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nyheder2019juni24

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For andet år i træk: Nye biler pulsede mere CO2 ud i 2018

En opgørelse fra Det Europæiske Miljøagentur viser, at udledningen af CO2 fra nye biler i Europa fortsat bevæger sig længere væk EU's mål for bilers udledning.

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Skærmforbrug kan ændre dine knogler: Tjek om du har en smartphone-bule i kraniet

Din krop kan være ved at gøre sig klar til et liv med bøjet nakke henover en lysende skærm.

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Child gambling is a form of self-harm – it’s too complex for a quick-fix clinic | Anouchka Grose

Simple therapies such as CBT can be only partly effective. We need to rein in an industry that unscrupulously targets vulnerable young people Almost half a million children in England and Wales are gambling regularly , with about 55,000 estimated to have a serious problem. Suicide rates for gambling addicts are high, and gambling-related problems cause stress for individuals and families. In respo

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New Drug Is Effective for Post-Partum Depression, But There Are Drawbacks

A new drug promises to cure postpartum depression, but it is restricted and patients must be hospitalized for a 60-hour IV infusion.

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Short-term effects of hurricanes Irma and Maria on Puerto Rico's forest birds

In September of 2017, hurricanes Irma and Maria delivered a devastating one-two punch to Puerto Rico, causing significant defoliation of the island's forests. While the detrimental effects of these storms on human populations was well-documented, little was known about how the island's bird populations were affected – until now. A new paper published in PLOS ONE by Vermont Center for Ecostudies (V

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Short-term effects of hurricanes Irma and Maria on Puerto Rico's forest birds

In September of 2017, hurricanes Irma and Maria delivered a devastating one-two punch to Puerto Rico, causing significant defoliation of the island's forests. While the detrimental effects of these storms on human populations was well-documented, little was known about how the island's bird populations were affected – until now. A new paper published in PLOS ONE by Vermont Center for Ecostudies (V

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Playing 'tag': Tracking movement of young oysters

A new publication in the journal Estuaries and Coasts investigates the use of a fluorescent dye to track movements of young oysters. The publication, "Field mark-recapture of calcein-stained larval oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in a freshwater-dominated estuary", provides new knowledge on methods for tracking oysters in low salinity environments common to coastal waters, particularly in the nort

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How the dragon got its frill

The frilled dragon exhibits a distinctive large erectile ruff. Researchers (UNIGE and SIB) report that an ancestral embryonic gill of the dragon embryo turns into a neck pocket that expands and folds, forming the frill. They demonstrate that this robust folding pattern emerges from mechanical forces during the homogeneous growth of the frill skin, due to the tensions resulting from its attachment

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Playing 'tag': Tracking movement of young oysters

A new publication in the journal Estuaries and Coasts investigates the use of a fluorescent dye to track movements of young oysters. The publication, "Field mark-recapture of calcein-stained larval oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in a freshwater-dominated estuary", provides new knowledge on methods for tracking oysters in low salinity environments common to coastal waters, particularly in the nort

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Applying the Goldilocks principle to DNA structure

The Goldilocks of fairy-tale fame knew something about porridge. It needed to be just right—neither too hot nor too cold. Same with furniture—neither too hard nor too soft. In a different context, scientists at UC San Diego know something about DNA. They know that the strands of our genetic code, if extended, would measure two meters, or about six feet. They also know that the strands fold into an

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Tapping into the way cells communicate

A new technology discovered by UConn School of Dental Medicine researchers records cellular communication in real time—providing a closer look into the dynamics of cell secretion and a greater understanding of how cells repair tissue.

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Should pets ever be kept in classrooms?

Animal charities say it’s teaching the wrong lessons – but schools argue it inspires children to learn about the natural world Watching duck eggs hatch in a classroom was a “wow” experience that brought the topic to life, says Sarah Holmes, teacher in Derby High School’s primary department. “It was a fantastic opportunity for the children to learn about the life cycle, see the ducklings grow and

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The case for a special Democratic climate debate | Kate Aronoff

Housing, immigration, health – there’s no policy area that won’t be touched by the climate crisis. The Democratic candidates should embrace the challenge Twenty candidates – ten candidates per night – will take the stage during this week’s two-part Democratic primary debates. Each debate will last two hours, and, excluding introductions and interruptions, each candidate will have roughly 12 minut

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The climate costs of a plastic planet | Carroll Muffett

Every stage of the plastic lifecycle releases harmful carbon emissions into the atmosphere, contributing to global heating Upset about the plastic crisis? Stop trying so hard Plastics are among the most ubiquitous materials in our economy, our lives, and our environment. They are also among the most pervasive and persistent pollutants on Earth. In recent years, stark images of beaches, waterways,

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Tapping into the way cells communicate

A new technology discovered by UConn School of Dental Medicine researchers records cellular communication in real time—providing a closer look into the dynamics of cell secretion and a greater understanding of how cells repair tissue.

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Remote-controlled drug delivery implant size of grape may help chronic disease management

People with chronic diseases like arthritis, diabetes and heart disease may one day forego the daily regimen of pills and, instead, receive a scheduled dosage of medication through a grape-sized implant that is remotely controlled.

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Crop pests more widespread than previously known

Insects and diseases that damage crops are probably present in many places thought to be free of them, new research shows.

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Crop pests more widespread than previously known

Insects and diseases that damage crops are probably present in many places thought to be free of them, new research shows.

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Drone sightings disrupt Singapore flights for second time

Drone sightings have disrupted flights at Singapore's main airport for the second time in a week, authorities said, as the devices increasingly cause havoc for air traffic worldwide.

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Nissan shareholders to vote on governance overhaul

Nissan shareholders began a fractious annual meeting Tuesday to discuss revamping operations at the crisis-hit Japanese automaker after the Carlos Ghosn scandal, amid lingering tension with French partner Renault.

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Jump in wildfires means smoke's health impact will spread

Climate change in the Western U.S. means more intense and frequent wildfires churning out waves of smoke that scientists say will affect tens of millions of people and cause premature deaths to spike.

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Russian, North American astronauts return to earth

The first crew to blast off to the International Space Station following a launch accident that deepened doubts over Russia's space programme returned to earth safely on Tuesday.

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Elon Musk's last warning about AI.

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Solar farms could be wildlife havens that tackle biodiversity crisis

UK’s solar farms could provide habitats and food for wildlife, says a new report – but critics worry that planned larger farms will be less wildlife-friendly

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New Research for week #25, 2019

49 publications for this week. T he last paper in this week's list features Skeptical Science volunteer and highly cited researcher Stephan Lewandowsky along with Skeptical Science founder John Cook as first and second authors respectively, working with regular collaborator Gilles Gignac. Their paper identifies, confirms and examines what seems to many laypersons to be peer pressure to conform to

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Rhino release: European parks bring animals to Rwanda

Five critically endangered rhinos from European zoos are flown to Rwanda to be released into the wild.

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Hackers are stealing years of call records from hacked cell networks

Security researchers say they have uncovered a massive espionage campaign involving the theft of call records from hacked cell network providers to conduct targeted surveillance on individuals …

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Banning dangerous chemicals could save the US billions | Leonardo Trasande

It’s a myth that environmental regulations stifle economic productivity. Harmful chemicals cost the US $340bn a year The Trump administration has argued that environmental regulations hold back economic productivity. Yet history suggests that the opposite is the case. Look at phasing out lead in gasoline. To this day, the US receives a $200bn annual economic stimulus package each year because lea

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Elite Runners' Microbes Make Mice Mightier

Mice fed bacteria isolated from elite athletes logged more treadmill time than other mice that got bacteria found in yogurt.

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Trackers help dementia sufferers stay at home

New tech includes GPS-fitted insoles, sleep sensors and smartphone memory prompts

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How smart tech is helping dementia sufferers

Devices range from room sensors tracking vital signs to bracelets triggering advice via radio

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Viewing pornography increase unethical behavior at work

New research discovers employees who view pornography aren't just costing companies millions of dollars in wasted time, they're causing harm to the company.

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Cholesterol medication could invite diabetes, study suggests

A study of thousands of patients' health records found that those who were prescribed cholesterol-lowering statins had at least double the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The detailed analysis of health records and other data from patients in a private insurance plan in the Midwest provides a real-world picture of how efforts to reduce heart disease may be contributing to another major medical

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Babies can learn link between language and ethnicity, study suggests

Eleven-month-old infants can learn to associate the language they hear with ethnicity, recent research from the University of British Columbia suggests. Eleven-month-old infants looked more at the faces of people of Asian descent versus those of Caucasian descent when hearing Cantonese versus English — but not when hearing Spanish.

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Remote-controlled drug delivery implant size of grape may help chronic disease management

People with chronic diseases like arthritis, diabetes and heart disease may one day forego the daily regimen of pills and, instead, receive a scheduled dosage of medication through a grape-sized implant that is remotely controlled.

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Tokyo Tech-led study shows how icy outer solar system satellites may have formed

Beyond the orbit of the planet Neptune, there are a multitude of icy and rocky small bodies, smaller than planets but larger than comets. These likely formed at the same time as the Solar System, and understanding their origin could provide important clues as to how the entire Solar System originated. Using sophisticated computer simulations and observations of TNOs, a Tokyo Tech-led team has show

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Shorter rotations in intensive care units mitigate burnout among physicians

Shortening the length of rotations in a medical intensive care unit (MICU) from the traditional 14-consecutive day schedule to only seven days helps mitigate burnout among critical care physicians, according to a new Penn Medicine pilot study. The study, published today in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, is the first to validate the efficacy of a truncated rotation

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Study finds link between hypertension and air pollution

A new study soon to appear in the Faculty of Public Health's Journal of Public Health, published by Oxford University Press, suggests that air pollution and living in apartment buildings may be associated with an increased risk for dangerous conditions like heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. This paper is embargoed until midnight EST on June 25.

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SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy Launches on 3rd Mission

The powerful rocket is carrying an assortment of cargo to orbit, including a solar sail, an atomic clock and the ashes of 152 people.

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Trods Sundhedsplatformen: Personale skal stadig hente ukrypterede patientdata i gamle systemer

Sundhedspersonale på Sjælland skal stadig hente oplysninger fra gamle systemer, der ellers skulle have været pensioneret med Sundhedsplatformen. Det giver risiko for at data bruges forkert, lyder vurderingen i rapport.

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Peak Performance: Inside The World Of Super Athletes

What does it mean to push the human body to the limit? (Image credit: RAJESH JANTILAL/AFP/Getty Images)

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Elite Runners' Microbes Make Mice Mightier

Mice fed bacteria isolated from elite athletes logged more treadmill time than other mice that got bacteria found in yogurt. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Elite Runners' Microbes Make Mice Mightier

Mice fed bacteria isolated from elite athletes log more treadmill time than other mice that got bacteria found in yogurt. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Likely Chinese Hacker Crew Targeted 10 Phone Carriers to Steal Metadata

In one case, they stole the location and call record data of 20 specific individuals.

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Chronic conditions — not infectious diseases — are top 5 causes of early death in China

Chronic diseases, such as stroke, ischemic heart disease, and lung cancer, now represent the leading causes of premature death in China, according to a new scientific study. The rise in non-communicable diseases reflects declines in maternal and child mortality over nearly three decades, largely the result of economic growth and increasing levels of education. In addition, China has instituted nat

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Time Dilation & Interstellar Civilizations

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Researchers clear runway for tin based perovskite solar cells

Researchers believe their tin based perovskite solar cell could clear the runway for solar panel technology to take off.

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Can deprescribing drugs linked to cognitive impairment actually reduce risk of dementia?

Scientists call for randomized deprescribing trials to address anticholinergic drug use as a potentially modifiable and reversible risk factor for dementia, a growing public health issue.

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Large cohort study confirms small added obstetric risk from transfer of longer developed embryos

The transfer of embryos cultured for five or six days (instead of two or three) after fertilization in IVF and ICSI has become routine in many fertility clinics. Many (but not all) studies show that transferring these longer and better developed embryos – known as blastocysts – will increase the chance of pregnancy and live birth.

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Chemists discover structure of glucagon fibrils

Study may be a step toward shelf-stable versions of the hormone, which is used to control diabetes.

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New therapy targets gut bacteria to prevent and reverse food allergies

A new study identifies the species of bacteria in the human infant gut that protect against food allergies, finding changes associated with the development of food allergies and an altered immune response.

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Alzheimer's missing link ID'd, answering what tips brain's decline

Researchers have found that immune cells that typically protect neurons from damage may be the link between early and late brain changes in Alzheimer's disease. Breaking that link could lead to new approaches to delay or prevent the disease.

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Seeing the doctor? Relax, you'll remember more

Some patients feel shame, anxiety or fear immediately before seeing their doctor, making them tense. But if they can relax and become calm, patients will likely pay attention to and better comprehend health messages, suggests a new study.

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Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru

Methods used 1,400 years ago could boost water availability during Lima's dry season, according to new research.

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Researchers clear runway for tin based perovskite solar cells

Researchers believe their tin based perovskite solar cell could clear the runway for solar panel technology to take off.

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Some trees can make droughts worse

Tree species in hotter climates—like oaks in California and the Mediterranean—respond to drought by quickly spending the water available to them. (DepositPhotos/) When budgets get tight, some people get thrifty and others get spending. Turns out, trees are much the same: while certain plants handle hot and dry spells by being frugal about their water usage, others ramp up the amount of moisture t

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Researchers create multi-junction solar cells from off-the-shelf components

In a proof-of-concept paper, researchers detail a new approach for creating multi-junction solar cells using off-the-shelf components, resulting in lower cost, high-efficiency solar cells for use in multiple applications.

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Playing 'tag': Tracking movement of young oysters

A new publication investigates the use of a fluorescent dye to track movements of young oysters. The publication provides new knowledge on methods for tracking oysters in low salinity environments common to coastal waters, particularly in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

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Interim scan during prostate cancer therapy helps guide treatment

New prostate cancer research shows that adding an interim scan during therapy can help guide a patient's treatment. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after two cycles of lutetium-177 (177Lu)-PSMA radioligand therapy has shown a significant predictive value for patient survival.

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Tropical soil disturbance could be hidden source of CO2

Researchers working in the Democratic Republic of the Congo found a link between the churning of deep soils during deforestation and the release of carbon dioxide through streams and rivers.

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Researchers create multi-junction solar cells from off-the-shelf components

In a proof-of-concept paper, researchers detail a new approach for creating multi-junction solar cells using off-the-shelf components, resulting in lower cost, high-efficiency solar cells for use in multiple applications.

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NASA's new plane will fly at supersonic speeds—without a windshield

The pilot's view in the X-59 cockpit will look something like this. (NASA/) In 2021, if all goes according to plan, NASA test pilots will take an experimental plane with a very long nose and fly it faster than the speed of sound. But the pilot won’t be gazing at the clouds ahead through a window—they’ll be staring at a 4K monitor. Two cameras will pipe real-time video from the front of the aircra

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Ant farmers boost plant nutrition

Research, led by Dr. Guillaume Chomicki from the Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, has demonstrated that millions of years of ant agriculture has remodeled plant physiology. Farming ants deposit nitrogen-rich feces directly inside plants, which has led to the evolution of these ultra-absorptive plant structures.

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SpaceRyde wants to make access to space more available and more affordable

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How VR Is Helping Autistic Kids Make Sense Of The World

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Largest offshore wind farm in the U.S. to go ahead

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Innovative Fridge Uses Gel, Bio-Nano Robots to Cool Your Food

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Ant farmers boost plant nutrition

Humans began cultivating crops about 12,000 years ago. Ants have been at it rather longer. Leafcutter ants, the best-known insect farmers, belong to a lineage of insects that have been running fungus farms based on chopped-up vegetable matter for over 50 million years. The ant farming of flowering plants, however, started more recently, about 3 million years ago in the Fiji Islands.

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Ant farmers boost plant nutrition

Humans began cultivating crops about 12,000 years ago. Ants have been at it rather longer. Leafcutter ants, the best-known insect farmers, belong to a lineage of insects that have been running fungus farms based on chopped-up vegetable matter for over 50 million years. The ant farming of flowering plants, however, started more recently, about 3 million years ago in the Fiji Islands.

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Alphabet's Plan for Toronto Depends on Huge Amounts of Data

Google sister company Sidewalk Labs outlines a plan for a 12-acre lot with affordable housing, a pneumatic tube for garbage, and room for autonomous vehicles.

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Gas on Saturn’s moon could be ‘free lunch’ for alien life

The subsurface ocean of Saturn’s moon Enceladus probably has higher than previously known concentrations of carbon dioxide and hydrogen and a more Earthlike pH level, possibly providing conditions favorable to life, according to new research. The presence of such high concentrations could provide fuel—a sort of chemical “free lunch”—for living microbes, says lead researcher Lucas Fifer, a doctora

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Is Mars' Methane Spike a Sign of Life? Here’s How We’ll Know

The Curiosity rover detected a high concentration of methane on the red planet. Two Mars orbiters may soon clarify what that sighting really means.

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Why money cannot 'buy' housework

If a man is handy with the vacuum cleaner, isn't averse to rustling up a lush family meal most nights after he's put on the washing machine having popped into the supermarket on his way home then it's more than likely his partner will have her own bank account.A new study by Lancaster University reveals the way in which couples manage their money tells 'a tale of two marriages' in the UK today.

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Fake news 'vaccine' works: 'Pre-bunking' game reduces susceptibility to disinformation

Study of thousands of players shows a simple online game works like a 'vaccine,' increasing skepticism of fake news by giving people a 'weak dose' of the methods behind disinformation.

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Crop pests more widespread than previously known

Insects and diseases that damage crops are probably present in many places thought to be free of them, new research shows.

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Record-breaking Astronaut Peggy Whitson: 'It's an Exciting Time for Space Exploration'

Whitson during her time on the International Space Station. (Credit: NASA) Peggy Whitson’s career as an astronaut has been trailblazing: With a total of 665 days in space, Whitson not only currently holds the space endurance record in the U.S., she is eighth on that list overall. She was the first woman astronaut to hold NASA’s chief astronaut position, has completed a total of 10 spacewalks over

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Students Who Take Music Classes Also Do Better Academically, Study Finds

(Credit: Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock) Music is the language of feelings, the food of the soul. But could it also be a grade booster for high school students? Researchers think so — if students engage in actually playing the music (not just listening to it). A new study published in the Journal of Educational Psychology reports high school students who play musical instruments score signifi

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Watch Live as ISS Astronauts Return to Earth Tonight

From left: Expedition 58/59 astronaut Anne McClain, Roscosmos cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko and Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques. (Credit: NASA) After 204 days orbiting Earth on the International Space Station, three astronauts will return to Earth tonight. June 24 marks the end of their mission as Anne McClain, Oleg Kononenko, and David Saint-Jacques, undock from ISS and eventually

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Why money cannot 'buy' housework

If a man is handy with the vacuum cleaner, isn't averse to rustling up a lush family meal most nights after he's put on the washing machine having popped into the supermarket on his way home then it's more than likely his partner will have her own bank account.

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Shift to legal pot shows up in wastewater

Cannabis use has both increased and substantially shifted from the illicit market since retail sales began in 2014 in Washington state, report researchers. The researchers analyzed wastewater samples from 2013-2016 from two treatment plants that service a community of 200,000 in Western Washington. “We set out to perform a wastewater-based analysis that explored the impact of newly legalized reta

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Gun sales go up when gun control is in the news

New research shows a causal link between print news media coverage of US gun control policy in the wake of mass shooting events and increases in gun sales. The researchers rooted their study in a data-driven approach that reveals causal relationships, rather than mere correlations. It is the first study to quantify the influence of news media stories on firearm prevalence. Increases in firearm pu

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Too much cleanliness not bad for health, report on hygiene says

Royal Society for Public Health says need to expose children to germs is ‘dangerous myth’ The notion that too much cleanliness can be bad for your health and that children need to be exposed to germs is a dangerous myth, according to a public health body. The Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) said the hygiene hypothesis – that allergies are caused by too much cleanliness, by killing off the

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Can ‘painting’ 3D scans improve body image?

3D technology has the potential to help young women better appreciate their bodies, say researchers. The research shows that images from 3D scanners can help young women focus on body appreciation, which might in turn improve mental health. “3D body image scanning is a relatively new tool in social science research, and the research on using 3D tools for improving body image is scant,” says Virgi

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Fossils bust myth about mammals in dinosaur age

Paleontologists are trying to dispel the myth that a world crowded with dinosaurs left little room for mammals and their relatives. According to the myth, mammals and their kin, together known as mammaliaforms, remained tiny, mouse-like, and primitive. The myth posits that mammals didn’t evolve diverse shapes, diets, behaviors, and ecological roles until the K-Pg mass extinction event 66 million

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Better care needed for people displaying first symptoms of bipolar disorder

Better care and more research into treatments for people experiencing a first manic episode are urgently needed, according to researchers at the NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre.The study, published today in The Lancet Psychiatry by a team of international experts, describes patchy and inconsistent care, widespread failure to detect bipolar disorder early enough, and a lack of guidance on

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Space X's Launch Tonight, An Illegal Airbnb Empire, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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How to stare at your phone all day without messing up your body

There's no such thing as perfect posture. (Deposit Photos/) For a brief moment last week, everyone with a WiFi password thought they were seconds away from sprouting devil horns. The inciting headline? “‘Horns’ are growing on young people’s skulls. Phone use is to blame, research suggests.” While the story has all the uncanny ingredients of an Alex Jones-style conspiracy theory, it actually came

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Publisher Correction: Structure and function of Vms1 and Arb1 in RQC and mitochondrial proteome homeostasis

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1360-7 Publisher Correction: Structure and function of Vms1 and Arb1 in RQC and mitochondrial proteome homeostasis

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A new theory for trapping light particles aims to advance development of quantum computers

Researchers have developed a new protocol for ensuring the stability of data when photons are stored for extended periods of time. The theory could advance development of quantum computers.

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Applying the Goldilocks principle to DNA structure

Inspired by ideas from the physics of phase transitions and polymer physics, researchers set out to determine the organization of DNA inside the nucleus of a living cell. Their findings suggest that the phase state of the genomic DNA is 'just right' — a gel poised at the phase boundary between gel and sol, the solid-liquid phase transition.

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Settling the debate on serotonin's role in sleep

New research finds that serotonin is necessary for sleep, settling a long-standing controversy.

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Calibration method improves scientific research performed with smartphone cameras

Although smartphones and other consumer cameras are increasingly used for scientific applications, it's difficult to compare and combine data from different devices. A new easy-to-use standardized method makes it possible for almost anyone to calibrate these cameras without any specialized equipment, helping amateurs, science students and professional scientists to acquire useful data with any con

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Horrifying Technologies That Should Never Exist

Since (almost all) futuristic technologies could likely cause negative impact instead of positive, here are the bone-chilling technology examples that should never be allowed to exist (listed in no particular order): Weaponized Nanotechnology Nothing could end our reign here on Earth faster than weaponized — or severely botched — molecular assembling nanotechnology. It's a threat that stems from

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Crypto CEO Funneled Client Money Into Fake Accounts Before Death

Bombshell Report When reports emerged in early February that cryptocurrency exchange QuadrigaCX’s CEO Gerald Cotten had died, the rumor mill immediately started spinning. Did Cotten fake his own death to run away with some $190 million ? While his death was later confirmed and the exchange filed for bankruptcy in January, there’s some truth to the wild speculation that followed Cotten’s death: he

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Six fanny packs to carry your humongous phones

Phones don’t seem to be getting any smaller, so it appears we have a future of either deeper pockets—no thank you—or fanny packs to look forward to. When looking for a fanny pack, you’ll want to consider how much it can store, the weight of the bag itself, the number of pockets, if there are any unique security features, and lastly, the quality of materials. Oh, and it doesn’t hurt that they look

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Mysterious 'Bathtub Rings' of Titan Replicated on Earth

Something dark is spreading across the surface of Titan, and physicists have a new piece of evidence to explain what it is.

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How to navigate your computer screen with only your keyboard

Shove that mouse off to the side and get a-tapping. (Deposit Photos/) It's hard to imagine using a computer without a mouse or its notable descendants, the trackpad and pointing stick (you know, that rubber thing in the middle of the keyboard). So when they stop working, either because a button jammed or because they've given up altogether, it can feel like your computer has been bricked. Fortuna

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Cancel Culture

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, June 24. That’s a Lotta Debt: Senator Bernie Sanders unveiled a new plan to cancel $1.6 trillion of existing student debt and make public colleges in the U.S. debt-free. The proposal is unique, writes Adam Harri

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Machine Learning Algorithms are Getting Good at Beating Humans in Games

Jeopardy! champion Emma Boettcher’s Master’s paper on using text mining to predict how hard a Jeopardy! clue might be didn’t win her a title all on its own, but it does demonstrate the progress of technology. The post Machine Learning Algorithms are Getting Good at Beating Humans in Games appeared first on Futurism .

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Shopkeepers Around the World, Photographed With Their Wares

Canadian photographer Vladimir Antaki captures proprietors in the midst of their life's work, documenting what he calls "urban temples."

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Elon Musk: This Is SpaceX’s “Most Difficult Launch” Ever

Final Countdown At 11:30 p.m. EDT Monday night, a SpaceX Falcon Heavy will attempt to launch 24 new experimental satellites into space for the United States Department of Defense. Getting the satellites into orbit and detaching them from the Falcon Heavy without causing any collisions will take some careful finagling — CNN reports that SpaceX CEO Elon Musk described it as the company’s “most diff

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Wearable technology to personalize Lu-177-DOTATATE therapy for NETs

Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, are developing a user-friendly (worn at home) vest with technology that collects data to tailor personalized therapy for patients with metastatic, somatostatin-receptor-2 positive neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The study was presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).

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Crab Nebula Has Hit Earth with Highest-Energy Light Ever Recorded

Light Showers The Tibet Air Shower Array is located about five kilometers (3.1 miles) above sea level, and this high altitude makes it an ideal spot to gather data on the subatomic particles that shower the Earth after high-energy cosmic rays blast the planet’s atmosphere. Now, researchers are reporting that the array has detected the highest-energy photon ever seen on Earth — and they think they

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Sperm Can Survive Microgravity, but Don’t Expect Any Space Babies Soon

Frozen sperm didn’t seem fazed by several loop the loops in an aerobatic plane, but that’s a far cry from showing that they would make a healthy baby in space.

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Playing 'tag': Tracking movement of young oysters

A new publication in the journal Estuaries and Coasts investigates the use of a fluorescent dye to track movements of young oysters. The publication, 'Field mark-recapture of calcein-stained larval oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in a freshwater-dominated estuary', provides new knowledge on methods for tracking oysters in low salinity environments common to coastal waters, particularly in the nort

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Tapping into the way cells communicate

For the first time, scientists can record cells communicating in real time, opening the floodgates for new developments in cell therapy and other areas within cell biology.

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Applying the Goldilocks principle to DNA structure

Inspired by ideas from the physics of phase transitions and polymer physics, researchers in the Divisions of Physical and Biological Sciences at UC San Diego set out to determine the organization of DNA inside the nucleus of a living cell. Their findings, recently published in Nature Communications, suggest that the phase state of the genomic DNA is 'just right' — a gel poised at the phase bounda

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Research journal publishes first-ever obesity-focused education competencies

Research journal publishes the study 'Development of Obesity Competencies for Medical Education: A Report from the Obesity Medicine Education Collaborative' which outlines the first set of obesity-focused competencies to improve obesity medicine education for physicians and advanced healthcare providers. The 32 competencies were developed by The Obesity Medicine Education Collaborative (OMEC), an

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Curiosity Detects Methane Spike on Mars Again, But What Does it Mean?

Spacecraft have been both finding and not finding methane around Mars for years. (Credit: ESA/ATG medialab) Last week, NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover detected a sudden spike in methane levels, which kickstarted excitement about the prospects of life on the Red Planet. On Earth, the most common source of methane is biological organisms, from cows and humans down to single-celled creatures, making its

10h

What Sets Bernie Sanders' Student-Debt Plan Apart

Democratic presidential hopefuls are full of ideas about what to do with the nation’s $1.6 trillion of student debt. Today, Senator Bernie Sanders announced the most expansive proposal of those the candidates have suggested thus far. Sanders, along with Representatives Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Pramila Jayapal of Washington, introduced new legislation to cancel all student debt—yes, all student

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Asteroid That's 3 Times As Long As a Football Field Will Whiz by Earth Thursday

Summer is the season for tourists, and that includes a cosmic traveler — one that's three times the length of a football field — that's expected to visit Earth's neighborhood later this week.

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Elon Musk on Twitter: 'Accelerating Starship development to build the Martian Technocracy'

While Buzz Lightyear goes to infinity and beyond, Elon Musk will have to settle for Mars for now.

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Apple fires back: Spotify pays fees on less than 1% of its members – CNET

Spotify has largely opted out of the Apple systems that require fees, specifically because it claims Apple abuses the power of the App Store to stifle rivals.

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Researchers identify genes linked to sex differentiation in giant Amazon fish

Discoveries by Brazilian and German researchers may facilitate early sexing of pirarucu (arapaima) and its reproduction in captivity while also paving the way for genetic improvement.

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Check your settings if you don't want Google tracking every move

I stepped out of the car and took a visit to a local hotel here right off the main road. It was so easy to find, I didn't have to use Google Maps to get there.

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Clouds and Rain Carry a Menagerie of Photosynthetic Microbes

Microbiologists identify diatoms, algae, and cyanobacteria species from samples above a mountaintop in France.

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Norway’s First-Ever Rural Pride Parade

“Coming out seemed like the worst thing ever,” says Anbjørn, a resident of Volda, in rural Norway. “You simply feel scared. I think every gay person in a small town has heard the horror stories.” Despite the fear that consumed him in his youth, Anbjørn has embraced his identity in adult life. Now he hopes to share that pride with the largely conservative-Christian community he calls home. In the

11h

Five rhinos resettled in Rwanda from Czech zoo

Five critically endangered eastern black rhinos were on Monday successfully relocated to Rwanda's Akagera National Park after a long journey from the Czech Republic, park officials said.

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There's a magazine that's written by AI. It's a little wild.

submitted by /u/a-MUK [link] [comments]

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New Memory Device 100X's More Efficient Than Current DRAM; & May Solve High Energy Costs wi. Computer Memory.

https://watchers.news/2019/06/23/scientists-patent-energy-saving-universal-computer-memory/ From "Scientific Reports". A new method of recording/deleting working memory in computers could revolutionize computer operation energy costs without sacrificing time. It's 100 Times more efficient than current DRAM. Lancaster Uni in UK reports invention of system and patents. Huge efficiencies & Progress

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Amazon Beats South American Nations in Fight Over .amazon Domain

Amazon Wins Again Amazon, the online retailer-turned-tech giant, recently won the exclusive right to the “.amazon” web domain. A coalition of South American nations had been lobbying for the rights to the domain since 2012, according to The Conversation , but the organization that divvies up domain names, ICANN, decided to give the rights to Amazon instead. Ultimately, the decision grants more po

11h

Five rhinos resettled in Rwanda from Czech zoo

Five critically endangered eastern black rhinos were on Monday successfully relocated to Rwanda's Akagera National Park after a long journey from the Czech Republic, park officials said.

11h

Study finds people prefer to donate time—even when charities lose out

Each year during the holiday season, soup kitchens and charities alike are flooded with offers to volunteer. But is a donation of your time most beneficial to the charity, or would a financial contribution provide more value?

11h

Woodstock really was a free-wheeling festival, new archeological research shows

The Woodstock Music Festival celebrates its 50th anniversary this summer, and new archaeological research from Binghamton University, State University of New York shows that the iconic event took on a life of its own.

11h

Tropical soil disturbance could be hidden source of CO2

Thousand-year-old tropical soil unearthed by accelerating deforestation and agriculture land use could be unleashing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, according to a new study from researchers at Florida State University.

11h

Alphabet-Owned Company Unveils Plans for Smart City

Smart City Inside a City Alphabet-owned subsidiary, Sidewalk Labs, just released a massive 1,524 page document outlining its plans for a $1.3 billion 190 acre smart neighborhood in Toronto, Canada. Plans for the equally ambitious and contentious Innovative Development and Economic Acceleration (IDEA) District cover large swathes of undeveloped land near the city’s lakeside. Sidewalk Labs wants to

11h

Researchers explain visible light from 2-D lead halide perovskites

Researchers drew attention three years ago when they reported that a two-dimensional perovskite—a material with a specific crystal structure—composed of cesium, lead and bromine emitted a strong green light. Crystals that produce light on the green spectrum are desirable because green light, while valuable in itself, can also be relatively easily converted to other forms that emit blue or red ligh

11h

New theory for trapping light particles aims to advance development of quantum computers

Quantum computers, which use light particles (photons) instead of electrons to transmit and process data, hold the promise of a new era of research in which the time needed to realize lifesaving drugs and new technologies will be significantly shortened. Photons are promising candidates for quantum computation because they can propagate across long distances without losing information, but when th

11h

Exclusive: North Korea claimed to be free of HIV. But infections appear to be surging

Report flags drug abuse and tainted blood donations as factors in virus’s spread

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Monarch Butterflies Born In Captivity Have Trouble Migrating South, Study Says

A researcher made the discovery after ordering monarchs from a breeder. To help them, experts recommend planting milkweed. (Image credit: George Rose/Getty Images)

11h

Does limited underground water storage make plants less susceptible to drought?

You might expect that plants hoping to thrive in California's boom-or-bust rain cycle would choose to set down roots in a place that can store lots of water underground to last through drought years.

11h

Microsoft missed mobile dominance by 'tiny' margin: Gates

Microsoft missed its chance to be the dominant firm in mobile technology because it was "distracted" during a lengthy antitrust battle with US authorities, company co-founder Bill Gates said Monday.

11h

What's your data worth to Big Tech? Bill would compel answer

As Congress bears down on big tech companies, two senators want to force giants like Google, Facebook and Amazon to tell users what data they're collecting from them and how much it's worth.

11h

LabTwin’s AI-powered Digital Assistant Now Talks Back and Connects Data Sources in the Lab with New Open API

LabTwin GmbH, the world's first voice and AI-powered digital lab assistant, today announced its new open API that will connect scientists with data sources both inside and outside of the lab. LabTwin will enable scientists to instantly access external databases as well as data streams from other sources such as lab equipment and informatics systems. With LabTwin’s open API, R&D groups will be able

11h

A new theory for trapping light particles aims to advance development of quantum computers

Researchers have developed a new protocol for ensuring the stability of data when photons are stored for extended periods of time. The theory could advance development of quantum computers.

11h

Woodstock really was a free-wheeling festival, new archeological research shows

The Woodstock Music Festival celebrates its 50th anniversary this summer, and new archaeological research from Binghamton University, State University of New York shows that the iconic event took on a life of its own.

11h

Earlier diagnosis and treatment assessment of tuberculosis achieved with pet/ct

Research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2019 Annual Meeting shows that molecular imaging with 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can evaluate tuberculosis at the molecular level, effectively identifying diseased areas and guiding treatment for patients.

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BCG Digital Ventures and Sartorius Help Launch the World's First Voice-powered Digital Assistant for Scientists

LabTwin GmbH, an independent company backed by Boston Consulting Group Digital Ventures (BCG Digital Ventures) and leading biopharma supplier, Sartorius, today announced the launch of the world's first voice and AI-powered digital lab assistant.

12h

Straight millennials are becoming less accepting of LGBTQ people

The survey found that 18- to 34-year-old non-LGBTQ Americans reported feeling less comfortable around LGBTQ people in a variety of hypothetical situations. The attitudes of older non-LGBTQ Americans have remained basically constant over the past few years. Overall, about 80 percent of Americans support equal rights for LGBTQ people. None A new survey from GLAAD suggests that young, non-LGBT Ameri

12h

Alzheimer's disease: Sex affects tau accumulation in the brain

The strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease is the apolipoprotein E type 4 allele (ApoE ε4). Research presented by Manish Paranjpe at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) used positron emission tomography (PET) to show that women who are ApoE ε4 carriers and already experiencing mild cognitive impairment are more susceptible than me

12h

Researchers create multi-junction solar cells from off-the-shelf components

In a proof-of-concept paper, researchers from North Carolina State University detail a new approach for creating multi-junction solar cells using off-the-shelf components, resulting in lower cost, high-efficiency solar cells for use in multiple applications.

12h

Tropical soil disturbance could be hidden source of CO2

Florida State researchers working in the Democratic Republic of the Congo found a link between the churning of deep soils during deforestation and the release of carbon dioxide through streams and rivers.

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Unique chance to confirm there is methane – and perhaps life – on Mars

NASA’s Curiosity Rover has detected methane on Mars, and we may be able to confirm the signal because gas-measuring satellites were monitoring the same region

12h

Facebook posts can predict 21 health problems

Facebook posts alone can predict some 21 diseases and conditions, including diabetes, hypertension, anxiety, and depression, a new study shows. The study, published in PLOS ONE , includes 999 participants who consented to share their social media posts and medical records. It involved an analysis of approximately 20 million words. The researchers looked at language patterns—words, phrases, cluste

12h

Monarch butterflies raised in captivity can’t migrate

Finding could set back efforts to boost the number of migrants

12h

A Barnyard Mystery: Are the Chicks Male or Female?

It’s easy to tell an adult rooster from an adult hen. But when they’re just chicks? That requires considerable expertise.

12h

Big city growth escalates the urban-rural divide

Microdata from Swedish population registers provide new insights into cities' economic growth paths. The data reveal a surge in regional inequality, with more and more resources flowing to cities atop the urban hierarchy, which thus acquire an increasing share of national wealth.

12h

New therapy promotes vascular repair following stroke

Following a stroke, antibodies that inhibit the signaling molecule Nogo-A can help repair blood vessels in the affected brain regions. This also promotes the regaining of motor functions, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown in a mouse model. The study opens up new avenues for treatment.

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Non-invasive, more precise preimplantation genetic test under development for IVF embryos

A team of researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, in collaboration with colleagues at Peking University and Yikon Genomics in China, have evaluated a new way to conduct preimplantation genetic testing and present results showing that this new method may improve the reliability of the test. Their findings are published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

12h

Engineering enzymes to turn plant waste into sustainable products

A new family of enzymes has been engineered to perform one of the most important steps in the conversion of plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics and chemicals.

12h

Culture shapes how we learn to reason?

New research in the US and China suggests there isn't a universal trajectory for how abstract thought develops in children — and that cultural environment may play a role.

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Monarch butterflies bred in captivity may lose the ability to migrate, study finds

Monarch butterflies purchased from a commercial breeder did not fly in a southward direction, even in offspring raised outdoors, in a new study conducted by scientists at the University of Chicago.

12h

Facebook’s Libra Cryptocurrency Just Resuscitated Bitcoin

Welcome Back Bitcoin reached the highest value the popular cryptocurrency has had in the last 16 months — $11,251.21 — on Monday. And Facebook is likely to blame. Analysts suggest that the social media giant’s recent unveiling of its own cryptocurrency called Libra likely bolstered investors’ confidence in crypto across the board, according to Agence France-Presse . Though Bitcoin never really re

12h

Attempted Whale Shark Mating Caught on Camera for the First Time in History

Nobody knows how whale sharks have sex, but these world-first aerial photos provide some big clues.

12h

Weird, Wonderful Photos From Another Era

While doing my job of researching photos for various stories, I always come across more interesting images than I need, or photos that are unrelated to the story yet still remarkable, strange, hilarious, or just great shots. I tuck the best of those into a folder without a clear plan for future use. Today, I offer another sampling from that folder—a grab bag of historic images depicting land-spee

12h

Monarch Butterflies Reared in Captivity Lack a Crucial Ability

Every fall, millions of monarch butterflies engage in one of nature’s great spectacles , migrating from sites across North America to refuges in either central Mexico or coastal California, where winter temperatures are more tolerable. They fly south for thousands of miles, propelled by some innate sense of direction to places that they neither they nor their parents have ever visited. But not al

12h

Are gut bacteria behind a dangerous autoimmune disease?

Common bacteria that reside in the human gut may be partly to blame for a serious autoimmune disease called antiphospholipid syndrome that frequently affects young women, report researchers. For their study, the research team focused on cells from patients with the immune system disorder, which raises the risk of blood clots. This chronic condition can lead to lung clots, strokes, heart attacks,

12h

Engineering enzymes to turn plant waste into sustainable products

A new family of enzymes has been engineered to perform one of the most important steps in the conversion of plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics and chemicals.

12h

Cannabis Compound Could Be Latest Weapon in War Against Superbugs

Battling Bacteria Researchers are closing in on yet another medical use for cannabidiol (CBD), the popular cannabis compound that doesn’t get you high. During Sunday’s annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, Mark Blaskovich, a senior research chemist from the University of Queensland, presented his finding that CBD is “ remarkably effective ” at killing a range of bacteria, inclu

12h

We finally have footage of a giant squid in U.S. waters

An engraving of a giant squid found in Newfoundland, 1877 (Wikimedia Commons/) Of all the wild creatures floating deep beneath the ocean, the giant squid is probably the one you’ve heard the most about—it’s inspired literal legends for centuries. But despite all you’ve heard, we actually know hardly anything about these outsized cephalopods. The very first images of a giant squid were only record

12h

Monarch butterflies bred in captivity may lose the ability to migrate, study finds

Monarch butterflies purchased from a commercial breeder did not fly in a southward direction, even in offspring raised outdoors, in a new study conducted by scientists at the University of Chicago. Wild-caught monarchs bred indoors under simulated outdoor conditions also did not orient south, suggesting that captive breeding disrupts the monarch's famous annual migratory behavior.

12h

Visible light from 2D lead halide perovskites explained

Electrical engineers have reported solving a lingering question about how a two-dimensional crystal composed of cesium, lead and bromine emitted a strong green light, opening the door to designing better light-emitting and diagnostic devices.

12h

Monarch butterflies bred in captivity may lose the ability to migrate, study finds

Monarch butterflies purchased from a commercial breeder did not fly in a southward direction, even in offspring raised outdoors, in a new study conducted by scientists at the University of Chicago. Wild-caught monarchs bred indoors under simulated outdoor conditions also did not orient south, suggesting that captive breeding disrupts the monarch's famous annual migratory behavior.

12h

Americans overestimate income for children from wealthy families—and underestimate it for children from poor ones

Americans overestimate the future income for children from wealthy and middle-income families, but underestimate that for children from poor ones, finds a new study by New York University sociologists.

12h

Engineering enzymes to turn plant waste into sustainable products

A new family of enzymes has been engineered to perform one of the most important steps in the conversion of plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics and chemicals.

12h

Trees' water-use strategies can intensify droughts

Nature, said Ralph Waldo Emerson, is no spendthrift. Unfortunately, he was wrong.

12h

The Cruel Paradox at the Heart of E. Jean Carroll’s Allegation Against Trump

On Friday, E. Jean Carroll, the journalist and advice columnist, published a new piece of writing : an excerpt from her forthcoming book, What Do We Need Men For? Posted on The Cut , the essay is a meditation on the sexual abuses that have accumulated, like plaque in the artery, over the course of her life; it contains allegations that several culturally prominent men have assaulted her. One of t

12h

Killing with kindness: captive-bred migratory butterflies don’t migrate

Crowd-sourced conservation plan for Monarchs appears to be backfiring. Natalie Parletta reports.

12h

The Trump EPA strategy to undo Clean Power Plan

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections The Trump administration’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on June 19 published its “ Affordable Clean Energy ” (ACE) rule to replace the Obama EPA’s Clean Power Plan (CPP). The replacement plan is essentially the Trump administration’s attempt to adhere to the letter of the law mandating that carbon pollution be regulated, while requiring the

12h

New research sheds light on a possible cause of autism: processed foods

A new study from the University of Central Florida makes the case for the emerging connection of autism and the human microbiome. High levels of Propionic Acid (PPA), used in processed foods to extend shelf life, reduces neuronal development in fetal brains. While more research is needed, this is another step in fully understanding the consequences of poor nutrition. None A new study from the Uni

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See More Teams

It’s just so easy to let moments of personal glory overshadow the collaborative marvels that made them possible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Gene networks reveal transition from healthy to failing heart

Researchers have created one of the first maps to reveal gene activity and connectivity as the heart shuts down.

13h

Understanding brain activity when you name what you see

Using complex statistical methods and fast measurement techniques, researchers found how the brain network comes up with the right word and enables us to say it.

13h

Does limited underground water storage make plants less susceptible to drought?

By tracking water flow through different environments in California, researchers have discovered a secret to the surprising resilience of Mediterranean plant communities during drought years. These plants do well during droughts because they are adapted to living with limited underground water storage even in very wet years. Rock moisture, or lack of it, is the key, and may help predict the fate o

13h

Big data says food is too sweet

New research analyzed nearly 400,000 food reviews posted by Amazon customers to gain real-world insight into the food choices that people make. The findings reveal that many people find the foods in today's marketplace to be too sweet.

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Researchers teach robots what humans want

Researchers are developing better, faster ways of providing human guidance to autonomous robots.

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Drug Companies Are Focusing on the Poor After Decades of Ignoring Them

The pharmaceutical industry once sued to keep AIDS drugs from dying Africans. Now companies boast of their efforts to get medicines to the developing world.

13h

Women face more cognitive issues after brain tumor radiation women face more cognitive issues after

Young women who undergo radiation therapy to treat a pediatric brain tumor are more likely to suffer from long-term cognitive impairment than male survivors, according to a study by Georgia State University researchers.

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As an automated workforce nears, eight-hour workweek may arise for humans

Researchers discovered that eight hours of work per week reduces mental health issues by 30 percent. Working a full-time job, roughly 40 hours per week, does not result in further mental health gains. Societies are going to have to grapple with a new distribution of work as AI and robotics will soon replace many jobs. None Alibaba co-founder, Jack Ma, came under fire in April when calling a 12-ho

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Why Is a Strange Plastic Crust Spreading on This Island’s Coast?

The New Pollution Three years after marine ecologist Ignacio Gestoso first noticed a blue crust speckling rocks on the shoreline of Madeira, he and his colleagues returned to the Portuguese island only to discover that the crust had spread — it now covered nearly 10 percent of the rocks’ surface and was a variety of colors. Through chemical analysis of samples, the team found that the crust was m

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Curiosity Rover Detects Abnormally High Methane Levels on Mars

The agency reports that Curiosity just detected an unusually high concentration of methane, a gas that we associate with biological processes. The post Curiosity Rover Detects Abnormally High Methane Levels on Mars appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Visible light from 2D lead halide perovskites explained

Electrical engineers have reported solving a lingering question about how a two-dimensional crystal composed of cesium, lead and bromine emitted a strong green light, opening the door to designing better light-emitting and diagnostic devices.

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Scientists hit pay dirt with new microbial research technique

Long ago, during the European Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci wrote that we humans 'know more about the movement of celestial bodies than about the soil underfoot.' Five hundred years and innumerable technological and scientific advances later, his sentiment still holds true. But that could soon change. A new study details how an improved method for studying microbes in the soil will help scientist

13h

Damage to the ozone layer and climate change forming feedback loop

Increased solar radiation penetrating through the damaged ozone layer is interacting with the changing climate, and the consequences are rippling through the Earth's natural systems, effecting everything from weather to the health and abundance of sea mammals like seals and penguins.

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Sense of wonderment may relieve the worry of waiting for uncertain news

An induced feeling of awe, or state of wonder, may be the best strategy yet for alleviating the discomfort that comes from uncertain waiting.

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Mood neurons mature during adolescence

Researchers have discovered a mysterious group of neurons in the amygdala — a key center for emotional processing in the brain — that stay in an immature, prenatal developmental state throughout childhood. Most of these cells mature rapidly during adolescence, suggesting a key role in the brain's emotional development, but some stay immature throughout life, suggesting new ideas about how the br

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'Bathtub rings' around Titan's lakes might be made of alien crystals

The frigid lakeshores of Saturn's moon Titan might be encrusted with strange, unearthly minerals, according to new research.

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Blodtest förbättrar diagnostiken av äggstockscancer

Det är forskare vid Uppsala universitet och Sahlgrenska Akademin vid Göteborgs universitet som utvecklat en metod där man med ett blodprov kan diagnosticera cancern utan att behöva operera för säkerhets skull. Den här upptäckten kan leda till färre onödiga och riskfyllda operationer. Idag upptäcks äggstockscancer ofta sent, när den redan är långt gången. Dödligheten är hög: av 10 patienter med äg

13h

Students Who Take Music Classes Also Do Better Academically, Study Finds

(Credit: Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock) Music is the language of feelings, the food of the soul. But could it also be a grade booster for high school students? Researchers think so …

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Interim scan during prostate cancer therapy helps guide treatment

New prostate cancer research shows that adding an interim scan during therapy can help guide a patient's treatment. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after two cycles of lutetium-177 (177Lu)-PSMA radioligand therapy has shown a significant predictive value for patient survival. The r

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PET/CT detects cardiovascular disease risk factors in obstructive sleep apnea patients

Research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2019 Annual Meeting draws a strong link between severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and impaired coronary flow reserve, which is an early sign of the heart disease atherosclerosis. Using 13N-ammonia positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), researchers were able to noninvasively evaluate coronary microv

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Young women who smoke face highest risk of major heart attack

Smoking increases both men's and women's risk of a major heart attack at all ages, but women smokers have a significantly higher increased risk compared to men, especially women under 50 years old, according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Despite the increased risk, smokers can reduce their risk to that of a never smoker in as little as a month after quitting.

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Cocoa shells may help prevent obesity-induced insulin resistance

A study of immune and fat cells from mice found that cocoa shell extract can reduce and prevent some of the cell dysfunctions that can result from obesity.

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How to Watch SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Launch a Solar Sail Tonight

One of the starring payloads is a solar sail that, when unfurled, will be the size of a boxing ring.

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Gig workers often get an unfair deal. This firm says it’s different.

LeadGenius claims to be an online contract company that treats its workers with more respect. Its founder and CEO Prayag Narula tells us why fairness is at its core.

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PSU study finds people prefer to donate time — even when charities lose out

Each year during the holiday season, soup kitchens and charities alike are flooded with offers to volunteer. But is a donation of your time most beneficial to the charity, or would a financial contribution provide more value? Researchers from Portland State University and Texas A&M University wondered what drives volunteering — especially when a monetary donation would have more impact. Their stu

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US Presidential Candidate Plans to End Fossil Fuel Industry

No Handouts Democratic presidential candidate Jay Inslee just announced a broad plan to take down the fossil fuel industry piece by piece. Inslee’s package of policy proposals, titled “ Freedom from Fossil Fuels ” would take drastic action to fight the fossil fuel industry and rapidly transition the U.S. to 100 percent renewable energy, reports Earther . It’s an ambitious bid — akin to U.S. Repre

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Elite Athletes' Gut Bacteria Give Rodent Runners a Boost

The chemical these bacteria produce appears to enhance athleticism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Techathlon podcast: Gadget lifespans, the home version, and summer vacation

We're headed into a summer break to work on some big projects, but you can play your own version of Techathlon at home! (Techathlon/) Everything around you is deteriorating. It sounds sad, but it’s just the way of our wonderful universe. In fact, the computer or smartphone you’re using to read this is slowly breaking down as we speak. This fact applies to humans, too, and the rigors of the Techat

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iPadOS makes Apple's tablets feel like a priority again

When I reviewed the iPad Pro last year, I was torn. Here was one of the most impressive (not to mention expensive) tablets any company had ever made, and its software seemed caught …

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Slurpees incoming! 7-Eleven begins delivery in public spaces

Craving a Slurpee from 7-Eleven but you're stuck in the park?

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Elite Athletes' Gut Bacteria Give Rodent Runners a Boost

The chemical these bacteria produce appears to enhance athleticism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Does limited underground water storage make plants less susceptible to drought?

By tracking water flow through different environments in California, UC Berkeley researchers have discovered a secret to the surprising resilence of Mediterranean plant communities during drought years. These plants do well during droughts because they are adapted to living with limited underground water storage even in very wet years. Rock moisture, or lack of it, is the key, and may help predict

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Study: Sperm Banks in Space Could Make Colonizing Mars Possible

Space Sperm Bank A new study by researchers from the Dexeus Women’s Health research network in Barcelona found that frozen sperm samples survived when exposed to microgravity. That could mean that sperm banks in space are possible, providing future space travelers with the ability to reproduce in space with sperm samples brought up from Earth. “Some studies suggest a significant decrease in the m

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How This Gut Bacteria May Give Elite Athletes an Edge

Elite athletes not only have stronger hearts and fitter muscles than the average Joe, but they also sport special gut bacteria that may actually boost their performance.

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Trump Goes After Iran’s Supreme Leader

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET President Donald Trump has declined to strike Iran for now over the downing of an American drone. Instead, he chose to retaliate by reaching again for a favorite tool: economic warfare. On Monday, Trump announced he would impose sanctions on Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and other individuals close to him, denying their access to “key financial resources a

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Machine Learning "Very Easy to Abuse"

Microbiologist Nick Loman talks about the power of artificial intelligence and the best way to use it.

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How soft materials react to deformation at molecular level

Before designing the next generation of soft materials, researchers must first understand how they behave during rapidly changing deformation. In a new study, researchers challenged previous assumptions regarding polymer behavior with newly developed laboratory techniques that measure polymer flow at the molecular level.

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Kometspaning från 1,5 miljoner kilometer bakom jorden

En rymdfysiker vid Umeå universitet utvecklar just nu ett mätinstrument som ska följa med rymdskeppet Comet Interceptor. Farkosten har valts ut att ingå i den europeiska rymdmyndigheten ESA:s program för att sikta kometer som precis kommit in i vårt solsystem. Uppskjutningen ska ske 2028. – Vi är med i det team som tar fram instrument med flera sensorer för att mäta elektriska och magnetiska fält

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Elite Athletes' Gut Bacteria Give Rodent Runners a Boost

The chemical these bacteria produce appears to enhance athleticism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Running a Marathon Changes Your Gut Microbes

How Running a Marathon Changes Your Gut Microbes Endurance exercise favors the growth of some gut bacteria, which might provide athletes with an extra boost. BostonMarathon_topNteaser.jpg Runners in the Boston Marathon on April 20, 2015. Image credits: ZDF via Shutterstock Sports Monday, June 24, 2019 – 13:15 Rodrigo Pérez Ortega, Contributor (Inside Science) — Finishing the Boston marathon is a

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Understanding brain activity when you name what you see

Using complex statistical methods and fast measurement techniques, researchers found how the brain network comes up with the right word and enables us to say it.

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Researchers explain visible light from 2D lead halide perovskites

Researchers led by an electrical engineer from the University of Houston have reported solving a lingering question about how a two-dimensional crystal composed of cesium, lead and bromine emitted a strong green light, opening the door to designing better light-emitting and diagnostic devices.

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Pathogen engineered to self-destruct underlies cancer vaccine platform

A team of investigators has developed a cancer vaccine technology using live, attenuated pathogens as vectors. A feature of the vaccine causes these bacteria to self-destruct once they've done their job, making it safe for use in humans.

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Researchers identify new hunger pathway in the brain

A newly identified hunger pathway in the brain can quickly modify food intake in the presence of food, according to a study of mice published in JNeurosci. This pathway could be a future target for the treatment of eating disorders.

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CityLab 2019 Summit to be Held in Washington, D.C.: Press Registration Now Open

Washington, D.C. and New York, NY — CityLab , the preeminent global summit organized by the Aspen Institute, The Atlantic, and Bloomberg Philanthropies to address the most urgent urban issues of our time, is open for press registration. CityLab will take place from October 27-29 in Washington, D.C.; the capital was selected to host the 7th annual gathering, following previous summits in New York,

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Trump Admin. Hid Climate Reports Warning of New Dangers

Dug Up The Trump Administration hid at least 45 research studies from the Department of Agriculture (USDA) into the impacts of climate change, according to a POLITICO investigation . The studies include findings that the increasing carbonization of the atmosphere is making certain foods less nutritious for people and animals. Others highlight conservation practices that farmers could use to prese

14h

Some Disaster Prevention Spending Reaps Higher Rewards

Protecting against flood and wind yields higher average benefits than fire and earthquakes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study ties poor sleep to reduced memory performance in older adults

A new study has found that variability in night-to-night sleep time and reduced sleep quality adversely affect the ability of older adults to recall information about past events. The study also found unexpected racial differences in the type of sleep patterns tied to lower memory performance across both younger and older African American research participants.

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Hydrogel offers double punch against orthopedic bone infections

Surgery prompted by automobile accidents, combat wounds, cancer treatment and other conditions can lead to bone infections that are difficult to treat and can delay healing until they are resolved. Now, researchers have a developed a double-duty hydrogel that both attacks the bacteria and encourages bone regrowth with a single application containing two active components.

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A wearable vibration sensor for accurate voice recognition

Scientists have developed a flexible and wearable vibration responsive sensor. When this sensor is attached to a neck, it can precisely recognize voice through vibration of the neck skin and is not affected by ambient noise or the volume of sound.

14h

How to bend waves to arrive at the right place

Under certain circumstances, a wave can split into several paths, reaching some places with high intensity, while avoiding others almost completely. This kind of 'branched flow' has first been observed in 2001. Scientists have now developed a method to exploit this effect. The core idea of this new approach is to send a wave signal exclusively along one single pre-selected branch, such that the wa

14h

Helping the body's ability to grow bone

For the first time, scientists have been able to study how well synthetic bone grafts stand up to the rigors and 'strains' of life, and how quickly they help bone re-grow and repair.

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How soft materials react to deformation at molecular level

Before designing the next generation of soft materials, researchers must first understand how they behave during rapidly changing deformation. In a new study, researchers challenged previous assumptions regarding polymer behavior with newly developed laboratory techniques that measure polymer flow at the molecular level.

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Screams contain a 'calling card' for the vocalizer's identity

Listeners can correctly identify whether pairs of screams were produced by the same person or two different people — a critical prerequisite to individual recognition.

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Music students do better in school than non-musical peers

High school students who take music courses score significantly better on math, science and English exams than their non-musical peers, according to a new study.

14h

A solarium for hens? How to increase the vitamin D content of eggs

Many people suffer from a vitamin D deficiency. This can result in brittle bones and an increased risk of respiratory diseases. Chicken eggs are a natural source of vitamin D and one way to, at least partially, compensate for this deficiency. A team of nutritionists and agricultural scientists has found a new way to further increase the vitamin D content of eggs: by exposing chickens to UV light.

14h

Gene networks reveal transition from healthy to failing heart, Stanford-led study shows

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators have created one of the first maps to reveal gene activity and connectivity as the heart shuts down.

14h

'Good' bacteria may prevent — and reverse — food allergy

A study by scientists at Boston Children's Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital, published today in Nature Medicine, makes a strong case that the national epidemic of food allergy is caused by the absence of certain beneficial bacteria in the human gut. 'The loss of these bacteria acts as a switch that makes children susceptible to food allergy,' says Talal Chatila, MD, director of the Food A

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Mathematics ties media coverage of gun control to upticks in gun purchases

For the first time, researchers have shown a causal link between print news media coverage of U.S. gun control policy in the wake of mass shooting events and increases in firearm acquisition, particularly in states with the least restrictive gun laws.

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The U.S. Needs to Tighten Vaccination Mandates

Existing religious and philosophical exemptions endanger public health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

Amazon Ring Will Survive the Anti-surveillance Backlash

In most cases, when police want to search your neighborhood, they need a warrant and a reason to believe something’s amiss. Now “reasonable suspicion” is going the way of dial-up. Fifty police departments across the United States are partnering with Amazon to collect footage from people who use Ring, the company’s internet-connected doorbell. Some are offering discounted or free Ring doorbells in

14h

Untangling the complicated relationships between people and nature for a brighter future

With major crises such as extinctions and environmental degradation upon us, there's never been a more crucial time to find solutions to environmental challenges. An international group of scientists is making major advances in sustaining the world's environments — by untangling the intricate ways in which people and nature depend on each other.

15h

Non-invasive view into the heart

The non-invasive measurement of blood flow to the heart using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is on par with cardiac catheterization.

15h

Shedding light on rhodopsin dynamics in the retina

Photoreceptor cells in our eyes can adjust to both weak and strong light levels, but we still don't know exactly how they do it. Researchers now revealed that the photoreceptor protein rhodopsin forms transient clusters within the disc membranes in retina. These clusters are concentrated in the center of disc membranes, and act as platforms in the process of light to chemical signal conversion.

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What's your data worth to Big Tech? Bill would compel answer

As Congress bears down on big tech companies, two senators want to force giants like Google, Facebook and Amazon to tell users what data they're collecting from them and how much it's worth.

15h

Stanford researchers teach robots what humans want

Researchers are developing better, faster ways of providing human guidance to autonomous robots.

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More energy needed to cope with climate change

A new study found that by mid-century climate change will increase the demand for energy globally, even with modest warming.

15h

'Nanoemulsion' gels offer new way to deliver drugs through the skin

MIT chemical engineers have devised a new way to create nanoemulsions, very tiny droplets of one liquid suspended within another. They also developed a way to easily convert nanoemulsions to a gel when they reach body temperature, which could be useful for developing materials that can deliver medication when rubbed on skin or injected into the body.

15h

Newly discovered immune cells at the frontline of HIV infection

Researchers have discovered brand new immune cells that are at the frontline of HIV infection. Known as CD11c+ dendritic cells, these new cells are more susceptible to HIV infection and can then transmit the virus to other cells.

15h

Play games with no latency

One of the most challenging issues for game players looks to be resolved soon with the introduction of a zero-latency gaming environment. A team has now developed technology that helps game players maintain zero-latency performance. The new technology transforms the shapes of game design according to the amount of latency.

15h

Targeting individual atoms

In recent decades, NMR spectroscopy has made it possible to capture the spatial structure of chemical and biochemical molecules. Now researchers have found a way to apply this measurement principle to individual atoms.

15h

Targeting individual atoms

In recent decades, NMR spectroscopy has made it possible to capture the spatial structure of chemical and biochemical molecules. Now researchers have found a way to apply this measurement principle to individual atoms.

15h

Big data says food is too sweet

New research from the Monell Center analyzed nearly 400,000 food reviews posted by Amazon customers to gain real-world insight into the food choices that people make. The findings reveal that many people find the foods in today's marketplace to be too sweet.

15h

Mathematics ties media coverage of gun control to upticks in gun purchases

For the first time, researchers have shown a causal link between print news media coverage of US gun control policy in the wake of mass shooting events and increases in firearm acquisition, particularly in states with the least restrictive gun laws.

15h

Combatting the world's deadliest infections using groundbreaking human-mimetic tools

A new article published today in the journal Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology shows that research built around human-mimetic tools are more likely to succeed in the search for effective treatments for and prevention of flavivirus infection as compared to research using monkeys or other animals as laboratory models.

15h

The Unseen Apollo 11

Much of the treasure trove of Apollo 11 images is rarely shown — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Cancer Prevention Should Start before Birth

We can now identify risk factors that seem to affect a developing fetus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

A Massive Freshwater Sea Is Buried Beneath the Atlantic Ocean

A gigantic freshwater aquifer is hiding under the salty Atlantic Ocean, just off the northeastern coast of the United States, a new study finds.

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Mars rover's large methane discovery excites scientists

Curiosity’s record-breaking measurement fuels speculation it is from microbial Martians Nasa’s Curiosity rover has detected its largest belch of methane on Mars so far, fuelling speculation that the robot may have trundled through a cloud of waste gas released by microbial Martians buried deep under the surface. Mission scientists announced on Monday that Curiosity had measured a record-breaking

15h

Dutch telephone outage takes out nation's emergency number

A major telephone outage hit the Netherlands on Monday, taking down the country's emergency number and leaving many businesses and municipalities unreachable by phone.

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'Tax us more,' US billionaires say

"Tax us more!" was the message on Monday from about 20 super-wealthy Americans who urged presidential candidates to back higher taxes on the wealthiest to confront climate change and other priorities.

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Science Leaders: We Can’t Stop Russian’s Plan for CRISPR Babies

Baby Boom When Chinese researcher He Jiankui announced that he’d edited a pair human embryos and brought them to term, resulting in the births of the first gene-edited humans , scientists across the globe quickly condemned his controversial experiment . But Russian biologist Denis Rebrikov was apparently inspired, not appalled, by He’s work. Earlier in June, he told Nature that he hopes to create

15h

3-D mammograms are popular, but are they better than 2-D?

The use of digital breast tomosynthesis, a newer breast cancer screening technology with limited evidence, has risen in recent years.

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How Elon Musk Saved the Electric Car

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How to Build Ethical Artificial Intelligence

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Singularity may arrive sooner than we imagine

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How Deep Learning Is Transforming Brain Mapping

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How NASA Sold the Science and Glamour of Space Travel

At the time of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission in the 1960s, some Americans had reservations about the wisdom of reaching for the stars when troubles swelled on Earth.

15h

5 books on the meaning of life

Some philosophers believe that we create our own meaning and it is for us to define. The meaning of life could be to live completely within the here and now. Even in the most dire and cruel of situations, humankind has found meaning in life. What is the meaning of life? This question has been proposed in both profound and commonplace manners. It has been both sneered at and critically considered

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The doctor who beat Ebola — and inspires other survivors to care for the sick

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01979-w Maurice Kakule Kutsunga has started a motorcycle ambulance service and is working to dispel rumours about the virus.

15h

Mars Rover Detects "Excitingly Huge" Methane Spike

NASA’s Curiosity rover reports the highest-ever reading of the gas at the planet’s surface — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Business as Usual Threatens Thousands of Amazon Tree Species

Climate change and deforestation could also severely fragment much of the forest by 2050, a new model projects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Close-range blast exposure & neurodegenerative processes among those with genetic risk for AD

A new study raises the possibility that close-range blast exposure among veterans with a genetically higher risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), may make them more susceptible to degradation of their white matter, the part of the brain made of fiber connections called axons that connect nerve cells.

15h

Discovery of performance-enhancing bacteria in the human microbiome

A collaborative team of Harvard researchers pinpointed one specific group of bacteria, called Veillonella, that they found was enriched in the gut microbiome of Boston Marathon runners after after completing the 26.2 race and in an independent group of 87 elite and Olympic athletes after competitions. Veillonella bacteria isolated from marathon athletes and given to mice increased the animals' per

15h

Why do people faint?

Here’s what’s happening in your body if you’re feeling faint. (William Moss/Shutterstock.com/) Maybe it’s a bride standing in a hot chapel, or an exhausted runner after a race. It could be someone watching a medical procedure on television or a donor at a blood drive. Maybe you’ve even experienced it yourself. You start to feel lightheaded, your stomach may hurt, your palms are sweaty, your visio

15h

Study explores 'rainbow wave' and identity gaps in LGBTQ liberal political perspectives

A University of Oklahoma study explores the so-called 'rainbow wave' of LGBTQ voters that emerged during the Trump presidency. Specifically, the study examines sexual, gender and queer identity gaps in liberalism among a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults collected by Survey Sampling International after the November 2018 polls. The OU study works toward a deeper understanding of the p

15h

Cancer Prevention Should Start before Birth

We can now identify risk factors that seem to affect a developing fetus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Business as Usual Threatens Thousands of Amazon Tree Species

Climate change and deforestation could also severely fragment much of the forest by 2050, a new model projects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Gut bacteria might influence how our brains develop as children

Two-year-olds with higher abundances of two particular gut microbes have more activity in brain regions associated with attention and language acquisition

15h

Netflix Is a Business, Not a Movement

Updated at 1:40 p.m. ET on June 24, 2019. From the way Netflix is described by some Hollywood luminaries in The New York Times ’ extensive package on the future of moviemaking, the company’s executives should be jumping for joy. Netflix has apparently pulled off the rarest of tricks: It no longer registers to most people as a business. It’s a way of life, a utility, a universally understood mediu

15h

Government-funded research increasingly fuels innovation

For the third year in a row, the Trump administration has proposed large cuts in science funding across a variety of agencies. Although Congress restored these cuts in the past two years, increased budgetary pressures may discourage them from doing so this year.

15h

Resonance-enhanced tunneling induces flourine and para-hydrogen reaction in interstellar clouds

Scientists from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators investigated the mechanism of rapid reactivity of the F + H2 reaction at low temperature and found that rapid reactivity was actually induced by resonance-enhanced tunneling.

15h

Children Cannot Parent Other Children

A fundamental truth about children is that they have needs they cannot themselves fulfill. They need people who acquire and prepare food for them, and people who look out for their safety and cleanliness. Beyond those material needs, they also need people who care for them emotionally, tending to them when they are sick and supporting them through tough times. Normally these duties fall to parent

15h

How to live forever: meet the extreme life-extensionists

Some sleep on electromagnetic mats, others pop up to 150 pills a day. But are ‘life extensionists’ any closer to finding the key to longevity? Alex Moshakis meets some of the people determined to become immortal In 2016, an American real-estate investor named James Strole established the Coalition for Radical Life Extension , a nonprofit based in Arizona which aims to galvanise mainstream support

16h

Broad Institute researchers use novel field-ready CRISPR platform to detect plant genes

SHERLOCK technology is a new CRISPR-based platform that is rapid and portable and enables detection and quantitation of plant genes to support a variety of agricultural applications. Additional advantages, including the ability to process crude plant extracts with minimal nucleic acid sample preparation required are described in a research article published in The CRISPR Journal.

16h

Tool lets smart speakers detect cardiac arrest

A new tool for a smart speaker—like Google Home or Alexa—or a smartphone can detect the gasping sound of agonal breathing associated with cardiac arrest, research shows. Almost 500,000 Americans die each year from cardiac arrest, when the heart suddenly stops beating. People experiencing cardiac arrest will suddenly become unresponsive and either stop breathing or gasp for air. Immediate CPR can

16h

What’s in a Name? Taxonomy Problems Vex Biologists

Carl Linnaeus was probably not the first scientist to realize the inherent connectedness of life on this planet. But he articulated and codified it. In the 10th edition of his Systema Naturae , published in 1758, he established a system of naming and organizing life that endures to this day — what we still call Linnaean taxonomy, although today’s system is somewhat different from the five-rank hi

16h

Galaxy clusters caught in a first kiss

For the first time, astronomers have found two giant clusters of galaxies that are just about to collide. This observation can be seen as a missing 'piece of the puzzle' in our understanding of the formation of structure in the universe, since large-scale structures—such as galaxies and clusters of galaxies—are thought to grow by collisions and mergers. The result was published in Nature Astronomy

16h

Smash and grab: A heavyweight stellar champion for dying stars

Dying stars that cast off their outer envelopes to form the beautiful yet enigmatic "planetary nebulae" (PNe) have a new heavy-weight champion, the innocuously named PNe BMP1613-5406. Massive stars live fast and die young, exploding as powerful supernovae after only a few million years. However, the vast majority of stars, including our own sun, have much lower mass and may live for many billions

16h

Broad Institute researchers use novel field-ready CRISPR platform to detect plant genes

SHERLOCK technology is a new CRISPR-based platform that is rapid and portable and enables detection and quantitation of plant genes to support a variety of agricultural applications. Additional advantages, including the ability to process crude plant extracts with minimal nucleic acid sample preparation required are described in a research article published in The CRISPR Journal.

16h

Calibration method improves scientific research performed with smartphone cameras

Although smartphones and other consumer cameras are increasingly used for scientific applications, it's difficult to compare and combine data from different devices. A new easy-to-use standardized method makes it possible for almost anyone to calibrate these cameras without any specialized equipment, helping amateurs, science students and professional scientists to acquire useful data with any con

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Broad Institute researchers use novel field-ready CRISPR platform to detect plant genes

SHERLOCK technology is a new CRISPR-based platform that is rapid and portable and enables detection and quantitation of plant genes to support a variety of agricultural applications. Additional advantages, including the ability to process crude plant extracts with minimal nucleic acid sample preparation required are described in a research article published in The CRISPR Journal, a new peer-review

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SLAS Discovery announces its July feature article, '3D Cell-Based Assays for Drug Screens: Challenges in Imaging, Image Analysis, and High-Content Analysis'

In July's SLAS Discovery feature article, '3D Cell-Based Assays for Drug Screens: Challenges in Imaging, Image Analysis, and High-Content Analysis,' Tijmen H. Booij, Ph.D., Screening Specialist for NEXUS Personalized Health Technologies (Switzerland), discusses the switch from using 2D to 3D cell cultures in drug discovery to more accurately mimic human physiological conditions and improve the suc

16h

OU study explores 'rainbow wave' and identity gaps in LGBTQ liberal political perspectives

A University of Oklahoma study explores the so-called 'rainbow wave' of LGBTQ voters that emerged during the Trump presidency. Specifically, the study examines sexual, gender and queer identity gaps in liberalism among a nationally representative sample of US adults collected by Survey Sampling International after the November 2018 polls. The OU study works toward a deeper understanding of the pol

16h

Hate speech on Twitter predicts frequency of real-life hate crimes

According to a first-of-its-kind study, cities with a higher incidence of a certain kind of racist tweets reported more actual hate crimes related to race, ethnicity, and national origin. Using machine learning, the researchers analyzed the location and linguistic features of 532 million tweets published between 2011 and 2016. The team found that cities with more targeted racist tweets, espousing

16h

Scientists Race to Build Vaccine for African Swine Fever

The devastating outbreak of the disease that has led to millions of pig deaths in East Asia has intensified efforts to develop a vaccine quickly, but the virus presents several challenges that are yet to be overcome.

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Scientists Find Scurvy in Mouth of Long-Dead, Failed Crusader King

One of the last crusader kings had scurvy when he died, a new forensic analysis finds — contradicting old narratives that he died of plague or dysentery.

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Treatable brain inflammation may be behind tinnitus

A treatment for tinnitus – a constant ringing in the ears – has been frustratingly elusive. Out-of-control inflammation, the brain's response to damage, may be the cause of long-term ringing in the ears. A study that examined mice with noise-induced hearing loss seems to have found the neural trigger for tinnitus. None Common, or subjective, tinnitus is no fun. If you have it, you know what we me

16h

Interplanetary matriarchy: why the future of space is female

Research has found that frozen sperm can survive in microgravity, paving the way for man-free missions Name: Interplanetary matriarchy. Appearance: Highly efficient. Continue reading…

16h

A Boy Who Had Spinal Surgery in the Womb Stands on His Own Two Feet

Operating before birth can minimize nerve damage caused by severe defects in tissue around the spinal column.

16h

Does stimulation of the brain's dorsal anterior insula trigger ecstasy?

The epileptic 'aura' is a subjective phenomenon that sometimes precedes the visible clinical features of a seizure. Investigators tested three epileptic patients prior to potential surgery to try to determine where their seizures originate. They observed that these patients reported an ecstatic aura only when the dorsal anterior insula of the brain was stimulated. Their findings in the journal Bra

16h

How Facebook and Google avoided FEC ad disclaimers during 2016 presidential election

The first academic research study to look specifically at how Facebook and Google deadlocked the Federal Election Commission's efforts to regulate digital political advertising.

16h

Calibration method improves scientific research performed with smartphone cameras

Although smartphones and other consumer cameras are increasingly used for scientific applications, it's difficult to compare and combine data from different devices. A new easy-to-use standardized method makes it possible for almost anyone to calibrate these cameras without any specialized equipment, helping amateurs, science students and professional scientists to acquire useful data with any con

16h

Clinical trials beginning for possible preeclampsia treatment

For over 20 years, a team of researchers at Lund University has worked on developing a drug against preeclampsia — a serious disorder which annually affects around 9 million pregnant women worldwide and is one of the main causes of death in both mothers and unborn babies.

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45% of American adults doubt vaccine safety, according to survey

The survey also asked Americans to choose a statement that best represented their feelings about vaccine safety and efficacy. While the vast majority (82%) chose in favor of vaccines, 8% selected responses expressing serious doubt. An additional 9% said they were unsure.

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Fingolimod: advantages for some children and adolescents with highly active RRMS

New analyses in an addendum confirm hint of an added benefit in one of four research questions. Especially with regard to quality of life, usable data are now available.

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Galaxy clusters caught in a first kiss

For the first time, astronomers have found two giant clusters of galaxies that are just about to collide. This observation can be seen as a missing 'piece of the puzzle' in our understanding of the formation of structure in the Universe, since large-scale structures — such as galaxies and clusters of galaxies — are thought to grow by collisions and mergers.

16h

Smash and grab: A heavyweight stellar champion for dying stars

PNe theoretically derive from stars in the range 1-8 times the mass of the Sun, representing 90% of all stars more massive than the sun. However, until now, PNe have been proven to derive from stars born with only 1-3 times the mass of our Sun. HKU researchers have now officially smashed this previous limit and grabbed proof that a PNe has emerged from a star born with 5.5 times the mass of our Su

16h

Untangling the complicated relationships between people and nature for a brighter future

With major crises such as extinctions and environmental degradation upon us, there's never been a more crucial time to find solutions to environmental challenges. An international group of scientists is making major advances in sustaining the world's environments — by untangling the intricate ways in which people and nature depend on each other.

16h

Resonance-enhanced tunneling induces F+H2 reaction in interstellar clouds

Scientists from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators investigated the mechanism of rapid reactivity of the F + H2 reaction at low temperature and found that rapid reactivity was actually induced by resonance-enhanced tunneling.

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Alzheimer's missing link ID'd, answering what tips brain's decline

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that immune cells that typically protect neurons from damage may be the link between early and late brain changes in Alzheimer's disease. Breaking that link could lead to new approaches to delay or prevent the disease.

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Roads and deforestation explode in the Congo basin

Logging roads are expanding dramatically in the Congo Basin, leading to catastrophic collapses in animal populations living in the world's second-largest rainforest, according to research co-led by a scientist at James Cook University in Australia.

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Damage to the ozone layer and climate change forming feedback loop

Increased solar radiation penetrating through the damaged ozone layer is interacting with the changing climate, and the consequences are rippling through the Earth's natural systems, effecting everything from weather to the health and abundance of sea mammals like seals and penguins.

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Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru

Methods used 1,400 years ago could boost water availability during Lima's dry season, according to new Imperial College London research.

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Speeding up single-cell genomics research

Time-saving method makes it possible to profile gene regulation in tens of thousands of individual human cells in a single day. Approach combines microfluidics and novel software to scale up single-cell ATAC-seq, which identifies parts of the tightly packaged genome that are more open and accessible to regulatory proteins. Profiling individual cells can clarify how genes function – in which specif

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Columbia researchers provide new evidence on the reliability of climate modeling

For decades, scientists studying a key climate phenomenon have been grappling with contradictory data that have threated to undermine confidence in the reliability of climate models overall. A new Columbia Engineering study settles that debate with regard to the Hadley cell, a tropical atmospheric circulation widely studied by climate scientists because it controls precipitation in the subtropics

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Deportation worries fuel anxiety, poor sleep, among US-born Latinx youth

A new study led by University of California, Berkeley, researchers tracked the mental and physical health of US-born teenage children of Mexican and Central American immigrants in California in the years before and after the 2016 election. Nearly half of the youth reported worrying at least sometimes about the impacts of US immigration policy on their families, and those with more worries also exp

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New therapy targets gut bacteria to prevent and reverse food allergies

A new study, led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital, identifies the species of bacteria in the human infant gut that protect against food allergies, finding changes associated with the development of food allergies and an altered immune response.

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Clouds dominate uncertainties in predicting future Greenland melt

New research led by climate scientists from the University of Bristol suggests that the representation of clouds in climate models is as, or more, important than the amount of greenhouse gas emissions when it comes to projecting future Greenland ice sheet melt.

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Chemists discover structure of glucagon fibrils

Study may be a step toward shelf-stable versions of the hormone, which is used to control diabetes.

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What influences how parents and their gay adolescent sons discuss sexual health at home?

Parent-child discussions about sexual health are complicated, particularly with a male teen who identifies as gay, bisexual, or queer. Research from Dalmacio Dennis Flores of the University of Pennsylvania found that even when such conversations avoid heteronormative stereotypes, outside factors like mass media and religion–those beyond the parents' control–can reinforce them.

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Can deprescribing drugs linked to cognitive impairment actually reduce risk of dementia?

A JAMA Internal Medicine commentary by three Regenstrief Institute research scientists calls for randomized deprescribing trials to address anticholinergic drug use as a potentially modifiable and reversible risk factor for dementia, a growing public health issue.

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Opioid overdose more likely if family member has opioid prescription

Having a family member who was previously dispensed prescription opioids was associated with higher odds of overdose for individuals who themselves didn't have an opioid prescription in this analysis of insurance company data. The study included 2,303 people with the earliest date of an opioid overdose in a family and 9,212 others in the insurance database for comparison.

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Food insecurity associated with migraine in young US adults

Food insecurity is when you worry that your food will run out before you have enough money to buy more. This study used nationally representative data to examine the association between food insecurity and migraine in young US adults because the economic and education transition of young adulthood may increase risk for food insecurity.

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Is US immigration policy environment associated with mental health outcomes for US-born teens of of immigrant parents

The current immigration policy environment in America appears to be associated with reported adverse mental health outcomes among US-born children of Latinx immigrants. Data were used from a group of 397 US-born adolescents with at least one immigrant parent from a long-term study of Mexican farmworker families in the Salinas Valley of California.

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Certain cells secrete a substance in the brain that protects neurons, USC study finds

USC researchers have discovered a secret sauce in the brain's vascular system that preserves the neurons needed to keep dementia and other diseases at bay.

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Settling the debate on serotonin's role in sleep

New research finds that serotonin is necessary for sleep, settling a long-standing controversy.

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More women in US receive 3D mammography but disparities remain

Use of 3D mammography, an advanced form of breast cancer screening, has risen rapidly in recent years, according to Yale researchers in a new study. But adoption of the technology varies widely, reflecting emerging disparities in care, they said.

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Commonly prescribed drugs could increase the risk of dementia, says a new study

New research suggests that regular use of certain types of commonly prescribed drugs used to treat bladder conditions, Parkinson's disease and depression, could significantly increase the risk of dementia in later life.

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Targeting individual atoms

In recent decades, NMR spectroscopy has made it possible to capture the spatial structure of chemical and biochemical molecules. Now researchers at ETH have found a way to apply this measurement principle to individual atoms.

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Widely available antibiotics could be used in the treatment of 'superbug' MRSA

Some MRSA infections could be tackled using widely-available antibiotics, suggests new research from an international collaboration led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Sanger Institute.

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Performance-enhancing bacteria found in the microbiomes of elite athletes

New research has identified a type of bacteria found in the microbiomes of elite athletes that contributes to improved capacity for exercise. These bacteria, members of the genus Veillonella, are not found in the guts of sedentary people.

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Molecular scissors stabilize the cell's cytoskeleton

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Villigen, Switzerland, have for the first time elucidated the structure of important enzymes in human cells that alter essential building blocks of the cellular cytoskeleton. This reveals the missing part of a cycle that regulates the build-up or breakdown of supporting elements of the cell. The enzymes investigated work as molecular scissors and c

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Sexual hormone oestradiol protects female brain in mid-life

How do sex hormones and body weight affect emotional and cognitive well-being? To answer this question, a team of scientists led by Rachel Zsido and Julia Sacher analysed the data of 974 participants from a large population-based study by the Leipzig Research Centre for Civilization Diseases (LIFE). The researchers found that sex hormone oestradiol plays a crucial role in keeping the structure of

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Should Human Feces Be Regulated Like a Drug?

For the past several years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been trying to figure out how to regulate human feces. Fecal transplants are an almost miraculously effective cure for a gut infection called C. diff . The microbes in the stool of a healthy donor repopulate the gut microbiome of a sick patient. But some of those microbes could be dangerous. This month, hypothetical concerns be

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New NASA Rover Discovery Hints at Signs of Life on Mars

Methane Spike This week, NASA’s Curiosity Rover detected methane readings three times its previously highest ever recorded level, according to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL). And that reading – 21 parts per billion units by volume – is a big deal. Methane is produced both by microbes on Earth and through interactions between rocks and water, meaning methane is a sign of life as we know it. The f

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Bacteria found in gut might help boost physical performance

Scientists say certain species are more abundant in marathon runners after race From go-faster stripes to energy gels, athletes have long sought ways to boost their performance. Now researchers say bacteria might also offer a helping hand. Scientists say they have found that certain species of bacteria in the gut appear to be more abundant in marathon runners after a race. They also claim that wh

16h

Mars meteorite assault stopped 500 million years earlier than thought

The Late Heavy Bombardment may have stopped on Mars 4.48 billion years ago, allowing it to become more favourable to life earlier than previously suggested

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Can your gut bacteria really make you a better runner?

A new study opens the door to probiotics that boost physical performance, but whether they will work in humans is far from proven

16h

Clouds dominate uncertainties in predicting future Greenland melt

New research led by climate scientists from the University of Bristol suggests that the representation of clouds in climate models is as, or more, important than the amount of greenhouse gas emissions when it comes to projecting future Greenland ice sheet melt.

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Researchers provide new evidence on the reliability of climate modeling

For decades, scientists studying a key climate phenomenon have been grappling with contradictory data that have threated to undermine confidence in the reliability of climate models overall. A new study, published today in Nature Geoscience, settles that debate with regard to the tropical atmospheric circulation.

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Targeting individual atoms

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important methods of physicochemical analysis. It can be used to determine precise molecular structures and dynamics. The importance of this method is also evidenced by the recognition of ETH Zurich's two latest Nobel laureates, Richard Ernst and Kurt Wüthrich, for their contributions to refining the method.

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Widely available antibiotics could be used in the treatment of 'superbug' MRSA

Some MRSA infections could be tackled using widely-available antibiotics, suggests new research from an international collaboration led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Sanger Institute.

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Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru

Nestled between the Pacific Ocean and the Andes mountains, Peru's coastal region relies on surface water from the Andes for drinking water, industry, and animal and crop farming.

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Gut microbes might help elite athletes boost their physical performance

Veillonella bacteria increased in some runners’ guts after a marathon, and may make a compound that might boost endurance, a mouse study suggests.

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Capuchin monkeys’ stone-tool use has evolved over 3,000 years

A Brazilian archaeological site reveals capuchins’ long history of practical alterations to pounding implements, researchers say.

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Why kids need to learn about gender and sexuality | Lindsay Amer

Lindsay Amer is the creator of "Queer Kid Stuff," an educational video series that breaks down complex ideas around gender and sexuality through songs and metaphors. By giving kids and their families a vocabulary to express themselves, Amer is helping to create more empathetic adults — and spreading a message of radical acceptance in a world where it's sometimes dangerous to just be yourself. "I

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Monkey tool design changed over millennia

Researchers find first evidence of gradual changes in the design of stone tools used by capuchins. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Roads and deforestation explode in the Congo basin

Logging roads are expanding dramatically in the Congo Basin, leading to catastrophic collapses in animal populations living in the world's second-largest rainforest, according to research co-led by a scientist at James Cook University in Australia.

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Improved single-cell ATAC-seq method scales up research into how genes are controlled

Scientists at Harvard University, collaborating with researchers at Bio-Rad Laboratories, have developed a new platform for rapid single-cell sequencing. The approach combines microfluidics and novel software to scale up single-cell ATAC-seq, which identifies parts of the genome that are open and accessible to regulatory proteins.

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Chemists discover structure of glucagon fibrils

Patients with type 1 diabetes have to regularly inject themselves with insulin, a hormone that helps their cells absorb glucose from the bloodstream. Another hormone called glucagon, which has the opposite effect, is given to diabetic patients to revive them if they become unconscious due to severe hypoglycemia.

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Ozone depletion driving climate change in Southern Hemisphere

Ozone depletion in the stratosphere continues to affect not only ultraviolet (UV) radiation levels at the Earth's surface but also climate in the Southern Hemisphere, an international study reports.

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Untangling the complicated relationships between people and nature for a brighter future

An international group of scientists is making major advances in sustaining the world's environments, untangling the intricate ways in which people and nature depend on each other.

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Molecular scissors stabilize the cell's cytoskeleton

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Villigen, Switzerland, have for the first time elucidated the structure of important enzymes in human cells that alter essential building blocks of the cellular cytoskeleton. This reveals the missing part of a cycle that regulates the build-up or breakdown of supporting elements of the cell. The enzymes investigated work as molecular scissors and c

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For America’s Uniformed Public Health Service, Existential Questions Abound

Despite its 130-year history, the Corps in latter decades has operated under a pall of derision and threats to its existence — some of it unfair, defenders say, but much of it earned, according to critics, whose voices are gaining new urgency under the budget-cutting oversight of President Donald J. Trump.

16h

Widely available antibiotics could be used in the treatment of 'superbug' MRSA

Some MRSA infections could be tackled using widely-available antibiotics, suggests new research from an international collaboration led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Sanger Institute.

16h

Improved single-cell ATAC-seq method scales up research into how genes are controlled

Scientists at Harvard University, collaborating with researchers at Bio-Rad Laboratories, have developed a new platform for rapid single-cell sequencing. The approach combines microfluidics and novel software to scale up single-cell ATAC-seq, which identifies parts of the genome that are open and accessible to regulatory proteins.

16h

Chemists discover structure of glucagon fibrils

Patients with type 1 diabetes have to regularly inject themselves with insulin, a hormone that helps their cells absorb glucose from the bloodstream. Another hormone called glucagon, which has the opposite effect, is given to diabetic patients to revive them if they become unconscious due to severe hypoglycemia.

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Molecular scissors stabilize the cell's cytoskeleton

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Villigen, Switzerland, have for the first time elucidated the structure of important enzymes in human cells that alter essential building blocks of the cellular cytoskeleton. This reveals the missing part of a cycle that regulates the build-up or breakdown of supporting elements of the cell. The enzymes investigated work as molecular scissors and c

16h

Screams contain a 'calling card' for the vocalizer's identity

Listeners can correctly identify whether pairs of screams were produced by the same person or two different people — a critical prerequisite to individual recognition.

16h

Government-funded research increasingly fuels innovation

A quantitative analysis going back over a period of more than 90 years shows that almost a third of patents in the U.S. rely on federal research funding.

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'Toy Story 4' Just Crushed the Box Office

Disney now has the four biggest opening weekends of 2019.

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A solarium for hens? How to increase the vitamin D content of eggs

Many people suffer from a vitamin D deficiency. This can result in brittle bones and an increased risk of respiratory diseases. Chicken eggs are a natural source of vitamin D and one way to, at least partially, compensate for this deficiency. A team of nutritionists and agricultural scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has found a new way to further increase the vitamin D

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Waterloo hospital site to be dug up by team including UK veterans

Archaeological dig will be first at building where thousands of Wellington’s men were treated A group of 25 British and Dutch military veterans are to join the first excavation of the main field hospital established by the Duke of Wellington during the Battle of Waterloo. The former soldiers, sailors and RAF personnel will work with archaeologists, led by Prof Tony Pollard of Glasgow University,

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Novel nanogenerator takes cue from electric eels

Researchers from the Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems and the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a bionic stretchable nanogenerator (BSNG) that takes inspiration from electric eels.

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Researchers unveil how soft materials react to deformation at molecular level

Before designing the next generation of soft materials, researchers must first understand how they behave during rapidly changing deformation. In a new study, researchers challenged previous assumptions regarding polymer behavior with newly developed laboratory techniques that measure polymer flow at the molecular level.

17h

A solarium for hens? How to increase the vitamin D content of eggs

Many people suffer from a vitamin D deficiency. This can result in brittle bones and an increased risk of respiratory diseases. Chicken eggs are a natural source of vitamin D and one way to, at least partially, compensate for this deficiency. A team of nutritionists and agricultural scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has found a new way to further increase the vitamin D

17h

Seeing the doctor? Relax, you'll remember more

Some patients feel shame, anxiety or fear immediately before seeing their doctor, making them tense. But if they can relax and become calm, patients will likely pay attention to and better comprehend health messages, suggests a new University of Michigan study.

17h

Querying big data just got universal

To solve one of the key obstacles in big-data science, KAUST researchers have created a framework for searching very large datasets that runs easily on different computing architectures. Their achievement allows researchers to concentrate on advancing the search engine, or query engine, itself rather than on painstakingly coding for specific computing platforms.

17h

Zimbabwe wants ivory ban lifted so it can sell $600-mln stockpile

Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa opened a UN wildlife summit on Monday with a call to lift the global ivory trade ban so that the country can sell $600 million of stockpiled tusks.

17h

The Startling Rise of Choking During Sex

There are a lot of emotions commonly associated with sex: love, happiness, excitement, maybe even relaxation. But for many women, one sexual feeling that comes to mind is a darker one: fear. In a recent study, Debby Herbenick, a professor and sex researcher at the Indiana University School of Public Health, found that nearly a quarter of adult women in the United States have felt scared during se

17h

Storing sperm in a freezer for a decade hardly affects birth rates

Many countries impose time limits on storing frozen sperm, but a sperm bank study has found this may not be necessary as it has little effect on birth rates

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Freezing embryos doesn't boost IVF success rate despite common use

People are often advised to freeze embryos and delay implantation so the uterus can recover from drugs taken during egg removal, but there may be few benefits

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Branching out: Making graphene from gum trees

Graphene is the thinnest and strongest material known to humans. It's also flexible, transparent and conducts heat and electricity 10 times better than copper, making it ideal for anything from flexible nanoelectronics to better fuel cells.

17h

A wearable vibration sensor for accurate voice recognition

A voice-recognition feature can be easily found on mobile phones these days. Oftentimes, we experience an incident where a speech recognition application is activated in the middle of a meeting or a conversation in the office. Sometimes, it is not activated at all regardless of numbers of times we call out the application. It is because a mobile phone uses a microphone which detects sound pressure

17h

Why YouTube's kid issues are so serious

To understand just how severe YouTube's kids problem is, take a look at the popularity charts.

17h

'Bathtub rings' around Titan's lakes might be made of alien crystals

The frigid lakeshores of Saturn's moon Titan might be encrusted with strange, unearthly minerals, according to new research being presented here.

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Dutchman swims epic ice-skating course threatened by climate change

As Europe braces for a heatwave this week, a Dutchman is swimming the route of the country's most famed ice skating race—which has not been held for two decades as climate change bites.

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Zimbabwe wants ivory ban lifted so it can sell $600-mln stockpile

Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa opened a UN wildlife summit on Monday with a call to lift the global ivory trade ban so that the country can sell $600 million of stockpiled tusks.

17h

Researchers unveil how soft materials react to deformation at molecular level

Before designing the next generation of soft materials, researchers must first understand how they behave during rapidly changing deformation. In a new study, researchers challenged previous assumptions regarding polymer behavior with newly developed laboratory techniques that measure polymer flow at the molecular level.

17h

A solarium for hens? How to increase the vitamin D content of eggs

Many people suffer from a vitamin D deficiency. This can result in brittle bones and an increased risk of respiratory diseases. Chicken eggs are a natural source of vitamin D and one way to, at least partially, compensate for this deficiency. A team of nutritionists and agricultural scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has found a new way to further increase the vitamin D

17h

Non-invasive view into the heart

The non-invasive measurement of blood flow to the heart using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is on par with cardiac catheterization. This was the result of an international study published in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine and headed by researchers from Goethe University.

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Novel Chinese nanogenerator takes cue from electric eels

Researchers from the Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems and the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a bionic stretchable nanogenerator (BSNG) that takes inspiration from electric eels.

17h

How to bend waves to arrive at the right place

Under certain circumstances, a wave can split into several paths, reaching some places with high intensity, while avoiding others almost completely. This kind of 'branched flow' has first been observed in 2001. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have now developed a method to exploit this effect. The core idea of this new approach is to send a wave signal exclusively along one single pre-selected bran

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'Bathtub rings' around Titan's lakes might be made of alien crystals

The frigid lakeshores of Saturn's moon Titan might be encrusted with strange, unearthly minerals, according to new research being presented at the 2019 Astrobiology Science Conference, June 24-28, co-hosted by AGU and NASA in Bellevue, Wa.

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Popular strategy for raising pregnancy rates in IVF fails to deliver improvement in large trial

The increasingly popular trend for fertility clinics to freeze all IVF embryos for later transfer has been shown in a large multicentre randomised trial to offer no improvement in delivery rates over traditional 'fresh' embryo transfers. 'Our findings give no support to a general freeze-all strategy in normally menstruating women,' said investigator Dr Sacha Stormlund from Copenhagen University Ho

17h

Immunotherapy and HDAC inhibition are anti-cancer besties

Colorado study shows that adding HDAC inhibitor sensitized cancers to anti-PD1 therapy.

17h

Google’s new media literacy program teaches kids how to spot disinformation and fake news

Google announced this morning it’s expanding its two-year-old digital safety and citizenship curriculum for children, “Be Internet Awesome,” to now include media literacy — …

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Mars rover detects ‘excitingly huge’ methane spike

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01981-2 NASA’s Curiosity rover reports the highest-ever reading of the gas at the planet’s surface.

17h

To Eurofighters er styrtet ned i Nordtyskland

To jetjagere af typen Eurofighter Typhoon fra er styrtet ned i Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, muligvis efter en kollission.

17h

We crave info like drugs, junk food, and cash

Information acts on the brain’s dopamine-producing reward system in the same way as money or food, according to new research. “To the brain, information is its own reward, above and beyond whether it’s useful,” says Ming Hsu, an associate professor at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, whose research employs functional magnetic imaging (fMRI), psychological the

17h

Ruminants' genes are a treasure trove

A new large-scaled research project has mapped the genome of 44 ruminant species – a group of animals that have intrigued researchers for years because of their biological diversity and their huge importance as domestic animals. The project gives valuable new insights on how genetic adjustments through evolution have rendered the ruminants one of the most successful groups of animals on the planet

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Bitcoin surges above $11,000 thanks to Facebook's currency plans

Bitcoin surged to a near 16-month high above $11,000 Monday, overshadowing showings across stock, foreign exchange and commodity markets, with investors looking ahead to the week's G20 summit.

17h

Hidden oil spill: New study contradicts owner's claims

A new federally led study of oil seeping from a platform toppled off Louisiana's coast 14½ years ago found releases lower than other recent estimates, but contradicts the well owner's assertions about the amount and source of oil.

17h

Slurpees incoming! 7-Eleven begins delivery in public spaces

Craving a Slurpee from 7-Eleven but you're stuck in the park?

17h

Intense heat wave to strike Paris, shimmer across Europe

The sunset had an orange glow and so does the new heat alert level for Paris.

17h

Scientists discover the forces behind extreme heat over Northeast Asia

Against the background of global warming, extreme heat has occurred more frequently and caused adverse socioeconomic effects. In the midsummer of 2018, a severe extreme heat episode struck Northeast Asia, causing numerous fatalities. For instance, the extreme heat that struck Japan in July 2018 resulted in about 24,000 hospitalized patients and more than 90 deaths. To understand what caused the ex

17h

Ruminants' genes are a treasure trove

A new large-scaled research project has mapped the genome of 44 ruminant species – a group of animals that have intrigued researchers for years because of their biological diversity and their huge importance as domestic animals. The project gives valuable new insights on how genetic adjustments through evolution have rendered the ruminants one of the most successful groups of animals on the planet

17h

Safeguarding Australia's Great Barrier Reef takes a cultural shift

It is sometimes the relatively simple ideas that work best. A novel low-cost device, that can rapidly secure coral fragments to the reef, has been so successful at helping propagate coral on high value sections of Australia's Great Barrier Reef that the Australian and Queensland Governments have committed more funding to take the project further.

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Senators Are Suddenly Really Interested in UFOs

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Driverless cars are coming. We’ll miss the thrill of the ride.

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Liquid Crystal Magna – Enabling Custom Mass Manufacture

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The Augmented Reality App That Lets You Experience the Moon Landing

Tied to a new series from the Smithsonian Channel, the app is the closest you can get to being on the moon without time-traveling to 1969

17h

How Neil, Buzz and Mike Got Their Workouts in on Their Way to the Moon and Back

To counter the effects of weightlessness, NASA equipped Apollo 11 with an Exer-Genie for isometric exercises

17h

SpaceX is launching NASA's $80 million Deep Space Atomic Clock tonight

Spacecraft have no independent navigation systems onboard. They rely on navigation instructions sent from Earth, which can take about 40 minutes to reach them. The presence of an onboard atomic clock would radically streamline spacecraft navigation and is crucial to autonomous space exploration missions. A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will take NASA's Deep Space Atomic Clock up for a year-long miss

17h

Fødevarerne bliver ikke 'grønne' i laboratoriet: »Hvis du vil redde verden, skal du arbejde med landbrug«

PLUS. En mere bæredygtig fødevareforsyning kræver, at mikrobiologerne i højere grad trækker i gummistøvlerne og kommer ud at grave i jorden, fastslår KU-biolog.

17h

How the Stonewall riots changed health care

June 28 marks the 50-year anniversary of the Stonewall riots—sparked when police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay club in New York City—which are credited with launching the gay rights movement. “In many ways, the riots also brought attention to the unique health care needs of the gay population and served as a catalyst for the improvements in health care seen today—though we still have far to go,

17h

Additions, deletions and changes to the official list of North American birds

The latest supplement to the American Ornithological Society's checklist of North and Middle American birds is being published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, and it includes several major updates to the organization of the continent's bird species. The official authority on the names and classification of the region's birds, the checklist is consulted by birdwatchers and professional scienti

17h

Additions, deletions and changes to the official list of North American birds

The latest supplement to the American Ornithological Society's checklist of North and Middle American birds is being published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, and it includes several major updates to the organization of the continent's bird species. The official authority on the names and classification of the region's birds, the checklist is consulted by birdwatchers and professional scienti

17h

A green spacecraft

NASA trials less toxic fuel.

17h

Scientists put comet mission on fast track

Bold plan to intercept a comet as it approaches the sun given high priority. Richard A Lovett reports.

17h

Pretty boys have ski-slope noses, research shows

Nose shape strongly informs the assumptions observers make. Andrew Masterson reports.

17h

Marine otter problems predate the fur trade

The glamour species, once hunted to near extinction, was in trouble even before fashion became a factor. Andrew Masterson reports.

17h

Shedding light on rhodopsin dynamics in the retina

Photoreceptor cells in our eyes can adjust to both weak and strong light levels, but we still don't know exactly how they do it. Emeritus Professor Fumio Hayashi of Kobe University and his colleagues revealed that the photoreceptor protein rhodopsin forms transient clusters within the disc membranes in retina. These clusters are concentrated in the center of disc membranes, and act as platforms in

17h

A wearable vibration sensor for accurate voice recognition

Professor Kilwon Cho of Chemical Engineering and Professor Yoonyoung Chung of Electronic and Electric Engineering from POSTECH successfully developed a flexible and wearable vibration responsive sensor. When this sensor is attached to a neck, it can precisely recognize voice through vibration of the neck skin and is not affected by ambient noise or the volume of sound.

17h

Islamic values play a significant role in the travel decisions of Muslim tourists

Islamic values are just as important as the destination, quality and value for money for Muslims when choosing a holiday destination, according to a new study by the University of Portsmouth.

17h

Study investigates role of family doctors in advanced therapies

A group of researchers at the University of Granada has conducted a study into the knowledge and attitudes of Family Medicine residents, in relation to the so-called 'advanced therapies'. These include gene therapy, cell therapy, and tissue engineering.

17h

Scientists discover the forces behind extreme heat over Northeast Asia

To understand what caused the extreme heat over Northeast Asia, a scientific collaboration of climatologists examined the forces of the tropical circulation and sea surface temperature.

17h

Helping the body's ability to grow bone

For the first time, scientists have been able to study how well synthetic bone grafts stand up to the rigors and 'strains' of life, and how quickly they help bone re-grow and repair.

17h

How Deep Learning Is Transforming Brain Mapping

Thanks to deep learning, the tricky business of making brain atlases just got a lot easier. Brain maps are all the rage these days. From rainbow-colored dots that highlight neurons or gene expression across the brain, to neon “brush strokes” that represent neural connections, every few months seem to welcome a new brain map . Without doubt, these maps are invaluable for connecting the macro (the

17h

What It Means for Health Care to Be a Human Right

More than half the world’s countries have pledged to protect their citizens’ right to health care, through either national laws or international human-rights agreements. The United States is not one of them, although demands for universal health care and Medicare for All have been animating issues in the opening months of the 2020 presidential campaign. According to a recent poll by the Pew Resea

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Model suggests how early dark energy could resolve the Hubble tension

The universe is continuously expanding, yet the exact rate at which it does so remains unclear, and has so far only been approximated using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and other similar instruments. Moreover, in recent years, astronomers using the Hubble telescope have unveiled a discrepancy between the two primary techniques used for estimating the universe's expansion rate.

18h

WeTransfer har sendt filer til de forkerte

Fildelingstjenesten WeTransfer har ved en fejl sendt links til de forkerte.

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Warmer seas threaten Northeast fishing communities

Most fishing communities from North Carolina to Maine will face declining fishing options unless they adapt to climate change by catching different species or fishing in different areas, a new study warns. Some Maine fishing communities are at greatest risk of losing their current fishing options, according to the study. “Some communities like Portland, Maine, are on track to lose out, while othe

18h

Conceptual model explains how thunderstorm clouds bunch together

Understanding the weather and climate change is one of the most important challenges in science today. A new theoretical study from Associate Professor Jan Härter at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, presents a new mechanism for the self-aggregation of storm clouds, a phenomenon by which storm clouds bunch together in dense clusters. The researcher used methods from complexity sc

18h

Destructive insect outbreaks and cod collapse

When fundamental changes started to happen in three ecosystems in North America, people reacted: They completely stopped pollution, forestry and fishing. But these measures were futile; it was impossible to bring the ecosystems back to their original state. Why didn't the management efforts have any effect?

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Destructive insect outbreaks and cod collapse

When fundamental changes started to happen in three ecosystems in North America, people reacted: They completely stopped pollution, forestry and fishing. But these measures were futile; it was impossible to bring the ecosystems back to their original state. Why didn't the management efforts have any effect?

18h

Surrey researchers clear runway for tin based perovskite solar cells

Researchers at the University of Surrey believe their tin based perovskite solar cell could clear the runway for solar panel technology to take off and help the UK reach its 2050 carbon neutral goal.

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Play games with no latency

One of the most challenging issues for game players looks to be resolved soon with the introduction of a zero-latency gaming environment. A KAIST team developed a technology that helps game players maintain zero-latency performance. The new technology transforms the shapes of game design according to the amount of latency.

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Hydrogel offers double punch against orthopedic bone infections

Surgery prompted by automobile accidents, combat wounds, cancer treatment and other conditions can lead to bone infections that are difficult to treat and can delay healing until they are resolved. Now, researchers have a developed a double-duty hydrogel that both attacks the bacteria and encourages bone regrowth with a single application containing two active components.

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Study ties poor sleep to reduced memory performance in older adults

A new study has found that variability in night-to-night sleep time and reduced sleep quality adversely affect the ability of older adults to recall information about past events. The study also found unexpected racial differences in the type of sleep patterns tied to lower memory performance across both younger and older African American research participants.

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Ruminants' genes are a treasure trove

A new large-scaled research project has mapped the genome of 44 ruminant species — a group of animals that have intrigued researchers for years because of their biological diversity and their huge importance as domestic animals.

18h

Querying big data just got universal

A universal query engine for big data that works across computing platforms could accelerate analytics research.

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Novel noninvasive molecular imaging for monitoring rheumatoid arthritis

A first-in-human Phase 1/Phase II study demonstrates that intravenous administration of the radiopharmaceutical imaging agent technetium-99m (99mTc) tilmanocept promises to be a safe, well-tolerated, noninvasive means of monitoring rheumatoid arthritis disease activity. At present, there is no reliable noninvasive way to directly monitor inflammation in joints of RA patients

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Early biomarker found for degenerative neurologic disease

Researchers have discovered a novel radioligand that can effectively differentiate progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) from similar brain disorders, allowing for earlier and more reliable diagnosis of the disease. Presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2019 Annual Meeting, these findings bring physicians a step closer to being able to definitively diagnose PSP with i

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Natural antibiotic's multi-level attack strategy prevents resistance

The natural antibiotic lugdunin, discovered three years ago by Tübingen researchers, attacks pathogenic bacteria in several different ways simultaneously. It also interacts with the defense mechanisms of the human body, according to a recent study published in Nature Communications. The study is the work of a research team led by Professor Birgit Schittek from the Department of Dermatology at the

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European Comet Interceptor Could Visit an Interstellar Object

Launching in 2028, the European Space Agency’s newly announced mission will wait in space for an exciting target — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How giving young people basic financial skills helps them find jobs

The picture in South Africa is a bleak one for the average 15—24 year old. Many have finished their schooling with a qualification of little value in the eyes of employers. And they lack the basic skills that employers now need. The result is that a staggering 39,6% (narrow definition) or 55,2% (expanded definition which includes those who have stopped actively looking for work) are unemployed.

18h

The Question the Iran Hawks Haven’t Answered

Since September 11, 2001, the United States has waged wars to unseat the rulers of Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya, wreaking chaos and destruction in the process. The consequences—for American power and prestige, for the American troops killed and wounded, and for the people whose countries disintegrated into civil war—have been catastrophic. Given this dismal track record, one might think no policy

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Study investigates lack of disclaimers on Facebook and Google's political advertising

A cloak of mystery often shrouds the inner workings of technological giants, but sometimes clarity is in plain sight. A Virginia Tech research team recently uncovered conclusive details about the roles Facebook, Google, and the Federal Election Commission played in digital advertising around the U.S. presidential election of 2016.

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'Quantitative literacy' would prevent unsound research policy

Research impact is measured in different ways. However, these indicators are often based on dubious calculations, says Ludo Waltman.

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How to bend waves to arrive at the right place

Waves do not always spread uniformly into all directions, but can form a remarkable "branched flow." At TU Wien (Vienna) a method has now been developed to control this phenomenon.

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Fingerprint spectroscopy within a millisecond

To guarantee high quality pharmaceuticals, manufacturers need not only to control the purity and concentration of their own products, but also those of their suppliers. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF have developed a measuring system capable of identifying a wide variety of chemical and pharmaceutical substances remotely and in real time. It is perfect

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We spoke to survivalists prepping for disaster: here's what we learned about the end of the world

"We are all fucked." A crude though oft-uttered sigh which tries to encapsulate an intense, but vague anxiety we experience on many fronts. What's causing it? The possibility of climate-induced population extinction, the development of so-called NBIC (nano-bio-info-cogno-) technologies, global financial collapse and the exponential development of potentially malevolent machine intelligence, to nam

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Nanogenerator's 2500% stretchability sets new record

By stretching like a rubber band to more than 25 times its original length, a new nanogenerator has set a new stretchability record. The triboelectric nanogenerator's 2500% stretchability represents a significant increase over the previous best values of approximately 1000%. In addition, the device is the first triboelectric nanogenerator that is completely fabricated with 3D printing.

18h

Measuring human impact on coastal ecosystems

Lush seagrass beds that support marine life, store carbon and prevent coastal erosion are on the decline due to such things as farming, aquaculture and coastal development.

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Scientists discover new antiviral roles for olfactory neurons in fish

There are thousands upon thousands of viruses in our various environments affecting our everyday life in a variety of ways. Many of those viruses infect humans by entering and exploiting the nasal route. Scientists at The University of New Mexico are conducting research to decipher how the immune system and the olfactory neurons present in the nose work together to quickly stop viral entry into ot

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Measuring human impact on coastal ecosystems

Lush seagrass beds that support marine life, store carbon and prevent coastal erosion are on the decline due to such things as farming, aquaculture and coastal development.

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Cooperatives and social enterprises may hold the key to more and better jobs

Co-operatives and social enterprises achieve employment growth at least on a par with other types of organisation, and also create good quality jobs, according to a new report by the University of Warwick, the Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini (FGB), and Eurofound.

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The competitive benefits of a modern energy system

As the EPA retreats from the Clean Power Plan's goal of reducing greenhouse gases and promotes President Trump's 19th-century coal-fired energy policy, states like New York and California are aggressively modernizing their energy systems. However, while blue states, largely on the coasts, are promoting renewable energy and reduced greenhouse gas emissions, red states are hanging back and letting t

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Halal holidays: Islamic values play a significant role in the travel decisions of Muslim tourists

Islamic values are just as important as the destination, quality and value for money for Muslims when choosing a holiday destination, according to a new study by the University of Portsmouth.

18h

Scientists discover new antiviral roles for olfactory neurons in fish

There are thousands upon thousands of viruses in our various environments affecting our everyday life in a variety of ways. Many of those viruses infect humans by entering and exploiting the nasal route. Scientists at The University of New Mexico are conducting research to decipher how the immune system and the olfactory neurons present in the nose work together to quickly stop viral entry into ot

18h

Researchers clear runway for tin-based perovskite solar cells

Researchers at the University of Surrey believe their tin based perovskite solar cell could clear the runway for solar panel technology to take off and help the UK reach its 2050 carbon neutral goal.

18h

Samsung Launches A New Range Of SmartThings Devices

If you’re looking to trick out your home to make it smarter, there are a plethora of choices of choose from, but if you’d rather not spend too much time looking around, Samsung …

18h

Amazon Echo Show 5 review: An Alexa display with alarm clock smarts

When Amazon introduced the second-gen Echo Show display last year, it was a huge upgrade over the original, with a built-in browser, better sound and more video options than before. …

18h

Natural antibiotic's multi-level attack strategy prevents resistance

The natural antibiotic lugdunin, discovered three years ago by Tübingen researchers, attacks pathogenic bacteria in several different ways simultaneously. It also interacts with the defense mechanisms of the human body, according to a recent study published in Nature Communications. The study is the work of a research team led by Professor Birgit Schittek from the Department of Dermatology at the

18h

Protein quality control and mitochondria

Protein aggregates are toxic for mitochondrial function, and thus disrupt the supply of chemical energy to their host cells. An LMU team has characterized a protein complex that prevents the build-up of such deposits in the organelles.

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Sandia's crawling robots, drones detect damage to save wind blades

Drones and crawling robots outfitted with special scanning technology could help wind blades stay in service longer, which may help lower the cost of wind energy at a time when blades are getting bigger, pricier and harder to transport, Sandia National Laboratories researchers say.

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Protein quality control and mitochondria

Protein aggregates are toxic for mitochondrial function, and thus disrupt the supply of chemical energy to their host cells. An LMU team has characterized a protein complex that prevents the build-up of such deposits in the organelles.

18h

Music students do better in school than non-musical peers

High school students who take music courses score significantly better on math, science and English exams than their non-musical peers, according to a new study published in the Journal of Educational Psychology.

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Mood neurons mature during adolescence

Researchers have discovered a mysterious group of neurons in the amygdala — a key center for emotional processing in the brain — that stay in an immature, prenatal developmental state throughout childhood. Most of these cells mature rapidly during adolescence, suggesting a key role in the brain's emotional development, but some stay immature throughout life, suggesting new ideas about how the br

18h

Suicide rates are rising significantly among African American teens

A large-scale study from The University of Toledo of young African Americans found a 182 percent increase in suicide deaths among females and a 60 percent increase among males. The findings suggest a greater need for mental health services in urban school districts and calls out the danger of having unsecured firearms and ammunition in the homes of parents and caregivers.

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Physical evidence in the brain for types of schizophrenia

In a study using brain tissue from deceased human donors, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they found new evidence that schizophrenia can be marked by the buildup of abnormal proteins similar to those found in the brains of people with such neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer's or Huntington's diseases.

18h

Additions, deletions, & changes to the official list of North American birds

The latest supplement to the American Ornithological Society's checklist of North and Middle American birds is being published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, and it includes several major updates to the organization of the continent's bird species. The official authority on the names and classification of the region's birds, the checklist is consulted by birdwatchers and professional scienti

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Music students score better in math, science, English than non-musical peers

High schoolers who take music courses score significantly better on exams in certain other subjects, including math and science, than their non-musical peers, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association.

18h

Branching out: Making graphene from gum trees

Researchers have developed a cost-effective and eco-friendly way of producing graphene using one of Australia's most abundant resources, eucalyptus trees.

18h

The Pediatrician’s Most Awkward Task

When Carrie Quinn was training to be a pediatrician, she dutifully memorized the list of symptoms for meningitis. She learned the right antibiotics for pneumonia. But when she got into the clinic, she found herself unprepared for what really concerned parents. “What I was actually faced with wasn’t seriously sick children,” Quinn, who’s now the executive director of the Mount Sinai Parenting Cent

18h

Amazon Echo Show 5 Review: Smaller Isn't Always Better

The screen-bedecked Alexa device is back—this time with a smaller display.

18h

To tackle the climate crisis we need more democracy, not less

As the climate crisis is increasingly felt across the globe, protesters take to the streets and politicians scrabble to respond, a crucial question is beginning to emerge. How can governments develop climate strategies which build public support for action? An announcement by six UK parliamentary committees that they will hold a citizens' assembly on the climate emergency is a crucial step toward

18h

Astronomers detect 130 short period variable stars

By conducting photometric observations of the open cluster Stock 8 and its surrounding region, astronomers have identified 130 short-period variable stars, classifying 51 of them as members of the cluster. A paper detailing the findings appeared June 18 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

18h

Play games with no latency

One of the most challenging issues for game players looks to be resolved soon with the introduction of a zero-latency gaming environment. A KAIST team developed a technology that helps game players maintain zero-latency performance. The new technology transforms the shapes of game design according to the amount of latency.

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Scientists capture first-ever video of giant squid in U.S. waters

FIU marine scientists Heather Bracken-Grissom and Lori Schweikert were among a team of researchers gathered around a monitor when the tentacle first came into view. It floated in and out of the darkness offering no hint of what was on the other end. Then, in an elegant explosion of arms and tentacles, the creature revealed itself—the phantom of the deep, known simply as the giant squid.

18h

Would you eat meat grown from cells in a laboratory? Here's how it works

For many of us, eating a meal containing meat is a normal part of daily life. But if we dig deeper, some sobering issues emerge.

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Metformin and Exercise

I’ve written about metformin quite a few times over the years on the blog, and for several reasons. It is (for starters) obviously a frontline drug for treatment of Type 2 diabetes, a condition that has unfortunately become more and more common in the world as the world puts on more and more weight. (Side note: if any readers do get around to inventing a time machine, a fun afternoon excursion wo

18h

An 'awe-full' state of mind can set you free

An induced feeling of awe, or state of wonder, may be the best strategy yet for alleviating the discomfort that comes from uncertain waiting.

18h

Scientists capture first-ever video of giant squid in U.S. waters

FIU marine scientists Heather Bracken-Grissom and Lori Schweikert were among a team of researchers gathered around a monitor when the tentacle first came into view. It floated in and out of the darkness offering no hint of what was on the other end. Then, in an elegant explosion of arms and tentacles, the creature revealed itself—the phantom of the deep, known simply as the giant squid.

18h

Would you eat meat grown from cells in a laboratory? Here's how it works

For many of us, eating a meal containing meat is a normal part of daily life. But if we dig deeper, some sobering issues emerge.

18h

Vegetables as well as meat could spread superbugs into food chain

Antibiotic-resistant microbes may be able to enter the human food chain via plants and vegetables as well as via meat, according to research in mice

18h

Back to the Stone Age: 17 Key Milestones in Paleolithic Life

The Stone Age may not have been "The Flintstones," but there were definitely caveman qualities to it.

18h

Understanding Transcriptomic or Proteomic Datasets to Reveal Biological Mechanisms

When analyzing large transcriptomics or proteomics datasets, we want to understand whether the phenomenon is unusual or commonplace and whether there are informative similarities to other areas of biology. To learn more about how Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA®) and Analysis Match can help, download this white paper from QIAGEN!

19h

Alzheimer’s tau ‘burns through’ brain’s antioxidant defense

New research may explain why an antioxidant that protects the brain is also associated with deterioration in areas susceptible to Alzheimer’s disease. The antioxidant, superoxide dismutase or SOD1, improves cognition by fighting off free radicals that cause oxidative damage in the brain. However, researchers have discovered SOD1’s protective benefits dramatically weaken when levels of tau protein

19h

What Do You Do When No One Takes You Seriously?

A ndrew Yang leaned toward me inside his 2020-campaign headquarters, as he compared federal economic policy to baking muffins. He suggested that his progressive 2020 rivals, like Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, want to change some ingredients and try again. Yang wants to start from scratch instead. “The recipe’s not working; this tastes like shit,” Yang said, talking quickly. “Inste

19h

Patriotism and the many secret identities of Luming Zhang

If you thought you already saw the worst research fraud from China, here comes the next level. Anything goes to please the Communist Party and to advance own academic career under the oppressive regime.

19h

Simulating Red Sea water exchanges

Powerful computer simulations are revealing new insights into water exchanges between the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden.

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Fremtidens arbejdsmarked: Danske ingeniører kommer til at dele kagen

PLUS. Fremtidens arbejdsmarked ser lyst ud for ingeniører, men faren for ulighed og ustabilitet lurer, hvis ikke alle faggrupper bliver klædt på til forandringerne, advarer OECD-økonom.

19h

Why plants don't die from cancer

Chernobyl has become a byword for catastrophe. The 1986 nuclear disaster, recently brought back into the public eye by the hugely popular TV show of the same name, caused thousands of cancers, turned a once populous area into a ghost city, and resulted in the setting up of an exclusion zone 2600km² in size.

19h

The similarities between a Van Gogh painting and a golf ball

On a molecular scale, there are surprising similarities between the outer shell of a golf ball and the white oil paint used by Van Gogh and his contemporaries. In both cases, the interactions between zinc ions and polymer chains are at the basis of important material properties. In a recent publication in the scientific journal Science Advances, Rijksmuseum and University of Amsterdam researchers

19h

Why plants don't die from cancer

Chernobyl has become a byword for catastrophe. The 1986 nuclear disaster, recently brought back into the public eye by the hugely popular TV show of the same name, caused thousands of cancers, turned a once populous area into a ghost city, and resulted in the setting up of an exclusion zone 2600km² in size.

19h

Amazon wins '.amazon' domain name, aggravating South American region and undermining digital commons

Amazon has a new means of dominating the market—one that threatens the economic interests of the people who call the original Amazon home. In May 2019, the online megastore secured the general top-level domain name ".amazon." Anyone with the internet will recognize these domain types even if they don't know the term. They're the endings to website addresses, like ".com," ".org," and ".ac.uk."

19h

Robots may care for you in old age—and your children will teach them

It's likely that before too long, robots will be in the home to care for older people and help them live independently. To do that, they'll need to learn how to do all the little jobs that we might be able to do without thinking. Many modern AI systems are trained to perform specific tasks by analysing thousands of annotated images of the action being performed. While these techniques are helping

19h

Curiosity Rover finds high levels of methane on Mars

A team working with NASA to study data the Mars Curiosity Rover has found high levels of methane at a site on the Red Planet. The existence of methane is, of course, a possible sign of life, since it is produced in abundance by microorganisms here on Earth.

19h

Phones and wearables combine to assess worker performance

Consumer tech and a custom app combine to optimize the employee review.

19h

People who spread deepfakes think their lies reveal a deeper truth

The recent viral "deepfake" video of Mark Zuckerberg declaring, "whoever controls the data controls the world" was not a particularly convincing imitation of the Facebook CEO, but it was spectacularly successful at focusing attention on the threat of digital media manipulation.

19h

Antibiotic combos could defeat superbugs

A sneaky form of antibiotic resistance is more widespread than thought, report researchers, but tracking “heteroresistance” could help choose drug combinations that can defeat “invincible” bacteria. The findings show that combinations chosen in this way effectively saved mice from otherwise lethal infections. Scientists say they still need to demonstrate efficacy in hospitalized patients. Heteror

19h

Scientists develop climate-ready wheat that can survive drought conditions

Wheat plants engineered to have fewer microscopic pores—called stomata—on their leaves are better able to survive drought conditions associated with climate breakdown, according to a new study.

19h

Scientists develop climate-ready wheat that can survive drought conditions

Wheat plants engineered to have fewer microscopic pores—called stomata—on their leaves are better able to survive drought conditions associated with climate breakdown, according to a new study.

19h

Clean energy from local producers

Is it possible to boost sales of locally produced solar energy by allowing households to trade it through a peer-to-peer platform? The year-long Quartierstrom research project in Walenstadt is investigating how energy markets might operate in the future.

19h

Space physicists send instrument to target comets

Space physicists at Umeå University, Sweden, develop measuring instruments for the spaceship Comet Interceptor. The vessel has been selected to be part of the European Space Agency's ESA program to target comets that have just entered our solar system. The launch will take place in 2028.

19h

Hundreds of orcas hold an annual meeting and now we may know why

We may now know why Orcas mysteriously meet near Australian every year. Underwater canyons funnel squid to the area making it a perfect feasting spot

19h

Raspberry Pi used to steal data from Nasa lab

Lax security at a Nasa lab let a hacker lurk on the agency's network for almost a year, says report.

19h

Study on Visual Framing in the Presidential Debates

This week we will have the first primary debates of the presidential cycle, with two Democratic debates of the top 20 candidates (10 each night). A timely study was just published looking at the coverage of the different candidates in the 2016 primary debates of both parties. The results show a dramatic disparity in how different candidates were covered. Unfortunately, the headline of the press r

19h

Image of the Day: Gut Response

Immune functions in the mouse intestine differ by segment.

19h

Green Propellant Infusion Mission spacecraft to test green propellant on orbit

NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate, along with co-investigators, including the Air Force Research Laboratory, Ball Aerospace, SpaceX, the Space and Missile Systems Center, and Aerojet, are scheduled to launch Ball's Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) spacecraft, enabling the first ever on-orbit demonstration of the AFRL developed ASCENT (Advanced Spacecraft Energetic Non-toxic Prope

19h

The rise of the anti-vaxxers is bad news for business

The social media platforms that facilitate their campaigns are suffering a PR backlash

19h

Research shows fewer males born in U.S. during periods of stress

It is a common understanding in scientific research that the male species, in general, are frailer and experience higher rates of mortality across their lifespans than females. Now, there is evidence that among humans the frail male also extends in utero.

20h

Black men in same sex relationships seek church, internet, for support

Black men who have sex with men, or BMSM, have been the subject of much research focused on health disparities in HIV occurrence, stigma and mental health. Fewer studies focus on other salient areas of their lives, such as spirituality, religious practices and social support.

20h

Subaru Telescope identifies the outermost edge of the Milky Way system

A team of researchers identified the outermost edge of the Milky Way galaxy. Using the Subaru Telescope, the researchers examined the boundary of the stellar system that makes up the galaxy. The ultimate size of the galaxy is 520,000 light years in radius, 20 times larger than the distance between the galactic center and our solar system (26,000 light years) (Figure 1). Stars that reach these oute

20h

Virtual Reality Might Be the Next Big Thing for Mental Health

The technology holds vast potential for insights into the workings of human brains — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

European Comet Interceptor Could Visit an Interstellar Object

Launching in 2028, the European Space Agency’s newly announced mission will wait in space for an exciting target — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

7 Far-Out Discoveries About the Universe's Beginnings

Physicists are constantly learning new facts about the universe’s beginnings, and they’re mind-blowing.

20h

Could CBD Fight Superbugs? Marijuana Compound Shows Promise As an Antibiotic.

But do not try to treat an infection with CBD at home.

20h

NASA Set To Launch a Deep-Space Atomic Clock Tonight

This technology demonstration mission that could transform the way humans explore space.

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Twist link-able cans that eliminate the need for plastic rings

submitted by /u/Heercamelot [link] [comments]

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World faces 'climate apartheid': UN expert

The world faces "a climate apartheid" where the wealthy are better able to adjust to a hotter planet while the poor suffer the worst from climate change, a UN expert said Monday.

20h

Study shows visual framing by media in debates affects public perception

Both Democratic and Republican Party front-runners benefited from preferential visual coverage during the televised 2016 presidential primary debates, according to a new study published by University …

20h

Ravelry, the Facebook of knitting, has banned pro-Trump posts over ‘open white supremacy’

The global community of knitters will not be allowed to support President Trump through words or projects, Ravelry said.

20h

Our Aversion to A/B Testing on Humans Is Dangerous – Facts So Romantic

Research suggests that people have an irrational aversion to A/B tests, which could limit the extent to which important institutions like hospitals, legislatures, and corporations base their decisions on objective evidence. Photograph by Fernando Cortes / Shutterstock Facebook once teamed up with scientists at Cornell to conduct a now-infamous experiment on emotional contagion. Researchers random

20h

Dear Therapist: I Can’t Stand My Fiancée’s Ex-Husband

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I am engaged to be married to a wonderful woman who has a 6-year-old daughter with her ex-husband. They share joint custody. A major contributing factor in her decision to end their marriage was her ex’s contr

20h

Viewing pornography at work increases unethical behavior on the job

New research discovers employees who view pornography on the job aren't just costing companies millions of dollars in wasted time, they're causing harm to the company.

20h

Indian rescuers to airlift bodies back from Himalaya slope

Bad weather hampered efforts Monday to bring down the bodies of seven climbers from the upper reaches of the Himalayas, an Indian military spokesman said.

20h

Medical groups warn climate change is a 'health emergency'

As Democratic presidential hopefuls prepare for their first 2020 primary debate this week, 74 medical and public health groups aligned on Monday to push for a series of consensus commitments to combat climate change, bluntly defined by the organizations as "a health emergency."

20h

Hue times two: A second look at the color of dinosaur eggs

After garnering worldwide attention last year for her research on the origins of egg color in birds, Yale paleontologist Jasmina Wiemann has taken a second look at her eggshells.

20h

More energy needed to cope with climate change

A new study published today in Nature Communications by researchers from IIASA, Boston University and the Ca' Foscari University of Venice found that by mid-century, climate change will increase the demand for energy globally, even with modest warming.

20h

The low density of some exoplanets is confirmed

The Kepler mission and its extension, called K2, discovered thousands of exoplanets. It detected them using the transit technique, measuring the dip in light intensity whenever an orbiting planet moved across the face of its host star as viewed from Earth. Transits can not only measure the orbital period, they often can determine the size of the exoplanet from the detailed depth and shape of its t

20h

'Phoenix' Aurora Spreads Its 'Wings' Over Abandoned Military Power Station in Russia

More than 4,000 photographers shot for the moon (and beyond) for the Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition in the U.K.

20h

Study shows visual framing by media in debates affects public perception

Both Democratic and Republican Party front-runners benefited from preferential visual coverage during the televised 2016 presidential primary debates, according to a new study published by University of Arkansas political scientists. But the researchers say Donald Trump was the clear winner in terms of visual techniques used by the media, such as camera time and solo shots.

20h

The highest-energy photons ever seen hail from the Crab Nebula

An experiment in Tibet spotted photons with over 100 trillion electron volts of energy.

20h

Virtual Reality Might Be the Next Big Thing for Mental Health

The technology holds vast potential for insights into the workings of human brains — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Faster Delivery Might Be Making It Worse For Our Environment

Fast delivery is all the rage these days, with companies such as Amazon offering deliveries that can be made in the next day or two. This is great because one of the downsides to shopping online …

21h

Bill Gates' greatest mistake was losing in mobile to Android

Even some of the wealthiest and most successful people in the world live with regret. For Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, it involves Android.

21h

Amerikansk supermarkedsgigant bruger AI til at afsløre butikstyve

Kameraerne, der overvåger kunderne ved kasserne, er blevet sat op i over tusind Walmart-butikker.

21h

Så avbildades terrorattacken i Stockholm

Tidigare har forskare undersökt hur nyhetsmedierna skildrade terrorattacken i Stockholm den 7 april 2017, men inte med bildjournalistik som huvudfokus. Nu presenterar medieforskaren Maria Nilsson, Stockholms universitet, sin kartläggning av hur svensk press gestaltade terrordådet via bilder och videoklipp. Hon visar hur nyhetsredaktionerna på Dagens Nyheter, Svenska Dagbladet, Aftonbladet och Exp

21h

Se kæmpeblæksprutte angribe madding på mini-ubåd

Det er lykkedes et hold forskere at filme kæmpeblæksprutten Architeuthis i den Mexicanske Golf på 759 meters dybde. En halv time efter ramte lynet skibet.

21h

2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #25

A chronological listing of news articles posted on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Jun 16 through Sat, June 22, 2019 Editor's Pick A Degree of Concern: Why Global Temperatures Matter Credit: NASA-JPL/Caltech Part 1 of a Two-Part Series If you could ask a sea turtle why small increases in global average temperature matter, you’d be likely to get a mouthful. Of

21h

The Unintended Consequences of the Contraceptive Mandate

In 1971, the Supreme Court for the first time struck down a law under the Constitution’s equal-protection clause that treated men and women differently. Courts since then have invalidated countless laws that discriminated on the basis of sex. Bucking convention, advocates frequently attacked laws that were designed to benefit women under the theory that such laws perpetuated harmful sex stereotyp

21h

The Boomers Ruined Everything

The Baby Boomers ruined America. That sounds like a hyperbolic claim, but it’s one way to state what I found as I tried to solve a riddle. American society is going through a strange set of shifts: Even as cultural values are in rapid flux, political institutions seem frozen in time. The average U.S. state constitution is more than 100 years old. We are in the third-longest period without a const

21h

An American Story, Starting in Kosovo

Over the past three years, Deb Fallows and I have written frequently about the lakeside city of Erie, Pennsylvania, and its reaction to the loss of traditional manufacturers over the past generation. One continuing theme has been the importance of the city’s overall openness to outsiders—refugees, other immigrants—in trying to make an economic, cultural, and civic future for itself. (Yes, includi

21h

US reportedly mulls requiring domestic 5G equipment to be made outside China – CNET

The talks come after President Donald Trump's executive order, which basically banned companies like Huawei, last month.

21h

Google Duo WIll Soon Let Users Send Photos To Each Other

Image credit – 9to5GoogleWhen Google announced Duo and Allo a few years ago, the differences between both apps is that one app was designed to be a messaging app (Allo), while the other …

21h

Study shows visual framing by media in debates affects public perception

New research shows that in the 2016 primary debates the front runners from both parties benefitted from preferential visual treatment by the media, but Donald Trump won in terms of camera time and angle.

21h

Hunger hormone may shed light on overeating

A new study offers insight into leptin, a hormone that plays a key role in appetite, overeating, and obesity. The new findings advance knowledge about leptin and weight gain, and also suggest a potential strategy for developing future weight-loss treatments, they say. Leptin, which fat cells secrete, informs the brain when fuel stored in body fat and in the liver is running low. It has been uncle

21h

The looming superbug crisis: Politics, profit, and Big Pharma

Alexander Fleming discovered a fungus that produced a chemical that could stop nearly every bacteria in its path. The 1950s are known as the Golden Era of Antibiotic Development. However, today, there is a looming superbug crisis because bacteria has mutated whilst we've focused on treating other diseases, such as cancer and heart disease. Many companies in the pharmaceutical industry don't want

21h

Omlagte bilafgifter efterlader ubetalt milliardregning

Regningen for at sænke registreringsafgiften i 2017 er aldrig blevet betalt fuldt ud. Pengene skulle være tjent ind igen gennem en vejafgift efter tysk forbillede, men den tyske vejskat blev i sidste uge skudt ned af EU-Domstolen.

21h

Techtopia #111: Skal Danmark have et cyberhjemmeværn?

Debatten spirer om, hvorvidt Danmark bør oprette et cyberhjemmeværn som følge af udviklingen i den digitale virkelighed.

21h

He Cyberstalked Teen Girls for Years—Then They Fought Back

How a hacker shamed and humiliated high school girls in a small New Hampshire town, and how they helped take him down.

21h

Apollo 11: Mission Out of Control

The inside story of how Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin struggled to touch down on the moon, while their guidance computer kept crashing. Again and again.

21h

Oru Kayak Haven: This Fold-Up Vessel Is a Work of Oar-igami Art

The collapsible kayak company's latest boat can transform from a one- to two-person vessel and come with you on vacation like a suitcase.

21h

How 9 People Built an Illegal $5M Airbnb Empire in New York

City officials say the network converted residential units in 36 buildings, earning more than $5 million for booking 24,330 rooms and housing 63,873 guests.

21h

Fear, Misinformation, and Measles Spread in Brooklyn

Measles is back, health care workers are racing to contain it, and parents of vulnerable children are frantic. How a fever spread in a tight-knit community.

21h

Artificial Intelligence Is Coming for Our Faces

Trained for a week on a massive data set of portraits, a neural network spits out striking images of nonexistent people.

21h

The Tech Industry's Latest Fitness Craze: Recovery

From neuro-stim headphones and percussive massage devices to dynamic compression pants, the latest gadgets are all about preparing for the next workout.

21h

Top 3 Bike Helmets for 2019: Bontrager, Specialized, Sena

Innovative materials, integrated sensors, and Bluetooth tech are making the latest head cases safer than their ancestors.

21h

We Need a Data-Rich Picture of What's Killing the Planet

If we're going to save Earth, we need a clear picture of all the forces that are destroying it. And that means capturing more data.

21h

Angry Nerd: Come On! We Can't 'Decentralize' Everything!

Legal scholar Angela Walch calls it the "veil of decentralization," a way for companies to obscure responsibility for their creations.

21h

Instagram Is Sweet and Sort of Boring—but the Ads!

One minute you're receiving representations of the good life; the next you have a chance to wake up and buy something that will improve your social well-being.

21h

The Internet Has Made Dupes—and Cynics—of Us All

The typical response to the onslaught of falsehood is to say, lol, nothing matters. But when so many of us are reaching this point, it really does matter.

21h

Underwater Gear for the Smartphone Photographer: AquaTech, Cressi, Da Fin, Matador, Lume

For your next tropical getaway, this setup will help your Instagram be so much more than just—yawn—sunsets and artfully arranged cocktails.

21h

Gear for Going off the Grid: Goal Zero, CRKT, Somewear, Grayl, and Good To-Go

The latest outdoor tech helps us stay safe, eat like a human, and recharge—even deep in the backcountry.

21h

Report: Microsoft Is Cooking Up a Dual-Screen Surface With Support for Android Apps

Computer makers have been dreaming about dual-screened laptops for a long time. Microsoft got the hype started nearly a decade ago with the Courier, a rumored dual-screen tablet that at some …

22h

Long Beach Scuba Show: Catching up with Reef Check and Ocean Sanctuaries

Kristin Butler dedicates her Scuba Series in remembrance of her beloved mother, Marilyn Butler, who passed along to Kristin a deep love for science and nature along with a pair of pink scuba diving fins. Each year, the Long Beach Scuba Show brings together divers from around the world for seminars and exhibits on all things scuba, with topics ranging from dive gear to scuba vacations. Though the s

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