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nyheder2019juni22

Do You Play with Your Cat? This Online Study Is for You!

Dogs aren't the only ones who can do science. The era of cat science is now — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

58min

NASA Rover on Mars Detects Puff of Gas That Hints at Possibility of Life

The Curiosity mission’s scientists picked up the signal this week, and are seeking additional readings from the red planet.

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James Bond's 1965 Aston Martin is up for auction, complete with working gadgets

The "most famous car in the world" has a set of 13 "working" gadgets built-in. (Simon Clay courtesy of RM Sotheby's/) RM Sotheby’s auctioneers tout James Bond’s 1965 Aston Martin DB5 as the “world’s most famous car,” and it is hard to argue the point. Untold millions of Bond movie fans have fantasized about driving this cool Shadow Grey British sports car outfitted with all the hardware needed to

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Experts raise alarm over climate change threat to cultural heritage

Climate change could wreak "irreversible damage" on the world's most precious ancient monuments and other cultural sites, experts warned Saturday as they pushed for UN protection for major global sites.

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Daimler recalls more cars over emissions cheating: report

German auto giant Daimler has been ordered to recall a further 60,000 diesel cars believed to have been equipped with emissions-cheating software, the mass-circulation daily Bild reported on Saturday.

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Ocean swimming alters skin microbiome, increasing vulnerability to infection

Swimming in the ocean alters the skin microbiome and may increase the likelihood of infection, according to research presented at ASM Microbe 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

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Plants may be transmitting superbugs to people

Antibiotic-resistant infections are a threat to global public health, food safety and an economic burden. To prevent these infections, it is critical to understand how antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their genes are transmitted from both meat and plant-foods. Researchers have now shown how plant-foods serve as vehicles for transmitting antibiotic resistance to the gut microbiome. The research is

10min

Ocean swimming alters skin microbiome, increasing vulnerability to infection

Swimming in the ocean alters the skin microbiome and may increase the likelihood of infection, according to research presented at ASM Microbe 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

16min

Plants may be transmitting superbugs to people

Antibiotic-resistant infections are a threat to global public health, food safety and an economic burden. To prevent these infections, it is critical to understand how antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their genes are transmitted from both meat and plant-foods. Researchers have now shown how plant-foods serve as vehicles for transmitting antibiotic resistance to the gut microbiome. The research is

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In-Group Favoritism Is Difficult to Change, Even When the Social Groups Are Meaningless

One has to go to great lengths to counteract the deeply ingrained tendency to infuse new social groups with rich meaning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In-Group Favoritism Is Difficult to Change, Even When the Social Groups Are Meaningless

One has to go to great lengths to counteract the deeply ingrained tendency to infuse new social groups with rich meaning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Do You Play with Your Cat? This Online Study Is for You!

Dogs aren't the only ones who can do science. The era of cat science is now — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

40min

Ocean swimming alters skin microbiome, increasing vulnerability to infection

Swimming in the ocean alters the skin microbiome and may increase the likelihood of infection, according to research presented at ASM Microbe 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

1h

Plants may be transmitting superbugs to people

Antibiotic-resistant infections are a threat to global public health, food safety and an economic burden. To prevent these infections, it is critical to understand how antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their genes are transmitted from both meat and plant-foods. Researchers have now shown how plant-foods serve as vehicles for transmitting antibiotic resistance to the gut microbiome.

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Windows 10's redesigned Terminal is available in preview

It's a good time to be a Windows power user. Microsoft has released a preview version of Windows 10's redesigned Terminal (known as just Windows Terminal) through its app …

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How and when to share streaming service logins

There goes Billy, screwing up your Netflix recommendations again. (freestocks.org via Unsplash/) If you've got access to a Netflix or Spotify account—or any other subscription streaming service—you might be using a friend or relative's login details rather than your own. Or maybe you're the one doing the login lending. It's common practice , but should you be doing it? Might you run into technica

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Metabolomic profiling of antibody response to periodontal pathogens

At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Jaakko Leskela, University of Helsinki, Finland, gave an oral presentation on 'Metabolomic Profiling of Antibo

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Neon Genesis Evangelion is the perfect story for this moment in history

Neon Genesis Evangelion has returned for a second life on Netflix, legally available for the first time in a couple decades. Watching Neon Genesis Evangelion in 2019 is fascinating …

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Electron-behaving nanoparticles rock current understanding of matter

Researchers have made a strange and startling discovery that nanoparticles engineered with DNA in colloidal crystals — when extremely small — behave just like electrons.

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'Robot blood' powers machines for lengthy tasks

Researchers have created a system of circulating liquid — 'robot blood' — within robotic structures, to store energy and power robotic applications for sophisticated, long-duration tasks.

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Crystal with a twist: Scientists grow spiraling new material

Scientists have created new inorganic crystals made of stacks of atomically thin sheets that unexpectedly spiral like a nanoscale card deck. Their surprising structures may yield unique optical, electronic and thermal properties, including superconductivity, the researchers say.

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Klimatest: Hvor grøn er din grillfest?

Øl eller vin, kul eller el? Du kan sagtens gøre grillfesten mere klimavenlig, uden at det bliver kedeligt.

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What are examples of media productions (books, articles, movies, art, radio, television, etc.), at any time in human history, that challenge the viewers to contemplate the implications of future technologies?

I appreciate reading or watching things that force me to actively think about the how future technologies may affect life. I usually get this from science fiction books, but recently watched a few Black Mirror episodes for the first time. I found it satisfying to be encouraged to consider the changes to relationships that humans have with each other and also with technology. I know that there are

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Animals' brain activity 'syncs' during social interactions

Egyptian fruit bats and mice, respectively, can 'sync' brainwaves in social situations. The synchronization of neural activity in the brains of human conversation partners has been shown previously, as a result of one person picking up social cues from the other and modulating their own behavior based on those cues. These studies suggest that something similar occurs when animals engage in natural

2h

Electron-behaving nanoparticles rock current understanding of matter

Researchers have made a strange and startling discovery that nanoparticles engineered with DNA in colloidal crystals — when extremely small — behave just like electrons.

2h

'Robot blood' powers machines for lengthy tasks

Researchers have created a system of circulating liquid — 'robot blood' — within robotic structures, to store energy and power robotic applications for sophisticated, long-duration tasks.

2h

Crystal with a twist: Scientists grow spiraling new material

Scientists have created new inorganic crystals made of stacks of atomically thin sheets that unexpectedly spiral like a nanoscale card deck. Their surprising structures may yield unique optical, electronic and thermal properties, including superconductivity, the researchers say.

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Skinny self-image, heavy workouts in adolescence are warning signs, study shows

New research finds that adolescents who see themselves as puny and who exercise to gain weight may be at risk of so-called muscularity-oriented disordered eating behaviors.

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National emergency alerts potentially vulnerable to attack

New research shows that hackers, working with limited resources, could send fake emergency alerts to cell phones in a confined area like a sports stadium.

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Astronomers see 'warm' glow of Uranus's rings

Two telescopes have measured the faint heat from the main, or epsilon ring, of Uranus, enabling astronomers for the first time to determine its temperature: a cool 77 Kelvin. Earlier images of the rings came from reflected light only. The observations also show that the rings lack dust, which is common in the rings of other planets, and are composed of centimeter-sized particles and larger.

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Inspired by 63 Up, author Tim Lott decides it's time to take stock

Turning 63, the writer looks back over highs and lows and asks, how can I sum it up? Ever since I read John Updike’s Rabbit tetralogy, I have felt that the ultimate test of a writer is to capture a single life from beginning to end in the pages of a novel. The idea of a single life captured through different points in time was behind the TV documentary series 63 Up (I am also 63). Partly for rese

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More than 5 million cancer survivors experience chronic pain, twice the rate of the general population

More than 5 million cancer survivors in the United States experience chronic pain, almost twice the rate in the general population, according to a new study.

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Scientists map huge undersea fresh-water aquifer off U.S. Northeast

In a new survey of the sub-seafloor off the U.S. Northeast coast, scientists have made a surprising discovery: a gigantic aquifer of relatively fresh water trapped in porous sediments lying below the salty ocean. It appears to be the largest such formation yet found in the world.

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Northern lights' 'social networking' reveals true scale of magnetic storms

Magnetic disturbances caused by phenomena like the northern lights can be tracked by a 'social network' of ground-based instruments, according to a new study.

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Rare recessive mutations pry open new windows on autism

Most genetic variants linked to autism are de novo mutations, which are not inherited and are relatively easy to find. A new study, in one of the largest cohorts to date, instead tracked rare recessive mutations in which a child inherits two 'bad' copies of a gene. The findings provides a likely explanation for up to 5 percent of all autism cases and offer new clues to autism's biological causes.

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Team supersizes 'quantum squeezing' to measure ultrasmall motion

Physicists have harnessed the phenomenon of 'quantum squeezing' to amplify and measure trillionths-of-a-meter motions of a lone trapped magnesium ion (electrically charged atom).

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New study maps how ocean currents connect the world's fisheries

It's a small world after all — especially when it comes to marine fisheries, with a new study revealing they form a single network, with over $10 billion worth of fish each year being caught in a country other than the one in which it spawned.

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Scientists make single-cell map to reprogram scar tissue into healthy heart cells

Annually, about 790,000 Americans suffer a heart attack, which leaves damaged scar tissue on the heart and limits its ability to beat efficiently. But what if scientists could reprogram scar tissue cells called fibroblasts into healthy heart muscle cells called cardiomyocytes? For the first time, researchers developed a stable, reproducible, minimalistic platform to reprogram human fibroblast cell

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Unlocking the secrets of liver regeneration

Researchers have reported a new way in which the liver is primed to regenerate itself. They found that by stripping parts of the epigenome, which play a primary role in repressing 'jumping genes' (i.e. transposable elements), other epigenetic marks were redistributed.

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Squeezing of blood vessels may contribute to cognitive decline in Alzheimer's

Reduced blood flow to the brain associated with early Alzheimer's may be caused by the contraction of cells wrapped around blood vessels, according to a new study that opens up a new way to potentially treat the disease.

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NASA Rover on Mars Detects Puff of Gas That Hints at Possibility of Life

The Curiosity mission’s scientists picked up the signal this week, and are seeking additional readings from the red planet.

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Do ice cores help to unravel the clouds of climate history?

For the first time, an international research team has investigated atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INPs) in ice cores, which can provide insights on the type of cloud cover in the Arctic over the last 500 years. These INPs play an important role in the formation of ice in clouds and thus have a major influence on the climate.

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Pod of Killer Whales Makes Rare Visit to Monterey Bay

There has been a startling number of killer whale sightings in the bay in June, normally an off-season month for whale watchers.

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Processed foods and effect on developing fetus' brain: Autism link?

New research examines what happens when neural stem cells are exposed to high levels of an acid commonly found in processed foods.

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Big Blast from Russian Volcano Raikoke

Suomi NPP/VIIRS image of the Raikoke plume, taken June 22, 2019. NASA. It has been awhile since we've had an unexpected eruption, but last night Raikoke in the Kuril Islands off Russia had an impressive explosion. Most people (and volcanologists) are likely unfamiliar with this remote volcano and rightly so — only ~140 people live within 100 kilometers and the last known eruption was in 1924. How

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Ericsson activates 5G NSA technology at 5TONIC open innovation lab

submitted by /u/MarioKartFromHell [link] [comments]

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Traditional fluid flow observations may miss the big picture

Before and after comparisons don't tell the full story of chemical reactions in flowing fluids, such as those in drug delivery systems.

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Space Photos of the Week: Saturn’s Rings Are Feelin’ Groovy

Plus, burps of hot plasma and sticky galaxy gas.

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This Week’s Awesome Stories From Around the Web (Through June 22)

ROBOTICS This Freaky Robotic Fish Is Powered by ‘Blood’ George Dvorsky | Gizmodo “In an effort to create more autonomous, life-like robots, scientists have developed a soft robotic lionfish with a multi-functional circulatory system. A blood-like compound powers the bot and provides propulsion.” QUANTUM COMMUNICATIONS World’s First ‘Quantum Drone’ for Impenetrable Air-to-Ground Data Link Takes Of

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Skin bacteria could save frogs from virus

Bacteria living on the skin of frogs could save them from a deadly virus, new research suggests.

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Combination of drugs may combat deadly drug-resistant fungus

Microbiologists have shown that a combination of anti-fungal and anti-bacterial medications may be an effective weapon against the recently discovered multidrug resistant, Candida auris (C. auris).

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Dissemination of pathogenic bacteria by university student's cell phones

New research has demonstrated the presence of S. aureus in 40% of the cell phones of students sampled at a university. S. aureus is a common cause of hospital and community-based infections and is currently considered an important pathogen because of its level of antibiotic resistance.

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Reforming pharmacy benefit manager practices may lead to drug cost savings

Efforts to control health care costs in the United States often focus on the listed prescription drug prices, but unregulated pharmacy benefit manager practices also may contribute to escalating expenses.

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Foodie calls: Dating for a free meal (rather than a relationship)

New psychology research reveals 23-33% of women in an online study say they've engaged in a 'foodie call,' where they set up a date for a free meal. These women score high on the 'dark triad' of personality traits as well.

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Harmful algal blooms in lakes, reservoirs

With limited resources to monitor often-unpredictable algae blooms, water managers are turning to new technologies from NASA and its partners to detect and keep track of potential hazards.

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'Sneezing' plants contribute to disease proliferation

"'The jumping droplets, at the rate of 100 or more an hour, are a violent expulsion of dew from the surface. It's good for the plant because it is removing spores from itself, but it's bad because, like a human sneeze, the liquid droplets are finding their way onto neighboring plants. '

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Study challenges 'no pain no gain' requirement for patients with clogged leg arteries

Patients with peripheral arterial disease should be given the option of pain-free exercise, according to a new study.

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Is BMI an Accurate Way to Measure Body Fat?

As widespread as the BMI method of body measurement is, the ever-growing consensus is that this one-size-fits-all approach may be flawed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cash Days Race Replay: Murder Nova vs. Ronnie Hobbs

The final race of the night: Murder Nova vs. Ronnie Hobbs. Don't miss new episodes of Street Outlaws at Mondays 9p! Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco

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'Friendly' bacteria could help save frogs from disease

A discovery by UK scientists could help save species such as the European common frog from extinction

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From sheep and cattle to giraffes, genome study reveals evolution of ruminants

A detailed study of the genomes of 44 species of ruminants gives new insight into the evolution and success of these mammals.

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Ageism reduced by education, intergenerational contact

Researchers have shown for the first time that it is possible to reduce ageist attitudes, prejudices and stereotypes through education and intergenerational contact.

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Traditional fluid flow observations may miss the big picture

Before and after comparisons don't tell the full story of chemical reactions in flowing fluids, such as those in drug delivery systems.

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'Hunger hormone' imbalance can trigger obesity

Scientists discovered a new mutation in the gene that regulates the key hormone suppressing hunger called leptin. This new mutation could help researchers understand why people develop excess of body fat.

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Tailor-made prosthetic liners could help more amputees walk again

Researchers have developed a new way of designing and manufacturing bespoke prosthetic liners, in less than a day.

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Gut bacteria associated with chronic pain for first time

A research team has shown, for the first time, that there are alterations in the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracts of people with fibromyalgia. Approximately 20 different species of bacteria were found in either greater or are lesser quantities in the microbiomes of participants suffering from the disease than in the healthy control group.

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Rise of the Extinction Deniers

Just like climate deniers, they’re out to obfuscate and debase the scientists and conservationists trying to save the world—and maybe get rid of a few pesky species in the process — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The New Science of Building Baseball Superstars

Golden Cosmos Baseball is the most American of sports, or so its celebrants, from Walt Whitman to George Will, have long been fond of telling us. How appropriate, then, that our national pastime is so steeped in that most American of creeds: exceptionalism. Baseball is different from such rival professional sports as basketball and football not simply because it’s older and slower, but because it

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Hackers Used Two Firefox Zero Days to Hit a Crypto Exchange

A ransomware haul, a border security leak, and more of the week's top security news.

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Rise of the Extinction Deniers

Just like climate deniers, they’re out to obfuscate and debase the scientists and conservationists trying to save the world—and maybe get rid of a few pesky species in the process — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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If machines want to make art, will humans understand it?

Assuming that the emergence of consciousness in artificial minds is possible, those minds will feel the urge to create art. But will we be able to understand it? To answer this question, we need to consider two subquestions: when does the machine become an author of an artwork? And how can we form an understanding of the art that it makes? Empathy, we argue , is the force behind our capacity to u

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How to find a good restaurant? Economists can help

Where to eat? It's a question you've probably pondered when visiting somewhere unfamiliar. Though it's fun to explore a strange suburb, town or city, when you're hungry you'd rather minimise the chance of paying exorbitant prices for an unpleasant experience. Can economics help? We've combined economic theory with data from online restaurant ratings to identify a few simple strategies that will h

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Does Fluffy Really Want to Be an Adventure Cat?

With a leash and a harness, any feline can safely explore the great outdoors. But owners need to be mindful of signs of stress.

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Think Again Podcast's 200th episode! Robert MacFarlane (writer) – deep time rising

"We think of ourselves as this surface species. Of builders. But we are a species of burrowers and borers. And we are leaving warrens behind us that dwarf any ant's nest…" "That handprint on the cave wall is testimony to that urge to move into darkness in search of meaning—in search of different orders of time." None I'm underground as I write this, one day before taping the conversation you're a

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Why So Many Bacteria Live on the Surface of Your Eye

Only recently have scientists found the human eye has its own microbiome.

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12 Best Couch Co-Op Games (2019): PS4, Xbox One, PC, Switch

These are some of the best local cooperative multiplayer games for 2 – 4 players—split screen fun for every gaming system.

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Hvad er det ved vinylpladen, som fortsat er tiltrækkende?

12-tommers plastpladerne endte ikke på teknologimuseet som forventet. CDen har til gengældt ramt muren.

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Scientists Find Early Evidence of Humans Cooking Starches

More than 100 millennia ago, people were roasting tubers—a practice that fueled their bodies and may have aided migrations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Netflix is testing a pop-out floating video player on desktop

Netflix is testing out a new feature that could mean you never have to stop watching, not even while you work – it’s a pop-out video player, similar to the one you may be used to from …

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Why Do Some People Always Get Bitten by Mosquitoes, While Others Don't?

Some people can sit outside all summer long and not suffer from mosquito bites. Others turn into an itchy mess despite bathing in DEET and never leaving the purple glow of the bug zapper. What gives?

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The rise of the deepfake and the threat to democracy

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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Electric MINI To Be Unveiled In July 2019

submitted by /u/classsiob23b [link] [comments]

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Is There Still a Deal to Be Done With Iran?

The United States stepped right up to the brink of striking Iran over a downed American drone—and then abruptly stepped back. Yet the conditions that have stoked weeks of tensions remain fully in place, as does the question of what exactly President Donald Trump plans to do in the face of Iranian threats against American assets and interests. Now that the two countries have traveled so far down t

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Colombia’s Border Czar Stands Against the Anti-migrant Tide

BOGOTÁ, Colombia—Felipe Muñoz’s cellphone rang about every five minutes as we talked in his 15th-floor apartment overlooking the Andes mountains. It was the local head of the UN refugee agency. Then the governor of a border state. Then a mayor. Then the leader of an NGO. Hundreds of Venezuelan military defectors housed along Colombia’s border were unhappy because they had been told their hosts wo

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15 Best Tech Deals Now: ThinkGeek Sale, Apple Watch, and More

From camp chairs to computers, we scoured the web to highlight some of our favorite tech deals this weekend.

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Tell Me It’s Not About Race

The pace of legal news in the third year of the Trump administration is dizzying; sometimes it seems as if our legal system is shaking itself to pieces, like a car driven too fast too long. So you can be forgiven if you missed two news developments earlier this month: first, a decision by a federal district court in California to dismiss federal indictments against four members of the neofascist

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A Regional Approach to Rural Health Challenges

We began the first morning of our recent visit to Danville, Virginia, at an early-bird breakfast with the Rotary Club, where my husband, Jim, and I heard several personal hopes, celebrations, and notes of gratitude from its members, as they pitched bills into the Happy Dollars bucket. One Happy Dollar for good wishes to a son about to deploy with the military; another for a granddaughter, a rainb

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Two Novels That Make Mental Illness Legible

In the hours before her second suicide attempt, Juliet, the eponymous teenage protagonist of Juliet Escoria’s new novel, starts “doing the thing where I removed myself from myself.” As if floating outside her own body, she sees herself as a too-skinny girl with tangled hair, beset by hallucinatory demons, whose expression is “so flat … that she might as well have been dead.” The vision leads Juli

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Greenland’s ice: A trip back in time to see the future of climate change

The Greenland ice sheet covers 80% of the island of Greenland. The sheet is 1,500 miles long, 700 miles across, and two miles thick. Scientists call it the largest laboratory in the world. By studying the minerals and gasses trapped in layers of ice, glaciologists can unravel mysteries of the past, such as what the temperature was 1,000 years ago, or search for clues as to why the Greenland Norse

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Firedagesugen er kun toppen af isbjerget

PLUS. Vejen til vækst går ikke nødvendigvis via mere arbejde, men det kræver en fokuseret kulturændring, viser ny bog om erfaringerne fra en dansk virksomhed.

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The US is making digital camouflage so that AIs can’t spot spy planes

The US Navy wants to modify military vehicles to fool AIs. For example, so that an AI misclassifies a tank as just an ordinary car

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Machine learning unlocks mysteries of quantum physics

submitted by /u/acschmidt23 [link] [comments]

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Varmepumpen har mange anvendelsesmuligheder i dansk industri

Varmepumpen er særligt interessant, fordi en vis mængde mekanisk energi kan forædles til en mange gange større varmeenergi, forklarede professor, dr.ing. J. L. Mansa ved et foredrag i Ingeniørforeningens Maskiningeniørgruppe i 1942.

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Futter du regnskov af, når du griller? Sådan finder du klimavenligt kul

Mærkningsordninger kan få dig på sporet af bæredygtigt kul, råder ekspert.

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Ljuskänslig svans

Det kan vara viktigt att hålla reda på var man har bakändan, men det kan vara svårt för en lång och böjlig orm som försöker gömma sig för någon som vill äta upp den. Ett internationellt forskarlag har nu funnit att havsormar av släktena Hydrophis och Hydrelaps har ett ljussinne i svansen, så att de kan märka om den är ordentligt gömd.

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Dry lakebeds and fights for water as drought grips India's Chennai

Angry residents fight in queues at water taps, lakes have been turned into barren moonscapes and restaurants are cutting back on meals as the worst drought in living memory grips India's Chennai.

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US blocks more Chinese tech firms on national security concerns

The US Commerce Department blacklisted five Chinese tech entities Friday in a new move against Beijing's supercomputing industry likely to raise tensions ahead of a meeting between President Trump and Xi Jinping next week.

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Sjögurkor ska städa svenska hav

Sjögurkan, eller ”havets dammsugare”, säljs för svindlande summor i Asien. Nu vill svenska forskare även få igång odling svenska vatten.

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First-ever successful mind-controlled robotic arm without brain implants

Researchers have made a breakthrough in the field of noninvasive robotic device control. Using a noninvasive brain-computer interface (BCI), researchers have developed the first-ever successful mind-controlled robotic arm exhibiting the ability to continuously track and follow a computer cursor.

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Virtual reality takes a leap into taste

submitted by /u/MarioKartFromHell [link] [comments]

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'Tung, men vigtig': DiCaprios nye dokumentar kommer med løsninger på klimakrisen

Klimaforsker er begejstret over HBOs nye film, men den er langt fra perfekt, lyder dommen.

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Trusler, løgne og chikane: Forstå krigen mellem økologiske og konventionelle landmænd

Danske landmænd er voldsomt uenige om sandheden, når det kommer til, hvem der skader klima og miljø mest.

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The gym proving too expensive or time consuming?

A new study investigated a home-based high-intensity interval training (Home-HIT) program and studied its benefits for clinically obese individuals with an elevated risk of heart disease.

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Your brain activity can be used to measure how well you understand a concept

As students learn a new concept, measuring how well they grasp it has often depended on traditional paper and pencil tests. Researchers have developed a machine learning algorithm, which can be used to measure how well a student understands a concept based on his or her brain activity patterns. The study is one of the first to look at how knowledge learned in school is represented in the brain.

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Moral concerns override desire to profit from finding a lost wallet

The setup of a research study was a bit like the popular ABC television program 'What Would You Do?' — minus the television cameras and big reveal in the end.

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How to solve the water puzzle from Die Hard 3

The last drop. (illustration by Laura Lannes/) Fans of Die Hard With A Vengeance will remember this one: To disable a bomb, Detective John McClane must measure out exactly 4 gallons of water, and place the resulting weight on a scale. His tools are yours: a 3-gallon and a 5-­gallon jug—and a single fountain. McClane did it in less than 5 minutes, but we won't time you. This go-round, lives probab

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Antiperspirant Boosts Armpit and Toe-Web Microbial Diversity

Rather than wiping microbes out, antiperspirants and foot powders increased the diversity of microbial flora in armpits and between toes. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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'Friendly' bacteria could help save frogs from disease

A discovery by UK scientists could help save species such as the European common frog from extinction

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A Tech Expert Says Google Chrome Has Become Spy Software

Why it might be time to change your browser.

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Cryo-EM structure of OSCA1.2 from Oryza sativa elucidates the mechanical basis of potential membrane hyperosmolality gating [Plant Biology]

Sensing and responding to environmental water deficiency and osmotic stresses are essential for the growth, development, and survival of plants. Recently, an osmolality-sensing ion channel called OSCA1 was discovered that functions in sensing hyperosmolality in Arabidopsis. Here, we report the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure and function of an OSCA1 homolog…

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Comprehensive comparison of pore-scale models for multiphase flow in porous media [Applied Physical Sciences]

Multiphase flows in porous media are important in many natural and industrial processes. Pore-scale models for multiphase flows have seen rapid development in recent years and are becoming increasingly useful as predictive tools in both academic and industrial applications. However, quantitative comparisons between different pore-scale models, and between these models…

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Multiplicative fitness, rapid haplotype discovery, and fitness decay explain evolution of human MHC [Evolution]

The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a central component of the vertebrate immune system and hence evolves in the regime of a host–pathogen evolutionary race. The MHC is associated with quantitative traits which directly affect fitness and are subject to selection pressure. The evolution of haplotypes at the MHC HLA…

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Acculturation drives the evolution of intergroup conflict [Evolution]

Conflict between groups of individuals is a prevalent feature in human societies. A common theoretical explanation for intergroup conflict is that it provides benefits to individuals within groups in the form of reproduction-enhancing resources, such as food, territory, or mates. However, it is not always the case that conflict results…

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Glucocorticoid receptor modulators CpdX and CpdX-D3 exhibit the same in vivo antiinflammatory activities as synthetic glucocorticoids [Medical Sciences]

We previously reported that the nonsteroidal compound CpdX, which was initially characterized 20 y ago as a possible gestagen and, shortly afterward, as a possible drug for treatments of inflammatory diseases, selectively triggers the NFκB/AP1-mediated tethered indirect transrepression function of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and could therefore be a selective…

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Epigenetic signature of PD-1+ TCF1+ CD8 T cells that act as resource cells during chronic viral infection and respond to PD-1 blockade [Immunology and Inflammation]

We have recently defined a novel population of PD-1 (programmed cell death 1)+ TCF1 (T cell factor 1)+ virus-specific CD8 T cells that function as resource cells during chronic LCMV infection and provide the proliferative burst seen after PD-1 blockade. Such CD8 T cells have been found in other chronic…

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Antiperspirant Boosts Armpit and Toe-Web Microbial Diversity

Rather than wiping microbes out, antiperspirants and foot powders increased the diversity of microbial flora in armpits and between toes. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hypersonic Missiles Are Unstoppable. And They’re Starting a New Global Arms Race.

The new weapons — which could travel at more than 15 times the speed of sound with terrifying accuracy — threaten to change the nature of warfare.

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Antiperspirant Boosts Armpit and Toe-Web Microbial Diversity

Rather than wiping microbes out, antiperspirants and foot powders increased the diversity of microbial flora in armpits and between toes. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The next Falcon Heavy launch is arguably the most exciting one to date

A Falcon Heavy demo mission (SpaceX/) SpaceX’s next Falcon Heavy launch is set for Monday, and it will undoubtedly be the Falcon Heavy’s most exciting and most challenging mission to date. It will mark the rocket’s first ever nighttime flight and its third flight overall, and it’s both the feat itself and the payloads it’s carrying that make this such a monumental event. For starters, there's the

19h

Radio Atlantic: The Fight for Reparations

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) On Wednesday—for the first time in a decade—Congress held a hearing on reparations for slavery. It was a crystallizing moment for an issue that has gained prominence since Ta-Nehisi Coates’s 2014 Atlantic essay . Coates and others testified before a House committee on June 19th—Juneteenth—a day the nation celebrat

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Virtual reality takes a leap into taste

optoPAD is a newly developed system for creating virtual taste realities. It combines advanced optical and genetic techniques with touch-screen technology to monitor and control feeding behaviors and taste sensations in fruit flies. This new tool, which is now being freely shared with the scientific community, significantly extends the toolset available to study feeding behavior in this model orga

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How recyclable is your food shop?

Research suggests almost half of packaging used by major UK supermarkets can't be easily recycled.

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For Cephalopod Week, Dive Into the World of Octopuses, Squids and More

A few fun facts about the many-armed creatures.

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How to lucid dream, and why you'd want to

A terrifying image of a lucid dream (agsandrew/Shutterstock/) Dreams can often be confusing and blurry experiences . Reduced critical thinking, little to no access to our true memories, and heightened impulsivity and emotions during normal dream states often make for head-scratching moments when our eyes first open in the morning. But dreams don't always play out this way. More than half of us ha

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Happy Numbers Have No Density

These blissful integers are a bit mysterious — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: No More Mr. Tough Guy

We’re trying something new: a once-a-week national-security-focused edition of The Atlantic ’s signature politics newsletter. Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. The Top Story Sailors get ready for flight action on the USS Abraham Lincoln in the Arabian Sea on June 14. (Tristan Kyle Labuguen / U.S. Navy / Handout / Reuters) No Mor

21h

Gender-specific differences in the salivary microbiome of caries-active children

At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Stephanie Ortiz, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, USA, gave a poster presentation on 'Gender-spec

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Lost wallets are more likely to be returned if they hold cash, researchers say

The study involved turning in more than 17,000 "lost" wallets to employees at various businesses in 40 countries. Employees were considerably more likely to report wallets with cash than those without. Interestingly, the results suggest altruism is not primarily driving this honest behavior. Would you be more likely to return a wallet you found on the street if it contained cash? A new study sugg

21h

Male ‘Pill’ may still prove too hard to swallow

Unwanted pregnancy carries higher physical and psychological costs for women than men

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Meet the Companies Trying to Put Humans Back on the Moon

In May, Jeff Bezos unveiled the lunar lander, dubbed Blue Moon, that his spacecraft company Blue Origin hopes to fly in the coming years. (Credit: Blue Origin) The rocket’s flare is sudden and brilliant, a blurring horizontal column of whooshing fire. Just as quickly, the bright jet flickers out of existence, the few seconds of burn enough complete the test. A pause in the control room, then appla

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NASA Selects PUNCH, a New Mission to Study the Sun

The PUNCH mission will include four microsatellites that work together to watch the entire heliosphere. (Credit: SwRI) The sun powers life on Earth and keeps us from freezing to death. It also occasionally sends out bursts of charged particles that can be deadly to astronauts outside Earth’s sheltering atmosphere, and also wreak havoc on electronics both on and above Earth. There's also a lot rese

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Ancient Campfire Remains Hold Oldest-Known Remains of Humans Cooking Starches

(Credit: Benevolente82/Shutterstock) More than 100,000 years ago, humans lived in the caves that dot South Africa’s coastline. With the sea on their doorstep and the Cape’s rich diversity of plant life at their backs, these anatomically modern Homo sapiens flourished. Over several millennia, they collected shells that they used as beads, created toolkits to manufacture red pigment, and sculpted to

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Costa Rica To Go 100% Plastic and Carbon-Free By 2021

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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No more squeaky voices: We're running out of helium

Although it's commonly used to make balloons float, helium is actually a precious, non-renewable resource. Without helium, a great deal of scientific research can not be conducted, and technology like MRI machines won't work. The demand for helium is enormous and growing; there is no way to create artificial helium economically and no way for the Earth's helium stores to sustain the demand. None

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You might not be able to opt-out of Amazon's drone-based "surveillance as a service"

In the near future, Amazon could announce their recently patented “surveillance as a service” program that employs delivery drones to photograph houses as they fly by, checking for break-ins …

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Genius Versus Google Explained

Emily Dreyfuss joins us this week to discuss the larger implications of Genius’s fight with Google over song lyrics. Also, we get all tingly with ASMR.

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New understanding of thermoelectric materials

Researchers reported a major step forward in the search for new thermoelectric materials Friday, the discovery of a new explanation for asymmetrical thermoelectric performance.

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Last week in tech: A MacBook Pro recall, the new Kindle, and Facebook’s cryptocurrency

Do you prefer yellow or blue light on your Kindle? This one has both. (Amazon/) The mid-2000s were the golden age for the MacBook Pro. You got a ton of port options—including an HDMI—and the keyboard didn't die a horrible death just because you let a single Frito crumb slip beneath the keys. Unfortunately, those old machines aren't always totally perfect. This week, Apple announced a recall of Ma

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Pathogenesis and treatment of periodontitis: Honoring the legacy of Ricardo Teles

The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and American Association for Dental Research (AADR) honored the legacy of Ricardo Teles in a symposium at the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the IADR, held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American AADR and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR).

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Autoimmunity and chair-side risk assessment of temporomandibular disorders

At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), many oral and poster presentations centered around temporomandibular disorders, or TMD.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘And That Was My Last Hideous Man.’

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, June 21. ‣ The writer E. Jean Carroll accused President Donald Trump of sexually assaulting her in a dressing room two decades ago, in a searing essay for New York : “I made a list of hideous men in my life. It

22h

New Sex Drug for Women to Improve Low Libido Is Approved by the F.D.A.

The treatment involves an injectable pen and can cause nausea. Only one other ‘Viagra for women’ therapy is on the market.

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This 12-Foot, 463-Lb. Alligator Went Head to Head with a Semitruck

The creature survived the crash and wandered dazed in circles around a highway exit in Tallahassee before a trapper turned up.

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Flushed Goldfish Grew to Be Kitten-Size in Niagara River

Tens of millions of "freed" goldfish are thought to inhabit the Great Lakes.

22h

New understanding of thermoelectric materials

Researchers reported a major step forward in the search for new thermoelectric materials Friday, the discovery of a new explanation for asymmetrical thermoelectric performance.

22h

Work smarter, not harder: Question all the things you 'should' do

Organization expert Carson Tate suggests taking a good hard look at all the things you assume you "should" do and questioning why those things are so important. By seeing beyond the veneer of our "shoulds," we can better understand when it's best to say, "Yes," and when it benefits us to say, "No." In this lesson, Tate explores a powerful method for evaluating every "should" that comes your way.

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Making complex decisions? Embrace objective truth.

The world is becoming more analytical. Given the deluge of data available and the rapid pace of change across all facets of our lives, good decision-making – that is, the ability to be analytical in your approach to making choices – is critical. In this lesson, Economist Lawrence Summers explores why deciding wisely is essential to leading a good life. By the end of it, you'll have a deeper under

22h

A Brit’s Advice for the U.S. Health-Care System

On the U.K.’s National Health Service, every person is covered completely. There are no bills, deductibles, or co-pays. In fact, there are no insurance policies to speak of. The system is paid for by taxes, and the government controls the prices of drugs and the salaries of the doctors. “It’s like an unwritten constitution. There’s nothing to renew. It’s all there and it’s free,” said Jennifer Di

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Huge fire breaks out at Philadelphia oil refinery

A huge blaze erupted at a Philadelphia oil refinery early Friday, sending a fireball into the sky and forcing residents to stay off nearby roads, local media and officials said.

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San Francisco's Juul Ban, an All-Electric Airplane, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Philly Refinery Explosion Shoots Fireball Visible from Space

The explosion was so hot and massive, it was picked up by weather satellites.

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