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nyheder2019juni19

Corsica's 'cat-fox': On the trail of what may be a new species

In the forest undergrowth of northern Corsica, two wildlife rangers open a cage to reveal a striped, tawny-coated animal, one of 16 felines known as "cat-foxes" in the area and thought to be a new species.

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Tre års intens jagt på intelligente væsener gav intet resultat

Den elektromagnetiske stråling fra mere end tusinde stjerner er blevet scannet på milliarder af radiokanaler. Der er ikke fundet tegn på intelligent liv i vores nærmeste omegn.

2h

Successful 'alien' bird invasions are location dependent

Published today in Nature, researchers show that alien bird introductions are most successful in locations and climates similar to their native habitats and in places where other alien species are already established.

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Making systems robust

The human body keeps the calcium concentration in the blood constant, similarly to an aircraft's autopilot keeping the plane at a constant altitude. What they have in common is that both the body and the autopilot employ sophisticated integral feedback control mechanisms.

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This Robot Fish Powers Itself With Fake Blood

A new robot lionfish uses a rudimentary vasculature and “blood” to both energize itself and hydraulically power its fins.

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Investigating coral and algal 'matchmaking' at the cellular level

What factors govern algae's success as 'tenants' of their coral hosts both under optimal conditions and when oceanic temperatures rise?

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Climate change could affect symbiotic relationships between microorganisms and trees

An international research consortium mapped the global distribution of tree-root symbioses with fungi and bacteria that are vital to forest ecosystems. The study was featured on the cover of Nature.

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Patients of surgeons with unprofessional behavior more likely to suffer complications

Patients of surgeons with higher numbers of reports from co-workers about unprofessional behavior are significantly more likely to experience complications during or after their operations, researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) reported today in JAMA Surgery.

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Simple scan could direct treatments for angina

A 40 minute test for angina could help patients avoid an overnight stay in hospital, according to research funded by the NIHR Guy's and St Thomas' Biomedical Research Centre. The MR-INFORM trial looked at whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be used to guide treatment decisions for angina patients, rather than performing a more invasive procedure.

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Finding 'Nemo's' family tree of anemones

Thanks in part to the popular film Finding Nemo, clownfishes are well known to the public and well represented in scientific literature. But the same can't be said for the equally colorful sea anemones — venomous, tentacled animals — that protect clownfishes and that the fish nourish and protect in return. A new study takes a step to change that, presenting a new tree of life for clownfish-hosti

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Powering a solution: Professor takes charge at improving lithium ion batteries safety

As cutting edge as electric vehicles are, they're still vulnerable to an Achilles heel—the very source that gives them power.

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There Is No Middle Ground on Reparations

On December 1, 1862—a month before he issued the Emancipation Proclamation—President Abraham Lincoln wrote to Congress. He was not yet the Great Emancipator. Instead, he proposed to become the Great Compensator. Lincoln proposed a Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution: the most expansive and expensive slavery reparations plan ever put forth by a U.S. president. “Every State wherein slaver

10min

The Tyranny of Workplace Food-Shamers

The first time someone commented on what I was eating at work, I was a teenager at my first job, manning the front desk at the local courthouse’s law library. On the way out one day, a regular visitors interrupted my fistful of cashews to tell me he loved watching me eat—I did it with such relish. Before I could locate a response, he had left. At 18, I was already well aware of the frequency with

10min

Facebook Moderators Are Dying at Their Desks

Hell Factory At a Facebook content moderation facility in Tampa, Florida, contractors working for Cognizant are regularly subjected to traumatizing, unsanitary, and dangerous conditions — that in at least one case literally led to a death. The contractors, who review as many as 200 flagged Facebook posts per day depicting animal abuse, sexual abuse, murder, and other horrifying acts, are subjecte

12min

UK Student Convicted for 3D Printing Gun

First Conviction A British student was convicted today by London police of manufacturing a firearm using a 3D printer, according to Agence France-Presse . Tendai Muswere, 26, pleaded guilty in a hearing, despite claiming the firearm was printed for a university film project — but without a licence to possess it. “Muswere claimed that he was printing the firearms for a ‘dystopian’ university film

12min

Phage display for engineering blood-contacting surfaces

Surfaces that enable endothelial cell attachment without causing blood clotting are needed for various tissue engineering efforts. A new approach involving phage display has been used to identify unique peptides with these typically divergent characteristics. The work is published in Tissue Engineering.

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Phage display for engineering blood-contacting surfaces

Surfaces that enable endothelial cell attachment without causing blood clotting are needed for various tissue engineering efforts. A new approach involving phage display has been used to identify unique peptides with these typically divergent characteristics. The work is published in Tissue Engineering.

14min

Whites' racial prejudice can lessen over time, research shows

Prejudice among white people can lessen over time, according to new research from Rice University.

14min

Family and community central to recovery of Sierra Leone's former child soldiers

Many of Sierra Leone's former child soldiers have gradually earned greater acceptance from families and communities, according to a sweeping new study of their adult lives. Former child soldiers experience mental health problems as a result of their experiences, but acceptance by family and community are central to their reintegration into society, according to the study in the Journal of the Amer

17min

Powering a solution: Professor takes charge at improving lithium ion batteries safety

Dr. Yu Zhu and his team of graduate students in The University of Akron's College of Polymer Science and Polymer Engineering are working to improve the safety of Li-ion batteries by creating a shear-thickening electrolyte — a substance that can become thicker under impact, set between the battery's anode and cathode that will be impact-resistant, thus not causing a fire or an explosion upon any c

17min

FEFU scientist reported on concentration of pesticides in marine organisms

According to ecotoxicologist from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), from the 90s and during 2000s in the tissues of Russian Far Eastern mussels the concentration of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) that had been globally used in agriculture in the mid-twentieth century has increased about ten times. OCPs pollute and affect badly the ecosystems of the Sea of Japan, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the

17min

A songbird's fate hinges on one fragile area

Researchers were surprised to find that a migratory songbird that breeds in the eastern and central United States is concentrated during winter in just one South American country.

17min

Vitamin D may not help your heart

While previous research has suggested a link between low levels of vitamin D in the blood and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, a new Michigan State University study has found that taking vitamin D supplements did not reduce that risk.

17min

Researchers find potential way to prevent most common pregnancy-related conditions

A new finding from University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers, published in the June issue of the journal Endocrinology, could have important implications for developing novel treatments to prevent placental abnormalities.

17min

Aggressive, non-native wetland plants squelch species richness more than dominant natives do

Dominant, non-native plants reduce wetland biodiversity and abundance more than native plants do, researchers report in the journal Ecology Letters. Even native plants that dominate wetland landscapes play better with others, the team found.

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Aggressive, non-native wetland plants squelch species richness more than dominant natives do

Dominant, non-native plants reduce wetland biodiversity and abundance more than native plants do, researchers report in the journal Ecology Letters. Even native plants that dominate wetland landscapes play better with others, the team found.

26min

Two Earth-Like Alien Planets Spotted Orbiting Nearby Star

You can add two new entries to the growing list of potentially habitable exoplanets. Astronomers have spotted a pair of planets orbiting Teegarden’s Star, a red dwarf about 12 light years distant. The post Two Earth-Like Alien Planets Spotted Orbiting Nearby Star appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Shipworm that eats rock instead of wood found in river in the Philippines

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has found and identified a species of shipworm that eats rock instead of wood. In their paper published in Proceedings …

29min

Malnourishment blamed for rise in encephalitis in Bihar

Medics in India say hunger is behind scores of child deaths, not just lychee toxins The recent deaths of more than 110 children in India from encephalitis have been attributed to natural toxins in lychees. But experts now suggest that the fruit itself may not be the cause of the illness but mainly the fact that poor children go to bed on an empty stomach after eating it. At least 31 children have

31min

Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration

On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. Although firefighters extinguished the blaze within 30 minutes, the shocking event helped galvanize the U.S. environmental movement. Fifty years later, the river is much healthier but still recuperating from a legacy of pollution, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmag

32min

A forest of nano-mushroom structures keep this plastic clean and stain-free

Technologies like solar panels and LEDs require a cover material that repels water, dirt and oil while still letting plenty of light through. There is also interest in new flexible materials so these devices can be incorporated into a variety of creative applications like curtains, clothes, and paper. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have created a flex

32min

Contemplating the Lives behind Ancient Bones

The remains of our distant relatives evoke more than just data points — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

37min

US military consumes more hydrocarbons than most countries—massive hidden impact on climate

The US military's carbon footprint is enormous and must be confronted in order to have a substantial effect on battling global warming.

38min

Plate tectonics may have driven Cambrian Explosion, study shows

The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist.

38min

South African forests show pathways to a sustainable future

Native forests make up 1percent of the landscape in South Africa but could play a key role in reducing atmospheric carbon and identifying sustainable development practices that can be used globally to counter climate change, according to a Penn State researcher.

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#65 På sporet af mordet

Podcasten Stetoskopet undersøger, hvad der sker, når et mord skal efterforskes. Få svar på, hvad retsmedicinerens konkrete rolle er.

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News from the diamond nursery

Unlike flawless gems, fibrous diamonds often contain small saline inclusions. These give hints to scientists about the conditions under which diamonds are formed deep in the Earth's mantle. A research team including scientists from Goethe University solved the puzzle of the formation of these inclusions by simulating conditions of extreme heat and pressure in the laboratory.

38min

Phage display for engineering blood-contacting surfaces

Surfaces that enable endothelial cell attachment without causing blood clotting are needed for various tissue engineering efforts. A new approach involving phage display has been used to identify unique peptides with these typically divergent characteristics.

38min

Overcoming PTSD: Study reveals memory disruption drug target

A new study suggests it may be possible to disarm the emotional memories of trauma that drive PTSD symptoms.

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US military consumes more hydrocarbons than most countries — massive hidden impact on climate

Research by social scientists from Durham University and Lancaster University shows the US military is one of the largest climate polluters in history, consuming more liquid fuels and emitting more CO2e (carbon-dioxide equivalent) than most countries.

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New species of rock-eating shipworm identified in freshwater river in the Philippines

A newly identified genus and species of worm-like, freshwater clam, commonly known as a shipworm, eats rock and expels sand as scat while it burrows like an ecosystem engineer in the Abatan River in the Philippines.

38min

Serotonin linked to somatic awareness, a condition long thought to be imaginary

An international team spearheaded by researchers at McGill University has discovered a biological mechanism that could explain heightened somatic awareness, a condition where patients experience physical discomforts for which there is no physiological explanation.

38min

A forest of nano-mushroom structures keep this plastic clean and stain-free

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have created a flexible optical plastic that is stain-resistant and superomniphobic, finding inspiration in a surprising place: the shape of Enoki mushrooms.

38min

Concordia researchers develop new method to evaluate artificial heart valves

Using high-tech equipment to look at the flow downstream of a bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve, researchers at Concordia have devised a technique to detect obstructions in a type of mechanical heart valve they believe will contribute to safer follow-up methods for cardiologists and their patients.

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New research finds increased CT use for suspected urolithiasis patients in ED

A new study performed in conjunction with the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute examines changing characteristics of utilization and potential disparities in US emergency department (ED) patients undergoing CT of the abdomen and pelvis (CTAP) for suspected urolithiasis.

38min

The Technology 202: Big Tech’s legal shield is increasingly in jeopardy with this Republican bill

Sen. Josh Hawley wants companies to undergo FTC audits to qualify for immunity.

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Nature-inspired materials can be used in applications ranging from tunneling to space

Optimal materials for cutting tools of tunnel boring machines (TBM) were developed in the recently finished three-year long project "Innovative polycrystalline diamond (PDC) drag bit for soft ground tunnel boring machines" by TalTech materials scientists from the tribology and recycling group.

44min

Biochar may boost carbon storage, but benefits to germination and growth appear scant

Biochar may not be the miracle soil additive that many farmers and researchers hoped it to be, according to a new University of Illinois study. Biochar may boost the agricultural yield of some soils—especially poor quality ones—but there is no consensus on its effectiveness. Researchers tested different soils' responses to multiple biochar types and were unable to verify their ability to increase

44min

Freezing bubbles viral video inspired research now published

Scientific inquiry often begins with the "why."

44min

Artificial muscles powered by glucose

Artificial muscles made from polymers can now be powered by energy from glucose and oxygen, just like biological muscles. This advance may be a step on the way to implantable artificial muscles or autonomous microrobots powered by biomolecules in their surroundings. Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have presented their results in the journal Advanced Materials.

44min

Tesla Uses Arcade Games to Lure Potential Buyers to Showrooms

Tesla’s Got Game In February, Tesla announced plans to close its dealerships as part of a shift to online-only sales. Ten days later, the company reversed course , saying it would keep some stores open to serve as “galleries, showcases and Tesla information centers.” It now seems Tesla has found another use for those former stores: it’s turning them into temporary video arcades . Your next chargi

47min

Bitwise Goes Big

Four years ago, my wife, Deb, and I wrote about an ambitious and unusual tech startup called Bitwise Industries , in the gritty and long-struggling city of Fresno in California’s Central Valley. For an introduction to Bitwise and its co-founders, Irma L. Olguin Jr. and Jake Soberal, please see “ California’s Centers of Technology: Bay Area, L.A., San Diego, and … Fresno? ” For what is at stake in

54min

Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals

Researchers report the first evidence in a non-human species, the domestic dog, of a relation between joint hypermobility and excitability: dogs with more joint mobility and flexibility tend to have more anxiety problems.

57min

'Goldilocks' neurons promote REM sleep

It has been a mystery why REM sleep, or dream sleep, increases when the room temperature is 'just right'. Neuroscientists show that melanin-concentrating hormone neurons within the hypothalamus increase REM sleep when the need for body temperature defense is minimized, such as when sleeping in a warm and comfortable room temperature. These data have important implications for the function of REM s

57min

Fatty fish without environmental pollutants protect against type 2 diabetes

If the fatty fish we eat were free of environmental pollutants, it would reduce our risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, the pollutants in the fish have the opposite effect and appears to eliminate the protective effect from fatty fish intake. This has been shown by researchers using innovative methods that could be used to address several questions about food and health in future studies.

57min

Unearthing the sweet potato proteome

The sweet, starchy orange sweet potatoes are tasty and nutritious ingredients for fries, casseroles and pies. Although humans have been cultivating sweet potatoes for thousands of years, scientists still don't know much about the protein makeup of these tubers. In ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, researchers have analyzed the proteome of sweet potato leaves and roots, and in the process, have re

58min

Aggressive, non-native wetland plants squelch species richness more than dominant natives do

Dominant, non-native plants reduce wetland biodiversity and abundance more than native plants do, researchers report. Even native plants that dominate wetland landscapes play better with others, the team found.

1h

Artificial muscles powered by glucose

Artificial muscles made from polymers can now be powered by energy from glucose and oxygen, just like biological muscles. This advance may be a step on the way to implantable artificial muscles or autonomous microrobots powered by biomolecules in their surroundings. Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have presented their results in the journal Advanced Materials.

1h

First step towards a better prosthetic leg? Trip people over and over

The first step a Vanderbilt team took in addressing a challenge in lower-body prosthetics was coming to understand the way people with two legs catch themselves, accomplished by covering test subjects with motion-capturing sensors.

1h

Whites' racial prejudice can lessen over time, research shows

Prejudice among white people can lessen over time, according to new research from Rice University.

1h

Plate tectonics may have driven 'Cambrian Explosion, study shows

The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist.

1h

South African forests show pathways to a sustainable future

Native forests make up 1percent of the landscape in South Africa but could play a key role in reducing atmospheric carbon and identifying sustainable development practices that can be used globally to counter climate change, according to a Penn State researcher.

1h

Researchers see around corners to detect object shapes

Computer vision researchers have demonstrated they can use special light sources and sensors to see around corners or through gauzy filters, enabling them to reconstruct the shapes of unseen objects. The researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Toronto and University College London said this technique enables them to reconstruct images in great detail, including the relief of

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Pilots criticize Boeing for mistakes on its grounded jet

Retired pilot Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger told a congressional panel Wednesday that pilots should practice the failure of Boeing flight-control software on simulators, not planes full of passengers.

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Watchdog criticizes rising costs, delays of NASA's next Moon rocket

The giant rocket NASA plans to use to return to the Moon by 2024 has been beset by delays and spending has overrun by almost 30 percent, an official audit said Wednesday.

1h

Contemplating the Lives behind Ancient Bones

The remains of our distant relatives evoke more than just data points — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Expanding the temperature range of lithium-ion batteries

Electric cars struggle with extreme temperatures, mainly because of impacts on the electrolyte solutions in their lithium-ion batteries. Now, researchers have developed new electrolytes containing multiple additives that work better over a wide temperature range. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

1h

Unearthing the sweet potato proteome

The sweet, starchy orange sweet potatoes are tasty and nutritious ingredients for fries, casseroles and pies. Although humans have been cultivating sweet potatoes for thousands of years, scientists still don't know much about the protein makeup of these tubers. In ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, researchers have analyzed the proteome of sweet potato leaves and roots, and in the process, have re

1h

Why tiny microbes may be a big factor in how climate change unfolds

Climate change is about big things: melting ice sheets, rising seas, the feverish temperature of the planet.

1h

Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals

The relation between collagen laxity and anxiety in humans is widely known, but this relation has never been observed before in other species. A team of researchers led by professors Jaume Fatjó and Antoni Bulbena from the Department of Psychiatry and Legal Medicine at the UAB, the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) and the UAB Affinity Foundation Chair in Animals and Health, analy

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High temperature records will be 'smashed' in coming century

Climate change will cause some regions of the world to "smash" high temperature records every year in the coming century, researchers warn. That will push "ecosystems and communities beyond their ability to cope," according to the authors of the study published online June 17 in Nature Climate Change.

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Got noxious weeds? In Seattle metro, there's an app for that

The small, white flower clusters can reach up to 10 feet and, to the unaware landscaper, would look pretty in a garden. Its leaves are bright green and the root looks like a carrot or parsnip. But the plant is also an invader that can wreak havoc if it's not contained.

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This software titan proposes a computer museum to mark Philly's role in starting the digital world

Computers didn't start in Silicon Valley. They started here," in Philadelphia, says Jim Scherrer.

1h

How humans and robots work side-by-side in Amazon fulfillment centers

Amazon employees start their shifts passing through turnstiles and a sign reminding them what they can't bring with them as they report for work alongside robots.

1h

There's a giant dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico thanks in large part to pollution from Chicago

Just off the coast of Louisiana, where the Mississippi River lets out into the Gulf of Mexico, an enormous algae bloom, fueled by fertilizer from Midwestern farm fields and urban sewage, creates an area so devoid of oxygen it's uninhabitable to most marine life every summer.

1h

Wild Rose Is the Best Kind of Musical Melodrama

There is a sub-sub-genre of film that I have an extreme, long-standing weakness for: If your movie is about working-class Brits living in a tough part of town and struggling to express themselves artistically, I am almost certainly going to like it. In Tom Harper’s Wild Rose , Rose-Lynn Harlan (played by Jessie Buckley) is a 20-something Glaswegian who was recently released from prison, is strugg

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NASA's Successor to the Hubble Telescope Inches Closer to Launch

The James Webb Space Telescope — minus the telescope — recently underwent another round of testing. (Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn) The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is NASA’s long-planned – and long-delayed – successor to Hubble. But after a recent spate of testing to mimic the extremes of space, it’s looking like the telescope is still on track for its 2021 launch date. The telescope itself, alo

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Our Gut Microbes Are Pickier Eaters Than We Thought

(Credit: POLIGOONE/Shutterstock) I don’t know who said “you are what you eat,” but it really doesn’t make sense. I am objectively not made of peanut butter and coffee, though I’m certain that would be my fate if the sentiment were true. That said, the general idea — that what we eat matters — seems to hold more and more weight as studies of our diet pile up. Now, researchers say there's yet anothe

1h

Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals

The relation between collagen laxity and anxiety in humans is widely known, but this relation has never been observed before in other species. A team of researchers led by professors Jaume Fatjó and Antoni Bulbena from the Department of Psychiatry and Legal Medicine at the UAB, the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) and the UAB Affinity Foundation Chair in Animals and Health, analy

1h

Got noxious weeds? In Seattle metro, there's an app for that

The small, white flower clusters can reach up to 10 feet and, to the unaware landscaper, would look pretty in a garden. Its leaves are bright green and the root looks like a carrot or parsnip. But the plant is also an invader that can wreak havoc if it's not contained.

1h

Research shows wind can prevent seabirds accessing their most important habitat

We marvel at flying animals because it seems like they can access anywhere, but a first study of its kind has revealed that wind can prevent seabirds from accessing the most important of habitats: their nests.

1h

Research shows wind can prevent seabirds accessing their most important habitat

We marvel at flying animals because it seems like they can access anywhere, but a first study of its kind has revealed that wind can prevent seabirds from accessing the most important of habitats: their nests.

1h

Owner training key to reducing risk of dog bite injuries

Dog attacks have been on the rise and it may the owners who need to go back to school. A new study published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal investigated what leads dog owners to train their pets using positive reinforcement methods.

1h

Upcycling process brings new life to old jeans

A growing population, rising standards of living and quickly changing fashions send mountains of clothing waste to the world's landfills each year. Although processes for textile recycling exist, they tend to be inefficient and expensive. Now, researchers have reported in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering an efficient, low-cost method that can convert waste denim into viscose-type fibers tha

1h

Future Smart Speakers Could Call 911 if They Hear a Heart Attack

Heart Monitor A new system for smart speakers or phones can listen for signs that a user is having a heart attack, according to its creators. By listening for the gasping and wheezing typical of the early stages of cardiac arrest, a new algorithm can identify a heart attack with 97 percent accuracy, according to MIT Technology Review . If the tool becomes commercially available, it could help mor

1h

Owner training key to reducing risk of dog bite injuries

Dog attacks have been on the rise and it may the owners who need to go back to school. A new study published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal investigated what leads dog owners to train their pets using positive reinforcement methods.

1h

Research shows wind can prevent seabirds accessing their most important habitat

We marvel at flying animals because it seems like they can access anywhere, but a first study of its kind has revealed that wind can prevent seabirds from accessing the most important of habitats: their nests.

1h

Expanding the temperature range of lithium-ion batteries

Electric cars struggle with extreme temperatures, mainly because of impacts on the electrolyte solutions in their lithium-ion batteries. Now, researchers have developed new electrolytes containing multiple additives that work better over a wide temperature range. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

1h

Biochar may boost carbon storage, but benefits to germination and growth appear scant

Biochar may not be the miracle soil additive that many farmers and researchers hoped it to be, according to a new University of Illinois study. Biochar may boost the agricultural yield of some soils — especially poor quality ones — but there is no consensus on its effectiveness. Researchers tested different soils' responses to multiple biochar types and were unable to verify their ability to inc

1h

Mobile crisis service reduces youth ER visits for behavioral health needs, says study

Children and youth with acute behavioral health needs who are seen through Connecticut's Mobile Crisis Intervention Service — a community-based program that provides mental health interventions and services to patients 18 years and younger — have a lower risk of experiencing a follow-up episode and are less likely to show up in an emergency room if and when another episode occurs.

1h

Owner training key to reducing risk of dog bite injuries

Dog attacks have been on the rise and it may the owners who need to go back to school. A new study published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal investigated what leads dog owners to train their pets using positive reinforcement methods. Positive reinforcement training methods are considered to be the most effective and humane approach to training dogs but many owners fail to effectively im

1h

Unearthing the sweet potato proteome

The sweet, starchy orange sweet potatoes are tasty and nutritious ingredients for fries, casseroles and pies. Although humans have been cultivating sweet potatoes for thousands of years, scientists still don't know much about the protein makeup of these tubers. In ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, researchers have analyzed the proteome of sweet potato leaves and roots, and in the process, have re

1h

Freezing bubbles viral video inspired research published

The mesmerizing sight of ice crystals floating around the bubble made the engineers wonder what caused the phenomenon

1h

Study reveals global disparities in cervical cancer rates among women with HIV

A new International Journal of Cancer study indicates that rates of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) are particularly high in women living with HIV in South Africa or Latin America.

1h

Many asylum seekers suffer from depression and anxiety symptoms

According to the internationally most extensive population study concerning the health of asylum seekers, up to 40% of the adults who have sought asylum in Finland told that they are suffering from major depression and anxiety symptoms.

1h

The secret of platinum deposits revealed by field observations in South Africa

There are two competing ideas of how platinum deposits formed: the first involves gravity-induced settling of crystals on the chamber floor, while the second idea implies that the crystals grow in situ, directly on the floor of the magmatic chamber. Researchers have established that the crystals grow in situ, with its high platinum status being attained while all its minerals were crystallizing al

1h

Inattentive children earn less money at 35

An international team finds that if kids can't pay attention in kindergarten, they will grow up to have less lucrative careers.

1h

Watch scientists melt a satellite part to save us from space junk

Earth's orbital space is getting more crowded by the day. The more satellites and space junk we put into orbit, the greater a risk that there could be a collision. Not all materials burn up during reentry; that's why scientists need to stress test satellite parts to ensure that they won't become deadly falling objects. None It's a simple fact that where there are humans, there's trash. Earth's or

1h

Brain scans offer clues to extremist violence

To gain insight into the psychology of radicalization and terrorist violence, researchers scanned the brains of men who support a terrorist organization associated with Al Qaeda. Artis International, a group of academics and policymakers, conducted the research with funding from the Minerva Program and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research of the US Department of Defense, and from the BIAL

1h

Findings link gut bacteria and fibromyalgia

There are alterations in the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracts of people with fibromyalgia, report researchers. Fibromyalgia affects 2-4 percent of the population and has no known cure. Symptoms include fatigue, impaired sleep, and cognitive difficulties, but the disease is most clearly characterized by widespread chronic pain. “As pain physicians, we are frustrated by our inability to help

1h

Read Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Testimony on Reparations

Five years ago, the journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates published “ The Case for Reparations ” in The Atlantic , a cover story that would reinvigorate national discussion over debts owed for slavery and discrimination against black Americans. Today, on Juneteenth , he is testifying at a House hearing on H.R. 40, a bill that would establish a commission to study reparations. It’s the first such hearing in

1h

The Tree With Matchmaking Powers

E very morning for 20 years, Karl-Heinz Martens steered his yellow mail truck through the narrow streets of Eutin, a market town arranged around a little castle in northern Germany, near the Baltic Sea. On his route, Martens would drive through miles of farms and fields before disappearing into a deep, enchanted forest, where he unlocked a gate using a special key and reversed into his parking sp

1h

Stop Meme-ing Taylor Swift

No matter what you feel about "You Need to Calm Down," you're probably playing directly into her hands.

1h

Top 10 academic institutions in 2018: normalized

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01924-x This ranking shows which institutions might be punching above their weight in producing high-quality research.

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The top 10 global institutions for 2018

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01922-z These institutions were the largest contributors to papers published in the past year in the 82 leading journals tracked by the Nature Index across all sectors.

1h

Top 10 institutions for physics in 2018

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01927-8 These institutions were the largest contributors to physics papers for 2018 published in the 82 leading journals tracked by the Nature Index.

1h

Leaders in high-quality natural sciences research by subject

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01920-1 From the top 10 by discipline to the top 20 overall, a graphical representation showing the institutions that dominate research in the life sciences, physical sciences, chemistry and Earth and environmental sciences.

1h

Top 10 institutions for life sciences in 2018

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01925-w These institutions were the largest contributors to life-sciences papers published in the 82 leading journals tracked by the Nature Index in 2018.

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The top 10 academic institutions in 2018

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01923-y Among the world’s academic institutions, these were the largest contributors to articles in the top-quality natural-sciences journals tracked by the Nature Index.

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Top 10 institutions for Earth and environmental sciences in 2018

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01928-7 These 10 institutions in the Nature Index were the largest contributors to papers in Earth and environmental sciences published in 82 leading journals in 2018.

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The top 10 countries that dominate natural-sciences research

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01921-0 The United States reigns as the colossus but China is taking up ever more space, squeezing out European stalwarts.

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In rankings, size is not the whole story

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01919-8 Renowned institutions reign over the research ranks, except when high-quality research is considered as a proportion of total research.

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Top 10 institutions for chemistry in 2018

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01926-9 These 10 institutions in the Nature Index were the largest contributors to chemistry papers published in 82 leading journals in 2018.

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Is glue the answer to climate change?

A small amount of cheap epoxy resin replaces bulky support materials in making effective carbon capture solid sorbents, developed by scientists.

1h

Motherhood can deliver body image boost

New research indicates that perfectionism is related to breast size dissatisfaction, but only in non-mothers — suggesting that mothers are more comfortable with their bodies.

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Upcycling process brings new life to old jeans

A growing population, rising standards of living and quickly changing fashions send mountains of clothing waste to the world's landfills each year. Although processes for textile recycling exist, they tend to be inefficient and expensive. Now, researchers have reported in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering an efficient, low-cost method that can convert waste denim into viscose-type fibers tha

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High reaction rates even without precious metals

Non-precious metal nanoparticles could one day replace expensive catalysts for hydrogen production. However, it is often difficult to determine what reaction rates they can achieve, especially when it comes to oxide particles. This is because the particles must be attached to the electrode using a binder and conductive additives, which distort the results. With the aid of electrochemical analyses

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How bacteria protect themselves from plasma treatment

Considering the ever-growing percentage of bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics, interest in medical use of plasma is increasing. In collaboration with colleagues from Kiel, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) investigated if bacteria may become impervious to plasmas, too. They identified 87 genes of the bacterium Escherichia coli, which potentially protect against effective compone

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Kazan University Clinic testing biodegradable plant-based implants

The prosthetics technology is based on potato and corn materials which serve as 'food' for the replaced tissues and can be slowly absorbed by the patient's own tissue. If the trials are successful, the treatment can be used for sclerosis, aneurysms, and various blood vessel pathologies.

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Fatty fish without environmental pollutants protect against type 2 diabetes

If the fatty fish we eat were free of environmental pollutants, it would reduce our risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, the pollutants in the fish have the opposite effect and appears to eliminate the protective effect from fatty fish intake. This has been shown by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, using innovative methods that could be used to address several qu

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'Goldilocks' neurons promote REM sleep

It has been a mystery why REM sleep, or dream sleep, increases when the room temper-ature is 'just right'. Neuroscientists from Bern show that melanin-concentrating hormone neurons within the hypothalamus increase REM sleep when the need for body tempera-ture defense is minimized, such as when sleeping in a warm and comfortable room tem-perature. These data have important implications for the func

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Inattentive children will earn less money at 35

An international team led by Université de Montréal researchers finds that if kids can't pay attention in kindergarten, they will grow up to have less lucrative careers.

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Distinguishing helpful and harmful gut immune cells offers new view on inflammatory diseases

A type of immune cell that contributes to inflammatory bowel disease exists in two forms, 'good' and 'bad.' A new Crick-led study in Immunity has characterized these distinct populations, which could help scientists to develop treatments targeting inflammation while preserving healthy gut function.

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Reports of unprofessional behavior by surgeons and risk of complications for patients

This observational study looked at whether patients whose surgeons were more often reported by coworkers for unprofessional behavior were at greater risk of postoperative complications. The analysis included data from reports of unprofessional behavior by coworkers for 202 surgeons from two academic medical centers, as well as data on surgical and medical complications within 30 days of operation

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Certain behaviors in kindergarten associated with lower adult salary

Inattention among kindergarteners was associated with lower earnings as adults in this study based on behavioral ratings from kindergarten teachers for 2,850 children in Canada at ages 5 or 6 and government tax returns for those same children as adults at ages 33 to 35.

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Vitamin D supplementation not associated with reduced cardiovascular events

This study, called a meta-analysis, combined the results of 21 randomized clinical trials with about 83,000 patients to look at whether vitamin D supplementation was associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease events such as heart attack or stroke. Some observational studies have suggested an association between low blood levels of vitamin D and an increased risk of cardiovascular disea

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Technology can propel healthcare out of the Middle Ages

Engineers today are developing extraordinary abilities to understand and intervene with physiology

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Trump Administration Weakens Climate Plan To Help Coal Plants Stay Open

The Trump administration is replacing one of President Obama's signature plans to address climate change. It could help some coal-fired power plants, but likely won't slow the industry's decline. (Image credit: J. David Ake/AP)

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Svensk Youtube-stjerne bygger Tesla Model 3 om til en pickup

Med venners hjælp og en vinkelsliber har dronningen af dårlige robotter, Simone Giertz, bygget en spritny Tesla Model 3 om en køreklar pickup truck ved navn Truckla.

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Arter dör ut i allt snabbare takt

Forskare från Stockholms universitet och från Storbritannien har gjort den mest omfattande sammanställningen över utdöda fröväxter hittills. Den visar att det är hög tid att uppdatera den internationella rödlistan över hotade arter (som också innefattar arter som har dött ut). Forskarnas sammanställning visar att 571 arter av fröväxter har dött ut under de senaste 250 åren. Det är fyra gånger fler

1h

Letters: The Navy Was ‘Conceding Defeat to an Overbearing President’

A Stain on the Honor of the Navy When President Donald Trump visited Yokosuka Naval Base in Japan last month, sailors were reportedly ordered by the White House to hang a tarp on the USS John S. McCain, covering the ship’s name. All sailors on board were also given the day off. (President Trump had previously taken swipes at the late senator, though he tweeted a denial that he had known about the

1h

Antarctic marine life recovery following the dinosaurs' extinction

A new study shows how marine life around Antarctica returned after the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs. A team studied just under 3000 marine fossils collected from Antarctica to understand how life on the sea floor recovered after the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction 66 million years ago. They reveal it took one million years for the marine ecosystem to return to pre-exti

1h

Astronomers make first detection of polarized radio waves in Gamma Ray Burst jets

Astronomers detect polarized radio waves from a gamma-ray burst for the first time. Polarization signature reveals magnetic fields in explosions to be much more patchy and tangled than first thought. Combining the observations with data from X-ray and visible light telescopes is helping unravel the mysteries of the universe's most powerful explosions.

1h

High postural sway doubles older women's fracture risk

Postural sway is an independent risk factor for bone fractures in postmenopausal women, according to a new study. Women with the highest postural sway had a two times higher fracture risk compared to women with the lowest postural sway.

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Electrons take alternative route to prevent plant stress

When plants absorb excess light energy during photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are produced, potentially causing oxidative stress that damages important structures. Plants can suppress the production of reactive oxygen species by oxidizing P700 (the reaction center chlorophyll in photosystem I). A new study has revealed more about this vital process.

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Memories form 'barrier' to letting go of objects for people who hoard

Researchers hope that the findings could help develop new ways to train people with hoarding difficulties to discard clutter.

1h

Researchers find quantum gravity has no symmetry

Using holography, researchers have found when gravity is combined with quantum mechanics, symmetry is not possible.

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Mapping and measuring proteins on the surfaces of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells

Sigma receptors are proteins found on mainly the surface of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in certain cells. Sigma-1 and sigma-2 are the two main classes of these receptors. The sigma-1 receptor is involved neurological disorders and certain types of cancer. To understand better how the receptor is involved in disease and whether drugs developed to target it are working, it is important to be able to

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How seafood shells could help solve the plastic waste problem

Chitin and chitosan from crustacean shells could put a dent in the world’s plastic waste problem.

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The secret of platinum deposits revealed by field observations in South Africa

There are two competing ideas of how platinum deposits formed: the first involves gravity-induced settling of crystals on the chamber floor, while the second idea implies that the crystals grow in situ, directly on the floor of the magmatic chamber. Researchers have established that the crystals grow in situ, with its high platinum status being attained while all its minerals were crystallising al

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Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals

Researchers from the UAB and the IMIM published in Scientific Reports the first evidence in a non-human species, the domestic dog, of a relation between joint hypermobility and excitability: dogs with more joint mobility and flexibility tend to have more anxiety problems.

1h

Is glue the answer to climate change?

A small amount of cheap epoxy resin replaces bulky support materials in making effective carbon capture solid sorbents, developed by scientists at the Energy Safety Research Institute of Swansea University.

1h

Motherhood can deliver body image boost — new study

New research indicates that perfectionism is related to breast size dissatisfaction, but only in non-mothers — suggesting that mothers are more comfortable with their bodies.

1h

Mapping and measuring proteins on the surfaces of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells

Sigma receptors are proteins found mainly on the surface of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in certain cells. Sigma-1 and sigma-2 are the two main classes of these receptors. The sigma-1 receptor is involved in neurological disorders and certain types of cancer. To understand better how the receptor is involved in disease and whether drugs developed to target it are working, it is important to be able

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Expert: Facebook Is Trying to Become an Independent Country

Pop Country Facebook just announced details of its upcoming cryptocurrency, the Libra. The goal is to help make the trade of goods and services for its billions of users easier, but that could give the company more global influence than ever before — and perhaps even turn the company into a virtual nation. “In my view as a social media researcher and educator, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is clea

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Klimatfrågan vinnare i dystopiernas kamp

– En dystopi är en framtida mardrömsvärld. Svenskars oro för en dystopisk framtid har vi mätt genom att fråga om orosmoln inför framtiden och samhällsproblem idag. Allt fler svenskar lyfter klimatfrågan som en av samtidens viktigaste frågor, och det gör klimatfrågan till vinnare i dystopiernas kamp, säger forskaren Björn Rönnerstrand. Vad är egentligen värst, en överhettad planet eller resistenta

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Bättre språk på twitter efter #metoo

Nyblivna doktorn i nationalekonomi, Sara Moricz, började redan som masterstudent att använda sig av programmerade datamodeller för sin forskning. Nationalekonomi använder av tradition statistiska modeller. Steget till att använda mer datadrivna sätt, alltså maskininlärning och AI, är inte långt. – Det är svårt att undersöka normer eftersom att vi forskare saknar data att jobba med. Men med social

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What almost dying taught me about living | Suleika Jaouad

"The hardest part of my cancer experience began once the cancer was gone," says author Suleika Jaouad. In this fierce, funny, wisdom-packed talk, she challenges us to think beyond the divide between "sick" and "well," asking: How do you begin again and find meaning after life is interrupted?

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Mapping and measuring proteins on the surfaces of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells

Sigma receptors are proteins found mainly on the surface of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in certain cells. Sigma-1 and sigma-2 are the two main classes of these receptors. The sigma-1 receptor is involved in neurological disorders and certain types of cancer. To understand better how the receptor is involved in disease and whether drugs developed to target it are working, it is important to be able

2h

UK makes 'first' conviction over 3-D printed gun

A student was convicted on Wednesday of manufacturing a firearm using a 3D printer, in what London's police said they believed was the first such successful prosecution in Britain.

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Researchers enhance security in proof of stake blockchain protocols

Blockchain Technology is known to be one of the top disruptive technologies of today that is driving the fourth industrial revolution. A blockchain, designed to be resistant to the modification of its data, offers security and privacy benefits that are well appreciated particularly by banks, governments and techno-corporations.

2h

Game of drones: Airports rally firms to battle threat from above

A quadcopter drone appears on the radar screen and makes a beeline for the control tower at Paris' Le Bourget airport.

2h

A sound idea: A step towards quantum computing

A team at the University of Tsukuba studied a novel process for creating coherent lattice waves inside silicon crystals using ultrashort laser pulses. Using theoretical calculations combined with experimental results that were obtained at the University of Pittsburgh, they were able to show that coherent vibrational signals could be maintained inside the samples. This research may lead to quantum

2h

Pitt researchers' report pushes for regional green infrastructure database

Stakeholders invested in the region's waterways, stormwater management and green infrastructure have a new roadmap to help understand the most important challenges they're facing and how to outline the most effective solutions.

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Astronomers make first detection of polarised radio waves in Gamma Ray Burst jets

Good fortune and cutting-edge scientific equipment have allowed scientists to observe a Gamma Ray Burst jet with a radio telescope and detect the polarisation of radio waves within it for the first time—moving us closer to an understanding of what causes the universe's most powerful explosions.

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Curbing the flammability of epoxy resin

In a paper to be published in a forthcoming issue of Nano, a team of researchers from Henan University have investigated the flame retardant performance of epoxy resin using a boron nitride nanosheet decorated with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

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Secure quantum communications in the microwave range for the first time

Mikel Sanz, of the Physical Chemistry Department of UPV/EHU, leads the theoretical group for an experiment published by the prestigious journal, Nature Communications. The experiment has managed to prepare a remote quantum state; i.e., absolutely secure communication was established with another, physically separated quantum computer for the first time in the microwave regime. This new technology

2h

Efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels from glucose

Researchers have presented a new strategy for efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels that can transform glucose and oleaginous microorganisms into microbial diesel fuel, with one-step direct fermentative production.

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Efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels from glucose

Researchers have presented a new strategy for efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels that can transform glucose and oleaginous microorganisms into microbial diesel fuel, with one-step direct fermentative production.

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The Green New Deal, explained

submitted by /u/wavfunction [link] [comments]

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The Digital COLD WAR

submitted by /u/borjamoya [link] [comments]

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Developing a new type of refrigeration via force-driven liquid gas transition

A research team has made a groundbreaking discovery in the quest to replace hydrofluorocarbons in refrigeration systems with natural refrigerants such as water and alcohol. Their study involved carrying-out a liquid-to-gas phase transition via a nanosponge, a soft, elastic material equipped with small nanopores less than 10 nanometers. Their findings could lead to more efficient refrigerants with

2h

Researchers find cause of rare, fatal disease that turns babies' lips and skin blue

Scientists used a gene editing method called CRISPR/Cas9 to generate mice that faithfully mimic a fatal respiratory disorder in newborn infants that turns their lips and skin blue. The new laboratory model allowed researchers to pinpoint the ailment's cause and develop a potential and desperately needed nanoparticle-based treatment. Mostly untreatable, Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misalignmen

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Directed evolution comes to plants

Accelerating plant evolution with CRISPR paves the way for breeders to engineer new crop varieties.

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Antarctic marine life recovery following the dinosaurs' extinction

A new study shows how marine life around Antarctica returned after the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs. A team led by British Antarctic Survey studied just under 3000 marine fossils collected from Antarctica to understand how life on the sea floor recovered after the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction 66 million years ago. They reveal it took one million years for the marine

2h

Researchers call for change to river management and modelling

A team of international experts including La Trobe University ecologist Nick Bond, led by the University of Canterbury, are calling for urgent global change to how we manage and model river ecosystems.

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Researchers find quantum gravity has no symmetry

Using holography, researchers have found when gravity is combined with quantum mechanics, symmetry is not possible.

2h

Memories form 'barrier' to letting go of objects for people who hoard

Researchers hope that the findings could help develop new ways to train people with hoarding difficulties to discard clutter.

2h

Mapping and measuring proteins on the surfaces of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells

Researchers from Kanazawa University on the development of a technique to closely track a specific protein on the surfaces of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells. Their findings are published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry.

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Efterlysning: Københavns Universitets bestyrelse søger ny formand og to nye medlemmer

Den 1. januar 2020 har universitetets bestyrelse brug for en ny formand og to nye eksterne medlemmer….

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How to Turn a Quantum Computer Into the Ultimate Randomness Generator

Say the words “quantum supremacy” at a gathering of computer scientists, and eyes will likely roll. The phrase refers to the idea that quantum computers will soon cross a threshold where they’ll perform with relative ease tasks that are extremely hard for classical computers. Until recently, these tasks were thought to have little real-world use, hence the eye rolls. But now that Google’s quantum

2h

Measuring peace essential to effective peacebuilding

Lack of effective means of measuring the quality of the peace may contribute to recurrence of violence in war-torn areas, according to a new book by Oxford professor Richard Caplan.

2h

E.P.A. Finalizes Its Plan to Replace Obama-Era Climate Rules

The new measure will very likely prompt a flurry of legal challenges. If upheld in court, it could tie the hands of future presidents on global warming.

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A sound idea: a step towards quantum computing

Researchers have developed a new method for using lasers to create tiny lattice waves inside silicon crystals that can encode quantum information. By taking advantage of existing silicon hardware, this work may greatly reduce the cost of future quantum computers for cryptographic and optimization applications.

2h

Developing a new type of refrigeration via force-driven liquid gas transition

A research team has made a groundbreaking discovery in the quest to replace hydrofluorocarbons in refrigeration systems with natural refrigerants such as water and alcohol. Their study involved carrying-out a liquid-to-gas phase transition via a nanosponge, a soft, elastic material equipped with small nanopores less than 10 nanometers. Their findings could lead to more efficient refrigerants with

2h

Researchers find cause of rare, fatal disease that turns babies' lips and skin blue

Scientists used a gene editing method called CRISPR/Cas9 to generate mice that faithfully mimic a fatal respiratory disorder in newborn infants that turns their lips and skin blue. The new laboratory model allowed researchers to pinpoint the ailment's cause and develop a potential and desperately needed nanoparticle-based treatment. Mostly untreatable, Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misalignmen

2h

Real-time analysis of MOF adsorption behavior

Researchers have developed a technology to analyze the adsorption behavior of molecules in each individual pore of a metal organic framework (MOF). This system has large specific surface areas, allowing for the real-time observation of the adsorption process of an MOF, a new material effective for sorting carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and methane.

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How arousal impacts physiological synchrony in relationships

A team of researchers has examined what type of social interaction is required for people to display physiological synchrony — mutual changes in autonomic nervous system activity. The study also looked at whether the levels of autonomic arousal people share predicts affiliation and friendship interest between people.

2h

Good viruses and bad bacteria: A world-first green sea turtle trial

A world-first study has found an alternative to antibiotics for treating bacterial infections in green sea turtles.

2h

Secure quantum communications in the microwave range for the first time

Mikel Sanz, of the Physical Chemistry Department of UPV/EHU, leads the theoretical group for an experiment published by the prestigious magazine, Nature Communications. The experiment has managed to prepare a remote quantum state; i.e., absolutely secure communication was established with another, physically separated quantum computer for the first time in the microwave regime. This new technology

2h

Electrons take alternative route to prevent plant stress

When plants absorb excess light energy during photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are produced, potentially causing oxidative stress that damages important structures. Plants can suppress the production of reactive oxygen species by oxidizing P700 (the reaction center chlorophyll in photosystem I). A new study has revealed more about this vital process.

2h

Astronomers make first detection of polarised radio waves in Gamma Ray Burst jets

Astronomers detect polarised radio waves from a gamma-ray burst for the first time. Polarisation signature reveals magnetic fields in explosions to be much more patchy and tangled than first thought. Combining the observations with data from X-ray and visible light telescopes is helping unravel the mysteries of the universe's most powerful explosions.

2h

High postural sway doubles older women's fracture risk

Postural sway is an independent risk factor for bone fractures in postmenopausal women, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. Women with the highest postural sway had a two times higher fracture risk compared to women with the lowest postural sway.

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Tasty deals: Apps help find unsold food and reduce waste

After a long day at work, Annekathrin Fiesinger is too tired to consider making dinner at home. So the 34-year-old uses her smart phone to check nearby restaurants, hotels or bakeries in Berlin for food being sold for a discount at the end of the day.

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Researchers lay out plan for managing rivers for climate change

New strategies for river management are needed to maintain water supplies and avoid big crashes in populations of aquatic life, researchers argue in a perspective piece published today in Nature.

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Hasselblad’s X1D II mirrorless camera is faster and more affordable

Most of the recent updates from Hasselblad have had to do with the cameras popping up on drones or costing $48,000. But the company is still working on the mirrorless medium-format …

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This Weird Animal Eats Rocks for Breakfast

Rocks might not sound like a delectable meal to most life-forms, but it's on the menu for a newly identified species of a plump, bizarre-looking clam.

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Good viruses and bad bacteria: A world-first green sea turtle trial

Researchers at the JCU Turtle Health Research Facility have conducted a first-of-its-kind study using what's known as phage therapy as an option for bacterial infections in green sea turtles.

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Real-time analysis of MOF adsorption behavior

Researchers have developed a technology to analyze the adsorption behavior of molecules in each individual pore of a metal organic framework (MOF). This system has large specific surface areas, allowing for the real-time observation of the adsorption process of an MOF, a new material effective for sorting carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and methane.

2h

Good viruses and bad bacteria: A world-first green sea turtle trial

Researchers at the JCU Turtle Health Research Facility have conducted a first-of-its-kind study using what's known as phage therapy as an option for bacterial infections in green sea turtles.

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Understanding nuclear weapons and Iran's uranium enrichment program

Iranian leaders have threatened to withdraw from a 2015 agreement that limits their nation's nuclear activities. Under the deal, the United States and five other world powers lifted economic sanctions they had imposed to prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons. But President Trump removed the U.S. from the deal in 2018 and reimposed sanctions.

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A new set of eyes heads for space

Germany’s bold universe observer mission is set for take-off.

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Shifting crop-burn timing reduces air pollution

Moves in India to change farming practice are paying big dividends. Biplab Das reports.

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Cosmetics injure thousands of children every year

US research finds nail polish, haircare products and fragrances lead to poisonings. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Långvarig hetta drabbar barn på förskolor

I kölvattnet av den exceptionellt varma sommaren 2018 utlyste forskningsrådet Formas medel för tvärvetenskaplig forskning om effekterna av ett extremt klimat. – Vi sökte anslag och fick pengar för att studera hur värme påverkar förskolebarn i deras utemiljö, säger docent Fredrik Lindberg, forskare inom stadsklimatologi och naturgeografi som leder det tvärvetenskapliga projektet ”Värmeböljors påve

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The Prickly Debate on Germline Gene Therapy, and Moving It Forward

In 2016, a healthy baby boy came screaming into the world in a Mexican clinic. Harboring DNA from three parents, the baby had had his genes dramatically altered while still an embryo. Without the treatment, an inheritable neurological disorder would’ve killed him before the age of three. Two years later across the world in China, two girls, also as embryos, had their genes edited using CRISPR to

3h

Using culture to breathe new life into historic city centres

Urban decay, social conflict and low living standards are not uncommon in many of Europe's historic city centres. Is it possible to breathe new life into these areas while doing it in a sustainable way?

3h

Image: Metal bracket in Ariane 5 is 3-D-printed in titanium

This organically-styled bracket, designed for the interior of an Ariane 5 launcher, was 3-D printed in space-worthy titanium alloy for an R&D project.

3h

Cat muzzles: cruel or useful?

It's not unusual to slap a muzzle on a dog if it's being aggressive or not keen on being given an injection, but a muzzle is not part of your average cat's wardrobe. Yet there they are online, by the dozen, in a wide range of styles and colours.

3h

Directed evolution comes to plants

A new platform for speeding up and controlling the evolution of proteins inside living plants has been developed by a KAUST-led team.

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Learning constrains further learning, neuroscientists find

Why is it that a master musician can learn a new score in no time, yet encounter difficulty learning something else, like skateboarding tricks? Could there is any truth to the myth that you use only 10 percent of your brain? A recent neuroscience study at KTH Royal Institute of Technology offers some answers about the limits of new learning and how the brain adapts to developing new skills and kno

3h

Cat muzzles: cruel or useful?

It's not unusual to slap a muzzle on a dog if it's being aggressive or not keen on being given an injection, but a muzzle is not part of your average cat's wardrobe. Yet there they are online, by the dozen, in a wide range of styles and colours.

3h

Directed evolution comes to plants

A new platform for speeding up and controlling the evolution of proteins inside living plants has been developed by a KAUST-led team.

3h

Learning constrains further learning, neuroscientists find

Why is it that a master musician can learn a new score in no time, yet encounter difficulty learning something else, like skateboarding tricks? Could there is any truth to the myth that you use only 10 percent of your brain? A recent neuroscience study at KTH Royal Institute of Technology offers some answers about the limits of new learning and how the brain adapts to developing new skills and kno

3h

Snail-Inspired Glue Can Paste You to the Ceiling, Then Let You Go

Either/Or When it comes to adhesives , you really have two options: something super-strong that creates an irreversible bond, like superglue, or something that’s less strong but reversible — think mounting putty. Now, researchers have discovered an adhesive that’s both strong and reversible — so of course they used it to suspend an engineering student from the ceiling. Snail Stuff At the center o

3h

How bacteria protect themselves from plasma treatment

Plasmas are created from gas that is pumped with energy. Today, plasmas are already used against multi-resistant pathogens in clinical applications, for example to treat chronic wounds. "Plasmas provide a complex cocktail of components, many of which act as disinfectants in their own right," explains Professor Julia Bandow, head of the RUB research group Applied Microbiology. UV radiation, electri

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5 ways a ‘lazy’ lawn makes pollinators happy

You might feel bad about having a less-than-manicured lawn, but it’s great for bees and other pollinators. Beyond supporting healthy ecosystems for other species (including us), pollinators are key to bringing food to our tables, not to mention coffee, chocolate, and tequila. Cutting yourself some slack in the yard can provide pollinators with food, shelter, and protection from pesticides, three

3h

High reaction rates even without precious metals

Non-precious metal nanoparticles could one day replace expensive catalysts for hydrogen production. However, it is often difficult to determine what reaction rates they can achieve, especially when it comes to oxide particles. This is because the particles must be attached to the electrode using a binder and conductive additives, which distort the results. With the aid of electrochemical analyses

3h

How bacteria protect themselves from plasma treatment

Plasmas are created from gas that is pumped with energy. Today, plasmas are already used against multi-resistant pathogens in clinical applications, for example to treat chronic wounds. "Plasmas provide a complex cocktail of components, many of which act as disinfectants in their own right," explains Professor Julia Bandow, head of the RUB research group Applied Microbiology. UV radiation, electri

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Opinion: With cryptocurrency launch, Facebook sets its path toward becoming an independent nation

Facebook has announced a plan to launch a new cryptocurrency named the Libra, adding another layer to its efforts to dominate global communications and business. Backed by huge finance and technology companies including Visa, Spotify, eBay, PayPal and Uber—plus a ready-made user base of 2 billion people around the world—Facebook is positioned to pressure countries and central banks to cooperate wi

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The secret of platinum deposits revealed by novel field observations in the Bushveld Complex

Research from the Wits School of Geoscience shows how platinum deposits form in the Bushveld Complex of South Africa.

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Get your fax right: Bungling officials spark Japan nuclear scare

Bungling Japanese officials sparked a nuclear scare after a violent, late-night earthquake by ticking the wrong box on a fax form—inadvertently alerting authorities to a potential accident.

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Greenpeace sounds alarm over plastic pollution in rivers

Greenpeace on Wednesday raised the alarm over microplastics in rivers after finding the pollutant in all the rivers it tested in Britain, calling it a "problem of enormous complexity".

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US CEO hands Oxford University $189 million for AI studies

An American billionaire has given Oxford University 150 million pounds ($188.6 million) for a new institute that will study the ethical implications of artificial intelligence and computing technologies.

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Gun 'that ended Van Gogh's life' sells for nearly triple estimate

The revolver with which Vincent van Gogh is believed to have shot himself sold for 162,500 euros ($182,000) at a Paris auction on Wednesday—nearly three times the estimate.

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SUTD researchers enhance security in proof of stake blockchain protocols

Proof of Stake Blockchain protocols rely on voting mechanisms to reach consensus on the data, but they can be vulnerable to faults when validators accidentally or maliciously withhold their votes. SUTD researchers studied weighted voting and designed an algorithm to enhance their security.

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Real-time analysis of MOF adsorption behavior

Researchers have developed a technology to analyze the adsorption behavior of molecules in each individual pore of a metal organic framework (MOF). This system has large specific surface areas, allowing for the real-time observation of the adsorption process of an MOF, a new material effective for sorting carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and methane.

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Good viruses and bad bacteria: A world-first green sea turtle trial

A world-first study at James Cook University in Australia has found an alternative to antibiotics for treating bacterial infections in green sea turtles.

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Study: How arousal impacts physiological synchrony in relationships

A team of researchers led by a member of the Colorado School of Public Health faculty at the Anschutz Medical Campus examined what type of social interaction is required for people to display physiological synchrony –mutual changes in autonomic nervous system activity. The study also looked at whether the levels of autonomic arousal people share predicts affiliation and friendship interest betwee

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New evidence shows rapid response in the West Greenland landscape to Arctic climate shifts

Evidence from an Arctic ecosystem experiencing rapid climate change reveals surprisingly tight coupling of environmental responses to climate shifts. Links between abrupt climate change and environmental response have long been considered delayed or dampened by internal ecosystem dynamics, or only strong when climate shifts are large in magnitude. The UMaine-led international research team present

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New study to examine feeding habits of Cape Cod great whites

Researchers on Cape Cod are launching a new study focused on the hunting and feeding habits of the region's great white sharks following last year's two attacks on humans, including the state's first fatal one in more than 80 years.

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New study to examine feeding habits of Cape Cod great whites

Researchers on Cape Cod are launching a new study focused on the hunting and feeding habits of the region's great white sharks following last year's two attacks on humans, including the state's first fatal one in more than 80 years.

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Adidas loses EU court battle over 'three stripe' design

German sportswear giant Adidas on Wednesday lost a legal battle to trademark its "three stripe" motif in the EU, as a court ruled the design was not distinctive enough to deserve protection.

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Cyanide-free gold goes into production

Australia is leading the charge towards greener and safer gold production with an environmentally-superior alternative gold recovery process technology, dispensing with toxic cyanide and mercury currently used in most gold production processes worldwide.

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Colonial genocide is a composite act: A human rights analysis

Canada is currently embroiled in a debate about whether the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls should have used the word "genocide" to describe our federal, provincial and municipal governments' past and current treatment of Indigenous peoples. Perhaps this word is too strong and inaccurate.

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Is glue the answer to climate crisis?

Is glue the answer to climate change? Researchers at the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University have proven that it could certainly help. They have developed a new material capable of capturing the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) with the key ingredient being a common epoxy resin you probably have at home.

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Rocket Lab: The small firm that launched the 3D-printed space revolution

Peter Beck founded Rocket Lab, which 3D-prints rocket engines for NASA. We talked to him about the technology’s benefits—and the future of the fledgling small launch industry.

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Electrons take alternative route to prevent plant stress

Plants are susceptible to stress, and with the global impact of climate change and humanity's growing demand for food, it's crucial to understand what causes plant stress and stress tolerance. When plants absorb excess light energy during photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are produced, potentially causing oxidative stress that damages important structures. Plants can suppress the production

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Predictive AI is the newest weapon in the battle to protect endangered animals

Sothear Chheng has one of the toughest jobs anywhere.

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Electrons take alternative route to prevent plant stress

Plants are susceptible to stress, and with the global impact of climate change and humanity's growing demand for food, it's crucial to understand what causes plant stress and stress tolerance. When plants absorb excess light energy during photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are produced, potentially causing oxidative stress that damages important structures. Plants can suppress the production

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Meat is masculine: how food advertising perpetuates harmful gender stereotypes

The UK Advertising Standards Authority has introduced a new rule in its advertising code which bans adverts which feature gender stereotypes "that are likely to cause harm, or serious or widespread offence."

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Predictive AI is the newest weapon in the battle to protect endangered animals

Sothear Chheng has one of the toughest jobs anywhere.

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Troublesome trees: spread of forests contributed to ancient extinction

Evidence from ancient rocks in north Alabama show the Earth's first forest spread rapidly, likely contributing to a mass extinction of shallow marine life some 370 million years ago.

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Graphene-based ink may lead to printable energy storage devices

Researchers have created an ink made of graphene nanosheets, and demonstrated that the ink can be used to print 3-D structures. As the graphene-based ink can be mass-produced in an inexpensive and environmentally friendly manner, the new methods pave the way toward developing a wide variety of printable energy storage devices.

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Playing games? It's a serious way to win community backing for change

How would you and your neighbours triple the number of households in your street block in order to keep your cherished suburb thriving and do your bit to tackle urban sprawl? You have a number of choices to make. Where do the new homes go? How big should they be? What do you do with the old houses on your street? How do you maintain the leafy, open qualities you all love? How can you build an even

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Ion beams and atom smashers: secrets of moon rocks

Moon samples collected by the Apollo astronauts a half-century ago hold answers to questions that weren't even on scientists' minds at the time, as new technological tools provide insight into some of the oldest mysteries about the moon, the earth and the solar system.

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For True Trump Believers, the Magic Isn’t Lost

ORLANDO—These are snapshots of loyalty. Rain-soaked Donald Trump supporters huddle under a tent outside the 20,000-capacity Amway Center, where in a few hours the president will “officially” kick off the reelection campaign he filed the paperwork for more than two years ago. It’s 2 p.m., and the “45 Fest”—a political tailgate of sorts outside the arena—started hours ago. There are rows upon rows

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Unexpected culprit: Wetlands as source of methane

Wetlands are an important part of the Earth's natural water management system. The complex system of plants, soil, and aquatic life serves as a reservoir that captures and cleans water. However, as cities have expanded, many wetlands were drained for construction. In addition, many areas of land in the Midwest were drained to increase uses for agriculture to feed a growing world.

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Your nose knows when it comes to stronger memories

Memories are stronger when the original experiences are accompanied by unpleasant odors, a team of researchers has found. The study broadens our understanding of what can drive Pavlovian responses and points to how negative experiences influence our ability to recall past events.

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Crocs' climate clock: Ancient distribution of Crocs could reveal more about past climates

Underneath their tough exteriors, some crocodilians have a sensitive side that scientists could use to shine light on our ancient climate.

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Researchers lay out plan for managing rivers for climate change

New strategies for river management are needed to maintain water supplies and avoid big crashes in populations of aquatic life, researchers argue.

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Spinning star scientists

Scientists at a research university often play a formative role in the commercialization of intellectual property and inventions emerging from their laboratories. Often, the "spinning off" of a startup company will be to the benefit of society as a whole particularly in the biomedical research areas where innovation might have a significant impact on human health.

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Emaciated Polar Bear Wanders Into a Siberian City

The animal was seen roaming the streets of Norilsk, Russia, hundreds of miles from its usual habitat. Experts said it was probably looking for food.

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Developing a new type of refrigeration via force-driven liquid gas transition

A research team of Tohoku University, Nissan Motor Co., Shinshu University, and Okayama University made a groundbreaking discovery in the quest to replace hydrofluorocarbons in refrigeration systems with natural refrigerants such as water and alcohol. Their study involved carrying-out a liquid-to-gas phase transition via a nanosponge, a soft, elastic material equipped with small nanopores less tha

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Efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels from glucose

Researchers have presented a new strategy for efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels that can transform glucose and oleaginous microorganisms into microbial diesel fuel, with one-step direct fermentative production.

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A sound idea: a step towards quantum computing

Researchers at the University of Tsukuba and the University of Pittsburgh have developed a new method for using lasers to create tiny lattice waves inside silicon crystals that can encode quantum information. By taking advantage of existing silicon hardware, this work may greatly reduce the cost of future quantum computers for cryptographic and optimization applications.

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New Kindle Oasis e-reader with color-adjustable light coming July 24 for $250 – CNET

Amazon's high-end e-reader is getting a slight refresh ahead of the summer with a light that goes from cool to warm.

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56 new species of arachnids found in Western Australia

Researchers at The University of Western Australia and the Western Australian Museum have discovered 56 new species of arachnids, known as schizomids, in Western Australia's Pilbara region.

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AI, robots, data software helping create new approach for planning cities of the future

Artificial intelligence and robots are playing significant roles as planners develop the cities of the future. The architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry is facing a major shift in balancing the massive amounts of data available through advanced technologies.

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Making flying actually sustainable

CO2 -neutral synthetic fuels are technically feasible today and the best promise for decarbonizing aviation. The right policy instruments could turn promise into reality, writes Anthony Patt.

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Largest data set in SETI history released to the public

Breakthrough Listen—the astronomical program searching for signs of intelligent life in the Universe—has submitted two publications to leading astrophysics journals, describing the analysis of its first three years of radio observations and the availability of a petabyte of radio and optical telescope data. This represents the largest release of SETI data in the history of its field.

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56 new species of arachnids found in Western Australia

Researchers at The University of Western Australia and the Western Australian Museum have discovered 56 new species of arachnids, known as schizomids, in Western Australia's Pilbara region.

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Report: Tariffs Could Raise Laptop, Phone Prices 22 Percent

The Consumer Technology Association has released a report quantifying the damage to the US economy if the Trump Administration goes ahead with proposed tariff increases. Laptop, cell phones, and tablets could all become significantly more expensive, if the projection is accurate. The post Report: Tariffs Could Raise Laptop, Phone Prices 22 Percent appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Shipworm that eats rock instead of wood found in river in the Philippines

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has found and identified a species of shipworm that eats rock instead of wood. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the bivalve and what they found.

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Dew drops spontaneously flinging themselves into the wind may spread wheat infections

A team of researchers with members from Virginia Tech, Indira Gandhi Delhi Technical University for Women and Cornell University has found that dew drops on wheat leaves can catapult themselves into the air. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes their study of dew drop behavior on wheat plants and why they believe it might be a means of dispersing

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Arianespace and ESA announce Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer launch contract

JUICE is the first large-class mission in ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015–2025 programme. Its mission is devoted to complete a unique tour of the Jupiter system.

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Shipworm that eats rock instead of wood found in river in the Philippines

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has found and identified a species of shipworm that eats rock instead of wood. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the bivalve and what they found.

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Dew drops spontaneously flinging themselves into the wind may spread wheat infections

A team of researchers with members from Virginia Tech, Indira Gandhi Delhi Technical University for Women and Cornell University has found that dew drops on wheat leaves can catapult themselves into the air. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes their study of dew drop behavior on wheat plants and why they believe it might be a means of dispersing

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Developing a new type of refrigeration via force-driven liquid gas transition

A research team of Tohoku University, Nissan Motor Co., Shinshu University, and Okayama University made a groundbreaking discovery in the quest to replace hydrofluorocarbons in refrigeration systems with natural refrigerants such as water and alcohol. Their study involved carrying-out a liquid-to-gas phase transition via a nanosponge, a soft, elastic material equipped with small nanopores less tha

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The Photographer Who Captured 20th-Century Queer Life

Updated: 2019-06-19 Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series about the gay-rights movement and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. In her classic 1975 self-portrait, the lesbian photographer Joan E. Biren (or “JEB,” as she is more commonly known) tacitly shifts the meaning of a road sign. Smiling, with a glint in her eye, she leans comfortably against the post, her confident po

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Google Turns to Retro Cryptography to Keep Datasets Private

Google's Private Join and Compute will let companies compare notes without divulging sensitive information.

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Alexa could spot your cardiac arrest—by listening to your breathing

A new system that listens for a telltale gasping sound could get you vital help in time.

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Direct method to etch-embed Ce onto Cu-based Oxide

In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, a team of researchers from Nanchang University have attempted to directly engineer the surface structure of Cu-based substrate to get a series of Ce-O-Cu catalysts for NH 3 -SCR of NO. The obtained catalysts exhibit distinct synergistic effect and attractive catalytic performance.

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Curbing the flammability of epoxy resin

How to improve the flame retardant performance of two-dimensional flame retardants?In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, a team of researchers from Henan University have investigated the flame retardant performance of epoxy resin using a boron nitride nanosheet decorated with cobalt ferrite nanoparticle.

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A 3D view of climatic behavior at the third pole

Research across several areas of the 'Third Pole' — the high-mountain region centered on the Tibetan Plateau — shows a seasonal cycle in how near-surface temperature changes with elevation. Near-surface temperature, which reflects the energy balance at the land surface, is crucial because it drives climate processes.

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Researchers lay out plan for managing rivers for climate change

New strategies for river management are needed to maintain water supplies and avoid big crashes in populations of aquatic life, researchers argue in a perspective piece published today in Nature.

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Brain anatomy links cognitive and perceptual symptoms in autism

Neuroscientists at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) and University College London have found an anatomical link between cognitive and perceptual symptoms in autism. Published in the Journal of Neuroscience, the study identified a posterior region of the brain whose size — amount of gray matter — is related to both cognitive rigidity and overly stable visual perception, two symptoms of au

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Observations reveal gas stripping and enhanced star formation in the galaxy JO206

Using the Very Large Array (VLA), astronomers have conducted observations of neutral gas in the galaxy JO206. Results of these observations provide important information regarding gas stripping and enhanced star formation in this galaxy. The findings are detailed in a paper published June 9 on arXiv.org.

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Varmt LED-lys forlænger levetiden på ost og kød

Nye typer lys kan forsinke misfarvninger og harskning af kød og ost.

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Unto the Fourth Generation – in Nematodes

An organism is exposed to some new task or stimulus in its environment, and learns a new behavior to deal with it. Does this trait get passed on to its progeny? Of course not. That would be Lamarckianism (or even worse, Lysenkoism ), and that’s just not how things work. If you teach your dog a complicated trick, her puppies will not be born knowing it. My own son and daughter displayed a notable

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The future of artificial intelligence: stories

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Investors will either use artificial intelligence or fall behind

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If doctor decides, aggressive end-of-life care more likely

Terminally ill patients who request that physicians make decisions on their behalf are more likely to receive aggressive treatments in the weeks before they die, a new study reports. The study in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management is the first to examine if personal beliefs and attitudes of both patients and physicians affect end-of-life treatments that can be painful and risky, researche

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Advancing AI for video: Startup launches powerful video processing platform

Voxel51, a University of Michigan startup, today launched its flagship product—a software platform designed to make it easier, faster and more affordable to access the untapped potential of video data.

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Facebook's new cryptocurrency won't protect user privacy from the company, expert says

Facebook announced Tuesday (June 18) it will launch a global cryptocurrency called Libra in 2020, alongside the underlying blockchain-based network—a secure, transparent and decentralized digital lender—that will support it.

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Guns are often obtained just days before a crime, study finds

Guns recovered from crimes are often a decade old, but knowing when a gun was manufactured doesn't reveal how many times it may have changed hands.

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Your nose knows when it comes to stronger memories

Memories are stronger when the original experiences are accompanied by unpleasant odors, a team of researchers has found. The study broadens our understanding of what can drive Pavlovian responses and points to how negative experiences influence our ability to recall past events.

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Shimmer and ClearSky announce partnership to improve analysis of wearable sensor data for CNS diseases

This partnership will employ Shimmer's Verisense™ wearable sensors platform, which has been designed specifically for use in clinical research, with ClearSky algorithms and machine learning to transform wearables data into actionable insights for central nervous system (CNS) diseases.

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Radioactive Energy Cards

Thailand officials warn of a radioactive snake-oil "energy card." It's worse than worthless – it's actively dangerous.

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Physicists to hunt dark matter in a former gold mine

In a mine where workers once risked their lives to find gold, researchers now seek the ultimate treasure in particle physics—dark matter. The Cage, as the elevator is called, leaves exactly at 7:30 am and slowly descends. Nearly two dozen people packed together inside wear coveralls, hard hats, and thick rubber boots to protect them from the water dripping from the timber buttressing the elevator

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Vaccine opinions, space-station science and Hong Kong protests

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01905-0 The week in science: 14–20 June 2019.

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Marine life recovery following the dinosaurs' extinction

A new study shows how marine life around Antarctica returned after the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs.

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Cruising in the Age of Consent

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series about the gay-rights movement and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. H unting for answers to one of life’s great questions, the lesbian writer Rita Mae Brown pasted on a mustache in 1975 and walked into a bathhouse for gay men. “The adventure attracted me, but besides that I’ve been raised with the constantly repeated notion that women’

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Study finds any single hair from the human body can be used for identification

Any single hair from anywhere on the human body can be used to identify a person.

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New evidence shows rapid response in the West Greenland landscape to Arctic climate shifts

New evidence shows that Arctic ecosystems undergo rapid, strong and pervasive environmental changes in response to climate shifts, even those of moderate magnitude, according to an international research team led by the University of Maine.

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The memory lanterns of Loi Krathong

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01910-3 Something to share.

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Image of the Day: Close Encounters

Watch a hawk close in on a target.

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How personalities of wild small mammals affect forest structure

A mouse scampers through the forest, stopping suddenly at the sight of a tree seed on the ground. A potential meal. And a dilemma.

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Olympus Tough TG-6 Review: A Durable Point-and-Shoot Camera

The latest Olympus TG is a go-anywhere camera that soars where smartphones crash.

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How personalities of wild small mammals affect forest structure

A mouse scampers through the forest, stopping suddenly at the sight of a tree seed on the ground. A potential meal. And a dilemma.

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China Reveals Scientific Experiments for Next Space Station

Projects will probe topics including DNA mutation, fire behaviour and the birth of stars — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ung læge: Styrelse gør os bekymret for at fejle

Yngre læger i almen medicin bekymrer sig i høj grad for at ende i klagesager, viser ny undersøgelse. Styrelsen for Patientsikkerheds offensive tilgang har gjort frygten større, siger ung læge. Styrelsen maner til ro.

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The Cuyahoga River Caught Fire at Least a Dozen Times, but No One Cared Until 1969

Despite being much smaller than previous fires, the river blaze in Cleveland 50 years ago became a symbol for the nascent environmental movement

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Mozilla Discloses Serious Firefox Security Exploit, Update Your Browser Now

You may have only recently updated your Firefox browser to build 67.0, but guess what? You should mash the update button once gain. The latest version, build 67.0.3, contains a fix for a major …

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Balancing the Ledger on Juneteenth

In 2019, Juneteenth will be celebrated as emancipation was in the old days: with calls for reparations. As the country marks 154 years since news of the end of slavery belatedly came to Texas, the House Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing on the subject of reparations for black Americans. It is a watershed moment in the larger debate over American policy and memory with regard to an enduring

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These genes could make a better chicken

Scientists have identified genes that may help farmers breed chickens than can resist one of the biggest disease threats facing poultry today, a new study reports. The findings show that a set of genes differentially expressed in two breeds of chickens can fight off, in varying degrees, Newcastle disease, a virus that hampers poultry production worldwide. Identifying the genes could help design b

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Statins could cut heart risk for many more Britons, study suggests

DNA tests might identify ‘invisible population’ who are not currently seen as in danger Hundreds of thousands more adults in the UK could benefit from taking statins because their genes put them at high risk of heart disease, research suggests. Speaking on Wednesday at the UK Biobank conference in London, Prof Sir Peter Donnelly, the founder of the company Genomics Plc, warned of an “invisible po

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Tiny LED could light up a computer that fits on a speck of dust

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01896-y Ultra-efficient light sources provide optical communication signals even at very low power levels.

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New environmental DNA program makes conservation research faster, more efficient

It's estimated that a person sheds between 30,000 to 40,000 skin cells per day. These cells and their associated DNA leave genetic traces of ourselves in showers, dust—pretty much everywhere we go.

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The satellite with X-ray vision

In the early hours of October 23, 2011, ROSAT was engulfed in the waves of the Indian Ocean. This was the end of a success story that is unparalleled in German space exploration research. The satellite, developed and built by a team led by Joachim Trümper from the Garchingbased Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, not only found more than 150,000 new cosmic X-ray sources, it also rev

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Californians agree: Don't build in wildfire-prone areas

Almost three-quarters of California voters think limits should be imposed on new housing developments in high-risk wildfire areas, according to a new Berkeley IGS Poll.

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New environmental DNA program makes conservation research faster, more efficient

It's estimated that a person sheds between 30,000 to 40,000 skin cells per day. These cells and their associated DNA leave genetic traces of ourselves in showers, dust—pretty much everywhere we go.

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NASA Administrator Confirms SpaceX Explosion Will Delay Launches

It has been almost two months since a SpaceX Dragon II capsule exploded during testing, and NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine has now confirmed publicly that the "anomaly" has pushed back the launch schedule. The post NASA Administrator Confirms SpaceX Explosion Will Delay Launches appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Scientists identify genes associated with biliary atresia survival

Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have identified an expression pattern of 14 genes at the time of diagnosis that predicts two year, transplant-free survival in children with biliary atresia — the most common diagnosis leading to liver transplants in children.

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Here Are the 5 Biggest Questions About the Galaxy Note 10

According to a new report from CNET, the Galaxy Note 10 is set to launch on August 7th in New York City, which based on the August 9th launch for the Note 9 last year, seems about right. But …

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Voracious Black Holes Could Feed Alien Life on Rogue Worlds

Black holes are engines of destruction on a cosmic scale, but they may also be the bringers of life.

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NEEMO: Testing space gear under the sea

NASA's Extreme Environment Mission Operations takes place more than 18 meters below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean. For nine days, astronauts, engineers, and scientists live and work underwater, testing new technologies for space.

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Where Are All the Working Mothers in STEM?

Unfortunately, career vs. family is too often still seen as an either/or choice. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Ambassador From a Government That Doesn’t Exist Yet

In Washington, D.C., Juan Guaidó and his representatives are feted as Venezuela’s only true leaders. But that’s far less of a reality in Caracas, where Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro remains entrenched in power. Guaidó, who has rocketed from obscurity to renown in mere months, is now recognized as Venezuela’s interim president by more than 50 countries. It’s the culmination of a long, fitful

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Hospitals Aren’t Ready for a Mass-Casualty Wildfire

With wildfires intensifying, the number of burn victims is likely to rise. But hospitals have been losing their burn treatment expertise, leaving the country unprepared.

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How Facial Recognition Is Fighting Child Sex Trafficking

A nonprofit called Thorn is using Amazon Rekognition to scan online ads for underage sex-trafficking victims.

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From Two Bulls, 9 Million Dairy Cows

Genetic homogeneity increases the risk of inherited disorders and reduces a population's ability to evolve in the face of a changing environment. Researchers decided to use half-century-old bull semen to create male calves with distinct Y chromosomes — every parameter in their development will be monitored.

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Japan says reducing carbon emissions is an 'urgent issue'

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Samurai Text Tells Secrets of Sword-Fighters' 'Supernatural Powers'

Dating back to the 17th century, the text contains knowledge passed down from a samurai who fought and won 33 duels in Japan.

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Where Are All the Working Mothers in STEM?

Unfortunately, career vs. family is too often still seen as an either/or choice. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Locally-based Haitian social entrepreneurs empower disaster-stricken villages

Steffen Farny, Ewald Kibler and Simon Down report how communities can better cope and move on from the trauma of natural disasters, and build hope for the future. Farny says, "Aside from the physical damage, the aftermath of a natural disaster can also create a cultural trauma, so we wanted to look beyond the first phase of disaster response and focus on the longer-term repercussions and approache

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Tre ud af ti danskere frygter sikkerhed i vacciner

En analyse fra The Wellcome Trust viser blandt andet, at danskere er mere skeptiske over for sikkerheden vedrørende vacciner end vores nordeuropæiske naboer. World Health Organisation kalder den lave tillid for en global krise.

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The Quantum Internet Is Emerging, One Experiment at a Time

Breakthrough demonstrations using defective diamonds, high-flying drones, laser-bathed crystals and other exotica suggest practical, unhackable quantum networks are within reach — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Her er Facebooks nye kryptovaluta Libra

Dine oplysninger om transaktioner vil blive behandlet separat fra dine normale Facebook-data, lover det sociale medie.

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The Quantum Internet Is Emerging, One Experiment at a Time

Breakthrough demonstrations using defective diamonds, high-flying drones, laser-bathed crystals and other exotica suggest practical, unhackable quantum networks are within reach — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Statisticians clamor for retraction of paper by Harvard researchers they say uses a “nonsense statistic”

“Uh, hypothetical situation: you see a paper published that is based on a premise which is clearly flawed, proven by existing literature.” So began an exasperated Twitter thread by Andrew Althouse, a statistician at University of Pittsburgh, in which he debated whether a study using what he calls a “nonsense statistic” should be addressed by … Continue reading Statisticians clamor for retraction o

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Alcohol Boosts the Risk of Breast Cancer. Many Women Have No Idea.

Drinking alcohol is known to raise women's risk of developing breast cancer, but many women aren't aware of this link.

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Oldest Known Galactic Get-Together Occurred Shortly After Big Bang

This is the earliest known galaxy merger in the universe.

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Professor har arbejdet på alt fra 1G til 6G: Målet er det trådløse kabel

PLUS. Professor Preben Mogensen har været med til at udvikle mobilnetværk i over 30 år. Nu er han begyndt på udviklingen af 6G, der først ventes klar om ti år.

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Legal Abortion Isn’t the Problem to Be Solved

Despite the fear and anxiety that many parents of disabled children initially have, published research shows that—with the proper support—they routinely end up satisfied with their lives and optimistic about their children’s chances for future happiness. Moreover, the lives of adults with impairments are hardly devoid of joy. One of us is able-bodied; the other was disabled by a spinal-cord injur

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Los Angeles Is in Crisis. So Why Isn’t It Building More Housing?

A few short months ago, Eric Garcetti, the mayor of Los Angeles, was giving serious consideration to running for the Democratic presidential nomination . Now he finds himself in the midst of a homelessness crisis that could doom his political future. If you were to conjure up the ideal California politician, you could do worse than Garcetti, a Jewish Mexican American Rhodes Scholar with a gift fo

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The Astonishing Rise of Existential Threats

Political discourse has taken on a certain shade of Camus. The term existential threat is fertile of late, especially among Democratic presidential hopefuls. It has become a set term in reference to climate change, as used by Governor Jay Inslee and by Senator Elizabeth Warren, both on Twitter and in speeches , while Mayor Pete Buttigieg has used the variation existential security challenge . For

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Your Professional Decline Is Coming (Much) Sooner Than You Think

"I t’s not true that no one needs you anymore.” These words came from an elderly woman sitting behind me on a late-night flight from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C. The plane was dark and quiet. A man I assumed to be her husband murmured almost inaudibly in response, something to the effect of “I wish I was dead.” Again, the woman: “Oh, stop saying that.” To hear more feature stories, see our ful

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A computer model explains how to make perfectly smooth crepes

Here’s how to prepare thin pancakes that are perfectly smooth, according to science.

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Build science in Africa

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01885-1 To cope with climate change and population growth, the continent urgently needs more home-grown researchers, argue Anagaw Atickem, Nils Chr. Stenseth and colleagues.

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Kulturjournalistiken spelade roll efter terrorattackerna i Paris

På kvällen den 13 november 2015 inträffade sex koordinerade terrorattacker på olika platser runt om i Paris, flera av dem på ställen där någon form av kulturaktivitet utövades. Förekomsten av terrorattacker mot kulturella mål så som tidningar, musik- eller teaterföreställningar har gjort att kulturjournalister också börjat rapportera kring attackerna. Gränsen mellan nyhets- och kulturjournalistik

7h

Kort men intensiv prostatastrålning kan korta köer

– Kortare behandlingstid på sjukhus är en fördel för både patienten och sjukvården. Vi kan se att metoden med intensiv strålbehandling totalt sett inte ger fler sena biverkningar, samtidigt som effekten är lika bra som med traditionell strålbehandling, säger Anders Widmark, senior professor vid Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper vid Umeå universitet och överläkare vid Cancercentrum vid Norrl

7h

Extremtorkan – en varning för vad som komma skall?

– Studien pekar mot att den torka som vi såg under 2018 ser ut att kunna bli rådande norm snarare än undantag i framtiden. Detta kan slå hårt mot EU:s jordbruk och därmed mot matförsörjningen. Dessutom pekar studien mot att detta kan ske inom en tämligen snar framtid, säger Ottmar Cronie, biträdande universitetslektor i matematisk statistik vid Umeå universitet, som är en av artikelförfattarna. S

7h

Firefox lukker heftigt sikkerhedshul

Mozilla har udsendt patch til sårbarhed, der muliggør fjerneksekvering af kode i Firefox.

7h

The media won't get less politicized. News consumers must get smarter.

The internet is parasitic on traditional media sources, says Keith Whittington. Traditional news outlets do the hard reporting to generate the facts and notable opinions that other outlets respond to. The greatest challenge to truth in journalism is that social media presents news stories out of context; we no longer see news among other news articles, and we may only ever see the headline withou

7h

A critical examination of a newly proposed interhemispheric teleconnection to Southwestern US winter precipitation

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10528-y A critical examination of a newly proposed interhemispheric teleconnection to Southwestern US winter precipitation

7h

Adenoviral vaccine targeting multiple neoantigens as strategy to eradicate large tumors combined with checkpoint blockade

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10594-2 Vaccination against neo-antigens has resulted in an effective antitumor response in several models. Here, the authors show that delivery of larger sets of neo-antigens using an adenovirus-based vaccination platform, results in much better tumor protection when combined with checkpoint blockade in a mouse model o

7h

Integrated NMR and cryo-EM atomic-resolution structure determination of a half-megadalton enzyme complex

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10490-9 NMR structure determination is challenging for proteins with a molecular weight above 30 kDa and atomic-resolution structure determination from cryo-EM data is currently not the rule. Here the authors describe an integrated structure determination approach that simultaneously uses NMR and EM data and allows them

7h

Mass cytometry reveals systemic and local immune signatures that distinguish inflammatory bowel diseases

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10387-7 Distinguishing clinical subtypes of IBD is critical for optimal treatments, outcome prediction, and better understanding of disease pathogenesis. Here the authors phenotype blood and intestinal immune cells by mass cytometry and identify signatures associated with distinct disease states.

7h

Publisher Correction: Contemporaneous 3D characterization of acute and chronic myocardial I/R injury and response

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10804-x Publisher Correction: Contemporaneous 3D characterization of acute and chronic myocardial I/R injury and response

7h

A tectonically driven Ediacaran oxygenation event

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10286-x The evolution of complex animal life in the Cambrian period is thought to be related to oxygenation of the Earth System, however the timing, magnitude and mechanism of this oxygenation event remain uncertain. Here, the authors use a biogeochemical model which links tectonic CO2 degassing rates to carbon and sulp

7h

PTPN21 and Hook3 relieve KIF1C autoinhibition and activate intracellular transport

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10644-9 The kinesin-3 KIF1C transports dense core vesicles in neurons and delivers integrins to cell adhesions sites. Here the authors show that KIF1C's autoinhibitory interactions are released upon binding of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN21 or cargo adapter Hook3 resulting in cargo-activated transport.

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Sub-stoichiometric 2D covalent organic frameworks from tri- and tetratopic linkers

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10574-6 Using complementary linkers as building blocks in the design of 2D covalent organic frameworks (COFs) limits the formation of compositionally and structurally complex networks. Here, the authors demonstrate a COF with a bex topology by combining non-complementary triangular and rectangular linkers.

7h

Cruise-industrien langer ud efter kritisk forurenings-rapport

En samlet krydstogtindustri tilbageviser påstande om ekstreme svovludslip i europæiske havne.

7h

'Alexa, monitor my heart': Researchers develop first contactless cardiac arrest AI system for smart speakers

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new tool to monitor people for cardiac arrest while they're asleep without touching them. A new skill for a smart speaker — like Google Home and Amazon Alexa — or smartphone lets the device detect the gasping sound of agonal breathing and call for help.

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Statin therapy reduced the risk of stroke and possibly other cardiovascular complications in cancer patients following radiation

Cancer patients who took statin medication had a 32% reduction in stroke following radiation therapy to the chest, head or neck. This is the first large study to look at whether statins are protective against cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications in cancer patients treated with radiation to the chest, head or neck.

7h

Virtually Try On Makeup During YouTube Tutorials

Buying makeup can be a gamble: How do you know if it’s worth spending $30 on a new shade of lipstick you’re not sure suits you? Google may have the answer. Subsidiary YouTube […] The …

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Reconstruction of bovine spermatozoa substances distribution and morphological differences between Holstein and Korean native cattle using three-dimensional refractive index tomography

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45174-3 Reconstruction of bovine spermatozoa substances distribution and morphological differences between Holstein and Korean native cattle using three-dimensional refractive index tomography

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Contrast of 83% in reflection measurements on a single quantum dot

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45259-z Contrast of 83% in reflection measurements on a single quantum dot

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Rapid weight loss with dietary salt restriction in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45341-6 Rapid weight loss with dietary salt restriction in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease

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A Selective FGFR inhibitor AZD4547 suppresses RANKL/M-CSF/OPG-dependent ostoclastogenesis and breast cancer growth in the metastatic bone microenvironment

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45278-w A Selective FGFR inhibitor AZD4547 suppresses RANKL/M-CSF/OPG-dependent ostoclastogenesis and breast cancer growth in the metastatic bone microenvironment

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A comprehensive study of the hormetic influence of biosynthesized AgNPs on regenerating rice calli of indica cv. IR64

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45214-y A comprehensive study of the hormetic influence of biosynthesized AgNPs on regenerating rice calli of indica cv. IR64

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Studies of Black Diamond as an antibacterial surface for Gram Negative bacteria: the interplay between chemical and mechanical bactericidal activity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45280-2 Studies of Black Diamond as an antibacterial surface for Gram Negative bacteria: the interplay between chemical and mechanical bactericidal activity

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A lattice model to manage the vector and the infection of the Xylella fastidiosa on olive trees

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44997-4 A lattice model to manage the vector and the infection of the Xylella fastidiosa on olive trees

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Optical Signatures Derived From Deep UV to NIR Excitation Discriminates Healthy Samples From Low and High Grades Glioma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45181-4 Optical Signatures Derived From Deep UV to NIR Excitation Discriminates Healthy Samples From Low and High Grades Glioma

7h

Boaty McBoatface Makes Discovery

In the years since the goofy name of a research vessel grabbed international headlines, Boaty has been off gathering crucial deep-sea data on the effects of climate change.

7h

Jesse Jackson on Reparations: ‘We Are Due a Different Kind of Recognition’

Jesse Jackson ran for president in 1984 with a lot of ideas and a little support, the second black candidate, after Shirley Chisholm in the 1970s, to organize a national campaign for the presidency. His presence in the race was a nuisance to Democrats at the time who worried that his policy proposals were too left-leaning. But the “Rainbow Coalition” he cobbled together—an assortment of minority

7h

CRISPR babies: when will the world be ready?

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01906-z Efforts to make heritable changes to the human genome are fraught with uncertainty. Here’s what it would take to make the technique safe and acceptable.

7h

Fet fisk utan miljögifter skyddar mot typ 2-diabetes

Rönen om vilken effekt fiskkonsumtion har på risken att utveckla diabetes har varit motstridiga. Enligt vissa studier minskar risken för att få typ 2-diabetes om man äter mycket fisk, enligt andra har det ingen effekt, och enligt vissa studier ökar till och med risken. Nya forskningsmetoder kan räta ut många frågetecken kring mat och hälsa framöver, menar forskare vid Chalmers, som lett en studie

8h

Greenland’s ‘unusual’ melting sea ice captured in stunning image

A climate scientist has captured the reality of sea ice loss in Greenland in a viral picture.

8h

Worm with eyes in head and bottom found off Shetland

Scientists found the new species during a survey of a marine protected area off Scotland.

8h

Face to face with DR Congo's deadly vipers

Photographer Hugh Kinsella Cunningham captures close-up portraits of some of the world's most dangerous snakes.

8h

US lawmaker wants Facebook to halt its Libra cryptocurrency project – CNET

Lawmakers still have a lot of questions about Facebook's cryptocurrency plans.

8h

Vaccines: Low trust in vaccination 'a global crisis'

The biggest global study into attitudes on immunisation reveals confidence is low in some regions.

8h

Why are Nike trainers washing up on beaches?

From Bermuda and the Azores to Ireland and France, large numbers of shoes are washing ashore.

8h

Fossil proves hyenas once roamed Canada's Arctic Plains

A 50-year-old mystery has been solved by scientists who identified the teeth of ancient Arctic hyenas.

8h

Japan quake causes minor tsunami, 16 hurt

A strong 6.4-magnitude earthquake rocked Japan, sparking a tsunami advisory that was later lifted with no reports Wednesday of major damage and only a handful of light injuries.

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Searching for the source of microplastics in European rivers

"Microbeads! A blue one—and a pink one!"

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Pick a leader with vision for the Food and Agriculture Organization

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01902-3 The United Nations body is about to elect a new director‑general. The choice will affect the entire globe for years to come.

8h

Europe's growing 'climate civil disobedience' movement

Thousands of European activists plan to blockade a large German lignite mine this week, the latest protest of a growing "climate civil disobedience" movement.

8h

Sæbebobler og snekugleeffekten: Et indblik i et overset fysisk fænomen

Overfladespændinger og indsigt fra midten af 1800-tallet styrer fysikken for sæbebobler, der fryser til is,

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Corsica's 'cat-fox': On the trail of what may be a new species

In the forest undergrowth of northern Corsica, two wildlife rangers open a cage to reveal a striped, tawny-coated animal, one of 16 felines known as "cat-foxes" in the area and thought to be a new species.

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Kinshasa: Commuting hell in DR Congo's capital

Cities almost everywhere have transport problems—just ask people stuck in traffic jams or overcrowded trains for their opinion.

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Slack primed as latest unicorn to make market debut

The 2019 parade of big new Wall Street entrants continues this week with the debut of Slack Technologies, underscoring investor hunger for new companies in spite of some high-profile stumbles.

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Tiny houses entice budget-conscious Americans

In a country that nearly always believes bigger is better—think supersize fries, giant cars and 10-gallon hats—more and more Americans are downsizing their living quarters.

8h

Arctic could face another scorching annus horribilis

Scientists say 2019 could be another annus horribilis for the Arctic with record temperatures already registered in Greenland—a giant melting icicle that threatens to submerge the world's coastal areas one day.

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In his remit: African fintech entrepreneur helps migrants move money

The money transfer business is personal for Ismail Ahmed. It was cash wired by his family that allowed him to make the final leg of his journey from escaping fighting in his native Somaliland to London in 1988 to take up a university scholarship.

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Indonesia pet orangutans released back into the wild

The young orangutan looks back at her rescuers before clambering over her steel cage and into the trees, swinging from hand to hand and hanging upside down.

8h

Pup fostering gives genetic boost to wild Mexican wolves

It's a carefully planned mission that involves coordination across state lines—from Mexican gray wolf dens hidden deep in the woods of New Mexico and Arizona to breeding facilities at zoos and special conservation centers around the U.S.

8h

Lawmakers will hear from pilots who have criticized Boeing

The president of the pilots' union at American Airlines says Boeing made mistakes in its design of the 737 Max and not telling pilots about new flight-control software on the plane.

8h

Senegal shines in showcase for female tech innovation

Barcode health cards, mobile apps for victims of violence and an online legal platform are just some of the ideas showing the direction of female digital pioneers in Africa, with Senegalese innovators in the spotlight.

8h

Indonesia pet orangutans released back into the wild

The young orangutan looks back at her rescuers before clambering over her steel cage and into the trees, swinging from hand to hand and hanging upside down.

8h

Pup fostering gives genetic boost to wild Mexican wolves

It's a carefully planned mission that involves coordination across state lines—from Mexican gray wolf dens hidden deep in the woods of New Mexico and Arizona to breeding facilities at zoos and special conservation centers around the U.S.

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Twice burned: Winklevii overshadowed by Zuckerberg yet again

Can a Libra and two Geminis get along? How about Facebook and the Winklevoss twins?

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Record-low fertility rates linked to decline in stable manufacturing jobs

As the Great Recession wiped out nearly 9 million jobs and 19 trillion dollars in wealth from U.S. households, American families experienced another steep decline—they had fewer children.

9h

Fettsuga lymfödem – ifrågasatt metod som blev behandlingssuccé

Hans resultat ifrågasattes och kallades för science fiction. Idag har plastikkirurgen och forskaren Håkan Brorsons metod – att fettsuga patienter med lymfödem – spridit sig till flera andra länder.

9h

Upptäckt – en ny kraft för optiska pincetter

När biologiska celler studeras med hjälp av en så kallad optisk pincett är ett stort problem den skada som verktyget orsakar cellen. Men nu har en forskare vid Göteborgs universitet upptäckt en ny typ av kraft som rejält minskar den optiska pincettens ljusanvändning – och förbättrar experiment på alla typer av celler och partiklar. – Vi kallar den ”intra-cavity feedback force”. Grundidén är att m

9h

Would a PhD be a good career move?

Your questions for our expert — and readers’ advice

9h

Does greater immersion in virtual reality lead to a better experience?

Contrary to current industry trends to develop more immersive virtual reality systems, a new study found that a more immersive environment or the presence of real-world distractions could have surprising effects on a participant's recall, description of the virtual encounter, and how positive they feel about the experience. The design, results, and implications of this timely study are published i

9h

Cool halo gas caught spinning like galactic disks

A group of astronomers led by Crystal Martin and Stephanie Ho of the University of California, Santa Barbara, has discovered a dizzying cosmic choreography among typical star-forming galaxies; their cool halo gas appears to be in step with the galactic disks, spinning in the same direction.

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First book published on fishes of the Salish Sea

The first book documenting all of the known species of fishes that live in the Salish Sea is now available.

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Unexpected culprit—wetlands as source of methane

Wetlands are an important part of the Earth's natural water management system. The complex system of plants, soil, and aquatic life serves as a reservoir that captures and cleans water. However, as cities have expanded, many wetlands were drained for construction. In addition, many areas of land in the Midwest were drained to increase uses for agriculture to feed a growing world.

9h

Appearance of deep-sea fish does not signal upcoming earthquake in Japan

The unusual appearance of deep-sea fish like the oarfish or slender ribbonfish in Japanese shallow waters does not mean that an earthquake is about to occur, according to a new statistical analysis.

9h

Crocs' climate clock: Ancient distribution of Crocs could reveal more about past climates

Underneath their tough exteriors, some crocodilians have a sensitive side that scientists could use to shine light on our ancient climate, according to new findings published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology.

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First book published on fishes of the Salish Sea

The first book documenting all of the known species of fishes that live in the Salish Sea is now available.

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Acupuncture Caused an Elderly Woman's Lung to Collapse

Even worse – it's not the first time.

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Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2019 shortlist – in pictures

The Milky Way over a Bavarian mountain, a colourful explosion of the Southern Lights in Tasmania, and the Horsehead and Flame nebulas, all featured in the Royal Observatory’s Insight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2019 shortlist. The competition, now in its 11th year, has broken the record of entries, receiving more than 4,600 photographs from amateurs and professionals. The winner

10h

Britain’s Conservatives Agree on All but One Issue, but It’s a Big One

LONDON—If the race to become Britain’s next prime minister is any indication, the ruling Conservatives are united on virtually all issues but one. Unfortunately for them, that issue happens to be Brexit—and it’s threatening to tear not only the party, but the whole country, apart. When five of the six contenders to succeed Theresa May as Conservative Party leader—and, consequently, prime minister

11h

Ekspert: Luft-luft varmepumper bliver undervurderet af stort set alle aktører

PLUS. I en ny rapport har Ea Energianalyse fremskrevet efterspørgslen på en række energiteknologier i takt med at elektrificeringen af det danske samfund fortsætter. Her spås især varmepumper en lun fremtid med en to- eller tredobling i antal.

12h

Sjælden, eksotisk fugl opdaget ved Birkerød: Den kvækker som en frø

Håbefulde danskere strømmer til området for at få et glimt af den sjældne dværgrørvagtel.

12h

25 million flights blocked by China's social credit system this year

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Surveillance cameras will soon be unrecognizable

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Lab-grown insect cells could be the planet-friendly ‘meat’ of the future

https://grist.org/article/lab-grown-insect-cells-could-be-the-planet-friendly-meat-of-the-future/ I'd try it. If they could get it reasonably like the meat we know that would be ideal. Can't help but wonder if we couldn't create some insect / animal cell hybrid that requires much less feeding but eventually gets to the consistency of meat. But then again, I think that's how the Insect Zombie Apoc

12h

Researchers find cause of rare, fatal disease that turns babies' lips and skin blue

Scientists used a gene editing method called CRISPR/Cas9 to generate mice that faithfully mimic a fatal respiratory disorder in newborn infants that turns their lips and skin blue. The new laboratory model allowed researchers to pinpoint the ailment's cause and develop a potential and desperately needed nanoparticle-based treatment. Mostly untreatable, Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misalignmen

12h

Sedation method does not affect colonoscopy detection rate

Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States and colonoscopy is the most-used screening tool to detect it. In a recently published study, researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine determined deep sedation does not improve the colonoscopy quality compared to moderate sedation when it comes to the polyp detection rate or adenoma detection rate, t

12h

Unexpected culprit — wetlands as source of methane

Knowing how emissions are created can help reduce them.

12h

Boomers back on the dating scene seek cosmetic procedures to put their best face forward

In today's dating world, singles make snap judgments about potential dates as fast as they can swipe. For the 20 million baby boomers currently using online dating sites, the high stakes of the modern dating world can be intimidating as they age. New statistics by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons show that more Americans age 55 and older are seeking cosmetic procedures to help them put the

12h

Study reveals key locations for declining songbird

Many of North America's migratory songbirds are declining at alarming rates. For conservation efforts to succeed, wildlife managers need to know where they go and what challenges they face during their annual migrations. Researchers in six states recently assembled an unprecedented effort to track where Prothonotary Warblers go in winter, and they found that nearly the entire species depends on a

12h

Crocs' climate clock: Ancient distribution of Crocs could reveal more about past climates

Underneath their tough exteriors, some crocodilians have a sensitive side that scientists could use to shine light on our ancient climate, according to new findings published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology.

12h

Wildfires rage near Siberia's "mouth of hell" — a giant depression that's getting bigger due to global warming

Wildfires blazing in Siberia, as seen by one of the Sentinel 2 satellites on June 11th. (Source: Copernicus Sentinel image data processed by Pierre Markuse) I started writing this post last week after seeing the stunning satellite image above showing a blazing Siberian wildfire. When I returned to finish the post today, I learned from a story in the Siberian Times that wildfires in this part of Ru

12h

These are the countries that trust scientists the most—and the least

Trust in scientists highest in Northern Europe, Wellcome Global Monitor finds

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France most skeptical about science and vaccines, global survey finds

Sluggish economy and unemployment could explain French pessimism about science’s job-boosting power

12h

Japan and Ukraine most likely to doubt safety of vaccines

Nature, Published online: 19 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01937-6 But countries in South Asia and East Africa overwhelmingly agree vaccines are safe, global survey finds.

12h

Survey shows crisis of confidence in vaccines in parts of Europe

Just half of people in eastern Europe think vaccines are safe, compared with 79% worldwide A global survey of attitudes towards science has revealed the scale of the crisis of confidence in vaccines in Europe, showing that only 59% of people in western Europe and 50% in the east think vaccines are safe, compared with 79% worldwide. Around the globe, 84% of people acknowledge that vaccines are eff

12h

Poorer countries have more confidence in vaccines

Survey shows strong support in east Africa and south Asia but Europe is suspicious

13h

Study reveals key locations for declining songbird

Many of North America's migratory songbirds, which undertake awe-inspiring journeys twice a year, are declining at alarming rates. For conservation efforts to succeed, wildlife managers need to know where they go and what challenges they face during their annual migration to Latin America and back. For a new study published by The Condor: Ornithological Applications, researchers in six states asse

13h

Study reveals key locations for declining songbird

Many of North America's migratory songbirds, which undertake awe-inspiring journeys twice a year, are declining at alarming rates. For conservation efforts to succeed, wildlife managers need to know where they go and what challenges they face during their annual migration to Latin America and back. For a new study published by The Condor: Ornithological Applications, researchers in six states asse

13h

Forsvarsadvokater om årelang fejl-konvertering af teledata: Øger mistilliden til retssystemet

Der er tale om en bekymrende sag, og en sådan fejl viser, at der ikke har været tilstrækkeligt opmærksomhed på, om denne data er blevet konverteret ordentligt i politiets program, lyder det fra Landsforeningen af Forsvarsadvokater.

13h

We Just Found 2 of The Most Earth-Like Exoplanets Yet, Only 12.5 Light Years Away

One of them might be the closest thing we've found to our own planet.

13h

Harry Potter: Wizards Unite release date finally revealed

Augmented reality game developed by Pokemon Go developers Niantic

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What oil companies knew: the great climate cover-up – podcast

Oil firms are said to have known for decades of the link between burning fossil fuels and climate breakdown. Author Bill McKibben describes how industry lobbying created a 30-year barrier to tackling the crisis. Plus: John Stewart on his campaign to stop the third runway at Heathrow Before 1988, climate change was a subject confined to the realm of academic journals. That all changed when the sci

14h

Today’s exotic pets are tomorrow’s invasive pests

Escaped pet parakeets have led to feral populations in cities from New Jersey to San Francisco. (Deposit Photos/) This past April, researchers captured and killed a record-breaking, 17-foot-long Burmese python in Florida's Big Cypress National Preserve. She weighed 140 pounds and contained 73 developing eggs. The species can grow up to 23 feet in length and weigh 200 pounds, but this was the larg

14h

Adobe is teaching artificial intelligence to sniff out Photoshopped images

The AI looks for clues that point to misleading edits. (Adobe/) People have been manipulating photos since the onset of consumer cameras more than a century ago. As a result, cynics have been trying to sniff out those manipulations and expose frauds for the same amount of time. As editing tools have progressed, the methods for snooping out sneaky edits has lagged behind—at least outside of areas

15h

Here's What Facebook's New Cryptocurrency Libra Will Look Like And How You'll Use It

Everyone's freaking out about Libra. Here's what you need to know.

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How Cars Advancing In Technology Are Saving More Lives

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Many parents struggle for years to adjust after learning a child's sexual orientation

Two years after their child 'comes out' as lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB), many parents still say that it is moderately or very hard for them to adjust to the news, according to a study published today.

16h

What the Google-Genius Copyright Dispute Is Really About

Genius says it caught Google red-handed. Then the evidence disappeared. The real story is even more complicated.

16h

This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.

Shipworms are known for boring into wood and digesting it, but scientists found a new species with a very different diet.

17h

Good physical fitness in middle age linked to lower chronic lung disease risk

Good heart and lung (cardiorespiratory) fitness in middle age is associated with a lower long term risk of chronic lung disease (COPD), suggests new research.

17h

One day of employment a week is all we need for mental health benefits

Latest research finds up to eight hours of paid work a week significantly boosts mental health and life satisfaction. However, researchers found little evidence that any more hours — including a full five-day week – provide further increases in wellbeing. They argue the findings show some paid work for the entire adult population is important, but rise of automation may require shorter hours for

17h

Yogurt may help to lower pre-cancerous bowel growth risk in men

Eating two or more weekly servings of yogurt may help to lower the risk of developing the abnormal growths (adenomas) which precede the development of bowel cancer — at least in men — finds new research.

17h

Incredible Rock-Eating Shipworm Is First Of Its Kind

A section of limestone riddled with burrows bored by a unique rock-eating shipworm. (Credit: Shipway et al 2019, Proc. R. Soc. B 20190434. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.0434) What would a shipworm do if a shipworm didn't eat wood? The humble bivalve has long had outsized influence on both its environment and even the global economy. That's because, until now, every known species consumes woo

17h

Honeybees Know What 3 Means (and 2 and 4), Researchers Find

One honeybee, ah ah ah… (Credit: yod67/Shutterstock) Humans, monkeys, pigeons, fish and honeybees can all grasp the concept of a greater than or less than sign and choose between bigger or smaller quantities. Now, new research from a team led by Martin Giurfa at Paul Sabatier University in Toulouse, France is the first to show that honeybees, like other vertebrates, can also recognize a specific

17h

Scientists Read the Sun’s History in Moon Rocks

Solar flares and coronal mass ejections were more common when the sun was younger, but it may still have been quieter than many other stars like it. (Credit: NASA/SDO) Stars, like humans, are more volatile when they’re young. As sunlike stars mature past their first billion years, they all tend to slow in their rotation, eventually converging to roughly the same period we see now in our sun: about

17h

Humans Are Probably Behind the Evolution of 'Puppy Dog Eyes'

Dogs likely evolved the gesture in response to human pressure. (Credit: Fotyma/Shutterstock) You know that look Fido gives you from underneath the dinner table? Those puppy dog eyes, researchers recently discovered, are something unique to domesticated dogs that evolved over the 30,000 or more years that we've coexisted. In a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sci

17h

What sex is this tomato plant? It depends on when you ask.

The more we learn about sex in the natural world, the less it looks like a binary system. (McDonnel/) Driving through the outback toward the end of the rainy season, Chris Martine and his research team were unusually attentive to their GPS, watching each mile of dirt pass by. "We could not wait," he says. Finally, the researchers arrived at the exact spot where, two years prior, they'd discovered

17h

Listen: Visiting nurses ease life with a new baby

An innovative, free public program for new moms and dads helps them adjust to life with a newborn. In each location where this program, called Family Connects, is offered, all families, rich and poor, are eligible to have a visiting nurse come right to the home after the birth of a child. The program has been shown to improve parenting behavior and reduce emergency medical care for infants. “We g

17h

How to explain a giant hole in Antarctic ice

The winter ice on the surface of Antarctica’s Weddell Sea occasionally forms an enormous hole. New research explores why it appears and its potential role in larger ocean circulation. One such hole that appeared in 2016 and 2017 drew intense curiosity from scientists and reporters. Though even bigger gaps had formed decades before, this was the first time oceanographers had a chance to truly moni

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Atrial fibrillation linked to increased risk of dementia, even in stroke-free patients

Atrial fibrillation is linked to an increased risk of dementia, even in people who have not suffered a stroke, according to the largest study to investigate the association in an elderly population published in the European Heart Journal.

17h

One day of employment a week is all we need for mental health benefits — study

Latest research finds up to eight hours of paid work a week significantly boosts mental health and life satisfaction. However, researchers found little evidence that any more hours — including a full five-day week – provide further increases in wellbeing. They argue the findings show some paid work for the entire adult population is important, but rise of automation may require shorter hours for

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‘Running hyenas’ once hunted and scavenged in the Arctic

Ancient hyenas inhabited the frigid Arctic during the last ice age, according to new research. The research, which appears in the journal Open Quaternary , reports on the first known fossils of hyenas from the Arctic. The study reveals that two ice age fossil teeth discovered in Yukon Territory in Canada belonged to the so-called “running hyena” Chasmaporthetes . Paleontologists tentatively thoug

17h

Oxford to receive biggest single donation 'since the Renaissance'

US billionaire Stephen Schwarzman is donating £150m to fund humanities research The University of Oxford has said it is to receive its biggest single direct donation “since the Renaissance”, after it unveiled a £150m gift from the US billionaire Stephen Schwarzman to fund humanities research and tackle looming social issues linked to artificial intelligence. The money will be used to create the S

17h

‘Sneezing’ plants may spread pathogens to their neighbors

A “surface tension catapult” can fling dewdrops carrying fungal spores from water-repellent leaves.

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Do urban voters get short shrift in Congress?

The geographic distribution of Democrats and Republicans has turned political campaigns into high-stakes battles in which the parties pit urban against rural interests, research finds. Political scientist Jonathan Rodden argues that ever since President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal of the 1930s, the Democratic Party has evolved to become an almost exclusively urban party. The geographic concentr

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New York to Approve One of the World’s Most Ambitious Climate Plans

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This rock-eating ‘worm’ could change the course of rivers

Newly discovered Filipino species overturns dogma about pesky shipworms

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How soap bubbles freeze

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10021-6 While the physics of freezing water droplets are known, it is less known how bubbles freeze. The authors investigate the physics of freezing soap bubbles and identify two distinct freezing modes, depending on whether the surroundings are warmer or colder than the melting temperature.

18h

Intracavity optical trapping of microscopic particles in a ring-cavity fiber laser

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10662-7 The authors demonstrate an optical trap where particles are trapped inside of a laser cavity. This is possible due to intracavity nonlinear feedback forces that produce stronger confinement on all 3 axes than standard optical tweezers, which greatly reduces the laser intensity needed to trap the same particle.

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Graphene oxide enabled long-term enzymatic transesterification in an anhydrous gas flux

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10686-z Implementing enzymatic reactions in gas phase has several limitations. Here, the authors report on a method to overcome these using graphene oxide aerogels to immobilize lipase, improve stability/lifetime and investigate the mechanism for improved function.

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CAPRI enables comparison of evolutionarily conserved RNA interacting regions

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10585-3 Comprehensive characterisation of RNA-protein interactions requires different levels of resolution. Here, the authors present an integrated mass spectrometry-based approach that allows them to define the Drosophila RNA-protein interactome from the level of multisubunit complexes down to the RNA-binding amino aci

18h

An ultrathin conformable vibration-responsive electronic skin for quantitative vocal recognition

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10465-w Though skin-attachable vibration sensors are promising for voice recognition applications, current technologies do not meet key performance requirements. Here, the authors report a flexible skin-attachable sensor with high sensitivity and flat frequency response over the vocal frequency range.

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Inkjet-printed stretchable and low voltage synaptic transistor array

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10569-3 The development of novel low-cost fabrication schemes for realizing stretchable transistor arrays with applicability in wearable electronics remains a challenge. Here, the authors report skin-like electronics with stretchable active materials and devices processed exclusively from ink-jet printing.

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IAPP toxicity activates HIF1α/PFKFB3 signaling delaying β-cell loss at the expense of β-cell function

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10444-1 Type 2 diabetes is associated with islet amyloid deposits derived from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) expressed by β-cells. Here the authors show that IAPP misfolded protein stress induces the hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha injury repair pathway and activates survival metabolic changes mediated by PFKFB3.

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Fcmr regulates mononuclear phagocyte control of anti-tumor immunity

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10619-w Myeloid cells modulate the immune response within the tumour microenvironment, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, the authors show that Fcmr – the putative receptor for soluble IgM – is a potent negative regulator of anti-tumour immunity.

18h

Daniel Rozen Makes Kinetic 'Mirrors' That Echo Your Movements

Walk up to one of Daniel Rozin's "mechanical mirrors" and see yourself reflected back in rippling waves of light and shadow.

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Surgery to straighten a deviated septum improves quality of life

Surgery to straighten a deviated nasal septum, also known as septoplasty, is worthwhile. Patients with a deviated (crooked) septum breathe more easily after this operation and their quality of life improves. The effects of this procedure have never been systematically investigated. Specialists have long debated its benefits. But now, researchers at Radboud university medical center have ended the

18h

Yogurt may help to lower pre-cancerous bowel growth risk in men

Eating two or more weekly servings of yogurt may help to lower the risk of developing the abnormal growths (adenomas) which precede the development of bowel cancer — at least in men — finds research published online in the journal Gut.

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Good physical fitness in middle age linked to lower chronic lung disease risk

Good heart and lung (cardiorespiratory) fitness in middle age is associated with a lower long term risk of chronic lung disease (COPD), suggests Danish research published online in the journal Thorax.

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Women's awareness of alcohol's role in breast cancer risk is poor

Women's awareness of alcohol's role in boosting breast cancer risk is poor, indicates research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

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Beyond Meat announces plan to sell ‘ground beef’ in stores. Shares skyrocket.

Shares of Beyond Meat opened at around $200 on Tuesday morning, falling to nearly $170 by the afternoon. Wall Street analysts remain wary of the stock, which has been on a massive hot streak since its IPO in May. Beyond Meat faces competition from Impossible Foods and, as of this week, Tyson. None Shares of Beyond Meat soared Tuesday after the company announced plans to sell a ground-beef product

18h

Wearable device reveals how seals prepare for diving

A wearable noninvasive device based on near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to investigate blood volume and oxygenation patterns in freely diving marine mammals, according to a new study.

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Sea otters have low genetic diversity like other threatened species, biologists report

Sea otters have very low genetic diversity, scientists report. Their findings have implications for the conservation of rare and endangered species, in which a lack of genetic diversity can increase the risk of extinction.

18h

Record-low fertility rates linked to decline in stable manufacturing jobs

New research identifies a link between the long-term decline in manufacturing jobs — accelerated during the Great Recession — and reduced fertility rates.

18h

Microfluidics device captures circulating cancer cell clusters

About 90% of cancer deaths are due to metastases, when tumors spread to other vital organs, and a research group recently realized that it's not individual cells but rather distinct clusters of cancer cells that circulate and metastasize to other organs. As the group reports, they set out to gain a better understanding of these circulating cancer cell clusters. The group's microfluidic device brin

18h

Cell structure linked to longevity of slow-growing Ponderosa Pines

Slow-growing ponderosa pines may have a better chance of surviving longer than fast-growing ones, especially as climate change increases the frequency and intensity of drought, according to new research from the University of Montana.

18h

Appearance of deep-sea fish does not signal upcoming earthquake in Japan

The unusual appearance of deep-sea fish like the oarfish or slender ribbonfish in Japanese shallow waters does not mean that an earthquake is about to occur, according to a new statistical analysis.

18h

Cool halo gas caught spinning like galactic disks

Astronomers have discovered cool halo gas spinning in the same direction as galactic disks in typical star-forming galaxies. Their findings suggest that the whirling gas halo will eventually spiral in towards the galactic disk where it can fuel star formation.

18h

Quantum music to my ears

Researchers have applied new atomic-sensing capabilities to detect and record music.

18h

Marijuana use increases, shifts away from illegal market

A new article reports that, based on analysis of public wastewater samples in at least one Western Washington population center, cannabis use both increased and substantially shifted from the illicit market since retail sales began in 2014.

18h

Size matters: New data reveals cell size sparks genome awakening in embryos

Researchers have found in an embryo that activation of its genome does not happen all at once. Instead, it follows a specific pattern controlled primarily by the various sizes of its cells.

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Scientists challenge notion of binary sexuality with naming of new plant species

Scientists have named a new plant species from the remote Outback. The description of the plant had confounded field biologists for decades because of the unusual fluidity of its flower form. The discovery offers a powerful example of the diversity of sexual forms found among plants.

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Here are the U.S. states with the highest prevalence of psychopaths

The study estimated psychopathy prevalence by looking at the prevalence of certain traits in the Big Five model of personality. The District of Columbia had the highest prevalence of psychopathy, compared to other areas. The authors cautioned that their measurements were indirect, and that psychopathy in general is difficult to define precisely. None A new study estimated the prevalence of psycho

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Microfluidics device captures circulating cancer cell clusters

About 90% of cancer deaths are due to metastases, when tumors spread to other vital organs, and a research group recently realized that it's not individual cells but rather distinct clusters of cancer cells that circulate and metastasize to other organs. As the group reports, they set out to gain a better understanding of these circulating cancer cell clusters. The group's microfluidic device brin

18h

New manufacturing process for aluminum alloys

Using a novel Solid Phase Processing approach, a research team eliminated several steps that are required during conventional extrusion processing of aluminum alloy powders, while also achieving a significant increase in product ductility. This is good news for sectors such as the automotive industry, where the high cost of manufacturing has historically limited the use of high-strength aluminum a

18h

Survivors of breast cancer face increased risk of heart disease

Thanks to advanced medical treatments, women diagnosed with breast cancer today will likely survive the disease. However, some treatment options put these women at greater risk for a number of other health problems. A new study shows that postmenopausal women with breast cancer are at greater risk for developing heart disease.

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A warming Midwest increases likelihood that farmers will need to irrigate

If current climate and crop-improvement trends continue into the future, Midwestern US corn growers who today rely on rainfall to water their crops will need to irrigate their fields, a new study finds. This could draw down aquifers, disrupt streams and rivers, and set up conflicts between agricultural and other human and ecological needs for water, scientists say.

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How a foreign country hacks a power grid

Two power outages caused by cyber warfare have already occurred. (Photo by Matthew Henry on Unsplash/) The United States has been infiltrating Russian infrastructure for years, The New York Times reported on Saturday, describing an effort of "digital incursions into Russia's electric power grid" that have intensified since 2018. Those cyber invasions, the Times reports, have taken both the form o

19h

Understanding Microsleep — When Our Minds Are Both Asleep and Awake

Seconds-long periods of sleep, known as "microsleep," are common during mundane tasks like driving. While these unintended brain naps can be difficult to control, getting adequate sleep is the key to preventing them. (Credit: pathdoc/Shutterstock) Have you ever spaced out during a meeting, but been jolted back to reality by the sound of your boss calling your name a few times? If you’ve ever been

19h

A Shitty Robot Tesla Truck, Facebook's New Cryptocurrency, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

19h

Facebook’s Libra: Three things we don’t know about the digital currency

The launch of Facebook’s new coin is certainly a big event, but so much about it remains unsettled.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Pentagone

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Tuesday, June 18. Shana-Can’t: Patrick Shanahan, the acting secretary of defense, withdrew from consideration to lead the agency after reports surfaced of domestic violence within his family. The announcement leaves the

19h

Steffens billede fra Grønland gik viralt: Det er desværre ikke manipuleret

En dansk meteorolog har set sit billede blive delt på alverdens medier – og er blevet beskyldt for manipulation.

19h

Isolated Ebola Cases Hard to Diagnose, Go Undetected

Wide availability of infection control and diagnostic resources is required to control outbreaks early.

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Mutant genes could supercharge efforts to decipher protein structures

Clever calculations reveal spatial arrangement of amino acids

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This NAD+ Supplement Takes the Fight Against Aging to the Cellular Level

Nobody likes getting old, and until the true Fountain of Youth is discovered, we pretty much all have to face it. But that doesn’t mean you have to face it lying down. An innovative NAD+ supplement from Elysium Health called Basis was designed by the company’s top scientists to help your body slow the effects of aging at the cellular level by boosting NAD+ levels. What is NAD+? Short for Nicotina

19h

Senator Slams Facebook’s New Crypto: “Facebook Is Already Too Big”

Immediate Pushback After more than a year of nebulous interest in blockchain and cryptocurrency technology, Facebook announced a new cryptocurrency called Libra on Tuesday. And not even a day later, The Verge reports that the government is already coming down on the social media giant. Senator Sherrod Brown, the leading Democrat on the Senate Banking Committee took to Twitter to argue that Facebo

19h

Unravelling the mysteries of preprints and peer review

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01947-4 A database assembles thousands of science journals’ editorial policies to boost transparency and accessibility.

19h

Cool halo gas caught spinning like galactic disks

A group of astronomers from University of California, Santa Barbara has discovered cool halo gas spinning in the same direction as galactic disks in typical star-forming galaxies.The researchers used W. M. Keck Observatory to obtain the first-ever direct observational evidence showing that corotating halo gas is not only possible, but common. Their findings suggest that the whirling gas halo will

20h

What is the cosmic web?

Composed of massive filaments of galaxies separated by giant voids, the cosmic web is the name astronomers give to the structure of our universe. Why does our universe have this peculiar, web-like structure? The answer lies in processes that took place in the first few hundred thousands years after the Big Bang. None Looking up at the night sky, it seems as though the stars and galaxies are sprea

20h

Physicists tackle a delicate challenge: making the ideal crêpe

Nature, Published online: 18 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01892-2 Computer simulations validate common technique for creating an even pancake.

20h

US Engineers boost output of solar desalination system by 50%

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5G self-driving buses hit the road in Zhengzhou, China

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Dogs Evolved Sad Eyes to Manipulate Their Human Companions, Study Suggests

You don't get to be man's best friend without copying a few of man's favorite facial expressions.

20h

Companies Don’t Need Conventions Like E3. They Should Go Anyway

More and more companies are skipping E3 and other industry conventions. They might be missing out.

20h

Boaty McBoatface Makes Major Discovery on Maiden Voyage

Yellow Submarine Boaty McBoatface is no longer just an internet sensation — it’s also a valuable contributor to climate change research. In 2016, the Natural Environment Research Council asked internet users to name its new research ship . But when “Boaty McBoatface” won the poll, they decided the moniker would be better suited to one of the ship’s bright yellow autonomous submarines. On Tuesday,

20h

Appearance of deep-sea fish does not signal upcoming earthquake in Japan

The unusual appearance of deep-sea fish like the oarfish or slender ribbonfish in Japanese shallow waters does not mean that an earthquake is about to occur, according to a new statistical analysis.

20h

Latest artificial intelligence research from China in Big Data

China is among the leaders in the rapidly advancing artificial intelligence field, and its broad range of cutting-edge research expertise is on display in this special issue on 'Artificial Intelligence in China' of Big Data.

20h

Record-low fertility rates linked to decline in stable manufacturing jobs

New research by University of Wisconsin-Madison sociologist Nathan Seltzer identifies a link between the long-term decline in manufacturing jobs — accelerated during the Great Recession — and reduced fertility rates.

20h

Does greater immersion in virtual reality lead to a better experience?

Contrary to current industry trends to develop more immersive virtual reality systems, a new study found that a more immersive environment or the presence of real-world distractions could have surprising effects on a participant's recall, description of the virtual encounter, and how positive they feel about the experience.

20h

Weather Forecasts Will Soon Use Weird, Bendy GPS Signals

SpaceX will soon launch weather-prediction satellites that track how GPS signals bend as they travel through the atmosphere.

20h

Chill coolers to keep your beverages and food cold

Stay chill wherever you go. (Depositphotos/) Just because it’s hot out doesn’t mean you have to chug down lukewarm beer, soda, or water. Grab a cooler that’ll keep your ice frozen and drinks bone-chillingly cold until well after your “Billy Joel and other party jams” playlist has finished. But, coolers have their own specific strengths. Here are some ice chests to fit your particular temperature-

20h

Doomsday Report Author: Earth’s Leaders Have Failed

Bad News Earlier this month, researchers from Australia’s Breakthrough National Centre for Climate Restoration published research containing a dire warning: reverse climate change or face the end of human civilization as we know it. Now, in an interview with GQ , researcher David Spratt specifically calls out political and economic leaders for turning a blind eye to the ongoing crises of global c

20h

What advice would you give your younger self? This is the first study to ever examine it.

A new study asked hundreds of participants what advice they would give their younger selves if they could. The subject matter tended to cluster around familiar areas of regret. The test subjects reported that they did start following their own advice later in life, and that it changed them for the better. Everybody regrets something; it seems to be part of the human condition. Ideas and choices t

20h

New clues on tissue damage identified in rheumatoid arthritis and lupus

Research supported by the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP) on Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (RA/SLE) provides new insights into tissue damage for these autoimmune conditions. These discoveries set the stage for uncovering potential drug target candidates that could advance to experimental treatments. Results of the studies were published today (June 18, 2019) in thr

20h

Do Devices that Monitor or Zap the Brain Live Up to Their Claims?

Direct-to-consumer neurotechnologies using EEG or tDCS are becoming increasingly popular, but some scientists are concerned about the lack of evidence for efficacy.

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Boaty McBoatface, Internet-Adored Sub, Makes Deep-Sea Discovery On Climate Change

Since the delightful snafu that led to the research vessel's goofy moniker, the autonomous submarine has been off gathering deep-sea data on the effects of Antarctic winds. (Image credit: Povl Abrahamsen, British Antarctic Survey)

21h

US air quality is slipping after years of improvement

After decades of improvement, America's air may not be getting any cleaner.

21h

Google pledges $1 bn for housing crisis in Bay Area

Google on Tuesday pledged to commit more than $1 billion to help address the severe housing crisis in the region that includes its headquarters and Silicon Valley.

21h

Domestication Might Have Sculpted Eyebrow Expressions in Dogs

Dogs have stronger facial muscles compared to wolves, giving them the sad or "puppy dog eyes" look.

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New Yolo anonymous Q&A app attracts millions of teenage users, has parents wary

As schools head into summer break, a new app allowing users to ask one another questions anonymously is captivating millions of teenagers.

21h

Hong Kong researchers forge ties with mainland China even as protesters fight for autonomy

Some worry collaboration could give Beijing greater influence over Hong Kong’s research agenda

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Outage knocks out Google Calendar on desktop computers

Hopefully you remember when and where your next appointment is.

21h

Does the gas in galaxy clusters flow like honey?

We have seen intricate patterns that milk makes in coffee and much smoother ones that honey makes when stirred with a spoon. Which of these cases best describes the behavior of the hot gas in galaxy clusters? By answering this question, a new study using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravi

21h

Has a black hole in a lab confirmed Hawking radiation?

Stephen Hawking predicted virtual particles splitting in two from the gravitational pull of black holes. Black holes, he also said, would eventually evaporate due to the absorption of negatively charged virtual particles. A scientist has built a black hole analogue based on sound instead of light. None While black holes may well be points in space into which everything falls and from which even l

21h

To improve drones, researchers study flying insects

The unmanned aircraft known as drones, used by hobbyists, researchers and industry to take aerial images and perform other tasks, are growing ever more popular—and smaller. But that miniaturization, which has produced drones that fit in a person's palm, has started to bump into the laws of physics.

21h

Photos: The Moods of Monument Valley

Monument Valley sits on the Utah-Arizona border, within the Navajo Nation reservation. The iconic sandstone buttes that dot the valley floor can mostly be accessed or viewed from Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, which—though instantly recognizable—has many fewer visitors annually than the nearby Grand Canyon. Gathered here, a collection of images of some of the many moods of the valley, from w

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Quantum music to my ears

It sounds like an old-school vinyl record, but the distinctive crackle in the music streamed into Chris Holloway's laboratory is atomic in origin. The group at the National Institute for Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado, spent a long six years finding a way to directly measure electric fields using atoms, so who can blame them for then having a little fun with their new technology?

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Egg-sucking sea slug from Florida's Cedar Key named after Muppets creator Jim Henson

Feet from the raw bars and sherbet-colored condominiums of Florida's Cedar Key, researchers discovered a new species of egg-sucking sea slug, a rare outlier in a group famous for being ultra-vegetarians.

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Boaty McBoatface mission gives new insight into warming ocean abyss

The first mission involving the autonomous submarine vehicle Autosub Long Range (better known as 'Boaty McBoatface') has for the first time shed light on a key process linking increasing Antarctic winds to rising sea temperatures. Data collected from the expedition will help climate scientists build more accurate predictions of the effects of climate change on rising sea levels.

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A Baby Exoplanet Is Creating Strange Dust Rings Around Its Star

Ring Wraith When stars are young, they’re often surrounded by a ring of dust and gas known as a protoplanetary disk . Eventually, the material in this disk can clump together, forming everything from planets to asteroids. Now, an international team of researchers has found a young star with thin rings and gaps in the outer part of its protoplanetary disk, a region typically home to wide, smooth h

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"Flesh-Eating" Bacteria May Be Spreading to Beaches Once Thought Off-Limits

The bacteria, which normally live in warmer waters, have caused infections in waters near Delaware and New Jersey — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mapping the Mission

Modern satellite imagery and 3D modeling create a multimedia view of how Apollo 11 played out on the lunar surface To learn more, read the story here: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/mapping-the-mission/ From: Scientific American

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Privacy Expert: Surveillance Cams Will Soon Be Impossible to Spot

Panopticon Surveillance cameras can now recognize and identify faces and track people as they move. But they still look the same as ever — in fact, they’ve gotten smaller and harder to spot — so many people fail to recognize this looming surveillance panopticon. That’s the argument of an essay published Tuesday in The Conversation by William Webster, a privacy researcher at the University of Stir

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Amazon is adding 15 additional Boeing cargo jets to growing air fleet

Amazon on Tuesday announced a partnership with GE Capital Aviation Services (GECAS) to add 15 additional Boeing 737-800 cargo aircraft to its growing fleet of package movers. They’ll fly in …

21h

The fellowship of the wing: Pigeons flap faster to fly together

Homing pigeons fit in one extra wingbeat per second when flying in pairs compared to flying solo, new research reveals.

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Afraid of food? The answer may be in the basal forebrain

A brain circuit in the mouse basal forebrain that is involved in perceiving the outside world, connects with and overrides feeding behaviors regulated by the hypothalamus.

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New evidence supports the presence of microbes in the placenta

Researchers report visual evidence supporting the presence of bacteria within the microarchitecture of the placental tissue.

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New study shows how environmental disruptions affected ancient societies

A new study shows that over the past 10,000 years, humanity has experienced a number of foundational transitions, or 'bottlenecks.' During these periods of transition, the advance or decline of societies was related to energy availability in the form of a benign climate and other factors.

21h

Collaborative research charts course to hundreds of new nitrides

For chemists attempting to create new nitrides in the laboratory, a recently published large stability map of the ternary nitrides will be a significantly valuable tool.

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Artificial intelligence could help farmers water only the thirsty plants

A robot. (Pixabay/) Wine growers have a neat, if unusual, trick for making more flavorful wine — don’t water the vines. Let the vines go dry right before harvest, and they will yield smaller grapes with more skin and less juice. Smaller grapes produce wine with a deeper color and more complex flavor. Trinchero Family Estates in Napa Valley, California wanted to make sure it was watering its grape

21h

Quantum music to my ears

It sounds like an old-school vinyl record, but the distinctive crackle in the music streamed into Chris Holloway's laboratory is atomic in origin. The group spent years finding a way to directly measure electric fields using atoms. They don't expect the atomic-recording's lower sound quality to replace digital music recordings, but the team is considering how this 'entertaining' example of atomic

22h

Survivors of breast cancer face increased risk of heart disease

Thanks to advanced medical treatments, women diagnosed with breast cancer today will likely survive the disease. However, some treatment options put these women at greater risk for a number of other health problems. A new study out of Brazil shows that postmenopausal women with breast cancer are at greater risk for developing heart disease. Results are published online in Menopause, the journal of

22h

"Flesh-Eating" Bacteria May Be Spreading to Beaches Once Thought Off-Limits

The bacteria, which normally live in warmer waters, have caused infections in waters near Delaware and New Jersey — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NASA Photographs Asteroid That Could Smash Into Earth in 22nd Century

Say Cheese NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft just zipped extremely closeby to tiny asteroid Bennu — and snapped an incredibly detailed image of an asteroid that could eventually smash into the Earth. This is the view from the closest orbit a spacecraft has ever made around a planetary body. This navigation image of asteroid Bennu was taken shortly after orbital insertion on June 13 from a distance of

22h

People Are Taking Emotional Support Animals Everywhere. States Are Cracking Down.

More Americans are saying they need a variety of animals — dogs, ducks, even insects — for their mental health. But critics say many are really just pets that do not merit special status.

22h

A new manufacturing process for aluminum alloys

An advanced manufacturing process to produce nano structured rods and tubes directly from high-performance aluminum alloy powder—in a single step—was recently demonstrated by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

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Egg-sucking sea slug from Florida's Cedar Key named after Muppets creator Jim Henson

Feet from the raw bars and sherbet-colored condominiums of Florida's Cedar Key, researchers discovered a new species of egg-sucking sea slug, a rare outlier in a group famous for being ultra-vegetarians.

22h

Cell structure linked to longevity of slow-growing Ponderosa Pines

Slow-growing ponderosa pines may have a better chance of surviving longer than fast-growing ones, especially as climate change increases the frequency and intensity of drought, according to new research from the University of Montana.

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Size matters: New data reveals cell size sparks genome awakening in embryos

Transitions are a hallmark of life. When dormant plants flower in the spring or when a young adult strikes out on their own, there is a shift in control. Similarly, there is a transition during early development when an embryo undergoes biochemical changes, switching from being controlled by maternal molecules to being governed by its own genome. For the first time, a team from the Perelman School

22h

The Defense Department Is Leaderless Again

Patrick Shanahan spent an unprecedented five and a half months as acting defense secretary—only to be forced to withdraw from consideration for the post today, leaving the Department of Defense with yet another acting secretary at the helm. During Shanahan’s long audition , he had to manage a massive bureaucracy undergoing epochal change, while juggling responses to the world’s hot spots and resp

22h

Researchers identify compounds that starve melanoma cancer cells of energy

Researchers have found a possible counterpunch to the drug resistance of melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer.

22h

A new manufacturing process for aluminum alloys

Using a novel Solid Phase Processing approach, a research team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory eliminated several steps that are required during conventional extrusion processing of aluminum alloy powders, while also achieving a significant increase in product ductility. This is good news for sectors such as the automotive industry, where the high cost of manufacturing has historically li

22h

Egg-sucking sea slug from Florida's Cedar Key named after Muppets creator Jim Henson

Feet from the raw bars and sherbet-colored condominiums of Florida's Cedar Key, researchers discovered a new species of egg-sucking sea slug, a rare outlier in a group famous for being ultra-vegetarians.

22h

Cell structure linked to longevity of slow-growing Ponderosa Pines

Slow-growing ponderosa pines may have a better chance of surviving longer than fast-growing ones, especially as climate change increases the frequency and intensity of drought, according to new research from the University of Montana.

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Size matters: New data reveals cell size sparks genome awakening in embryos

Transitions are a hallmark of life. When dormant plants flower in the spring or when a young adult strikes out on their own, there is a shift in control. Similarly, there is a transition during early development when an embryo undergoes biochemical changes, switching from being controlled by maternal molecules to being governed by its own genome. For the first time, a team from the Perelman School

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The fellowship of the wing: Pigeons flap faster to fly together

New research publishing June 18 in the open-access journal, PLOS Biology, led by Dr. Lucy Taylor from the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology now reveals that homing pigeons fit in one extra wingbeat per second when flying in pairs compared to flying solo.

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Infant Monkeys Died in Accidental Poisoning at UC Davis Lab

The seven primates came into contact with a dye that was used on their mothers, documents reveal.

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The Same Exact Foods Affect Each Person's Gut Bacteria Differently

Diet can influence the gut microbiome, but the same food can have the opposite effect on different people.

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The fellowship of the wing: Pigeons flap faster to fly together

New research publishing June 18 in the open-access journal, PLOS Biology, led by Dr. Lucy Taylor from the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology now reveals that homing pigeons fit in one extra wingbeat per second when flying in pairs compared to flying solo.

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How an Arctic Hyena Was Found in Canada, Then Lost, Then Found Again

The discovery illustrates how museum collections may be filled with forgotten fossils that could expand knowledge of prehistory.

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Psychedelics change how you read faces. That may help alleviate anxiety and depression.

A new systematic review states that serotonergic hallucinogens help users recognize emotions in facial expressions. Sufferers of anxiety and depression often only read negative emotions in other people's faces, adding to their malaise. While more research is needed, psychedelics could prove to be a powerful agent in battling mental health disorders. None If you want to know what someone is thinki

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An ounce of prevention: Preoperative management of inflammation may stave off cancer recurrences

Administering anti-inflammatory treatments that prevent inflammation as well as proresolution treatments that tamp down the body's inflammatory response to surgery or chemotherapy can promote long-term survival in experimental animal cancer models, new research shows.

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How hepatitis B and delta viruses establish infection of liver cells

Researchers have developed a new, scalable cell culture system that allows for detailed investigation of how host cells respond to infection with hepatitis B (HBV) and delta virus (HDV).

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Monitoring biodiversity with sound: How machines can enrich our knowledge

Ecologists have long relied on their senses when it comes to recording animal populations and species diversity. However, modern programmable sound recording devices are now the better option for logging animal vocalizations. Scientists have investigated this using studies of birds as an example.

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New insight from Great Barrier Reef coral provides correction factor to climate records

Newly developed geological techniques help uncover the most accurate and high-resolution climate records to date, according to a new study. The research finds that the standard practice of using modern and fossil coral to measure sea-surface temperatures may not be as straightforward as originally thought. By combining high-resolution microscopic techniques and geochemical modeling, researchers ar

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Pace of Heat Records Will Pick up With Warming

If greenhouse gases are not curbed, 60 percent of the world will set monthly records by century’s end — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Seals consciously reduce blood flow to their blubber before diving

The dive reflex, in which blood flow to the skin is reduced, was once thought to be an entirely automatic response – but seals have worked out how to control it

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UK 'likely' to host critical climate conference next year

The UK is in pole position to host next year's key climate meeting after agreeing a partnership with main rival Italy.

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The Tree That Might Have Inspired Dr. Seuss' 'The Lorax' Has Died

A Monterey cypress that is thought to have inspired the Truffula trees in Dr. Seuss' book "The Lorax" has died.

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Microfluidics device captures circulating cancer cell clusters

About 90% of cancer deaths are due to metastases, when tumors spread to other vital organs, and a research group recently realized that it's not individual cells but rather distinct clusters of cancer cells that circulate and metastasize to other organs. As the group reports in AIP Advances, they set out to gain a better understanding of these circulating cancer cell clusters. The group's microflu

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Cell structure linked to longevity of slow-growing ponderosa pines

Slow-growing ponderosa pines may have a better chance of surviving longer than fast-growing ones, especially as climate change increases the frequency and intensity of drought, according to new research from the University of Montana.

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Size matters: New data reveals cell size sparks genome awakening in embryos

Transitions are a hallmark of life, and so there is a transition during early development when an embryo undergoes biochemical changes, switching from being controlled by maternal molecules to being governed by its own genome. For the first time, researchers have found in an embryo that activation of its genome does not happen all at once, instead it follows a specific pattern controlled primarily

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Egg-sucking sea slug from Florida's Cedar Key named after Muppets creator Jim Henson

Feet from the raw bars and sherbet-colored condominiums of Florida's Cedar Key, researchers discovered a new species of egg-sucking sea slug, a rare outlier in a group famous for being ultra-vegetarians.

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The fellowship of the wing: Pigeons flap faster to fly together

New research publishing June 18 in the open-access journal, PLOS Biology, led by Dr. Lucy Taylor from the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology now reveals that homing pigeons fit in one extra wingbeat per second when flying in pairs compared to flying solo.

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A dietary supplement improves skills of an atypical Rett syndrome patient

Administration of the amino acid L-serine, a dietary supplement, contributes to the improvement of the communicative and motor skills of a patient with a mutation that alters glutamate receptors.

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Sea otters have low genetic diversity like other threatened species, biologists report

Sea otters have very low genetic diversity, a UCLA-led team of life scientists reports June 18 in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. The findings have implications for the conservation of rare and endangered species, in which a lack of genetic diversity can increase the risk of extinction.

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Collegiate affirmative action bans tied to rise in smoking among minority high schoolers

College affirmative action bans may adversely affect the health of underrepresented minority high school students, according to the results of a new study from researchers at Penn Medicine. Between 1996 and 2013, nine US states banned consideration of race and ethnicity in college admissions. A new study in PLOS Medicine shows that the action bans had unanticipated effects, specifically resulting

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