Search Posts

nyheder2019juni21

Foodie calls: Dating for a free meal (rather than a relationship)

New psychology research reveals 23-33% of women in an online study say they've engaged in a 'foodie call,' where they set up a date for a free meal. These women score high on the 'dark triad' of personality traits as well.

16h

18h

1.000 ton varme sten lagrer nu el i Hamborg

Siemens Gamesa har netop indviet, hvad virksomheden selv betegner som verdens første elektrisk-termiske energilager. Lageret baseres på ‘vulkanske sten’ og kan opbevare 130 MWh i op til en uge.

5h

Is Technology Turning Us Into Horned Monsters? Not Exactly

Are young people really growing horns from using their smart phones? The short answer is no, but for a while media coverage seemed to suggest otherwise.

11min

Plant-based diet leads to Crohn's Disease remission, according to case study

Eating a plant-based diet may be an effective treatment for Crohn's disease, according to a case study published in the journal Nutrients.

16min

Antibiotic resistance in spore-forming probiotic bacteria

New research has found that six probiotic Bacillus strains are resistant to several antibiotics. Genetic analysis of other Bacillus strains has shown genes that contribute to antibiotic resistance towards various types of drugs and methods in which they can still grow in their presence.

16min

A new drug target for chemically induced Parkinson's disease

An enzyme that modifies chemicals formed in the body by alcohol, tobacco, and certain foods may be a new target for treating Parkinson's disease. The altered compounds, the researchers found, may play a role in triggering the onset or advancing the progression of the neurodegenerative condition.

16min

Research details response of sagebrush to 2017 solar eclipse

The short period of darkness caused a significant reduction in photosynthesis and transpiration in the desert shrub, but not quite to the levels of nighttime, according to some of the most detailed research on plant response to solar eclipses ever reported.

16min

Measles vaccination linked to health and schooling benefits

Researchers have assessed the long-term associations of measles vaccination and child anthropometry, cognition, and schooling outcomes in Ethiopia, India, and Vietnam.

16min

New e-tattoo enables accurate, uninterrupted heart monitoring for days

A new wearable technology that is made from stretchy, lightweight material, could make heart health monitoring easier and more accurate.

16min

Millions with neurological diseases could find new option in neurostimulation devices

Researchers are using graphene to help people with neurological diseases who use implantable devices.

16min

How you lock your smartphone can reveal your age

Older smartphone users tend to rely more on their phones' auto lock feature compared to younger users, a new study has found. They also prefer using PINs over fingerprints to unlock their phones.

16min

Alzheimer's family history risk may show as memory deficit even for those in their 20s

Results from a study of nearly 60,000 individuals suggest those at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease due to family history may demonstrate changes in memory performance as early as their 20s. Researchers gathered the data through an online word-pair memory test called MindCrowd, one of the world's largest scientific assessments of how healthy brains function.

16min

21min

Experts: It’d be "relatively easy" to deploy killer robots by 2021

submitted by /u/speakhyroglyphically [link] [comments]

21min

21min

21min

Experts: Spy used AI-generated face to connect with targets

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

21min

21min

Millions of Dell And Other Brand PCs Vulnerable To System Hijack Security Flaw In 3rd Party Software

Some laptop and desktop consumers may want to double-check that they have recently updated their devices. It was discovered that millions of Dell PCs as well as other brands could be vulnerable …

21min

Scaffold helps cells repair torn meniscus in lab tests

About a million times a year, Americans with a torn meniscus in their knee undergo surgery in hopes of a repair. Certain tears can't be fixed or won't heal well, and many patients later suffer osteoarthritis. To improve meniscus healing, Duke scientists have developed a scaffold derived from a pig's meniscus, which performed better in lab tests than healing without a scaffold.

37min

NASA Installs Wheels on Mars 2020 Rover

NASA has attached the wheels and suspension to the starboard side of the frame. We're one step closer to a functional rover now, and hopefully it will prove even more durable than Curiosity. The post NASA Installs Wheels on Mars 2020 Rover appeared first on ExtremeTech .

41min

Cop Gets $585K After Colleagues Snooped on Her DMV Data

A jury this week found that Minneapolis police officers abused their license database access. Dozens of other lawsuits have made similar claims.

50min

Human Lives Might Be Long Enough Already

In the mid-19th century, people in the developed world entered into a Faustian bargain with the aging process. In exchange for life expectancies gaining an additional 30 years in the space of only a few generations, billions of people had to find out what it was like to be elderly. In 2019, more people than ever before get to see their grandkids grow up. They get to enjoy a lengthy retirement, if

52min

Combination of drugs may combat deadly drug-resistant fungus

Microbiologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have shown that a combination of anti-fungal and anti-bacterial medications may be an effective weapon against the recently discovered multidrug resistant, Candida auris (C. auris).

1h

The places in the world that still appreciate vaccines

A nurse in northern Ethiopia, a country with one of the highest rates of belief in vaccine efficacy, prepares to give a measles vaccine (UK Department for International Development/) It’s an unfortunate truth of this world that the people most benefiting from a system are the least likely to acknowledge how great it is—vaccines are just one example. Vaccine-preventable diseases suffer from the ve

1h

Extraterrestrial Life Could Feasibly Live in Salty Puddles on Mars

All Dried Up Scientists found another possible place to look for extraterrestrial life on Mars. The Red Planet, recently discovered to have water just beneath its surface , could be dotted with puddles of mud with a high concentration of salts. Investigating similar salty mud puddles on Earth, Wichita State University astrobiologists found that bacterial life could survive even after getting comp

1h

Idiot Drivers Can’t Grasp That Teslas Aren’t Fully Autonomous

Misleading Monikers Drivers just can’t seem to grasp that Teslas aren’t capable of driving themselves. One after another, they keep enabling Autopilot and then falling asleep — or passing out — behind the wheel, seemingly confident that the car will get them where they need to go in one piece. But it seems drivers aren’t solely to blame for this incredibly stupid trend. On Thursday, the Insurance

1h

Before Iran Shot It Down, the US’s $130M Drone Spied on the World

The Rundown On Thursday, Iran shot down an RQ-4 Global Hawk drone that the U.S. Navy had been flying near the country’s borders. American leaders insist that the Northrop Grumman-manufactured drone, which costs about $130 million to make, was over international waters, while Iranian officials say it crossed into Iranian territory, according to The New York Times . Before that, though, the Global

1h

From sheep and cattle to giraffes, genome study reveals evolution of ruminants

A team of researchers has carried out a detailed study of the genomes of ruminants, giving new insight into their evolution and success.

1h

From sheep and cattle to giraffes, genome study reveals evolution of ruminants

A team of researchers has carried out a detailed study of the genomes of ruminants, giving new insight into their evolution and success.

1h

Antibiotic resistance in spore-forming probiotic bacteria

New research has found that six probiotic Bacillus strains are resistant to several antibiotics. Genetic analysis of other Bacillus strains has shown genes that contribute to antibiotic resistance towards various types of drugs and methods in which they can still grow in their presence. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

1h

Experiments with salt-tolerant bacteria in brine have implications for life on Mars

Salt-tolerant bacteria grown in brine were able to revive after the brine was put through a cycle of drying and rewetting. The research has implications for the possibility of life on Mars, as well as for the danger of contaminating Mars and other planetary bodies with terrestrial microbes. The research is presented at ASM Microbe 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

1h

Antibiotic resistance in spore-forming probiotic bacteria

New research has found that six probiotic Bacillus strains are resistant to several antibiotics. Genetic analysis of other Bacillus strains has shown genes that contribute to antibiotic resistance towards various types of drugs and methods in which they can still grow in their presence. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

1h

Experiments with salt-tolerant bacteria in brine have implications for life on Mars

Salt-tolerant bacteria grown in brine were able to revive after the brine was put through a cycle of drying and rewetting. The research has implications for the possibility of life on Mars, as well as for the danger of contaminating Mars and other planetary bodies with terrestrial microbes. The research is presented at ASM Microbe 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

1h

UFOs Over Kansas City Turned Out to Be Something Strange

Bubble Burst Were two mysterious white objects that were spotted in the sky over Kansas City, Missouri last night evidence of otherworldly intelligence? Nope — instead they turned out to be evidence of a strange research project the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA), Gizmodo reports , which is working on balloons that can intelligently use wind currents to steer as they stay alo

1h

300 stars show our solar system may be special

A new survey offers new details about Jupiter-like planets, which could influence theories about how Earth formed and became habitable. Over the past four years, an instrument attached to a telescope in the Chilean Andes—known as the Gemini Planet Imager—has set its gaze on 531 stars in search of new planets. The team behind it has now released initial findings from the first half of the survey,

1h

No, you're not growing horns because of your phone – CNET

Multiple reports suggest our reliance on phones may be causing us to grow weird horns in the back of our head. But that's not the case.

1h

A new drug target for chemically induced Parkinson's disease

An enzyme that modifies chemicals formed in the body by alcohol, tobacco, and certain foods may be a new target for treating Parkinson's disease, according to a team led by University of Pennsylvania scientists. The altered compounds, the researchers found, may play a role in triggering the onset or advancing the progression of the neurodegenerative condition.

1h

Waymo’s Bizarre Plan to Bring Autonomous Cars to France and Japan

Shipping Out Waymo, the self-driving car company owned by Google’s parent company, Alphabet, has a plan to go international. The autonomous car developer partnered with Nissan and Renault, TechCrunch reports , in order to figure out how to get the company’s autonomous vehicles on the streets of France and Japan. The goal of the partnership would be for the three automakers to jointly develop adva

2h

FDA finds asbestos in Claire’s product. Why are cosmetics barely regulated?

Claire's voluntarily pulled the products from shelves. Small amounts of asbestos have been found in several beauty products in recent years. The Food and Drug Administration has said it wants greater oversight of the cosmetics industry. None A batch of makeup sets — sold by Claire's Stores, Inc. and marketed to young girls — contained small amounts of asbestos, according to the Food and Drug Admi

2h

ET Deals: Dell Core i7 Laptop $649, Seagate 2TB External HDD $59, Apple AirPods w/ Wireless Charging Case $179

Schools out for summer, but only for so long. If you are headed to college in the fall or have a child in high school, now's an excellent time to pick up some new tech to help get them through their classes. The post ET Deals: Dell Core i7 Laptop $649, Seagate 2TB External HDD $59, Apple AirPods w/ Wireless Charging Case $179 appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

Researchers report new understanding of thermoelectric materials

Researchers reported a major step forward in the search for new thermoelectric materials Friday, the discovery of a new explanation for asymmetrical thermoelectric performance.

2h

Immunology — not just supporting actors

Non-classical monocytes were long thought to play a purely surveillance role in the immune system. With the aid of a novel marker (PD-L1), Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have now shown that they are directly involved in the regulation of immune response.

2h

Dissemination of pathogenic bacteria by university student's cell phones

New research has demonstrated the presence of S. aureus in 40% of the cell phones of students sampled at a university. S. aureus is a common cause of hospital and community-based infections and is currently considered an important pathogen because of its level of antibiotic resistance.

2h

Experiments with salt-tolerant bacteria in brine have implications for life on Mars

Salt-tolerant bacteria grown in brine were able to revive after the brine was put through a cycle of drying and rewetting. The research has implications for the possibility of life on Mars, as well as for the danger of contaminating Mars and other planetary bodies with terrestrial microbes.

2h

Antibiotic resistance in spore-forming probiotic bacteria

New research has found that six probiotic Bacillus strains are resistant to several antibiotics. Genetic analysis of other Bacillus strains has shown genes that contribute to antibiotic resistance towards various types of drugs and methods in which they can still grow in their presence.

2h

Survey of dental researchers' perceptions of sexual harassment at AADR conferences

At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), AADR Immediate Past President Raul Garcia, Boston University, Massachusetts, USA, presented a poster on 'Surve

2h

500 Vultures Killed in Botswana by Poachers’ Poison, Government Says

As scavengers, vultures can help rangers locate poachers by their presence in the air over freshly killed animals, such as elephants.

2h

Blue States Roll Out Aggressive Climate Strategies. Red States Keep to the Sidelines.

The widening divide between states on climate-change policy comes with the potential to cement an economic and social divide for years to come.

2h

High-speed black phosphorus field-effect transistors approaching ballistic limit

As a strong candidate for future electronics, atomically thin black phosphorus (BP) has attracted great attention in recent years because of its tunable bandgap and high carrier mobility. Here, we show that the transport properties of BP device under high electric field can be improved greatly by the interface engineering of high-quality HfLaO dielectrics and transport orientation. By designing t

2h

Understanding the asymmetrical thermoelectric performance for discovering promising thermoelectric materials

Thermoelectric modules, consisting of multiple pairs of n- and p-type legs, enable converting heat into electricity and vice versa. However, the thermoelectric performance is often asymmetrical, in that one type outperforms the other. In this paper, we identified the relationship between the asymmetrical thermoelectric performance and the weighted mobility ratio, a correlation that can help predi

2h

Multifaceted design optimization for superomniphobic surfaces

Superomniphobic textures are at the frontier of surface design for vast arrays of applications. Despite recent substantial advances in fabrication methods for reentrant and doubly reentrant microstructures, design optimization remains a major challenge. We overcome this in two stages. First, we develop readily generalizable computational methods to systematically survey three key wetting properti

2h

Molecular insights into the surface-catalyzed secondary nucleation of amyloid-{beta}40 (A{beta}40) by the peptide fragment A{beta}16-22

Understanding the structural mechanism by which proteins and peptides aggregate is crucial, given the role of fibrillar aggregates in debilitating amyloid diseases and bioinspired materials. Yet, this is a major challenge as the assembly involves multiple heterogeneous and transient intermediates. Here, we analyze the co-aggregation of Aβ 40 and Aβ 16–22 , two widely studied peptide fragments of

2h

Highly efficient sky blue electroluminescence from ligand-activated copper iodide clusters: Overcoming the limitations of cluster light-emitting diodes

Organic light-emitting diodes using cluster emitters have recently emerged as a flexible optoelectronic platform to extend their biological and optical applications. However, their inefficient cluster-centered excited states and deficient electrical properties limit device performance. Here, we introduce donor groups in organic ligands to form ligand-activated clusters, enabling the fabrication o

2h

High-resolution, reconfigurable printing of liquid metals with three-dimensional structures

We report an unconventional approach for high-resolution, reconfigurable 3D printing using liquid metals for stretchable, 3D integrations. A minimum line width of 1.9 μm can be reliably formed using direct printing, and printed patterns can be reconfigured into diverse 3D structures with maintaining pristine resolutions. This reconfiguration can be performed multiple times, and it also generates

2h

Electric field-induced selective catalysis of single-molecule reaction

Oriented external electric fields (OEEFs) offer a unique chance to tune catalytic selectivity by orienting the alignment of the electric field along the axis of the activated bond for a specific chemical reaction; however, they remain a key experimental challenge. Here, we experimentally and theoretically investigated the OEEF-induced selective catalysis in a two-step cascade reaction of the Diel

2h

Visualization of vermilion degradation using pump-probe microscopy

Here, we demonstrate the use of pump-probe microscopy for high-resolution studies of vermilion degradation. Vermilion (mostly α-HgS), an important red pigment used in historical paintings, blackens over time, and metallic Hg and β-HgS have been implicated as possible degradation products. Conventional analysis techniques have trouble differentiating α- and β-HgS with sufficiently high spatial res

2h

2D-IR spectroscopy for oil paint conservation: Elucidating the water-sensitive structure of zinc carboxylate clusters in ionomers

The molecular structure around metal ions in polymer materials has puzzled researchers for decades. This question has acquired new relevance with the discovery that aged oil paint binders can adopt an ionomer structure when metal ions leached from pigments bind to carboxylate groups on the polymerized oil network. The characteristics of the metal-polymer structure are expected to have important c

2h

Breaking the quantum adiabatic speed limit by jumping along geodesics

Quantum adiabatic evolutions find a broad range of applications in quantum physics and quantum technologies. The traditional form of the quantum adiabatic theorem limits the speed of adiabatic evolution by the minimum energy gaps of the system Hamiltonian. Here, we experimentally show using a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond that, even in the presence of vanishing energy gaps, quantum adiabatic

2h

2h

The Iranian Hedgehog vs. the American Fox

Though few citizens of the United States or Iran seek conflict, the two countries are on a dangerous trajectory that has less and less to do with the diverging interest of two nation-states. More and more, the escalation is being driven by the clashing temperaments of two cynical elderly men. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the 80-year-old Iranian Supreme Leader, has been steadfast, even monomaniacal, in

2h

Could an Injection of Dead Cells Help Fight Cancer?

Dead cells in the body don't sound very useful, but they might provide a new way to fight cancer, a new study in animals suggests.

2h

Nato prepares first outer space strategy

Alliance looks to combat growing military capabilities of Russia and China beyond Earth

2h

Dying Cells Push the Mouse Immune System into Killing Tumors

Introducing either necroptotic cells or an enzyme that triggers necroptosis can wipe out cancer.

2h

Researchers report new understanding of thermoelectric materials

The promise of thermoelectric materials as a source of clean energy has driven the search for materials that can efficiently produce substantial amounts of power from waste heat.

2h

Reforming pharmacy benefit manager practices may lead to drug cost savings

Efforts to control health care costs in the United States often focus on the listed prescription drug prices, but unregulated pharmacy benefit manager practices also may contribute to escalating expenses, according to a perspective published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

2h

Your brain activity can be used to measure how well you understand a concept

As students learn a new concept, measuring how well they grasp it has often depended on traditional paper and pencil tests. Dartmouth researchers have developed a machine learning algorithm, which can be used to measure how well a student understands a concept based on his or her brain activity patterns. The findings are published in Nature Communications. The study is one of the first to look at

2h

From sheep and cattle to giraffes, genome study reveals evolution of ruminants

A detailed study of the genomes of 44 species of ruminants gives new insight into the evolution and success of these mammals.

2h

Carbon farming is the hot (and overhyped) tool to fight climate change

Using farms to capture and store more carbon in soil is becoming trendy, but the science is still not settled on how much it can help to address climate change.

2h

AI revolution shakes-up academia

Philosophers with dim career prospects are in demand to research the ethics of data tech

2h

2h

San Francisco's E-Cigarette Ban Aims to Goose the FDA

Some researchers say teens will find a way to vape despite a ban. Some worry that it will drive kids to tobacco.

2h

Planting Milkweed Across Major Cities Could Help Save Monarchs

A Monarch butterfly on the flowers of a milkweed plant (Credit: Mark Rogovin/The Field Museum) In the past two decades, the monarch butterfly population east of the Rocky Mountains has declined by 87 percent. That's due in part to the fact that the only plant that monarchs lay their eggs on – milkweed – has become scarcer thanks to farmers removing it from their fields. Scientists say that stoppin

2h

AI Could Give Millions Online Legal Help. But What Will the Law Allow?

(Credit: BuffaloBoy/Shutterstock) So, you just got a parking ticket. Let’s assume it wasn’t the first. And let’s take that a step further and say that you absolutely, positively, do not want to pay it, or think you should, for that matter. Or let’s say you’re in a more serious situation – you’re planning to file for divorce. You might not be able to afford an expensive attorney, or maybe you just

2h

Worse Than Obama’s Red-Line Moment

President Donald Trump reversed himself, calling off the attack against Iran already under way to retaliate against the destruction of a U.S. drone operating in international airspace. Having warned , “If Iran wants to fight, that will be the official end of Iran,” but then balking when his bluff was called, Trump has now shown himself just as willing as President Barack Obama was to make empty t

3h

The Exercise Myth That Won’t Go Away

Every New Years’ Day at 6 a.m., my high-school team had swimming practice. Driving to the pool in the frozen Indiana darkness, I assumed the rationale was simply that the coach was a nonviolent psychopath. Someone had ruined his youth and now he wanted to ruin ours. We weren’t explicitly forbidden from going out and having fun on New Year’s Eve. But once you see one hungover person vomit in the p

3h

House panel clarifies how universities would report sexual harassment cases to U.S. funders

Bipartisan legislation aims to create a governmentwide policy

3h

How to get Alexa, Siri, and Google to understand you better

No, shouting at your devices isn't going to make it any better. (Deposit Photos/) When voice assistants first came out, I thought they were silly gimmicks and nothing more. Now, I live and die by Google Assistant and Amazon’s Alexa. They navigate me where I want to go, send messages to my friends, and control the lights and thermostats in my house. But occasionally, one or the other will mishear

3h

Cytotoxicity and physical properties of glass ionomer cement containing flavonoids

At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Aline de Castilho, University of Campinas, Brazil, presented a poster on 'Cytotoxicity and Physical Properties

3h

Americans Don’t Really Care About Reaching Mars, Says Poll

Homebodies U.S. President Donald Trump recently made it clear he wants NASA’s attention on Mars instead of the Moon. But the American people think the space agency should focus on a different planet: Earth. While 68 percent of Americans who responded to a recent poll called monitoring asteroids and comets that could hit the Earth “very/extremely important” for NASA, only 27 percent said the same

3h

Not All Drones Are Created Equal

Iran’s decision to shoot down an American RQ-4 Global Hawk surveillance drone brought the United States to the brink of military retaliation. Beyond their enormous diplomatic and geopolitical implications, these events have also heightened anxieties around the world over the role of autonomous systems. Could drones lead humans down a reckless path to war? Not so fast, people. Yes, the situation i

3h

A new set of images that fool AI could help make it more hacker-proof

Squirrels mislabeled as sea lions and dragonflies confused with manhole covers are challenging algorithms to be more resilient to attacks.

3h

Cells Shimmer Like a Thousand Ice Cream Sprinkles in Gorgeous New 'DNA Microscope' Images

What looks like a cross between a nebula and a 1980s dance party is something even more astonishing: a view of the locations of DNA and RNA inside a living cell.

3h

3h

3h

Libra. Facebook's Cryptocurrency To Rule Them All

submitted by /u/tonyjay6 [link] [comments]

3h

3h

Why the age of electric flight is finally upon us

submitted by /u/zexterio [link] [comments]

3h

Police suspend work with major forensics firm after cyber-attack

More than half of outsourced case work disrupted due to Eurofins security breach Police have halted all work with the UK’s largest private forensics provider after a ransomware attack, in the latest crisis to hit the forensics sector. Eurofins, which carries out DNA analysis, toxicology, ballistics and computer forensics work, detected a breach of its system on 2 June. It has emerged that police

3h

Why dirt-eating goats never need to visit the dentist

Their four-part stomachs sort out sand and grit before they chew

3h

Russian Military Actively Testing Lasers, Hypersonic Weapons

Coming Soon The Russian military has begun combat tests for new lasers and hypersonic weapons. “In the near future, the Russian Armed Forces will receive a completely new, unparalleled weapon based on hypersonic and laser energy technologies,” Russian Minister of Defense Sergey Shoygu said, per a Russian military press release . “Its first samples have already been put on trial combat duty.” If R

3h

Prominent Mouse Genetics Center Could be Shuttered

Staff at the UK’s Harwell Institute were notified that a strategy board recommended halting its academic work, but a final decision is months away.

3h

Who Liked Hurricane Sandy? These Tiny, Endangered Birds

On New York’s Fire Island, the piping plover population has nearly doubled since the big storm in 2012, scientists report.

4h

A new deepfake detection tool should keep world leaders safe—for now

Donald Trump, Elizabeth Warren, and other presidential hopefuls will be protected against AI doppelgängers thanks to a technique that looks at how they move.

4h

Ready for a Wild Summer? | Serengeti Begins Sunday August 4th

Serengeti begins Sunday August 4th at 8pm on Discovery and Discovery GO! With unrivaled access to one of the most pristine and unspoiled corners of the African plains, SERENGETI is a groundbreaking series that follows the heartwarming stories of a cast of African wildlife over the course of a year. Narrated by Oscar®-winner Lupita Nyong’o and set to the backdrop of original music, this television

4h

Hubble captures elusive, irregular galaxy

This image shows an irregular galaxy named IC 10, a member of the Local Group—a collection of over 50 galaxies in our cosmic neighborhood that includes the Milky Way.

4h

Scientists map huge undersea fresh-water aquifer off US Northeast

In a new survey of the sub-seafloor off the U.S. Northeast coast, scientists have made a surprising discovery: a gigantic aquifer of relatively fresh water trapped in porous sediments lying below the salty ocean. It appears to be the largest such formation yet found in the world. The aquifer stretches from the shore at least from Massachusetts to New Jersey, extending more or less continuously out

4h

NASA is going back to the moon but most people in the US don't want to

Most people in the US don’t support going to the moon or Mars, according to a recent survey, but about half say they’d take a trip to orbit Earth if given the chance

4h

Daily briefing: The master genes that sculpt tentacles and legs alike

Nature, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01974-1 Cuttlefish, spiders and human deploy the same genes despite evolving limbs independently. Plus: meet the Ebola workers battling a virus in a war zone and learn how to do fieldwork with kids in tow.

4h

How the Numbers on the EPA's New Climate Rule Stack Up

The rule will have little impact on emissions and provides only modest cuts to other harmful pollutants — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Emaciated polar bear found in Russia taken for treatment

An emaciated polar bear seen roaming around an industrial city in Russia far south of its normal sea ice hunting grounds is being transported to a zoo for examination and treatment.

4h

NASA helps warn of harmful algal blooms in lakes, reservoirs

Harmful algal blooms can cause big problems in coastal areas and lakes across the United States. When toxin-containing aquatic organisms multiply and form a bloom, it can sicken people and pets, contaminate drinking water, and force closures at boating and swimming sites.

4h

Emaciated polar bear found in Russia taken for treatment

An emaciated polar bear seen roaming around an industrial city in Russia far south of its normal sea ice hunting grounds is being transported to a zoo for examination and treatment.

4h

Neural networks taught to recognize similar objects on videos without accuracy degradation

Andrey Savchenko, Professor at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University), has developed a method that can help to enhance image identification on videos. In his project, a network was taught by a new algorithm and can now make decisions on image recognition and classification at a rate 10 times faster than before. This research was presented in the paper "Sequential three-way decisions in mu

4h

Marshall Islanders 'sitting ducks' as sea level rises, says president

Marshall Islands President Hilda Heine stressed Friday the need for dramatic climate action and international support to ensure her people are not left as "sitting ducks" when sea levels inevitably rise.

4h

Hubble captures elusive, irregular galaxy

IC 10 is a remarkable object. It is the closest-known starburst galaxy, meaning that it is undergoing a furious bout of star formation fueled by ample supplies of cool hydrogen gas.

4h

NASA helps warn of harmful algal blooms in lakes, reservoirs

With limited resources to monitor often-unpredictable algae blooms, water managers are turning to new technologies from NASA and its partners to detect and keep track of potential hazards.

4h

What is the summer solstice? An astronomer explains

The summer solstice marks the official start of summer. It brings the longest day and shortest night of the year for the 88 percent of Earth's people who live in the Northern Hemisphere. People around the world observe the change of seasons with bonfires and festivals and Fête de la Musique celebrations . Przemyslaw 'Blueshade' Idzkiewicz , CC BY-SA Astronomers can calculate an exact moment for t

4h

Can you overdose on weed?

Too much marijuana can cause extreme confusion, increased blood pressure and heart rate, and unintentional injury. But dying from the substance alone is very unlikely, if possible at all. (Deposit Photos/) Last month, a coroner in Louisiana claimed to have recorded the first death exclusively caused by weed. Toxicology results for a woman who died in February suggested she was killed by an excess

4h

Death of mother prompts adolescent chimps to look after their siblings

After their mothers died, adolescent chimps adopted their younger siblings and became upset if they lost sight of them even temporarily

4h

The future of AI research is in Africa

In the last few years, the machine-learning community has blossomed, applying the technology to challenges like food security and health care.

4h

Joe Biden’s Endless Search for the Middle on Race

From the beginning of his career in public life, Joe Biden’s instinct has been to recoil from those he considers the hard-charging activists in his party, and to find ways to understand those he knows his own allies would detest. Biden thinks that’s his special insight into politics, that he’s a bridge builder—but it’s meant building bridges to people others think don’t deserve any kind of bridge

4h

Researchers find new mutation in the leptin gene

Texas Biomed Staff Scientist Raul Bastarrachea, M.D., is part of a team that discovered a new mutation in the gene that regulates the key hormone suppressing hunger called leptin. This new mutation could help researchers understand why people develop excess of body fat. Dr. Bastarrachea's research is aimed at helping tackle metabolic disorders like cardiovascular disease and diabetes which are fue

4h

The Crab Nebula just blasted Earth with the highest-energy photons ever recorded

One measured photon has roughly the energy of a falling ping-pong ball.

4h

Elon Musk: Civilization Could Collapse in 30 Years

Population Bomb Elon Musk has a grim prediction for the future of humanity. A “population bomb,” as he puts it, will go off in the coming decades, when an increasingly-elderly global population clashes with declining birth rates around the world. This isn’t the first time Musk talked about a worldwide collapse in human population, reports Business Insider , but now he’s elaborating to say that we

4h

Experts: It’d Be “Relatively Easy” to Deploy Killer Robots by 2021

Decision Maker Killer robots aren’t nearly as hard to build as you might think — and they could be here sooner than you expect, too. Those are two of the disturbing takeaways from a new Vox story focused on the state of autonomous weapons , AI-powered systems that could make the decision to use lethal force without any human input. “Technologically, autonomous weapons are easier than self-driving

4h

4h

This Bizarre Device Will Help Rescue Injured Astronauts on the Moon

Astronaut Down The European Space Agency (ESA) just tested out a device that’s meant to assist in astronaut rescue missions on the surface of the Moon. The strange contraption, dubbed the Lunar Evacuation System Assembly, is a pyramid-like structure that can be operated by a single astronaut to extricate a fallen comrade — the world’s first, according to the ESA. The gadget is meant to save incap

4h

The Iran Crisis Is Forcing Trump Into Uncomfortable Territory

Americans know Donald Trump as a showman, business mogul, and politician. What they haven’t really seen is Trump in the role of commander in chief. That may be about to change. A face-off with Iran led to a fateful choice Thursday night: hit back after weeks of escalating tensions between both countries that culminated in Iran shooting down an American drone, or back down. At the last minute, Tru

4h

Ageism reduced by education, intergenerational contact

Researchers at Cornell University have shown for the first time that it is possible to reduce ageist attitudes, prejudices and stereotypes through education and intergenerational contact.

4h

Embryonic microRNA fuels heart cell regeneration, Temple researchers show

By adulthood, the heart is no longer able to replenish injured or diseased cells. As a result, heart disease or an event like a heart attack can be disastrous, leading to massive cell death and permanent declines in function. A new study by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, however, shows that it may be possible to reverse this damage and restore heart function,

4h

Scientists map huge undersea fresh-water aquifer off US Northeast

In a new survey of the sub-seafloor off the US Northeast coast, scientists have made a surprising discovery: a gigantic aquifer of relatively fresh water trapped in porous sediments lying below the salty ocean. It appears to be the largest such formation yet found in the world.

4h

Parental care has forced great crested grebes to lay eggs with an eye on seagulls

Ornithologists from St Petersburg University, Elmira Zaynagutdinova and Yuriy Mikhailov, studied the features of the great crested grebes (Podiceps cristatus) nesting in the nature reserve 'North Coast of the Neva Bay'. It turned out that some birds have learned to change the time of egg incubation in order to breed along with black-headed gulls and black terns. This strategy makes it possible for

4h

Parasites ruin some finches’ songs by chewing through the birds’ beaks

Parasitic fly larvae damage the beaks of Galápagos finches, changing their mating songs and possibly causing females to pick males of a different species.

5h

10 Times HBO's 'Chernobyl' Got the Science Wrong

From the dramatic helicopter rescue scene and the casualties at the "Bridge of Death" to the radiation effects on the liquidators, sometimes the writers took creative license, getting the facts wrong, in the Chernobyl series.

5h

Mystery of immunosuppressive drug's biosynthesis finally unlocked

Mycophenolic acid (MPA), discovered in 1893, was the first natural antibiotic to be isolated and crystallized in human history. Today, this fungal metabolite has been developed into multiple first-line immunosuppressive drugs to control immunologic rejection during organ transplantation and treat various autoimmune diseases.

5h

Ayesha Curry’s Comfort Television

On Family Food Fight , a new show hosted and executive-produced by the restaurateur Ayesha Curry, cooking is competitive, but it’s not a ruthless game. The ABC series pits four families against each other each week, with one group being eliminated and the others claiming their spot at the show’s official competition tables. The remaining families will compete for a $100,000 prize. Along the way,

5h

Researchers discover traditional fluid flow observations may miss the big picture

Before and after comparisons don't tell the full story of chemical reactions in flowing fluids, such as those in a chemical reactor, according to a new study from a collaboration based in Japan.

5h

Ericsson activates 5G NSA technology at 5TONIC open innovation lab

The deployment, successfully achieved by Ericsson and Telefónica, includes a new 5G Massive MIMO Radio running on 3.5GHz band, along with virtual Evolved Packet Core and User Data Consolidation.

5h

Here's how to prove that you are a simulation and nothing is real

Philosopher Nick Bostrom argues that humans are likely computer simulations in the "Simulation Hypothesis". Bostrom thinks advanced civilizations of posthumans will have technology to simulate their ancestors. Elon Musk and others support this idea. None Are we living in a computer-driven simulation? That seems like an impossible hypothesis to prove. But let's just look at how impossible that rea

5h

Ice lithography: Opportunities and challenges in 3-D nanofabrication

Nanotechnology and nanoscience are enabled by nanofabrication. Electron-beam lithography (EBL), which makes patterns down to a few nanometers, is one of the fundamental pillars of nanofabrication. In the past decade, significant progress has been made in electron-beam-based nanofabrication, such as the emerging ice lithography (IL) technology, in which ice thin-films are used as resists and patter

5h

Mystery of immunosuppressive drug's biosynthesis finally unlocked

Mycophenolic acid (MPA), discovered in 1893, was the first natural antibiotic to be isolated and crystallized in human history. Today, this fungal metabolite has been developed into multiple first-line immunosuppressive drugs to control immunologic rejection during organ transplantation and treat various autoimmune diseases.

5h

5h

The Biggest Health Problem: Obesity

A sugary beverage tax is just a start, but it exemplifies the population-wide approach we need — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

NASA Sets Tentative Date For Launching Astronauts In SpaceX Ship

Planning Dates SpaceX and NASA are targeting November 15, 2019 as a tentative date to launch its astronaut-ferrying Crew Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station, according to new information from NASA and the US Government Accountability Office. Boeing set a launch date of an uncrewed Orbital Test Flight of its competing Starliner vehicle for September 17, NASASpaceflight reports — t

5h

The Military Is Not a Prop

Late Thursday night, The New York Times dropped an astonishing piece of news : President Donald Trump, responding to Iran shooting down an American drone, had ordered strikes against the Islamic Republic—and then decided, with planes in the air, to call them back and pull his punch. Often, when news organizations deliver this kind of story, the president denies the claim forcefully, usually with

5h

The architectural secrets of the world's ancient wonders | Brandon Clifford

How did ancient civilizations move massive stones to build Stonehenge, the Pyramids and the Easter Island statues? In this quick, delightful talk, TED Fellow Brandon Clifford reveals some architectural secrets of the past and shows how we can use these ingenious techniques to build today. "In an era where we design buildings to last 30, maybe 60 years, I would love to learn how to create something

5h

What technologies from 2019 would seem like science fiction to people from the 1950s?

Many people during the mid 20th century have often tried to imagine what life might be like by the 21st century. While many predictions were wrong. Some were more spot on than others. What technologies from 2019 would the 1950s be completely dazzled by? For this discussion I will exclude Smartphones because they are too obvious. submitted by /u/Redditor_2017 [link] [comments]

5h

5h

5h

Robots may care for you in old age – and your children will teach them

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

5h

5h

How Facebook's Libra Currency Will Work

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

5h

Why Nuclear Fusion Really is Coming Soon

submitted by /u/DragonGod2718 [link] [comments]

5h

Nvidia Built One of the Most Powerful AI Supercomputers in 3 Weeks

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

5h

5h

It could take 118 years for female computer scientists to match publishing rates of male colleagues

Studies examine the slow change in the ratio of female to male authors

5h

Neural networks taught to recognize similar objects on videos without accuracy degradation

Andrey Savchenko, Professor at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University), has developed a method that can help to enhance image identification on videos. In his project, a network was taught by a new algorithm and can now make decisions on image recognition and classification at a rate 10 times faster than before. This research was presented in the paper 'Sequential three-way decisions in mu

5h

'Sneezing' plants contribute to disease proliferation

'"The jumping droplets, at the rate of 100 or more an hour, are a violent expulsion of dew from the surface. It's good for the plant because it is removing spores from itself, but it's bad because, like a human sneeze, the liquid droplets are finding their way onto neighboring plants. '

5h

The Biggest Health Problem: Obesity

A sugary beverage tax is just a start, but it exemplifies the population-wide approach we need — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The cosmic ‘Cow’ may be a strange supernova

New observations suggest the strange bright burst called the ‘Cow’ was a supernova, rather than a shredded star.

5h

PSI imaging helps with rocket launches

Rockets from the European Space Agency (ESA) fly into space with support from the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Imaging carried out at PSI in cooperation with Dassault Aviation ensures the quality of certain components of the Ariane 5 and Vega launch vehicles. With the help of the neutrons generated at the neutron source SINQ, PSI researchers are screening so-called pyrotechnic components that ar

5h

Keeping children safe in the 'Internet of Things' age

Children need protection when using programmable Internet computing devices—and Lancaster University scientists have drawn up new guidelines to help designers build in safeguards.

5h

Shaken and stirred: Scientists capture the deformation effect of shock waves on a material

Understanding how shock waves affect structures is crucial for advancements in material science research, including safety protocols and novel surface modifications. Using X-ray diffraction probes, scientists at the Institute of Materials Structure Science of KEK, Tokyo of Tech, Kumamoto University, and University of Tsukuba studied the deformation of polycrystalline aluminum foil when subjected t

5h

Keeping children safe in the 'Internet of Things' age

Children need protection when using programmable Internet computing devices — and Lancaster University scientists have drawn up new guidelines to help designers build in safeguards.

5h

Northern lights' social networking reveals true scale of magnetic storms

Magnetic disturbances caused by phenomena like the northern lights can be tracked by a 'social network' of ground-based instruments, according to a new study from the University of Warwick.

5h

Researchers discover traditional fluid flow observations may miss the big picture

Before and after comparisons don't tell the full story of chemical reactions in flowing fluids, such as those in drug delivery systems, according to a new study from a collaboration between Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) and Nihon University based in Japan.

5h

B chromosome first—mechanisms behind the drive of B chromosomes uncovered

The specific number of chromosomes is one of the defining characteristics of a species. Whilst the common fruit fly carries 8 chromosomes, the genome of bread wheat counts 42 chromosomes. In comparison, the human genome is made out of a total of 46 chromosomes. However, about 15% of all eukaryotic species additionally carry supernumerary chromosomes referred to as "B chromosomes". Other than the e

6h

Hydrogen-natural gas hydrates harvested by natural gas

A hydrogen-natural gas blend (HNGB) can be a game changer only if it can be stored safely and used as a sustainable clean energy resource. A recent study has suggested a new strategy for stably storing hydrogen, using natural gas as a stabilizer. The research proposed a practical gas phase modulator based synthesis of HNGB without generating chemical waste after dissociation for the immediate serv

6h

B chromosome first—mechanisms behind the drive of B chromosomes uncovered

The specific number of chromosomes is one of the defining characteristics of a species. Whilst the common fruit fly carries 8 chromosomes, the genome of bread wheat counts 42 chromosomes. In comparison, the human genome is made out of a total of 46 chromosomes. However, about 15% of all eukaryotic species additionally carry supernumerary chromosomes referred to as "B chromosomes". Other than the e

6h

Are hungry swarms of tiny krill behind ocean mixing?

Engineers are investigating the impact of krill swarms on ocean mixing, and possibly global climate. Scientists have long chalked up ocean mixing of salt, heat, nutrients, and gases—such as oxygen and carbon dioxide—to wind and tides. The new research is investigating whether krill are another possible contributor. Mixing ocean water may seem like a big job for such a tiny creature, but krill are

6h

Sand bliver stjålet som aldrig før: Nu indsættes bevæbnede vagter

PLUS. Befolkningstilvækst og urbanisering øger konstant verdens sandbehov. En stor del dækkes af illegal udvinding. I Vietnam skal bevæbnede grænsevagter forhindre sandtyveriet.

6h

Netflix jokes it's cancelling Good Omens, while Amazon 'kills' Stranger Things – CNET

Both streaming services responded on Twitter to the petition to remove Good Omens.

6h

Exposure to others' suffering even worse than being shot at

War veterans who were not personally in life-threatening danger have more psychological problems than those who were injured by gunfire, according to a study that surveyed Norwegian veterans after their return from Afghanistan.

6h

Scientists dissolve crude oil in water to study its composition

Researchers from MIPT, Skoltech, the Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and Lomonosov Moscow State University have offered a new approach to oil composition analysis. They used high temperature and pressure to dissolve oil in water and analyze its composition. The new method is compliant with the green chemistry principle as it makes it possible to avoid usin

6h

Dental microwear provides clues to dietary habits of lepidosauria

High-resolution microscopic images of the surface of dental enamel of lepidosauria, which is a subclass of reptiles including monitor lizards, iguanas, lizards, and tuatara, allow scientists to determine their dietary habits. The enamel wear patterns reveal significant differences between carnivores and herbivores, but also allow finer distinctions, such as between algae-, fruit-, and mollusk-eati

6h

Scientists make a discovery that may explain some forms of stroke

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a novel behaviour of the blood vessels of the brain in zebrafish that may explain some forms of stroke in humans.

6h

Shaken and stirred: Scientists capture the deformation effect of shock waves on a material

Understanding how shock waves affect structures is crucial for advancements in material science research, including safety protocols and novel surface modifications. Using X-ray diffraction probes, scientists at the Institute of Materials Structure Science of KEK, Tokyo of Tech, Kumamoto University, and University of Tsukuba studied the deformation of polycrystalline aluminum foil when subjected t

6h

Ice lithography: opportunities and challenges in 3D nanofabrication

The history and progress of ice lithography (IL), and its applications in 3D nanofabrication are reviewed. The evolution of IL instruments is discussed and major instrumentation advances are highlighted. Finally, the perspectives of nanoscale 3D printing of functional materials using organic ices are presented.

6h

Media alert: New articles in The CRISPR Journal from MIT, Harvard, Editas, and others

The CRISPR Journal announces the publication of its June 2019 issue with articles from MIT, Harvard, Editas, Inscripta, and others.

6h

Why These Strange, Reclusive Arachnids Fled Underground in Evolutionary Waves

When Australia got too hot and dry, which killed off forests, these woodland creatures decided to live underground.

6h

Meet the Ebola workers battling a virus in a war zone

Nature, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01957-2 Nature's Amy Maxmen reports from the front line of the crisis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

6h

A Friendship Forged Through the Gay-Rights Movement

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series about the gay-rights movement and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week, she talks with two men who became friends through the gay-rights movement in Au

6h

The Brexit Catch-22 Driving U.K. Politics Crazy

In Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 , the anarchic anti-hero Captain John Yossarian marvels at the beauty of the trap he finds himself in. To escape the war he is being forced to fight, he must prove he is crazy. But asking not to fight proves he is not crazy. Therefore he has to fight. The trap is inescapable. “Yossarian was moved very deeply by the absolute simplicity of this clause of Catch-22 and let

6h

6h

Crowdfunded lightsail mission readies for take-off

Science fiction set to become fact as Bill Nye’s solar spacecraft takes to the air. Richard A Lovett reports.

6h

Microfibres polluting the Great Barrier Reef

Researchers are trying to track down the source of microplastics contaminating a World Heritage Area. Mark Bruer reports.

6h

What can we learn from a seashell?

In April this year, Harvard University physics student Amir Siraj made a discovery of international significance. Here is his personal take on what was achieved.

6h

Neuroscience research questions current alcohol limit

The research adds weight to calls for a lowered alcohol limit for drivers. Even one pint of beer can compromise a person's feeling of being in control.

6h

The pressure difference and vortex flow of blood in the heart chambers may signal heart dysfunction

Japanese scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Teikyo University of Science, and Juntendo University have found — in animal studies — a close relationship between vortex flow and pressure differences in the ventricles, or lower chambers, of the heart. The new information could inform the development of new markers for cardiovascular dysfunction that can lead to hea

6h

Discovery of the cell fate switch from neurons to astrocytes in the developing brain

During mammalian brain development, neural precursor cells first generate neurons and later astrocytes. This cell fate change is a key process generating proper numbers of neurons and astrocytes. Here we discovered that FGF regulates the cell fate switch from neurons to astrocytes in the developing cerebral cortex using mice. FGF is a critical extracellular regulator of the cell fate switch, neces

6h

Adam Savage Tests a Junior Panjandrum | Savage Builds

Adam Savage sets out to create a working version of one of history's most notorious engineering failures: Britain's WWII beach-storming bust, the Panjandrum. First off, testing a miniature size version! Stream Full Episodes of Savage Builds: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/savage-builds/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Disc

6h

UK study shows seal singing 'Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star'

Researchers in Scotland say gray seals can copy the sounds of human words and songs including "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star."

6h

UK study shows seal singing 'Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star'

Researchers in Scotland say gray seals can copy the sounds of human words and songs including "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star."

6h

New AI Generates Infinite Horrible Marketing Sites

PR-Bot A new website illustrates just how good artificial intelligence has gotten at churning out almost-coherent passages of text. “ This Marketing Blog Doesn’t Exist ” recreates that particular species of bland PR website, complete with 900-word articles about things like “ROI scales” and “synchronicity” crapped out by AI tools that have learned to mimic online content. Tag Team The website was

6h

The Right Ball for Playing Catch While Skydiving

You and a buddy are plummeting through the clouds. Perfect time for a game of catch—if you have the exact right type of ball.

6h

Can social media threaten medical experiments?

Researchers need to find new ways to ensure participants aren’t swapping experiences, suggest Niccolò Tempini and David Teira.

6h

Eat like the locals: How scurvy undid last crusader king

He was the last of the crusader kings who was thought to have died of the plague as he made one last—rather roundabout—attempt to recover the Holy Land for the Christianity.

6h

Blue pigment from engineered fungi could help turn the textile industry green

Often, the findings of fundamental scientific research are many steps away from a product that can be immediately brought to the public. But every once in a while, opportunity makes an early appearance.

6h

Lab-Grown Dairy: The Next Food Frontier

Lab-grown meat is getting a lot of attention along with plant-based meat substitutes . Technology is driving the industry toward providing alternatives to conventionally produced food products. Dairy proteins may be the next product produced in a lab, for use in fluid “milk” production and processed dairy products like yogurt and cheese, to name a few. Winston Churchill predicted the rise of synt

6h

This Ridiculous Grill Proves We Don’t Need AI for Everything

Spicy Tech The list of things a grill needs to be able to do is pretty short: cook food and make anyone standing next to it look sufficiently outdoorsy. We never gave much thought to the things a grill doesn’t need to be able to do — until, at least, we heard about spice manufacturer McCormick’s new AI-powered concept grill. Jazz Hands The SUMR HITS 5000 is rife with touch sensors and webcams tha

6h

Havfruekablets fibre vil nå helt til København

Havfruekablet skal forbinde Esbjerg med New Jersey i USA, men skal nu forlænges til Ballerup.

6h

Parasites in Ancient Poo Reflect Neolithic Settlers' Lifestyle

From an excavation of a site called Catalhoyuk, in modern-day Turkey, scientists recover preserved whipworm eggs–a sign of settling down and living in close quarters.

6h

The Books Briefing: Social Media for Bibliophiles

Social media is probably not the first medium most bibliophiles think of when they consider their favorite ways to read literature. The digital-literary debate usually surrounds the virtues of light-in-weight-but-not-choices e-readers versus the meditative pleasures of holding a physical book. When it comes to platforms such as Instagram and Twitter, readers might be skeptical of how services bes

6h

Newly discovered immune cells at the frontline of HIV infection

Researchers at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research have discovered brand new immune cells that are at the frontline of HIV infection. Known as CD11c+ dendritic cells, these new cells are more susceptible to HIV infection and can then transmit the virus to other cells.

6h

Moral lessons in children's television programs may require extra explanation

In two separate studies, researchers monitored more than 100 4-6-year-olds and found that they didn't understand messages about inclusiveness.

6h

Brains of pairs of animals synchronize during social interaction

UCLA researchers have published a Cell study showing that the brains of pairs of animals synchronize during social situations. The level of synchronization actually predicted how much the animals would interact.

6h

How you can control other people’s sway on your emotions

We have more control over how other people influence our emotions than previously realized, report researchers. In a new study, psychologists examined why some people respond differently to an upsetting situation and learned that people’s motivations play an important role in how they react. The researchers found that when a person wanted to stay calm, they remained relatively unfazed by angry pe

7h

Fungus produces highly effective surfactant

Mortierella alpina lives in the soil and likes to keep cool. This fungus, which belongs to the zygomycetes, grows best at temperatures of 10 to 15 degrees C and occurs mainly in alpine or arctic habitats. In biotechnology, the fungus has been used for the large-scale production of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic acids, mainly as a dietary supplement in baby foods.

7h

Dental microwear provides clues to dietary habits of lepidosauria

High-resolution microscopic images of the surface of dental enamel of lepidosauria, which is a subclass of reptile including monitor lizards, iguanas, lizards and tuatara, allow scientists to determine their dietary habits. The enamel wear patterns reveal significant differences between carnivores and herbivores, but also allow finer distinctions, such as between algae-, fruit-, and mollusk-eating

7h

Dental microwear provides clues to dietary habits of lepidosauria

High-resolution microscopic images of the surface of dental enamel of lepidosauria, which is a subclass of reptile including monitor lizards, iguanas, lizards and tuatara, allow scientists to determine their dietary habits. The enamel wear patterns reveal significant differences between carnivores and herbivores, but also allow finer distinctions, such as between algae-, fruit-, and mollusk-eating

7h

Scientists identify fire hazard areas in forests near Lake Baikal

Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University are developing a system for predicting the likelihood of forest fires. Using Gilbirinsky Forestry in the basin of Lake Baikal, they created a map of the territory and identified forest areas where the likelihood of fire emergency is the highest due to the vegetative conditions of the territory itself. This data will underpin a geographic information sys

7h

Ten times the Chernobyl television series lets artistic licence get in the way of facts

Audiences have been gripped by Chernobyl, the HBO/Sky series that charts the events and aftermath of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster of April 1986.

7h

Emotional violence in childhood linked to thoughts of suicide

Early exposure to emotional violence increases the chances that young people will contemplate suicide, a new study in three countries finds. “We find the odds of suicide ideation are consistently and significantly greater for adolescents who report overexposure to emotional violence,” says Lindsay Stark, associate professor at Washington University in St. Louis and coauthor of the paper in Child

7h

Do Prisons Make Us Safer?

New research shows that prisons prevent far less violent crime than you might think — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Do Prisons Make Us Safer?

New research shows that prisons prevent far less violent crime than you might think — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Climbing droplets driven by mechanowetting on transverse waves

Modern applications use self-cleaning strategies and digital microfluids to control individual droplets of fluids on flat surfaces but existing techniques are limited by the side-effects of high electric fields and high temperatures. In a new study, Edwin De Jong and co-workers at the interdisciplinary departments of Advanced Materials, Mechanical Engineering and Complex Molecular Systems develope

7h

Copernicus Sentinel-1 images the largest delta in the Arctic

The Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission takes us over the Lena River Delta, the largest delta in the Arctic.

7h

Fungus produces highly effective surfactant

Mortierella alpina lives in the soil and likes to keep cool. This fungus, which belongs to the zygomycetes, grows best at temperatures of 10 to 15 degrees C and occurs mainly in alpine or arctic habitats. In biotechnology, the fungus has been used for the large-scale production of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic acids, mainly as a dietary supplement in baby foods.

7h

Blue pigment from engineered fungi could help turn the textile industry green

A new biosynthetic production pathway developed by scientists at the Joint BioEnergy Institute could provide a sustainable alternative to conventional synthetic blue dye. The highly efficient fungi-based platform may also open the door for producing many other valuable biological compounds that are currently very hard to manufacture.

7h

Mystery of immunosuppressive drug's biosynthesis finally unlocked

The biogenesis of mycophenolic acid (MPA), an old and important molecule, has remained an unsolved mystery for more than a century. Scientists from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences cracked this intriguing black-box by fully elucidating the biosynthetic pathway of MPA.

7h

Structural development of the brain

In a recent study published in The Journal of Neuroscience, researchers reveal how the basic structure of the brain is formed.

7h

Hydrogen-natural gas hydrates harvested by natural gas

A recent study has suggested a new strategy for stably storing hydrogen, using natural gas as a stabilizer. The research proposed a practical gas phase modulator based synthesis of HNGB without generating chemical waste after dissociation for the immediate service.

7h

Deaths from cardiovascular diseases attributable to heat and cold down 38% in Spain

Women are more vulnerable to heat, while cold-related deaths are more common among men.

7h

B chromosome first — mechanisms behind the drive of B chromosomes uncovered

B chromosomes are supernumerary chromosomes, which often are preferentially inherited and showcase an increased transmission rate. This transmission advantage is known as 'chromosome drive'. Scientists from the IPK in Gatersleben have now deciphered the mechanisms behind the drive of B chromosomes in Aegilops speltoides.

7h

Researching slang to help solve gang crime

Gang-related violent crime continues to affect young people across England and Wales, with the latest reports suggesting that gang leaders are offering teenagers up to £1,000 pounds to carry out stabbings. In their efforts to curb violence among young people, police and politicians must distinguish between those who are involved in crime and those who are innocent—or risk further marginalizing dep

7h

Acropolis Museum marks 10-year anniversary with new extension

Greece's Acropolis Museum has opened to the public a new section housing the remains of an ancient Athens neighbourhood to mark its 10-year-anniversary, organisers said Friday.

7h

Brain Health Supplements Don't Work, New Study Shows

Older people often take many supplements, including ones purported to help with brain health. A recent study says the supplements do not work. (Credit: Mladen Zivkovic/Shutterstock) Americans and others around the world have turned increasingly to dietary supplements in order to maintain or preserve their brain health. A recent study found that a quarter of adults over 50 take a supplement for bra

7h

Northern lights' social networking reveals true scale of magnetic storms

Magnetic disturbances caused by phenomena like the northern lights can be tracked by a 'social network' of ground-based instruments, according to a new study from the University of Warwick.

7h

7 ways to build your child's vocabulary

If you want your child to have a rich and fulfilling life, one of the best things you can do is help build your child's vocabulary. Research shows strong language ability is associated with a number of positive things, including happiness, friendships, connections with family, academic success and a satisfying career.

7h

Kelly Latimer flies at the cutting edge of aviation—and soon, space

Kelly Latimer, 54, is a test pilot for Virgin Galactic and Virgin Orbit—two commercial space companies owned by British billionaire Richard Branson. For space tourism company Virgin Galactic, Latimer flies the giant, twin-fuselage aircraft known as WhiteKnightTwo, which carries a smaller spaceship at its belly to an altitude of up to 50,000 feet before the spaceship detaches and blasts off toward

7h

An Idiotic Exhibit

I suppose this will be sort of a chemical engineering, scale-up, process chemistry post. . .and most certainly will be filed here under the “How Not to Do It” category. The Bellingcat group (Dan Kaszeta in particular) have a very interesting look at a display in “ Patriot Park ” (a military-themed destination located in a town west of Moscow) of what is supposed to be a small Sarin production fac

7h

Reactionaries love it, but country music has a progressive heart

When Donald Trump took the first international trip of his presidency to Saudi Arabia in May 2017, another US icon also travelled along as part of the celebration of the alliance between these two countries: the country-music star Toby Keith. For many observers, Keith was a surprise choice for an appearance in a Muslim country, as he rose to conservative prominence in the US through his post-9/11

7h

Electronic Arts Says That Loot Boxes Are Basically Kinder Eggs

A rep for the videogame company went before the UK Parliament this week to answer questions about game content.

7h

VinGardeValise Grande 05 Review: A Safe Way to Haul Hooch

Pack this padded suitcase full of fancy wines (or any bottles) and fly worry-free.

7h

Planet-Saving Robots? Robert Downey Jr. Is on to Something

Opinion: Go ahead, roll your eyes at his vague plans to “clean up the planet” with nanotech. I welcome these new conservation technologists.

7h

Next-gen solar cells spin in new direction

A nanomaterial made from phosphorus, known as phosphorene, is shaping up as a key ingredient for more sustainable and efficient next-generation perovskite solar cells. PSCs which are one of the fastest developing new solar technologies and can achieve efficiencies comparable to more commonly used commercially available silicon solar cells.

7h

Amid Skyrocketing Insulin Prices, Americans Head to Canada

Due to a concentrated market and a complex relationship between manufacturers, pharmacies, and insurers, Insulin has become so unaffordable that many American diabetics are finding other ways to obtain the medication — including traveling to Canada, where it can be purchased for a fraction of the price.

7h

Huge fire breaks out at Philadelphia oil refinery

A huge blaze erupted at a Philadelphia oil refinery early Friday, forcing residents to shelter in place and boosting gasoline prices, but there were no immediate reports of injuries, officials said.

7h

Philippine telco to roll out Huawei-backed 5G service

The Philippines' Globe Telecom said Friday it will launch Southeast Asia's first 5G broadband service next month using Huawei technology, despite US blacklisting of the Chinese giant over cybersecurity concerns.

7h

Whales freed from Russia 'jail' head to sea in trucks

Whales captured to perform in aquariums and held in cramped pens in far eastern Russia on Friday were journeying in trucks back to their home waters after President Vladimir Putin backed their release.

7h

Foxconn chairman Terry Gou says he is stepping down

Terry Gou, chairman of Foxconn, the world's largest contract assembler of consumer electronics for companies such as Apple, said Friday he was stepping down amid speculation he could be planning a presidential run next year.

7h

Study: Lethal plastic trash now common in Greece's whales

A study of whales and dolphins that have washed up dead in Greece over a 20-year period has found alarmingly high levels of plastic trash—mostly bags—in the animals' stomachs, which can condemn them to a slow and painful death.

7h

"A Bird Made of Birds" | Sarah Kay

"The universe has already written the poem you were planning on writing," says Sarah Kay, quoting her friend, poet Kaveh Akbar. Performing "A Bird Made of Birds," she shares how and where she finds poetry. (Kay is also the host of TED's podcast "Sincerely, X." Listen on the Luminary podcast app at luminary.link/ted)

7h

Dwarf galaxy’s black hole is way smaller than we thought

A black hole at the center of a nearby dwarf galaxy, called NGC 4395, is about 40 times smaller than previously thought, report researchers. If astronomers want to learn about how supermassive black holes form, they have to start small—really small, astronomically speaking. Currently, astronomers believe that supermassive black holes sit at the center of every galaxy as massive as or larger than

7h

Djøf-kommission: Behov for teknologitilsyn til kontrol af techgiganter

Fagforeningen anbefaler tilsyn med juridiske og økonomiske ressourcer til at slå ned på techgiganter, der har for nemt ved at omgå persondataloven og udnytte data om brugere.

7h

Whales freed from Russia 'jail' head to sea in trucks

Whales captured to perform in aquariums and held in cramped pens in far eastern Russia on Friday were journeying in trucks back to their home waters after President Vladimir Putin backed their release.

7h

The Ruminant Genome Project reveals the secret lives of deer

Three teams of researchers working independently have conducted three specific studies of ruminants—a class of mammals that obtains nutrients from plants by fermenting it in chambered stomachs. The work was part of an overall project called, quite naturally, the Ruminant Genome Project. All three teams were made up of members from several institutions in China and a few other countries. All three

7h

The Ruminant Genome Project reveals the secret lives of deer

Three teams of researchers working independently have conducted three specific studies of ruminants—a class of mammals that obtains nutrients from plants by fermenting it in chambered stomachs. The work was part of an overall project called, quite naturally, the Ruminant Genome Project. All three teams were made up of members from several institutions in China and a few other countries. All three

7h

Interaction-induced topology in symmetry-broken phase

Symmetry is a fundamental characteristic in nature. Understanding the mechanisms that break symmetries is essential to scientific research. Spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB), in particular, occurs when thermal or quantum fluctuations drive a system from a symmetric state into an ordered state, as it occurs when a liquid turns into a solid. This mechanism allows researchers to classify different

8h

What does the Trump administration want from Iran?

Two oil tankers were attacked on June 13 off the coast of Oman, forcing the crew members of one burning ship to flee. It was the latest in a series of assaults on tankers transporting oil through the Gulf. In May, Saudi, Norwegian and Emirati oil tankers were attacked off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, causing damage but no casualties . The attacks have gone unclaimed, so the perpetrator

8h

8h

8h

8h

8h

Andrew Yang UBI is the Only Solution

submitted by /u/CaptainTomato21 [link] [comments]

8h

8h

8h

8h

Russia Has Announced the Upcoming Enter of a Laser Weapon in the Russian Army

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

8h

8h

8h

Medicine contends with how to use artificial intelligence

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

8h

Heated battle over automation and jobs at Port of L.A. moves to City Council

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

8h

8h

8h

8h

'Living drug' offers hope to terminal blood cancer patients

submitted by /u/classsiob23b [link] [comments]

8h

Scientists dissolve crude oil in water to study its composition

Researchers from MIPT, Skoltech, the Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and Lomonosov Moscow State University report a new approach to oil composition analysis. They used high temperature and pressure to dissolve oil in water and analyze its composition. The new method is compliant with green chemistry principles as it obviates the need for environmentally ha

8h

Employees who often take their dog to work report 22% higher work satisfaction

Research from the University of Lincoln has shown employees who often bring their dogs to work report 22 percent higher satisfaction with their working conditions.

8h

Washable electronic textiles to usher in an era of even smarter wearable products

With the wearable electronic device market firmly established, active research is being conducted on electronic textiles capable of functioning like electronic devices. Fabric-based items are flexible and can be worn comfortably all day, making them the ideal platform for wearable electronic devices.

8h

Researchers make steps toward debugging tools for quantum computers

In classical computing, debugging programs is one of the most time-consuming tasks in software development. Successful debugging relies on software development tools and also on the experience of the programmer. In quantum computing, researchers predict debugging will be an even greater challenge. In a paper soon to appear at the ACM/IEEE 46th Annual International Symposium for Computer Architectu

8h

A new coating material that could help reduce thermal noise on gravity wave detector mirrors

A team of researchers from the University of Glasgow, the University of Strathclyde and Hobart and William Smith Colleges has developed a new coating for mirrors used on gravity detectors that is 25 times less noisy than mirror surfaces used on LIGO. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes how they made it and how well it performed during testing.

8h

U.K. Official Suspended for Forcing Out Climate Protester by the Neck

TV footage showed Mark Field, a senior foreign policy official, jump from his seat and grab a protester at an event Thursday night.

8h

Artificial intelligence could spot early signs of schizophrenia

Years before schizophrenia can be diagnosed by doctors, artificial intelligence may be able to detect early signs of the condition in people's speech

8h

Books on the Brain: Summer Reading List 2019

Summer’s arrival—time for outdoor gaiety, vacations, and unearthing the unfinished tube of sunblock from last year (it’s hiding by the one from two year’s prior, truly). It also heralds longer days … and that means more sunshine to read by! If you’re normally the type to have books on the brain, then venture forth, dear reader, and acquaint yourself with the following authors, a collection of neu

8h

Washable electronic textiles to usher in an era of even smarter wearable products

With the wearable electronic device market having firmly established itself in the 21st century, active research is being conducted on electronic textiles, which are textiles (e.g. clothing) capable of functioning like electronic devices. Fabric-based items are flexible and can be worn comfortably all day, making them the ideal platform for wearable electronic devices.

8h

Target T cell ‘handshake’ to boost cancer immunotherapy?

Researchers have discovered redundancies in the biochemical signaling pathways of immune cells. The finding has important implications for advances in cancer immunotherapy, among other areas. Oncologists have had great success with cancer immunotherapy in recent years, especially with the approach known as immune checkpoint inhibition, which was recognized with last year’s Nobel prize for medicin

8h

Syv ud af ti solcelleejere er tilfredse med deres anlæg

Ønsket om at spare el og blive selvforsynende med energi er de vigtigste grunde til, at folk investerer i solcelleanlæg. Klimahensyn kommer på en fjerdeplads, konkluderer ny undersøgelse.

8h

People Growing Horns? – More Bad Science Reporting

One type of bad science reporting that is very common is reporting the speculation at the end of a study as if it were the finding of the study. For example, the Washington Post headline was, “Horns are growing on young people’s skulls. Phone use is to blame, research suggests.” The research, you may be surprised to learn, had nothing to do with phone use. “Horns” is also a stretch. When I see he

8h

Hot spots make purifying salt water super efficient

A solar-powered way to purify salt water with sunlight and nanoparticles is even more efficient than first thought, a new study reports. Simply adding inexpensive plastic lenses to concentrate sunlight into “hot spots” boosted the efficiency of a solar-powered desalination system by more than 50 percent, researchers say. “The typical way to boost performance in solar-driven systems is to add sola

8h

More public and industry engagement, earlier intervention needed to prevent child sexual offending online

A new report involving over 2,000 experts in online child sex offending has made strong recommendations on how to better prevent the growing problem of child sexual offending on the internet.

8h

A cheap, accurate method for exploring groundwater

Water is a vital resource for people and the environment. One of the most important sources is groundwater which is renewed from precipitation or surface water. Population growth as well as agriculture and industry strongly influence the quantity and quality of groundwater. To be able to investigate groundwater resources more easily, cost-effectively and comprehensively than in the past, researche

8h

Let’s Build a Global Skyscraper Network to Save the Planet

A network of skyscrapers that communicate and trade their carbon emissions around the world could form the backbone of a climate change solution.

8h

The Strangely Charming World of Los Espookys

The premise of HBO’s Los Espookys sounds straightforward enough: The half-hour comedy follows a group of horror enthusiasts in an unnamed Latin American country who are hired to set up eerie scenarios—monster sightings, haunted houses, exorcisms, etc.—using their special effects and makeup skills. They’re a band of misfits attempting to fly their freak flags for a living. But try to describe any

8h

At Work, Expertise Is Falling Out of Favor

In the faint predawn light, the ship doesn’t look unusual. It is one more silhouette looming pier-side at Naval Base San Diego, a home port of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. And the scene playing out in its forward compartment, as the crew members ready themselves for departure, is as old as the Navy itself. Three sailors in blue coveralls heave on a massive rope. “Avast!” a fourth shouts. A percussive

8h

U.S. Arms Sales to the Gulf Have Failed

Over the past few weeks, the parts of the world still dependent on fossil fuels—which is to say, all of them—have anxiously watched tensions rise in the Strait of Hormuz, the narrow channel between the oil-rich Persian Gulf and the deepwater shipping channels of the Indian Ocean. Television broadcasts show images of U.S. naval vessels escorting oil tankers through the strait, ensuring that oil an

8h

Bee populations in trouble following EPA pesticide decision

Just a few weeks ago, the Environmental Protection Agency announced it was pulling 12 products off the market that contained pesticides that were harmful to the honeybee. This week, the agency made an emergency exception for nearly a dozen states to use a pesticide called sulfoxaflor on certain crops. Environmental advocates worry about the chemical's harmful impact on bees.

8h

Looking for freshwater in all the snowy places

Snowflakes that cover mountains or linger under tree canopies are a vital freshwater resource for over a billion people around the world. To help determine how much freshwater is stored in snow, a team of NASA-funded researchers is creating a computer-based tool that simulates the best way to detect snow and measure its water content from space.

8h

No more fear of police: South Australia is close to fully decriminalising sex work

South Australia is a crucial step closer to becoming one of few places in the world to decriminalize sex work.

8h

Bee populations in trouble following EPA pesticide decision

Just a few weeks ago, the Environmental Protection Agency announced it was pulling 12 products off the market that contained pesticides that were harmful to the honeybee. This week, the agency made an emergency exception for nearly a dozen states to use a pesticide called sulfoxaflor on certain crops. Environmental advocates worry about the chemical's harmful impact on bees.

8h

The dark side of personality

Social life entails countless situations in which people have to trust each other. From mundane family matters to profane issues such as trade negotiations among world leaders in a conflicted globalized world—all require the trust and the trustworthiness of the involved individuals. But how do individuals with antisocial personality traits behave in such circumstances? A new study by an internatio

8h

Image of the Day: Hybrid Cetacean

The DNA of a whale shows its father was a beluga and its mother was a narwhal.

8h

A New "Law" Suggests Quantum Supremacy Could Happen This Year

Quantum computers are improving at a doubly exponential rate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

iPad confusion and Tory antics indicate lack of intelligent life on Earth | John Crace

Aliens are unlikely to be impressed by the likes of Annunziata Rees-Mogg and the Conservative party After three years of training telescopes on 1,327 stars within 160 light years of Earth as part of the Breakthrough Listen project, astronomers have been met with silence , having failed to detect any signals that resemble intelligent life elsewhere. And yet many scientists still believe such life

8h

The SPECULOOS telescopes and searching for red worlds in the northern skies

With a new telescope situated on a scenic plateau in Tenerife, Spain, MIT planetary scientists now have an added way to search for Earth-sized exoplanets. Artemis, the first ground-based telescope of the SPECULOOS Northern Observatory (SNO), joins a network of 1-meter-class robotic telescopes as part of the SPECULOOS project (Search for habitable Planets EClipsing ULtra-cOOl Stars), which is led b

8h

A mathematical proof isn't just an intellectual exercise

How do you prove something? What even is proof?

8h

How climate change impacts the economy

The Fourth National Climate Assessment, published in 2018, warned that if we do not curb greenhouse gas emissions and start to adapt, climate change could seriously disrupt the U.S. economy. Warmer temperatures, sea level rise and extreme weather will damage property and critical infrastructure, impact human health and productivity, and negatively affect sectors such as agriculture, forestry, fish

8h

Microbial growth and carbon uptake are driven mainly by nature, not nurture

For soil microorganisms, how much of their life's work is driven by evolution (nature) versus their current environmental (nurture)?

9h

Curious cases of chemical cross-kingdom communication

All living things are divided into six kingdoms: plants, animals, fungi, protists (protozoa and some algae), and two types of bacteria—eubacteria and archaebacteria.

9h

Microbial growth and carbon uptake are driven mainly by nature, not nurture

For soil microorganisms, how much of their life's work is driven by evolution (nature) versus their current environmental (nurture)?

9h

Curious cases of chemical cross-kingdom communication

All living things are divided into six kingdoms: plants, animals, fungi, protists (protozoa and some algae), and two types of bacteria—eubacteria and archaebacteria.

9h

Cognitive dissonance: Canada declares a national climate emergency and approves a pipeline

On June 18, the government of Canada declared a national climate emergency. The next day, the same government approved the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion (TMX), which will be able to move almost 600,000 barrels of oil per day from Alberta to the Port of Burnaby in British Columbia.

9h

It’s Younger and Cooler Than a Carbon Tax

For a good many years, a carbon tax was climate policy’s hottest plan. The idea—that polluters should pay a dollar amount for every ton of climate-warming carbon dioxide they pump into the atmosphere—seemed like it had everything. It fought climate change, a progressive goal. It avoided new government regulation, a win for conservatives. It even elevated the magic of the market, delighting libert

9h

The extreme tactic of self-amputation means survival in the animal kingdom

Imagine yourself in the grips of a deadly predator. You see your life flash before your eyes: this looks like the end of the road. But wait! With a quick yank, your limb pops off in the predator's mouth and you make a break for freedom. You've escaped certain death through a grisly trade.

9h

Algae: Here, there, and everywhere

On a clear and cold February morning in 2015, Ruth Kassinger slipped on an insulated down coat and donned knee-high waterproof boots. Stepping aboard a long fishing boat in South Korea's Hoedong Harbor, she gingerly navigated her way around a 3-foot-deep blue bin that covered the deck side to side and end to end. The bin would hold the day's harvest of Porphyra, a seaweed cultivated in the bay's e

9h

Mammals and their relatives thrived, diversified during so-called 'Age of Dinosaurs'

Paleontologists are trying to dispel a myth about what life was like when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. The false narrative has wormed its way into books, lectures and even scientific papers about this long-ago era.

9h

The extreme tactic of self-amputation means survival in the animal kingdom

Imagine yourself in the grips of a deadly predator. You see your life flash before your eyes: this looks like the end of the road. But wait! With a quick yank, your limb pops off in the predator's mouth and you make a break for freedom. You've escaped certain death through a grisly trade.

9h

Algae: Here, there, and everywhere

On a clear and cold February morning in 2015, Ruth Kassinger slipped on an insulated down coat and donned knee-high waterproof boots. Stepping aboard a long fishing boat in South Korea's Hoedong Harbor, she gingerly navigated her way around a 3-foot-deep blue bin that covered the deck side to side and end to end. The bin would hold the day's harvest of Porphyra, a seaweed cultivated in the bay's e

9h

Mammals and their relatives thrived, diversified during so-called 'Age of Dinosaurs'

Paleontologists are trying to dispel a myth about what life was like when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. The false narrative has wormed its way into books, lectures and even scientific papers about this long-ago era.

9h

Among India's working poor, sobriety may boost savings

Trying to stay sober does not change the earnings of some workers—but it does increase the amount of money they save, according to an MIT economist's field experiment about low-income workers in India.

9h

Biothreats, Real and Imagined

We have more to fear from natural pathogens than from biological weapons — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

A Robot Has Been Stuck on Mars for Months

Sue Smrekar wishes she could be on Mars right now. Specifically, on Elysium Planitia, a smooth plain in the planet’s northern hemisphere, where a NASA spacecraft called InSight resides. InSight touched down on the surface last November and used its robotic arm and five-fingered hand to unpack. The cider-colored ground was soon littered with scientific instruments, like a well-arranged picnic spre

9h

Six amazing facts you need to know about ants

Have you have seen ants this year? In Britain, they were probably black garden ants, known as Lasius niger—Europe's most common ant. One of somewhere between 12,000 and 20,000 species, they are the scourge of gardeners—but also fascinating.

9h

Six amazing facts you need to know about ants

Have you have seen ants this year? In Britain, they were probably black garden ants, known as Lasius niger—Europe's most common ant. One of somewhere between 12,000 and 20,000 species, they are the scourge of gardeners—but also fascinating.

9h

Ariane 5's second launch of 2019

An Ariane 5 has delivered the T-16 and Eutelsat-7C telecom satellites into their planned orbits.

9h

Spaceship Concordia

Science for the benefit of space exploration does not only happen off planet. While some studies require the weightless isolation of the International Space Station, another location provides the right conditions for investigating the consequences of spaceflight, and it is right here on Earth.

9h

Researchers demonstrate new path to reliable quantum computation

Researchers at the University of Chicago published a novel technique for improving the reliability of quantum computers by accessing higher energy levels than traditionally considered. Most prior work in quantum computation deals with "qubits," the quantum analogue of binary bits that encode either zero or one. The new work instead leverages "qutrits," quantum analogues of three-level trits capabl

9h

Approaching the magnetic singularity

In many materials, electrical resistance and voltage change in the presence of a magnetic field, usually varying smoothly as the magnetic field rotates. This simple magnetic response underlies many applications including contactless current sensing, motion sensing, and data storage. In a crystal, the way that the charge and spin of its electrons align and interact underlies these effects. Utilizin

9h

Soft drink by-products could reduce global warming

Professor of Chemistry Craig Teague and his students have discovered that the by-products of soft drinks could help reduce global warming.

9h

How NASA’s portable atomic clock could revolutionize space travel

An atomic clock designed to enable self-driving spaceships and GPS-like navigation on other planets is about to take a yearlong test flight.

9h

Argentina's Blackout and the Storm-Battered Future of the Grid

The countrywide blackout comes after a period of heavy rains, a reminder that the US electric grid itself isn't ready for extreme weather either.

9h

Supplements for Brain Health Don't Work, According to Neurologist

Aren't all of these "medications" approved by the Food and Drug Administration? Nope.

9h

Biothreats, Real and Imagined

We have more to fear from natural pathogens than from biological weapons — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Small satellite concept finalists target moon, Mars and beyond

NASA has selected three finalists among a dozen concepts for future small satellites. The finalists include a 2022 robotic mission to study two asteroid systems, twin spacecraft to study the effects of energetic particles around Mars, and a lunar orbiter managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, to study water on the moon. At least one of these missions is expected to mo

9h

Mars 2020 rover gets its wheels

In this image, taken on June 13, 2019, engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, install the starboard legs and wheels—otherwise known as the mobility suspension—on the Mars 2020 rover. They installed the port suspension later that day.

9h

De første sundhedsordførere udpeget

Peder Hvelplund fortsætter som sundhedsordfører for Enhedslisten, mens der er skifte på posten i Det Konservative Folkeparti.

9h

Climate Change Throws a Wrench in Everglades Restoration

The drought and heat that drove a recent massive seagrass die-off could become more common in the future — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Researchers report annual variability of ice-nucleating particle concentrations at different Arctic locations

For the first time, an international research team led by the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) has investigated atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INPs) in ice cores, which can provide insights on the type of cloud cover in the Arctic over the last 500 years. These INPs play an important role in the formation of ice in clouds, and thus have a major influence on the climate.

9h

Climate Change Throws a Wrench in Everglades Restoration

The drought and heat that drove a recent massive seagrass die-off could become more common in the future — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

De 500 hurtigeste supercomputere er nu alle i petaflops-skala

Danmark får en enkelt maskine med på junis liste. Det er DTU og CBS's Apollo 2000, der kommer ind på en 471. plads.

9h

Uvejr kastede biler rundt i Aabenraa – et 'microburst' kan stå bag

Vejrfænomenet microburst formodes at stå bag flere væltede biler i Aabenraa, da et uvejr rasede over Sønderjylland sidste fredag. Skytypen cumulonimbus er skurken bag fænomenet og er også oprindelsessted for tornadoer og skypumper.

9h

British orchids thriving in Dunstable Downs 'sunken trails'

Eight species of British orchid are flourishing on historical sheep-driving pathways.

9h

10h

Forensics Friday: Can you spot the issues with this image?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the seventh in a series, Forensics Friday. Take a look at the image below, and then take our poll. … Continue readi

10h

Mavesmerter og hjertebanken: Så voldsomt føles en spiseforstyrrelse

75.000 danskere lider af fx tvangsoverspisning, bulimi eller anoreksi – og hjælp udefra er afgørende.

10h

By i Florida betaler 4 mio. kroner til hackere efter ransomware-angreb

Riviera Beach i Florida betaler 600.000 dollar, svarende til 4 mio. kroner, til hackere, som har krypteret byens data. Byen er en af tusindvis af byer i Amerika og på verdensplan, som er blevet udsat for et såkaldt ransomware-angreb.

10h

Tailor-made prosthetic liners could help more amputees walk again

Researchers at the University of Bath have developed a new way of designing and manufacturing bespoke prosthetic liners, in less than a day.

10h

A battle against antibiotic resistance

Nature, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01962-5 Epidemiologist Maya Nadimpalli focuses on developing nations where meat consumption is rising.

10h

People of Color Are Less Likely to Receive Organ Transplants

Despite higher diagnosis rates for liver and kidney disease among racial and ethnic minorities in the U.S., individual and systemic obstacles — like limited income, lack of access to affordable medical care, long waitlists, and language barriers — contribute to fewer organ transplants among the same groups.

10h

How psychedelics work: Fire the conductor, let the orchestra play

If your ego had a "location" in the brain, it would be the default mode network, where much of your self-critical mind chatter happens. Taking psychedelics down-regulates this brain network. Researchers describe the effect of psychedelics as "letting the brain off its leash", or firing the conductor to let the orchestra play. Without the default mode network acting as a dictator, areas of the bra

10h

An Aviation Pioneer Goes All In on Electric Planes

André Borschberg, one of two men to fly around the world in a solar-powered plane, launched a new company called H55.

10h

The key to unlock bacterial fusion

Most people know Chlamydia as the venereal disease that can cause infertility if left untreated. But for researchers studying the causative agent, Chlamydia trachomatis, it's a bacteria with intriguing properties. Rather than grow and replicate in the blood or other bodily fluids, C. trachomatis get inside cells where they multiply. In most people, this trait keeps the bacterium from being detecte

10h

Stresses from past earthquakes explain location of seismic events

The cumulative stresses caused by historic earthquakes could provide some explanation as to why and where they occur, according to new research.

10h

The key to unlock bacterial fusion

Most people know Chlamydia as the venereal disease that can cause infertility if left untreated. But for researchers studying the causative agent, Chlamydia trachomatis, it's a bacteria with intriguing properties. Rather than grow and replicate in the blood or other bodily fluids, C. trachomatis get inside cells where they multiply. In most people, this trait keeps the bacterium from being detecte

10h

'Nanoemulsion' gels offer new way to deliver drugs through the skin

MIT chemical engineers have devised a new way to create very tiny droplets of one liquid suspended within another liquid, known as nanoemulsions. Such emulsions are similar to the mixture that forms when you shake an oil-and-vinegar salad dressing, but with much smaller droplets. Their tiny size allows them to remain stable for relatively long periods of time.

10h

Color change and behavior enable multi-colored chameleon prawns to survive

Chameleon prawns change colour to camouflage themselves as the seaweed around them changes seasonally, new research shows.

10h

Summer books of 2019: Technology

John Thornhill selects his mid-year reads

10h

Summer books of 2019: Science

Clive Cookson selects his mid-year reads

10h

Religious Monuments Are Fine Now—If They’re Old

“A government that roams the land, tearing down monuments with religious symbolism and scrubbing away any reference to the divine,” Justice Samuel Alito warned the nation yesterday, “will strike many as aggressively hostile to religion.” Luckily, he wrote, the Supreme Court will spare the nation the spectacle of such a secular juggernaut by allowing the state of Maryland to maintain the 94-year-o

10h

AOC’s Generation Doesn’t Presume America’s Innocence

On Monday night, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez declared in an Instagram video that “the United States is running concentration camps on our southern border.” The following morning, Liz Cheney tweeted , “Please @AOC do us all a favor and spend just a few minutes learning some actual history. 6 million Jews were exterminated in the Holocaust. You demean their memory and disgrace yourself with comments l

10h

Mass Surveillance Is Coming to a City Near You

The tech entrepreneur Ross McNutt wants to spend three years recording outdoor human movements in a major U.S. city, KMOX news radio reports . If that sounds too dystopian to be real, you’re behind the times. McNutt, who runs P ersistent Surveillance Systems, was inspired by his stint in the Air Force tracking Iraqi insurgents. He tested mass-surveillance technology over Compton, California , in

10h

How Danville Has Avoided Omaha’s Mistake

Two previous reports, first here and then here , described the bittersweet heritage of old tobacco and textile buildings in the former mill town of Danville, Virginia. The bitter was obviously the loss of what had been the city’s economic mainstays. The potentially sweet was that Danville never got around to demolishing the old structures—and now is beginning to turn them to new use. A reader who

10h

Political Punk Rock That Protests Its Own Singer

For Titus Andronicus, one of the 21st century’s best rock acts, anger isn’t simple. The singer Patrick Stickles boasts a rabid-badger snarl, and his band’s ruckus is worthy of both humming along to and kicking walls to. But the songs turn and twist in surprising ways, and the singer undercuts his every rebellious slogan with confessions about his own complicity. A track off the band’s 2008 debut

10h

Color change and behavior enable multi-colored chameleon prawns to survive

Chameleon prawns change colour to camouflage themselves as the seaweed around them changes seasonally, new research shows.

10h

Pressede lægespecialer fylder mest blandt de højeste lægelønninger

Regionernes top 20-lister over de højest lønnede læger er ifølge regionsdirektørerne et udtryk for, hvilke læger der skal løbe hurtigst. Anæstesiologi, psykiatri og kardiologi er de specialer på tværs af regionerne, hvor der er mest fart på.

10h

Giant Squid, Phantom of the Deep, Reappears on Video

Seven years after scientists caught the elusive deep-sea cephalopod on video, they saw another. Then lightning struck a third time.

11h

Author Correction: Neutrophils support lung colonization of metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells

Nature, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1328-7 Author Correction: Neutrophils support lung colonization of metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells

11h

Predictability of a modified Mini- Nutritional- Assessment version on six-month and one-year mortality in hospitalized geriatric patients: a comparative analysis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45452-0 Predictability of a modified Mini- Nutritional- Assessment version on six-month and one-year mortality in hospitalized geriatric patients: a comparative analysis

11h

Studies of the oligomerisation mechanism of a cystatin-based engineered protein scaffold

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45565-6 Studies of the oligomerisation mechanism of a cystatin-based engineered protein scaffold

11h

Polymorphisms of the cryptochrome 2 and mitoguardin 2 genes are associated with the variation of lipid-related traits in Duroc pigs

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45108-z Polymorphisms of the cryptochrome 2 and mitoguardin 2 genes are associated with the variation of lipid-related traits in Duroc pigs

11h

Broadband and Tunable RCS Reduction using High-order Reflections and Salisbury-type Absorption Mechanisms

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45501-8 Broadband and Tunable RCS Reduction using High-order Reflections and Salisbury-type Absorption Mechanisms

11h

Immunization with merozoite surface protein 2 fused to a Plasmodium-specific carrier protein elicits strain-specific and strain-transcending, opsonizing antibody

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45440-4 Immunization with merozoite surface protein 2 fused to a Plasmodium -specific carrier protein elicits strain-specific and strain-transcending, opsonizing antibody

11h

Drug repurposing in alternative medicine: herbal digestive Sochehwan exerts multifaceted effects against metabolic syndrome

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45099-x Drug repurposing in alternative medicine: herbal digestive Sochehwan exerts multifaceted effects against metabolic syndrome

11h

Control over the transverse structure and long-distance fiber propagation of light at the single-photon level

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45082-6 Control over the transverse structure and long-distance fiber propagation of light at the single-photon level

11h

Analytical level set fabrication constraints for inverse design

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45026-0 Analytical level set fabrication constraints for inverse design

11h

Nonreciprocal charge transport at topological insulator/superconductor interface

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10658-3 The superconducting proximity effect on the surface state of a topological insulator is promising to generate topological superconductivity. Here, Yasuda et al. reported enhanced nonreciprocal charge transport in a Bi2Te3/FeTe heterostructure with an emerging superconducting order parameter.

11h

Structural basis for the homotypic fusion of chlamydial inclusions by the SNARE-like protein IncA

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10806-9 Chlamydia trachomatis forms membrane-bound inclusions inside the host cell that are decorated with IncA, a SNARE-like protein that promotes the fusion of inclusions. Here, Cingolani et al. show that the protein folds into a non-canonical four-helix bundle and identify an intramolecular clamp required for membran

11h

Lugdunin amplifies innate immune responses in the skin in synergy with host- and microbiota-derived factors

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10646-7 Lugdunin is a peptide antibiotic produced by the skin commensal Staphylococcus lugdunensis. Here, the authors show that lugdunin reduces Staphylococcus aureus colonization in human keratinocytes and mouse skin by inducing the expression of human LL-37 and recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils.

11h

Local atomic order and hierarchical polar nanoregions in a classical relaxor ferroelectric

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10665-4 The understanding of relaxor ferroelectrics is hindered by the complexity of nanoscale perturbations of their structure. Here, a data set of independent techniques treated on common footing provides a multiscale description of atomic order which reconciles conflicting models derived from single methods.

11h

Monitoring biomolecule concentrations in tissue using a wearable droplet microfluidic-based sensor

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10401-y Continuous real-time measurement of biomarker levels in body fluids offers many exciting possibilities. Here, the authors develop an integrated wearable droplet microfluidic sensor that combines continuous sampling of tissue fluid with in situ analysis using wet-chemical assays.

11h

Site-selectively generated photon emitters in monolayer MoS2 via local helium ion irradiation

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10632-z Light emitters can be induced in transition metal dichalcogenides by defect engineering, but challenges remain in their controlled spatial positioning. Here, the authors irradiate monolayer MoS2 with a sub-nm focused helium ion beam to deterministically create defects, and obtain spectrally narrow emission lines

11h

Evidence for low density holes in Jupiter’s ionosphere

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10708-w Intense electromagnetic impulses induced by Jupiter’s lightning can produce both low-frequency dispersed whistler emissions and non-dispersed radio pulses. Here, the authors show Jupiter dispersed pulses associated with Jovian lightning that are evidence of low density holes in Jupiter’s ionosphere.

11h

Convergent genomic signatures of flight loss in birds suggest a switch of main fuel

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10682-3 Flight loss has occurred numerous times in bird evolution. Here, the authors examine convergent sites in the exonic and intronic sequences of 48 bird genomes, finding amino-acid changes in two genes, ATGL and ACOT7, with potential implications for a change in metabolism rather than anatomy.

11h

Color change and behavior enable multi-colored chameleon prawns to survive

Chameleon prawns change color to camouflage themselves as the seaweed around them changes seasonally, new research shows.

11h

'Nanoemulsion' gels offer new way to deliver drugs through the skin

MIT chemical engineers have devised a new way to create nanoemulsions, very tiny droplets of one liquid suspended within another. They also developed a way to easily convert nanoemulsions to a gel when they reach body temperature, which could be useful for developing materials that can deliver medication when rubbed on skin or injected into the body.

11h

Stresses from past earthquakes explain location of seismic events

A study published in Nature Communications suggests the cumulative stresses caused by historic earthquakes could provide some explanation as to why and where they occur. The research involved a detailed analysis of centuries of earthquakes in central Italy, where unrivaled records of seismic events have been kept since 1349.

11h

The key to unlock bacterial fusion

Researchers identify how a Chlamydia-produced protein helps bacterial compartments fuse together, thus increasing pathogenicity.

11h

Vejen til ambitiøse klimamål går gennem elektrificering: »Der er ikke andre langtidsholdbare muligheder«

PLUS. Skal vi i Danmark slippe afhængigheden af fossile brændsler og nå vores ambitiøse klimamålsætninger, skal vi ifølge eksperterne satse på el. Få overblikket over fremtidens energisektor og de krav, den stiller til ingeniørerne.

11h

Regionerne forventer først økonomiforhandlinger til august

Valget til Folketinget betyder, at økonomiforhandlingerne mellem regeringen og regionerne helt er blevet udskudt.

11h

A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies

A Moscow scientist claims he has a safe way of editing genes in human embryos — a method that could protect resulting babies from being infected with HIV. Approval of the experiment seems unlikely. (Image credit: Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images)

11h

Cory Booker Thinks He’s Figured Out Iowa

URBANDALE, Iowa—Cory Booker’s New Jersey accent never comes out stronger than when he pronounces caucus as “kaw-kus.” And here in a two-story building that used to be the city hall—and then was briefly a massage school—Booker’s team of 50-plus people is chasing a dream that no poll in the past six months would suggest they’d achieve: that the 50-year-old senator can win Iowa next February and go

11h

The Old Senate Is Hardwired Into Joe Biden

When Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. arrived in the Senate from Delaware in 1973, one of the first colleagues he tangled with was James Oliver Eastland of Mississippi, the vicious segregationist who ruled the Judiciary Committee with unyielding resolve, and who’d first been elected a couple of weeks before Biden was born. After Biden spoke up forcefully in a Democratic caucus meeting on behalf of tota

11h

11h

11h

Expert: Facebook is trying to become an independent country

submitted by /u/striketheviol [link] [comments]

11h

The best place to live on the Moon

submitted by /u/filosoful [link] [comments]

11h

11h

How 5G could democratise the telecoms industry

A new, digital revolution might be about to hit us. Autonomous cars are driving our way, cities and companies are rapidly ramping up the use of sensors—also called the Internet of Things (IoT) – and virtual and augmented reality are making rapid strides.

12h

Brandfare: Apple tilbagekalder MacBook Pro-computere

På en række MacBook Pro-computere, som er et par år gamle, er der risiko for, at batteriet kan overophede og bryde i brand. Derfor tilbagekalder Apple nu de pågældende computere og beder ejerne om at sende dem til reparation med det samme.

12h

Hør ugens Transformator: Europas bilindustri har fået baghjul af Tesla

Den europæiske bilindustri står foran store omvæltninger og investerer nu massivt. Og så vokser sagen om fejl i analyser af udledningen af kvælstof med trusler om sagsanlæg.

12h

The chart that defines our warming world

Communicating what's meant by climate change in one simple, easy to understand visualisation.

12h

Dansk Psykolog Forening ansætter ny direktør

Jacob Stengaard Madsen bliver ny direktør for Dansk Psykolog Forening efter sommer.

12h

12h

Drømme i en ventetid

[no content]

12h

12h

Apple voluntarily recalling batteries on MacBook Pro notebooks due to safety risk. What to do

Apple announced a voluntary recall on certain 15-inch MacBook Pro models sold primarily between September 2015 and February 2017.

13h

13h

13h

Advanced NMR captures new details in nanoparticle structures

Advanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have revealed surprising details about the structure of a key group of materials in nanotechology, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), and the placement of their active chemical sites.

13h

Five reasons “hacking back” is a recipe for cybersecurity chaos

A new US bill would make it legal for private companies to chase hackers across the internet. It’s a terrible idea that simply will not die.

13h

NASA selects PUNCH mission to image beyond the Sun's outer corona

NASA has selected Southwest Research Institute to lead the "Polarimeter to Unify the Corona and Heliosphere" (PUNCH) mission, a landmark Small Explorers Program mission that will image beyond the Sun's outer corona.

13h

Major study finds no conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators

Researchers have found no link between exposure to emissions from municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) and infant deaths or reduced foetal growth.

13h

Cities are key to saving monarch butterflies

It's easy to think of cities as being the enemy of nature. When we talk about escaping the skyscrapers and car horns, we have visions of breathing in fresh mountain air while hiking through forests in mind. But for Monarch butterflies, the busy cities we know could be key to their survival.

13h

Foodie calls: Dating for a free meal (rather than a relationship)

When it comes to getting a date, there's any number of ways people can present themselves and their interests. One of the newer phenomena is a "foodie call" where a person sets up a date with someone they are not romantically interested in, for the purpose of getting a free meal. New research finds that 23—33% of women in an online study say they've engaged in a "foodie call."

13h

Cities are key to saving monarch butterflies

It's easy to think of cities as being the enemy of nature. When we talk about escaping the skyscrapers and car horns, we have visions of breathing in fresh mountain air while hiking through forests in mind. But for Monarch butterflies, the busy cities we know could be key to their survival.

13h

Skin bacteria could save frogs from virus

Bacteria living on the skin of frogs could save them from a deadly virus, new research suggests.

13h

Skin bacteria could save frogs from virus

Bacteria living on the skin of frogs could save them from a deadly virus, new research suggests.

13h

Scientists seek beaches where dead whales can rot in peace

So many gray whales are dying off the U.S. West Coast that scientists and volunteers dealing with the putrid carcasses have an urgent request for coastal residents: Lend us your private beaches so these ocean giants can rot in peace.

14h

Rot in peace: Sites lacking for whale corpses amid die-off

So many gray whales are dying off the U.S. West Coast that scientists and volunteers dealing with the putrid carcasses have an urgent request for coastal residents: Lend us your private beaches so these ocean giants can rot in peace.

14h

Protesters urge ASEAN leaders to ban trash imports

Protestors in Bangkok on Thursday dumped plastic waste in front of a government building and called on Southeast Asian leaders to ban imports of trash from developed countries.

14h

Pressure mounts on YouTube to better protect young users

Millions of children regularly use YouTube to watch video game tutorials, television shows and even to watch random people unbox new toys.

14h

Thousands of big energy reps at UN climate talks: monitor

Lobby groups representing some of the world's biggest polluters have sent thousands of delegates to negotiations aimed at limiting global warming since UN climate talks began, according to data obtained by AFP.

14h

14h

EU leaders fail to set 2050 target of zero net carbon emissions

European Union leaders failed Thursday to set a target of zero net greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, amid opposition from Poland and other coal-dependent eastern European countries, summit sources said.

14h

Voice-activiated Monopoly tells players: 'You're bankrupt!'

What fictional financial wisdom might the mustachioed, top-hat-wearing billionaire Mr Monopoly dole out to a regular board-game player?

14h

Apple urges Trump not to impose tariffs on iPhones amid China trade war

'We urge the US government not to impose tariffs on these products,' says tech firm

14h

Virtual Facebook currency faces real-world resistance

If Facebook's new cryptocurrency should resonate anywhere it should be India, where the social media giant has more than 300 million followers.

14h

Apple says US tariffs on China would backfire

Apple is warning the US administration that proposed tariffs on Chinese imports would be counterproductive, saying they would hurt the iPhone maker's competitiveness and "tilt the playing field" to non-American rivals.

14h

14h

Restaurants could be first to get genetically modified salmon

Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in indoor tanks, they could be served in restaurants by late next year.

14h

Restaurants could be first to get genetically modified salmon

Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in indoor tanks, they could be served in restaurants by late next year.

14h

Families mourn death of robot companion; friend

submitted by /u/theguywithacomputer [link] [comments]

15h

15h

15h

I think people on reddit constantly overlook one of the MAJOR benefits to a sex robot industry: The wider access to bionic body parts and cybernetic bodies

If the sex robot industry becomes mainstream, then many disabled people will be able to gain access to bionic limbs as there would be large factories dedicated to manufacturing them. Think of how much this industry can help advance cybernetics Elon Musk , Kernel, and others are working on BCI’s while scientists are researching how to achieve head transplants. Eventually brain transplants will be

15h

15h

15h

150 years of the periodic table – Science Weekly podcast

Nicola Davis invites Prof Brigitte Van Tiggelen and Dr Peter Wothers on to the podcast to look at how the periodic table took shape and asks whether it might now be in jeopardy Continue reading…

15h

This solstice, try Stonehenge as therapy | Maggie Aderin-Pocock

The prehistoric peoples who built this amazing monument could teach us a lesson about connecting with the universe When was the last time you stepped outside and looked up? It’s hard to find the time to do it, and even when we do, high-rise cityscapes, light pollution and – the bane of all astronomy – “cloud” often limit the view of what lies beyond. But perhaps it is something we are fundamentall

15h

150 years of the periodic table – Science Weekly podcast

Nicola Davis invites Prof Brigitte Van Tiggelen and Dr Peter Wothers on to the podcast to look at how the periodic table took shape and asks whether it might now be in jeopardy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

15h

15h

15h

Photos of the Week: Kangaroo Boxing, Royal Ascot, Moon Pool

A hungry polar bear in Russia, rescued cats in the United Arab Emirates, a King Kong sculpture in France, Women's World Cup action in France, exuberant Raptors fans in Toronto, the Royal Highland Show in Scotland, a Harley Davidson rally in Portugal, a “Protest Against Divisiveness” in New York, a decommissioned oil platform in England, aquabike racing in Hungary, and much more.

15h

Skin bacteria could save frogs from virus

Bacteria living on the skin of frogs could save them from a deadly virus, new research suggests.

16h

Do women regret embryo testing before IVF?

By the time a woman is 44 years old, the vast majority of her embryos will be abnormal. A new study asked women who had their embryos tested before in vitro fertilization if they were glad or regretted the procedure? Regardless of whether they had a normal embryo or not, 94% of patients surveyed were glad to have the information.

16h

Americans still eat too much processed meat and too little fish

A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that the amount of processed meat consumed by Americans has remained unchanged in the past 18 years, nor has their intake of fish/shellfish increased. In addition, one quarter of US adults are still eating more unprocessed red meat than the recommended level, and less than 15% meet the guidelines for

16h

Cities are key to saving monarch butterflies

Monarch butterflies are at risk of disappearing from most of the US, and to save them, we need to plant milkweed for them to lay their eggs on. In two new studies, scientists found that one of the most important places for us to plant milkweed is in cities — even though cities make up just 3% of US landmass, they have the potential to support 30% of the milkweed Monarchs need.

16h

Americans Ignore Experts, Continue To Devour Processed Meats

Processed meats remain a major part of the average American's diet. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Raysonho@ Open Grid Scheduler/Grid Engine) Well, the results are in. After years and years of nutritionists telling Americans to eat fewer processed meats and more fish, Americans are eating (drumroll please) … exactly the same amounts as they did 18 years ago. A research team at Tufts University in Bost

16h

Skræddersyet behandling mod tarmkræft bliver nu gjort bedre

Nyt forskningsprojekt skal gøre det muligt for danske læger i langt højere grad at behandle patienter med tarmkræft mere præcist, så risikoen for komplikationer bliver mindre, og chancerne for at overleve bliver større.

16h

Hjertelæge anklaget for millionsvindel

30. august skal en tidligere overlæge fra Region Hovedstaden på anklagebænken i Københavns Byret. Han står tiltalt for groft bedrageri for 3,8 mio. kr., men nægter sig skyldig.

16h

Forsvarer: Helt urimeligt at holde læge anklaget i fem år

Det har haft store konsekvenser for den anklagede læge, at sagen har trukket ud i så lang tid, siger lægens forsvarer. Sagen har aldrig stået stille, siger anklager.

16h

Bilagssagerne betød strammere regler hos hjertelægerne

Sagerne fra Rigshospitalet har været en slags katalysator for en god udvikling mod større åbenhed, siger formand for hjertelægerne.

16h

Lista: Fyra saker du inte visste om sill

Sill är inte bara bra mat på midsommarbordet, forskning visar att den är bra för hjärnan och en av de mest miljövänliga fiskar du kan äta. Om den inte är från Östersjön.

16h

My $599 weekend in space

Fifty years on from Apollo 11, Neville Hawcock heads to Alabama’s Space Camp to test his mettle as an astronaut

16h

Genomcenter med uklare svar om kobling af CPR-nummer med genomdata

Uklare meldinger fra Nationalt Genom Center om hvordan koblingen mellem CPR-nummer og genomdata kommer til at foregå. Centeret ønsker ikke at svare på afklarende spørgsmål.

17h

Analyse: Derfor laver tyskerne ikke bare en Tesla

PLUS. Den europæiske bilindustri står foran enorme omvæltninger, og løsningen kunne umiddelbart være at ‘lave en Tesla’. Men økonomiske, politiske og strukturelle forhold står i vejen. Den tyske bilindustri er dog fuldt ud klar over truslen og investerer nu massivt.

17h

17h

How the ISS recycles its air and water

The ISS is (almost) a closed loop. (infographic by Goran Factory/) Storage is hard to come by aboard the International Space Station . Even if a rocket had room to ferry thousands of pounds of water and oxygen to supply a six-month mission, you'd struggle to find anywhere to stash it. So engineers have devised creative ways to squeeze essentials from astronauts' sweat, urine, and breath. But we'r

17h

Global data resource shows genetic diversity of chickens

A total of 174 chicken breeds are described in a publicly accessible database which scientists have built up in recent years. This database, the Synbreed Chicken Diversity Panel (SCDP), includes information about a large proportion of the available chicken species and their diversity. The researchers created a family tree of exceptional completeness and detail.

18h

New platform flips traditional on-demand supply chain approach on its head

Engineers have demonstrated how a hierarchical model that provides suppliers with a certain amount of choice could improve supply and demand matching for underutilized resources — and may even transform what's become known as the sharing economy.

18h

Marine microbiology: Successful extremists

In nutrient-poor deep-sea sediments, microbes belonging to the Archaea have outcompeted bacterial microorganisms for millions of years. Their ability to efficiently scavenge dead cells makes them the basal producers in the food chain.

18h

Expanding the temperature range of lithium-ion batteries

Electric cars struggle with extreme temperatures, mainly because of impacts on the electrolyte solutions in their lithium-ion batteries. Now, researchers have developed new electrolytes containing multiple additives that work better over a wide temperature range.

18h

Perfect quantum portal emerges at exotic interface

Researchers have captured the most direct evidence to date of Klein tunneling, a quantum quirk that allows particles to tunnel through a barrier like it's not even there. The result may enable engineers to design more uniform components for future quantum computers, quantum sensors and other devices.

18h

Major study finds no conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators

Researchers have found no link between exposure to emissions from municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) and infant deaths or reduced fetal growth.

18h

18h

Machine learning unlocks mysteries of quantum physics

submitted by /u/MaikeruShogun [link] [comments]

18h

Stack delivery drones with electromagnetic under and ferris plate over to boost loads.

With this ability to carry a load from below and and be assisted from above , we could build skytrains of any length, and with a rotational replacement or power sharing or refueling of the drones , a unlimited range can be created by algorithms. submitted by /u/Deadbees [link] [comments]

18h

Why Safer Cars Don't Lead To Cheaper Car Insurance … Yet

submitted by /u/MaikeruShogun [link] [comments]

18h

Rare baby gorilla born at Taronga zoo

Taronga Conservation Society Australia has announced the birth of a Western Lowland gorilla. The female, yet to be named, was born on Thursday 6 June to Frala, an experienced mother, and was sired by Kibali • ‘Gorilla selfie’: DRC park ranger explains photo that went viral Continue reading…

18h

The gym proving too expensive or time consuming?

A new study, published in The Journal of Physiology investigated a home-based high-intensity interval training (Home-HIT) program and studied its benefits for clinically obese individuals with an elevated risk of heart disease.

19h

19h

Ion-to-ion amplification through an open-junction ionic diode [Applied Physical Sciences]

As biological signals are mainly based on ion transport, the differences in signal carriers have become a major issue for the intimate communication between electrical devices and biological areas. In this respect, an ionic device which can directly interpret ionic signals from biological systems needs to be designed. Particularly, it…

19h

Deep learning enables high-quality and high-throughput prediction of enzyme commission numbers [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

High-quality and high-throughput prediction of enzyme commission (EC) numbers is essential for accurate understanding of enzyme functions, which have many implications in pathologies and industrial biotechnology. Several EC number prediction tools are currently available, but their prediction performance needs to be further improved to precisely and efficiently process an ever-increasing…

19h

Species-specific mechanisms of cytotoxicity toward immune cells determine the successful outcome of Vibrio infections [Microbiology]

Vibrio species cause infectious diseases in humans and animals, but they can also live as commensals within their host tissues. How Vibrio subverts the host defenses to mount a successful infection remains poorly understood, and this knowledge is critical for predicting and managing disease. Here, we have investigated the cellular…

19h

A cell topography-based mechanism for ligand discrimination by the T cell receptor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The T cell receptor (TCR) initiates the elimination of pathogens and tumors by T cells. To avoid damage to the host, the receptor must be capable of discriminating between wild-type and mutated self and nonself peptide ligands presented by host cells. Exactly how the TCR does this is unknown. In…

19h

Converting existing transmission corridors to HVDC is an overlooked option for increasing transmission capacity [Sustainability Science]

A changing generation mix and growing demand for carbon-free electricity will almost certainly require dramatic changes in the infrastructure and topology of the electricity system. Rather than build new lines, one way to minimize social opposition and regulatory obstacles is to increase the capacity of existing transmission corridors. In addition…

19h

High-fidelity amplified FISH for the detection and allelic discrimination of single mRNA molecules [Applied Biological Sciences]

Amplification of signals by the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) is a powerful approach for increasing signal strength in single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, but probes tagged with an HCR initiator sequence are prone to producing false signals. Here we describe a system of interacting hairpin binary probes in which the…

19h

An effector from cotton bollworm oral secretion impairs host plant defense signaling [Plant Biology]

Insects have evolved effectors to conquer plant defense. Most known insect effectors are isolated from sucking insects, and examples from chewing insects are limited. Moreover, the targets of insect effectors in host plants remain unknown. Here, we address a chewing insect effector and its working mechanism. Cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera)…

19h

Odor coding in the antenna of the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans [Neuroscience]

Tsetse flies transmit trypanosomiasis to humans and livestock across much of sub-Saharan Africa. Tsetse are attracted by olfactory cues emanating from their hosts. However, remarkably little is known about the cellular basis of olfaction in tsetse. We have carried out a systematic physiological analysis of the Glossina morsitans antenna. We…

19h

The glucocorticoid receptor agonistic modulators CpdX and CpdX-D3 do not generate the debilitating effects of synthetic glucocorticoids [Medical Sciences]

Seventy years after the discovery of their anti-inflammatory properties, glucocorticoids (GCs) remain the mainstay treatment for major allergic and inflammatory disorders, such as atopic dermatitis, asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, colitis, and conjunctivitis, among others. However, their long-term therapeutical administration is limited by major debilitating side effects, e.g., skin atrophy, osteopo

19h

Environment-to-phenotype mapping and adaptation strategies in varying environments [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Biological organisms exhibit diverse strategies for adapting to varying environments. For example, a population of organisms may express the same phenotype in all environments (“unvarying strategy”) or follow environmental cues and express alternative phenotypes to match the environment (“tracking strategy”), or diversify into coexisting phenotypes to cope with environmental uncertainty…

19h

Unified cochlear model for low- and high-frequency mammalian hearing [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The spatial variations of the intricate cytoarchitecture, fluid scalae, and mechano-electric transduction in the mammalian cochlea have long been postulated to provide the organ with the ability to perform a real-time, time-frequency processing of sound. However, the precise manner by which this tripartite coupling enables the exquisite cochlear filtering has…

19h

Arginine dephosphorylation propels spore germination in bacteria [Microbiology]

Bacterial spores can remain dormant for years but possess the remarkable ability to germinate, within minutes, once nutrients become available. However, it still remains elusive how such instant awakening of cellular machineries is achieved. Utilizing Bacillus subtilis as a model, we show that YwlE arginine (Arg) phosphatase is crucial for…

19h

Rapid assembly and profiling of an anticoagulant sulfoprotein library [Chemistry]

Hematophagous organisms produce a suite of salivary proteins which interact with the host’s coagulation machinery to facilitate the acquisition and digestion of a bloodmeal. Many of these biomolecules inhibit the central blood-clotting serine proteinase thrombin that is also the target of several clinically approved anticoagulants. Here a bioinformatics approach is…

19h

Domesticated species: It takes one to know one [Commentaries]

Darwin was fascinated by both the process and outcome of our own species’ efforts toward the domestication of the plethora of others that became so central to our unparalleled success (1). In fact, he documented many of the various traits and behaviors that we have so purposefully selected. He was…

19h

A structure-based mechanism of cisplatin resistance mediated by glutathione transferase P1-1 [Biochemistry]

Cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP)] is one of the most successful anticancer agents effective against a wide range of solid tumors. However, its use is restricted by side effects and/or by intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Here, we probed the role of glutathione transferase (GST) P1-1, an antiapoptotic protein often overexpressed in…

19h

A strategy for stabilizing the catalyst Co4O4 in a metal-organic framework [Commentaries]

Artificial photosynthesis provides a basis for storing solar energy in chemical bonds (1, 2), with water oxidation a critical step (3, 4). The half reaction for the oxidation of water, 2H2O → O2 + 4e− + 4H+, provides protons and electrons for the production of a fuel at a cathode…

19h

Waymo Goes Global With Renault-Nissan Partnership

But don’t expect *les voitures autonomes de Waymo* to roam international roads just yet.

19h

Exosomes: Helping you stay in touch with your trillions of closest friends.

There are roughly 37.2 trillion cells in the human body. That’s nearly 5 thousand times the total number of people on the entire planet, and all these cells must somehow work together to make you “You.” Each cell has a set role to play in keeping you healthy and functioning, but how do these cells […]

19h

END OF FEED

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image