Search Posts

nyheder2019juni25

7h

Hubble finds tiny 'electric soccer balls' in space, helps solve interstellar mystery

Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have confirmed the presence of electrically-charged molecules in space shaped like soccer balls, shedding light on the mysterious contents of the interstellar medium (ISM) – the gas and dust that fills interstellar space.

5h

Stort studie: Populært fryse-trick til barnløse har ingen effekt

Det er en fejl at fryse alle æg for at øge chancen for at blive gravid. »Vi kan nu slå fast med stor sikkerhed, at det ikke virker,« siger dansk læge bag stort EU-støttet studie.

12h

These Cities Will Track Scooters to Get a Handle on Regulation

The cities, which include New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco, will use the same tool to keep track of where scooters go, and where they are parked.

3min

Sometimes, a non-invasive procedure will suffice

When a patient complains about chest pain, diagnosis will usually involve catheter angiography to evaluate the adequacy of blood supply to the heart. Researchers have now established that, in certain cases, the diagnostic reliability of non-invasive coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is as good as that of coronary angiography – thereby dispensing with the need for invasive procedures.

6min

Air pollution found to affect marker of female fertility in real-life study

Ovarian reserve, a term widely adopted to reflect the number of resting follicles in the ovary and thus a marker of potential female fertility, has been found in a large-scale study to be adversely affected by high levels of air pollution.

6min

What is the origin of thinking? A new book argues that it's action, not language.

In Mind in Motion , Stanford psychologist Barbara Tversky argues that action is the foundation of thinking. Tversky focuses on a variety of communication systems that transcend language, such as gestures, signs, maps, accounting, and music. Paying attention to our environment makes us better communicators and, arguably, better thinkers. None In 2001, Colombian neuroscientist Rodolfo Llinás declar

10min

Common antidepressants interact with opioid med to lessen pain relief

Common antidepressants interact with the opioid pain medication tramadol to make it less effective for pain relief, according to a new study. These findings have important implications for the opioid epidemic, suggesting that some patients suspected of drug-seeking may in fact be under-medicated and just are seeking more effective pain relief. They also could help explain why some people exceed th

20min

YouTube's kids content prompts calls for FTC to hold site accountable – CNET

A US senator and two consumer groups send letters to the Federal Trade Commission expressing concern about data collection and children's privacy.

23min

Canada's longest space mission comes to an end

Astronaut David Saint-Jacques spent 204 days in space alongside crew mates from Russian and the US.

24min

Publisher Correction: Randomized controlled trial on the influence of dietary intervention on epigenetic mechanisms in children with cow’s milk allergy: the EPICMA study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45226-8 Publisher Correction: Randomized controlled trial on the influence of dietary intervention on epigenetic mechanisms in children with cow’s milk allergy: the EPICMA study

28min

Author Correction: Lifeact-TagGFP2 alters F-actin organization, cellular morphology and biophysical behaviour

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45276-y Author Correction: Lifeact-TagGFP2 alters F-actin organization, cellular morphology and biophysical behaviour

28min

Publisher Correction: MAOA variants differ in oscillatory EEG & ECG activities in response to aggression-inducing stimuli

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45227-7 Publisher Correction: MAOA variants differ in oscillatory EEG & ECG activities in response to aggression-inducing stimuli

28min

Author Correction: Sequential transfection of RUNX2/SP7 and ATF4 coated onto dexamethasone-loaded nanospheres enhances osteogenesis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45277-x Author Correction: Sequential transfection of RUNX2/SP7 and ATF4 coated onto dexamethasone-loaded nanospheres enhances osteogenesis

28min

Publisher Correction: Transcriptomic and neurochemical analysis of the stellate ganglia in mice highlights sex differences

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45211-1 Publisher Correction: Transcriptomic and neurochemical analysis of the stellate ganglia in mice highlights sex differences

28min

Author Correction: Environmental filtering and community delineation in the streambed ecotone

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45692-0 Author Correction: Environmental filtering and community delineation in the streambed ecotone

28min

Publisher Correction: DNA damage detection in nucleosomes involves DNA register shifting

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1343-8 Publisher Correction: DNA damage detection in nucleosomes involves DNA register shifting

31min

SpaceX catches Falcon Heavy nosecone with net-outfitted boat

SpaceX launched Falcon Heavy into space early Tuesday morning. A part of its nosecone – known as a fairing – descended back to Earth using special parachutes. A net-outfitted boat in the Atlantic Ocean successfully caught the reusable fairing, likely saving the company millions of dollars. None After successfully launching its Falcon Heavy rocket into space early Tuesday morning, SpaceX used a ne

32min

Apple’s New iOS 13, a Mars Survival Course, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

39min

SpaceX catches Falcon Heavy nosecone with net-outfitted boat

SpaceX launched Falcon Heavy into space early Tuesday morning. A part of its nosecone – known as a fairing – descended back to Earth using special parachutes. A net-outfitted boat in the Atlantic Ocean successfully caught the reusable fairing, likely saving the company millions of dollars. None After successfully launching its Falcon Heavy rocket into space early Tuesday morning, SpaceX used a ne

43min

'Flying salt shakers of death:' Fungal-infected 'zombie' cicadas

Cicadas can carry a fungus containing chemicals similar to those found in hallucinogenic mushrooms, making them zombie-like fliers.

49min

Cyanide compounds discovered in meteorites may hold clues to the origin of life

Compounds containing iron, cyanide, and carbon monoxide discovered in carbon-rich meteorites by scientists may have helped power life on early Earth.

49min

These neurons affect how much you do, or don't, want to eat

Researchers have identified a network of neurons that coordinate with other brain regions to influence eating behaviors. These findings could help those suffering from disease-induced appetite loss or over-eating.

49min

Pine woodland restoration creates haven for birds in Midwest

Researchers have shown in a new study that restoration of pine woodlands, through the combined use of intentional, managed fires and strategic thinning of tree density, has a strikingly beneficial effect on a diverse array of birds, some of which are facing sharp declines from human-driven impacts like climate change and habitat loss.

49min

CBD Might Work as an Antibiotic to Treat Bacterial Infections

(Credit: ElROi/Shutterstock) CBD, or cannabidiol, is growing in popularity as a stress-relieving wonder drug that may help ease anxiety, inflammation and pain. Many enthusiasts also say it can cure a smorgasbord of other conditions. CBD is a non-active ingredient in cannabis — it doesn't get you high. And that's helped retailers avoid legal problems while plopping the substance into all manner of

49min

Salt-loving Bacteria's Survival Skills Bode Well for Life on Mars

The dark streaks seen on Martian slopes might be an indication of where water sometimes flows, especially since orbiters have also observed salts in the same locations. (Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona) Mars’ surface is dry and dusty. But researchers know there’s water there. It's locked up in the polar ice caps, and occasionally it probably seeps to the surface as liquid. And at night, the

49min

These Monkeys Have An Archaeological Record 3,000 Years Old

A capuchin using a stone to break open its next meal. (Credit: Lisa Crawford/Shutterstock) Among the rocky monoliths of Brazil’s Serra da Capivara National Park, wild monkeys crack cashews and seeds with an array of stone tools. Now, caches of ancient monkey tools reveal the primates started the culinary tradition 3,000 years ago. This archaeological record also shows they adapted their food proce

49min

Judge Halts Treatments at Florida Stem Cell Clinic

U.S. Stem Cell must stop injecting fat extracts into patients, an unproven treatment that federal officials say blinded some patients.

51min

Elite Athletes Get a Performance Boost From Special Gut Microbes

Researchers at Harvard Medical have found that elite athletes like marathon runners have more of a gut microbe, Veillonella, that gives them an endurance boost. They're working on turning it into a probiotic so us slowpokes can get a boost, too. (Credit: lzf/Shutterstock) More and more, researchers have been studying how your gut microbes might be making you sick. Scientists have linked these vita

53min

‘Climate apartheid’: Report says the rich could buy out of climate change disaster

A new report from a United Nation expert warns that an over-reliance on the private sector to mitigate climate change could cause a "climate apartheid." The report criticizes several countries, including the U.S., for taking "short-sighted steps in the wrong direction." The world's poorest populations are most vulnerable to climate change even though they generally contribute the least to global

54min

Whoa! Enormous 'Cotton Candy' Explosion in Kids' Chemistry Lab

A classic chemistry demonstration gets supersized in a recent Twitter video.

55min

Surviving the Worst Skydiving Accident in History

The professional skydiver Dan Brodsky-Chenfeld was poised to achieve his dreams. He was training with his team for the World Championships—a life goal since he started practicing the sport at age 5, jumping off his bunk bed with a blanket for a parachute. Then, on April 23, 1992, Brodsky-Chenfeld lived a nightmare. Along with 22 others, he boarded a plane for a routine training jump. Two months l

1h

The Mueller Report, Live: How Hollywood Tried to Save America

If only a staged performance were the answer to the country's problems.

1h

The secret to moving this ancient sphinx? Hoverboards

The Sphinx of Ramses II awaits its relocation. (The Penn Museum/) Relative to its grand provenance and imposing figure, the Sphinx of Ramses II received a paltry welcome upon its arrival in North America in 1913. The 3,000-year-old red granite Egyptian statue languished for more than a week at the Port Richmond docks. No one wanted to move the human-headed, lion-bodied beast when the local baseba

1h

Klimaforandringer påvirker allerede fødevareproduktionen verden over

Forskning fra Københavns Universitet viser at afgrøder verden over allerede er påvirket…

1h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Greener Pastures

Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. What We’re Watching Today It’s Tuesday, June 25. ‣ Democratic presidential candidates will face off in two nights of debates starting tomorrow, and political rookies will share a stage with elected officials who have decades of experience. We’ll be ba

1h

This probiotic is going to bat against a horrifying fungal plague

Myotis lucifugus A little brown bat ( Myotis lucifugus ) with white-nose syndrome. (Joseph Hoyt/) Since it was first observed in 2006, white-nose syndrome—a fungal disease spread by the aptly named Pseudogymnoascus destructans —has ravaged bats across the United States and Canada, threatening to wipe out several species. Biologists have found infected bats in 33 states and seven Canadian province

1h

Risk for Dementia May Increase With Long-Term Use of Certain Medicines

Here’s what research suggests about a class of drugs called anticholinergics, which treat a wide range of ailments, from depression to bladder issues.

1h

Volvo's 'Vera' – an electric-powered, autonomous cargo vehicle

submitted by /u/DenzzS-_- [link] [comments]

1h

Andrew Yang will give a $12,000 basic income to a random Twitter follower

submitted by /u/DragonGod2718 [link] [comments]

1h

1h

1h

AI will drive the societies of the future. Will the governed consent?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

1h

1h

Ancient Peruvian engineering could help solve modern water shortages

submitted by /u/i_love_anachronisms [link] [comments]

1h

1h

'Flying salt shakers of death:' Fungal-infected zombie cicadas, explained by WVU research

Cicadas can carry a fungus containing chemicals similar to those found in hallucinogenic mushrooms, making them zombie-like fliers.

1h

Cyanide compounds discovered in meteorites may hold clues to the origin of life

Compounds containing iron, cyanide, and carbon monoxide discovered in carbon-rich meteorites by a team of scientists at Boise State University and NASA may have helped power life on early Earth.

1h

More monitoring needed to reduce post-hospitalization urinary tract infections

Broader monitoring of patients is needed to reduce the number of people who develop a urinary tract infection after being discharged from the hospital, new research suggests.

1h

Bringing neuromodulation therapies to drug-resistant epilepsy patients

To fill a service gap and improve seizure control for drug-resistant epilepsy, the University of Alabama at Birmingham created an epilepsy neuromodulation clinic. Now Sandipan Pati, M.D., assistant professor in the UAB Department of Neurology, and colleagues report on the outcomes provided by this specialized clinic during 19 months of operation, in a short research article published in Epilepsia

1h

Research reveals exotic quantum states in double-layer graphene

Researchers from Brown and Columbia Universities have demonstrated previously unknown states of matter that arise in double-layer stacks of graphene, a two-dimensional nanomaterial. These new states, known as the fractional quantum Hall effect, arise from the complex interactions of electrons both within and across graphene layers. 'The findings show that stacking 2D materials together in close pr

1h

Someone Hacked Global Telecom Companies. Experts Blame China.

Global Strike More than ten cell service companies from around the world were hit by targeted hacks that may have revealed customers’ personal information, call logs, and other private data. The attack, first detected and currently under investigation by the security research company Cybereason, likely began in 2012 and has targeted at least 20 victims, reports TechCrunch . While Cybereason would

1h

Facebook's political ad transparency tools roll out worldwide

Facebook's efforts to improve transparency in political ads are now a truly global affair. The social site has made its transparency tools available to advertisers worldwide, …

1h

New Estimate for an Oil Leak: A Thousand Times Worse Than Rig Owner Says

The leak, about 12 miles off the Louisiana coast, has been releasing oil and gas into the Gulf of Mexico since 2004, when a bundle of undersea pipes ruptured.

1h

Meta-Post: Posts on Cancer

Cross-Check columns on cancer and related topics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Radionuclide therapy effective in high-grade neuroendocrine neoplasms

Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been shown to be safe and effective for patients with grade 3 (G3) neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs), according to research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's (SNMMI) 66th Annual Meeting.

2h

Conservation efforts for giant South American river turtles have protected 147,000 females

By analyzing records in countries of the Amazon and Orinoco basins–which include Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador — a paper published today in Oryx — The International Journal of Conservation, categorized 85 past and present initiatives or projects that work to preserve the South American River Turtle, or charapa (Podocnemis expansa), a critically endangered species. These

2h

Thorny devils grow giant legs to pin rivals

Bulked-up males mate twice as often as their smaller peers

2h

The Real Meaning of Trump’s ‘She’s Not My Type’ Defense

“I’ll say it with great respect. Number one, she’s not my type. Number two, it never happened. It never happened, okay?” That was Donald Trump, speaking yesterday with reporters from The Hill . The president was addressing, in part, the latest allegation of sexual assault to be brought against him, this time from the advice columnist and author E. Jean Carroll: In the mid-1990s, Carroll alleged i

2h

Mars Had a Chance to Grow Life 4.4 Billion Years Ago, Study Shows

Mars Attacked Mars had a rough infancy, with giant meteorites pummeling the planet soon after its formation. Now, an international team of researchers has found evidence that this bombardment may have ended sooner than previously expected, changing what we thought we knew about the Red Planet’s historic ability to host life — and maybe even providing evidence that Mars was inhabited before Earth

2h

2h

Pine woodland restoration creates haven for birds in Midwest, MU study finds

Researchers from the University of Missouri have shown in a new study that restoration of pine woodlands, through the combined use of intentional, managed fires and strategic thinning of tree density, has a strikingly beneficial effect on a diverse array of birds, some of which are facing sharp declines from human-driven impacts like climate change and habitat loss.

2h

Common antidepressants interact with opioid med to lessen pain relief

Common antidepressants interact with the opioid pain medication tramadol to make it less effective for pain relief, according to a study published in the journal Pharmacotherapy. These findings have important implications for the opioid epidemic, suggesting that some patients suspected of drug-seeking may in fact be under-medicated and just are seeking more effective pain relief. They also could h

2h

Microsoft beefs up security for your most important OneDrive files

Microsoft is adding extra layers of security to OneDrive for your most important files. It's setting up a protected section called OneDrive Personal Vault that requires another …

2h

$40 off an Anker portable projector and other great deals happening today

Anker (Amazon/) Anker's new USB C Adapter is on sale for the next two weeks when you use the code ANKER8337 at checkout. Get it today for just under $21. The 3-in-1 adapter plugs into your computer's USB-C port and provides the option for a USB 3.0, 4K HDMI, or USB-C connection. The PD USB-C port provides up to 51-watts pass-through charging power. $21 . Teckin (Amazon/) Use the code XUGJGQ2X at

2h

How ‘The Twilight Zone’ First Saw Man on the Moon

The 1959 pilot episode, airing a decade before the first moon landing, bore what would become the series’ hallmark: narrating Cold War anxieties through a mix of science and superstition.

2h

Weird New Theory: Aliens Could Be Using Toxic Gas as Defense

Toxic Gases At the Astrobiology Science Conference in Seattle, MIT postdoctoral student Clara Sousa-Silva talked about a strange new way to find extraterrestrial life: look for the existence of phosphine, an “extremely flammable, incredibly toxic, outrageously foul-smelling molecule,” as Sousa-Silva described it to Live Science . The idea is simple: since phosphine is so immensely reactive to oxy

2h

This Fintech Firm’s Investing Platform Could Change Real Estate Forever

If someone walked up to you and asked how technology makes your life better, you could probably rattle off at least a dozen examples in under a minute, citing everything from mobile coffee apps and on-demand streaming to smart home systems and tele-health services. But what if someone asked you how technology makes you money? Would you have an answer? If not, it’s probably time to familiarize you

2h

Exclusive: Controversial King Tut Statue Has Sketchy Origins. Now Christie's Is Selling it.

A Live Science investigation reveals more about the sketchy origins of a statue that has led to a diplomatic dispute between Egypt, the U.K. and the auction house Christie's.

2h

Target is offering 30 percent discounts on in-store pickups for select games

If you’re thinking about buying a game for your Nintendo Switch, PS4, or Xbox One, you’ll save 30 percent on several titles at Target when you opt to pick it up in store. For context, …

2h

Fintech Expert: Libra Could Be Facebook’s Downfall

Libra Is Dead As Facebook moves forward with its new Libra cryptocurrency project, it may be setting in motion its own demise. That’s according to University of British Columbia professor and fintech expert Marc-David Seidel. He wrote in The Conversation on Monday that creating a blockchain network would legitimize the decentralized technology that Seidel believes threatens to delegitimize Facebo

2h

As Ebola outbreak rages, plan to test second vaccine sparks debate

New shots could protect more people, but also create confusion and stretch resources

2h

FedEx sues US government over export rules in Huawei case

A lawsuit filed by FedEx against the U.S. government over export rules follows a dispute over diverted shipments that were intended for Huawei Technologies, the Chinese telecommunications-equipment giant.

3h

Israel's SpaceIL says it won't try second moonshot

SpaceIL, the Israeli company that attempted but failed to put an unmanned craft on the moon earlier this year, says it will not try a second moonshot.

3h

History of Mars Impacts Leaves Hope for Ancient Martian Life

If large impacts ceased early in Mars’ history, that would leave plenty of time for life to have formed in its ancient oceans. (Credit: NASA/GSFC) When the solar system was young, some scientists suspect it was too wild and raucous a place for life to develop. Earth, Mars, and the other planets were all being pelted by massive asteroids and rocky debris. Some of those rocks might have delivered th

3h

A Genetic Ghost Hunt: What Ancient Humans Live On In Our DNA?

(Credit: Yulliii/Shutterstock) When the Neanderthal genome was first sequenced in 2010 and compared with ours, scientists noticed that genes from Homo neanderthalensis also showed up in our own DNA. The conclusion was inescapable: Our ancestors mated and reproduced with another lineage of now-extinct humans who live on today in our genes. When the Denisovan genome was sequenced soon after, in 2012

3h

US Fed to look 'carefully' at Facebook virtual coin Libra

Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell said Tuesday the US central bank will be closely scrutinizing Facebook's newly announced cryptocurrency Libra with an eye toward potentially regulating the virtual coin.

3h

Data visualization could reveal nature of the universe

As cosmologists ponder the universe—and other possible universes—the data available to them is so complex and vast that it can be extremely challenging for humans alone to comprehend.

3h

Deckhand Fixes Boat Crane in the Air | Deadliest Catch

Josh and Casey send a young deckhand 25 feet above the tumultuous seas to fix the Cornelia Marie's malfunctioning crane. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://tw

3h

How to fact check suspicious science stories for yourself

Fortunately you only need one of these tools to investigate a study for yourself. (nappy/) For every complex scientific question, there's an answer that's clear, simple, and wrong. I'm bastardizing H.L. Mencken here , but the point stands: for every clicky headline offering you simple truths about your health, there's a peer-reviewed paper that most people (including, in many cases, the folks who

3h

Algorithm designed to map universe, solve mysteries

Cornell University researchers have developed an algorithm designed to visualize models of the universe in order to solve some of physics' greatest mysteries.

3h

Shot could remove side effects from late-stage head and neck cancer therapy

A new chemoradiotherapy formulation could kill head and neck cancer cells more effectively — without the side effects.

3h

Divisive giant telescope cleared for construction on Hawaiian peak

Thirty Meter Telescope surmounts last legal hurdle but protesters plan to disrupt construction

3h

Airbnb Luxe offers castles, villas and islands for $1,000 per night

If you've ever wanted to stay in a castle in France or book an entire island in the Pacific, you might appreciate Airbnb's new luxury travel offering, Airbnb Luxe. The company …

3h

Apple Watch could get a band with a camera – CNET

The camera could be aimed in different directions, according to a patent.

3h

Google Is Trying to Teach Kids How to Spot Fake News

Nose for Fake News When many of today’s parents were growing up, there was no “fake news” to watch out for online . In fact, for some, there was no online. But just like Bane was born into and molded by the darkness, today’s kids are being born into and molded by a digital world — and Google wants to make sure they’re ready for it. To that end, the tech giant launched the Be Internet Awesome prog

3h

Gene-Edited, Less Addictive Tobacco Could Help You Quit Smoking

CRISPR Tobacco A team of scientists from the Technical University of Dortmund, Germany have figured out a way to grow tobacco plants that contain 99.7 percent less nicotine. They used the popular gene-editing technique CRISPR to disable six enzymes in the plant that aid in the production of the addictive stimulant. According to the researchers, the new version has just 0.04 milligrams of nicotine

3h

These corals live so deep there’s barely any light

A series of submersible dives to ocean depths about 100 to at least 500 feet down found coral living where little to no light breaks through, researchers report. These deep areas, known as the mesophotic zone, span the world’s oceans and are home to extensive coral reef communities, though scientists know little about them because of the difficulty getting there. Now, researchers have explored th

3h

3h

This Solar-Powered RV Runs Without Fuel Or Charging Stations

submitted by /u/WarOfNoise [link] [comments]

3h

Investors are still embracing 3-D printing despite some big IPO misfires

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

3h

This needs to be built on the Moon

submitted by /u/cloudrunner69 [link] [comments]

3h

3h

A 3,2-Hydroxypyridinone-based Decorporation Agent that Removes Uranium from Bones In Vivo

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10276-z In vivo decorporation of U(VI) from bones is an unsolved challenge because of the formation of stable uranium phosphate complexes. Here, the authors develop a hydroxypyridonone-based ligand with strong uranium complexation and low cytotoxicity. They find this ligand effectively removes uranium from kidney and bo

3h

Coordination mode engineering in stacked-nanosheet metal–organic frameworks to enhance catalytic reactivity and structural robustness

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10547-9 Engineering the coordination mode of atom or ion onto the substrate remains challenging. Here, guided by theoretical calculation, the authors prepare stacked-nanosheet MOF based catalyst with precisely controlled coordination sites on the surface and enhanced catalytic reactivity and structural robustness.

3h

Organometallic compounds as carriers of extraterrestrial cyanide in primitive meteorites

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10866-x Cyanide is thought to be crucial for the origin of life. Here, the authors showed that iron cyanocarbonyl complexes are present in meteorites and propose that these compounds were a source of free cyanide on early Earth and served as precursors to the active sites of ancient hydrogenases.

3h

Mechanisms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II activation in single dendritic spines

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10694-z Activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) in dendritic spines is a key step of long-term potentiation (LTP) induction, yet the exact biochemical steps of CaMKIIα activation in dendritic spines remained elusive. In this study, the authors developed a novel imaging approach to monitor CaM interact

3h

A global multi-hazard risk analysis of road and railway infrastructure assets

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10442-3 Spatial distribution has been rarely studied in global disaster risk models. Here the authors address damaged networked infrastructure at the asset level for a wider range of hazards and reveal a global Expected Annual Damages ranging from $3.1 to 22 billion with a particular vulnerability of transport infrastru

3h

m6A mRNA demethylase FTO regulates melanoma tumorigenicity and response to anti-PD-1 blockade

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10669-0 FTO is an m6A demethylase. Here, the authors show that FTO promotes melanoma tumorigenicity and contributes to resistance to anti-PD1 blockade, while FTO inhibition sensitizes melanoma to anti-PD1 blockade.

3h

Coevolution of vocal signal characteristics and hearing sensitivity in forest mammals

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10768-y Sensory drive theory predicts that vocal signalling coevolves with auditory sensitivity, but empirical evidence is limited. Here, Charlton et al. show that vocal characteristics and hearing have coevolved in forest mammals, due to constraints imposed by the local signalling environment.

3h

Circuit asymmetries underlie functional lateralization in the mouse auditory cortex

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10690-3 The left hemisphere of the brain is especially involved in processing social vocalizations and (in humans) language, but the mechanisms of this lateralization of function are unclear. Here, the authors compared left and right auditory cortex in mice and show lateralized, experience-dependent circuit-motifs.

3h

‘Children Were Dirty, They Were Scared, and They Were Hungry’

Over the past week, reports have emerged of hundreds of migrant children being held in unbelievably harsh conditions at government facilities on and near the southern U.S. border. The stories have shocked many Americans, and led to deep division on the part of House Democrats over how to fund an emergency humanitarian-aid package. To understand more about this crisis, I called Elora Mukherjee, a

3h

The Problem With Verification

Travis Hawley was scrolling through the comments sections of LeBron James’s Instagram posts recently when he noticed some postings from other athletes. “Dm me to buy verification badge,” wrote Dmitry Orlov, a player for the Washington Capitals. “Dm me to buy verification badge! Paypal, Zelle, Cashapp,” Malcolm Grant, an American professional basketball player in Lithuania, commented repeatedly. O

3h

Fitted With Sensors, Antarctic Seals Track Water Temperatures

Scientists have outfitted an army of Antarctic pinnipeds with trackers to monitor warming oceans.

3h

These fungi drug cicadas with psilocybin or amphetamine to make them mate nonstop

Massospora fungi use a compound found in magic mushrooms or an amphetamine to drive infected cicadas to mate and mate and mate.

3h

Facebook will reportedly hand over identity data of users suspected of hate speech – CNET

French users of the social network who are suspected of engaging in hate speech will have data identity handed over to judges, a report says.

3h

Instagram chief insists it doesn't spy on users

Instagram doesn't snoop on private conversations as part of its advertising targeting strategy, the head of the popular social media site said in an interview Tuesday.

3h

How Facebook’s new blockchain might revolutionize our digital identities

The Libra cryptocurrency was unveiled on a wave of hype and speculation. But what its white paper suggested about Facebook’s vision for how we manage our identifying credentials may be just as important.

3h

BMP controls dorsoventral and neural patterning in indirect-developing hemichordates providing insight into a possible origin of chordates [Evolution]

A defining feature of chordates is the unique presence of a dorsal hollow neural tube that forms by internalization of the ectodermal neural plate specified via inhibition of BMP signaling during gastrulation. While BMP controls dorsoventral (DV) patterning across diverse bilaterians, the BMP-active side is ventral in chordates and dorsal…

3h

QTL x environment interactions underlie adaptive divergence in switchgrass across a large latitudinal gradient [Evolution]

Local adaptation is the process by which natural selection drives adaptive phenotypic divergence across environmental gradients. Theory suggests that local adaptation results from genetic trade-offs at individual genetic loci, where adaptation to one set of environmental conditions results in a cost to fitness in alternative environments. However, the degree to…

3h

TNF-{alpha} inhibits glucocorticoid receptor-induced gene expression by reshaping the GR nuclear cofactor profile [Genetics]

Glucocorticoid resistance (GCR) is defined as an unresponsiveness to the therapeutic effects, including the antiinflammatory ones of glucocorticoids (GCs) and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). It is a problem in the management of inflammatory diseases and can be congenital as well as acquired. The strong proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha (TNF)…

3h

Human NK cell receptor KIR2DS4 detects a conserved bacterial epitope presented by HLA-C [Immunology and Inflammation]

Natural killer (NK) cells have an important role in immune defense against viruses and cancer. Activation of human NK cell cytotoxicity toward infected or tumor cells is regulated by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) that bind to human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I). Combinations of KIR with HLA-I are genetically…

3h

CDK7 inhibition suppresses aberrant hedgehog pathway and overcomes resistance to smoothened antagonists [Medical Sciences]

The aberrant hedgehog (Hh) pathway plays important roles in multiple cancer types, therefore serving as a promising drug target. Current clinically available hedgehog-targeted drugs act mostly by antagonizing the upstream component smoothened; however, both primary and acquired resistance to FDA-approved smoothened inhibitor (SMOi) drugs have been described. We have recently…

3h

Lineage tracing and targeting of IL17RB+ tuft cell-like human colorectal cancer stem cells [Medical Sciences]

Cancer stem cell (CSC)-specific markers may be potential therapeutic targets. We previously identified that Dclk1, a tuft cell marker, marks tumor stem cells (TSCs) in mouse intestinal adenomas. Based on the analysis of mouse Dclk1+ tumor cells, we aimed to identify a CSC-specific cell surface marker in human colorectal cancers…

3h

Apelin protects against abdominal aortic aneurysm and the therapeutic role of neutral endopeptidase resistant apelin analogs [Medical Sciences]

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) remains the second most frequent vascular disease with high mortality but has no approved medical therapy. We investigated the direct role of apelin (APLN) in AAA and identified a unique approach to enhance APLN action as a therapeutic intervention for this disease. Loss of APLN potentiated…

3h

Oxidation of PKGI{alpha} mediates an endogenous adaptation to pulmonary hypertension [Medical Sciences]

Chronic hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension (PH), vascular remodeling, right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy, and cardiac failure. Protein kinase G Iα (PKGIα) is susceptible to oxidation, forming an interprotein disulfide homodimer associated with kinase targeting involved in vasodilation. Here we report increased disulfide PKGIα in pulmonary arteries from mice with hypoxic PH…

3h

TMEM16A controls EGF-induced calcium signaling implicated in pancreatic cancer prognosis [Medical Sciences]

Pancreatic cancer typically spreads rapidly and has poor survival rates. Here, we report that the calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A is a biomarker for pancreatic cancer with a poor prognosis. TMEM16A is up-regulated in 75% of cases of pancreatic cancer and high levels of TMEM16A expression are correlated with low patient…

3h

Symptomatic plant viroid infections in phytopathogenic fungi [Microbiology]

Viroids are pathogenic agents that have a small, circular noncoding RNA genome. They have been found only in plant species; therefore, their infectivity and pathogenicity in other organisms remain largely unexplored. In this study, we investigate whether plant viroids can replicate and induce symptoms in filamentous fungi. Seven plant viroids…

3h

Second type of criticality in the brain uncovers rich multiple-neuron dynamics [Neuroscience]

Cortical networks that have been found to operate close to a critical point exhibit joint activations of large numbers of neurons. However, in motor cortex of the awake macaque monkey, we observe very different dynamics: massively parallel recordings of 155 single-neuron spiking activities show weak fluctuations on the population level….

3h

Transfer of complex regional pain syndrome to mice via human autoantibodies is mediated by interleukin-1-induced mechanisms [Neuroscience]

Neuroimmune interactions may contribute to severe pain and regional inflammatory and autonomic signs in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a posttraumatic pain disorder. Here, we investigated peripheral and central immune mechanisms in a translational passive transfer trauma mouse model of CRPS. Small plantar skin–muscle incision was performed in female C57BL/6…

3h

Elevated dopamine signaling from ventral tegmental area to prefrontal cortical parvalbumin neurons drives conditioned inhibition [Neuroscience]

Conditioned inhibition is an important process to suppress learned responses for optimal adaptation, but its underlying biological mechanism is poorly understood. Here we used safety learning (SL)/fear discrimination after fear conditioning as a conditioned inhibition model because it demonstrates the essential properties of summation and retardation. Activity of the dorsomedial…

3h

PRCD is essential for high-fidelity photoreceptor disc formation [Neuroscience]

Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a small protein residing in the light-sensitive disc membranes of the photoreceptor outer segment. Until now, the function of PRCD has remained enigmatic despite multiple demonstrations that its mutations cause blindness in humans and dogs. Here, we generated a PRCD knockout mouse and observed a…

3h

Persistence of learning-induced synapses depends on neurotrophic priming of glucocorticoid receptors [Neuroscience]

Stress can either promote or impair learning and memory. Such opposing effects depend on whether synapses persist or decay after learning. Maintenance of new synapses formed at the time of learning upon neuronal network activation depends on the stress hormone-activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and neurotrophic factor release. Whether and how…

3h

Exploratory locomotion, a predictor of addiction vulnerability, is oligogenic in rats selected for this phenotype [Neuroscience]

Artificially selected model organisms can reveal hidden features of the genetic architecture of the complex disorders that they model. Addictions are disease phenotypes caused by different intermediate phenotypes and pathways and thereby are potentially highly polygenic. High responder (bHR) and low responder (bLR) rat lines have been selectively bred (b)…

3h

Intracellular iron deficiency in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells induces pulmonary arterial hypertension in mice [Physiology]

Iron deficiency augments hypoxic pulmonary arterial pressure in healthy individuals and exacerbates pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in patients, even without anemia. Conversely, iron supplementation has been shown to be beneficial in both settings. The mechanisms underlying the effects of iron availability are not known, due to lack of understanding of…

3h

Drought suppresses soil predators and promotes root herbivores in mesic, but not in xeric grasslands [Ecology]

Precipitation changes among years and locations along gradients of mean annual precipitation (MAP). The way those changes interact and affect populations of soil organisms from arid to moist environments remains unknown. Temporal and spatial changes in precipitation could lead to shifts in functional composition of soil communities that are involved…

3h

Humboldt’s Tableau Physique revisited [Ecology]

Alexander von Humboldt’s Tableau Physique (1807) has been one of the most influential diagrams in the history of environmental sciences. In particular, detailed observations of the altitudinal distribution of plant species in the equatorial Andes, depicted on a cross-section of Mt. Chimborazo, allowed Humboldt to establish the concept of vegetation…

3h

Climatic shifts drove major contractions in avian latitudinal distributions throughout the Cenozoic [Ecology]

Many higher level avian clades are restricted to Earth’s lower latitudes, leading to historical biogeographic reconstructions favoring a Gondwanan origin of crown birds and numerous deep subclades. However, several such “tropical-restricted” clades (TRCs) are represented by stem-lineage fossils well outside the ranges of their closest living relatives, often on northern…

3h

Early snowmelt projected to cause population decline in a subalpine plant [Ecology]

How climate change influences the dynamics of plant populations is not well understood, as few plant studies have measured responses of vital rates to climatic variables and modeled the impact on population growth. The present study used 25 y of demographic data to analyze how survival, growth, and fecundity respond…

3h

Global ensemble projections reveal trophic amplification of ocean biomass declines with climate change [Ecology]

While the physical dimensions of climate change are now routinely assessed through multimodel intercomparisons, projected impacts on the global ocean ecosystem generally rely on individual models with a specific set of assumptions. To address these single-model limitations, we present standardized ensemble projections from six global marine ecosystem models forced with…

3h

Loss of the HIF pathway in a widely distributed intertidal crustacean, the copepod Tigriopus californicus [Evolution]

Hypoxia is a major physiological constraint for which multicellular eukaryotes have evolved robust cellular mechanisms capable of addressing dynamic changes in O2 availability. In animals, oxygen sensing and regulation is primarily performed by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway, and the key components of this pathway are thought to be highly…

3h

Evolution of sex ratio through gene loss [Evolution]

The maintenance of males at intermediate frequencies is an important evolutionary problem. Several species of Caenorhabditis nematodes have evolved a mating system in which selfing hermaphrodites and males coexist. While selfing produces XX hermaphrodites, cross-fertilization produces 50% XO male progeny. Thus, male mating success dictates the sex ratio. Here, we…

3h

Inositol polyphosphates promote T cell-independent humoral immunity via the regulation of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase [Immunology and Inflammation]

T cell-independent (TI) B cell response is critical for the early protection against pathogen invasion. The regulation and activation of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is known as a pivotal step of B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling in TI humoral immunity, as observed in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) experiencing…

3h

An endosomal LAPF is required for macrophage endocytosis and elimination of bacteria [Immunology and Inflammation]

Macrophages can internalize the invading pathogens by raft/caveolae and/or clathrin-dependent endocytosis and elicit an immune response against infection. However, the molecular mechanism for macrophage endocytosis remains elusive. Here we report that LAPF (lysosome-associated and apoptosis-inducing protein containing PH and FYVE domains) is required for caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Lapf-deficie

3h

Shear stress regulation of miR-93 and miR-484 maturation through nucleolin [Medical Sciences]

Pulsatile shear (PS) and oscillatory shear (OS) elicit distinct mechanotransduction signals that maintain endothelial homeostasis or induce endothelial dysfunction, respectively. A subset of microRNAs (miRs) in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are differentially regulated by PS and OS, but the regulation of the miR processing and its implications in EC biology…

3h

Endothelial cell Piezo1 mediates pressure-induced lung vascular hyperpermeability via disruption of adherens junctions [Medical Sciences]

Increased pulmonary microvessel pressure experienced in left heart failure, head trauma, or high altitude can lead to endothelial barrier disruption referred to as capillary “stress failure” that causes leakage of protein-rich plasma and pulmonary edema. However, little is known about vascular endothelial sensing and transduction of mechanical stimuli inducing endothelial…

3h

Neutralization of rhesus cytomegalovirus IL-10 reduces horizontal transmission and alters long-term immunity [Microbiology]

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) causes severe disease in infants and immunocompromised people. There is no approved HCMV vaccine, and vaccine development strategies are complicated by evidence of both persistent infection and reinfection of people with prior immunity. The greatest emphasis has been placed on reducing transmission to seronegative pregnant women to…

3h

Genome sequencing and transcriptome analyses of the Siberian hamster hypothalamus identify mechanisms for seasonal energy balance [Physiology]

Synthesis of triiodothyronine (T3) in the hypothalamus induces marked seasonal neuromorphology changes across taxa. How species-specific responses to T3 signaling in the CNS drive annual changes in body weight and energy balance remains uncharacterized. These experiments sequenced and annotated the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus) genome, a model organism for seasonal…

3h

Molecular basis for branched steviol glucoside biosynthesis [Plant Biology]

Steviol glucosides, such as stevioside and rebaudioside A, are natural products roughly 200-fold sweeter than sugar and are used as natural, noncaloric sweeteners. Biosynthesis of rebaudioside A, and other related stevia glucosides, involves formation of the steviol diterpenoid followed by a series of glycosylations catalyzed by uridine diphosphate (UDP)-dependent glucosyltransferases….

3h

bHLH-PAS protein RITMO1 regulates diel biological rhythms in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum [Plant Biology]

Periodic light–dark cycles govern the timing of basic biological processes in organisms inhabiting land as well as the sea, where life evolved. Although prominent marine phytoplanktonic organisms such as diatoms show robust diel rhythms, the mechanisms regulating these processes are still obscure. By characterizing a Phaeodactylum tricornutum bHLH-PAS nuclear protein,…

3h

Common neural code for reward and information value [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Adaptive information seeking is critical for goal-directed behavior. Growing evidence suggests the importance of intrinsic motives such as curiosity or need for novelty, mediated through dopaminergic valuation systems, in driving information-seeking behavior. However, valuing information for its own sake can be highly suboptimal when agents need to evaluate instrumental benefit…

3h

Correction for Amundson and Biardeau, Opinion: Soil carbon sequestration is an elusive climate mitigation tool [Correction]

OPINION Correction for “Opinion: Soil carbon sequestration is an elusive climate mitigation tool,” by Ronald Amundson and Léopold Biardeau, which was first published November 13, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1815901115 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 115, 11652–11656). The authors note that, on page 11652, left column, line 9, “10 Gt CO2” should instead…

3h

Correction for Wolfe et al., Mapping hydroxyl variability throughout the global remote troposphere via synthesis of airborne and satellite formaldehyde observations [Correction]

EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND PLANETARY SCIENCES Correction for “Mapping hydroxyl variability throughout the global remote troposphere via synthesis of airborne and satellite formaldehyde observations,” by Glenn M. Wolfe, Julie M. Nicely, Jason M. St. Clair, Thomas F. Hanisco, Jin Liao, Luke D. Oman, William B. Brune, David Miller, Alexander Thames, Gonzalo…

3h

Correction for McKenzie et al., Caspase-1 inhibition prevents glial inflammasome activation and pyroptosis in models of multiple sclerosis [Correction]

NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Caspase-1 inhibition prevents glial inflammasome activation and pyroptosis in models of multiple sclerosis,” by Brienne A. McKenzie, Manmeet K. Mamik, Leina B. Saito, Roobina Boghozian, Maria Chiara Monaco, Eugene O. Major, Jian-Qiang Lu, William G. Branton, and Christopher Power, which was first published June 12, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1722041115…

3h

Correction to Supporting Information for Yu et al., Childhood trauma history is linked to abnormal brain connectivity in major depression [SI Correction]

NEUROSCIENCE Correction to Supporting Information for “Childhood trauma history is linked to abnormal brain connectivity in major depression,” by Meichen Yu, Kristin A. Linn, Russell T. Shinohara, Desmond J. Oathes, Philip A. Cook, Romain Duprat, Tyler M. Moore, Maria A. Oquendo, Mary L. Phillips, Melvin McInnis, Maurizio Fava, Madhukar H….

3h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Impacts of farming in Neolithic Çatalhöyük community Neolithic burial from Çatalhöyük, Turkey; a headless young adult female with a fetal skeleton (arrow). Image courtesy of the Çatalhöyük Research Project/Jason Quinlan. Humans began transitioning from foraging to farming around 10,000–11,000 years ago. Health and lifestyle changes experienced by early farmers are…

3h

On the power to detect rare recombination events [Biological Sciences]

We read with great interest the recent work in PNAS by Bergero et al. (1) describing differences in male and female recombination patterns on the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) sex chromosome. We fully agree that recombination in males is largely confined to the ends of the sex chromosome. Bergero et al….

3h

Reply to Wright et al.: How to explain the absence of extensive Y-specific regions in the guppy sex chromosomes [Biological Sciences]

Wright et al. (1) are correct that our genomic data for the guppy sex chromosome are not dissimilar from theirs. However, our conclusion truly differs from their previous chief conclusion that “evolutionary strata” are evolving (2). Strata are sex chromosome regions that evolved suppressed recombination in separate events, each establishing…

3h

An alternative dogma on reduced artemisinin susceptibility: A new shadow from east to west [Biological Sciences]

In PNAS, Demas et al. (1) show, by long-term in vitro selection using culture-adapted Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Senegal, that the gene encoding the actin-binding protein P. falciparum coronin (pfcoronin) and its genetic variants (G50E, R100K, and E107V) can reduce the susceptibility of the parasite to the active metabolite of…

3h

Reply to Velavan et al.: Polymorphisms of pfcoronin in natural populations: Implications for functional significance [Biological Sciences]

Velavan et al. (1) describe work that they have carried out based on our recent PNAS publication, “Mutations in Plasmodium falciparum actin-binding protein coronin confer reduced artemisinin susceptibility” (2). Among 297 patient samples from 4 countries in Africa, they found 12 polymorphic amino acid sites in PfCoronin, 7 observed only…

3h

Riccardo Giacconi (1931-2018) [Retrospectives]

Riccardo Giacconi, the “Father of X-ray Astronomy,” Nobel laureate, and one of the most influential figures in astrophysics over the past 60 years, died on December 9, 2018, at the age of 87. With a career spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, Riccardo opened up new windows for observing the universe and…

3h

Profile of Mahzarin R. Banaji [Profile]

Harvard University experimental social psychologist Mahzarin Banaji is on the frontlines of the “implicit revolution,” a paradigm shift in psychology that, since the 1980s, has been reconceiving the relationship between unconscious and conscious mental processes. Banaji and her colleague Anthony Greenwald applied the concept to social psychology via the intertwined…

3h

Profile of Clark Spencer Larsen [Profile]

The Ohio State University biological anthropologist Clark Spencer Larsen has conducted pioneering research on biocultural adaptation that occurred during the last 10,000 years of human evolution. He was among the first to apply multidisciplinary approaches to the study of temporal trends in diet, health, mobility, and interpersonal conflict. Elected to…

3h

The kinetochore and the origin of eukaryotic chromosome segregation [Cell Biology]

All organisms must faithfully segregate their DNA during cell division to safeguard complete inheritance of the genome. In eukaryotes, mechanisms of cell and nuclear division are highly variable, and while these usually involve the use of a mitotic microtubule-based spindle and a kinetochore (KT) that physically links the chromatin and…

3h

On the altitudes of von Humboldt [Ecology]

With climate changing, living organisms are on the move, shifting their geographical range, their latitudinal and altitudinal distribution. The rate of change can be tracked by monitoring individual species, communities, or entire ecosystems in the present, for instance, by annual field surveys or remote sensing by satellites. Alternatively, we may…

3h

A natural killer cell receptor takes sharp aim at the world of bacteria [Immunology and Inflammation]

Killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR) are expressed on natural killer (NK) cells, lymphocytes of innate immunity and reproduction. The principal KIR ligands are the polymorphic HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C glycoproteins of the human major histocompatibility complex. The KIR form 4 phylogenetic lineages. Lineage III KIR are most numerous and include…

3h

Ironing out pulmonary arterial hypertension [Physiology]

Iron and oxygen are essential to aerobic organisms, and their biologic functions are intertwined. For example, iron as a component of hemoglobin is required for oxygen transport to tissues, which is critical for energy generation. However, excess iron in combination with oxygen can generate toxic free radicals that damage cellular…

3h

Cofilin drives rapid turnover and fluidization of entangled F-actin [Applied Physical Sciences]

The shape of most animal cells is controlled by the actin cortex, a thin network of dynamic actin filaments (F-actin) situated just beneath the plasma membrane. The cortex is held far from equilibrium by both active stresses and polymer turnover: Molecular motors drive deformations required for cell morphogenesis, while actin-filament…

3h

An ultralow-density porous ice with the largest internal cavity identified in the water phase diagram [Chemistry]

The recent back-to-back findings of low-density porous ice XVI and XVII have rekindled the century-old field of the solid-state physics and chemistry of water. Experimentally, both ice XVI and XVII crystals can be produced by extracting guest atoms or molecules enclosed in the cavities of preformed ice clathrate hydrates. Herein,…

3h

Regenerative and durable small-diameter graft as an arterial conduit [Engineering]

Despite significant research efforts, clinical practice for arterial bypass surgery has been stagnant, and engineered grafts continue to face postimplantation challenges. Here, we describe the development and application of a durable small-diameter vascular graft with tailored regenerative capacity. We fabricated small-diameter vascular grafts by electrospinning fibrin tubes and poly(ε-caprolacton

3h

Climate-driven oscillation of phosphorus and iron limitation in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre [Environmental Sciences]

The supply of nutrients is a fundamental regulator of ocean productivity and carbon sequestration. Nutrient sources, sinks, residence times, and elemental ratios vary over broad scales, including those resulting from climate-driven changes in upper water column stratification, advection, and the deposition of atmospheric dust. These changes can alter the proximate…

3h

Transport dynamics of complex fluids [Physics]

Thermal motion in complex fluids is a complicated stochastic process but ubiquitously exhibits initial ballistic, intermediate subdiffusive, and long-time diffusive motion, unless interrupted. Despite its relevance to numerous dynamical processes of interest in modern science, a unified, quantitative understanding of thermal motion in complex fluids remains a challenging problem. Here,…

3h

Two-dimensional photonic crystals for engineering atom-light interactions [Physics]

We present a 2D photonic crystal system for interacting with cold cesium (Cs) atoms. The band structures of the 2D photonic crystals are predicted to produce unconventional atom–light interaction behaviors, including anisotropic emission, suppressed spontaneous decay, and photon-mediated atom–atom interactions controlled by the position of the atomic array relative to…

3h

Periodic catastrophes over human evolutionary history are necessary to explain the forager population paradox [Anthropology]

The rapid growth of contemporary human foragers and steady decline of chimpanzees represent puzzling population paradoxes, as any species must exhibit near-stationary growth over much of their evolutionary history. We evaluate the conditions favoring zero population growth (ZPG) among 10 small-scale subsistence human populations and five wild chimpanzee groups according…

3h

The origins of specialized pottery and diverse alcohol fermentation techniques in Early Neolithic China [Anthropology]

In China, pottery containers first appeared about 20000 cal. BP, and became diverse in form during the Early Neolithic (9000–7000 cal. BP), signaling the emergence of functionally specialized vessels. China is also well-known for its early development of alcohol production. However, few studies have focused on the connections between the…

3h

{beta}-Actin mRNA interactome mapping by proximity biotinylation [Cell Biology]

The molecular function and fate of mRNAs are controlled by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Identification of the interacting proteome of a specific mRNA in vivo remains very challenging, however. Based on the widely used technique of RNA tagging with MS2 aptamers for RNA visualization, we developed a RNA proximity biotinylation (RNA-BioID)…

3h

Mosaic origin of the eukaryotic kinetochore [Cell Biology]

The emergence of eukaryotes from ancient prokaryotic lineages embodied a remarkable increase in cellular complexity. While prokaryotes operate simple systems to connect DNA to the segregation machinery during cell division, eukaryotes use a highly complex protein assembly known as the kinetochore. Although conceptually similar, prokaryotic segregation systems and the eukaryotic…

3h

Bioarchaeology of Neolithic Catalhoyuk reveals fundamental transitions in health, mobility, and lifestyle in early farmers [Anthropology]

The transition from a human diet based exclusively on wild plants and animals to one involving dependence on domesticated plants and animals beginning 10,000 to 11,000 y ago in Southwest Asia set into motion a series of profound health, lifestyle, social, and economic changes affecting human populations throughout most of…

3h

Bioinspired inner microstructured tube controlled capillary rise [Applied Biological Sciences]

Effective, long-range, and self-propelled water elevation and transport are important in industrial, medical, and agricultural applications. Although research has grown rapidly, existing methods for water film elevation are still limited. Scaling up for practical applications in an energy-efficient way remains a challenge. Inspired by the continuous water cross-boundary transport on…

3h

The isoprenoid alcohol pathway, a synthetic route for isoprenoid biosynthesis [Applied Biological Sciences]

The more than 50,000 isoprenoids found in nature are all derived from the 5-carbon diphosphates isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP). Natively, IPP and DMAPP are generated by the mevalonate (MVA) and 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathways, which have been engineered to produce compounds with numerous applications. However, as these pathways…

3h

Transport gap in SmB6 protected against disorder [Applied Physical Sciences]

The inverted resistance method was used in this study to extend the bulk resistivity of SmB6 to a regime where the surface conduction overwhelms the bulk. Remarkably, regardless of the large off-stoichiometric growth conditions (inducing disorder by samarium vacancies, boron interstitials, etc.), the bulk resistivity shows an intrinsic thermally activated…

3h

Persistence of the permeability transition pore in human mitochondria devoid of an assembled ATP synthase [Biochemistry]

The opening of the permeability transition pore, a nonspecific channel in inner mitochondrial membranes, is triggered by an elevated total concentration of calcium ions in the mitochondrial matrix, leading to disruption of the inner membrane and necrotic cell death. Cyclosporin A inhibits pore opening by binding to cyclophilin D, which…

3h

Functional assembly of nitrous oxide reductase provides insights into copper site maturation [Biochemistry]

The multicopper enzyme nitrous oxide reductase reduces the greenhouse gas N2O to uncritical N2 as the final step of bacterial denitrification. Its two metal centers require an elaborate assembly machinery that so far has precluded heterologous production as a prerequisite for bioremediatory applications in agriculture and wastewater treatment. Here, we…

3h

High-resolution cryo-EM structures of outbreak strain human norovirus shells reveal size variations [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Noroviruses are a leading cause of foodborne illnesses worldwide. Although GII.4 strains have been responsible for most norovirus outbreaks, the assembled virus shell structures have been available in detail for only a single strain (GI.1). We present high-resolution (2.6- to 4.1-Å) cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of GII.4, GII.2, GI.7, and…

3h

Possible mechanisms of polyphosphate-induced amyloid fibril formation of {beta}2-microglobulin [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Polyphosphate (polyP), which is found in various microorganisms and human cells, is an anionic biopolymer consisting of inorganic phosphates linked by high-energy phosphate bonds. Previous studies revealed that polyPs strongly promoted the amyloid formation of several amyloidogenic proteins; however, the mechanism of polyP-induced amyloid formation remains unclear. In the present…

3h

Correlated protein conformational states and membrane dynamics during attack by pore-forming toxins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are a class of proteins implicated in a wide range of virulent bacterial infections and diseases. These toxins bind to target membranes and subsequently oligomerize to form functional pores that eventually lead to cell lysis. While the protein undergoes large conformational changes on the bilayer, the connection…

3h

The tilted helix model of dynamin oligomers [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Dynamin proteins assemble into characteristic helical structures around necks of clathrin-coated membrane buds. Hydrolysis of dynamin-bound GTP results in both fission of the membrane neck and partial disruption of the dynamin oligomer. Imaging by atomic force microscopy reveals that, on GTP hydrolysis, dynamin oligomers undergo a dynamic remodeling and lose…

3h

2-hydroxyglutarate inhibits MyoD-mediated differentiation by preventing H3K9 demethylation [Cell Biology]

Oncogenic IDH1/2 mutations produce 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), resulting in competitive inhibition of DNA and protein demethylation. IDH-mutant cancer cells show an inability to differentiate but whether 2HG accumulation is sufficient to perturb differentiation directed by lineage-specifying transcription factors is unknown. A MyoD-driven model was used to study the role of IDH…

3h

The cell wall regulates dynamics and size of plasma-membrane nanodomains in Arabidopsis [Cell Biology]

Plant plasma-membrane (PM) proteins are involved in several vital processes, such as detection of pathogens, solute transport, and cellular signaling. For these proteins to function effectively there needs to be structure within the PM allowing, for example, proteins in the same signaling cascade to be spatially organized. Here we demonstrate…

3h

Quantitative imaging of anion exchange kinetics in halide perovskites [Chemistry]

Ion exchange, as a postsynthetic transformation strategy, offers more flexibilities in controlling material compositions and structures beyond direct synthetic methodology. Observation of such transformation kinetics on the single-particle level with rich spatial and spectroscopic information has never been achieved. We report the quantitative imaging of anion exchange kinetics in individual…

3h

Synthesis of liquid fuel via direct hydrogenation of CO2 [Chemistry]

Synthesis of liquid fuels (C5+ hydrocarbons) via CO2 hydrogenation is very promising. Hydrogenation of CO2 to liquid hydrocarbons usually proceeds through tandem catalysis of reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction to produce CO, and subsequent CO hydrogenation to hydrocarbons via Fischer–Tropsch synthesis (FTS). CO2 is a thermodynamically stable and chemically…

3h

Exploration of the chemical space and its three historical regimes [Chemistry]

Chemical research unveils the structure of chemical space, spanned by all chemical species, as documented in more than 200 y of scientific literature, now available in electronic databases. Very little is known, however, about the large-scale patterns of this exploration. Here we show, by analyzing millions of reactions stored in…

3h

Influence of single-nanoparticle electrochromic dynamics on the durability and speed of smart windows [Chemistry]

Nanomaterials have tremendous potential to increase electrochromic smart window efficiency, speed, and durability. However, nanoparticles vary in size, shape, and surface defects, and it is unknown how nanoparticle heterogeneity contributes to particle-dependent electrochromic properties. Here, we use single-nanoparticle-level electro-optical imaging to measure structure–function relationships in

3h

Ruminococcus gnavus, a member of the human gut microbiome associated with Crohn’s disease, produces an inflammatory polysaccharide [Chemistry]

A substantial and increasing number of human diseases are associated with changes in the gut microbiota, and discovering the molecules and mechanisms underlying these associations represents a major research goal. Multiple studies associate Ruminococcus gnavus, a prevalent gut microbe, with Crohn’s disease, a major type of inflammatory bowel disease. We…

3h

Measuring the activation energy barrier for the nucleation of single nanosized vapor bubbles [Chemistry]

Heterogeneous bubble nucleation is one of the most fundamental interfacial processes that has received broad interest from diverse fields of physics and chemistry. While most studies focused on large microbubbles, here we employed a surface plasmon resonance microscopy to measure the nucleation rate constant and activation energy barrier of single…

3h

Flame-formed carbon nanoparticles exhibit quantum dot behaviors [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

We examine the quantum confinement in the photoemission ionization energy in air and optical band gap of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs). Premixed, stretched-stabilized ethylene flames are used to generate the CNPs reproducibly over the range of 4–23 nm in volume median diameter. The results reveal that flame-formed CNPs behave like an…

3h

Sixty-six million years along the road of mammalian ecomorphological specialization [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The fossil record of the large terrestrial mammals of the North American Cenozoic has previously been quantitatively summarized in six sequential episodes of faunal associations—“evolutionary faunas”—that correspond well with previously proposed qualitative “Chronofaunas.” Here, we investigate the ecological spectrum of these faunas by classifying their major taxonomic components into discrete…

3h

On the psychology and economics of antisocial personality [Economic Sciences]

How do fundamental concepts from economics, such as individuals’ preferences and beliefs, relate to equally fundamental concepts from psychology, such as relatively stable personality traits? Can personality traits help us better understand economic behavior across strategic contexts? We identify an antisocial personality profile and examine the role of strategic context…

3h

Science and Culture: Artists and scientists come together to explore the meaning of natural sound [Engineering]

David Monacchi has spent the last 20 years hiking into some of the most remote habitats on Earth. He’s canoed through flooded Amazonian forests and tread deep into the jungles of Southeast Asia and Africa. But he isn’t on a quest for rare animals or for samples of their remains….

3h

Massively parallel screening of synthetic microbial communities [Engineering]

Microbial communities have numerous potential applications in biotechnology, agriculture, and medicine. Nevertheless, the limited accuracy with which we can predict interspecies interactions and environmental dependencies hinders efforts to rationally engineer beneficial consortia. Empirical screening is a complementary approach wherein synthetic communities are combinatorially constructed and ass

3h

Quantifying the sensing power of vehicle fleets [Environmental Sciences]

Sensors can measure air quality, traffic congestion, and other aspects of urban environments. The fine-grained diagnostic information they provide could help urban managers to monitor a city’s health. Recently, a “drive-by” paradigm has been proposed in which sensors are deployed on third-party vehicles, enabling wide coverage at low cost. Research…

3h

Scotopic rod vision in tetrapods arose from multiple early adaptive shifts in the rate of retinal release [Evolution]

The ability of vertebrates to occupy diverse niches has been linked to the spectral properties of rhodopsin, conferring rod-based vision in low-light conditions. More recent insights have come from nonspectral kinetics, including the retinal release rate of the active state of rhodopsin, a key aspect of scotopic vision that shows…

3h

Inner Workings: How bacteria cause pain and what that reveals about the role of the nervous system [Immunology and Inflammation]

Flesh-eating bacteria employ a devious strategy. When the bacteria, known as Streptococcus pyogenes, slip under the skin via a small cut or bug bite, they eat away at the tissue underneath, causing a condition called necrotizing fasciitis. One of the early, defining symptoms is that a minor wound or abrasion…

3h

Association between medical cannabis laws and opioid overdose mortality has reversed over time [Medical Sciences]

A 2014 study by Bachhuber et al. (1) created a sensation by showing that state medical cannabis laws were associated with lower-than-expected opioid overdose mortality rates from 1999 to 2010. Cited by more than 350 scientific articles to date, the study attracted national and international media attention and was hailed…

3h

1,4-Benzoquinone antimicrobial agents against Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis derived from scorpion venom [Microbiology]

Two 1,4-benzoquinone derivatives, found in the venom of the scorpion Diplocentrus melici following exposure to air, have been isolated, characterized, synthesized, and assessed for antimicrobial activities. Initially a white, viscous liquid, the extracted venom colors within minutes under ambient conditions. From this colored mixture, two compounds, one red, the other…

3h

Superconductor-metal transition in odd-frequency-paired superconductor in a magnetic field [Physics]

It is shown that the application of a sufficiently strong magnetic field to the odd-frequency–paired pair-density wave state described in A. M. Tsvelik [Phys. Rev. B 94, 165114 (2016)] leads to formation of a low-temperature metallic state with zero Hall response. Applications of these ideas to the recent experiments on…

3h

Evidence for distinct biodevelopmental influences on male sexual orientation [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Several biological mechanisms have been proposed to influence male sexual orientation, but the extent to which these mechanisms cooccur is unclear. Putative markers of biological processes are often used to evaluate the biological basis of male sexual orientation, including fraternal birth order, handedness, and familiality of same-sex sexual orientation; these…

3h

Consistency between individuals' past and current romantic partners' own reports of their personalities [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Do people have a “type” when it comes to their romantic partners’ personalities? In the present research, we used data from a 9-y longitudinal study in Germany and examined the similarity between an individual’s ex- and current partners using the partners’ self-reported personality profiles. Based on the social accuracy model,…

3h

Education rather than age structure brings demographic dividend [Social Sciences]

The relationship between population changes and economic growth has been debated since Malthus. Initially focusing on population growth, the notion of demographic dividend has shifted the attention to changes in age structures with an assumed window of opportunity that opens when falling birth rates lead to a relatively higher proportion…

3h

Attendance trends threaten future operations of America’s state park systems [Sustainability Science]

This research examines how the operating expenditures of America’s state park systems will be affected by a continued growth in attendance consistent with observed trends as well as potential climate futures. We construct a longitudinal panel dataset (1984–2017) describing the operations and characteristics of all 50 state park systems. These…

3h

Radioactive tadpoles reveal contamination clues

Tadpoles can be used to measure the amount of radiocesium, a radioactive material, in aquatic environments, according to new research from University of Georgia scientists.

4h

Private prisons have a political role in corrections issues in the US, researcher finds

Private prisons play a political role in immigration and incarceration issues in the United States and the industry may face obstacles as well as opportunities in the current political landscape, a new paper from an Oregon State University researcher suggests.

4h

National trash: Reducing waste produced in US national parks

When you think of national parks, you might picture the vast plateaus of the Grand Canyon, the intricate wetlands of the Everglades, or the inspiring viewscapes of the Grand Tetons. You probably don't envision 100 million pounds of mashed water bottles, barbecue-smudged paper plates, and crumpled coffee cups—but that is the staggering quantity of garbage that is generated in our National Parks eac

4h

Radioactive tadpoles reveal contamination clues

Tadpoles can be used to measure the amount of radiocesium, a radioactive material, in aquatic environments, according to new research from University of Georgia scientists.

4h

Which climates are best for passive cooling technologies?

Researchers recently set out to gain a better understanding of the thermal balance of power plants and surfaces, but quickly realized that they would need to determine what roles cloud cover and relative humidity play in the transparency of the atmosphere to radiatio. The group presents detailed radiative cooling resource maps they created to help determine the best climates for large-scale deploy

4h

Development of ice controlling tech using pressure

Scientists have succeeded in creating room-temperature ice and controlling its growth behaviors by dynamically compressing water up to pressures above 10,000 atmospheres.

4h

Remote-controlled drug delivery implant size of grape may help chronic disease management

People with chronic diseases like arthritis, diabetes and heart disease may one day forego the daily regimen of pills and, instead, receive a scheduled dosage of medication through a grape-sized implant that is remotely controlled.

4h

Instagram chief insists it doesn't spy on users

Instagram doesn't snoop on private conversations as part of its advertising targeting strategy, the head of the popular social media site said in an interview Tuesday.

4h

Elon Musks monster-raket sendt op i morges: 'En kæmpe succes for Space X'

Raketten fik sendt 24 satellitter i kredsløb, hvorefter tre dele vendte tilbage til Jorden.

4h

NATO Plans to Launch Its Strategy for Militarizing Space This Week

Space Alliance NATO officials are expected to unveil their strategy for operations in outer space later this week. The military and trade alliance has taken stabs at space policy before, but now officials say space has become “more congested, contested and competitive,” reports Agence France-Presse . As more and more countries like America , Russia , China, and India demonstrate their abilities t

4h

Titan’s Lakes May Have ‘Bathtub Rings’ of Bizarre Crystals

Titan has permanent bodies of liquid on the surface like Earth, but they're liquid hydrocarbon instead of water. That doesn't explain the perplexing "bathtub rings" around Titan's seas, though. New experiments on Earth suggest those rings could come from crystalized acetylene and butane. The post Titan’s Lakes May Have ‘Bathtub Rings’ of Bizarre Crystals appeared first on ExtremeTech .

4h

Molecular imaging suggests smokers may have impaired neuroimmune function

Research presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNM MI) shows preliminary evidence that tobacco smokers may have reduced neuroimmune function compared with nonsmokers.

4h

Private prisons have a political role in corrections issues in the US, researcher finds

Private prisons play a political role in immigration and incarceration issues in the United States and the industry may face obstacles as well as opportunities in the current political landscape, a new paper from an Oregon State University researcher suggests.

4h

New research hopes to identify individuals at risk of clinically significant COPD

New research from UAB provides evidence, for the first time, to continue using the criteria set by major respiratory societies for the diagnosis of airflow obstruction and COPD.

4h

More years of childhood education may reduce adult heart disease risk

State policies requiring children to attend additional years of school may result in a reduced risk for heart disease and improvements in several cardiovascular risk factors in adulthood, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and Stanford University.

4h

New target for drug intervention in Alzheimer's disease identified

Scientists at UAB have identified an enzyme in the brain, LIMK1, that may be an intriguing target for interventions against Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. LIMK1 appears to play a role in the degradation of dendritic spines.

4h

4h

Captive breeding makes monarchs that don’t fly south

Monarch butterflies bred in captivity don’t fly in a southward direction, and neither do their offspring, a new study shows. Wild-caught monarchs bred indoors under simulated outdoor conditions also don’t orient south, researchers say, suggesting that captive breeding disrupts the monarch’s famous annual migratory behavior. The North American monarch population has declined 90 percent over the la

4h

With a Poof, Mars Methane Is Gone

Last week, NASA’s Curiosity rover detected a belch of natural gas on the red planet. The gas has since dissipated, leaving only a mystery.

4h

Startup Unveils World’s First Long-Range “Solar Car”

Lightyear One The fact that the newly unveiled Lightyear One electric car has a better range than any other EV on the market is enough to set it apart. That it’s also solar-powered makes it one of a kind. Dutch startup Lightyear unveiled the Lightyear One prototype on Tuesday, and according to the company, the solar-powered EV boasts a range of 725 kilometers (450 miles) on a single charge — far

4h

Which climates are best for passive cooling technologies?

Researchers recently set out to gain a better understanding of the thermal balance of power plants and surfaces, but quickly realized that they would need to determine what roles cloud cover and relative humidity play in the transparency of the atmosphere to radiatio. The group presents detailed radiative cooling resource maps they created to help determine the best climates for large-scale deploy

4h

Development of ice controlling tech using pressure

Scientists have succeeded in creating room-temperature ice and controlling its growth behaviors by dynamically compressing water up to pressures above 10,000 atmospheres.

4h

How octopus arms make decisions

Researchers studying the behavior and neuroscience of octopuses have long suspected that the animals' arms may have minds of their own. A new model is the first attempt at a comprehensive representation of information flow between the octopus's suckers, arms and brain, based on previous research in octopus neuroscience and behavior, and new video observations conducted in the lab.

4h

Babies can learn link between language and ethnicity, study suggests

Eleven-month-old infants can learn to associate the language they hear with ethnicity, recent research suggests. Eleven-month-old infants looked more at the faces of people of Asian descent versus those of Caucasian descent when hearing Cantonese versus English — but not when hearing Spanish.

4h

Remote-controlled drug delivery implant size of grape may help chronic disease management

People with chronic diseases like arthritis, diabetes and heart disease may one day forego the daily regimen of pills and, instead, receive a scheduled dosage of medication through a grape-sized implant that is remotely controlled.

4h

Astronomy bot speeds up search for Jupiter's twins

Astronomers have a new tool in their search for extraterrestrial life — a sophisticated bot that helps identify stars hosting planets similar to Jupiter and Saturn.

4h

National trash: Reducing waste produced in US national parks

When you think of national parks, you might picture the vast plateaus of the Grand Canyon, the intricate wetlands of the Everglades, or the inspiring viewscapes of the Grand Tetons. You probably don't envision 100 million pounds of mashed water bottles, barbecue-smudged paper plates, and crumpled coffee cups — but that is the staggering quantity of garbage that is generated in our National Parks

4h

Repeat ER users changed how they used ERs after gaining Medicaid coverage

A new study sought to determine how the nature of visits to emergency departments (EDs) changed for previously uninsured patients who gained Medicaid insurance expansion under the ACA and who went to the ED at least once before and once after expansion. The study found that compared with patients who remained uninsured in states where Medicaid was not expanded, these patients shifted their use of

4h

Study reveals elevated cancer risk in children with birth defects

A collaborative team of scientists led by Baylor College of Medicine has assembled the largest study to date to evaluate cancer risk in children with birth defects.

4h

Hands On With DJI’s New RoboMaster S1 Battling Robot

If you've always thought you could out-drive, out-shoot, and out-program the teams competing in various battling robot contests, DJI's RoboMaster S1 will give you your chance — if you have the budget. The post Hands On With DJI’s New RoboMaster S1 Battling Robot appeared first on ExtremeTech .

4h

How American Women Are Amplifying Their Political Power

Alicia Garza’s phone never stops ringing. The Black Lives Matter co-founder now leads Supermajority , a women’s political-training organization, along with a roster of female organizers including Cecile Richards, the former Planned Parenthood Federation of America president. The two have dedicated their efforts to building women’s political power in the U.S., a mandate that means near-constant co

4h

How to Respond to Teens’ ‘Emotional Eruptions’

A toddler falls. She lands on her knee and inspects it. And then—this is the crucial step—she looks to her parent. “Whatever’s going on with your face dictates what happens next,” says Lisa Damour, a clinical psychologist and author. If the parent’s look indicates all is well, all will usually be well. But if the parent looks frightened, tears often ensue. When children are in moments of exaspera

4h

A Rational Case for Following Your Emotions

In the popular American imagination, emotion and rationality are often mutually exclusive. One is erratic, unpredictable, and often a liability; the other, cool, collected, and absent obvious feeling. And even though research suggests that people experience emotions internally in similar ways no matter their gender , many Americans still regard emotion as uniquely feminine and weak. That myth has

4h

How to conquer your fear of the kitchen

It's time to actually use that kitchen. (Deposit Photos/) Even if you’re not a fan of cooking, you can’t escape it. Whether you’re scrolling through social media, flipping through channels on the television, or streaming your favorite shows, it’s difficult to go a day without seeing the step-by-step preparation of someone’s dinner. But if you’re afraid of getting your hands dirty in the kitchen,

4h

Power of simple physical models for complex protein machines

The function of protein machines in biological cells is so complex that even supercomputers cannot predict their cycles at atomic detail. But many aspects of their operation at mesoscales can be already revealed by exploring simple mechanical models, amenable for simulations on common computers. The authors now show how artificial protein-like structures with machine properties can be designed.

4h

How to avoid ‘speed dating’ mistakes when adopting a dog

Psychologists who study how people pick their spouses have turned their attention to another important relationship: choosing a canine companion. They recently found that, when it comes to puppy love, the heart doesn’t always know what it wants. The researchers based their results, which could help improve the pet adoption process, on data from a working animal shelter. Picking a pet from dog she

4h

Journals' Plagiarism Detectors May Flag Papers in Error

One recent case, in which a scientist claims his submitted manuscript was rejected despite a lack of actual plagiarism, highlights the limitations of automated tools.

4h

Radioactive tadpoles reveal contamination clues

Tadpoles can be used to measure the amount of radiocesium, a radioactive material, in aquatic environments, according to new research from University of Georgia scientists.

5h

When is Amazon Prime Day? The date is out—and it's just around the corner

Amazon Prime Day, when the e-commerce giant offers a Black Friday-like sale in the middle of summer, will take place on July 15 and 16, the company says.

5h

GM to upgrade assembly plants ahead of new pickup, SUV lines

General Motors Co. has announced it's investing more than $4.2 billion in assembly plants in Indiana, Michigan and Texas to prepare for the launch of its next generation of pickups and SUVs.

5h

Apple launches iOS 13 public beta: 10 reasons to get the software now if you're feeling brave

Apple will unveil new iPhones in September, assuming the company sticks to its usual playbook. The fall timeframe is also when Apple officially releases the latest flavor of iOS, the software that will not only be at the core of whatever new handsets Apple introduces, but that will also add fresh features to the iPhones already out in the wild, likely including the phone in your pocket.

5h

One Small Step Back In Time: Relive the Wonder of Apollo 11

Half a century after the moon shot, we remember how we achieved the impossible—and why we need to do it again — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Want to Raise Rational Kids? Try Teaching Your Toddler Verbs

(Credit: Travelerpix/Shutterstock) What are were your first words? Odds are, if you grew up in the United States speaking English, these words were nouns. Nouns like mama, dada, a favorite animal or food (or "lawnmower," if my father is to be believed). But in languages like Korean and Mandarin Chinese, babies’ first words are more often verbs like "go" and "want." New research suggests these diff

5h

How people want to feel determines whether others can influence their emotions

New Stanford research on emotions shows that people's motivations are a driving factor behind how much they allow others to influence their feelings, such as anger.

5h

Thunderbolt of lightning, gamma rays exciting

University of Tokyo graduate student Yuuki Wada with colleagues from Japan discover a connection between lightning strikes and two kinds of gamma-ray phenomena in thunderclouds. The research suggests that in certain conditions, weak gamma-ray glows from thunderclouds may precede lightning bolts and their accompanying gamma-ray flashes.

5h

Bringing Baseball to a Foreign Field

Bringing Baseball to a Foreign Field Setting up the field for the 'London Series' between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees presents significant technical challenges. LondonStadium_topNteaser.jpg Aerial view of London Stadium, where the Boston Red Sox will play the New York Yankees in a two-games series the last weekend of June. Image credits: UAV 4 via Shutterstock Sports Tuesday, June

5h

Space Rocks Near Neptune Could Reveal the Solar System’s Origins

Origin Story A new computer simulation shakes up the popular theory for how distant space rocks called trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) formed during the earliest days of our solar system. Past models for TNO formation posit that it was a slow, drawn out process where celestial bodies collided and broke apart. But the new research , published Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy , suggests TNOs f

5h

How to help physics teachers who don't know physics

A shortage of high school physics teachers has led to teachers with little-to-no physics training taking over physics classrooms, causing additional stress and job dissatisfaction for those teachers—and a difficult learning experience for their students.

5h

Scientists on Madeira see new 'plasticrust' sea pollution

Researchers say they may have identified a new kind of plastic pollution in the sea and they're calling it "plasticrust."

5h

Best Practices: Calculating Cell Confluency

In this white paper, learn how to use a cell imager system to directly and accurately capture and calculate cell confluency!

5h

5h

A new 'golden' age for electronics?

One way that heat damages electronic equipment is it makes components expand at different rates, resulting in forces that cause micro-cracking and distortion. Plastic components and circuit boards are particularly prone to damage due to changes in volume during heating and cooling cycles. But if a material could be incorporated into the components that compensates for the expansion, the stresses w

5h

Researchers connect lightning with gamma-ray phenomena in clouds

University of Tokyo graduate student Yuuki Wada with colleagues from Japan have discovered a connection between lightning strikes and two kinds of gamma-ray phenomena in thunderclouds. The research suggests that in certain conditions, weak gamma-ray glows from thunderclouds may precede lightning bolts and their accompanying gamma-ray flashes.

5h

Four approaches to understanding and moving beyond dysfunctional deliberation

It may feel like we have reached an impasse in the debate over divisive issues such as gun violence, climate change and immigration.

5h

Solving a condensation mystery

Condensation might ruin a wood coffee table or fog up glasses when entering a warm building on a winter day, but it's not all inconveniences; the condensation and evaporation cycle has important applications.

5h

Analyzing the tweets of Republicans and Democrats

New research examined how Republicans and Democrats express themselves online in an attempt to understand how polarization of beliefs occurs on social media.

5h

Helping physics teachers who don't know physics

A shortage of high school physics teachers has led to teachers with little-to-no training taking over physics classrooms, reports show. This has led to additional stress and job dissatisfaction for those teachers — and a difficult learning experience for their students. But new research indicates that focused physics professional development for teachers — even those who have no prior physics tr

5h

These neurons affect how much you do, or don't, want to eat

University of Arizona researchers have identified a network of neurons that coordinate with other brain regions to influence eating behaviors. These findings could help those suffering from disease-induced appetite loss or over-eating.

5h

The making of 'warm ice'

The Center for Convergence Property Measurement, Frontier in Extreme Physics Team at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) succeeded in creating room-temperature ice and controlling its growth behaviors by dynamically compressing water up to pressures above 10,000 atmospheres.

5h

A new 'golden' age for electronics?

Scientists at Nagoya University, Japan, have created materials that shrink uniformly in all directions when heated under normal everyday conditions, using a cheap and industrially scalable process. This potentially opens up a new paradigm of thermal-expansion control that will make electronic devices more resilient to temperature changes.

5h

LGBTI adolescents and young adults with cancer: Can we do better?

A new systemic review of the literature has shown a clear gap in the understanding of cancer in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or intersex (LGBTI) adolescents and young adults (AYA).

5h

What will future stem cell or artificial technology be capable of ? In terms of human enhancement and changing traits ?

If combined with nanotechnology and genetic engineering What could it achieve in terms of making large scale complex structural changes ? submitted by /u/Mewto1k [link] [comments]

5h

When AI learns to make art, will humans even understand it?

submitted by /u/junkadelicmusic [link] [comments]

5h

5h

5h

Islands in the sun: Heatwave gives cities that sinking feeling

Boffins call it a heat sink—a passive exchanger designed to dissipate heat—but when the sink is an actual city, its concrete and asphalt sweltering in the heat, it feels more like an oven to those who live and work there.

5h

Cryptocurrencies need close scrutiny, monitor warns

An international financial monitor warned world leaders Tuesday that wider use by retail shoppers of cryptocurrencies like Libra, unveiled last week by Facebook, would need "close scrutiny" by regulators.

5h

T-Mobile Will Launch Its 5G network, Galaxy S10 5G on June 28

The carrier will launch its 5G network in a handful of cities on June 28th, and there will be a single 5G device available to take advantage of the new network. T-Mobile will launch the Samsung …

5h

Scientific American Editors Build Saturn V Rocket LEGO Set

In the early morning hours of July 16, 1969, technicians at the Kennedy Space Center loaded upward of 750,000 gallons of fuel into the 363-foot Saturn V rocket that would successfully propel the Apollo 11 spacecraft toward the moon. It would be one of 13 Saturn V launches between 1967 and 1973. This vehicle remains the tallest, heaviest and most powerful rocket ever in operation. In honor of the

5h

In Images: Rising 'Phoenix' Aurora and Starburst Galaxies Light Up the Skies

Cosmic marvels dazzle in the U.K.'s 'Astronomy Photographer of the Year' contest.

5h

Hearts and stripes: A tiny fish offers clues to regenerating damaged cardiac tissue

Zebrafish, a pet shop staple, may hold the clue for how hearts can heal from damage.

5h

Using 3D-printing to stop hair loss

Columbia researchers have created a way to grow human hair in a dish, which could open up hair restoration surgery to more people, including women, and improve the way pharmaceutical companies search for new hair growth drugs.

5h

De-escalating breast cancer therapy; can some patients be spared chemotherapy?

Researchers develop molecular testing to distinguish patients who may need less from those who may need more therapy for HER2 positive breast cancer.

5h

Predictors of cognitive recovery following mild to severe traumatic brain injury

Researchers have shown that higher intelligence and younger age are predictors of greater cognitive recovery 2-5 years post-mild to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

5h

New combination therapy established as safe and effective for prostate cancer

A novel therapy using two targeted treatments for prostate cancer has been shown to maximize efficacy while reducing side effects according to research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) 2019 Annual Meeting.

5h

Hubble finds tiny 'electric soccer balls' in space, helps solve interstellar mystery

Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have confirmed the presence of electrically-charged molecules in space shaped like soccer balls, shedding light on the mysterious contents of the interstellar medium (ISM) — the gas and dust that fills interstellar space.

5h

How human genetic data is helping dogs fight cancer

Colorado study sequences 33 canine cancer cell lines to identify 'human' genetic changes could be driving these canine cancers, possibly helping veterinary oncologists use more human medicines to cure cancer in dogs.

5h

Ultrasmall nanoclusters and carbon quantum dots show promise for acute kidney injury

Acute kidney injury (AKI) often complicates the treatment outcomes of hospitalized patients, resulting in dangerous levels of toxic chemicals accumulating in the blood and causing numerous deaths annually. Currently, only supportive treatment is available for AKI, but two related research studies presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging offer ho

5h

Scientists find potential way to defuse 'time bomb' of cardiology

In a new study published in EBioMedicine, researchers at Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute use principles from cancer biology to demonstrate what might be causing aortic aneurysms and potentially how to treat them.

5h

New Theory: A 2D Universe Could Host Living Creatures

Sim City In theory, a two-dimensional universe may still be able to support life . That statement runs in stark opposition to what’s called the anthropic argument, which states that if the fundamental properties of our three-dimensional universe were tweaked, life would no longer be possible. It’s a bold claim, but University of California physicist James Scargill did the work to back it up. In a

5h

Microscopic glass blowing used to make tiny optical lenses

Inserting air into hot glass to form a bubble has been used to make glass objects since Roman times. In new work, researchers apply these same glass blowing principles on a microscopic scale to make specialized miniature cone-shaped lenses known as axicons.

6h

Biochip advances enable next-generation sequencing technologies

Biochips are essentially tiny laboratories designed to function inside living organisms, and they are driving next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. This powerful combination is capable of solving unique and important biological problems, such as single-cell, rare-cell or rare-molecule analysis, which next-generation sequencing can't do on its own.

6h

California's mighty predator, the mountain lion, faces 'extinction vortex'

As the mountain lions of Southern California approach what some experts call an "extinction vortex," environmentalists are demanding that state officials grant the big cats protective status—a move that could potentially ban development on thousands of acres of prime real estate.

6h

Biochip advances enable next-generation sequencing technologies

Biochips are essentially tiny laboratories designed to function inside living organisms, and they are driving next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. This powerful combination is capable of solving unique and important biological problems, such as single-cell, rare-cell or rare-molecule analysis, which next-generation sequencing can't do on its own.

6h

California's mighty predator, the mountain lion, faces 'extinction vortex'

As the mountain lions of Southern California approach what some experts call an "extinction vortex," environmentalists are demanding that state officials grant the big cats protective status—a move that could potentially ban development on thousands of acres of prime real estate.

6h

Free Solo Is Not a Life Lesson

Free Solo , the Academy Award–winning documentary about Alex Honnold’s quest to climb the 3,000-foot face of El Capitan in Yosemite National Park, has transformed a well-known rock climber into a global hero. El Capitan isn’t difficult for an experienced climber, but Honnold scaled its granite face without ropes or harnesses—an unprecedented, extraordinary feat. The ascent required a series of in

6h

Researchers create first portable tech for detecting cyanotoxins in water

North Carolina State University researchers have developed the first portable technology that can test for cyanotoxins in water. The device can be used to detect four common types of cyanotoxins, including two for which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently finalized recreational water quality criteria.

6h

You've Heard of Postpartum Depression, But Probably Not Postpartum Anxiety

More accurately known as perinatal anxiety, and like most people, I had no idea it existed until it struck me — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Biochip advances enable next-generation sequencing technologies

Biochips are driving next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, and this powerful combination is capable of solving unique and important biological problems, such as single-cell, rare-cell or rare-molecule analysis, which next-generation sequencing can't do on its own. In APL Bioengineering, researchers from Seoul National University explore the role advancements in biochip technology are playin

6h

Puppy love: Choosing the perfect pooch poses challenges similar to dating

Indiana University psychologists who study relationship choice have found that when it comes to picking a canine companion, what people say they want in a dog isn't always in line with what they choose.

6h

Solving a condensation mystery

Dropwise condensation on liquid infused surfaces presented a mystery: what's causing the movement of water droplets? Researchers in the McKelvey School of Engineering have found the answer.

6h

Researchers create first portable tech for detecting cyanotoxins in water

North Carolina State University researchers have developed the first portable technology that can test for cyanotoxins in water. The device can be used to detect four common types of cyanotoxins, including two for which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently finalized recreational water quality criteria.

6h

Microscopic glass blowing used to make tiny optical lenses

Inserting air into hot glass to form a bubble has been used to make glass objects since Roman times. In new work, researchers apply these same glass blowing principles on a microscopic scale to make specialized miniature cone-shaped lenses known as axicons.

6h

Zero-calorie sweeteners on trial again

For the first time, scientists exposed pregnant and lactating mice to sucralose and acesulfame-K — a common combination in soda, sports supplements and other sweetened products — and found their pups developed harmful metabolic and gut bacteria changes.Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, the study reinforces an emerging consensus: artificial sweeteners may be safe when used in moderation by

6h

Not Even Trump Has Any Idea What His Iran Policy Is

On Friday, after pulling back a strike on targets in Iran—with 10 minutes to go, by his account—President Donald Trump explained his decision on Twitter , saying that an estimated death toll of 150 was “not proportionate to shooting down an unmanned drone.” On Tuesday, after Iranian President Hassan Rouhani offered a rather Trumpian assessment of Trump and his administration, the U.S. president t

6h

Trump’s Trade War With China Is Already Changing the World

At a G20 summit in Osaka, Japan, this week, Donald Trump and Xi Jinping are set to have a one-on-one meeting, and hopes are high that a good conversation will restart stalled trade negotiations and convince the White House to hold off on further tariffs against China. For Alfred LaSpina, the outcome may not matter very much, though. When LaSpina, the new vice president of eLumigen, based in Troy,

6h

Payloads deployed by SpaceX to study space weather and spacecraft propulsion

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory researchers designed and built two science payloads that went up with SpaceX's Falcon 9 Heavy rocket launch on June 25.

6h

Levanluhta jewellery links Finland to a European exchange network

The Levänluhta water burial site, dating back to the Iron Age (300-800 CE), is one of Finland's most famous archaeological sites. Nearly one hundred individuals, mainly women or children, were buried in a lake located at Isokyrö in SW Finland, during the Iron Age. Some of the deceased were accompanied by arm rings and necklaces made out of copper alloy, bronze or brass.

6h

Milk: Best drink to reduce burn from chili peppers

People who order their Buffalo wings especially spicy and sometimes find them to be too "hot," should choose milk to reduce the burn, according to Penn State researchers, who also suggest it does not matter if it is whole or skim.

6h

Monarch butterflies raised in captivity don’t migrate

Finding could set back efforts to boost the number of migrants

6h

Milk: Best drink to reduce burn from chili peppers

People who order their Buffalo wings especially spicy and sometimes find them to be too "hot," should choose milk to reduce the burn, according to Penn State researchers, who also suggest it does not matter if it is whole or skim.

6h

Plants couldn’t run away from Chernobyl—but that’s what saved them

An abandoned hotel building in Pripyat, a few miles from Chernobyl. (Fotokon/Shutterstock/) Chernobyl has become a byword for catastrophe. The 1986 nuclear disaster, recently brought back into the public eye by the hugely popular TV show of the same name, caused thousands of cancers , turned a once populous area into a ghost city, and resulted in the setting up of an exclusion zone 1,000 mi² in s

6h

Virtual reality faces—animating precise, lifelike avatars for VR in real-time

Computer scientists are focused on adding enhanced functionality to make the "reality" in virtual reality (VR) environments highly believable. A key aspect of VR is to enable remote social interactions and the possibility of making it more immersive than any prior telecommunication media. Researchers from Facebook Reality Labs (FRL) have developed a revolutionary system called Codec Avatars that g

6h

You've Heard of Postpartum Depression, But Probably Not Postpartum Anxiety

More accurately known as perinatal anxiety, and like most people, I had no idea it existed until it struck me — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Non-addictive CRISPR-edited tobacco could help eliminate smoking

A gene-edited tobacco plant with near-zero nicotine could boost plans to eliminate smoking by making cigarettes non-addictive

6h

Exposure to air pollution seems to negatively affect women's fertility

Daily exposure to air pollution, including particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide, has a negative impact on women's fertility

6h

6h

Virtual reality faces: animating precise, lifelike avatars for VR in real-time

Researchers from Facebook Reality Labs (FRL) have developed a revolutionary system called Codec Avatars that gives VR users the ability to interact with others while representing themselves with lifelike avatars precisely animated in real-time.

6h

Milk: Best drink to reduce burn from chili peppers

People who order their Buffalo wings especially spicy and sometimes find them to be too 'hot,' should choose milk to reduce the burn, according to Penn State researchers, who also suggest it does not matter if it is whole or skim.

6h

Machine learning reveals how strongly interacting electrons behave at atomic level

A team of scientists from the Universities of Oxford, Cornell and San Jose State, collaborating across theoretical and experimental physics and computer science, have developed and trained a new Machine Learning (ML) technique, to finally understand how electrons behave in important quantum materials. Their far-reaching results were published in Nature online on 19 June and will feature in this we

6h

Massachusetts General study identifies pathway linking socioeconomic status to cardiovascular risk

A biological pathway previously found to contribute to the impact of stress on the risk of cardiovascular disease also may underlie the increased incidence of such disease experienced by individuals with lower socioeconomic status.

6h

SwRI-led team studies binaries to make heads or tails of planet formation

A Southwest Research Institute-led team studied the orientation of distant solar system bodies to bolster the 'streaming instability' theory of planet formation.

6h

Study funded by NIH supports optimal threshold for diagnosing COPD

A new study provides evidence to support a simple measurement for diagnosing clinically significant airflow obstruction, the key characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The study found that a 70% ratio of two indicators of lung function proved as or more accurate than other thresholds for predicting COPD-related hospit

6h

Retailers Are Judging Consumers By Using Secret “Surveillance Scores”

Surveillance Scoring China isn’t the only country with a draconian “social credit score” system — there’s one quite a bit like it operating in the U.S. Except that it’s being run by American businesses, not the government. There’s plenty of evidence that retailers have been using a technique called “surveillance scoring” for decades in which consumers are given a secret score by an algorithm to g

6h

Major Medical Groups Release Call to Action on Climate Change

The agenda urges emissions reductions and a guarantee of access to clean water — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

You've Heard of Postpartum Depression, But Probably Not Postpartum Anxiety

More accurately known as perinatal anxiety, and like most people, I had no idea it existed until it struck me — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Botox Maker Allergan Is Sold to AbbVie in $63 Billion Deal

The transaction would give AbbVie a potent source of popular treatments as it faces the loss of patent protection for its best-selling drug, Humira.

6h

2020 Hyundai Palisade Review: A New Star Among Midsize SUVs

Hyundai's first big SUV is a hit: The Palisade is roomy, quiet, off-road capable, and an immediate thorn in the side of the equally new Ford Explorer. Which Hyundai undercuts by $10K on price. The post 2020 Hyundai Palisade Review: A New Star Among Midsize SUVs appeared first on ExtremeTech .

6h

Endelig aftale: Italiensk konsortium skal bygge 80 procent af Nyt OUH

PLUS. Øget brug af præfabrikation, ændret byggesystem og tilpasning af installationer på patientstuer gør, at Region Syddanmark nu tør underskrive endelig kontrakt om byggeri af endnu en del af Nyt OUH

6h

Daily briefing: Athletes’ guts host a performance-enhancing microbe

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02003-x V. atypica eats lactate and makes mice run longer. Plus: meet the physician who beat Ebola and inspires other survivors to care for the sick, and explore a tomb for spent nuclear fuel.

6h

Air pollution 'may affect number of eggs ovaries can produce'

Results suggest environmental factors could play a role in female reproductive health Air pollution has been linked to a drop in activity of a woman’s ovaries, researchers have revealed. Experts say the findings suggest the female reproductive system is affected by environmental factors, although the study does not look specifically at the impact of air pollution on fertility. Continue reading…

6h

AbbVie makes $63B bid for Botox maker Allergan

The specialty drug company AbbVie will spend $63 billion to acquire Allergan, the maker of Botox and other cosmetic treatments.

6h

Watch Toyota’s Basketball-Playing Robot Set a World Record

Robot Baller Toyota just earned itself a Guinness World Record — and the achievement had nothing to do with cars. In 2017, a team of engineers from the company thought it would be fun to use their downtime to build a basketball robot that could sink every shot it attempted. By April 2019, they were unveiling their third iteration of the robot , which they named “CUE3,” and the following month, th

6h

Goat milk kefir is proven to be good for your health

Kefir is a fermented dairy product that is gradually becoming more and more common on the shelves of Spanish shops and supermarkets. Since it is a milk-based product, made from lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation, it is assumed to have several health-enhancing functions resulting from its protein and peptide content with biological activity (molecules made up of amino acids, smaller than protei

7h

Giant Squid Filmed Alive for Second Time in History. Here's the Video.

For only the second time in history, researchers have recorded footage of a live — and very curious — giant squid in the pitch-dark depths of its salty, deep-sea home.

7h

Adding clinical variables improves accuracy of lung allocation score

Implemented in 2005, the lung allocation score is used to prioritize patients awaiting lung transplants in the US. Sicker transplant candidates have a higher calculated score and are placed at the top of the list. But a recent study led by Maryam Valapour, M.D., MPP, director of Lung Transplant Outcomes in Cleveland Clinic's Respiratory Institute, found including new clinical variables helped to b

7h

Scientists track brain tumor turncoats with advanced imaging

To better understand the cells that brain tumors recruit, scientists developed advanced imaging techniques to visualize macrophages.

7h

Multiresistant intestinal bacteria spread widely in Vietnamese hospitals

Around half of patients admitted to hospital in Vietnam are carriers of multiresistant intestinal bacteria, which are resistant to carbapenems, a group of broad-spectrum antibiotics. This is the conclusion of a study by Swedish and Vietnamese scientists led by Linköping University, published in the Journal of Infection.

7h

Laser light detects tumors

A team of researchers from Jena presents a groundbreaking new method for the rapid, gentle and reliable detection of tumors with laser light. The Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) introduced a compact device for rapid cancer diagnosis during surgery at the leading trade fair "Laser World of Photonics" from 24 to 27 June 2019 in Munich. The optical method will help surgeons to

7h

Air pollution found to affect marker of female fertility in real-life study

Ovarian reserve, a term widely adopted to reflect the number of resting follicles in the ovary and thus a marker of potential female fertility, has been found in a large-scale study to be adversely affected by high levels of air pollution.

7h

Hannah Gadsby’s Genius Follow-Up to Nanette

“Had I known trauma would be so wildly popular,” says Hannah Gadsby to a roll of educated laughter at Boston’s Shubert Theater on June 19, “I might have budgeted my trauma better.” She knows why we’re here; we know why we’re here. We’re here because of Nanette , the breakout 2018 Netflix special in which Gadsby used her own experience of sexual violence to (in her words) “turn the laugh tap off.”

7h

New research shows how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the sea

The findings of a research expedition to coastal Greenland which examined, for the first time, how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the oceans has been published in the journal Progress in Oceanography.

7h

Symbiotic upcycling: Turning 'low value' compounds into biomass

Plants use light energy from the sun for photosynthesis to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) into biomass. Animals can't do that. Therefore, some of them have teamed up with bacteria that carry out a process called chemosynthesis. It works almost like photosynthesis, only that it uses chemical energy instead of light energy. Many animals rely on chemosynthetic bacteria to supply them with food. The symbio

7h

Goat milk kefir is proven to be good for your health

Kefir is a fermented dairy product that is gradually becoming more and more common on the shelves of Spanish shops and supermarkets. Since it is a milk-based product, made from lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation, it is assumed to have several health-enhancing functions resulting from its protein and peptide content with biological activity (molecules made up of amino acids, smaller than protei

7h

Researchers model how octopus arms make decisions

Researchers studying the behavior and neuroscience of octopuses have long suspected that the animals' arms may have minds of their own.

7h

Symbiotic upcycling: Turning 'low value' compounds into biomass

Plants use light energy from the sun for photosynthesis to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) into biomass. Animals can't do that. Therefore, some of them have teamed up with bacteria that carry out a process called chemosynthesis. It works almost like photosynthesis, only that it uses chemical energy instead of light energy. Many animals rely on chemosynthetic bacteria to supply them with food. The symbio

7h

Organic sanitizer kills bacteria on fresh veggies

Food scientists have found that a combination of lactic acid with food grade sodium hypochlorite is an effective sanitizer to process fresh organic vegetables. Organic foods like vegetable sprouts are getting more popular as people become more aware of the potential benefits to their health and well being. However, food borne pathogen infection caused by contaminated vegetables during each stage

7h

7h

The Future Looks Terrible for US Nursing Home Costs

submitted by /u/mynameis_neo [link] [comments]

7h

7h

7h

The Alibaba Disruption to the Designer World

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

7h

Toyota is building a robot that can play basketball

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

7h

7h

Changes in blood flow tell heart cells to regenerate

Altered blood flow resulting from heart injury switches on a communication cascade that reprograms heart cells and leads to heart regeneration in zebrafish.

7h

First in vivo proof-of-concept in Steinert's myotonic dystrophy

Ana Buj Bello's team, a researcher in an Inserm unit at Genethon, the AFM-Telethon laboratory, has made the proof-of-concept of a CRISPR-Cas9 approach in a mouse model of Steinert's myotonic dystrophy, the most common neuromuscular disease in adults.

7h

Study snapshot: Missed exams and lost opportunities: Who could gain from expanded college admission

Universal college admission testing in the state of Virginia could increase the number of high school graduates with test scores competitive for admission at universities in the state by as much as 40 percent — and at the most selective institutions, nearly 20 percent — with larger increases for low-income students.

7h

SwRI scientist develops novel algorithm to aid search for exoplanets

Inspired by movie streaming services such as Netflix or Hulu, a Southwest Research Institute scientist developed a technique to look for stars likely to host giant, Jupiter-sized planets outside of our solar system. She developed an algorithm to identify stars likely to host giant exoplanets, based on the composition of stars known to have planets.

7h

Levänluhta jewellery links Finland to a European exchange network

A recently completed study indicates that the material of the jewellery found together with human remains at the Levänluhta water burial site originates in southern Europe, contrary to what researchers had previously thought.

7h

Researchers study healthy ALS neurons as way to understand resistance to the disease

Scientists have developed a stem-cell-based modeling system that identifies how some neurons are resistant to ALS — a breakthrough that offers potential for battling neurodegeneration.

7h

Discovery may help kick-start ageing immune system

The thymus, a vital organ producing the immune system's T cells, is one of the first to diminish in function as we age, resulting in a gradual loss of T cell production and eventually increased susceptibility to infections and cancer. Researchers have identified factors affecting the cells in the thymus that set in motion this loss, paving the way to develop targeted strategies for the recovery of

7h

Finding missing network links could help develop new drugs, stop disease, ease traffic

A new mathematical model of the structure of networks could help find new cancer drugs, speed up traffic flow and combat sexually transmitted disease. Although the three challenges seem diverse, they all could benefit from a theory that helps uncover information about a network by analyzing its structure. Successful link prediction algorithms already exist for certain types of networks, but the re

7h

How the brain helps us make good decisions — and bad ones

A prevailing theory in neuroscience holds that people make decisions based on integrated global calculations that occur within the frontal cortex of the brain. However, Yale researchers have found that three distinct circuits connecting to different brain regions are involved in making good decisions, bad ones and determining which of those past choices to store in memory, they report June 25 in t

7h

Which climates are best for passive cooling technologies?

UCSD researchers recently set out to gain a better understanding of the thermal balance of power plants and surfaces, but quickly realized that they would need to determine what roles cloud cover and relative humidity play in the transparency of the atmosphere to radiatio. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, the group presents detailed radiative cooling resource maps they created t

7h

Study looks at opioid use after knee surgery

A small study looked at whether reducing the number of opioid tablets prescribed after knee surgery would reduce postoperative use and if preoperative opioid-use education would reduce it even more. The study included 264 patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery at a single academic ambulatory surgery center.

7h

Seizures in Alzheimer's mouse model disrupt adult neurogenesis

Working with animal models of Alzheimer's disease, a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine discovered that seizures that are associated with the disease both in animal models and humans alter the normal dynamics of neurogenesis in adult brains. Administering anti-seizure medication restored neurogenesis and improved performance in a spatial discrimination task.

7h

Next-Gen BMW Cruise Control Can Stop At Traffic Lights Automatically

Adaptive cruise control technology has been around for quite some time now. The car can slow down automatically if the car in front of it does and then go back up to the set cruise speed without …

7h

Have sperm will travel. But what would an all-female planet look like? | Stephanie Merritt

The discovery that frozen sperm can survive space flight opens up tantalising possibilities. But there’s no guarantee of utopia If you’re a woman who has despaired over the past week, as you’ve observed the questionable conduct of jowly white men in positions of power and subsequently seen it defended by both men and women – take heart. The good news is that when our species eventually abandons th

7h

Protecting emergency personnel: Platform shows potential of AI in hazardous environments

Whether it's at rescue and firefighting operations or deep-sea inspections, mobile robots finding their way around unknown situations with the help of artificial intelligence (AI) can effectively support people in carrying out activities in hazardous environments. The potential as well as the concrete benefits of AI in this field are illustrated in a current report from Plattform Lernende Systeme,

7h

Discovery may tame overactive parathyroid glands

The discovery of a protein that appears to protect parathyroid glands from overactivity may lead to new drugs to treat hyperparathyroidism. The condition is currently treatable only with surgery. The parathyroid are four small glands located in the neck, behind the larger thyroid, and are responsible for maintaining healthy blood calcium levels through the secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH).

7h

Lateral thinking: How to workshop innovative ideas

As we get older, the work we consistently do builds "rivers of thinking." These give us a rich knowledge of a certain kind of area. The problem with this, however, is that as those patterns get deeper, we get locked into them. When this happens it becomes a challenge to think differently — to break from the past and generate new ideas. How do we get out of this rut? One way is to bring play and g

7h

Wearable robot 'WalkON Suit' off to Cybathlon 2020

Standing upright and walking alone are very simple but noble motions that separate humans from many other creatures. Wearable and prosthetic technologies have emerged to augment human function in locomotion and manipulation. However, advances in wearable robot technology have been especially momentous to Byoung-Wook Kim, a triplegic for 22 years following a devastating car accident.

7h

Conceptual model can explain how thunderstorm clouds bunch together

Understanding how the weather and climate change is one of the most important challenges in science today. A new theoretical study presents a new mechanism for the self-aggregation of storm clouds, a phenomenon, by which storm clouds bunch together in dense clusters. The researcher used methods from complexity science, and applied them to formerly established research in meteorology on the behavio

7h

Lifelong ill-health after exposure to chemical weapons

People exposed to chemical warfare agents (CWAs) often incur chronic damage to their lungs, skin and eyes, for example. They also frequently succumb to depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts. This is shown by research on survivors from the 1988 gas attacks against Kurdish Halabja in Iraq.

7h

New research shows how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the sea

The findings of a research expedition to coastal Greenland which examined, for the first time, how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the oceans has been published in the journal Progress in Oceanography.

7h

New osteoporosis therapy's dual effects on bone tissue

Sclerostin is a protein produced by osteocytes in the bone that inhibits bone formation. A recent analysis of results from a clinical trial reveals the beneficial effects of romosozumab, an antibody therapy that targets sclerostin, on bone tissue in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. The findings are published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

7h

How gastric stem cells fight bacteria

Stem cells are not only key players in tissue regeneration, they are also capable of taking direct action against bacteria. This is the finding of a study conducted by researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, which describes what happens during a Helicobacter pylori infection of the human stomach. By actively fighting the colonizing bacteria, gastric stem cells protect themselves aga

7h

New blood test for detecting Alzheimer's disease

Researchers from Lund University, together with the Roche pharmaceutical company, have used a method to develop a new blood marker capable of detecting whether or not a person has Alzheimer's disease. If the method is approved for clinical use, the researchers hope eventually to see it used as a diagnostic tool in primary healthcare. This autumn, they will start a trial in primary healthcare to te

7h

Dung beetles use wind compass when the sun is high

Researchers have shown for the first time that an animal uses different directional sensors to achieve the highest possible navigational precision in different conditions. When the sun is high, dung beetles navigate using the wind.

7h

Symbiotic upcycling: Turning 'low value' compounds into biomass

Kentron, a bacterial symbiont of ciliates, turns cellular waste products into biomass. It is the first known sulfur-oxidizing symbiont to be entirely heterotrophic. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology now report about this unexpected bacterium that turns waste into food.

7h

Finding missing network links could help develop new drugs, stop disease, ease traffic

A new mathematical model of the structure of networks could help find new cancer drugs, speed up traffic flow and combat sexually transmitted disease.

7h

What If Social Media Could Tell You When You’re Mean?

Years ago, when I still used Facebook a lot, I posted a really mean reply to a friend’s post. A real friend, too, not just a “Facebook friend.” The aftermath was ruinous. My friend forgave me, thank goodness, but I was so horrified at my gaffe that I purged my account, shedding thousands of friends. I stopped posting my own personal updates, too. The whole experience made me not trust myself with

7h

Why we need to fight misinformation about vaccines | Ethan Lindenberger

Ethan Lindenberger never got vaccinated as a kid. So one day, he went on Reddit and asked a simple question: "Where do I go to get vaccinated?" The post went viral, landing Lindenberger in the middle of a heated debate about vaccination and, ultimately, in front of a US Senate committee. Less than a year later, the high school senior reports back on his unexpected time in the spotlight and a new m

7h

An Arctic fox made an epic 4400-kilometre-long journey over sea ice

In 2018, a satellite-tracked Arctic fox migrated across sea ice from Svalbard to northeast Canada – but repeat journeys may soon be impossible as the poles warm

7h

After brain tumor radiation, more cognitive trouble for women

Young women who undergo radiation therapy to treat a pediatric brain tumor are more likely to suffer from long-term cognitive impairment than are male survivors, a new study reports. “Some of the survivors are doing quite well, going on to graduate degrees or medical school,” says Tricia King, professor of psychology and neuroscience at Georgia State University and senior author of the study in t

7h

A further step towards reliable quantum computation

A team of physicists introduces a novel technique to detect entanglement even in large-scale quantum systems with unprecedented efficiency. This brings scientists one step closer to the implementation of reliable quantum computation. The new results are of direct relevance for future generations of quantum devices.

7h

Cholesterol medication could invite diabetes, study suggests

A study of thousands of patients' health records found that those who were prescribed cholesterol-lowering statins had at least double the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The detailed analysis of health records and other data from patients in a private insurance plan in the Midwest provides a real-world picture of how efforts to reduce heart disease may be contributing to another major medical

7h

7h

New Google Drive Beta Brings Full Offline File Access In Chrome

Google's G Suite has been around for a long time now, and one of the things that users have wanted since its inception was an offline mode. Google has now announced that users can work anywhere …

7h

New membrane efficiently separates mirrored molecules

Prof. Liu Bo and colleagues at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) have developed a chiral separation membrane capable of capturing left-handed chiral molecules and releasing the right-handed counterpart using two-dimensional layered materials. The chiral membrane, showing a separation efficiency up to 89% towards limonene racemate, is expected to be put into industrial produc

7h

Ingeniøren, der så Danmarks potentiale som industriland

PLUS. Alexander Foss’ visioner lever videre i den fond, der i 1919 blev stiftet i hans navn, og som stadig støtter de gode ideer.

7h

Video games offer clues to help curb animal disease outbreaks

Strengthening biosecurity is widely considered the best strategy to reduce the devastating impact of disease outbreaks in the multi-billion-dollar global swine industry, but successfully doing so all comes down to human decision-making, a University of Vermont study shows.

7h

Video games offer clues to help curb animal disease outbreaks

Strengthening biosecurity is widely considered the best strategy to reduce the devastating impact of disease outbreaks in the multi-billion-dollar global swine industry, but successfully doing so all comes down to human decision-making, a University of Vermont study shows.

8h

Dung beetles get wind

Researchers have shown for the first time that these insects use different directional sensors to achieve the highest possible navigational precision in different conditions.

8h

Goat milk kefir is proven to be good for your health

A University of Cordoba research team, for the first time, applied a protein identification technique to this product on a massive scale and found activity of healthy compounds

8h

Distinct clinical profiles of Huntington's disease can be associated with two specific neural signature

Researchers from the Cognition and Brain plasticity group of Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro), with the collaboration of Radboud University in the Netherlands, have identified two specific patterns of cerebral disorders underlying two clinical profiles of Huntington's disease. The study, published in 'Neur

8h

An ion channel with a doorkeeper: The pH of calcium ions controls ion channel opening

Ion channels are pores in the membrane of cells or cell organelles that allow ions to be transported across the membrane. Biochemists have now succeeded in imaging an important regulatory region of the human TRPML2 calcium ion channel at high resolution, an area of the channel shaped like a large ring on one side of the membrane. This ring acts like a doorman, deciding whether ions can move throug

8h

Researchers block protein that plays a key role in Alzheimer's disease

The researchers have carried out genetic studies that show that certain mutations of the gene of Galectin-3 are associated with a higher risk of suffering from Alzheimer's. In their work, they have shown how the activated microglia release galectin-3 in response to the fibrous form of the Amyloid beta peptide, so playing an essential regulatory role in the activation of the microglia.

8h

The Quixotic Quest to Birth a Baby Northern White Rhino

Humans drove northern white rhinos to functional extinction. Now human fertility tech may pull the species back from the brink.

8h

Blodprov i primärvården kan upptäcka Alzheimer

Det forskare från Lunds universitet som tillsammans med ett läkemedelsföretag utvecklat blodmarkören, som kan upptäcka om en person har Alzheimers sjukdom eller inte. Om metoden de använt godkänns för klinisk användning hoppas forskarna att den på sikt kan användas som diagnostiskt verktyg inom primärvården. I dag diagnosticeras Alzheimers sjukdom med hjälp av att identifiera ämnet beta-amyloid,

8h

Can Neurodiversity Defeat Doublethink?

Steve Silberman, the author of NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity , once observed that many people with autism “have been ignored and shunted to the margins of society, and condemned as weird, insane, or worse.” But the idea that they have valuable insights “not in spite of their autism but because of it is gaining ground as part of a global movement to honor neuro

8h

Trauma of Australia’s Indigenous ‘Stolen Generations’ is still affecting children today

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01948-3 A report shows that children living with adults who were forcibly separated from their families are more likely to face a host of challenges.

8h

China organ transplant claims raise alarm about research

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01890-4 Researchers hope the conclusions of a people’s tribunal will pressure journals to reject papers that might include data from unethical transplants.

8h

Artificial intelligence could be 'game changer' in detecting, managing Alzheimer's disease

Could artificial intelligence be the solution for detecting and managing a complex condition like Alzheimer's disease? A team of researchers thinks so. They employed a novel application of supervised machine learning and predictive modeling to demonstrate and validate the cross-sectional utility of MemTrax as a clinical decision support screening tool for assessing cognitive impairment. They intro

8h

How trees affect the weather

New research find that some plants and trees are prolific spendthrifts in drought conditions — 'spending' precious soil water to cool themselves and, in the process, making droughts more intense.

8h

Americans overestimate income for children from wealthy families

Americans overestimate the future income for children from wealthy and middle-income families, but underestimate that for children from poor ones, finds a new study.

8h

Big city growth escalates the urban-rural divide

Microdata from Swedish population registers provide new insights into cities' economic growth paths. The data reveal a surge in regional inequality, with more and more resources flowing to cities atop the urban hierarchy, which thus acquire an increasing share of national wealth.

8h

Monarch butterflies bred in captivity may lose the ability to migrate, study finds

Monarch butterflies purchased from a commercial breeder did not fly in a southward direction, even in offspring raised outdoors, in a new study.

8h

Engineering enzymes to turn plant waste into sustainable products

A new family of enzymes has been engineered to perform one of the most important steps in the conversion of plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics and chemicals.

8h

Widely available antibiotics could be used in the treatment of 'superbug' MRSA

Some MRSA infections could be tackled using widely-available antibiotics, suggests new research from an international collaboration.

8h

Habitat loss linked to global emergence of infectious diseases

New research may provide the foundation for new scientific studies looking into the association of habitat loss and the global emergence of infectious diseases.

8h

Survivors of childhood brain tumors experience lasting cognitive and socioeconomic burdens

Survivors of childhood brain tumors who received radiotherapy and were very young at the time of diagnosis may experience cognitive and socioeconomic burdens decades after treatment, according to a new study. Interventions such as cognitive therapies and educational and occupational services may be needed to mitigate such long-term effects.

8h

Review emphasizes the power of simple physical models for complex protein machines

The living cell can be viewed as a factory where protein machines are in charge of various processes, such as transport of material inside the cell or operations with other macromolecules like DNA. Their operation is typically fueled by ATP molecules, the major energy carrier in biological cells. The chemical energy gained through ATP hydrolysis is used by a protein machine to cyclically change it

8h

Research team studies binaries to make heads or tails of planet formation

A Southwest Research Institute-led team studied the orientation of distant solar system bodies to bolster the "streaming instability" theory of planet formation.

8h

Bombardier sells regional jet division to Mitsubishi for $550 mn

Canadian manufacturer Bombardier announced Tuesday the sale of its CRJ Series regional jet program to Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) for US$550 million, effectively exiting the commercial passenger aircraft sector.

8h

Tidal tails detected around dwarf galaxy DDO 44

By conducting deep, wide-area imaging survey of the galaxy NGC 2403 and its environment, including the dwarf satellite galaxy DDO 44, astronomers have detected tidal tails emanating from the dwarf. The finding, presented in a paper published June 19, could shed more light on the interactions between galaxies and their satellites.

8h

SpaceX Aces Falcon Heavy Launch, Despite Booster Explosion

Blast Off SpaceX’s groundbreaking Falcon Heavy rocket — currently the most powerful operating rocket in the world — launched successfully from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 2:30 am ET, marking the third launch of its kind. And almost everything went according to plan as the ground crews cheered. But not all three reusable rocket boosters stuck the landing. The center booster just missed

8h

A further step towards reliable quantum computation

A team of physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences introduces a novel technique to detect entanglement even in large-scale quantum systems with unprecedented efficiency. This brings scientists one step closer to the implementation of reliable quantum computation. The new results are of direct relevance for future generations of quantum devices and are published

8h

Santorini volcano, a new terrestrial analogue of Mars

One of the great attractions of the island of Santorini, in Greece, lies in its spectacular volcanic landscape, which also contains places similar to those of Mars. A team of European and U.S. scientists has discovered it after analysing basaltic rocks collected in one of its coves.

8h

New membrane efficiently separates mirrored molecules

Prof. LIU Bo and colleagues at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) have developed a chiral separation membrane capable of capturing left-handed chiral molecules and releasing right-handed counterpart using two-dimensional layered materials. The chiral membrane, showing a separation efficiency up to 89% towards limonene racemate, is expected to be put into industrial production

8h

Researchers model how octopus arms make decisions (+ video)

Researchers studying the behavior and neuroscience of octopuses have long suspected that the animals' arms may have minds of their own. A new model being presented at the 2019 Astrobiology Science Conference, co-hosted by AGU and NASA, is the first attempt at a comprehensive representation of information flow between the octopus's suckers, arms and brain, based on previous research in octopus neur

8h

Lifelong ill-health after exposure to chemical weapons

People exposed to chemical warfare agents (CWAs) often incur chronic damage to their lungs, skin and eyes, for example. They also frequently succumb to depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts. This is shown by research on survivors from the 1988 gas attacks against Kurdish Halabja in Iraq.

8h

Video games offer clues to help curb animal disease outbreaks

As Asia and Europe battle African swine fever outbreaks, UVM research shows how farmers' risk attitudes affect the spread of infectious animal diseases and offers a first-of-its kind model for testing disease control and prevention strategies. Getting just 10% of risk tolerant farmers to adopt biosecurity measures resulted in a significant reduction of disease, but keeping the disease under contro

8h

Artificial intelligence improves heart attack risk assessment

When used with a common heart scan, machine learning (ML), a type of artificial intelligence, does better than conventional risk models at predicting heart attacks and other cardiac events, according to a new study.

8h

Bad weather causing 'catastrophic' French honey harvest

Alarmed French beekeepers and farming groups warned Tuesday of a "catastrophic" honey harvest this year due to adverse weather.

8h

Court faults France in key air pollution case

A court on Tuesday found the French state had failed to take sufficient steps to limit air pollution around Paris, following a complaint by a mother and daughter that their health had been harmed.

8h

Desert going green

A bird’s eye view of a massive project for change.

8h

Cooperation arises in biological systems, as long as it’s forced

Research finds a fundamental link between enforcement and the suppression of selfish behaviour. Stephen Fleischfresser reports.

8h

Planets covered in water may be more common than we thought

The question remains as to whether they are habitable. Richard A Lovett reports.

8h

Bad weather causing 'catastrophic' French honey harvest

Alarmed French beekeepers and farming groups warned Tuesday of a "catastrophic" honey harvest this year due to adverse weather.

8h

Livslång ohälsa efter exponering för kemiska vapen

– Resultatet visar att exponering för kemiska stridsmedel, framför allt senapsgas, leder till livslång fysisk och psykisk ohälsa, konstaterar Faraidoun Moradi, doktorand inom arbets- och miljömedicin vid Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet. Senapsgas och andra kemiska vapen är fortfarande ett hot mot människors säkerhet, och det finns i dag tiotusentals patienter, främst i Mellanöstern, s

8h

Engineering enzymes to turn plant waste into sustainable products

A new family of enzymes has been engineered to perform one of the most important steps in the conversion of plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics and chemicals.

8h

Drone takes to the skies to image offshore reefs

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01988-9 Scientists are using uncrewed aircraft to map the topography of Guam’s coral reefs.

8h

How the dragon got its frill

The frilled dragon exhibits a distinctive large erectile ruff. Researchers report that an ancestral embryonic gill of the dragon embryo turns into a neck pocket that expands and folds, forming the frill. They demonstrate that this robust folding pattern emerges from mechanical forces during the homogeneous growth of the frill skin, due to the tensions resulting from its attachment to the neck and

8h

Sugary drink taxes reduce consumption, major review shows

A 10 per cent tax on sugary drinks has cut the purchase and consumption of sugary drinks by an average of 10 per cent in places it has been introduced, a just published major review has found.

8h

Could coffee be the secret to fighting obesity?

Scientists have discovered that drinking a cup of coffee can stimulate 'brown fat', the body's own fat-fighting defenses, which could be the key to tackling obesity and diabetes.

8h

Branching out: Making graphene from gum trees

Researchers have developed a cost-effective and eco-friendly way of producing graphene using one of Australia's most abundant resources, eucalyptus trees.

8h

Molecular scissors stabilize the cell's cytoskeleton

Researchers have for the first time elucidated the structure of important enzymes in human cells that alter essential building blocks of the cellular cytoskeleton. This reveals the missing part of a cycle that regulates the build-up or breakdown of supporting elements of the cell. The enzymes investigated work as molecular scissors and can be involved in the development of various diseases, for ex

8h

Performance-enhancing bacteria found in the microbiomes of elite athletes

New research has identified a type of bacteria found in the microbiomes of elite athletes that contributes to improved capacity for exercise. These bacteria, members of the genus Veillonella, are not found in the guts of sedentary people.

8h

Red dwarf stars 'too young' to host ET planets

Hypothesis links chances of complex life to stellar mass. Andrew Masterson reports.

8h

Thanks to AI, we know we can teleport qubits in the real world

Deep learning shows its worth in the word of quantum computing. Gabriella Bernardi reports.

8h

Blow-ins: wind responsible for UK insect invasion

The arrival of a ladybird plague in England might not be because of human activity, researchers suggest. Andrew Masterson reports.

8h

In the wake of Chernobyl, plants thrive.

Why is plant life so resilient to radiation and nuclear disaster? Stuart Thompson from the UK’s University of Westminster explains.

8h

Exposure to air pollution in India is associated with more hypertension in women

The CHAI project assessed the link between fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and black carbon and blood pressure in over 5,500 people living in a peri-urban area near Hyderabad city

8h

HKBU discovers mechanisms underlying early life stress and irritable bowel syndrome

Researchers from Hong Kong Baptist University have found that the abnormal rise of a soluble protein called Nerve Growth Factor is a key factor linking early life stress to the development of irritable bowel syndrome.

8h

(Not only) the wind shows the way

When the South African dung beetle rolls its dung ball through the savannah, it must know the way as precisely as possible. Scientists have now discovered that it does not orient itself solely on the position of the sun.

8h

Intelligent testing could save lives by defusing ticking time bomb of liver disease

An innovation in liver function testing could detect liver disease decades before it becomes fatal.

8h

Mice with a human immune system help research into cancer and infections

Researchers from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital have succeeded in using mice with a transplanted human immune system to study functions in the immune system which are otherwise particularly difficult to study. The method could turn out to be important in further research into e.g. cancer, HIV and autoimmune diseases.

8h

Sometimes, a non-invasive procedure will suffice

When a patient complains about chest pain, diagnosis will usually involve catheter angiography to evaluate the adequacy of blood supply to the heart. Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have now established that, in certain cases, the diagnostic reliability of non-invasive coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is as good as that of coronary angiography – thereby dispensin

8h

Genome study reveals history of European potato

A team of researchers from Germany, Peru, the U.K. and Spain has sequenced a large number of potato varieties to learn more about the history of the modern European potato. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the group describes their study of the history of the potato and what they found.

8h

How Facebook’s New ‘Mirror World’ Will Help Train AI

The dream of a robot butler seems tantalizingly close, but first we need to teach them how to navigate our cluttered human environments. That’s why Facebook has created an ultra-realistic simulator to train AI to carry out our bidding in a variety of indoor settings. Virtual environments from Atari videogames to self-driving car simulators have emerged as a leading tool for teaching machines how

8h

Q&A: Myth Debunkers Take Aim at Microbiology Lore

University of Michigan’s Ada Hagan separates fact from fiction, such as whether you should starve a fever or if eating chocolate really causes acne.

8h

As Europe starts to bake, governments step in

As Europe started to sizzle Tuesday at the start of a heatwave that could break records, drivers on Germany's famously-speedy motorways were ordered to slow down and fans at the women's World Cup were showered in health warnings.

8h

Genome study reveals history of European potato

A team of researchers from Germany, Peru, the U.K. and Spain has sequenced a large number of potato varieties to learn more about the history of the modern European potato. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the group describes their study of the history of the potato and what they found.

8h

Start-up develops maintenance-free, evergreen moss façades for a better climate in cities

Air pollution is increasing in many cities. It is also getting warmer and warmer and flooding occurs during heavy rain because the surfaces are sealed. Therefore, new concepts are needed to ensure that cities remain livable for their inhabitants, including more green spaces that ensure a pleasant climate and keep the air clean. The greening of façades is also important. A start-up of Technische Un

8h

UK car sector warns of £70m daily cost on Brexit no-deal

A no-deal Brexit could cost UK-based carmakers up to £70 million ($89 million, 78 million euros) daily through delays to production, the country's auto sector warned Tuesday.

8h

Puppy love: Choosing the perfect pooch poses challenges similar to dating

Psychologists at Indiana University who study how people pick their spouses have turned their attention to another important relationship: choosing a canine companion.

8h

Setting the standard for machine learning

The microcomputer revolution of the 1970s triggered a Wild West-like expansion of personal computers in the 1980s. Over the course of the decade, dozens of personal computing devices, from Atari to Xerox Alto, flooded into the market. CPUs and microprocessors advanced rapidly, with new generations coming out on a monthly basis.

8h

Christie’s Scathing Indictment

Former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie wants to be clear: He supports Donald J. Trump. But don’t you dare presume that he supports what Trump says or does . Sure, he voted for Trump in 2016, but only reluctantly. And okay, he plans to vote for Trump again in 2020. But he’s adamantly opposed to many of the most consequential actions Trump has taken as president. He’ll even say so in public. Doe

8h

How a Dutch university aims to boost gender parity

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01998-7 Female applicants will receive priority consideration for faculty positions at Eindhoven University of Technology for at least 18 months.

8h

Arctic at risk from vast Belt and Road development

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01977-y Arctic at risk from vast Belt and Road development

8h

Air pollution: a global problem needs local fixes

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01960-7 Researchers must find the particles that are most dangerous to health in each place so policies can reduce levels of those pollutants first, urge Xiangdong Li and colleagues.

8h

Forests: questioning carbon stores after restoration

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01975-0 Forests: questioning carbon stores after restoration

8h

Racism in science: the taint that lingers

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01968-z Angela Saini’s book indicts a destructive bias in research, writes Robin G. Nelson.

8h

Turning discarded DNA into ecology gold

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01987-w Ecologists are monitoring biodiversity using DNA shed by wildlife into the environment.

8h

From the archive

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01966-1 How Nature reported the first occurrence of paralytic shellfish poisoning in Britain in 1969, and a discussion in 1919 of how human nervous systems contain features of much older nervous systems.

8h

The reality behind solar power’s next star material

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01985-y Companies say they are close to commercializing cheap perovskite films that could disrupt solar power — but are they too optimistic?

8h

James Lovelock at 100: the Gaia saga continues

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01969-y Tim Radford reassesses the independent scientist’s groundbreaking body of writing.

8h

Tracking the precession of single nuclear spins by weak measurements

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1334-9 Periodic weak measurements of just a few carbon-13 nuclear spins in diamond demonstrate sensitive, high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at the molecular level.

8h

Iranian biologists face US trial for trying to take proteins out of the country

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01901-4 At issue is whether growth factors are exempt from export restrictions; a judge will soon decide whether to continue to trial.

8h

Chinese agriculture minister to head UN food agency

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01991-0 Qu Dongyu says that he will prioritize improving farming in tropical and drought-stricken countries.

8h

Volcano’s magma hit top speed

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01980-3 Volcanologists might need to update their ideas about how molten rock travels from deep within Earth to erupt at the surface.

8h

Daily briefing: Why Switzerland is the best place to lose your wallet

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01992-z People return wallets — especially if there’s money inside (and especially in Switzerland). Plus: Mars rover detects ‘excitingly huge’ methane spike and climate change is undermining the reliability of hydropower.

8h

Puppy love: Choosing the perfect pooch poses challenges similar to dating

Psychologists at Indiana University who study how people pick their spouses have turned their attention to another important relationship: choosing a canine companion.

8h

Public opinion on wrongful convictions swayed by entertainment series, study finds

Americans are hooked on the Netflix series When They See Us, which reconstructs the true story of five Harlem teens falsely accused of a brutal crime.

8h

You Can Own a 90 Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Tooth for Less Than a Pair of AirPods

Dinosaur bones are always the main attraction at natural history museums, and it’s not hard to understand why. Even if most of them did have feathers , dinosaurs are still awesome. Massive, ferocious, and millions of years old, they inspire more childlike wonder than any other creatures in the history of the planet. And now you can actually own your very own spinosaurus tooth because of the dinos

8h

Småfiskar löser Darwins paradox

Mangroveträsk och sjögräsängar fungerar som yngelkammare för de korallevande fiskarterna. Ynglen föds i korallreven men växer upp i dessa skyddade miljöer – och återvänder till reven när de blivit vuxna. Nu har ett internationellt forskarteam visat att en fiskgrupp avviker från det här mönstret. Det rör sig om mängder av pyttesmå bottenlevande arter, bland annat smörbultar. Deras yngel stannar i r

8h

FedEx sues US over mandate to monitor Huawei shipments

FedEx has already been accused of diverting Huawei's shipments, and it's not keen on dealing with more complaints. The courier has sued the US Commerce Department (including …

8h

The Lightyear One EV adds solar power to radical efficiency – Roadshow

The Dutch company's first effort looks awesome, but will it be the next big electric car?

8h

How icy outer solar system satellites may have formed

Beyond the orbit of the planet Neptune, there are a multitude of icy and rocky small bodies, smaller than planets but larger than comets. These likely formed at the same time as the Solar System, and understanding their origin could provide important clues as to how the entire Solar System originated. Using sophisticated computer simulations and observations of TNOs, astronomers have shown how the

8h

Fake news 'vaccine' works: 'Pre-bunking' game reduces susceptibility to disinformation

Study of thousands of players shows a simple online game works like a 'vaccine,' increasing skepticism of fake news by giving people a 'weak dose' of the methods behind disinformation.

8h

Why money cannot 'buy' housework

If a man is handy with the vacuum cleaner, isn't averse to rustling up a lush family meal most nights after he's put on the washing machine having popped into the supermarket on his way home then it's more than likely his partner will have her own bank account. A new study reveals the way in which couples manage their money tells 'a tale of two marriages' in the UK today.

8h

Ant farmers boost plant nutrition

Research has demonstrated that millions of years of ant agriculture has remodeled plant physiology. Farming ants deposit nitrogen-rich feces directly inside plants, which has led to the evolution of these ultra-absorptive plant structures.

8h

New evidence on the reliability of climate modeling

For decades, scientists studying a key climate phenomenon have been grappling with contradictory data that have threated to undermine confidence in the reliability of climate models overall. A new study settles that debate with regard to the Hadley cell, a tropical atmospheric circulation widely studied by climate scientists because it controls precipitation in the subtropics and also creates a re

8h

Researcher shows physics suggests life could exist in a 2-D universe

James Scargill, a physicist at the University of California, has written a paper reporting that the laws of physics allow for the existence of a life-supporting two-dimensional universe. MIT's Technology Review has reviewed the paper and found that the work does show that such a 2+1 universe could exist.

8h

Scientist develops novel algorithm to aid search for exoplanets

Inspired by movie streaming services such as Netflix or Hulu, a Southwest Research Institute scientist developed a technique to look for stars likely to host giant, Jupiter-sized planets outside of our solar system. She developed an algorithm to identify stars likely to host giant exoplanets, based on the composition of stars known to have planets.

8h

Stem cells moonlight to protect the stomach from bacterial invaders

Our mucosal surfaces are constantly exposed to numerous bacterial species, some of which can induce DNA damage in host cells. Normally this remains inconsequential, as the rapid turnover of the mucosa means damaged cells are shed within days. However, if the long-lived stem cells that continually give rise to new replacement cells receive damage it could lead to the development of cancer. Research

8h

Engineers automate science from remote Antarctic station

A remote and unoccupied research station in Antarctica has, for the first time, collected important scientific measurements of climate, ozone and space weather thanks to ground-breaking technology developed by British Antarctic Survey's (BAS) engineers.

8h

Stem cells moonlight to protect the stomach from bacterial invaders

Our mucosal surfaces are constantly exposed to numerous bacterial species, some of which can induce DNA damage in host cells. Normally this remains inconsequential, as the rapid turnover of the mucosa means damaged cells are shed within days. However, if the long-lived stem cells that continually give rise to new replacement cells receive damage it could lead to the development of cancer. Research

8h

FBI Investigating uBiome’s Billing Practices

FBI Probe The FBI is currently investigating the billing practices of the medical testing startup uBiome Inc, as evidence has emerged that the company has been tweaking bills and records in order to get more payments out of medical insurers. Typically, medical bills sent to insurers will rely on a system of codes for patient diagnoses and the services that were rendered. The Wall Street Journal r

8h

Conceptual model can explain how thunderstorm clouds bunch together

Understanding how the weather and climate change is one of the most important challenges in science today. A new theoretical study from associate professor, Jan Härter, at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, presents a new mechanism for the self-aggregation of storm clouds, a phenomenon, by which storm clouds bunch together in dense clusters. The researcher used methods from comple

9h

Review emphasizes the power of simple physical models for complex protein machines

The function of protein machines in biological cells is so complex that even supercomputers cannot predict their cycles at atomic detail. But, as demonstrated in this review article, many aspects of their operation at mesoscales can be already revealed by exploring simple mechanical models, amenable for simulations on common computers. The authors also show how artificial protein-like structures w

9h

Workers who are unpaid caregivers of older relatives struggle with unmet workplace needs

People who care for elderly parents outside of their full-time jobs — and are unpaid for it — experience considerable disruption of their workplace routines. Many are not getting employer support because it is not offered or because they do not feel able to use it, even if it is available, a Baylor University study found.

9h

Preconceptional and prenatal exposure to paternal smoking affects semen quality of adult sons

The adverse effect of maternal smoking during pregnancy is well established and associated with several negative neonatal outcomes (such as low birth weight and preterm birth). It is also evident in some studies that the semen quality of men exposed to prenatal maternal smoking is generally more impaired than that of unexposed men. However, there is little known about the effect of paternal smokin

9h

Nuclear medicine PSMA-targeted study offers new options for cancer theranostics worldwide

Research presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) describes a new class of radiopharmaceuticals, named radiohybrids (rh), that offer a fresh perspective on cancer imaging and radioligand therapy (theranostics). In addition, the technology encompasses a highly innovative and efficient isotopic labelling method to facilitate broad applicat

9h

NYC park study compares crime reports, kids' park use

The more crime reported in the neighborhood, the fewer elementary-age kids play in New York City parks—especially girls. That's the finding of a recent study that compared park use with police reports made one week, one month and three months beforehand in low-income communities surrounding 20 public parks.

9h

Creating community, battling loneliness among LGBTQ seniors

Research shows that LGBTQ older adults are at higher risk for many chronic medical conditions, yet are also resilient and proactive when it comes to taking care of their health.

9h

Analyzing the tweets of Republicans and Democrats

New Stanford linguistics research has analyzed how Republicans and Democrats use different language when discussing mass shootings on social media and found that Republicans talk more about the shooter and Democrats focus more on the victims.

9h

Elektrisk fly fra Israel blev darling på verdens største flymesse

Eviation forventer, at det elektriske fly Alice flyver for første gang før året er slut. Filosofien bag er, at selv om det vil tage år før store passagerfly kan flyve på batterier, kan mindre også gøre det.

9h

The Two Technologies Changing the Future of Cancer Treatment

Chemotherapy is the most widely known and widely successful treatment for cancer in medical history, but it’s also infamous for its side effects. For millions of people, surviving cancer means hair loss, months of nausea, drastic weight loss, and extreme fatigue, among many other bodily reactions that can make the treatment process brutal. While speaking on a panel at Aspen Ideas: Health, co-host

9h

Crop pests more widespread than previously known

Insects and diseases that damage crops are probably present in many places thought to be free of them, new research shows.

9h

Designing light-harvesting organic semiconductor microcrystals with wavelength-tunable lasers

Organic solid-state lasers are essential for photonic applications, but current-driven lasers are a great challenge to develop in applied physics and materials science. While it is possible to create charge transfer complexes (i.e. electron-donor-acceptor complexes among two/more molecules or across a large molecule) with p-/n- type organic semiconductors in electrically pumped lasers, the existin

9h

Hugh, me and everybody: Join the war on plastic pollution

Last night saw the final installment of War on Plastic with Hugh and Anita on BBC One, featuring Fauna & Flora International (FFI) vice-president Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, which has once again got the nation talking about our plastic footprint.

9h

Få overblikket i Rigspolitiets teleskandale

For omkring en uge siden kom det frem, at Rigspolitiet i flere år kan have leveret mangelfulde og fejlbehæftede teleoplysninger brug for retssager. En uge senere er der stadig mange spørgsmål, som er ubesvarede.

9h

Countdown to NATO space strategy

NATO will launch its first strategy for space this week as the alliance heads beyond the skies to defend against the likes of China and Russia.

9h

How Libra could hasten Facebook's demise

When Mark Zuckerberg was five years old in 1989, two dominant players in telecommunications made a big announcement.

9h

What is surveillance capitalism and how does it shape our economy?

I recently purchased a bedroom bundle (mattress, bed base, pillows and sheets) from a well known Australian startup for my son, who has flown the nest. Now I'm swamped with Google and Facebook ads for beds and bedding. The week before it was puffer jackets.

9h

Climate change puts health at risk and economists have the right prescription

Doctors and economists may seem like strange partners. We spend our days working on very different problems in very different settings. But climate change has injected a common and urgent vocabulary into our work. We find ourselves agreeing both about the nature of the problem and the best solution. It's essential that we put a price on carbon pollution.

9h

Santorini volcano, a new terrestrial analogue of Mars

The Greek island of Santorini is now one of the most popular tourist destinations in the Mediterranean, but 3,600 years ago it suffered one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history. Among the material that was exposed, scientists have now found rocks similar to those of Mars.

9h

BMW vows to rev up electric car rollout

German high-end carmaker BMW said Tuesday it would accelerate its plans to build new electric models, as the whole industry comes under pressure to meet strict emissions regulations.

9h

SpaceX launches hefty rocket with 24 satellites

SpaceX launched its heftiest rocket with 24 research satellites Tuesday, a middle-of-the-night rideshare featuring a deep space atomic clock, solar sail, a clean and green rocket fuel testbed, and even human ashes.

9h

Blood test predicts stroke risk in patients with diabetes

A blood test in patients with diabetes reveals how levels of a protein associated with brain cell death could predict the risk of a future stroke.

9h

No cell is an island

In a new study, published on June 25, 2019, in the journal eLife, the researchers report that higher levels of doublets — long dismissed as technical artifacts — can be found in people with severe cases of tuberculosis or dengue fever.

9h

Study in nutrients shows important role choline and DHA play in infant brain and eye health

Pharmavite LLC, the makers of Nature Made vitamins, minerals and supplements, announced the publication of a review paper in the May issue of the journal Nutrients, highlighting current research into the roles of choline and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in maternal and infant nutrition.

9h

Star tours

Astronomers have a new tool in their search for extraterrestrial life — a sophisticated bot that helps identify stars hosting planets similar to Jupiter and Saturn.

9h

Artificial intelligence could be 'game changer' in detecting, managing Alzheimer's disease

Could artificial intelligence be the solution for detecting and managing a complex condition like Alzheimer's disease? A team of researchers thinks so. They employed a novel application of supervised machine learning and predictive modeling to demonstrate and validate the cross-sectional utility of MemTrax as a clinical decision support screening tool for assessing cognitive impairment. They intro

9h

Women exposed to common antibacterial chemical more likely to break a bone

Women exposed to triclosan are more likely to develop osteoporosis, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

9h

Sugary drink taxes reduce consumption, major review shows

A 10 per cent tax on sugary drinks has cut the purchase and consumption of sugary drinks by an average of 10 per cent in places it has been introduced, a just published major review has found.

9h

Researching While Chinese

One of my basic principles is that “Just because you can mess things up by going in one direction doesn’t mean that you can’t mess them up by doing the opposite”. And we may be proving that one again, with this example being the position of Chinese researchers in the US. I will stipulate up front that Chinese industrial espionage in the US is a real thing – some of it free-lancing by people wanti

9h

LightSail 2 Launches to Space to Soar on the Power of Sunshine

The Planetary Society's second solar sail will attempt to use sunlight to fly through space

9h

What the U.S. Medical System Can Learn From Estonia

The scene: a doctor’s office. You: frustrated, on your lunch break from work, just wanting to get in and get out. It’s probably not your first visit to that provider. It might not even be your second or third. And yet there you are, filling out byzantine papers attached to a clipboard, promising to pay if your insurance doesn’t, providing your Social Security number for the kajillionth time, and

9h

Identifying a fake picture online is harder than you might think

It can be hard to tell whether a picture is real. Consider, as the participants in our recent research did, these two images and see whether you think neither, either or both of them has been doctored.

9h

Dung beetles use wind compass when the sun is high

Researchers have shown for the first time that an animal uses different directional sensors to achieve the highest possible navigational precision in different conditions. When the sun is high, dung beetles navigate using the wind.

9h

Dung beetles use wind compass when the sun is high

Researchers have shown for the first time that an animal uses different directional sensors to achieve the highest possible navigational precision in different conditions. When the sun is high, dung beetles navigate using the wind.

9h

The pH of calcium ions controls ion channel opening

Ion channels are pores in the membrane of cells or cell organelles. They allow positively or negatively charged particles, so-called ions, to be transported across the membrane. Biochemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have now succeeded in imaging an important regulatory region of the human TRPML2 calcium ion channel at high resolution, an area of the channel shaped like a large r

9h

Testing designed carbon materials to purify wastewater

Waste streams from industry and agriculture could be used for the production of coal that can serve as a cheap adsorbent for water purification. In her thesis at the Industrial Doctoral School, Mirva Niinipuu demonstrates that the capacity of carbon materials to separate organic water pollution was generally low, but that they have potential for improvement. She defended her thesis at Umeå Univers

9h

Circular cities of the world: What can green infrastructure do?

More than half of the world's population currently lives in cities while projections show an increase to two thirds by 2050. Many people living in small areas means large amounts of waste, high resource consumption and loads of energy use. We can combat these issues with the ideas behind the circular economy.

9h

How the dragon got its frill

The frilled dragon exhibits a distinctive large erectile ruff. This lizard usually keeps the frill folded back against its body, but can spread it as a spectacular display to scare off predators. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, and the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics report in the journal eLife that an ancestral embryonic gill of the dragon embryo turns into a n

9h

The pH of calcium ions controls ion channel opening

Ion channels are pores in the membrane of cells or cell organelles. They allow positively or negatively charged particles, so-called ions, to be transported across the membrane. Biochemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have now succeeded in imaging an important regulatory region of the human TRPML2 calcium ion channel at high resolution, an area of the channel shaped like a large r

9h

How the dragon got its frill

The frilled dragon exhibits a distinctive large erectile ruff. This lizard usually keeps the frill folded back against its body, but can spread it as a spectacular display to scare off predators. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, and the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics report in the journal eLife that an ancestral embryonic gill of the dragon embryo turns into a n

9h

Your unique screams can identify you

Human screams convey a level of individual identity that may help explain their evolutionary origins, according to a new study. The research shows that listeners can correctly identify whether the same person or two different people produced pairs of screams—a critical prerequisite to individual recognition. “Our findings add to our understanding of how screams are evolutionarily important,” says

9h

Stor spridning av multiresistenta tarmbakterier på sjukhusen i Vietnam

– Vi ser att det är en stor spridning av multiresistenta tarmbakterier på Vietnamesiska sjukhus. Ju längre patienterna är inlagda på sjukhus, desto större är risken att de smittas av tarmbakterier som är karbapenemresistenta, säger Håkan Hanberger, professor vid Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin vid Linköpings universitet och överläkare vid Infektionskliniken vid Universitetssju

9h

Boosting light-based computing

University of Twente spinoff company QuiX is currently developing a photonic chip using the quantum properties of light for carrying out complex calculations. The new chip, of which a first version is already operational, calculates using light, photons, and will be an attractive platform for discovering the potential of quantum computing and for experimenting with new ways of calculating. Further

9h

New findings could lead to cheaper solar cells

At the atomic scale materials can show a rich palette of dynamic behaviour, which directly affects the physical properties of these materials. For many years, it has been a dream to describe these dynamics in complex materials at various temperatures using computer simulations. Physicists of the University of Vienna have developed an on-the-fly machine-learning method that enables such calculation

9h

Evidence of capuchin monkeys using tools 3000 years ago

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Brazil and the U.K., has found evidence of capuchin monkeys using stone tools as far back as 3,000 years ago. In their paper published in Nature Ecology and Evolution, the group describes the archaeological dig they carried out and the stone tool artifacts they found.

9h

Physics Tricks to Make Steph Curry's Golf Show More Extreme

*Holey Moley* forces mini-golfers to surmount an obstacle course to win. But the options for physics-inspired golf stunts are endless—here are a few ideas.

9h

Doctors to ‘step inside’ biopsy samples with VR

Researchers are pairing a nanoscale imaging technique with virtual reality technology to offer a way for researchers to “step inside” biological data. By combining the technique, called expansion microscopy, with virtual reality (VR), scientists will be able to enlarge, explore, and analyze cell structures far beyond the capabilities of traditional light microscopy. The development of these techn

9h

Competitive rivalry in Facebook messaging not such a bad thing

Research at the University of York has shown that brands that "take on" their competitors in Facebook posts are more likely to get higher engagement rates.

9h

MUSE reveals a glowing ring of light in the distant universe

The MUSE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile has revealed very detailed halos of neutral hydrogen around distant galaxies. A new result zooms on a few such halos, one of them forming a large, almost-complete ring of light. This result will be presented by Adélaïde Claeyssens (Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon—CRAL UMR5574) at the annual meeting of the European Astronomical So

9h

In search of an undersea kelp forest's missing nitrogen

Plants need nutrients to grow. So scientists were surprised to learn that giant kelp maintains its impressive growth rates year-round, even in summer and early fall when ocean currents along the California coast stop delivering nutrients. Clearly something else is nourishing the kelp, but what?

9h

Strategy and structure breakdowns benefit companies during radical change

Breakdowns in the strategies and structures of companies undergoing radical change are valuable to organisations as they encourage reflection at all levels of management, according to new research published in the Academy of Management Journal.

9h

Part of the Pacific Ocean is not warming as expected, buy why?

State-of-the-art climate models predict that as a result of human-induced climate change, the surface of the Pacific Ocean should be warming—some parts more, some less, but all warming nonetheless. Indeed, most regions are acting as expected, with one key exception: what scientists call the equatorial cold tongue. This is a strip of relatively cool water stretching along the equator from Peru into

9h

Kessler researchers explore social cognitive deficits in progressive multiple sclerosis

'This study is an important first step toward a better understanding of cognitive dysfunction in individuals with progressive MS,' said Dr. Genova. 'By examining both the cognitive and affective components of Theory of Mind, we found evidence for differential effects of progressive MS, similar to the effects reported for relapsing remitting MS, including the apparent sparing of affective ability.

9h

A Saturn V LEGO Set, a Moon Images Exhibit and New Science Books

Special Apollo 11–themed recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

In search of an undersea kelp forest's missing nitrogen

Plants need nutrients to grow. So scientists were surprised to learn that giant kelp maintains its impressive growth rates year-round, even in summer and early fall when ocean currents along the California coast stop delivering nutrients. Clearly something else is nourishing the kelp, but what?

9h

New rapid test diagnoses pneumonia and other lower respiratory infections

Scientists at UEA and the Quadram Institute have developed a new, rapid way of diagnosing lower respiratory tract infections that could improve patient care and control the spread of antimicrobial resistance.

9h

What the Iran Crisis Reveals About European Power

Donald Trump is forcing Europe to confront its own weakness. The U.S. president’s bellicose policy toward Iran has, until now, been met with an unusual unity of opposition from Europe’s big three powers, the U.K., France, and Germany, as well as from the European Union itself. And yet, despite their combined economic weight and presence on the world stage, Europe’s principal players have proved l

9h

New rapid test diagnoses pneumonia and other lower respiratory infections

Scientists at UEA and the Quadram Institute have developed a new, rapid way of diagnosing lower respiratory tract infections that could improve patient care and control the spread of antimicrobial resistance.

9h

A better way to encapsulate islet cells for diabetes treatment

When medical devices are implanted in the body, the immune system often attacks them, producing scar tissue around the device. This buildup of tissue, known as fibrosis, can interfere with the device's function.

9h

Volcano Raikoke spits ash over Bering Sea

An unexpected and powerful eruption started at Raikoke volcano in the Kuril Islands on 21 June 2019. This image, which was captured on 22 June, shows the brown ash plumes rising high above the dense clouds—drifting eastwards over the North Pacific Ocean.

9h

Research resets timeline for life on Mars

Western researchers, leading an international team, have shown that the first 'real chance' of Mars developing life started early, 4.48 billion years ago, when giant, life-inhibiting meteorites stopped striking the Red Planet. The findings not only clarify possibilities for Earth's nearest neighbour, but may reset the timeline for life on our home planet, as well.

9h

Scientists Capture First Footage of Giant Squid in US Waters

Researchers have captured the second giant squid video ever, and the first to be recorded in US waters. The post Scientists Capture First Footage of Giant Squid in US Waters appeared first on ExtremeTech .

9h

We probed Santorini's volcano with sound to learn what's going on beneath the surface

The island of Santorini in the Mediterranean has attracted people for millennia. Today, it feels magical to watch the sun set from cliffs over the deep bay, surrounded by cobalt blue churches and whitewashed houses. This mystical place attracts about 2 million tourists per year, making it one of the top destinations in Greece.

9h

The ancient croc that preyed on dinosaurs

A new species of crocodile has been described from opalised fossils found at Lightning Ridge in NSW, Australia, from a fossil unearthed more than a century ago, and a second one found more than 70 years later.

9h

Atmospheric rivers getting warmer along U.S. West Coast

Most of the West Coast of the United States relies on a healthy winter snowpack to provide water through the dry summer months. But when precipitation falls as rain rather than snow, it can diminish summer water supplies, as well as trigger floods and landslides.

9h

BMW Motorrad Vision DC Roadster mimics a boxer but is actually electric – Roadshow

The flat-two engine is gone, and in its place is a bunch of batteries.

9h

For less than $200, engineering students built a realistic robotic fish

Mechanical engineering students challenged themselves to make a robotic fish that not only swims like a real fish, but looks the part too, demonstrating the possibilities inherent to soft robotics.

10h

Study shows how icy outer solar system satellites may have formed

Using sophisticated computer simulations and observations, a team led by researchers from the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) at Tokyo Institute of Technology has shown how the so-called trans-Neptunian objects (or TNOs) may have formed. TNOs, which include the dwarf planet Pluto, are a group of icy and rocky small bodies—smaller than planets, but larger than comets—that orbit the solar system

10h

Researchers identify genes linked to sex differentiation in giant Amazon fish

Brazilian and German scientists have completed a collaborative project to sequence and analyze the whole genome of Arapaima gigas, a giant freshwater fish known in Brazil as pirarucu and elsewhere as arapaima or paiche. Its growth rate is the fastest among known freshwater fish species. Its natural distribution covers most of the Amazon River basin in Peru and Brazil.

10h

Big city growth escalates the urban-rural divide

Microdata from Swedish population registers provide new insights into cities' economic growth paths. The data reveal a surge in regional inequality, with more resources flowing to cities atop the urban hierarchy, which thus acquire an increasing share of national wealth.

10h

Autonomous diaper sensor better detects urinary tract infection

Urinary tract infections are the second most common type of infection in children, with ear infections taking first place.

10h

The Hospital Is Too Damn Loud

When the musician Yoko Sen was hospitalized a few years ago, she could not help but hear the hospital’s many alarms as a musician . Consider a cardiac monitor that beeps in C, she says, along with a bed-fall alarm that emits a high-pitched whine. Together, the two make a sound so dissonant that the combination of notes was once called the “devil’s interval.” “People thought it was so disturbing t

10h

The Problem With Diversity in Computing

When Amy Webb broke her ankle, she was forced to hobble around on a walking boot. That inconvenience spawned others: among them, she couldn’t pass through the metal detector at airport TSA PreCheck lines any longer. Instead, she had to use the backscatter machines that produce X-ray images of passengers. Webb, who is a professor at New York University and the author of The Big Nine: How the Tech

10h

Researchers identify genes linked to sex differentiation in giant Amazon fish

Brazilian and German scientists have completed a collaborative project to sequence and analyze the whole genome of Arapaima gigas, a giant freshwater fish known in Brazil as pirarucu and elsewhere as arapaima or paiche. Its growth rate is the fastest among known freshwater fish species. Its natural distribution covers most of the Amazon River basin in Peru and Brazil.

10h

Djur kopplar på reservkompassen när solen står högt

Det är ett internationellt forskarlag bestående av biologer i Sverige och Sydafrika som har upptäckt dyngbaggarnas vindkompass och hur den kompletterar solen som vägvisare. – Det här är den första studien som visar hur en biologisk kompass hos ett djur på ett flexibelt sätt integrerar olika riktningsgivare, i det här fallet vind och sol. Allt för att hela tiden uppnå så hög precision som möjligt,

10h

Physicists develop new method to prove quantum entanglement

One of the essential features required for the realization of a quantum computer is quantum entanglement. A team of physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences (ÖAW) introduces a novel technique to detect entanglement even in large-scale quantum systems with unprecedented efficiency. This brings scientists one step closer to the implementation of reliable quantum

10h

US military is a bigger polluter than as many as 140 countries

The US military's carbon bootprint is enormous. Like corporate supply chains, it relies upon an extensive global network of container ships, trucks and cargo planes to supply its operations with everything from bombs to humanitarian aid and hydrocarbon fuels. Our new study calculated the contribution of this vast infrastructure to climate change.

10h

'Sadness, disgust, anger': Fear for the Great Barrier Reef made climate change feel urgent

Media coverage of mass coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef may have been a major tipping point for public concerns around climate change, according to research published today.

10h

10h

10h

10h

10h

10h

Opinion | The dangerous consequences of automation

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

10h

Projections of educated world population

submitted by /u/OliverSparrow [link] [comments]

10h

Which climate innovations will really limit global warming?

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

10h

More Ways to Capture Carbon

One of the most frustrating things about the climate change debate is that we already have viable solutions either at hand or nearly so, and we just need the vision and political will to prioritize the changes necessary to decarbonize our civilization. Some of the resistance is pure protectionism for vested interests, like the fossil fuel industry. However, studies find that much of the rank-and-

10h

Hot Chip Hones the Meaning of ‘Ecstasy’

A recent Hot Chip music video portrays a bickering bohemian L.A. couple who, mysteriously, find that the band’s single “Hungry Child” is playing on loop in their life. It follows them wherever they go—taxis, therapy—and is audible to those around them. This is torture. “I hate house music!” a passerby on the street screams, and the couple seem to agree with him. The video is funny, but prepostero

10h

Elevated air pollution could diminish health benefits of living in walkable communities

The benefits of living in a walkable neighbourhood could be diminished by increased exposure to traffic-related air pollution, suggests a study led by St. Michael's Hospital and ICES, a non-profit research institute that uses population-based health information to produce knowledge on a broad range of health care issues.

10h

'Jet in a box' powers remote Halley Antarctic base

Engineers succeed in automating science experiments at the UK's Halley research station.

10h

This score indicates risk of death, suicide, memory loss

A new tool “scores” patients with multiple chronic conditions. Those with higher multimorbidity scores have faster memory loss, a higher suicide risk, and a higher overall risk of death, researchers report. Assessing the effect of chronic disease on a person’s health is important because 45 percent of all adults have more than one condition—and that figure jumps to 80 percent after age 65, says r

10h

A new algorithm finds nearby stars that could host hidden worlds

An algorithm dubbed “Netflix for exoplanets” identified more than 350 stars that, based on their chemistry, might have planets orbiting out of sight.

10h

The Challenge of Helping Blind People Navigate Indoors

The very existence of Indoor Explorer, which uses Bluetooth beacons to map public indoor spaces, has profound implications for the debate over the role of giant tech platforms.

10h

A New Kind of Space Camp Teaches the Art of Martian Medicine

Enrollees—mainly engineers and health workers—pretend to live on Mars, wear spacesuits, and ride in ATVs as medical disasters crop up around them.

10h

Inside the Room Where They Control the Weather Satellites

Low Earth orbit satellites spin around the earth, slurping up temperature and humidity data, and feeding the numbers to supercomputer weather models.

10h

Image of the Day: Vocal Tracks

Hear seals imitating human sounds and melodies.

10h

10h

The New Scramble for the Moon

A new race could be heating up to claim valuable moon terrain amid uncertain laws — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Fighting obesity with a single cup of coffee

A first-of-its-kind study finds that caffeine is an effective way to stimulate brown fat in cultured cells and humans, pointing to new obesity treatments.

10h

Britiske myndigheder: Forældre fejlfortolker "syv pund skidt"-talemåde

Sundhedsorganisation mener ikke, at børn kan blive for rene. Dansk professor synes, at organisationen skal slappe lidt af.

10h

Second world war bomb explodes after three-quarters of a century

This huge crater in a field in Germany was created when a bomb dropped around 75 years ago finally exploded

11h

Rhino release: Epic journey to freedom in Rwanda

Five zoo-born eastern black rhinos have been transported from Europe to Africa.

11h

Global surgical guidelines drive cut in post-surgery deaths — study

The English National Health Service (NHS) reduced post-operative deaths by 37.2% following the introduction of globally recognised surgical guidelines — paving the way for life-saving action in low — and middle-income countries (LMICs), a new study reveals.

11h

Elevated air pollution could diminish health benefits of living in walkable communities

The benefits of living in a walkable neighborhood could be diminished by increased exposure to traffic-related air pollution, suggests a study led by St. Michael's Hospital and ICES, a non-profit research institute that uses population-based health information to produce knowledge on a broad range of health care issues.

11h

The Yale Happiness Class, Distilled

The most popular class in the history of Yale University was inspired by a paradox: Even when people, conventionally speaking, succeed—get into a top college, make lots of money, or accumulate prestige and accolades—they are often left feeling unsatisfied. It’s a problem that may be particularly acute at a place like Yale, but the lessons of the class, called “Psychology and the Good Life,” are w

11h

Cities Are Surprisingly Fragile

Congestion, rising housing prices, rising cost of living, and increased homelessness are all stressors—but so-called “social compacts” can help — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Nazis Dosed Soldiers with Performance-Boosting 'Superdrug'

The remarkable endurance of German and Allied soldiers during World War II had a secret ingredient.

11h

Amid Drug Pricing Crisis, FDA Guidelines Could Offer Some Relief

New guidelines may help more companies produce "generic" biologics: Medications produced by living organisms used to treat conditions like psoriasis and Crohn’s disease. This could bring more competition to the market and lower prices for consumers, but long-dominant pharmaceutical monopolies could persist.

11h

How Does New Libdo-Boosting Drug for Women Work?

It seems to excite the brain's reward system.

11h

Uranus Is a Weirdo — And So Are Its Rings

New images of the icy planet's rings reveal some surprises.

11h

'Harry Potter: Wizards Unite' Isn’t the Next 'Pokémon Go.' Good

'Wizards Unite' is bloated and overly complex—but at least it's something different.

11h

Spiff Up Your Real-World Skills With Old-Timey YouTube

YouTube is full of channels for learning how people survived centuries ago. They might be the nicest places on the internet.

11h

The Best Features of iOS 13: Maps, Photos, Privacy, Health

Apple's next mobile operating system is now available as a public beta. Here's what you need to know about iOS 13.

11h

Schools and Phone Companies Face Off Over Wireless Spectrum

The FCC proposes to auction a portion of spectrum reserved decades ago for educational uses. Some education advocates aren't happy.

11h

50 Years of Moon Missions: Graphic

All 122 attempts, visualized — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Cities Are Surprisingly Fragile

Congestion, rising housing prices, rising cost of living, and increased homelessness are all stressors—but so-called “social compacts” can help — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

IVF success rates peak as only one in four attempts achieve pregnancy

The success rates for two common fertility treatments have peaked, with only one in four cycles of IVF or ICSI getting pregnant

11h

How to Debate a Science Denier

A new finding shows that marshaling facts and identifying an opponent’s rhetorical techniques are effective at dampening a skeptic’s message — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

How to Debate a Science Denier

A new finding shows that marshaling facts and identifying an opponent’s rhetorical techniques are effective at dampening a skeptic’s message — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Ønskedrømme til en høj pris

Et konkurrenceparameter for private aktører er at tilbyde flere, grundigere og nyere helbredsundersøgelser, der vil finde endnu flere ikke-problemer, som det offentlige sundhedsvæsen skal rydde op efter.

11h