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nyheder2019juni20

24min

Iran Shoots Down a US Drone, Apple Recalls MacBook Batteries, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

1h

New technique makes it possible to see around corners

Computer vision researchers report using special light sources and sensors to see around corners or through gauzy filters, letting them reconstruct the shapes of unseen objects. The researchers say this technique enables them to reconstruct images in great detail, including the relief of George Washington’s profile on a US quarter. Ioannis Gkioulekas, an assistant professor in Carnegie Mellon Uni

1h

Bagsiden: Danmarks mærkeligste badebro

Vor læser i Herlev gør opmærksomhed på en mærkelig brokonstruktion, som tydeligvis er mere politisk korrekt end praktisk anvendelig. Han skriver bl.a.:

36min

Bagsiden: Kompashus eller sværtepude?

Der er i hvert fald to meninger om formålet med den messingdåse, som Torben H. Larsen fremlyste i sidste uge.

36min

'Clean electricity' will dominate power supply

Britain is set to obtain more of its power from zero-carbon sources than from fossil fuels.

37min

Investors Love Slack—for Now

Slack shares rose nearly 50 percent in their debut. It's the latest successful stock offering for a maker of business software.

52min

One Day of Work Per Week is Enough to Get the Mental Health Benefits of Employment

Work, even in small doses, can actually be good for our mental health. (Credit: GaudiLab/Shutterstock) For most of us, work is, well, work. It can be stressful, and suck up a lot of our time. But despite these negatives, there are work perks other than a paycheck and standard employer benefits. Employment offers structure, social contact, physical and mental activity and it’s often a crucial part

59min

Why having too many choices makes decisions harder

People faced with more options than they can effectively consider want to make a good decision, but feel unable to do so, according to a new study. The study used cardiovascular measures and fictional dating profiles to reach its conclusions. Despite the apparent opportunities presented by having a lot of options, the need to choose creates a “paralyzing paradox,” according to coauthor Thomas Sal

1h

Opioid overdoses spike after cold snaps

A marked increase in fatal opioid overdoses follows snaps of cold weather, according to a new study. Researchers found a 25 percent increase in fatal opioid overdoses after periods of freezing temperatures compared to days with an average temperature of 52 degrees. And while the researchers continue to investigate the reasons for this pattern, Brandon Marshall, associate professor of epidemiology

1h

Serotonin levels may clarify unexplained pain

A newly-discovered biological mechanism could explain heightened somatic awareness, in which people experience pain that has no physiological explanation. Patients with heightened somatic awareness often experience unexplained symptoms—headaches, sore joints, nausea, constipation, or itchy skin—that cause emotional distress, and are twice as likely to develop chronic pain. The condition, associat

1h

Male ants are pretty much just flying sperm (and other amazing ant facts)

Who knew? (Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-ND/) Have you have seen ants this year? In Britain, they were probably black garden ants, known as Lasius niger —Europe's most common ant. One of somewhere between 12,000 and 20,000 species , they are the scourge of gardeners—but also fascinating. The small, black, wingless workers run around the pavements, crawl up your plants tending aphids, or collect tasty

1h

'I want to be a guinea pig to help others'

How one amputee is helping scientists improve the lives of other people who rely on prosthetic limbs.

1h

Tailor-made prosthetic liners could help more amputees walk again

Researchers at the University of Bath have developed a new way of designing and manufacturing bespoke prosthetic liners, in less than a day.

1h

Major study finds no conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators

Researchers have found no link between exposure to emissions from municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) and infant deaths or reduced fetal growth.

1h

Post-Soviet food system changes led to greenhouse gas reductions

Changes in agriculture, trade, food production and consumption after the collapse of the Soviet Union led to a large reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, a new study has found. From 1991 to 2011, there was a net emissions reduction of 7.61 gigatons (Gt) of carbon dioxide equivalents — the same as one quarter of the CO2 emissions from deforestation in Latin America in the same period.

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Post-Soviet food system changes led to greenhouse gas reductions

Changes in agriculture, trade, food production and consumption after the collapse of the Soviet Union led to a large reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, a new study has found.

1h

Sugars that coat proteins are a possible drug target for pancreatitis

CA19-9 is a complex sugar structure that coats proteins. Elevated levels of CA19-9 was found to cause inflammation in the pancreas in mice and promote rapid progression to pancreatic cancer. By neutralizing the functions of CA19-9 with antibodies, researchers were able to reduce and even prevent pancreatic damage in animal models.

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Netflix is experimenting with 'rumble' feedback for mobile devices

Haptic feedback has been a feature in video games for many years now. Just about anybody who plays games regularly has experienced the classic controller vibrating effect many developers take …

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The first paternity tests involved 'blood vibration.' They didn't work.

In "Paternity," historian Nara B. Milanich chronicles the age-old quest for the father. (Deposit Photos/) In 1921, Mrs. Rosa Vittori filed charges in a San Francisco court against her former husband. Paul Vittori refused to pay child support for her two-month-old daughter Virginia because, he insisted, the baby was not his. It was a fairly conventional, if heated, story of domestic misery, but Pa

2h

'DNA microscopy' offers entirely new way to image cells

Rather than relying on optics, the microscopy system offers a chemically encoded way to map biomolecules' relative positions.

2h

Advanced NMR captures new details in nanoparticle structures

Advanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have revealed surprising details about the structure of a key group of materials in nanotechology, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), and the placement of their active chemical sites.

2h

GE's process for resetting smart light bulbs is complicated, but necessary

Smart home gadgets have the uncanny ability to take a common task and somehow make it simultaneously simpler and more complicated. Right now, a video demonstrating the process for hard-resetting GE smart lightbulbs is enjoying the dubious honor of internet virality. The video shows the process for resetting the bulbs without having to use the app. It’s a tedious routine that involves turning the

2h

Assembly of the human oral microbiome age 1 to 12

At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Ann Griffen, Ohio State University, Columbus, USA, gave an oral presentation on "Assembly of the Human Oral M

2h

Lasing in strained germanium microbridges

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10655-6 Germanium (based) lasers are a promising route towards a fully CMOS-compatible light source, key to the further development of silicon photonics. Here, the authors realize lasing from strained germanium microbridges up to 100 K, finding a quantum efficiency close to 100%.

2h

Synergetic iridium and amine catalysis enables asymmetric [4+2] cycloadditions of vinyl aminoalcohols with carbonyls

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10674-3 Inverse electron-demand cycloadditions in palladium catalysis are inherently limited by the linear selectivity in the allylic substitution step. To overcome this issue, the authors report a synergetic iridium (branched-selective) and amine catalysis in [4+2] cycloadditions of vinyl aminoalcohols with carbonyls.

2h

Time-restricted feeding restores muscle function in Drosophila models of obesity and circadian-rhythm disruption

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10563-9 Time-restricted feeding (TRF) has beneficial metabolic effects. Here the authors examine how TRF impacts muscle physiology using fly models of metabolically adverse conditions, including diet and genetic models of obesity as well as circadian rhythm disruption, and find that TRF ameliorates skeletal muscle dysfu

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Identification of metabolic vulnerabilities of receptor tyrosine kinases-driven cancer

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10427-2 Cancer subtypes may have distinct metabolic vulnerabilities that can be exploited for therapeutic interventions. Here, the authors show that in lung cancer, genetic activation of distinct oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases results in unique metabolic liabilities and, in particular, EGFR aberrant cancers rely on

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Phosphorylated lipid-conjugated oligonucleotide selectively anchors on cell membranes with high alkaline phosphatase expression

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10639-6 Membrane-anchored DNA probes have been used to study molecular interactions and control cell assembly, but are not selective for different cell membranes. Here the authors develop a lipid-conjugated oligonucleotide for alkaline phosphatase-dependent cell membrane anchorage and use it to distinguish different can

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Direct allylic C–H alkylation of enol silyl ethers enabled by photoredox–Brønsted base hybrid catalysis

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10641-y Allylic C–H activation of enol silyl ethers via one-electron oxidation is usually accompanied by undesired desilylation. Here, under hybrid photoredox and Brønsted base catalysis, the authors show the mild functionalization of enol silyl ethers, providing a platform to access an array of complex carbonyl compoun

2h

Programmable terahertz chip-scale sensing interface with direct digital reconfiguration at sub-wavelength scales

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09868-6 Chip-scale, room-temperature terahertz sensing can potentially enable many applications, but remains restricted in terms of spectrum, angle of incidence and polarization. Here the authors report a methodology for a CMOS-based, programmable THz sensor surface that allows dynamic adaption in all three properties.

2h

Brain leptin reduces liver lipids by increasing hepatic triglyceride secretion and lowering lipogenesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10684-1 Obesity is associated with leptin resistance and rising blood leptin levels while central leptin exposure may be limited. Here, the authors show that brain leptin infusion reduces hepatic lipid content in rats by increasing hepatic VLDL secretion and lowering liver de novo lipogenesis via a vagal mechanism.

2h

'DNA microscopy' offers entirely new way to image cells

Rather than relying on optics, the microscopy system offers a chemically encoded way to map biomolecules' relative positions.

2h

Epilepsy and sudden death linked to bad gene

In sudden death in epilepsy, people stop breathing for no apparent reason and die. Now, a group of UConn neuroscientists have a lead as to why. Many neurologists argue that a bad seizure can travel through the brain to cause breathing or heartbeat malfunction, and that's what kills. But epileptics can die suddenly without having an obvious seizure. Instead, the researchers have evidence a genetic

2h

Advanced NMR captures new details in nanoparticle structures

Advanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have revealed surprising details about the structure of a key group of materials in nanotechology, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), and the placement of their active chemical sites.

2h

Phenols in cocoa bean shells may reverse obesity-related problems in mouse cells

A new study suggests that three of the phenolic compounds in cocoa bean shells have powerful effects on the fat and immune cells in mice, potentially reversing the chronic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity.

2h

One way to increase voter turnout? More sleep.

Forty percent of Americans sleep less than seven hours, resulting in lost productivity, more accidents, and an increased likelihood of dementia. A new study shows that a lack of sleep also results in decreased voter turnout. Other prosocial behaviors are also implicated in this discussion, including signing petitions and donating money to charity. None As Democratic candidates discuss ways to inc

2h

Iranian Hackers Launch a New US-Targeted Campaign as Tensions Mount

Three cybersecurity firms have identified phishing attacks stemming from Iran—that may lay the groundwork for something more destructive.

2h

Apple's MacBook Pro Battery Recall Adds to Its Laptop Problems

Thursday's recall, issued because of battery overheating concerns, is not an isolated incident when it comes to Apple’s premium laptops.

2h

In Hawaii, Construction to Begin on Disputed Telescope Project

Work on the Thirty Meter Telescope on Mauna Kea, bitterly opposed by Hawaiian activists, may soon be underway.

2h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: More Roy

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, June 20. ‣ The Republican Roy Moore, who lost the race for an Alabama Senate seat in 2017 to Doug Jones after allegations of sexual misconduct, announced he would run again. ‣ The Supreme Court ruled that a go

2h

ESA Plans Mission to Intercept a 'Pristine' Comet

Comet 67P was thoroughly explored over two years. Now, astronomers are hunting an even fresher catch. (Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NavCam) The European Space Agency has selected a new mission that aims to investigate a wholly pristine comet, or one that has never visited the sun. Because these objects are hard to spot until they’re already close to the sun, the idea is that the mission would launch withou

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People Are More Likely to Return Wallets if There's Lots of Money Inside, Study Says

People are more likely to track down a the owner of a wallet if it contains a large sum of money. (Credit: Shutterstock) What would you do if you found a wallet with $100 in it? Would you return it? Keep it? Well, if you’re like the majority of people in this world, you’d probably contact its owner and return the wallet without a cent missing. But, if the wallet contained only a few bucks, you may

2h

Scientists Find a Never-Before-Seen Hybrid: A Narluga

The first "narluga" skull ever to be discovered. The hybrid mixes traits of its beluga and narwhal parents. (Credit: Mikkel Høegh Post, Natural History Museum of Denmark.) While visiting West Greenland in the 1980s, an Inuit hunter killed an odd-looking whale. He realized there was something unique about the animal, so he kept its skull. Years later in 1990, a researcher from the Greenland Institu

2h

Medical proof a vacation is good for your heart

New research shows that using, instead of losing, your vacation time can be beneficial to your heart health.

3h

Spotting objects amid clutter

A new technique enables robots to quickly identify objects hidden in a three-dimensional cloud of data, reminiscent of how some people can make sense of a densely patterned 'Magic Eye' image if they observe it in just the right way.

3h

Psoriasis patients turn to alternative medicine when traditional treatments fail

A recent survey from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found patients with psoriasis frequently use complementary or alternative therapies to treat their symptoms when traditional treatments fail.

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Early-and-regular cannabis use by youth is associated with alteration in brain circuits that support cognitive control

The development of neural circuits in youth, at a particularly important time in their lives, can be heavily influenced by external factors — specifically the frequent and regular use of cannabis. A new study reports that alterations in cognitive control — an ensemble of processes by which the mind governs, regulates and guides behaviors, impulses, and decision-making based on goals are directly

3h

Sweet headphones to rock, run, and chill out with

Buds, on ears, and over ears. (Malte Wingen via Unsplash/) A pair of headphones with stellar audio quality is nothing new, but there have been major improvements to battery life, wireless connectivity, and noise-cancelation. If you want to upgrade your older pair, here’s a list of some options to fit your ears and your life. Master & Dynamic headphones have one of the more classic and recognizabl

3h

Treatment for common cause of diarrhea more promising

Researchers have figured out how to grow the intestinal parasite Cryptosporidium in the lab, an achievement that will speed efforts to treat or prevent diarrhea caused by the parasite.

3h

Scientists discover new method for developing tracers used for medical imaging

Researchers discovered a method for creating radioactive tracers to better track pharmaceuticals in the body as well as image diseases, such as cancer, and other medical conditions.

3h

Animals may have more than one means of surviving hypoxia

A tidepool crustacean's ability to survive oxygen deprivation though it lacks a key set of genes raises the possibility that animals might have more ways of dealing with hypoxic environments than had been thought.

3h

Looking for freshwater in all the snowy places

Snowflakes that cover mountains or linger under tree canopies are a vital freshwater resource for over a billion people around the world.

3h

Dirty Surgical Instruments Tied to Hundreds of Infections at Colorado Hospital, Lawsuit Alleges

These included tools tainted with blood, chunks of bone, cement, hair and even a dead insect.

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Facebook finally unveils its cryptocurrency. What we know about Libra so far.

Facebook has just announced its new cryptocurrency, Libra. Early investors include many of the world's leading companies, implying they will accept Libra as payment The announcement was met with a mixed response, but only time will tell how Libra will be received None In a much-anticipated announcement on Tuesday, Facebook introduced the world to its new cryptocurrency Libra which is slated for l

3h

NASA Funds $2M Study to See if We Could Live in Moon Pits

Curiosity Piqued Unlike lunar craters , which typically form from asteroid collisions, Moon pits are akin to the sinkholes that occasionally crop up on Earth, forming when the surface of the Moon collapses into an underground cavity. NASA suspects the voids could prove useful for reaching underground resources, such as minerals or ice, or perhaps even serve as shelter for lunar colonists — so it

3h

Blue Origin Test Fires Moon Lander Engine For the First Time

“Data Looks Great” Jeff Bezos-led Blue Origin just fired up its gigantic BE-7 Moon lander engine for the first time at NSA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The test signifies a big step forward for the private space company’s efforts to land on the Moon. “Data looks great and hardware is in perfect condition,” Bezos tweeted. “Test went full planned duration — 35 seconds.” Th

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Prepping for Surgery With 3D-Printed Organs May Become Commonplace

Measure Twice Many doctors are using 3D-printed replicas of human organs to practice for complex surgeries like transplants. Technology is still expensive, but Knowable Magazine reports that as 3D printing gets cheaper, rehearsing a surgery on a 3D-printed replica of a specific patient’s organ could become the norm rather than the exception — a bizarre example of how emerging technology could mak

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Facebook finally unveils its cryptocurrency. What we know so far about Libra.

Facebook has just announced its new cryptocurrency, Libra. Early investors include many of the world's leading companies, implying they will accept Libra as payment The announcement was met with a mixed response, but only time will tell how Libra will be received None In a much-anticipated announcement on Tuesday, Facebook introduced the world to its new cryptocurrency Libra which is slated for l

3h

Den lærende kultur er sat voldsomt under pres af kontrol

Det er stik i mod alt, hvad vi ved om sikker læring, og medvirker desværre til at skabe afstand og reducere den psykologiske tryghed. Det er den forkerte vej.

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All Hail The Mighty Translatotron!

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Printing vaccines at the pharmacy or at home will be the way of the future

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Platforms and Blockchain Will Transform Logistics

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Designing a Future Apartment Platform

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Study finds ‘Pokémon region’ in brains of people who played game

The study explored humans' developmental window, during which the visual cortex forms regions that recognize specific objects, like faces, words and, surprisingly, Pokémon. The results showed that these Pokémon-selective regions exist in the same brain areas among people who played Pokémon as children. The findings could help improve treatments for conditions such as autism. None If you spent man

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About the Idea That You’re Growing Horns From Looking Down at Your Phone …

Neck strain and bone spurs are certainly possible from poor posture, but some experts doubt that cellphones are the only culprit.

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Scientific American Editors Build Saturn V Rocket LEGO Set

In the early morning hours of July 16, 1969, technicians at the Kennedy Space Center loaded upward of 750,000 gallons of fuel into the 363-foot Saturn V rocket that would successfully propel the Apollo 11 spacecraft toward the moon. It would be one of 13 Saturn V launches between 1967 and 1973. This vehicle remains the tallest, heaviest and most powerful rocket ever in operation. In honor of the

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ESA Announces “Mothership” Mission to Intercept Comets

In Position The European Space Agency just announced plans to launch a new “mothership” spacecraft that will sit in wait up in space and intercept incoming comets. The launch, planned for 2028, stands to give astronomers a better shot at studying pristine comets as they approach from the outer reaches of the solar system, according to BBC News . That’s because the mothership probe and two smaller

4h

Saturn’s Moon Enceladus Has Nutrient-Rich Oceans

Diving In Until now, the subterranean oceans of Saturn’s moon Enceladus, were thought to be harsh and utterly unsuitable for life. But now, a closer look reveals that the oceans likely have a similar temperature, salt content, and acidity as our oceans here on Earth. Those factors, plus high concentrations of organic gases, lead scientists to believe that the oceans might harbor microbial life, a

4h

‘Microscope’ made of DNA reveals a cell’s hidden structures

Nature, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01940-x DNA tags can be used to assemble a diagram of the genetic material inside a cell.

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Forget "text neck." New research suggests humans are growing horns.

A team of researchers in Queensland says 33% of the Australian population has sizable bone spurs growing at the base of their skulls. This postural deformity, enthesophytes, results in chronic headaches and upper back and neck pain. The likelihood humans will alter their addiction to this technology is low, so this might be a major consequence of technology. None We knew it was coming. We just we

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Hilton: Future Hotels Will Talk to Visitors’ Microchip Implants

Century Noted A hundred years ago, Hilton opened its first hotel. Now, in celebration of the momentous anniversary, it’s looking 100 years into the future, sharing its predictions for the hotels of 2119 in a newly released report — and some of those predictions are downright wild. Space Tourism One of the first major differences the report notes between the hotels of today and those of the future

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Largest study of CTE finds it in 6% of subjects

Nearly 6% of athletes and non-athletes were found to have the neurodegenerative disorder chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in the largest, and broadest, study conducted of the disease to date. Kevin F. Bieniek, Ph.D., of UT Health San Antonio is the lead author.

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Biden's Gaffe Exposed the Crack in His Coalition

When journalists, including me , point out that Joe Biden is running as a candidate of nostalgia, it’s usually a reference to his argument that he can return things to a pre-2016 idyll of American unity and happiness. But the former vice president’s backward look has taken a weird turn this week as Biden delivered a confusing story involving a long-dead Democratic segregationist senator from Miss

4h

Die. Freeze Body. Store. Revive.

Until the day he died, in 2011, Robert Ettinger hoped humanity would figure out a way to cheat death. Today, his body is stored in a cryonic vessel filled with liquid nitrogen and frozen to –196 degrees Celsius. He lies in cryopreservation at the Cryonics Institute in Michigan—which he founded—alongside his late mother, his first and second wives, and more than 150 other deceased. “We’re classifi

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Study: Phenols in cocoa bean shells may reverse obesity-related problems in mouse cells

A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois suggests that three of the phenolic compounds in cocoa bean shells have powerful effects on the fat and immune cells in mice, potentially reversing the chronic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity.

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Advanced NMR at Ames Lab captures new details in nanoparticle structures

Advanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have revealed surprising details about the structure of a key group of materials in nanotechology, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), and the placement of their active chemical sites.

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Many elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma benefit from targeted therapies

Many elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) — who are often underrepresented in clinical trials to treat the kidney cancer — are seeing overall survival benefits from treatment with targeted therapies, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open.

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Epilepsy and sudden death linked to bad gene

In sudden death in epilepsy, people stop breathing for no apparent reason and die. Now, a group of UConn neuroscientists have a lead as to why. Many neurologists argue that a bad seizure can travel through the brain to cause breathing or heartbeat malfunction, and that's what kills. But epileptics can die suddenly without having an obvious seizure. Instead, the researchers have evidence a genetic

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NASA selects SwRI's PUNCH mission to image beyond the Sun's outer corona

NASA has selected Southwest Research Institute to lead the 'Polarimeter to Unify the Corona and Heliosphere' (PUNCH) mission, a landmark Small Explorers Program mission that will image beyond the Sun's outer corona.

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Burnout: Sleepless firefighters at risk of exhaustion and mental health conditions

Sleep disturbances and mental health challenges are putting close to half of America's firefighters at high risk of emotional fatigue and exhaustion, new research by Monash University in Australia shows.

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What big ideas will shape U.S. science over the next decade? Here are some contenders

National Science Foundation asks public to weigh in on contest

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UTH er til for læring – ikke for rapportering

At Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed skulle repræsentere en bevægelse væk fra læring og mod mere kontrol er ganske enkelt forkert.

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Not always reaching your potential is okay, but overthinking it is a problem

Having aspirations helps us navigate life in a meaningful and fulfilling way, but it can also cause psychological distress when hopes are left unfulfilled. New research has found that it's not failing to make progress toward our 'ideal-self' that is problematic but rather the tendency to focus on that lack of progress in a negative way that leads to psychological distress.

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Engineers 3D print flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces

Engineers have designed pliable, 3D-printed mesh materials whose flexibility and toughness they can tune to emulate and support softer tissues such as muscles and tendons. They can tailor the intricate structures in each mesh, and they envision the tough yet stretchy fabric-like material being used as personalized, wearable supports, including ankle or knee braces, and even implantable devices, su

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Gorgeous 'Atlas of Space' Smashes the Textbook View of the Solar System

The solar system is more than a row of nine circles. Try 18,000 of them.

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National emergency alerts potentially vulnerable to attack

New research shows that hackers, working with limited resources, could send fake emergency alerts to cell phones in a confined area like a sports stadium.

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Do ice cores help to unravel the clouds of climate history?

For the first time, an international research team led by the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) has investigated atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INPs) in ice cores, which can provide insights on the type of cloud cover in the Arctic over the last 500 years. These INPs play an important role in the formation of ice in clouds and thus have a major influence on the climate.

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Rare recessive mutations pry open new windows on autism

Most genetic variants linked to autism are de novo mutations, which are not inherited and are relatively easy to find. A new study, in one of the largest cohorts to date, instead tracked rare recessive mutations in which a child inherits two 'bad' copies of a gene. The findings provides a likely explanation for up to 5 percent of all autism cases and offer new clues to autism's biological causes.

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Lost wallets are more likely to be returned if they hold cash

Worldwide, return rates of lost wallets goes up as the money inside increases, contradicting the idea that people act in their own self-interest.

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After Nearly Perfecting It, Google Is Abandoning the Tablet

Google isn’t killing all tablets, but it will no longer be making its own tablets. It’s a crying shame as Google’s merging of Android and Chrome OS for last years abysmally reviewed Pixel Slate …

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The planet has a fever, and the cure is more capitalism, a prominent researcher argues

In a provocative new book, MIT’s Andrew McAfee asserts that rich countries have figured out how to grow with lighter environmental impacts—and developing nations can follow suit.

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Quantum Computing for English Majors

The poet who discovered Shor’s algorithm answers questions about quantum computers and other mysteries. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Largest study of CTE finds it in 6% of subjects

Nearly 6% of athletes and non-athletes were found to have the neurodegenerative disorder chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in the largest, and broadest, study conducted of the disease to date. Kevin F. Bieniek, Ph.D., of UT Health San Antonio is the lead author.

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Depth of Field: The Metaphor of Trump and the MAGA Hat

Mandel Ngan's photo from Trump's rally on Tuesday says a lot about the president's grip on his own message.

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New Technique Maps RNAs in Cells Without a Microscope

DNA microscopy pinpoints the locations of transcripts by laying a grid of tags over the molecules and labeling each connection.

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Europes Oldest Mosque May Be Buried Underground in This Visigothic City

Hidden buildings in a 1,400-year-old Visigothic city were revealed in a new survey.

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Astronomers see 'warm' glow of Uranus's rings

Two telescopes have measured the faint heat from the main, or epsilon ring, of Uranus, enabling astronomers for the first time to determine its temperature: a cool 77 Kelvin. Earlier images of the rings came from reflected light only. The observations by teams at UC Berkeley and the University of Leicester also show that the rings lack dust, which is common in the rings of other planets, and are c

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Renault and Nissan end standoff over post-Ghosn governance

Renault announced Thursday that it had reached an agreement with its partner Nissan on the Japanese carmaker's governance overhaul, paving the way for the French company to back changes decided …

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Animals may have more than one means of surviving hypoxia

A tidepool crustacean's ability to survive oxygen deprivation though it lacks a key set of genes raises the possibility that animals might have more ways of dealing with hypoxic environments than had been thought.

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Animals may have more than one means of surviving hypoxia

A tidepool crustacean's ability to survive oxygen deprivation though it lacks a key set of genes raises the possibility that animals might have more ways of dealing with hypoxic environments than had been thought.

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Meteoric smoke could be key to putting clouds on Mars

Clouds on Mars aren't big and fluffy, but they may have a tumultuous origin story. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/) Martian clouds are certainly not as awe-inspiring as the ones we enjoy on Earth , but the fact that the planet is able to make them at all is quite remarkable. It's a small, cold, hellishly dry red rock—a far cry from the warmer, wetter world it probably was billions of years ago. Its atmosphere

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What Dropping 17,000 Wallets Around The Globe Can Teach Us About Honesty

Scientists used "lost" wallets to test whether people are more likely to be dishonest when they might profit. The results were puzzling — so they put more money in the wallets. (Image credit: Christian Zünd)

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What Do the Tech Oligarchs Have in Mind for Us?

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A New Way for Investors to Be Heard, with Zach Hascoe from Say

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A Molecule Long Thought Harmless Plays a Role in Pancreatic Cancer, Could Hint at Cure

The location of the pancreas in the human body. (Credit: Magic mine/Shutterstock) Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer — a virtually incurable condition. But now, a serendipitous discovery is providing new hope: A sugar molecule associated with the disease, but long thought harmless, known as CA19-9, actually plays an active role in the genesis of pancreatic cancer, researcher

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The Event Horizon Telescope's Possible Next Target? Blazars

A blazar is an active black hole hurling jets of material directly at Earth. (Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab) The Event Horizon Telescope made history on April 10 when it captured the first image of a supermassive black hole’s event horizon at the heart of galaxy M87. While there’s only one other target close enough to image that way – the black hole at the center of our own Milky

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Third Falcon Heavy Launch Set for Next Week

Falcon Heavy made its second launch on April 11 from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. (Credit: SpaceX) The third launch of SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket is scheduled to blast off from Kennedy Space Center late at night on June 24. Along for the ride will be 24 satellites and a slate of experiments, including new technology developed by NASA that will help guide our way to Mars. The Deep Space Atomic Cl

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U.S honeybees had the worst winter die-off in more than a decade

Colonies suffered from parasitic, disease-spreading Varroa mites. Floods and fire didn’t help.

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Life could exist in a 2D universe (according to physics, anyway)

Physicists and philosophers have long claimed that life can form only in a universe like ours, with three dimensions of space and one of time. That thinking may need to be revised.

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Apollo Training: When Arizona Stood In for the Moon

Throughout the 1960s, NASA scientists and technicians worked relentlessly to train their astronauts for the Apollo missions to come. Locations throughout Arizona were selected by the United States Geological Survey’s new astrogeology branch to serve as lunar analogues—the moon right here at home. Arizona had plenty of existing craters, exposed canyons, volcanic cinder cones, and lava fields to te

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First Neolithic City Was So Overcrowded People Started Trying to Kill Each Other

The transition from foraging to living close together took an ugly turn.

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People are more honest than they think they are

More money in a lost wallet means it is more likely to be returned

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The Global Hawk Drone Iran Shot Down Was a $220M Surveillance Monster

The Global Hawk can fly at an altitude of 55,000 feet and stay aloft for 30 hours straight.

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Renault and Nissan end standoff over post-Ghosn governance

Renault announced Thursday that it had reached an agreement with its partner Nissan on the Japanese carmaker's governance overhaul, paving the way for the French company to back changes decided in the wake of the Carlos Ghosn scandal.

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Looking for freshwater in all the snowy places

Snowflakes that cover mountains or linger under tree canopies are a vital freshwater resource for over a billion people around the world. To help determine how much freshwater is stored in snow, a team of NASA-funded researchers is creating a computer-based tool that simulates the best way to detect snow and measure its water content from space.

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An AI “Vaccine” Can Block Adversarial Attacks

Virtual Vaccine For as smart as artificial intelligence systems seem to get, they’re still easily confused by hackers who launch so-called adversarial attacks — cyberattacks that trick algorithms into misinterpreting their training data, sometimes to disastrous ends. In order to bolster AI’s defenses from these dangerous hacks, scientists at the Australian research agency CSIRO say in a press rel

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As countries battle for control of North Pole, science is the ultimate winner

Armed with new seafloor maps, Russia, Denmark, and Canada seek to extend their continental shelves and claim extra territory for mining and more

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Animals may have more than one means of surviving hypoxia

A tidepool crustacean's ability to survive oxygen deprivation though it lacks a key set of genes raises the possibility that animals might have more ways of dealing with hypoxic environments than had been thought.

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Crystal with a twist: Scientists grow spiraling new material

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have created new inorganic crystals made of stacks of atomically thin sheets that unexpectedly spiral like a nanoscale card deck. Their surprising structures, reported in a new study in the journal Nature, may yield unique optical, electronic and thermal properties, including superconduct

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Cereal grains scientists fight hidden hunger with new approach

Global demand for staple crops like maize, wheat, and rice is on the rise — making these crops ideal targets for improving nutrition through biofortification. Biofortification is the process of developing micronutrient-dense staple crops by combining traditional breeding practices with modern biotechnology.

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New research provides medical proof vacation is good for your heart

New Research from Syracuse University professors Bryce Hruska and Brooks Gump published Wednesday in Psychology and Health shows that using, instead of losing, your vacation time can be beneficial to your heart health.

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Scientists discover new method for developing tracers used for medical imaging

University of North Carolina researchers discovered a method for creating radioactive tracers to better track pharmaceuticals in the body as well as image diseases, such as cancer, and other medical conditions.

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The richer the pickings, the more honest the people

The more money there is in a lost wallet, the more likely it is to be returned to its owner, researchers from the universities of Zurich, Michigan and Utah show in a global study. They explain the surprising result with the fact that dishonest finders have to adapt their self-image, which involves psychological costs that can exceed the material value of the wallet.

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Squeezing of blood vessels may contribute to cognitive decline in Alzheimer's

Reduced blood flow to the brain associated with early Alzheimer's may be caused by the contraction of cells wrapped around blood vessels, according to a UCL-led study that opens up a new way to potentially treat the disease.

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High on iron? It stops anemia but has a downside

A global study looking at the role that iron plays in 900 diseases has uncovered the impact of both low and high iron levels — and the news is mixed.

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Electron-behaving nanoparticles rock current understanding of matter

Northwestern University researchers have made a strange and startling discovery that nanoparticles engineered with DNA in colloidal crystals — when extremely small — behave just like electrons.

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For global fisheries, it's a small world after all

Even though many nations manage their fish stocks as if they were local resources, marine fisheries and fish populations are a single, highly interconnected and globally shared resource, a new study emphasizes.

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First results from ruminant genome project will inform agriculture, conservation and biomedicine

A trio of Reports and a Perspective in this issue present the Ruminant Genome Project's (RGP) initial findings, which range from explaining how deer antlers exploit cancer-associated signaling pathways to regenerate, to informing reindeer genetic adaptations — including as relates to circadian rhythm — that have helped these animals thrive in the frigid Arctic.

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Long thought harmless, a glycan biomarker may cause pancreatic disease and cancer

A widely recognized biomarker for pancreatic disease, CA19-9, thought to be benign for decades, may in fact be a promoter for the development of these diseases, including pancreatic cancer.

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People globally return 'lost' wallets more as money increases

In a study of how people in 40 countries decided to return (or not) 'lost' wallets, researchers were surprised to find that — in contrast to classic economic logic — people returned the wallets holding the greater amounts of money more often.

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Moral concerns override desire to profit from finding a lost wallet

The setup of a research study was a bit like the popular ABC television program 'What Would You Do?' — minus the television cameras and big reveal in the end.

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Sugars that coat proteins are a possible drug target for pancreatitis

CA19-9 is a complex sugar structure that coats proteins. Elevated levels of CA19-9 was found to cause inflammation in the pancreas in mice and promote rapid progression to pancreatic cancer. By neutralizing the functions of CA19-9 with antibodies, researchers were able to reduce and even prevent pancreatic damage in animal models.

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New study maps how ocean currents connect the world's fisheries

It's a small world after all — especially when it comes to marine fisheries, with a new study revealing they form a single network, with over $10 billion worth of fish each year being caught in a country other than the one in which it spawned.

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NIST team supersizes 'quantum squeezing' to measure ultrasmall motion

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have harnessed the phenomenon of 'quantum squeezing' to amplify and measure trillionths-of-a-meter motions of a lone trapped magnesium ion (electrically charged atom).

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One third of Cambodians infected with threadworm, study finds

Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted threadworm that is endemic in many tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have conducted a nation-wide parasitology survey of the Cambodian population and concluded that nearly a third of the studied population is infected with S. stercoralis.

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How bacteria kill host cells from the inside

A bacterial pathogen that typically multiplies outside of host cells can enter and induce the destruction of cells called macrophages, according to a study published June 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Anne-Béatrice Blanc-Potard of the Université de Montpellier in France, and colleagues.

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More cash ups the chance people return lost wallets

The more money there is in a lost wallet, the more likely it is to be returned to its owner, according to research in 355 cities. The researchers explain the surprising result with the fact that dishonest finders have to adapt their self-image, which involves psychological costs that can exceed the material value of the wallet. The classic economic model predicts that individuals will typically k

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We are more likely to return a lost wallet if it is full of cash

People are more likely to hand in found wallets if they contain more money, probably because we don’t like to think of ourselves as thieves

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How reindeer evolved to survive freezing Arctic winters

Genes improve fat transport, vitamin D uptake

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Cancer genes help deer antlers grow

Study also reveals a single origin for horns, antlers, and other headgear

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A growing sensory smog threatens the ability of fish to communicate, navigate, and survive

Researchers probe how noise, murky waters, and ocean acidification affect senses

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Honesty is majority policy in lost wallet experiment

Public more likely to return wallet containing larger sum of money, global study finds Here’s a moral dilemma: if you find a wallet stuffed with bank notes, do you pocket the cash or track down the owner to return it? We can each speak for ourselves, but now a team of economists have put the unsuspecting public to the test in a mass social experiment involving 17,000 “lost” wallets in 40 countrie

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Keeping the gate open

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Hand it to you

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A colitis circuit

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"Missing" Wallets with More Cash Are More Likely to Be Returned

A massive global study with 17,000 planted wallets found similar patterns among most of the 40 countries involved — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The world’s fisheries are incredibly intertwined, thanks to baby fish

A computer simulation reveals how one nation's management of its fish spawning grounds could significantly help or hurt another country's catch.

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Want to forge stronger social bonds? Bring beer.

A new analysis of an ancient Wari brewery suggests chicha helped maintain the civilization's social capital for hundreds of years. Civilizations throughout the ancient world used alcoholic drinks to signify kinship, hospitality, and social cohesion. The researchers hope their findings will remind us of the importance in reaffirming social institutions and sharing cultural practices — even if over

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Looking for freshwater in all the snowy places

Snowflakes that cover mountains or linger under tree canopies are a vital freshwater resource for over a billion people around the world.

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More than 5 million cancer survivors experience chronic pain, twice the rate of the general population

More than 5 million cancer survivors in the United States experience chronic pain, almost twice the rate in the general population, according to a study published by Mount Sinai researchers

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Engineers 3D print flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces

MIT engineers have designed pliable, 3D-printed mesh materials whose flexibility and toughness they can tune to emulate and support softer tissues such as muscles and tendons. They can tailor the intricate structures in each mesh, and they envision the tough yet stretchy fabric-like material being used as personalized, wearable supports, including ankle or knee braces, and even implantable devices

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'Robot blood' powers machines for lengthy tasks

Researchers at Cornell University have created a system of circulating liquid — 'robot blood' — within robotic structures, to store energy and power robotic applications for sophisticated, long-duration tasks.

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New study maps how ocean currents connect the world's fisheries

A new study published in the journal Science finds that the world's marine fisheries form a single network, with over $10 billion worth of fish each year being caught in a country other than the one in which it spawned.

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Resolving ruminants

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The glycan CA19-9 promotes pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in mice

Glycosylation alterations are indicative of tissue inflammation and neoplasia, but whether these alterations contribute to disease pathogenesis is largely unknown. To study the role of glycan changes in pancreatic disease, we inducibly expressed human fucosyltransferase 3 and β1,3-galactosyltransferase 5 in mice, reconstituting the glycan sialyl-Lewis a , also known as carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (

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Quantum amplification of mechanical oscillator motion

Detection of the weakest forces in nature is aided by increasingly sensitive measurements of the motion of mechanical oscillators. However, the attainable knowledge of an oscillator’s motion is limited by quantum fluctuations that exist even if the oscillator is in its lowest possible energy state. We demonstrate a technique for amplifying coherent displacements of a mechanical oscillator with in

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Photoexcitation of flavoenzymes enables a stereoselective radical cyclization

Photoexcitation is a common strategy for initiating radical reactions in chemical synthesis. We found that photoexcitation of flavin-dependent "ene"-reductases changes their catalytic function, enabling these enzymes to promote an asymmetric radical cyclization. This reactivity enables the construction of five-, six-, seven-, and eight-membered lactams with stereochemical preference conferred by

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Direct arene C-H fluorination with 18F- via organic photoredox catalysis

Positron emission tomography (PET) plays key roles in drug discovery and development, as well as medical imaging. However, there is a dearth of efficient and simple radiolabeling methods for aromatic C–H bonds, which limits advancements in PET radiotracer development. Here, we disclose a mild method for the fluorine-18 ( 18 F)–fluorination of aromatic C–H bonds by an [ 18 F]F – salt via organic p

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Particle analogs of electrons in colloidal crystals

A versatile method for the design of colloidal crystals involves the use of DNA as a particle-directing ligand. With such systems, DNA-nanoparticle conjugates are considered programmable atom equivalents (PAEs), and design rules have been devised to engineer crystallization outcomes. This work shows that when reduced in size and DNA grafting density, PAEs behave as electron equivalents (EEs), roa

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Akkermansia muciniphila induces intestinal adaptive immune responses during homeostasis

Intestinal adaptive immune responses influence host health, yet only a few intestinal bacteria species that induce cognate adaptive immune responses during homeostasis have been identified. Here, we show that Akkermansia muciniphila , an intestinal bacterium associated with systemic effects on host metabolism and PD-1 checkpoint immunotherapy, induces immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibodies and antig

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Structural identification of a hotspot on CFTR for potentiation

Cystic fibrosis is a fatal disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Two main categories of drugs are being developed: correctors that improve folding of CFTR and potentiators that recover the function of CFTR. Here, we report two cryo–electron microscopy structures of human CFTR in complex with potentiators: one with the U.S. Food and Drug Adm

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Demographic dynamics of the smallest marine vertebrates fuel coral reef ecosystem functioning

How coral reefs survive as oases of life in low-productivity oceans has puzzled scientists for centuries. The answer may lie in internal nutrient cycling and/or input from the pelagic zone. Integrating meta-analysis, field data, and population modeling, we show that the ocean’s smallest vertebrates, cryptobenthic reef fishes, promote internal reef fish biomass production through extensive larval

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The small world of global marine fisheries: The cross-boundary consequences of larval dispersal

Fish stocks are managed within national boundaries and by regional organizations, but the interdependence of stocks between these jurisdictions, especially as a result of larval dispersal, remains poorly explored. We examined the international connectivity of 747 commercially fished taxonomic groups by building a global network of fish larval dispersal. We found that the world’s fisheries are hig

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New Products

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Learning how to pivot

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Large-scale ruminant genome sequencing provides insights into their evolution and distinct traits

The ruminants are one of the most successful mammalian lineages, exhibiting morphological and habitat diversity and containing several key livestock species. To better understand their evolution, we generated and analyzed de novo assembled genomes of 44 ruminant species, representing all six Ruminantia families. We used these genomes to create a time-calibrated phylogeny to resolve topological co

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Biological adaptations in the Arctic cervid, the reindeer (Rangifer tarandus)

The reindeer is an Arctic species that exhibits distinctive biological characteristics, for which the underlying genetic basis remains largely unknown. We compared the genomes of reindeer against those of other ruminants and nonruminant mammals to reveal the genetic basis of light arrhythmicity, high vitamin D metabolic efficiency, the antler growth trait of females, and docility. We validate tha

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Genetic basis of ruminant headgear and rapid antler regeneration

Ruminants are the only extant mammalian group possessing bony (osseous) headgear. We obtained 221 transcriptomes from bovids and cervids and sequenced three genomes representing the only two pecoran lineages that convergently lack headgear. Comparative analyses reveal that bovid horns and cervid antlers share similar gene expression profiles and a common cellular basis developed from neural crest

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Trends and challenges in robot manipulation

Dexterous manipulation is one of the primary goals in robotics. Robots with this capability could sort and package objects, chop vegetables, and fold clothes. As robots come to work side by side with humans, they must also become human-aware. Over the past decade, research has made strides toward these goals. Progress has come from advances in visual and haptic perception and in mechanics in the

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Rotary substates of mitochondrial ATP synthase reveal the basis of flexible F1-Fo coupling

F 1 F o –adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthases make the energy of the proton-motive force available for energy-consuming processes in the cell. We determined the single-particle cryo–electron microscopy structure of active dimeric ATP synthase from mitochondria of Polytomella sp. at a resolution of 2.7 to 2.8 angstroms. Separation of 13 well-defined rotary substates by three-dimensional classifi

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DNA patents revisited

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News at a glance

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Lost at sea

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Hiding in plain sight

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Exercising empathy

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Keeping the gate open

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Hand it to you

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A colitis circuit

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BeATing back obesity

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Senescent beta cells

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Wildebeest! Okapi! Giraffe! Ibex! Come Peruse Their Genomes

The Ruminant Genome Project just released the DNA of 44 species of the multi-stomached, headgear-bearing animals, revealing a host of biological curiosities.

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Physicists Hack the Uncertainty Principle to See an Ion Wiggle

Heisenberg's famous principle can't be violated, but it can be gamed. A new study shows a way to measure particles with far more precision than before.

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Would You Return This Lost Wallet?

An intriguing new study found that people across the world are more inclined to give back a lost wallet if there is money inside.

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Astronomers see 'warm' glow of Uranus's rings

The rings of Uranus are invisible to all but the largest telescopes—they weren't even discovered until 1977—but they're surprisingly bright in new heat images of the planet taken by two large telescopes in the high deserts of Chile.

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New study maps how ocean currents connect the world's fisheries

A new study published in the journal Science finds that the world's marine fisheries form a single network, with over $10 billion worth of fish each year being caught in a country other than the one in which it spawned.

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Electron-behaving nanoparticles rock current understanding of matter

It's not an electron. But it sure does act like one.

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"Missing" Wallets with More Cash Are More Likely to Be Returned

A massive global study with 17,000 planted wallets found similar patterns among most of the 40 countries involved — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Getting to grips with robot hand design

Researchers suggest alternative approaches to the vexing problems of grasping and pinching. Nick Carne reports.

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"Missing" Wallets with More Cash Are More Likely to Be Returned

A massive global study with 17,000 planted wallets found similar patterns among most of the 40 countries involved — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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People globally return 'lost' wallets more as money increases

The setup of a research study was a bit like the popular ABC television program "What Would You Do?"—minus the television cameras and big reveal in the end.

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Research team supersizes 'quantum squeezing' to measure ultrasmall motion

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have harnessed the phenomenon of "quantum squeezing" to amplify and measure trillionths-of-a-meter motions of a lone trapped magnesium ion (electrically charged atom).

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UK's leading mouse genetics centre faces closure

Plan to halt academic work at Harwell Institute threatens research including on diabetes Britain’s leading centre for mouse genetics is facing closure in a move that critics say will undermine crucial research on serious diseases and threaten the standing of UK science. The Medical Research Council has told staff at its Harwell Institute in Oxfordshire that an internal strategy board recommended

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New Mind-Controlled Robot Arm First to Work Without Brain Implant

Approaching Avatar If you want to control a robot with your mind — and really, who doesn’t? — you currently have two options. You can get a brain implant , in which case your control over the robot will be smooth and continuous. Or you can skip the risky, expensive surgery in favor of a device that senses your brainwaves from outside your skull — but your control over the bot will be jerky and no

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Bank of England to mull access for likes of Facebook's Libra

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney is open to the idea of letting new payment services such as Facebook's upcoming Libra hold funds with the central bank—something previously limited to commercial banks.

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Chernobyl: Facts About the Nuclear Disaster

The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant explosion resulted in the most horrific nuclear disaster in the world.

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Apple recalls some older MacBook Pros after finding their batteries could overheat

In an announcement Thursday afternoon, the iPhone maker said it was recalling a 'limited number' of MacBook Pros because their batteries 'may pose a fire safety risk.'

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These New Smart Lightbulbs Can Beam Data Through Light

Bright Idea Smart electronics company Signifiy just announced a futuristic take on the internet of things: the Trulifi, a smart lightbulb that can beam data streams using light instead of WiFi. “Wherever there’s light, there can now be wireless communication,” promises Olivia Qiu, Chief Innovation Officer at Signify, in a press release . Li-Fi The technology behind the bulb, called Li-Fi, can tra

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Hackers Stole Data from NASA’s Robotics Lab

H4ck3d NASA’s famed Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) might have been able to land multiple remotely-controlled robots on Mars — but when it comes to its cybersecurity track record, things look a lot less rosy. According to a new 82 page investigation by NASA’s Office of Inspector General, the JPL team’s cybersecurity systems is plagued by flaws. In fact, the report outlines an event in which 23 fi

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Trump’s plan would make government stupid

Nature, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01961-6 Cuts to science advisory panels for federal agencies will haunt the United States long after the current administration finishes, says Gretchen T. Goldman.

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The White House Is Nowhere Near Ready for Impeachment

Anyone can tell from President Donald Trump’s Twitter feed that he’s furious with congressional Democrats for even contemplating impeachment. But to get a better sense of what he’s telling friends, I went to one of his confidants and occasional golf partners: Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina. “Does Trump ever mention impeachment to you?” I asked, trailing the senator through the hallways

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Europe: Chronic hepatitis B infections on the rise since 2008

In 2017, the majority (58%) of the almost 27 000 newly reported hepatitis B cases in the European Union and European Economic Area were classified as chronic infections. This follows a consistent upward trend in reported chronic hepatitis B cases since 2008.

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We Are Enslaved By Algorithms

Algorithms are the tool being used to control the world, but the second you bring up that a select few are using technology to control the masses you get shot down as a "conspiracy theorist." Not sure if its because people are really as stupid as they seem or if its a willful ignorance of the ugly truth. Just look at the music industry, the rise of the internet brought a new wave of creativity an

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The U.S. Loses Over $1.5 Trillion in a Decade of Data Breaches

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Habitable Planet Reality Check: The Earth-Size Planets of Teegarden’s Star

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We waste 40 percent of the food we grow—here's where it goes

The chow we chuck. (Valerio Pellegrini/) Only 60 percent of the food we grow in the United States makes it into our mouths. The rest drops out of the supply chain, bit by bit, as grub wends its way to our plates. Pests chomp some in the field and vittles inevitably spoil on their way to the store, but picky grocers and shoppers waste plenty as well. Here's a rough breakdown of when and why we squ

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Are people getting smarter or dumber? Yes.

Many countries made incredible gains in IQ scores during the 20th century, averaging three IQ points per decade. Studies out of Europe have shown a reversal of this trend. Such declines are not universal, and researchers remain unsure of what is causing them. None Are people getting smarter or dumber? It seems an easy enough question to answer. Researchers look at IQ tests; see if scores go up, d

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Cold War Spy Satellites Reveal Substantial Himalayan Glacier Melt

Ice melt in the mountain range today is twice as fast as it was before 2000, once-secret images show — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Meet the Narluga, Hybrid Son of a Narwhal Mom and a Beluga Whale Dad

Its skull sat in a museum collection for decades before new technology unlocked its genetic secrets.

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The Time Boris Johnson Thought Trump Was ‘Out of His Mind’

President Donald Trump has long had warm words for Boris Johnson, who always seemed destined to make it to the runoff in the race to become Britain’s next prime minister. But Johnson, who on Thursday officially became one of two candidates left in the race to succeed Theresa May, hasn’t always had warm words for Trump. Johnson, who won the support of more than half of Conservative Party lawmakers

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Canadian researchers discover new genetic link to premenopausal breast cancer

University of Alberta researchers have added a new genetic marker to the breast cancer map, helping to expand the list of genetic mutations clinicians can watch for in cancer screenings.

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Signature of an ineffective immune response to cancer revealed

Our immune system is programmed to destroy cancer cells. Sometimes it has trouble slowing disease progression because it doesn't act quickly or strongly enough. In a study published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers from the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) revealed the genetic signature of this failed immune response for the first time.

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Slack Technologies rises in Wall Street debut

Software company Slack Technologies climbed on the New York Stock Exchange Thursday after entering in a direct listing in the latest sign of Wall Street's appetite for new technology entrants.

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Mother sperm whale and baby dead in fishing net off Italy

A mother sperm whale and its baby have died after becoming tangled in a fishing net in the Tyrrhenian Sea off Italy's western coast, an Italian environmental group reported Thursday.

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Slack Technologies rises in Wall Street debut

Software company Slack Technologies climbed on the New York Stock Exchange Thursday after entering in a direct listing in the latest sign of Wall Street's appetite for new technology entrants.

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Mother sperm whale and baby dead in fishing net off Italy

A mother sperm whale and its baby have died after becoming tangled in a fishing net in the Tyrrhenian Sea off Italy's western coast, an Italian environmental group reported Thursday.

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Heat kills invasive jumping worm cocoons, could help limit spread

New research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum shows that temperatures of about 100 degrees Fahrenheit kill the cocoons of invasive jumping worms.

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Spiders risk everything for love

University of Cincinnati biologist George Uetz long suspected the extravagant courtship dance of wolf spiders made them an easy mark for birds and other predators.

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Landmark study signals shift in thinking about stem cell differentiation

A pioneering new study led by Florida State University biologists could fundamentally change our understanding of how embryonic stem cells differentiate into specific cell types.

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Heat kills invasive jumping worm cocoons, could help limit spread

New research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum shows that temperatures of about 100 degrees Fahrenheit kill the cocoons of invasive jumping worms.

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Spiders risk everything for love

University of Cincinnati biologist George Uetz long suspected the extravagant courtship dance of wolf spiders made them an easy mark for birds and other predators.

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Landmark study signals shift in thinking about stem cell differentiation

A pioneering new study led by Florida State University biologists could fundamentally change our understanding of how embryonic stem cells differentiate into specific cell types.

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Just add humidity: How this air-to-water machine can quench your thirst

It's a devil's pact: The gleaming rays of sunshine this time of year come hand-in-hand with body-drenching humidity. But what if that humidity could serve as a commodity for our current and future water needs in South Florida and beyond? What if clean water could be created … right out of thick air?

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Florida City Pays Hackers $600,000 to Restore Hijacked Network

Pay Up The city council of Riviera Beach, Florida just paid anonymous hackers $600,000 of ransom money after the hackers took control of the city’s computer records, email system, and 911 dispatch logs. The hackers demanded the ransom be paid in Bitcoin to help cover their tracks, Phys.org reports , marking the latest of the many ransomware attacks hitting tech firms and government agencies latel

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Perovskite solar cells tested for real-world performance — in the lab

Researchers bring diurnal and seasonal variations into the lab to test the performance of perovskite solar cells under realistic conditions.

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Pigs help scientists understand human brain

For the first time, researchers have used an imaging method normally reserved for humans to analyze brain activity in live agricultural swine models, and they have discovered that pig brains are even better platforms than previously thought for the study of human neurological conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

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Timed release of turmeric stops cancer cell growth

A new research team has developed a drug delivery system using curcumin, the main ingredient in the spice turmeric, that successfully inhibits bone cancer cells while promoting growth of healthy bone cells.

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Dynamic collaboration behind new research into best way of using biologging tags

Methods used to design F1 cars and spacecraft have played a crucial role in new research into the tags used to track animal movements. Ecologists teamed up with aerospace colleagues to find the best way to reduce the drag of biologging tags — the recording devices used to track animal movements and behavior.

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Heat kills invasive jumping worm cocoons, could help limit spread

New research shows that temperatures of about 100 degrees Fahrenheit kill the cocoons of invasive jumping worms. That's good news for ecologists and horticulturalists who are working to slow or stop the spread of the worms, which can damage the soils they invade.

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Landmark study signals shift in thinking about stem cell differentiation

Researchers found that embryonic stem cells commit to a cell fate far more rapidly than anticipated.

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"Sort" lobbyisme trumfer grøn: Lobbyister er bedst til at skabe modstand

PLUS. En konkret amerikansk case viser, at lobbyisme mod klimalovgivning er mere effektiv end lobbyisme for samme lovgivning.

7h

Research details response of sagebrush to 2017 solar eclipse

The total solar eclipse's swath across Wyoming and the United States in August 2017 provided an opportunity for scientists to study a variety of celestial and earthly phenomena, from learning more about the sun's corona to the behavior of animals and plants.

7h

Russia to release 100 illegally captured whales

Russian officials have launched an operation to release nearly 100 illegally captured whales whose confinement in Russia's far east has become a rallying cry for environmentalists.

7h

Google workers, labor advocates confront parent Alphabet over practices

Google workers, labor advocates, and local community members rallied outside parent company Alphabet Inc.'s annual meeting of company shareholders here on Wednesday, calling on the technology company to change its labor practices.

7h

Research details response of sagebrush to 2017 solar eclipse

The total solar eclipse's swath across Wyoming and the United States in August 2017 provided an opportunity for scientists to study a variety of celestial and earthly phenomena, from learning more about the sun's corona to the behavior of animals and plants.

7h

Russia to release 100 illegally captured whales

Russian officials have launched an operation to release nearly 100 illegally captured whales whose confinement in Russia's far east has become a rallying cry for environmentalists.

7h

Merkel boosts EU push for 2050 net zero emissions target

German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Thursday endorsed for the first time a European Union target of net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, putting pressure on reluctant coal-dependent eastern European countries.

7h

Trump Administration Relaxes Emissions Limits on Power Plants

A new rule for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency allows states to set their own limits on carbon-emissions levels — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Novel model for studying intestinal parasite could advance vaccine development

The intestinal parasite Cryptosporidium causes frequent outbreaks in the US, and has been historically difficult to study. A novel model of infection from the University of Pennsylvania serves as a new tool to pursue a vaccine.

7h

Not always reaching your potential is okay, but overthinking it is a problem

Having aspirations helps us navigate life in a meaningful and fulfilling way, but it can also cause psychological distress when hopes are left unfulfilled.New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found that it's not failing to make progress toward our 'ideal-self' that is problematic but rather the tendency to focus on that lack of progress in a negative way that leads to psychological distre

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Google Maps has a fake business listing problem

Google Maps is overrun with fake business listings and phone numbers that reroute to competing businesses, according to a Wall Street Journal report. Hundreds of thousands of fake …

7h

Signify uses office lights for 250 Mbps wireless data transfer

Though most of make use of radio waves to wirelessly send and receive data to and from our work mobile devices and computers, there is another way. Signify – or Philips Lighting as it …

7h

Astronomers Discover a New Stage of Galaxy Evolution — the 'Cold Quasar'

An artist depicts the powerful quasar blowing away material immediately around it, but with the outer reaches of the galaxy still containing red dust and gas. (Credit: Michelle Vigeant) Quasars are supermassive black holes actively gobbling material from the galaxy around them. While black holes are known for pulling material in, the turbulent swirl of that whirlpool often also flings material and

7h

AOC’s Critics Are Pretending Not to Know How Language Works

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is in the linguistic hot seat yet again. This time, she is taking heat for accusing Donald Trump’s administration of operating “concentration camps” on the southern border. Some people, it appears, would prefer that she refer to them as “tender-age facilities,” as the administration has proposed. Or, at least, some believe it is below the belt for Ocasio-Cortez to use a t

7h

Pressure’s 400-year-old measurement techniques get an upgrade

Nature, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01950-9 Lasers and quantum calculations help metrologists to update centuries-old mercury methods.

7h

Spiders risk everything for love

A biology study finds that blue jays can easily spot wolf spiders engaged in their courtship rituals. The results demonstrate the powerful influence of sexual selection.

7h

Biomedical bleeding may impact horseshoe crabs' spawning behavior and movement

Horseshoe crabs that have undergone biomedical bleeding tend to reside in deeper water and approach mating beaches less often, according to a new study.

7h

Artificial intelligence identifies 'kissing bugs' that spread Chagas disease

A researcher published proof-of-concept research showing artificial intelligence can recognize 12 Mexican and 39 Brazilian species of kissing bugs with high accuracy by analyzing ordinary photos — an advantage for officials looking to cut the spread of Chagas disease.

7h

Vanilla makes milk beverages seem sweeter

Adding vanilla to sweetened milk makes consumers think the beverage is sweeter, allowing the amount of added sugar to be reduced, according to new researchers, who will use the concept to develop a reduced-sugar chocolate milk for the National School Lunch Program.

7h

Low-carb diet may reduce diabetes risk independent of weight loss

A low-carb diet may have benefits for people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes even if they don't lose any weight, a new study suggests.

7h

Study of multiethnic genomes identifies 27 genetic variants associated with disease

Researchers have identified 27 new genomic variants associated with conditions such as blood pressure, type II diabetes, cigarette use and chronic kidney disease in diverse populations. The team collected data from 49,839 African-American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian, Native Hawaiian, Native American and people who identified as others and were not defined by those ethnic groups. The study aimed to bet

7h

US Senators Receive Classified Info on UFO Sightings

Little Green Men Three U.S. senators received a closed-door Pentagon briefing yesterday about UFO sightings, Politico reports . The meeting was about a series of sightings by Navy pilots of “unidentified aerial phenomenon” — yet another sign that Congress is starting to take the matter more seriously . The news comes after reports emerged in April that the Navy is working on new guidelines for it

8h

Brain Awareness Week 2019 in Photos

Brain Awareness Week 2019 may have concluded in March, but since April, nearly 300 partners from around the world have submitted Partner Reports detailing results of their events and activities from the campaign. In these reports, Brain Awareness Week partners share their successes as well as what they would do differently next time. They also describe the activities they organized, details of ho

8h

A Rogue Raspberry Pi Let Hackers Into NASA’s JPL Network

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) works with some of the most advanced technology in the world including Mars rovers and space telescopes. However, it was a relatively simple piece of consumer technology that allowed hackers to break into its network and steal data. The post A Rogue Raspberry Pi Let Hackers Into NASA’s JPL Network appeared first on ExtremeTech .

8h

Spotting objects amid clutter

A new MIT-developed technique enables robots to quickly identify objects hidden in a three-dimensional cloud of data, reminiscent of how some people can make sense of a densely patterned 'Magic Eye' image if they observe it in just the right way.

8h

Research details response of sagebrush to 2017 solar eclipse

The short period of darkness caused a significant reduction in photosynthesis and transpiration in the desert shrub, but not quite to the levels of nighttime, according to some of the most detailed research on plant response to solar eclipses ever reported.

8h

One step closer to chronic pain relief

While effective drugs against chronic pain are not just around the corner, researchers have succeeded in identifying a protein as a future potential target for medicinal drugs. Basic research shows that blocking a protein named sortilin prevents pain — initially in laboratory mice.

8h

Upbeat music can sweeten tough exercise

New research demonstrates that upbeat music can make a rigorous workout seem less tough. Even for people who are insufficiently active.

8h

Gold for silver: A chemical barter

From effective medicines to molecular sensors to fuel cells, metal clusters are becoming fundamentally useful in the health, environment, and energy sectors. This diverse functionality of clusters arises from the variability in size and type.

8h

Earth's oldest animals could take trips

New research settles a longstanding debate about whether the most ancient animal communities were deliberately mobile. It turns out they were, because they were hungry.

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Archaeological mystery solved with modern genetics

Researchers have conducted a census of the Japanese population around 2,500 years ago using the Y chromosomes of men living on the main islands of modern-day Japan. This is the first time analysis of modern genomes has estimated the size of an ancient human population before they were met by a separate ancient population.

8h

Using graphene and tiny droplets to detect stomach-cancer causing bacteria

A research team has used graphene and microfluidics to identify stomach-cancer causing bacteria by detecting chemical reactions of the bacteria at the surface of the biosensor. The sensor is highly sensitive and the test only takes half an hour. Further, their approach could be used to also detect other harmful bacteria.

8h

Russia to Release First Whales Held in ‘Jail’ for Months

After intervention by President Vladimir V. Putin, nearly 100 orcas and belugas will be released where they were caught with the intention of being sold to theme parks.

8h

YouTube gives up, tests hiding comments by default on Android

YouTube finally seems to have realized the obvious: comments, for the most part, are bad and you shouldn’t read them. It’s currently testing a new layout in the Android app that …

8h

Under pressure, plane industry vows cleaner flight—someday

Battery-powered planes, solar planes, hydrogen planes—jet makers are working on myriad ways to make flying less damaging to the planet. Yet clean flying on a mass scale remains decades away.

8h

Dr Henry Lynch obituary

Geneticist who unlocked the secrets of hereditary cancers In 1962 a medical intern sat with a man recovering from alcohol poisoning in a veterans’ hospital in the US state of Nebraska. Henry Lynch, who has died aged 91, listened as the young farm worker told him that he liked to drown his sorrows because, as with everyone else in his family, he was pretty much guaranteed to die young of cancer. Ly

8h

BDSM as a Tonic for Serious Illness

While my mother was on kidney dialysis, kinky sex gave her some of the best times of her life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

The Biggest Obstacle to Trump’s Victory in 2020

In his campaign kickoff this week, President Donald Trump demonstrated once again that he is determined to solve a problem he doesn’t have—even at the expense of exacerbating the greatest obstacle to his reelection. With its extended litany of grievances, dark warnings on immigration, and extravagant attacks on Democrats (“The Democrat Party has become more radical, more dangerous, and more unhin

8h

Memo: The Atlantic’s President Bob Cohn to Leave in September

Below is the full text of a memo from Atlantic Media Chairman David G. Bradley announcing that, after nearly 11 years at The Atlantic , president Bob Cohn has decided to leave the company this fall. He has been named a Resident Fellow at The Institute of Politics (IOP) at Harvard Kennedy School. My Atlantic Colleagues, Summer greetings to you. I’m writing to tell you a development that, while ful

8h

Daily briefing: World population will push 10 billion by 2050

Nature, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01959-0 India is soon to overtake China as the most populous country, meet a robo-fish powered by battery ‘blood’ and consider what it will take to make gene editing a human embryo acceptable as a clinical tool.

8h

Video: Why does the moon smell like gunpowder?

After walking on the moon, astronauts hopped back into their lunar lander, bringing the heavenly body's dust along with them on their spacesuits.

8h

Endangered rhinos ready to be sent from Europe to Rwanda

Five critically endangered eastern black rhinos from wildlife parks in three European countries are ready to be transported back to their natural habitat in Rwanda, where the entire rhino population was wiped out during the genocide in the 1990s.

8h

Russians capture hungry polar bear roaming Arctic city

Russian officials said Thursday that scientists have captured a hungry polar bear found roaming the streets of an Arctic city, hundreds of kilometres from its natural habitat, and would take it to a zoo to recover.

8h

BDSM as a Tonic for Serious Illness

While my mother was on kidney dialysis, kinky sex gave her some of the best times of her life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

A plant’s sneeze spreads disease

Nature, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01943-8 Some plants send dewdrops hurtling off their leaves — and pathogens tag along.

8h

Team proposes stochastic model to explain microbiome composition

All living things—from the simplest animal and plant organisms to the human body—live closely together with an enormous abundance of microbial symbionts, which colonise the insides and outsides of their tissues. The functional collaboration of host and microorganisms, which scientists refer to as a metaorganism, has only recently come into the focus of life science research. Today we know that we

8h

Researchers study super-repellent surfaces for safer fruits, vegetables

Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station, TEES, were recently awarded a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture to study and develop super-repellent and anti-fouling surfaces for foods.

8h

Russia to Release First Whales Held in ‘Jail’ for Months

After intervention by President Vladimir V. Putin, nearly 100 orcas and belugas will be released where they were caught with the intention of being sold to theme parks.

8h

Roberto Burle Marx and His Leafy Vision of the Tropics

The New York Botanical Garden has opened its largest ever show, devoted to the Brazilian landscape architect.

8h

Endangered rhinos ready to be sent from Europe to Rwanda

Five critically endangered eastern black rhinos from wildlife parks in three European countries are ready to be transported back to their natural habitat in Rwanda, where the entire rhino population was wiped out during the genocide in the 1990s.

8h

Russians capture hungry polar bear roaming Arctic city

Russian officials said Thursday that scientists have captured a hungry polar bear found roaming the streets of an Arctic city, hundreds of kilometres from its natural habitat, and would take it to a zoo to recover.

8h

Discovery of a 'holy grail' with the invention of universal computer memory

A new type of computer memory to solve the digital technology energy crisis has been invented and patented by scientists. The device is the realization of the decades long search for a 'Universal Memory' to replace the $100 billion market for Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) and flash drives. It promises to transform daily life with its ultra-low energy consumption, allowing computers which do

8h

Narwhals and belugas can interbreed

A team of researchers has compiled the first and only evidence that narwhals and beluga whales can breed successfully. DNA and stable isotope analysis of an anomalous skull from the Natural History Museum of Denmark has allowed researchers to confirm the existence of a narwhal-beluga hybrid.

8h

17 minutes outside a day keeps the doctor away

You don’t have to pull a Thoreau and move to Walden pond to get a health-enhancing dose of nature. (Deposit Photos/) It's no secret that the great outdoors is also great for your health. The benefits of elective time with nature are hard to quantify, but scientists have connected time spent outside to improved mental health , a decreased risk of obesity , and better sleep. But Americans often mis

8h

Former NIH Director James Wyngaarden Dies

The Duke University emeritus professor was an expert in purine biosynthesis and the genetics of gout.

8h

Team proposes stochastic model to explain microbiome composition

All living things—from the simplest animal and plant organisms to the human body—live closely together with an enormous abundance of microbial symbionts, which colonise the insides and outsides of their tissues. The functional collaboration of host and microorganisms, which scientists refer to as a metaorganism, has only recently come into the focus of life science research. Today we know that we

8h

A study describes the reaction mechanism of DNAzymes

A study from the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) has published a study in the journal Nature Catalysis that describes the reaction mechanism used by the DNAzyme 9DB1, the first structurally available catalyser formed by DNA.

8h

Why climate change means a rethink of coffee and cocoa production systems

Global demand for coffee and cocoa is on the rise. Yet across the equatorial belt where these two crops are produced, the future is not looking bright. Climate change in the tropics is pushing coffee and cocoa closer to the limits of physiological tolerance and constraining the places where they can grow in the future.

8h

The Power, and Limits, of Artificial Intelligence

AI is very good at certain specific tasks. But we're still a long way from intelligence that switches tasks as easily as a person.

8h

Nvidia Built One of the Most Powerful AI Supercomputers in 3 Weeks

Autonomous vehicles aren't perfect, so to help upgrade their intelligence and prevent fatal accidents, Nvidia created the DGX SuperPod, an AI-optimized supercomputer that will help design a better self-driving car. The post Nvidia Built One of the Most Powerful AI Supercomputers in 3 Weeks appeared first on ExtremeTech .

8h

A study describes the reaction mechanism of DNAzymes

A study from the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) has published a study in the journal Nature Catalysis that describes the reaction mechanism used by the DNAzyme 9DB1, the first structurally available catalyser formed by DNA.

8h

Why climate change means a rethink of coffee and cocoa production systems

Global demand for coffee and cocoa is on the rise. Yet across the equatorial belt where these two crops are produced, the future is not looking bright. Climate change in the tropics is pushing coffee and cocoa closer to the limits of physiological tolerance and constraining the places where they can grow in the future.

8h

Biomedical bleeding may impact horseshoe crabs' spawning behavior and movement

Horseshoe crabs that have undergone biomedical bleeding tend to reside in deeper water and approach mating beaches less often, according to a new study published in The Biological Bulletin. In "Effects of the Biomedical Bleeding Process on the Behavior of the American Horseshoe Crab, Limulus polyphemus in Its Natural Habitat," Meghan Owings and her colleagues report the results of an investigation

8h

Vanilla makes milk beverages seem sweeter

Adding vanilla to sweetened milk makes consumers think the beverage is sweeter, allowing the amount of added sugar to be reduced, according to Penn State researchers, who will use the concept to develop a reduced-sugar chocolate milk for the National School Lunch Program.

8h

Dynamic collaboration behind new research into best way of using biologging tags

Methods used to design F1 cars and spacecraft have played a crucial role in new research into the tags used to track animal movements.

8h

Juul’s New Marketing Is Straight Out of Big Tobacco’s Playbook

Out of a firestorm of controversy over teen nicotine use, Juul Labs emerged in January with a newly sober and adult marketing identity. Forget the fruit-flavored vaping pods, the colorful ads populated with young models, the viral Instagram and Facebook posts. What the Silicon Valley e-cigarette giant is really about, its $10 million television ad campaign declares, is helping cigarette smokers s

8h

Them That Follow Is a Lazy Portrait of Religious Fanaticism

Films about unusual religious sects, and acts of faith that most viewers would find extreme or off-putting, walk a tight line. It’s tough to compassionately portray, for example, a snake-handling church—where preachers and congregants hold live, poisonous rattlers during service to demonstrate their connection to God—without seeming like the camera is staring in horror. At least, that was my take

8h

Spiders risk everything for love

A biology study finds that blue jays can easily spot wolf spiders engaged in their courtship rituals. The results demonstrate the powerful influence of sexual selection.

8h

Landmark study signals shift in thinking about stem cell differentiation

Researchers found that embryonic stem cells commit to a cell fate far more rapidly than anticipated.

8h

Heat kills invasive jumping worm cocoons, could help limit spread

New research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum shows that temperatures of about 100 degrees Fahrenheit kill the cocoons of invasive jumping worms. That's good news for ecologists and horticulturalists who are working to slow or stop the spread of the worms, which can damage the soils they invade.

8h

New e-tattoo enables accurate, uninterrupted heart monitoring for days

A new wearable technology, developed by engineers at the University of Texas at Austin, that is made from stretchy, lightweight material, could make heart health monitoring easier and more accurate.

8h

Timed release of turmeric stops cancer cell growth

A WSU research team has developed a drug delivery system using curcumin, the main ingredient in the spice turmeric, that successfully inhibits bone cancer cells while promoting growth of healthy bone cells.

8h

BDSM as a Tonic for Serious Illness

While my mother was on kidney dialysis, kinky sex gave her some of the best times of her life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Biomedical bleeding may impact horseshoe crabs' spawning behavior and movement

Horseshoe crabs that have undergone biomedical bleeding tend to reside in deeper water and approach mating beaches less often, according to a new study published in The Biological Bulletin. In "Effects of the Biomedical Bleeding Process on the Behavior of the American Horseshoe Crab, Limulus polyphemus in Its Natural Habitat," Meghan Owings and her colleagues report the results of an investigation

8h

Dynamic collaboration behind new research into best way of using biologging tags

Methods used to design F1 cars and spacecraft have played a crucial role in new research into the tags used to track animal movements.

8h

Synthetic joint lubricant holds promise for osteoarthritis

A new type of treatment for osteoarthritis, currently in canine clinical trials, shows promise for eventual use in humans. The treatment, developed by biomedical engineers, is a synthetic version of a naturally occurring joint lubricant that binds to the surface of cartilage in joints and acts as a cushion during high-impact activities, such as running.

8h

Making systems robust

Both nature and technology rely on integral feedback mechanisms to ensure that systems resist external perturbations. Researchers have now used synthetic biology to design a new mechanism of this sort from scratch. For the first time, they have introduced it into a living cell as an artificial genetic regulatory network. This will be a useful tool for cell therapy in medicine and for biotechnology

8h

Weird skull belongs to narwhal-beluga hybrid

Scientists can now account for an odd whale skull that was gathering dust in the Natural History Museum of Denmark. It’s from a narwhal-beluga hybrid. Researchers compiled this first and only evidence that narwhals and beluga whales can breed successfully. Using DNA and stable isotope analysis, the scientists determined that the skull belonged to a male, first-generation hybrid between a female n

8h

DNA Microscope Sees ‘Through the Eyes of the Cell’

A new imaging tool works more like Google Maps than a traditional microscope.

8h

Seals have been trained to sing the Star Wars theme – have a listen

Scientists have trained grey seals to copy speech, as well as notes from music including the Star Wars theme and the nursery rhyme Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

8h

Pigs help scientists understand human brain

For the first time, researchers in the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center have used an imaging method normally reserved for humans to analyze brain activity in live agricultural swine models, and they have discovered that pig brains are even better platforms than previously thought for the study of human neurological conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

8h

Processed foods may hold key to rise in autism

University of Central Florida researchers are now a step closer to showing the link between the food pregnant women consume and the effects on a fetus' developing brain.

8h

Artificial intelligence identifies 'kissing bugs' that spread Chagas disease

A University of Kansas researcher publishes proof-of-concept research showing artificial intelligence can recognize 12 Mexican and 39 Brazilian species of kissing bugs with high accuracy by analyzing ordinary photos — an advantage for officials looking to cut the spread of Chagas disease.

8h

New p53 gene discovery sheds light on how to make cancer therapies more effective

Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center have discovered that the loss of a protein called DBC1 in breast cancer cells leads to the dysregulation of normal anti-cancer functions, contributing to cancer cell growth and resistance to therapies. By restoring the expression of this protein, doctors may be able to help prevent the development of cancer and increase the effectiveness of common cancer trea

8h

Biomedical bleeding may impact horseshoe crabs' spawning behavior and movement

Horseshoe crabs that have undergone biomedical bleeding tend to reside in deeper water and approach mating beaches less often, according to a new study published in The Biological Bulletin. In 'Effects of the Biomedical Bleeding Process on the Behavior of the American Horseshoe Crab, Limulus polyphemus in Its Natural Habitat,' Meghan Owings and her colleagues report the results of an investigation

8h

Trump Might Not Want War, but the Military Is Steering His Iran Policy

Updated at 1:03 p.m. ET on June 20, 2019. Weeks of threats and counterthreats have culminated here: Iran shot down a U.S. surveillance drone overnight, marking the most serious escalation to date in the U.S.-Iran confrontation. The U.S. has been accusing Iran and its allies of repeated attacks against commercial shipping and U.S. allies and interests in Saudi Arabia and Iraq, but now for the firs

8h

Groundwater pumping has significantly reduced US stream flows

Groundwater pumping in the last century has contributed as much as 50% to stream flow declines in some US rivers. This is the first study to examine the impact of past groundwater pumping across the entire US. Previous research examined how groundwater pumping affected surface waters, but at smaller scales. The researchers compared what US surface waters would have been like without consumptive us

9h

Retracing ancient routes to Australia

New insights into how people first arrived in Australia have determined the likely routes travelled by Aboriginal people tens of thousands of years ago along with the sizes of groups required for the population to survive in harsh conditions.

9h

New high-resolution maps show how to defeat malaria

New high-resolution maps show the global burden of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, the two parasites that cause the majority of malaria cases worldwide.

9h

Urban wildlife may be a significant vector for anti-microbial resistant germs

In the cities of developing nations, where unregulated antibiotic use is common and livestock jostle with people amid often unsanitary conditions, scientists have found a potentially troubling vector for the dissemination of anti-microbial resistant (AMR) bacteria — wildlife.

9h

How in times of trouble animals also stand together

Faced with potential violence from rival factions, dwarf mongoose groupmates pull together and behave more cooperatively, according to new research.

9h

Synthetic joint lubricant holds promise for osteoarthritis

A new type of treatment for osteoarthritis, currently in canine clinical trials, shows promise for eventual use in humans. The treatment, developed by biomedical engineers, is a synthetic version of a naturally occurring joint lubricant that binds to the surface of cartilage in joints and acts as a cushion during high-impact activities, such as running.

9h

Methods and models

It's a well-known fact that the ocean is one of the biggest absorbers of the carbon dioxide emitted by way of human activity. What's less well known is how the ocean's processes for absorbing that carbon change over time, and how they might affect its ability to buffer climate change.

9h

Making systems robust

Both nature and technology rely on integral feedback mechanisms to ensure that systems resist external perturbations. Researchers have now used synthetic biology to design a new mechanism of this sort from scratch. For the first time, they have introduced it into a living cell as an artificial genetic regulatory network. This will be a useful tool for cell therapy in medicine and for biotechnology

9h

Successful 'alien' bird invasions are location dependent

Whether 'alien' bird species thrive in a new habitat depends more on the environmental conditions than the population size or characteristics of the invading bird species, finds a new study.

9h

South African forests show pathways to a sustainable future

Native forests make up 1percent of the landscape in South Africa but could play a key role in reducing atmospheric carbon and identifying sustainable development practices that can be used globally to counter climate change.

9h

'Alexa, monitor my heart': Researchers develop first contactless cardiac arrest AI system for smart speakers

Researchers have developed a new tool to monitor people for cardiac arrest while they're asleep without touching them. A new skill for a smart speaker — like Google Home and Amazon Alexa — or smartphone lets the device detect the gasping sound of agonal breathing and call for help.

9h

Many parents struggle for years to adjust after learning a child's sexual orientation

Two years after their child 'comes out' as lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB), many parents still say that it is moderately or very hard for them to adjust to the news, according to a new study.

9h

Are Omega-3 Eggs as Good as Eating Fish?

Fish are high in omega-3 fatty acids. But what if you can't eat seafood? Can omega-3 enriched eggs or peanut butter provide the same health benefits? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Subscriptions Are About to Swallow Gaming

UPlay Plus, EA Access, Origin Access, Xbox Game Pass, PlayStation Now, Nintendo Switch Online, Discord Nitro. Help.

9h

When Magic Is Seen in Twisted Graphene, That’s a Moiré

When two very similar grids with light and dark elements overlap, new sinuous patterns emerge that seem to shimmer and flow. Whether you’re into art or science, engineering or fashion, you have probably seen or at least heard of these moiré patterns. The name moiré (pronounced mwa-ray ) is etymologically related to the French word for mohair and entered the language centuries ago, describing ripp

9h

Dynamic collaboration behind new research into best way of using biologging tags

Methods used to design F1 cars and spacecraft have played a crucial role in new research into the tags used to track animal movements. Ecologists teamed up with aerospace colleagues at Swansea University to find the best way to reduce the drag of biologging tags — the recording devices used to track animal movements and behaviour.

9h

Measles vaccination linked to health & schooling benefits among children in LMICS

Researchers at CDDEP, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the University of Pennsylvania, RTI International, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health assessed the long-term associations of measles vaccination and child anthropometry, cognition, and schooling outcomes in Ethiopia, India, and Vietnam.

9h

Vanilla makes milk beverages seem sweeter

Adding vanilla to sweetened milk makes consumers think the beverage is sweeter, allowing the amount of added sugar to be reduced, according to Penn State researchers, who will use the concept to develop a reduced-sugar chocolate milk for the National School Lunch Program.

9h

'DNA microscopy' offers entirely new way to image cells

Rather than relying on optics, the microscopy system offers a chemically encoded way to map biomolecules' relative positions.

9h

Nearly 5.4 million cancer survivors suffer chronic pain

A new report finds about one in three cancer survivors (34.6%) reported having chronic pain, representing nearly 5.4 million cancer survivors in the United States.

9h

22% of young men, 5% of young women engage in 'disordered eating' to bulk up

Adolescents who see themselves as puny and who exercise to gain weight may be at risk of so-called muscularity-oriented disordered eating behaviors, say researchers led by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals.

9h

Treatment for common cause of diarrhea more promising

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have figured out how to grow the intestinal parasite Cryptosporidium in the lab, an achievement that will speed efforts to treat or prevent diarrhea caused by the parasite.

9h

Eye exams common among US adults but some disparities persist

A substantial proportion of US adults reported recently having an eye exam in this online survey study that included 2,013 adults ages 50 to 80. About 82% of those surveyed reported an eye exam in the past two years.

9h

NYU Abu Dhabi researchers unlock the secrets of liver regeneration

In a recent study published in the journal Developmental Cell, NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have reported a new way in which the liver is primed to regenerate itself. They found that by stripping parts of the epigenome, which play a primary role in repressing 'jumping genes' (i.e. transposable elements), other epigenetic marks were redistributed.

9h

Bats' brains sync when they socialize

The phrase 'we're on the same wavelength' may be more than just a friendly saying: A new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers shows that bats' brain activity is literally in sync when bats engage in social behaviors like grooming, fighting or sniffing each other. The finding opens the door to future study on how our brains process social interactions and has potential implicati

9h

Scientists make single-cell map to reprogram scar tissue into healthy heart cells

Annually, about 790,000 Americans suffer a heart attack, which leaves damaged scar tissue on the heart and limits its ability to beat efficiently. But what if scientists could reprogram scar tissue cells called fibroblasts into healthy heart muscle cells called cardiomyocytes? For the first time, UNC School of Medicine researchers developed a stable, reproducible, minimalistic platform to reprogra

9h

A chemical approach to imaging cells from the inside

A team of researchers has developed a new technique for mapping cells. The approach, called DNA microscopy, shows how biomolecules such as DNA and RNA are organized in cells and tissues, revealing spatial and molecular information that is not easily accessible through other microscopy methods. DNA microscopy also does not require specialized equipment, enabling large numbers of samples to be proce

9h

Frustrated fish give up thanks to glia, not just neurons

Giving up when efforts are futile depends on glial cells called radial astrocytes, highlighting a novel computational role for the underappreciated brain cells.

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Researchers develop a new, non-optical way to visualize DNA, cells, and tissues

Researchers have come up with a new way to image cell populations and their genetic contents. Their study, appearing June 20 in the journal Cell, describes how a technique called DNA microscopy helps illuminate the spatial organization of genetic material within cells and tissues without specialized, expensive optical equipment. Using only the sample plus reagents delivered with pipettes, DNA micr

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Two studies show that animals' brain activity 'syncs' during social interactions

Two papers publishing June 20 in the journal Cell show that Egyptian fruit bats and mice, respectively, can 'sync' brainwaves in social situations. The synchronization of neural activity in the brains of human conversation partners has been shown previously, as a result of one person picking up social cues from the other and modulating their own behavior based on those cues. These studies suggest

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Stochastic model to explain microbiome composition

All living things — from the simplest animal and plant organisms to the human body — live closely together with an enormous abundance of microbial symbionts, which colonize the insides and outsides of their tissues. The functional collaboration of host and microorganisms, which scientists refer to as a metaorganism, has only recently come into the focus of life science research.

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Plants' oil-production accelerator also activates the brakes

Scientists studying plant biochemistry recently made a surprising discovery: They found that a protein that turns on oil synthesis also activates a protein that puts the brakes on the same process. They describe how this seemingly paradoxical system keeps oil precursors perfectly balanced to meet plants' needs.

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A forest of nano-mushroom structures keep this plastic clean and stain-free

Researchers have created a flexible optical plastic that is stain-resistant and superomniphobic, finding inspiration in a surprising place: the shape of Enoki mushrooms.

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Powering a solution: Professor takes charge at improving lithium ion batteries safety

Scientists are working to improve the safety of Li-ion batteries by creating a shear-thickening electrolyte — a substance that can become thicker under impact, set between the battery's anode and cathode that will be impact-resistant, thus not causing a fire or an explosion upon any collision.

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Vitamin D may not help your heart

While previous research has suggested a link between low levels of vitamin D in the blood and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, a new study has found that taking vitamin D supplements did not reduce that risk.

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How bacteria protect themselves from plasma treatment

Considering the ever-growing percentage of bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics, interest in medical use of plasma is increasing.

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Brain anatomy links cognitive and perceptual symptoms in autism

Neuroscientists have found an anatomical link between cognitive and perceptual symptoms in autism. The study identified a posterior region of the brain whose size — amount of gray matter — is related to both cognitive rigidity and overly stable visual perception, two symptoms of autism that until now were only conceptually related.

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Women who edit Wikipedia report serious harassment

Concerns about safety were a common theme in interviews with female “Wikipedians” for a new study that examines the lack of female and non-binary editors on Wikipedia. Wikipedia is one of the most successful online communities in history, yet it struggles to attract and retain editors who are women—another example of the gender gap online. “People can get harassed when they’re editing content in

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First look inside Amtrak's next-generation Acela train

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

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On board the UK's first hydrogen train

submitted by /u/classsiob23b [link] [comments]

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Researchers confirm that narwhals and belugas can interbreed

A team of University of Copenhagen researchers has compiled the first and only evidence that narwhals and beluga whales can breed successfully. DNA and stable isotope analysis of an anomalous skull from the Natural History Museum of Denmark has allowed researchers to confirm the existence of a narwhal-beluga hybrid.

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Bats' brains sync when they socialize

The phrase "we're on the same wavelength" may be more than just a friendly saying: A new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers shows that bats' brain activity is literally in sync when bats engage in social behaviors like grooming, fighting or sniffing each other.

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'DNA microscopy' offers entirely new way to image cells

Microscopy just got reinvented—again.

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Frustrated fish give up thanks to glia, not just neurons

Secured in place in a virtual-reality-equipped chamber, frustrated zebrafish just didn't want to swim anymore.

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Mice and bats’ brains sync up as they interact with their own kind

The brain activity of mice and bats aligns in social settings, a coordination that may hold clues about how social context influences behavior.

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Demise of Gasoline Cars? What We Know About N.Y.’s Ambitious Climate Goals

It’s one of the world’s most far-reaching climate plans. Here’s what it could mean for your work, health, neighborhood and bank account.

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Nye wifi-forbindelser vil klippe kabler i industrien

PLUS. Senere i år bliver den nye Wi-Fi 6-standard rullet ud med hurtigere hastigheder, kortere latenstid og lavere energiforbrug. Det gør den trådløse teknologi mere interessant for Internet of Things-applikationer i industrien.

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Researchers use DNA to take pictures of cells

New microscopy technique could let scientists study tumors and our brains

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Why does the moon smell like gunpowder? (video)

After walking on the Moon astronauts hopped back into their lunar lander, bringing Moon dust with them. They were surprised, and perplexed, to find that it smelled like spent gunpowder. This week on Reactions, learn why Moon dust might smell like the aftermath of a Civil War reenactment.

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Perovskite solar cells tested for real-world performance — in the lab

Researchers at EPFL bring diurnal and seasonal variations into the lab to test the performance of perovskite solar cells under realistic conditions. The findings are published in Nature Energy.

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A study from IRB Barcelona describes the reaction mechanism of DNAzymes

Modesto Orozco's lab (IRB Barcelona) has published a study on the reaction mechanism of DNAzymes in Nature Catalysis. DNAzymes, which are catalysers formed by DNA, have applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. These research results will contribute to advances in the design and improvement of catalysers for therapeutic purposes.

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God doesn't play dice — does cancer?

Colorado study suggests that changes to the tissue ecosystem and not necessarily mutations allows growth of cancer.

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Laser method promising for detecting trace chemicals in air

Researchers have developed a new laser-based method that can detect electric charges and chemicals of interest with unprecedented sensitivity. The new approach could one day offer a way to scan large areas for radioactive material or hazardous chemicals for safety and security applications.

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SpaceX is about to launch a sail propelled through space by sunshine

The Planetary Society’s LightSail-2 satellite, which uses sails to harness the energy of sunlight, is planned to launch on 24 June aboard a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket

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Researchers confirm that narwhals and belugas can interbreed

A team of University of Copenhagen researchers has compiled the first and only evidence that narwhals and beluga whales can breed successfully. DNA and stable isotope analysis of an anomalous skull from the Natural History Museum of Denmark has allowed researchers to confirm the existence of a narwhal-beluga hybrid.

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Bats' brains sync when they socialize

The phrase "we're on the same wavelength" may be more than just a friendly saying: A new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers shows that bats' brain activity is literally in sync when bats engage in social behaviors like grooming, fighting or sniffing each other.

9h

'DNA microscopy' offers entirely new way to image cells

Microscopy just got reinvented—again.

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Frustrated fish give up thanks to glia, not just neurons

Secured in place in a virtual-reality-equipped chamber, frustrated zebrafish just didn't want to swim anymore.

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Scientists reveal the inter-cluster and intra-cluster dynamics of thiolate-protected gold-silver alloys

From effective medicines to molecular sensors to fuel cells, metal clusters are becoming fundamentally useful in the health, environment, and energy sectors. This diverse functionality of clusters arises from the variability in size and type. Now, scientists led by Professor Yuichi Negishi, of the Department of Applied Chemistry at Tokyo University of Science, add to this ongoing tale by explainin

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The living tech we need to support human life on other planets | Lynn Rothschild

What would it take to settle Mars? In a talk about the future of space exploration, Lynn Rothschild reviews the immense challenges to living elsewhere in the universe and proposes some bold, creative solutions to making a home off planet Earth — like "growing" houses out of fungi or using bacteria to help generate electricity.

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The bioluminescence people find so attractive is a defence mechanism

It drives away the predators of microscopic plankton

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Greenland’s ice sheet is melting unusually fast

That may raise the sea level by an extra millimetre this year

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Submarine-launched drone platoons will soon be emerging from the sea

Commando operations are about to be robotised

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Stopping bees swapping hives keeps disease down and productivity up

The probable reason is that they don’t then spread mites

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Business this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Politics this week

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Global data resource shows genetic diversity of chickens

A total of 174 chicken breeds are described in a publicly accessible database which scientists from the University of Göttingen and the Friedrich Loeffler Institute in Neustadt-Mariensee have built up in recent years with numerous international partners. This database, the Synbreed Chicken Diversity Panel (SCDP), includes information about a large proportion of the available chicken species and th

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Global data resource shows genetic diversity of chickens

A total of 174 chicken breeds are described in a publicly accessible database which scientists from the University of Göttingen and the Friedrich Loeffler Institute in Neustadt-Mariensee have built up in recent years with numerous international partners. This database, the Synbreed Chicken Diversity Panel (SCDP), includes information about a large proportion of the available chicken species and th

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Robot traps ball without coding

Dr. Kee-hoon Kim's team at the Center for Intelligent & Interactive Robotics of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) developed a way of teaching "impedance-controlled robots" through human demonstrations using surface electromyograms (sEMG) of muscles, and succeeded in teaching a robot to trap a dropped ball like a soccer player. A surface electromyogram is an electric signal produ

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Florida city pays $600,000 ransom to save computer records

A Florida city agreed to pay $600,000 in ransom to hackers who took over its computer system, the latest in thousands of attacks worldwide aimed at extorting money from governments and businesses.

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Early-and-regular cannabis use by youth is associated with alteration in brain circuits that support cognitive control

The development of neural circuits in youth, at a particularly important time in their lives, can be heavily influenced by external factors — specifically the frequent and regular use of cannabis. A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that alterations in cognitive control–an ensemble of processes by which th

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3D technology might improve body appreciation for young women

Virginia Ramseyer Winter, assistant professor in the School of Social Work and director of the MU Center for Body Image Research and Policy, is a nationally recognized body image expert. In a new study, she found that images from 3D scanners can be used to help young women focus on body appreciation, which might in turn improve mental health.

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Psoriasis patients turn to alternative medicine when traditional treatments fail

A recent survey from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found patients with psoriasis frequently use complementary or alternative therapies to treat their symptoms when traditional treatments fail.

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Global treaty is leaving some countries vulnerable to increase in tobacco consumption

Two studies published in the British Medical Journal show there is no statistical evidence that global cigarette consumption has fallen as a result of the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, and in low-and-middle-income countries it has actually increased, according to two studies led by global health researchers at York University.

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Plants' oil-production accelerator also activates the brakes

Scientists studying plant biochemistry at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory recently made a surprising discovery: They found that a protein that turns on oil synthesis also activates a protein that puts the brakes on the same process. In a paper just published in the journal Plant Physiology, they describe how this seemingly paradoxical system keeps oil precursors perfec

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Coincidence or master plan?

Joint press release by Kiel University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön (MPI-EB).

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Researchers find a mechanism to improve pancreatic islet transplantation in type 1 diabetes

Researchers from the University of Barcelona and IDIBAPS led a study that identifies a protein as the potential modulator in the revascularization of pancreatic islets. In a study conducted on diabetic mice with islet transplant from other animals or human islets, researchers showed that grafts without this protein have a higher revascularization — favouring the viability of cells — and regular

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Researchers find link between exposure to world trade center dust and prostate cancer

World Trade Center (WTC) responders with prostate cancer showed signs that exposure to dust from the World Trade Center site had activated chronic inflammation in their prostates, which may have contributed to their cancer, according to a study by Mount Sinai researchers in Molecular Cancer Research in June.

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Laser method promising for detecting trace chemicals in air

Researchers have developed a new laser-based method that can detect electric charges and chemicals of interest with unprecedented sensitivity. The new approach could one day offer a way to scan large areas for radioactive material or hazardous chemicals for safety and security applications.

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Following the ocean's flow

The dramatic sight of Atlantic waves crashing onto UK shores from the vast, surging ocean illustrates perfectly the joke behind its nickname of 'The Pond'.

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Disrupting one gene could be first step toward treating honey bee parasite nosema ceranae

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have taken the first step towards a weapon against the major honey bee parasite Nosema ceranae.

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Connecting the dots: nitrogen dioxide over Siberian pipelines

New maps that use information from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite reveal emissions of nitrogen dioxide along a Siberian natural gas pipeline that connects the Urengoy gas field—the second-largest gas field in the world—with Europe.

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German cabin crew union threatens Lufthansa strikes in July

German cabin crew union UFO called Thursday for a strike against airline giant Lufthansa in July, threatening travel chaos during the busy summer holiday season over a wage dispute.

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Disrupting one gene could be first step toward treating honey bee parasite nosema ceranae

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have taken the first step towards a weapon against the major honey bee parasite Nosema ceranae.

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Long work hours associated with increased risk of stroke

Working long hours for 10 years or more may be associated with stroke. People under age 50 had a higher risk of stroke when working long hours for a decade or more.

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Sickle cell drug showing promise in clinical trial

An investigational drug for the treatment of sickle cell disease is showing early promise in clinical trials for impacting biomarkers of the disease in patients, reported researchers.

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Scientists Describe 'Super-Weird' Whale: First Confirmed Beluga-Narwhal Hybrid

Scientists Describe 'Super-Weird' Whale: First Confirmed Beluga-Narwhal Hybrid Skull was donated by an Inuit hunter in 1990. HybridWhale_topNteaser.jpg An illustration of the potential hybrid. Image credits: Markus Bühler Creature Thursday, June 20, 2019 – 09:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A mysterious whale skull came from the first and only known hybrid of a beluga and a na

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Scientists Find the Most Earth-Like Exoplanet Ever — and It’s Nearby

Distant Cousins Rapidly orbiting around the 24th nearest star to the Sun are two small exoplanets, newly discovered by a massive international team of astronomers. Nowadays, exoplanet discoveries happen all the time , but one of these planets is special: Teegarden b resembles Earth more closely than any other world that scientists have found to date, Gizmodo reports . It’s an exciting finding, an

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190 stumbles could lead to better prosthetic legs

Looking at how people recover from tripping while walking could lead to improved prosthetic legs, say researchers. Andrés Martínez, a PhD student from Vanderbilt University, strode briskly on the treadmill, staring straight ahead and counting backwards by seven from 898, a trick to keep his brain from anticipating the literal stumbling block heading his way: a compact 35 pounds of steel specifica

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An Ancient Greek Philosopher Was Exiled for Claiming the Moon Was a Rock, Not a God

2,500 years ago, Anaxagoras correctly determined that the rocky moon reflects light from the sun, allowing him to explain lunar phases and eclipses

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Record efficiency for a gas engine

At the end of May, the final meeting of the "Horizon 2020" project "GasOn" with the EU Commission took place in Brussels. The aim of this EU project was the further development of gas engines for cars and vans. Around 20 partners participated, including ETH Zurich and Empa as well as four European automobile manufacturers and well-known suppliers. Gas-powered vehicles generally emit less pollutant

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Here's how to prove that you are a simulation and nothing is real

Philosopher Nick Bostrom argues that humans are likely computer simulations in the "Simulation Hypothesis". Bostrom thinks advanced civilizations of posthumans will have technology to simulate their ancestors. Elon Musk and others support this idea. None Are we living in a computer-driven simulation? That seems like an impossible hypothesis to prove. But let's just look at how impossible that rea

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'Avengers: Endgame' Is Getting Re-Released With Some 'Surprises'

Also, Pixar's new movie sounds pretty deep.

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Kitchen physics: what we can learn from making crepes

Spreading the batter just right could have applications in industry. Phil Dooley reports.

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You can trust a mongoose in times of trouble

Field studies show they have each other’s backs. Nick Carne reports.

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Läkemedel mot havandeskapsförgiftning i sikte

Preeklampsi är ett allvarligt sjukdomstillstånd som årligen drabbar cirka 9 miljoner gravida kvinnor i världen och är den främsta dödsorsaken hos både mödrar och foster. Nu har forskargruppen i Lund publicerat en studie som öppnar för vidare forskning mot ett läkemedel. Studien är gjord på möss, men är viktig då den bekräftar tidigare studier som visar att alfa-1-mikroglobulin har effekt vid pree

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Protein kopplad till aggressiv hudcancer

Hudcancer har blivit en av våra vanligaste cancerformer. I Sverige drabbas drygt 4 000 personer varje år av malignt melanom. Under de senaste tio åren har nya behandlingsalternativ, som på olika sätt stärker immunförsvaret eller attackerar specifika cancerceller, utvecklats för patienter med spridd hudcancer. Dessa behandlingar har kunnat introduceras tack vare ökad förståelse för hur melanom utv

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Därför är det svårt för syriska flyktingar att återvända

Flyktingsituationen i Mellanöstern, efter Syrienkriget som startade 2011, är ohållbar. Libanon, lika stort som Skåne, och med en befolkning av 4,2 miljoner har sedan kriget började tagit emot 2 miljoner syriska flyktingar. Turkiet har tagit emot 3,5 miljoner syriska flyktingar och Jordanien knappt en miljon. Redan innan fanns 400 000 palestinska flyktingar i Libanon liksom ett stort antal i Turki

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Laser method promising for detecting trace chemicals in air

Researchers have developed a new laser-based method that can detect electric charges and chemicals of interest with unprecedented sensitivity. The new approach could one day offer a way to scan large areas for radioactive material or hazardous chemicals for safety and security applications.

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Is burning trash a good way to handle it? Waste incineration in 5 charts

Burning trash has a long history in the United States, and municipal solid waste incinerators have sparked resistance in many places. As an environmental justice scholar who works directly with low-income and communities of color, I see incineration as a poor waste management option.

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Global data resource shows genetic diversity of chickens

A total of 174 chicken breeds are described in a publicly accessible database which scientists from the University of Göttingen and the Friedrich Loeffler Institute in Neustadt-Mariensee have built up in recent years with numerous international partners. This database, the Synbreed Chicken Diversity Panel (SCDP), includes information about a large proportion of the available chicken species and th

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Facebook Unleashes Software to Make Programming Robots Easy

PyRobot could simplify the way researchers program their machines, and could even make it easier for non-robotics types to jump into the field.

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The Most Synthetically Complex Drug Candidate Ever

This is quite a synthetic chemistry accomplishment: the halichondrin derivative E7130 has been synthesized on an 11-gram scale by the Kishi group (open-access paper). I’ve copied that structure directly from the published paper, because there’s just not enough time this morning to redraw it! This would surely be the most complex natural product structure ever synthesized on such a scale; I cannot

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Scary Close Call with a Breakaway Pot | Deadliest Catch

The wrath of Arctic Storm Elsa hits the Cornelia hardest as a breakaway pot thrashes Josh and Casey's crew. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dea

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The sea anemone in red

Algae adds a touch of colour, in the name of science.

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Miniature icon heralds inkless printing process

New technique borrows inspiration from butterflies and Japanese art. Andrew Masterson reports.

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First ever beluga-narwhal hybrid identified

Skull stored in museum provides evidence of Arctic whale interbreeding. Nick Carne reports.

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Religion must rise to the challenge of climate change too

With biblical floods and famine on the cards, the fight against global warming needs faiths to get serious about green issues, says Graham Lawton

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Labelling people "anti-vaxxers" ignores real roots of their concerns

There’s no doubt everyone should vaccinate – but to combat “anti-vax” we must understand the legitimate reasons for some communities’ mistrust, says Furaha Asani

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Yazılıkaya: A 3000-year-old Hittite mystery may finally be solved

A 3200-year-old sanctuary once described as the Sistine Chapel of Hittite religious art could have acted as a calendar that was centuries ahead of its time

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Working hypothesis: From DJ sets in space to ancient bagels

Our regular column sorting the week's supernovae from the absolute zeros

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Using graphene and tiny droplets to detect stomach-cancer causing bacteria

Biosensors are currently used in healthcare to monitor blood glucose; however, they also have the potential to detect bacteria. Researchers at Osaka University have invented a new biosensor using graphene—a material consisting of a one-atom-thick layer of carbon—to detect bacteria such as those that attack the stomach lining and that have been linked to stomach cancer. When the bacteria interact w

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CRISPR in Russia: The World’s Next Gene-Edited Babies May Not Be Far Away

When Chinese scientist He Jiankui announced he had edited the genomes of two babies last November, he sparked an international outcry . Many feared he had opened the floodgates to human genetic engineering. It seems those fears were well-founded after a Russian researcher said he plans to do the same by year-end. Denis Rebrikov is the head of a genome-editing laboratory at the Kulakov National Me

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African Americans less likely to quit menthol cigarettes

African Americans who smoke menthol cigarettes are 12 percent less likely to quit smoking than other menthol smokers, a study shows. Targeted marketing may be why. The findings underscore the role that mentholated cigarettes play in smoking cessation efforts, particularly among African American tobacco users, says Philip Smith, an assistant professor in the kinesiology and health department at Mi

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Cancer test, plastic recycling win Europe inventor awards

A diagnostic tool to assess the risk of a cancer relapse, machines for plastic recycling, an alternative to toxic ship paint— all were among the inventions honoured at the European Inventor Awards on Thursday.

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Swiss watchdog 'in contact' with Facebook cryptocurrency backers

Switzerland's market watchdog confirmed Thursday that it is contact with the "initiators" of Facebook's new cryptocurrency, as questions mount over how the money will be regulated.

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Libra: four reasons to be extremely cautious about Facebook's new currency

Facebook has unveiled libra, a cryptocurrency that will enable users to make international payments over Messenger and other group platforms like WhatsApp—perhaps from as soon as 2020.

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EU under pressure over 2050 net zero emissions target

European Union leaders will push Thursday "to advance work" towards setting a target of net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, according to a draft resolution.

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Slack is latest tech company to go public, with a twist

Shares of work messaging platform Slack are expected to start trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker "WORK."

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Løbehjulsfirmaer klar med egne regler: Vil komme regulering i forkøbet

Firmaerne Lime, Voi og Tier, der alle udlejer el-løbehjul, har sendt et forslag med fokus på selvregulering til Københavns Kommune. Senere idag skal kommunens borgerrepræsentationn stemme om en forsøgsordning.

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Scientists Find a Never-Before-Seen Hybrid: A Narluga

The first "narluga" skull ever to be discovered. The hybrid mixes traits of its beluga and narwhal parents. (Credit: Mikkel Høegh Post, Natural History Museum of Denmark.) While visiting …

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iRobot Acquires Root Robotics to Boost STEM Education for Kids

Root promises to teach coding skills to children, starting as young as 4 years old

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Team determines asteroid origin of 5 meteorites

By determining the age of five meteorites, researchers have solved the riddle of their origins and formation. The work shows that the rocks are over 4.5 billion years old and originate from Vesta, the second-largest asteroid in the main belt. When our sun was just a young star, a revolving disc of gas and dust formed around it. Over time, the dust clumped together, forming boulders that went on t

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Why climate change means a rethink of coffee and cocoa production systems

New research by an international group of scientists, from Inland Norway University, Bioversity International, Wageningen University and World Agroforestry, examines whether incorporating suitable trees into crop systems or replacing coffee with cocoa could help the thousands of families in Mesoamerica meet future climate conditions.

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Cancer control: Structure of important transport protein solved

For the first time, Bernese researchers have been able to solve the structure of a transport protein and thus to describe the functional mechanism that plays a significant role in the survival of cancer cells. This is an important step towards developing effective inhibitors and fight tumor growth.

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Retracing ancient routes to Australia

New insights into how people first arrived in Australia have determined the likely routes travelled by Aboriginal people tens of thousands of years ago along with the sizes of groups required for the population to survive in harsh conditions.

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Danish researchers confirm that narwhals and belugas can interbreed

A team of University of Copenhagen researchers has compiled the first and only evidence that narwhals and beluga whales can breed successfully. DNA and stable isotope analysis of an anomalous skull from the Natural History Museum of Denmark has allowed researchers to confirm the existence of a narwhal-beluga hybrid.

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Archaeological mystery solved with modern genetics

Researchers at the University of Tokyo conducted a census of the Japanese population around 2,500 years ago using the Y chromosomes of men living on the main islands of modern-day Japan. This is the first time analysis of modern genomes has estimated the size of an ancient human population before they were met by a separate ancient population.

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Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration

On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. Although firefighters extinguished the blaze within 30 minutes, the shocking event helped galvanize the US environmental movement. Fifty years later, the river is much healthier but still recuperating from a legacy of pollution, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagaz

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We’re living through a climate emergency. Time to start acting like it

It’s not enough to call climate change an emergency, says Adam Vaughan. We need to take emergency action as well

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How climate change impacts the economy

The Fourth National Climate Assessment, published in 2018, warned that if we do not curb greenhouse gas emissions and start to adapt, climate change could seriously disrupt the U.S. economy. Warmer temperatures, sea level rise and extreme weather will damage property and critical infrastructure, impact human health and productivity, and negatively affect sectors such as agriculture, forestry, fish

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Persuasive politics: why emotional beats rational for connecting with voters

Politics is mired in a communications crisis. Across the world voters are disillusioned, while in the UK the stock of politicians has never been lower.

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Danmarks første psykiatriprofessor med fokus på psykoterapi

Sidse Arnfred, overlæge ved Psykiatrien Vest i Slagelse, er landets første psykiatriprofessor med fokus på psykoterapi. I det nye professorat vil hun bl.a. udvikle en ny terapiform.

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First-Ever Beluga-Narwhal Hybrid Found in the Arctic

Belugas and narwhals can apparently breed. Scientists have confirmed the only known specimen of beluga-narwhal hybrid.

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Lodjur sänker priset på jaktarrenden

Studien har publicerats i den välrenommerade tidskriften Forest Policy and Economics och är den första som gör en analys av hur stora rovdjur påverkar värdet av jaktarrenden. Stora rovdjur kan påverka arrendepriserna genom att avskjutningen av vilt minskar, men också genom ökad skaderisk för jakthundar och genom jägarnas subjektiva värdering av rovdjursförekomst på jaktmarken. Avskjutningen av vi

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Tonårsföräldrar positiva till ökat föräldrastöd

I syfte att främja barn och ungdomars psykiska hälsa har regeringen antagit en nationell strategi för ett stärkt föräldraskapsstöd. Strategin innehåller både riktat stöd till föräldrar då någon form av problem har uppstått och universellt stöd som brett vänder sig till alla föräldrar. Sverige har en lång tradition av att erbjuda olika former av universellt föräldraskapsstöd, som exempelvis samtal

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New York Senate Passes Flamethrower Ban

Not a Flamethrower In January 2018, Elon Musk’s The Boring Company announced a new product : propane-fueled $500 flamethrowers. Within four days, it had preorders for all 20,000 of the accidents-waiting-to-happen, and by June 2018, the company was already making deliveries . This whole stunt prompted the New York State Senate to pass a bill banning the recreational use of flamethrowers. It’ll now

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Scientists map toxic proteins linked to Alzheimer's

A team of researchers from McMaster University has mapped at atomic resolution a toxic protein linked to Alzheimer's disease, allowing them to better understand what is happening deep within the brain during the earliest stages of the disease.

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Scientists map toxic proteins linked to Alzheimer's

A team of researchers from McMaster University has mapped at atomic resolution a toxic protein linked to Alzheimer's disease, allowing them to better understand what is happening deep within the brain during the earliest stages of the disease.

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Display of commitment by the police is important for dealing with difficult groups of young people

Groups of young people who cause a nuisance and/or participate in criminal activities are a recurring and persistent problem for the police. Displaying commitment is an important part of the approach to the problem, but proves to be complicated in practice. Public administration expert Anne van Uden reached this conclusion in her Ph.D. research into police approaches to difficult groups of young p

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A miniature camera for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will help test the observatory and take first images

Scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are building the world's largest digital camera for astronomy and astrophysics—a minivan-sized 3,200-megapixel "eye" of the future Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) that will enable unprecedented views of the universe starting in the fall of 2022 and provide new insights into dark energy and other cosmic mysteries.

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Estimating the time of death under water

Why barnacles prefer elegant shoes and other mysteries perplexing forensic scientists.

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The complex issue of returning Islamic State fighters

A new paper from The Australian National University (ANU) warns we need to look beyond stripping citizenship from Islamic State fighters seeking to return to Australia as an approach to dealing with terrorism.

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Researchers develop 'vaccine' against attacks on machine learning

Researchers from CSIRO's Data61, the data and digital specialist arm of Australia's national science agency, have developed a world-first set of techniques to effectively 'vaccinate' algorithms against adversarial attacks, a significant advancement in machine learning research.

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Boeing eyes more 737 Max sales after post-crash drought

Boeing's post-crash business slump may be coming to an end.

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Digitally programmable perovskite nanowire-block copolymer composites

One-dimensional nanomaterials with highly anisotropic optoelectronic properties can be used within energy harvesting applications, flexible electronics and biomedical imaging devices. In materials science and nanotechnology, 3-D patterning methods can be used to precisely assemble nanowires with locally controlled composition and orientation to allow new optoelectronic device designs. In a recent

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Future cities will need a holistic vision 'for the benefit of the entire society'

Catherine Peters, chair and professor of civil and environmental engineering, discusses the future of infrastructure, the urgency of integrating large-scale systems and the skills students need to solve tomorrow's problems.

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Growing a better seaweed to fuel the future

"Thirteen point two." One scientist calls out the measurement; another jots it down in her data sheet. It's hot and stuffy in the lab, and the pungent smell of seaweed is inescapable as the team sits for hours at a black table measuring blades of sugar kelp—brownish seaweeds that look like oversized slabs of bacon.

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Software to protect the world's most endangered species

By combining genetic and environmental databases, researchers at EPFL are seeking to help biologists identify more accurately the animal and plant species most exposed to climate change, in order to develop appropriate conservation methods.

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NASA's Webb Telescope will survey Saturn and Titan

If you stop a random person on the sidewalk and ask them what their favorite planet is, chances are their answer will be Saturn. Saturn's stunning rings are a memorable sight in any backyard telescope. But there is still a lot to learn about Saturn, especially about the planet's unique weather and chemistry, as well as the origin of its opulent ring system. After its launch in 2021, NASA's James W

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Scientists discover seemingly paradoxical mechanism for regulating oil synthesis

Scientists studying plant biochemistry at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory recently made a surprising discovery: They found that a protein that turns on oil synthesis also activates a protein that puts the brakes on the same process. In a paper just published in the journal Plant Physiology, they describe how this seemingly paradoxical system keeps oil precursors perf

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Book presents the case that animals are just as important as people

In her new book, "Fellow Creatures: Our Obligations to the Other Animals," Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Philosophy Christine Korsgaard makes the case that humans are not inherently more important than animals and therefore should treat them much better than we do.

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Jakobshavn Glacier grows for third straight year

New NASA data shows that Jakobshavn Glacier—Greenland's fastest-moving and fastest-thinning glacier for most of the 2000s—grew from 2018 into 2019, marking three consecutive years of growth.

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Software to protect the world's most endangered species

By combining genetic and environmental databases, researchers at EPFL are seeking to help biologists identify more accurately the animal and plant species most exposed to climate change, in order to develop appropriate conservation methods.

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Scientists discover seemingly paradoxical mechanism for regulating oil synthesis

Scientists studying plant biochemistry at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory recently made a surprising discovery: They found that a protein that turns on oil synthesis also activates a protein that puts the brakes on the same process. In a paper just published in the journal Plant Physiology, they describe how this seemingly paradoxical system keeps oil precursors perf

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New research backs Australian regulatory decision on poppers

Young gay and bisexual men are frequent users of alkyl nitrites, or poppers, but few show signs of addiction, risky consumption habits or other psychosocial problems, a study shows.

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UBC research shows upbeat music can sweeten tough exercise

New research coming out of UBC's Okanagan campus demonstrates that upbeat music can make a rigorous workout seem less tough. Even for people who are insufficiently active. Matthew Stork is a postdoctoral fellow in the School of Health and Exercise Sciences. He recently published a study examining how the right music can help less-active people get more out of their workout–and enjoy it more.

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Scientists map toxic proteins linked to Alzheimer's

A team of researchers from McMaster University has mapped at atomic resolution a toxic protein linked to Alzheimer's disease, allowing them to better understand what is happening deep within the brain during the earliest stages of the disease.

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Multi-mobile (M2) computing system makes android & iOS apps sharable on multiple devices

Computer scientists at Columbia Engineering have developed a new computing system that enables current, unmodified mobile apps to combine and share multiple devices, including cameras, displays, speakers, microphones, sensors, and GPS, across multiple smartphones and tablets. Called M2, the new system operates across heterogeneous systems, including Android and iOS, combining the functionality of

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Using graphene and tiny droplets to detect stomach-cancer causing bacteria

A Japan-based research team led by Osaka University used graphene and microfluidics to identify stomach-cancer causing bacteria by detecting chemical reactions of the bacteria at the surface of the biosensor. The sensor is highly sensitive and the test only takes half an hour. Further, their approach could be used to also detect other harmful bacteria.

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One step closer to chronic pain relief

While effective drugs against chronic pain are not just around the corner, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have succeeded in identifying a protein as a future potential target for medicinal drugs. Basic research shows that blocking a protein named sortilin prevents pain — initially in laboratory mice.

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Gold for silver: A chemical barter

From effective medicines to molecular sensors to fuel cells, metal clusters are becoming fundamentally useful in the health, environment, and energy sectors. This diverse functionality of clusters arises from the variability in size and type. Professor Yuichi Negishi, from Tokyo University of Science, adds to this ongoing tale by explaining the dynamics of the metal cluster, thiolate-protected gol

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Low-carb diet may reduce diabetes risk independent of weight loss

A low-carb diet may have benefits for people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes even if they don't lose any weight, a new study suggests.

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High school seniors losing trust in law enforcement, justice system

High school seniors' confidence in law enforcement and the justice system significantly declined from 2006 to 2017 while their faith in religious organizations and schools was comparatively higher and more stable, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Physicists team up to tackle proton radius problem

Ten years ago, just about any nuclear physicist could tell you the approximate size of the proton. But that changed in 2010, when atomic physicists unveiled a new method that promised a more precise measurement. The new quantity came up 4% shorter than expected, setting off a scramble within the nuclear and atomic physics communities to determine if this discrepant result was due to new physics or

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The return of the wolf: Wild cubs born in the Netherlands

Authorities say wolves are officially back in the Netherlands, two centuries after the animals were hunted to extinction in the country, after a pair produced a litter in the wild.

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Nu er det bevist: Narhvaler og hvidhvaler får unger sammen

Et forskerhold fra Københavns Universitet har nu det første og eneste bevis i verden for, at…

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The return of the wolf: Wild cubs born in the Netherlands

Wolves are officially back in the Netherlands, two centuries after the animals were hunted to extinction in the country, after a pair produced a litter in the wild—news welcomed Thursday by conservationists.

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Asian nations scramble to contain pig disease outbreaks

Asian nations are scrambling to contain the spread of highly contagious African swine fever, with Vietnam culling 2.5 million pigs and China reporting more than a million dead in an unprecedentedly huge epidemic some fear is out of control.

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Was This Viral Proposal Staged?

On Tuesday, Marissa Casey Fuchs, a fashion influencer known on Instagram as @ fashionambitionist , shared a video to her 160,000-plus followers. In it, her boyfriend, Gabriel Grossman, professes his love and tells her that she’s about to embark on “an extraordinary adventure.” “I have the most important question of my life to ask you,” he says . “The problem is, we’re not really into traditional

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Hybridization between two high Arctic cetaceans confirmed by genomic analysis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44038-0 Hybridization between two high Arctic cetaceans confirmed by genomic analysis

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Adobe Lightroom Is Now Available From The Mac App Store

Adobe Lightroom, the photo-editing tool meant for professionals, is now available from the Mac App Store. This now happens to be the first Adobe app that’s available from the revamped …

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Used Nest cameras had bug that let their previous owners snoop on new owners

Some Nest cameras were hit by a bug that could have allowed the previous owner to snoop on the new owner's household. All the while, the new owner had no idea they were being spied on.

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Here's what teachers look for when kids start school

Many parents believe teaching their child to read is the best way to get them ready to start school, but teachers often disagree. Teachers generally consider it more important for children to know how to regulate their emotions, be confident in their abilities and be curious learners.

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Asian nations scramble to contain pig disease outbreaks

Asian nations are scrambling to contain the spread of highly contagious African swine fever, with Vietnam culling 2.5 million pigs and China reporting more than a million dead in an unprecedentedly huge epidemic some fear is out of control.

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Einstein's relativity document gifted to Nobel museum

The Nobel Museum in Stockholm has been gifted Albert Einstein's first paper published after he received the Nobel Prize in 1922 and discussing his then still controversial relativity theory.

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Rooftop solar panels get boost from tool that previews a year on grid in minutes

Homeowners and businesses may now have an easier time getting solar panels on rooftops thanks to software developed at Sandia.

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How an emerging tick-borne pathogen evades detection

Human babesiosis is an emerging infectious disease transmitted to humans by ticks. A team of Yale researchers has discovered how Babesia microti, one of the two Babesia parasite species that transmit the disease in the United States, communicates with its host.

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Using fluid dynamics to perfect crêpe cooking techniques

A pair of fluid dynamics physicists, one with Ecole Polytechnique, the other the University of Canterbury, have used their respective backgrounds to develop the optimal way to fry a crêpe. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Fluids, Edouard Boujo and Mathieu Sellier describe their approach to finding the best way to cook a crêpe.

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A new route for plant nutrient delivery

Agriculture around the globe requires new solutions for food and water sustainability. With more frequent climate extremes, growing populations, increased food demand, and global crop threats, environmental engineers are searching for solutions to manage food production for the future, starting at the tiniest level.

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Y chromosomes reveal population boom and bust in ancient Japan

Researchers at the University of Tokyo conducted a census of the Japanese population around 2,500 years ago using the Y chromosomes of men living on the main islands of modern-day Japan. This is the first time analysis of modern genomes has estimated the size of an ancient human population before they were met by a separate ancient population.

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New international initiative stresses need for global action on air pollution as health impacts remain high

The National Academies of Sciences and Medicine from South Africa, Brazil, Germany, and the United States of America have joined forces to issue an urgent call to action on harmful air pollution. They are calling for a new global compact to improve collaboration on the growing problem, and for governments, businesses and citizens to reduce air pollution in all countries. The academies launched the

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There are 70 million refugees in the world. Here are 5 solutions to the problem

This week, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Filippo Grandi, labeled the world's refugee problem a crisis that is primarily impacting developing countries, who are hosting most of the world's 70 million displaced people.

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How an emerging tick-borne pathogen evades detection

Human babesiosis is an emerging infectious disease transmitted to humans by ticks. A team of Yale researchers has discovered how Babesia microti, one of the two Babesia parasite species that transmit the disease in the United States, communicates with its host.

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Weird whale may be a hybrid of a narwhal mother and beluga father

DNA analysis of an unusually shaped skull found in west Greenland suggests the creature was a hybrid male whale, with a narwhal mother and beluga father

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Mærkværdigt tandsæt og kæmpe kranie: Danske forskere opdager ukendt hybrid-hval

I 30 år har et mystisk hval-kranie ligget gemt i en kælder. Nu afslører DNA dets herkomst.

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Studies suggest more original migrants to Australia than thought—and they came on purpose

Two teams of Australian researchers working independently have found that there were likely more first arrivals to Australia and New Guinea than previously thought—and it was not by accident. The first team created a model showing that a large number of people must have made the trip to have survived the migration. They have published their results in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.

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Fyret sygehusdirektør får ny direktørpost

Den tidligere sygehusdirektør for Sjællands Universitetshospital i Roskilde og Køge har et halvt år efter sin fyring fået nyt job som administrerende direktør for medicin.dk.

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Machine learning unlocks mysteries of quantum physics

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Robots are already farming crops inside this Silicon Valley warehouse

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Predictions About the Future of Farming Rarely Involve Farmers

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Future smart speakers could detect a heart attack and call an ambulance

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DNA confirms a weird Greenland whale was a narwhal-beluga hybrid

DNA analysis of a skull indicates that the animal had a narwhal mother and beluga father.

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Under Trump, Cybersecurity Has Waned

Opinion: Congress has abdicated its role in preventing and punishing cyberattacks. The Cyber Solarium Commission is our best defense.

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The Big Business of ASMR Apps, Videos, and Gadgets

ASMR videos and apps feature soft sounds and quiet whispers that help you relax. But they're also a path to serious revenue.

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Nyt vand-lab skal medvirke til besparelser på milliarder af liter

Aalborg Universitets Smart Water Lab er mere analogt, end navnet antyder. Det skal tjekke, om computermodeller og -algoritmer holder i virkeligheden – så det bliver nemmere at følge drikke- og spildevandets vej verden over.

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High school seniors losing trust in law enforcement, justice system

High school seniors' confidence in law enforcement and the justice system significantly declined from 2006 to 2017 while their faith in religious organizations and schools was comparatively higher and more stable, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Massive brown dwarf detected by astronomers

An international team of astronomers has found a new brown dwarf, one of the most massive objects of this type discovered to date. The newly detected brown dwarf, designated EPIC 212036875 b, turns out to be about 50 times more massive than Jupiter. The finding is detailed in a paper published June 13 on arXiv.org.

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Gut bacteria associated with chronic pain for first time

In a paper published today in the journal Pain, a Montreal-based research team has shown, for the first time, that there are alterations in the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracts of people with fibromyalgia. Approximately 20 different species of bacteria were found in either greater or are lesser quantities in the microbiomes of participants suffering from the disease than in the healthy cont

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Alzheimer's family history risk may show as memory deficit even for those in their 20s

Results from a study of nearly 60,000 individuals suggest those at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease due to family history may demonstrate changes in memory performance as early as their 20s. Researchers from the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, and the University of Arizona gathered the data through an online word-pair memory test called

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Machine learning is about to revolutionize the study of ancient games

AI, computer modeling, and data mining are tools for a new field focusing on how games have evolved.

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Narlugas Are Real

In the late 1980s, an Inuit subsistence hunter named Jens Larsen killed a trio of very strange whales off the western coast of Greenland. He and his fellow subsistence hunters would regularly catch two species: narwhals, whose males famously have long, helical tusks protruding from their snouts; and belugas, with their distinctive white skin. But Larsen’s new kills were neither. Their skin wasn’t

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Celebrating My (Gay) Divorce

Kailey Whitman Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series about the gay-rights movement and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. On August 25, 2013, I said “I do” to Jim, my partner of nine years, who became my “lawfully wedded husband.” Our friend and officiant, Fred Silverman, proclaimed: “By becoming married today, you are making a powerful statement to each other, your family

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Unpacking the Immense Popularity of Shtisel

Last Wednesday, Gady Levy, the executive director of the Streicker Center at New York’s Temple Emanu-El, herded the Israeli actors Neta Riskin and Dov Glickman through the cavernous synagogue’s hallways. Riskin and Glickman, who play the daughter-father pair Giti and Shulem on the Israeli television show Shtisel , had just left a room jammed with donors waiting to get their picture taken with the

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Voice-Activated Monopoly Game Eliminates Human Banking Error

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that bagsying the role of banker in Monopoly is absolute class. A new voice-activated version of the banking game, however, makes the financial position …

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Milstolpe för forskning om havandeskapsförgiftning

Forskare vid Lunds universitet har i över 20 år envist arbetat med att försöka ta fram ett läkemedel mot preeklampsi, havandeskapsförgiftning. Det är ett allvarligt sjukdomstillstånd som årligen drabbar cirka 9 miljoner gravida kvinnor i världen och är den främsta dödsorsaken hos både mödrar och foster. Nya resultat öppnar för vidare forskning mot ett läkemedel.

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New research could lead to a pregnancy test for endangered marsupials

Many women realize they are pregnant before they've even done the test—perhaps feeling a touch of nausea, or tender, larger-than-usual breasts.

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3 ways being empathetic can make you more productive at work

When we think about productivity at work, things like meeting deadlines and producing deliverables come to mind. And while those certainly can be aspects of productivity, many of us overlook how empathy comes into play. Not only does empathy come with some serious, science-backed mental and physical health benefits, it can also make our work lives more enjoyable and more productive. We spoke with

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Why we need to look at decline, not just growth

When Dr. Murray MacRae embarked on his Ph.D. thesis on forecasting the decline of technology, a lot of academics wondered why. But the Massey University marketing lecturer believes humans are reaching a critical point on this planet and understanding patterns of decline will be crucial to our future.

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Majority of children in care have experienced significant abuse and neglect

A joint study by researchers at the Universities of York and Stirling has found that 90 percent of children in Scotland who go into care when aged five or under have experienced significant abuse and neglect before they enter the care system.

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Earned income tax credit helps low-income moms live on their own

Increasing the earned income tax credit helps low-income single mothers improve their housing outcomes as they are less likely to live in crowded households and more likely to live independently, according to a University of Michigan study.

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New research could lead to a pregnancy test for endangered marsupials

Many women realize they are pregnant before they've even done the test—perhaps feeling a touch of nausea, or tender, larger-than-usual breasts.

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Forskare lyssnar hur bäckar andas och mår

En viktig frågeställning för ekologer och geovetare är hur ett ekosystem mår och hur det interagerar med klimatet. I vattendrag är många organismer, inte minst fisk, beroende av att syrgas kan tar sig in i vattnet. Samtidigt släpper många vattendrag växthusgaser till atmosfären, oftast en produkt av nedbrytning av organiskt material. För att bättre kunna förstå och kvantifiera dessa processer är

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From Two Bulls, 9 Million Dairy Cows

Just two Y chromosomes exist in a huge population of U.S. Holsteins; researchers want to know what traits have been lost — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Children America Throws Away

Kyle Kashuv won’t be going to Harvard next year. The young gun-rights activist and survivor of the February 14, 2018, Parkland school shooting that killed 17 of his schoolmates had his admission rescinded once Harvard learned that he had used racial slurs while editing a document shared with friends, including a reference to a black classmate as a “niggerjock.” Kashuv apologized for his past rema

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Possible Universal Memory Reported

Universal memory is one of those things you probably didn’t know you wanted (unless you are a computer nerd). However, it is the “holy grail” of computer memory that, if achievable, would revolutionize computers. Now, scientists from Lancaster University in the UK, have claimed to do just that . The practical benefit of this advance, if implemented, would be a significant reduction in the energy

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Computer model illuminates critical moment in Drosophila development

A computer model of forces exerted by cells during development of a fertilized egg into a fruit fly larvae holds promise to help scientists understand the morphogenesis of organisms that are much more complicated.

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Sensors and metrology as the driving force for digitalization

Many digitalized processes depend on data collected by increasingly powerful sensors and other test and measurement technology. When this data is processed, it provides precise and reliable information about the operating environment. Nine Fraunhofer Institutes will be presenting the results of their research into sensor technology and its applications in the field of testing and measurement at Se

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Young women share their stories of homelessness

Increasing numbers of women lack a safe and secure place to call home. But most women who are homeless are "invisible." You don't see these vulnerable women sleeping on the streets—most are forced into "couch-surfing," staying in crisis or temporary accommodation, or sleeping in their cars.

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Computer model illuminates critical moment in Drosophila development

A computer model of forces exerted by cells during development of a fertilized egg into a fruit fly larvae holds promise to help scientists understand the morphogenesis of organisms that are much more complicated.

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To repair torn meniscus in the knee, turn to pigs?

To repair a torn meniscus in the knee, scientists have tried developing scaffolds from plastics and textiles. Now, a more organic model shows promise in the lab. About a million times a year, Americans with a torn meniscus in their knee undergo surgery in hopes of a repair. Surgeons can’t fix certain tears and others won’t heal well. Many patients later suffer osteoarthritis from the injury. As d

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The Trebek effect: The benefits of well wishes

Long-time “Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek announced in March that he had been diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer. Within days, he offered thanks to “the hundreds of thousands of people who have sent emails, texts, tweets, and cards wishing me well regarded my health." Then last month, Trebek reported that his cancer was in “near remission," saying that his doctors “hadn't seen this kind of pos

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Brim 8-Cup Pour-Over Coffee Maker Review: Barista-Style Brew Without All the Effort

An automatic coffee machine that gives you a barista-style brew.

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Konstgjorda muskler som drivs av glukos

Rörelserna i våra muskler drivs av energi som frigörs när glukos och syre omvandlas genom biokemiska reaktioner. På liknande sätt kan så kallade aktuatorer (ställdon som styr ett mekaniskt system) tillverkas för att omvandla energi till rörelse, men energin kommer då från andra energikällor, som elektricitet. Forskare vid Linköpings universitet försöker utveckla konstgjorda muskler som fungerar m

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Image of the Day: Imitation Fish

Scientists create a soft-bodied robotic fish that pumps synthetic blood and swims on its own.

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The Problem With HR

In April 2018, I spent three days in Austin, Texas, in the company of more than 2,500 people, most of them women, who are deeply concerned about the problem of workplace sexual harassment. The venue was the city’s convention center, and when a man named Derek Irvine took the vast stage and said that there had been “an uprising in the world of those who refuse to be silent,” the crowd roared its s

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