jobs just to women

Program would boost female professors at Eindhoven University of Technology

1h

How a walk through CERN's corridors helped lead to the discovery of the gluon 40 years ago

Forty years ago, in 1979, experiments at the DESY laboratory in Germany provided the first direct proof of the existence of gluons—the carriers of the strong force that "glue" quarks into protons, neutrons and other particles known collectively as hadrons. This discovery was a milestone in the history of particle physics, as it helped establish the theory of the strong force, known as quantum chro

1h

Everest summits smash records amid deadly bottlenecks

A record 885 people climbed Everest in May this year, figures showed Tuesday, capping a deadly traffic-clogged season that also saw 11 climbers die on the world's highest mountain.

1h

Climate change enhances carbon dioxide flux from lakes

Boreal lakes play a significant role in global carbon cycling. Small and shallow lakes are abundant in northern areas, and they are often biologically active because of the loading of organic matter from the catchments. As microbes degrade organic matter that has been accumulated in the water column and in the bottom sediments, the water column carbon dioxide concentration exceeds the saturation l

1h

The Surreal End of an American College

Like most other colleges across the country, Newbury College in Brookline, Massachusetts, held classes through the end of this past spring semester and then bid farewell to cap-and-gown-wearing seniors. But unlike almost every other college, those classes, and that farewell , were the school’s last: Newbury officially ceased operations at the end of May. One of the first sources to publicly confi

1h

Carving a new path for skier safety

A spectacular stack on a ski slope in Canada has led to a researcher determining a simple modification that could improve skier safety on the snow. Researchers studied visual perception under different lighting conditions to identify a better method for grooming ski runs.

1h

Genetic cause for fatal response to Hepatitis A

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that caused an 11-year-old girl to suffer a fatal reaction to infection with the Hepatitis A virus (HAV). The study reveals that mutations in the IL18BP gene causes the body's immune system to attack and kill healthy liver cells, and suggests that targeting this pathway could prevent the deaths of patients suffering rapid liver failure in response to

1h

Speeding up the journey towards clean energy through photocatalyst optimization

Researchers have studied the photocatalytic activity of oxyhalide materials and were able to demonstrate a relationship between parameters measured by time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) and oxygen generation.

1h

New AI system manages road infrastructure via Google Street View

A program to monitor street signs automatically via Google Street View will save time and money for municipal authorities.

1h

Carving a new path for skier safety

A spectacular stack on a ski slope in Canada has led to a researcher determining a simple modification that could improve skier safety on the snow. Researchers studied visual perception under different lighting conditions to identify a better method for grooming ski runs.

1h

Urban gardens to monitor air pollution

Researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid in collaboration with the University of Copenhagen have assessed the use of edible plants for the biomonitoring of atmospheric pollution.

1h

Gold adds the shine of reversible assembly to protein cages

Protein cages—capsule-like structures made up of numerous protein molecules—perform roles in nature that have inspired their application in areas such as drug delivery. Their controlled assembly is therefore of particular research interest; however, the stimuli responsive disassembly of protein cages has not yet been reported. Now, an international research team has reported gold-directed reversib

1h

Redundancies in T cells

Researchers at ETH Zurich have discovered redundancies in the biochemical signalling pathways of immune cells. This finding has important implications for advances in cancer immunotherapy, among other areas.

1h

Molecular switch for 'exhaustion mode' of immune cells discovered

Tumors and certain viral infections pose a challenge to the human body which the immune system typically fails to hand. In these diseases it switches to hypofunctional state that prevent adequate protection. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has achieved a major success: They identified the crucial molecular switch that triggers such dysfunctional immune responses. This

1h

Gold adds the shine of reversible assembly to protein cages

An international team including researchers from the University of Tsukuba has shown the reversible self-assembly of protein cages using gold ions to direct the process. The team designed protein building blocks that formed 3D structures in the presence of gold ions and could be disassembled in the presence of reducing agents, exhibiting smart behavior attractive for cargo delivery applications. T

1h

Changing how we predict coral bleaching

A remote sensing algorithm offers better predictions of Red Sea coral bleaching and can be fine tuned for use in other tropical marine ecosystems.

1h

Dormant neural stem cells in fruit flies activate to generate new brain cells

Researchers in Singapore have discovered the mechanism behind how neural stem cells in fruit flies are activated to stimulate the generation of new brain cells.

1h

Artificial peptide bond formation provides clues to creation of life on Earth

The main constituents of cells, tissue, organs, and whole organisms are proteins, which are built by the addition of amino acids one after another to form long protein chains called polypeptides. Although living cells have advanced machinery that can achieve this chain extension with astonishing speed and accuracy, efforts to mimic this reaction in the lab in order to create natural peptide produc

1h

A map of America’s most famous – and infamous

Replace city names with those of their most famous residents And you get a peculiar map of America's obsession with celebrity If you seek fame, become an actor, musician or athlete rather than a politician, entrepreneur or scientist Chicagoland is Obamaland Seen from among the satellites, this map of the United States is populated by a remarkably diverse bunch of athletes, entertainers, entrepren

1h

Historical significance is extremely difficult to predict

Modern data suggests the philosophers are right. Biplab Das reports.

1h

Is Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle wrong? It depends on how you look at it.

New experimental results challenge recent criticisms of one of the fundamental ideas in quantum mechanics. Howard Wiseman of Australia’s Griffith University explains.

1h

Two ancient galaxies, merging

About 13 billion years ago there was a titanic collision.

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Gender inequality arose 8000 years ago

Neolithic graves in Spain reveal increasing, but not complete, male dominance. Dyani Lewis reports.

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A warming Midwest increases likelihood that farmers will need to irrigate

If current climate and crop-improvement trends continue into the future, Midwestern corn growers who today rely on rainfall to water their crops will need to irrigate their fields, a new study finds. This could draw down aquifers, disrupt streams and rivers, and set up conflicts between agricultural and other human and ecological needs for water, scientists say.

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French minister presses Renault to back Nissan reforms

French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire on Tuesday urged Renault to back governance reforms at Japan's Nissan, saying it would send a "positive sign" for the future of the alliance between the two car makers.

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Hungry polar bear found wandering in Russia industrial city

A hungry polar bear has been spotted on the outskirts of the Russian industrial city of Norilsk, hundreds of miles from its natural habitat, authorities said Tuesday.

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Hungry polar bear found wandering in Russia industrial city

A hungry polar bear has been spotted on the outskirts of the Russian industrial city of Norilsk, hundreds of miles from its natural habitat, authorities said Tuesday.

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France demands 'guarantees' on Facebook's cryptocurrency plan

France's finance minister said Tuesday that strong guarantees were needed over the use of cryptocurrencies after Facebook announced it was leaping into the market with its own digital money.

1h

Slashing plane emissions a lofty goal, but progress elusive

The aircraft industry is facing growing criticism over greenhouse gas emissions that are set to soar as more people take to the skies, but experts say game-changing technology for cleaner planes is still decades away.

1h

Artificial peptide bond formation provides clues to creation of life on Earth

The main constituents of cells, tissue, organs, and whole organisms are proteins, which are built by the addition of amino acids one after another to form long protein chains called polypeptides. Although living cells have advanced machinery that can achieve this chain extension with astonishing speed and accuracy, efforts to mimic this reaction in the lab in order to create natural peptide produc

1h

A new force for optical tweezers

When studying biological cells using optical tweezers, one main issue is the damage caused to the cell by the tool. Giovanni Volpe, University of Gothenburg, has discovered a new type of force that will greatly reduce the amount of light used by optical tweezers—and improve the study of all kinds of cells and particles.

1h

Speeding up the journey toward clean energy through photocatalyst optimization

Osaka University researchers have studied the photocatalytic activity of oxyhalide materials and were able to demonstrate a relationship between parameters measured by time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) and oxygen generation. Using the relationship, they optimized the processing temperature for the synthesis of the photocatalyst PbBiO2Cl, resulting in a three-fold improvement in the appar

1h

Changing how we predict coral bleaching

A remote sensing algorithm offers better predictions of Red Sea coral bleaching and can be fine tuned for use in other tropical marine ecosystems.

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Saudi, Philippines airlines place big Airbus orders at Paris show

Saudi Arabian Airlines, the kingdom's national airline, said Tuesday it had ordered 65 A320neo-type aircraft from Airbus, worth more than $7.4 billion at list prices, giving an early boost to the European manufacturer at the Paris Air Show.

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Surveillance cameras will soon be unrecognizable

It is often argued that the UK is the most surveilled country on the planet. This may or may not have been the case in the past but there are certainly now millions of surveillance cameras in public spaces—not to mention private buildings and homes. Behind those lenses they are changing in ways that people are often barely aware of, with privacy implications that should be widely discussed as a ma

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OSIRIS-REx spacecraft captures closest ever image of Bennu asteroid

NASA has captured its closest and most detailed image yet of Bennu, a 78 billion-kilogram asteroid which approaches close to Earth every six years

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Rotavirus vaccine comes with lower risk of type 1 diabetes

Babies who are fully vaccinated against rotavirus in the first months of life have a 33 percent lower risk of developing type 1 diabetes than their unvaccinated peers, a new study reports. Rotavirus, which hits infants and toddlers hardest, can cause diarrhea and vomiting that can lead to dehydration or loss of fluids. Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong disease with no known prevention strategies or c

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Heathrow publishes 'masterplan' for controversial third runway

London Heathrow, Europe's busiest airport, on Tuesday issued plans for its controversial third runway, including the rerouting of rivers and roads, as it sought also to allay environmental concerns.

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How cryptocurrencies can replace other pay options

Cryptocurrencies live in a volatile, roller-coaster world, which Facebook is seeking to change with its new Libra digital money.

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Kyle Kashuv Becomes a Symbol to Conservatives Who Say the Left Can’t Forgive

At 9 o’clock eastern time yesterday morning, Kyle Kashuv—a gun-rights activist and survivor of the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida—announced on Twitter that Harvard University had rescinded its offer of admission to him. One hour and 12 minutes later, Kashuv and his now-uncertain educational future had been officially declared victims of an overzealous p

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How Harvard Should Handle the Kyle Kashuv Mess

After the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, many survivors became outspoken advocates of gun control. In contrast, Kyle Kashuv became an outspoken advocate of gun rights, appearing on Fox News and speaking at events to young conservatives. He was set to attend Harvard after a gap year. But the university rescinded its offer, Kashuv announced yesterday, ci

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Politician Accidentally Rocks AR Kitty Ears During Livestream

Here Kitty Kitty A Pakistani politician got an unexpected makeover during his press conference last week. Shaukat Yousafzai, the Minister for Health and Information in Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, accidentally enabled one of Facebook’s AR filters while livestreaming the event, according to CNN — specifically, the one that superimposes cute little cat ears and whiskers over people’s fac

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Heat to smash records every year across vast swathes of Earth

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01891-3 If emissions continue to rise, more than half the planet will regularly see monthly temperature records broken.

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New AI system manages road infrastructure via Google Street View

A program to monitor street signs automatically via Google Street View will save time and money for municipal authorities.

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Rebirth of the Japanese black tea market: challenges for entrepreneurial green tea farmers

We investigated the history of Japanese black tea, its decline, the manufacturing technology and the components of tea. We found that the main reasons for the revival and spread of Japanese black tea were production and manufacturing innovation. Fermentation is an especially important process because it determines tea quality. Fermentation technology was established by entrepreneurial farmers and

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UQ researcher carving a new path for skier safety

A spectacular stack on a ski slope in Canada has led to a University of Queensland researcher determining a simple modification that could improve skier safety on the snow. UQ's Queensland Brain Institute researcher Dr Will Harrison studied visual perception under different lighting conditions to identify a better method for grooming ski runs.

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Tackling plastic pollution for communities and coral reefs in coastal Cambodia

Take a moment to imagine yourself on a sun-kissed beach on Koh Rong, watching the sea foam onto the white sand and hearing the gentle rustle of tropical rainforest behind you. The stunning beaches and vibrant marine biodiversity of Koh Rong and Cambodia's other islands may be precious, but not all is idyllic. With each rising tide, waves of bottles, bags and other waste wash up on the shoreline, a

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New Earth-like exoplanets discovered around red dwarf Teegarden star

An international team led by the University of Göttingen (Germany) with participation by researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) have discovered, using the CARMENES high-resolution spectrograph at the Calar Alto Observatory (Almería) two new planets like the Earth around one of the closest stars within our galactic neighbourhood.

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Study sheds light on gauge invariance in ultrastrong-coupling cavity quantum electrodynamics

In quantum electrodynamics, the choice of gauge (i.e. specific mathematical formalism used to regulate degrees of freedom) can greatly influence the form of light-matter interactions. Interestingly, however, the "gauge invariance" principle implies that all physical results should be independent from a researcher's choice of gauge. The quantum Rabi model, which is often used to describe light-matt

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Ireland to ban sales of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030

Ireland has announced it will ban the sale of new petrol and diesel vehicles by 2030 as part of its new climate change plan.

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The smartphone: a global product

Smartphones are a product with which China has demonstrated not only its manufacturing prowess, but its ambitions to become a cutting-edge technology developer thanks to the rise of Huawei.

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Speeding up the journey towards clean energy through photocatalyst optimization

Osaka University researchers studied the photocatalytic activity of oxyhalide materials and were able to demonstrate a relationship between parameters measured by time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) and oxygen generation. Using the relationship, they optimized the processing temperature for the synthesis of the photocatalyst PbBiO 2 Cl, resulting in a 3-fold improvement in the apparent qua

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Zipingpu Reservoir reveals climate-tectonics interplay around 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

A new study led by Prof. JIN Zhangdong from the Institute of Earth Environment (IEE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences provided a new insight on the interplay between climate and tectonics from a sediment record in the Zipingpu Reservoir around the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake.

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Study: Marijuana use increases, shifts away from illegal market

A new article published by researchers from University of Puget Sound and University of Washington reports that, based on analysis of public wastewater samples in at least one Western Washington population center, cannabis use both increased and substantially shifted from the illicit market since retail sales began in 2014.

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Researchers find genetic cause for fatal response to Hepatitis A

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that caused an 11-year-old girl to suffer a fatal reaction to infection with the Hepatitis A virus (HAV). The study, which will be published June 18, 2019 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that mutations in the IL18BP gene causes the body's immune system to attack and kill healthy liver cells, and suggests that targeting this pathway co

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Shields up to beat global warming

Might an enormous orbiting "shield" be one way to combat the rising temperatures around the world caused by elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels? Writing in the International Journal of Global Warming, a team in China has done the calculations and they suggest it might be possible to lower average global temperatures by a third of a degree Celsius with such a shield. This could have a signif

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'Hot spots' increase efficiency of solar desalination

Researchers showed they could boost the efficiency of their nanotechnology-enabled solar membrane desalination system by more than 50% simply by adding inexpensive plastic lenses to concentrate sunlight into 'hot spots.'

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Automation will not wipe out truck-driving jobs

While stories in the media present automation as having the potential to eliminate large swaths of jobs in the near future, a new study argues otherwise.

2h

New study suggests automation will not wipe out truck-driving jobs

While stories in the media present automation as having the potential to eliminate large swaths of jobs in the near future, a new study by researchers Maury Gittleman and Kristen Monaco argues otherwise.

2h

Evidence of hiring discrimination against nonwhite groups in nine countries examined

A new meta-analysis on hiring discrimination by Northwestern University sociologist Lincoln Quillian and his colleagues finds evidence of pervasive hiring discrimination against all nonwhite groups in all nine countries they examined. Yet some countries discriminate more than others—and certain laws and institutional practices might explain why. The study published in Sociological Science today.

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Research links fracking to higher radon levels in Ohio homes

A new study at The University of Toledo connects the proximity of fracking to higher household concentrations of radon gas, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S.

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Fracking linked to higher radon levels in Ohio homes

A new study connects the proximity of fracking to higher household concentrations of radon gas, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US.

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From the archive

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01908-x How Nature reported Alcock and Brown’s trans-Atlantic flight in 1919, and predictions of a huge expansion of air traffic in 1969.

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Prepare river ecosystems for an uncertain future

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01877-1 As the climate warms, we can’t restore waterways to pristine condition, but models can predict potential changes, argue Jonathan D. Tonkin, N. LeRoy Poff and colleagues.

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Closer look at supernova dust suggests there's more of it than previously assumed

A pair of researchers with the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry dust from a supernova have found evidence that suggests it is more abundant than thought. In their paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, Jan Leitner and Peter Hoppe describe their use of new technology to examine grains of supernova dust and what they found.

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Gold nanoparticle clusters for simultaneous photo-thermal imaging and therapy

NUS chemists have found that gold nanoparticle clusters can be used in photo-thermal therapy for imaging and treatment of human prostate cancer.

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A Plan to Stop Breaches With Dead Simple Database Encryption

Database giant MongoDB has a new encryption scheme that should help slow the scourge of breaches.

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Are E-Bikes and Scooters Doomed?

Opinion: China's e-biking masses offer a model for our struggling scoot-scape

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One More Brutal Fact About the Ice Age Arctic: It Also Had Hyenas

Imagine you’re a baby mammoth. It’s 1.4 million years before the present day, in the middle of January, and you haven’t seen the sun in weeks. All around you, the Yukon tundra stretches into miles and miles of nothingness. Suddenly, a shape hurtles out of the darkness. And as you turn to meet your killer, you come face to face with … a hyena? Since the first hyena fossil was identified in the A

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Another brown dwarf in the system? Study investigates properties of HD 206893

Aiming to constrain the orbit and dynamical mass of the brown dwarf in the HD 206893 system, an international team of astronomers has investigated the host star and its companion using a combination of observing techniques. Results of this observational campaign suggest the presence of another massive object in the system, most likely a brown dwarf. The findings are detailed in a paper published J

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Fracking linked to higher radon levels in Ohio homes

A new study connects the proximity of fracking to higher household concentrations of radon gas, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US.

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Patents and Prophecy

Like many industrial scientists, I’ve been dealing with the patent literature for so long that I’m used to its (many) idiosyncrasies. There are large sections of any patent that I just page through as rapidly as possible because they are utterly not worth reading. The parts where the various dosage forms and potential dosing combinations are recited, for example, is the densest boilerplate – you

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Emerging device by the fusion of IGZO and ferroelectric-HfO2

Ferroelectric FET (FeFET) is a promising memory device because of its low-power, high-speed and high-capacity. Toward 3D integration for higher capacity, a team of researchers developed a ferroelectric-HfO2 based FeFET with 8nm-thick IGZO channel instead of poly-silicon channel. They achieved nearly ideal subthreshold swing of 60mV/dec and higher mobility than poly-silicon channel thanks to the ma

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'Hot spots' increase efficiency of solar desalination

Rice University researchers showed they could boost the efficiency of their nanotechnology-enabled solar membrane desalination system by more than 50% simply by adding inexpensive plastic lenses to concentrate sunlight into 'hot spots.'

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Drug boosts growth in youngsters with most common form of dwarfism, new study finds

A drug that helps regulate bone development has boosted growth rates in children with achondroplasia — the most common type of dwarfism — in a trial by Melbourne's Murdoch Children's Research Institute. Phase 2 trial results in children aged 5 to 14 years are published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The project is now in Phase 3 to test the drug, vosoritide, in a larger group of p

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Evidence of hiring discrimination against nonwhite groups in 9 countries examined

A new meta-analysis on hiring discrimination by Northwestern University sociologist Lincoln Quillian and his colleagues finds evidence of pervasive hiring discrimination against all nonwhite groups in all nine countries they examined. Yet some countries discriminate more than others — and certain laws and institutional practices might explain why.

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New study suggests automation will not wipe out truck-driving jobs

While stories in the media present automation as having the potential to eliminate large swaths of jobs in the near future, a new study by researchers Maury Gittleman and Kristen Monaco argues otherwise.

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One Small Step Back in Time

Half a century after Apollo 11, we remember how we achieved the impossible and why we need to do it again — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mapping the Mission

Modern satellite imagery and 3-D modeling give us a new view of how Apollo 11 played out — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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‘Borrowed’ virus genes put wings on some pea aphids

Scientists have pinpointed genes that influence whether pea aphids produce offspring with or without wings in response to their environment. For many organisms, cues from the environment influence traits. These features, known as phenotypically plastic traits, are important in allowing an organism to cope with unpredictable environments, researchers say. In a paper in Current Biology , scientists

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Genetikken skal give æbler med velsmag

Efter at have udviklet et stamtræ for æbler er dansk forsker gået på jagt efter de molekylære markører, der kan give en genvej til nye æblesorter, der kombinerer det bedste fra gamle danske æblesorter og nyere mere sygdomsresistente sorter.

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Egypt’s Only Democratic Leader Helped Kill Its Democracy

In June 2012, I stood with hundreds of thousands of Mohamed Morsi’s supporters in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, where they prayed that the Egyptian military, still powerful behind the scenes, would allow a fair ballot count. Independent tallies suggested that the Muslim Brotherhood’s Morsi had squeaked past the military’s preferred candidate in Egypt’s first-ever free presidential election—the only ques

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Nvidia Supercharges ARM HPC Deployments

Nvidia has announced it will bring full software stack support to ARM CPUs, including its entire HPC product stack. This move will put ARM on an equal playing field with x86 and Power. The post Nvidia Supercharges ARM HPC Deployments appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Very Large Telescope Gears Up to Hunt Exoplanets in Alpha Centauri

Astronomers around the world were thrilled in 2016 when the ESO announced the discovery of an exoplanet around Proxima Centauri, the closest star to Earth. Now the VLT has gotten an upgrade that will help it scan other nearby stars. The post Very Large Telescope Gears Up to Hunt Exoplanets in Alpha Centauri appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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A prebiotic route to DNA

DNA may have appeared on Earth earlier than has hitherto been assumed. LMU chemists led by Oliver Trapp show that a simple reaction pathway could have given rise to DNA subunits on the early Earth.

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Adulting Tips: 5 Psychological Secrets

Whether your graduation is coming up or twenty years behind you, we all have moments when we wonder whether we’re cut out for this adulthood thing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to answer the argument that Australia's emissions are too small to make a difference

After a recent foray into the debate over Australia's so-called "climate election", I received plenty of critical replies to my argument that Australians should take climate action more seriously. The most common rebuttal was that Australians were right to focus on other issues at the ballot box because Australia's contribution to global climate change is small anyway.

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Adulting Tips: 5 Psychological Secrets

Whether your graduation is coming up or twenty years behind you, we all have moments when we wonder whether we’re cut out for this adulthood thing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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3-D cranial reconstruction elucidates the evolution of new world monkeys

Researchers have used computed tomography (CT) scanning to examine and reconstruct cranial fossils belonging to two extinct species of monkey, Caipora bambuiorum and Cartelles coimbrafilhoi. The fossils were found almost 30 years ago in a cave complex in Bahia, Brazil, located in the Caatinga, a semiarid biome that occupies part of Brazil's Northeast Region.

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A prebiotic route to DNA

DNA may have appeared on Earth earlier than has hitherto been assumed. LMU chemists led by Oliver Trapp show that a simple reaction pathway could have given rise to DNA subunits on the early Earth.

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How many humans tomorrow? The United Nations revises its projections

In 2019, the planet has 7.7 billion inhabitants, which is likely to rise to 8.5 billion in 2030 and nearly 10 billion in 2050. These figures are taken from the world population projections just released by the United Nations.

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ALMA finds earliest example of merging galaxies

Researchers using ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) observed signals of oxygen, carbon, and dust from a galaxy in the early Universe 13 billion years ago. This is the earliest galaxy where this useful combination of three signals has been detected. By comparing the different signals, the team determined that the galaxy is actually two galaxies merging together, making it the earl

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Michio Kaku: Genetic and digital immortality are within reach

Through the Connectome Project we may soon be able to map the pathways of the entire human brain, including memories, and create computer programs that evoke the person the digitization is stemmed from. We age because errors build up in our cells — mitochondria to be exact. With CRISPR technology we may soon be able to edit out errors that build up as we age, and extend the human lifespan. None T

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UToledo research links fracking to higher radon levels in Ohio homes

A new study at The University of Toledo connects the proximity of fracking to higher household concentrations of radon gas, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US.

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3-D cranial reconstruction elucidates the evolution of new world monkeys

Researchers have used computed tomography (CT) scanning to examine and reconstruct cranial fossils belonging to two extinct species of monkey, Caipora bambuiorum and Cartelles coimbrafilhoi. The fossils were found almost 30 years ago in a cave complex in Bahia, Brazil, located in the Caatinga, a semiarid biome that occupies part of Brazil's Northeast Region.

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Palm’s head-scratching tiny phone may find a niche with kids – CNET

It’s not just for Verizon Wireless anymore; the company now will sell an unlocked version on its site.

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Kan du stå for nuttede hundeøjne? De er udviklet til at charmere dig

Evolutionen har givet hunden muskler i øjenbrynene, der gør den bedre til at tigge og kommunikere med mennesker.

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Robot pizza delivery coming later this year from Domino's

Domino's partnered with the Silicon Valley startup Nuro to have robot cars deliver pizza. The trial run will begin in Houston later this year. The robots will be half a regular car and will need to be unlocked by a PIN code. None Would you have to tip robots? You might be answering that question sooner than you think as Domino's is about to start using robots for delivering pizza. Later this year

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New mapping application visualizes costs of developing renewable energy resources

A new report, "Exploring Renewable Energy Opportunities in Select Southeast Asian Countries: A Geospatial Analysis of the LCOE of Utility-Scale Wind and Solar PV," finds that there is abundant potential for utility-scale, land-based wind and solar PV development across Southeast Asia.

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Collaborative research charts course to hundreds of new nitrides

Andriy Zakutayev knows the odds of a scientist stumbling across a new nitride mineral are about the same as a ship happening upon a previously undiscovered landmass.

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How energy choices after Fukushima impacted human health and the environment

After the March 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, Japan, nuclear power output experienced a rapid and large decline in that country as well as Germany. Although the specific reasons for this decline differed between the two countries, it is clear that antinuclear public attitudes were a major factor. Soon after the accident, Germany announced plans to completely phase out its remaini

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Global analysis of streamflow response to forest management

Planting large numbers of trees may contribute to improving an ecosystem and mitigating atmospheric CO2 levels. But planting trees in arid areas can sometimes worsen the environmental circumstances, especially the water availability for people living downstream. Environmental researchers from Utrecht University studied over 400,000 watersheds worldwide. Their results have been published in Nature.

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Ways to juggle fieldwork with kids in tow

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01909-w Researcher-parents must balance their children’s needs with work priorities while in the field.

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The master genes that sculpt tentacles and legs alike

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01829-9 Diverse groups of animals rely on the same genes to ensure that limbs form as they should.

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Trump’s Sinister Assault on Truth

Like many writers I know, I’ve had a passion for words for almost as long as I can remember. I’ve admired those who use words well, who have shaped my imagination and given voice to things I wanted to express but didn’t feel like I adequately could. That is why they have to be protected against assault and degradation. At an early age I recognized their power to convey deep emotions and longings,

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Is Authenticity a Thing?

Authenticity is a tricky concept when it comes to people, and is increasingly being challenged both in psychology and even with regard to physical objects (with regard to objects, the value rather than reality of authenticity is questioned). Writing for Scientific American, psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman deconstructs the psychological concept of authenticity nicely. But let’s start with a stand

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What Adam Savage Needs to Know to Fly an Iron Man Suit

In the first episode of Savage Builds, Adam Savage tries to build and control an Iron Man flying suit. But he didn't quite figure out the controls.

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Review: Gocycle's GX Is a Fast, Foldable, and Spendy Ride

Gocycle’s folding electric bike is fun and stable, but its high price tag puts it out of reach for most people.

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Roli Lumi Keyboard: Price, Specs, Release Date

The keys on the Roli Lumi light up different colors, and a companion mobile app uses those colors to teach you how to play a song.

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Inflatable heat shield could deliver heavy payloads to worlds with a thick atmosphere

One of the greater challenges of sending payloads to Mars is contending with the planet's atmosphere. While incredibly thin compared to Earth's (with roughly half of 1 percent of Earth's air pressure), the resulting air friction is still an issue for spacecraft looking to land there. And looking to the future, NASA hopes to land heavier payloads on Mars, as well as other planets—some of which may

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Image: Desert greenery

Today marks the 25th anniversary of World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought (WDCD). Under its theme 'Let's grow the future together,' the initiative celebrates the 25 years of progress made in sustainable land management.

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How advertising can repurpose itself to serve cities in more sustainable ways

Noisy, ugly and dirty. Advertising has polluted cities, annoyed consumers, and jeopardised its own existence. Beyond a mass-media cacophony, brand communications' significant carbon footprint and runaway consumption are certainly contributing to what economists call market failure.

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Danske forskere afslører hvordan giftige mandler blev spiselige

Efter mere end 12 års arbejde, kan forskere på Københavns Universitet nu afsløre,…

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Image of the Day: Handheld Science

Researchers create a 3-D printed, portable centrifuge that can be affordably produced for science classrooms.

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Scientists synthesize anticancer drug in 'landmark discovery'

In a 'landmark in drug discovery,' researchers achieved, for the first time, the total synthesis of a potent anticancer compound called halichondrin.

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Why Some Amazonian Societies Survived and Others Perished amid Pre-Columbian Droughts

Confronting climate change, cultures with intensive, specialized land use were vulnerable. Those that endured cultivated multiple crops and helped edible rainforest species prosper — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Can California better use winter storms to refill its aquifers?

The general long-term forecast for California as climate change intensifies: more frequent droughts, intermittently interrupted by years when big storms bring rain more quickly than the water infrastructure can handle.

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Why Some Amazonian Societies Survived and Others Perished amid Pre-Columbian Droughts

Confronting climate change, cultures with intensive, specialized land use were vulnerable. Those that endured cultivated multiple crops and helped edible rainforest species prosper — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Africa’s science academy leads push for ethical data use

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01894-0 The goal is to create the continent’s first cross-disciplinary guidelines for collecting, storing and sharing data and specimens.

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Researcher explores the gendered social construction of exceptionalism in early adolescence

"Are boys better at school than girls?" Michela Musto, a postdoctoral fellow at the Clayman Institute, asked middle school students, after observing their classrooms. Musto recently presented their answers to an audience of Clayman Institute faculty fellows. Her talk, titled "Brilliant or Bad: School Regulation of Boys' Rule-Breaking and the Gendered Social Construction of Exceptionalism in Early

3h

'Boaty McBoatface' maps deep ocean water

The intrepid submarine has made its first significant discovery, say UK scientists.

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Biological evolution inspires machine learning

Evolution allows life to explore almost limitless diversity and complexity. Scientists hope to recreate such open-endedness in the laboratory or in computer simulations, but even sophisticated computational techniques like machine learning and artificial intelligence can't provide the open-ended tinkering associated with evolution. Here, common barriers to open-endedness in computation and biology

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Coral bleaching causes a permanent change in fish life

Repeat coral bleaching caused by rising sea temperatures has resulted in lasting changes to fish communities, according to a new long-term study.

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Study reveals new genomic roots of ecological adaptation in polar bear evolution

Scientists have shed new light on the genomic foundation of the polar bear's ecological adaption by pinpointing rapid changes in the bear's gene copy numbers in response to a diet shifting from vegetation to meat.

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Ring resonators corner light

Researchers at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) have created the first silicon chip that can reliably constrain light to its four corners. The effect, which arises from interfering optical pathways, isn't altered by small defects during fabrication and could eventually enable the creation of robust sources of quantum light.

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Maps of fallen kingdom shed light on Atlantic slave trade

Those who boarded slave ships from the Bight of Benin, or the Slave Coast of Africa, lost more than their homes—they lost their identities. New maps of a former kingdom made by a University of Colorado Boulder professor, though, may help shed some light on the centuries-old question of where they came from.

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Japan is fighting global warming with carbon-absorbing kelp forests

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AI for AI: IBM debuts AutoAI in Watson Studio

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The increase in wildfires is linked via climate change to social inequity

When the crown jewel of industrial civilization—the automobile—was introduced in London, it was met with resistance. Wouldn't burning fossil fuels pollute the air? "Yes, it would," admitted its proponents, "but think of how much cleaner the streets would be for lack of horse manure." As one technology has supplanted another, so has one pollution changed forms. Horse manure, for all its faults, is

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Black plastic can't be recycled – but we've just found a way to use the carbon in renewable energy

The big problem with plastics is that though they last for a very long time, most are thrown away after only one use. Since plastics were invented in the 1950s, about 8,300m metric tonnes (Mt) have been made, but over half (4,900 Mt) is already in landfill or has been lost to the environment. In 2010 alone, an estimated 4.8 to 12.7 Mt went into the oceans.

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Meet the naked mole-rat: impervious to pain and cancer, and lives ten times longer than it should

The naked mole-rat is perhaps one of the most bizarre beasts on the planet. At first glance, it looks like little more than a cocktail sausage with legs and teeth. But beneath its wrinkly pink skin, this creature's strange and beautiful biology has me fascinated—so much so that I set up a whole research group devoted to studying them. Largely immune to cancer, impervious to some forms of pain, and

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Meet the naked mole-rat: impervious to pain and cancer, and lives ten times longer than it should

The naked mole-rat is perhaps one of the most bizarre beasts on the planet. At first glance, it looks like little more than a cocktail sausage with legs and teeth. But beneath its wrinkly pink skin, this creature's strange and beautiful biology has me fascinated—so much so that I set up a whole research group devoted to studying them. Largely immune to cancer, impervious to some forms of pain, and

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Kursen ligger fast: Vi bliver 9,7 milliarder i 2050

Indien vil overhale Kina som verdens mest befolkede land i 2027, mens Kinas befolkning vil falde med 31,4 millioner mennesker inden 2050.

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Radically different telescope design offers deeper look into space

A radically different type of X-ray space telescope has been designed by scientists in Sweden, using advanced optic techniques that were originally developed in medical imaging research.

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Decoding Lake Matoaka's sedimental history of the anthropocene

The region around the Mississippi River town of Galena, Illinois, ran on lead for the better part of a century.

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Transparent ceramic armor provides superior ballistic protection over traditional glass laminates

Transparent aluminum, a technology first suggested in the science fiction film Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, is now a reality.

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Skogsvandringar kan minska björnrädsla

En ny metod att minska björnrädsla har tagits fram i samarbete mellan Lunds universitet, Mittuniversitetet, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet och Norskt institut för naturforskning. Projektledare är Maria Johansson, professor i miljöpsykologi vid LTH, Lunds universitet. Den handlar om att under kontrollerade former exponera människor med oro för att möta björn i djurets egen miljö tillsammans med en

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Prisoners in China are still being used as organ donors, says inquiry

Transplant organs are still being sourced from executed prisoners in China, according to an inquiry set up by a campaign group to investigate the issue

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Facebook plans to launch a new cryptocurrency called Libra

Facebook is launching a cryptocurrency called Libra. It says people will be able to use the currency to pay for goods from within WhatsApp

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Prehistoric Hyena’s Teeth Show Bone-Crushing Carnivore Roamed the Arctic

The only hyena to live in North America, Chasmaporthetes , had the stature of a wolf and the powerful jaws of its modern relatives

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Mystery of how gas bubbles form in liquid solved

Findings show how to make confined bubbles develop uniformly, instead of in their usual scattershot way.

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Where Are Your Boundaries?

Psychological research unveils a central element of individual and group differences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study explores how gossip spreads in social networks

How many different types of people—colleagues, friends, taxi drivers, etc.—should we hear a piece of information from before we start sharing it as a true fact?

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Supercomputers aid in novel simulations of gamma ray generation research

While intense magnetic fields are naturally generated by neutron stars, researchers have been striving to achieve similar results for many years. UC San Diego mechanical and aerospace engineering graduate student Tao Wang recently demonstrated how an extremely strong magnetic field, similar to that on the surface of a neutron star, can be not only generated but also detected using an X-ray laser i

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Turning the switch on biofuels

Plant cell walls contain a renewable, nearly limitless supply of sugar that can be used in the production of chemicals and biofuels. However, retrieving these sugars isn't all that easy.

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Where Are Your Boundaries?

Psychological research unveils a central element of individual and group differences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Turning the switch on biofuels

Plant cell walls contain a renewable, nearly limitless supply of sugar that can be used in the production of chemicals and biofuels. However, retrieving these sugars isn't all that easy.

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Here comes the sun: a new framework for artificial photosynthesis

Scientists have long sought to mimic the process by which plants make their own fuel using sunlight, carbon dioxide, and water through artificial photosynthesis devices, but how exactly substances called catalysts work to generate renewable fuel remains a mystery.

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Human rights treaties benefit the world's most oppressed

International human rights treaties really do work, and they work most effectively against the most repressive governments, argues Emily Hencken Ritter, associate professor of political science, in a new book called Contentious Compliance: Dissent and Repression under International Human Rights Law.

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How to detect life on Mars

When MIT research scientist Christopher Carr visited a green sand beach in Hawaii at the age of 9, he probably didn't think that he'd use the little olivine crystals beneath his feet to one day search for extraterrestrial life. Carr, now the science principal investigator for the Search for Extraterrestrial Genomes (SETG) instrument being developed jointly by the Department of Earth, Atmospheric a

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Ex-chief scientist fears for UK climate plan if Boris Johnson is PM

Prof David King says would-be PM oversaw ‘devastating’ cuts in efforts to tackle crisis Prof David King, the former chief scientist, has expressed alarm at the prospect of Boris Johnson becoming prime minister because the Tory MP oversaw “devastating” cuts in efforts to tackle the climate crisis when he was foreign secretary and then wanted to hush them up. Related: UK climate plan unclear, says

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A Close Look at Newborn Planets Reveals Hints of Infant Moons – Facts So Romantic

Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine’s Abstractions blog. Astronomers have discovered a complex planetary system still swirling into existence. Photograph by ESO / A. Müller et al Astronomers have spent decades, if not centuries, hoping to see embryonic planets. As of a year ago, the closest they had come was the discovery of gaps, thought to be caused by budding planets , in the spinni

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The secret social lives of viruses

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01880-6 Scientists are listening in on the ways viruses communicate and cooperate. Decoding what the microbes are saying could be a boon to human health.

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US to Russia on Nuke Experiments: Do as We Say, Not as We Do

The US is quietly ramping up its plutonium experiments even as Washington raises concerns about Russian testing.

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NASA Wants to Build a 'Starshade' to Hunt Alien Planets

Such a mission would have to keep two spacecraft, separated by thousands of miles, aligned within 3 feet of each other.

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Where Are Your Boundaries?

Psychological research unveils a central element of individual and group differences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Långt liv och minskad demensrisk vid viss genvariant

– Dessa resultat ger ytterligare ledtrådar kring vilka biologiska mekanismer som skyddar mot nervnedbrytande sjukdomar och ger ökad chans till ett långt liv, säger Anna Zettergren, docent i experimentell psykiatri vid Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, och en av författarna bakom publiceringen. Det är sedan tidigare känt att personer med en ovanlig variant i genen PLCG2 har halverad ris

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Bone-Crushing Hyenas Lived in Canada's Arctic During the Last Ice Age

During the last ice age, bone-crushing hyenas stalked the snowy Canadian Arctic, likely satisfying their meat cravings by hunting herds of caribou and horses, while also scavenging mammoth carcasses on the tundra, a new study finds.

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Why Global Population Growth Will Grind to a Halt by 2100

Global population growth will nearly grind to a stop by the end of the century.

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Hyenas roamed the Arctic during the last ice age

Two teeth confirm the idea that hyenas crossed the Bering land bridge into North America, a study finds.

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Ruins of a Lost Colonial Tavern (And Maybe Brothel) Were Just Uncovered in North Carolina

This colonial tavern (and maybe brothel) burned down years before the rest of Brunswick Town was razed by British soldiers in 1766.

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New Sensor Could Detect Electrical Failures in Ships or Buildings

A monitoring device could measure overall power consumption and identify critical malfunctions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fossil Find Is First Evidence Of Arctic Hyenas

An artist’s rendering of ancient Arctic hyenas belonging to the genus Chasmaporthetes, now known to have roamed Canada's Yukon Territory. (Credit: Julius T. Csotonyi) You might associate hyenas with Africa's sprawling savannas, but the animals were once right at home above the Arctic Circle. Modern hyenas generally stick to Africa. (A decreasing number of one species, the striped hyena, can be fou

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Så får även de yngsta barnen inflytande i förskolan

– Det är viktigt att pedagogerna tar utgångspunkt i det barnen gör och tonar in deras kroppsliga och sinnliga uttryck, säger Kristin Ungerberg, doktor i pedagogiskt arbete som undersökt hur pedagoger i förskolan kan arbeta med de yngsta barnens inflytande. Alla barn ska, enligt förskolans läroplan, ha inflytande över verksamheten som de deltar i. Även FN:s konvention om barnets rättigheter, som n

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Förslag på utfasning av ”onödiga” högfluorerade ämnen

Mängden potentiellt skadliga kemikalier i vår miljö skulle kunna reduceras kraftigt om industrin använde dem enbart när det verkligen var nödvändigt. Det är slutsatsen i en artikel i den vetenskapliga tidskiften Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts som forskare vid Stockholms universitet publicerar 17 juni 2019. För att underlätta för både konsumenter och producenter att minska användningen

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Plaggen som talar genom vibrationer

– Historiskt sett har textilen alltid varit nära människan, säger Nils-Krister Persson, docent inom Smart Textiles vid Högskolan i Borås. Prototyper i projektet. Plaggen har utvecklats i olika generationer. Det började med en röd klänning, som blev en svart klänning, en grön väst och nu är de framme vid fjärde generationen: En svart väst med schackrutig rygg där varje ruta kan avge vibrationer. –

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Små fiskar växer snabbare i uppvärmt vatten

De pågående klimatförändringarna gör att våra hav blir allt varmare. Det påverkar fiskens tillväxt. Studien från Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet visar att uppvärmningen gör att liten – men inte stor – fisk växer allt snabbare över tid. Biotestsjön är ett inhägnat havsområde som varit uppvärmt av kylvatten från Forsmarks kärnkraftverk sedan 1980. I biotestsjön är vattnet alltid mellan några och upp

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Så olika bedöms psykisk ohälsa

I en ny avhandling i sociologi undersöker Maricel Knechtel vid Uppsala universitet hur läkare inom primärvården och handläggare vid Försäkringskassan bedömer personer med psykisk ohälsa. – Media har uppmärksammat hur personer med psykiatrisk problematik har hamnat mellan stolarna och det verkar ibland som att det finns en diskrepans mellan patienters behov och de beslut som fattas av Försäkringsk

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Fossil teeth reveal ancient hyenas in the Arctic

Modern hyenas are known as hunters and scavengers in Asian and African ecosystems such as the savanna. But in ancient times, these powerful carnivores also roamed a very different landscape, inhabiting the frigid Arctic during the last ice age. A new study reports on the first hyena fossils discovered in the Arctic — two teeth.

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iOS 13 Will Remind You to Cancel Those Bloodsucking Subscriptions

Competition is great for the consumer, but it also means you end up having to keep tabs on umpteen different subscriptions for services like streaming music, movies, and even games. In an effort …

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Cutting Military Emissions Is a Matter of National Security

Security analysts have warned that the consequences of climate change may make regions of the world politically unstable, posing a national security threat to the United States. Yet the U.S. military remains the world’s single largest consumer of oil, and as a result, one of the world’s top carbon emitters.

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Silicon and your phone could lead to home diagnostics

Combining an iPhone with nanoscale porous silicon can offer cheap, simple home diagnostics, say researchers. The simplest home medical tests might look like a deck of various silicon chips coated in special film, one that could detect drugs in the blood, another for proteins in the urine indicating infection, another for bacteria in water and the like. Add the bodily fluid you want to test, take

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Dødsulykke i Sig: Usikret jernbaneoverkørsel skulle have været nedlagt

PLUS. En ældre kvinde og en taxichauffør blev dræbt af et Arriva-tog sidste år. Lokomotivfører havde indberettet overkørslen, som altid stod åben, og som ville være blevet nedlagt, hvis ikke signalprogrammet var forsinket.

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Unintended consequences of gender-equality plans

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01904-1 Don’t let academia’s initiatives to advance women become just another way to game the research system, urges Charikleia Tzanakou.

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Inside Backpage.com’s Vicious Battle With the Feds

For years, it was the largest portal for sex on the internet. Now its fate could shape the future of Silicon Valley.

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Julián Castro Wants to Hold Police Accountable

Julián Castro, the former secretary of Housing and Urban Development under President Barack Obama and former mayor of San Antonio, has put forth perhaps the most ambitious immigration and police-reform plans in the Democratic primary. A second-generation immigrant who is widely credited with fostering an economic revival in San Antonio, Castro hopes that his progressive policy record and compelli

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China Is Cutting Tariffs—For Everyone Else

Lobster is Maine’s top export. Like many Americans with something to sell, Maine’s trappers benefited from positive turns in China’s economic development. The movement of tens of millions of people out of poverty and into the middle class increased demand for a source of protein—and a Chinese New Year delicacy—that Maine could happily provide. Yet in the wake of President Donald Trump’s trade war

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Birth Is Not the Finish Line

Somewhere inside my fertility clinic’s laboratory, in a tank of liquid nitrogen, there are several vials with my name on them. The vials contain five embryos, frozen at the blastocyst stage since early 2013, when they were created from a single round of in vitro fertilization, or IVF, using my eggs and my husband’s sperm. I have never seen the vials, but my husband and I pay a storage fee—current

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What If the Chaos Is Strategic?

Of the many challenges facing anyone trying to understand Donald Trump’s presidency is the fact that it is maddeningly nonlinear, lurching several times each day between policy objectives that may be dictated by a Fox News anchor, a friend from Mar-a-Lago, or the prime minister of Norway. This was especially true in the first six months of his administration, when the chief political strategist S

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Hyenas roamed the Arctic during the last ice age

Two teeth confirm the idea that hyenas crossed the Bering land bridge into North America, a study finds.

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Fossil teeth reveal ancient hyenas in the Arctic

Modern hyenas are known as hunters and scavengers in Asian and African ecosystems such as the savanna.

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Ireland to ban new petrol and diesel vehicles from 2030

submitted by /u/filosoful [link] [comments]

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AI = Artificial Imagination?

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Temperaturstigninger kan få træer til at vokse stærkt og dø unge

Globale klimaforandringer kan ifølge britisk studie betyde, at verdens træer får nedsat evne til at optage CO2. Dansk forsker er derimod overbevist om, at hurtigtvoksende træer kan være til gevinst for det globale klima.

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Water dynamics in MCF-7 breast cancer cells: a neutron scattering descriptive study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45056-8 Water dynamics in MCF-7 breast cancer cells: a neutron scattering descriptive study

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Iron (II/III) perchlorate electrolytes for electrochemically harvesting low-grade thermal energy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45127-w Iron (II/III) perchlorate electrolytes for electrochemically harvesting low-grade thermal energy

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Exploring subcellular responses of prostate cancer cells to X-ray exposure by Raman mapping

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45179-y Exploring subcellular responses of prostate cancer cells to X-ray exposure by Raman mapping

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A Differential Approach to Form and Site of Peptic Ulcer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44893-x A Differential Approach to Form and Site of Peptic Ulcer

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Drivers of diet selection of critically endangered Western Derby eland during the food shortage period within conservation breeding in Senegal

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45035-z Drivers of diet selection of critically endangered Western Derby eland during the food shortage period within conservation breeding in Senegal

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Diet assessment of two land planarian species using high-throughput sequencing data

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44952-3 Diet assessment of two land planarian species using high-throughput sequencing data

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Redox balance, metabolic fingerprint and physiological characterization in contrasting North East Indian rice for Aluminum stress tolerance

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45158-3 Redox balance, metabolic fingerprint and physiological characterization in contrasting North East Indian rice for Aluminum stress tolerance

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With 'Libra,' Facebook takes on the world of cryptocurrency

Facebook is leaping into the world of cryptocurrency with its own digital money, designed to let people save, send or spend money as easily as firing off text messages.

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Apple TV Will Finally Gain Picture-In-Picture Support

A lot of modern TVs these days allow users to do picture-in-picture. For those who are unfamiliar, PIP mode is where you can have two screens in a single display itself, where one portion can …

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Nintendo is launching 'Dr. Mario World,' a new mobile game

Nintendo's new mobile game "Dr. Mario World" is coming July 10, the company's latest foray into the world of iOS and Android mobile games.

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Scientists Explain Puppy Dog Eyes

You know that feeling you get when a dog looks into your face and either looks really sad or kind of confused? Scientists say they've figured out why they do that, and why it makes us melt.

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University racism report: Cape Town replies

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01872-6 University racism report: Cape Town replies

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Plantations take economic pressure off natural forests

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01878-0 Plantations take economic pressure off natural forests

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Psychiatry crisis is a chance to change tack

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01911-2 Psychiatry crisis is a chance to change tack

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University racism report: efforts bear fruit in Cape Town

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01912-1 University racism report: efforts bear fruit in Cape Town

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Jellyfish researchers want you to start thinking about these creatures for your next meal

A few summers ago, Stefano Piraino was walking along the rocky shoreline on a small island off the coast of Sicily when he spotted a washed up jellyfish. Naturally, he tore a piece off and popped it into his mouth.

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Evolutionen belønnede par med færre børn

Analyse af stamtræer viser, at par med lavere frugtbarhed havde flere overlevende efterkommere på…

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The Moderate Men Waiting for Biden to Fall

Joe Biden’s Democratic rivals are hoping he tumbles. Many are confident that he will. No one needs Biden to fade more than the other white, male, moderate candidates who believe they’d be able to step in and take his place. To anyone who complains how hard it’s become for a white man with middle-of-the-road politics to find space within the Democratic Party, many would recommend the tiniest violi

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Jellyfish researchers want you to start thinking about these creatures for your next meal

A few summers ago, Stefano Piraino was walking along the rocky shoreline on a small island off the coast of Sicily when he spotted a washed up jellyfish. Naturally, he tore a piece off and popped it into his mouth.

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Indian family branches out with novel tree house

When the Kesharwanis decided to branch out and expand their family home, they came up with a novel way of dealing with an ancient giant fig tree in their garden—they built the house around it.

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The Ambitious Plan Behind Facebook’s Cryptocurrency, Libra

Facebook designs a cryptocurrency that it won't fully control, but that will uniquely benefit Facebook.

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Academics join outcry sparked by Hong Kong’s contentious extradition bill

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01889-xThe bill has been suspended but protestors want it withdrawn; researchers say the plan to extradite people …

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Ambu shares tumble after it calls quits on colonoscope product

Danish medical equipment group slashes sales forecast as it ends range

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Nye 5G-netværk vil konkurrere med bredbånd over telefonstikket

De nye 5G-netværk vil give bredbånd over kobbernettet stærk konkurrence. Sådan lyder det fra Huaweis tekniske direktør i Norden, danske Mads Arnbjørn Rasmussen, et interview om nye 5G-teknologier.

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Earthquake swarms reveal missing piece of tectonic plate-volcano puzzle

Deep under the ocean bed, a sinking tectonic plate causes a "swarm" of earthquakes, feeding molten rock into newly forming volcanoes, new research has discovered.

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How adapting to research setbacks can pave the way to greater outcomes

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01916-x Skeletal biologist Justyna Miszkiewicz says that the disappointments she encountered during her PhD were as valuable as her successes.

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Look up! The Strawberry Moon will shine bright tonight

Be sure to look up from your phones for a few minutes tonight to see the Strawberry Moon, which will be visible from sundown to sunrise.

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Academics join outcry sparked by Hong Kong’s contentious extradition bill

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01889-x The bill has been suspended but protestors want it withdrawn; researchers say the plan to extradite people to mainland China could stifle academic debate.

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Rising methane may thwart efforts to avoid catastrophic climate change

If the world were on track to meet the Paris Agreement goal of less than 2 degrees Celsius of global warming, methane levels in the atmosphere would theoretically be dropping. Instead, they have been rising since 2007, and shooting up even faster since 2014. A perspective published in the journal Science discusses the potential causes and consequences of our planet's out-of-control methane.

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Tired of #$%& passwords? Single Sign-on could be savior

The experience we know as password hell could be radically changed for the better within the next year and a half to three years.

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Engineer's 'Smart Speaker Firewall' isolates Alexa devices in a snap

Chuck Carey is an experienced engineer and self-described technophile, but he's also wary of the proliferation of data-hoovering, Internet-connected devices such as the microphone-and-speaker combos used with digital assistants such as Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant.

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Mattel revs up Hot Wheels to new digital generation

Hot Wheels is ready to zoom into the new century.

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They Cheered Russian Rule. Now Some Have Buyer’s Remorse.

Support for this article was provided by a grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. SIMFEROPOL, Crimea—One morning in February 2014, the 2 million inhabitants of Crimea, the Black Sea peninsula that was Ukraine’s premier seaside destination, woke to find a new set of flags flying in their streets. Overnight, Russian special forces had taken over checkpoints on the sliver of land that c

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Iceland’s data centers are booming—here’s why that’s a problem

Bitcoin miners and data scientists love cheap, green Icelandic processing power. Maybe a little too much.

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First Australians Arrived in an Incredible Planned Migration With Over 1,300 People

They were more technologically advanced than we assumed.

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Can A One-Minute Cure Really Heal Virtually All Diseases?

The author of this book claims to have found a one-minute cure that will heal virtually all diseases. The claim is ludicrous, and is not supported by any evidence.

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Coral bleaching causes a permanent change in fish life

Repeat coral bleaching caused by rising sea temperatures has resulted in lasting changes to fish communities, according to a new long-term study in the Seychelles.

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Coral bleaching causes a permanent change in fish life

Repeat coral bleaching caused by rising sea temperatures has resulted in lasting changes to fish communities, according to a new long-term study in the Seychelles.

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Tesla Driver Caught Sleeping For More Than 30 Miles on One of California's Busiest Freeways

This isn't the first time something like this has happened.

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Vaccine Injury Claims Are Few and Far Between

Data from a federal program designed to compensate people harmed by vaccines shows how rare it is for someone to claim they were hurt after getting vaccinated.

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By the Numbers: Vaccines Are Safe

Americans have received billions of doses of vaccines for everything from measles to the flu. In 30 years, very few injury claims have been filed with the federal government.

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Coral bleaching causes a permanent change in fish life

Repeat coral bleaching caused by rising sea temperatures has resulted in lasting changes to fish communities, according to a new long-term study in the Seychelles.

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Methods in belowground botany

Plant root systems play a crucial role in ecosystems, radically impacting everything from nutrient cycling to species composition. Despite their importance, scientists are just beginning to develop the tools to understand how these complex systems are structured, how they function, and how structure and function are related. Much of the research into root systems today uses sophisticated new techn

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Methods in belowground botany

Plant root systems play a crucial role in ecosystems, radically impacting everything from nutrient cycling to species composition. Despite their importance, scientists are just beginning to develop the tools to understand how these complex systems are structured, how they function, and how structure and function are related. Much of the research into root systems today uses sophisticated new techn

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Science suffers collateral damage as US, China tensions rise

A rise in US visa denials for Chinese academics and intensified scrutiny of alleged links to Beijing over fears of potential espionage are having a chilling effect on long-standing research collaboration, researchers say.

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Manchester: “research misconduct concerned only one member of the research group”

The University of Manchester found out that someone has secretly manipulated data in the papers of their star cancer researcher, Richard Marais. Who might that be?

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Særligt gen øger din risiko for at blive afhængig af cannabis

Forskere har fundet et gen, der er med til at afgøre, om du kan blive cannabis-misbruger.

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Methods in belowground botany

Plant root systems play a crucial role in ecosystems, radically impacting everything from nutrient cycling to species composition. Despite their importance, scientists are just beginning to develop the tools to understand how these complex systems are structured, how they function, and how structure and function are related. This special issue of Applications in Plant Sciences presents research fr

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ELSI researchers use biological evolution to inspire machine learning

Evolution allows life to explore almost limitless diversity and complexity. Scientists hope to recreate such open-endedness in the laboratory or in computer simulations, but even sophisticated computational techniques like machine learning and artificial intelligence can't provide the open-ended tinkering associated with evolution. Here, common barriers to open-endedness in computation and biology

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Health policies key factor in hospitalization of seniors

Government policy and infrastructure have a substantial impact on hospitalization of older adults, according to a University of Waterloo study.The study examined the experiences of 254,664 patients in home-care programs and 162,045 residents in long-term care in Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario.

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Terminally ill who request doctors make decisions undergo more aggressive final treatments

Terminally ill patients who request that physicians make decisions on their behalf are more likely to receive aggressive treatments in the weeks before they die, according to a Rutgers study.The study, published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, is the first to examine if personal beliefs and attitudes of both patients and physicians affect end-of-life treatments that can be painful a

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Study finds alcohol and tobacco appear frequently in UK reality television

A new study in the Faculty of Public Health's Journal of Public Health, published by Oxford University Press, finds that tobacco and alcohol usage are extremely common in British reality television shows.

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It's Pollinator Week and we're all a-buzzzz!

This is a perfect week to make and share your pollinator observations with scientists. Our editors selected five projects in need of your help. More about pollinators from Penn State's website:"Pollinators are animals (primarily insect, but sometimes avian or mammalian) that fertilize plants, resulting in the formation of seeds and the fruit surrounding seeds. Humans and other animals rely on poll

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Kommuner til kamp mod krav i EFI-afløser: Frygter mere manuel efterkontrol af gældsposter

Stramme datakrav i det nye inddrivelssystem vil medføre behov for større systemændringer og mere manuel efterkontrol hos fordringshavere, advarer KL. Skatteforvaltningen afviser, at datakrav er strammere end lovgivning.

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Efter norsk eksplosion: Hvor farligt er brint som brændstof til biler?

PLUS. I sidste uge eksploderede en brinttankstation nær Oslo. Efterforskningen er stadig i gang. I mellemtiden er snesevis af påfyldningsstationer lukket, deriblandt i Danmark.

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This self-building house unfolds in just 10 minutes.

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Scientists just debunked a major myth about heirloom wheat

Heritage wheat doesn't need less help to grow. (DepositPhotos/) Wheat is stronger than you're giving it credit for—that's the message of a comprehensive new study from German and Australian researchers. They looked at the most common wheat cultivars and found that, contrary to popular perception, selective breeding has made them stronger, not weaker. Study author Rod Snowdon, a professor of plant

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Monkey Cousins Use Similar Calls

Two monkey species who last shared a common ancestor 3 million years ago have "eerily similar" alarm calls.

14h

14h

Atlantic Ocean 'running out of breath'

Edinburgh University leads an international research programme to assess the health of the Atlantic.

14h

Çatalhöyük: 9,000 years ago, a community with modern urban problems

Some 9,000 years ago, residents of one of the world's first large farming communities were also among the first humans to experience some of the perils of modern urban living.

15h

Cell Culture 101 – From Catastrophe to Success

Download this eBook to learn about the basic considerations and applications for cell culture, detecting and dealing with contamination, and the advantages of automation!

15h

15h

eBook: Cell Culture 101 – From Catastrophe to Success

Download this eBook to learn about the basic considerations and applications for cell culture, detecting and dealing with contamination, and the advantages of automation!

15h

Nuro’s Pizza Robot Will Bring You a Domino’s Pie

It’s about half the size of a sedan, and for now it needs a chase car with a babysitter. For now.

15h

Programmable mutually exclusive alternative splicing for generating RNA and protein diversity

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10403-w Alternative splicing expands the genetic coding capacity and proteomic diversity of the cell. Here the authors create a synthetic biology platform for regulating four programmable exons in modular transcription factors.

15h

Easy access to oxygenated block polymers via switchable catalysis

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10481-w Multiblock oxygenated polyols often show better properties than the constituent polyols, but their synthesis can be complex and difficult. Here a switchable catalysis concept is described which allows for the efficient preparation of multiblock poly(ether-b-ester) materials starting from mixtures of common monom

15h

Mediator complex interaction partners organize the transcriptional network that defines neural stem cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10502-8 The Mediator complex regulates transcription by connecting enhancers to promoters. Here, the authors purify Mediator from neural stem cells (NSCs), identify 75 novel protein-protein interaction partners and characterize the Mediator-interacting network that regulates transcription and establishes NSC identity.

15h

Microbially induced potassium enrichment in Paleoproterozoic shales and implications for reverse weathering on early Earth

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10620-3 The transition from smectite to illite requires potassium incorporation, yet the role of microbes in facilitating K+ uptake remains debated, especially during the early Earth. Here, the authors suggest that the Paleoproterozoic microbial mats extracted potassium from sea water and induced localized illitization

15h

Disentangling charge carrier from photothermal effects in plasmonic metal nanostructures

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10771-3 Confidently separating the photothermal effect from the generation of energetic charge carriers and quantifying their relative contribution to chemical reactions remain a great challenge in plasmon-mediated chemical reactions. Here, authors describe a strategy based on the construction of a plasmonic electrode c

15h

Author Correction: Limited capacity of tree growth to mitigate the global greenhouse effect under predicted warming

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10731-x Author Correction: Limited capacity of tree growth to mitigate the global greenhouse effect under predicted warming

15h

9,000 years ago, a community with modern urban problems

Bioarchaeologists report new findings from the ancient ruins of Çatalhöyük, in modern Turkey. The results paint a picture of what it was like for humans to move from a nomadic hunting and gathering lifestyle to a more sedentary life built around agriculture.

15h

Redshirts on the red planet: Mars is sporting a giant Star Trek insignia

Boldly go. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/) NASA's newest picture of Mars found some unlikely branding on the red planet's southern hemisphere. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter—a satellite that laps the planet once every couple of hours—captured a formation that looks very similar to Star Trek's Starfleet logo. This is pure coincidence, but has trekkies everywhere weighing in (and has eve

15h

Photograph lays bare reality of melting Greenland sea ice

Research teams traversing partially melted fjord to retrieve weather equipment release startling picture Rapidly melting sea ice in Greenland has presented an unusual hazard for research teams retrieving their oceanographic moorings and weather station equipment. A photo, taken by Steffen Olsen from the Centre for Ocean and Ice at the Danish Meteorological Institute on 13 June, showed sled dogs w

15h

Sun's history found buried in Moon's crust

The Sun's rotation rate in its first billion years is unknown. Yet, this spin rate affected solar eruptions, influencing the evolution of life. Scientists think they've figured it out by using the Moon as critical evidence.

15h

Superstrong, reversible adhesive that works like snail slime

Snails can anchor themselves in place using a structure known as an epiphragm. The snail's slimy secretion works its way into the pores found on even seemingly smooth surfaces, then hardens, providing strong adhesion that can be reversed when the slime softens. Engineers have developed a new material that works in a similar way.

15h

Monkey Cousins Use Similar Calls

Two monkey species who last shared a common ancestor 3 million years ago have "eerily similar" alarm calls. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Monkey Cousins Use Similar Calls

Two monkey species who last shared a common ancestor 3 million years ago have "eerily similar" alarm calls. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

Monkey Cousins Use Similar Calls

Two monkey species who last shared a common ancestor 3 million years ago have "eerily similar" alarm calls. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

Dogs' eyes evolve to appeal to humans

Scientists have found a muscle that allows dogs to make 'puppy eyes' and bond with humans.

16h

MPs call for end to 'throwaway clothes' era

A report by MPs urges the UK government to end the era of throwaway clothes and poor working conditions in the fashion supply chain.

16h

Inside Heathrow's high-tech baggage system

Heathrow's luggage system handles 180,000 items per day. Tom Burridge takes a look inside.

16h

Machine learning says ‘sound words’ predict psychosis

Frequent use of words associated with sound is one clue to the later emergence of psychosis, a machine-learning method indicates. The researchers also developed a new machine-learning method to more precisely quantify the semantic richness of people’s conversational language, a known indicator for psychosis. Their results show that automated analysis of the two language variables—more frequent us

16h

Feisty mantis shrimp have amazing tail ‘shields’

The tough tails of mantis shrimp could solve a big manufacturing problem: creating lighter materials that absorbs lots of energy from a shape impact in limited space. What if there were a material that could prevent car ceilings from caving in on passengers during an accident, or fragile objects from breaking when transported over long distances? The ornery mantis shrimp’s secret is its tail appe

16h

Superstrong, reversible adhesive that works like snail slime

Snails can anchor themselves in place using a structure known as an epiphragm. The snail's slimy secretion works its way into the pores found on even seemingly smooth surfaces, then hardens, providing strong adhesion that can be reversed when the slime softens. Engineers have developed a new material that works in a similar way.

16h

Researchers Find Earliest Example of Merging Galaxies

An artist rendered their own view of what the merging galaxies might look like. (Credit: NAOJ) Thirteen billion years ago, two galaxies collided to make something totally new. Each of those galaxies was among the universe’s first, since the cosmic clock had only been ticking for less than a billion years. As the galaxies’ dust and gas swirled together, new generations of stars were born, and their

16h

Closing In On a Non-sugar Sweetener — One Without a Weird Aftertaste

(Credit: SpeedKingz/Shutterstock) The first time someone synthesized saccharin, the artificial sweetener in Sweet’N Low, it was an accident. A scientist studying coal tar in 1879 didn’t wash his hands before eating dinner and was surprised to taste a sweet residue from the lab on his fingertips. Same goes for the invention of the sweetener sodium cyclamate in 1937: the unwitting pioneer, who was w

16h

SNAPSHOT: How Sediment Layers Reveal Earth's Ancient Climate Cycles

Colorized elevation map of a lakebed in New Jersey shows stripes of ancient sediment deposits. The deposits are tied to cycles of wet and dry climates throughout Earth’s history. (Credit: LIDAR image, US Geological Survey; digital colorization by Paul Olsen) Ribbons of blue — the modern Raritan and Neshanic rivers — slice across a landscape that’s key to understanding Earth’s deep-time climate cyc

16h

This combo could make an RSV vaccine possible

A unique adjuvant can prevent vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease, a sickness that has posed a major hurdle in vaccine development for RSV, according to a study with mice. An adjuvant is a substance that enhances the body’s immune response to toxins and foreign matter. The study suggests that combining this adjuvant, which researchers at the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State Uni

16h

Tanning industry uses promos, cheap prices to lure adolescents and young adults, study finds

Everyone knows cigarette smoking causes cancer and as a result, prices and advertising are closely regulated to discourage youth from starting. But another cancer risk, indoor tanning, which has been shown to cause melanoma, lags in regulation.

16h

GPs should not use inflammatory marker tests to rule out serious conditions, study finds

Blood tests that detect inflammation, known as inflammatory marker tests, are not sensitive enough to rule out serious underlying conditions and GPs should not use them for this purpose, according to researchers from the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care, University of Exeter and the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Resear

16h

Watch: Algorithm lets people walk right out of images

People moving in and out of photographs used to be reserved for the world of Harry Potter, but computer scientists have now brought that magic to real life. Their algorithm, Photo Wake-Up , can take a person from a 2D photo or a work of art and make them run, walk, or jump out of the frame. Pablo Picasso’s “Untitled” (1939) steps out of the frame. (Credit: U. Washington) The system also lets user

16h

Map: Heat-related deaths climate action could prevent

Speeding up efforts to meet the Paris Climate Agreement’s goal of limiting temperature rise to below 2 degrees Celsius could prevent thousands of extreme heat-related deaths in US cities, experts say. The planet will warm by about 3 degrees Celsius (5.4 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels by the end of the century if the US and other nations meet only their current commitments under t

16h

Huawei Says US Sanctions Will Reduce Revenue by $30 Billion

The Trump administration last month barred shipments of any US technology to Chinese telecom giant Huawei.

16h

Shedding light on 'black box' of inpatient opioid use

People who receive opioids for the first time while hospitalized have double the risk of continuing to receive opioids for months after discharge compared with their hospitalized peers who are not given opioids. The finding sare among the first to shed light on the little-studied causes and consequences of inpatient opioid prescribing.

16h

Facebook posts better at predicting diabetes, mental health than demographic info

Analyzing language shows that identifying certain groups of words significantly improves upon predicting some medical conditions in patients.

16h

How climate change affects crops in India

Researchers found that the yields from grains such as millet, sorghum, and maize are more resilient to extreme weather in India; their yields vary significantly less due to year-to-year changes in climate and generally experience smaller declines during droughts. But yields from rice, India's main crop, experience larger declines during extreme weather conditions.

16h

Antioxidant puts up fight, but loses battle against protein linked to Alzheimer's disease

New research may explain why an antioxidant that protects the brain is also associated with deterioration in areas susceptible to Alzheimer's disease. The antioxidant, superoxide dismutase or SOD1, improves cognition, but a research team found SOD1's protective benefits dramatically weaken when levels of tau proteins — a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease — increase.

16h

Past climate change: A warning for the future?

A new study of climate changes and their effects on past societies offers a sobering glimpse of social upheavals that might happen in the future. The prehistoric groups studied lived in the Amazon Basin of South America hundreds of years ago, before European contact, but the disruptions that occurred may carry lessons for our time.

16h

Your circle of friends is more predictive of your health, study finds

To get a better reading on your overall health and wellness, you'd be better off looking at the strength and structure of your circle of friends, according to a new study.

16h

3D printed tissues and organs without the scaffolding

A research team has developed a process that enables 3D printing of biological tissues without scaffolds using 'ink' made up of only stem cells.

16h

The Reinvention of a Downtown: Danville’s Story, Part 2

Previously in this series: why the ups and downs of economic history have left the southern Virginia town of Danville with a genuine problem (what to do after its big mills closed), but also a significant advantage (the physical infrastructure that those old tobacco and textile sites left behind, much of it quite beautiful.) Years ago, on the first reporting visit that my wife, Deb, and I made to

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