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nyheder2019juni26

By turning molecular structures into sounds, researchers gain insight into protein structures and create new variations

Want to create a brand new type of protein that might have useful properties? No problem. Just hum a few bars.

3h

Volcano Just Shot Out a Mushroom-Shaped Cloud So Big It Could Be Seen from Orbit

The International Space Station captured a stunning photo of an erupting volcano.

5h

Den danske stat har favoriseret diesel for 42 milliarder siden 2008

En ny OECD-rapport slår fast, at der ikke findes belæg for at fastholde lave afgifter på diesel i forhold til benzin.

12h

The case of the poisoned songbirds

Researchers from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife's Wildlife Investigations Laboratory present their results from a toxicological investigation into a mortality event involving songbirds in a new publication in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

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New contents: Neuronal Parkinson inclusions are different than expected

An international team of researchers involving members of the University of Basel's Biozentrum challenges the conventional understanding of the cause of Parkinson's disease. The researchers have shown that the inclusions in the brain's neurons, characteristic of Parkinson's disease, are comprised of a membranous medley rather than protein fibrils. The recently published study in 'Nature Neuroscien

3min

Russian scientists patent new agent for X-ray

Russian scientists patent new agent for X-ray. Russian scientists found that nanocrystal tungsten trioxide can be used instead of barium for X-ray examinations and also in cancer treatment. The results of the study are published in «Journal of Nanomaterials».

3min

Are testosterone-boosting supplements effective? Not likely, according to new research

Research points toward t-boosting supplements as having little or no known effect.

3min

Hurricanes: How These Destructive Storms Form, and Why They Get So Strong

Typhoon, cyclone, hurricane … all different names for the same swirling storms.

6min

New Theory: Marsquakes Could be Caused by Frozen Groundwater

Marsquakes NASA’s InSight Mars lander has been closely listening to the activity inside the core of the Red Planet. And something is stirring deep beneath the surface — earlier this year the rover recorded its first ever marsquake . But what caused it? Michael Manga, a planetary scientist at the University of California at Berkeley, has a new theory as to what may be causing marsquakes. During th

13min

Sydney Is in a State of Emergency to Fight Climate Change

All Hands On Monday, the city council of Sydney, Australia, unanimously voted to enter a state of emergency over the looming threat posed by climate change. The decision — which makes Sydney the first major city in Australia to declare a climate emergency, but nearly the 660th to do so worldwide — mobilizes the entirety of the city’s infrastructure to cut back on carbon emissions and try to preve

21min

Model of ear’s speech sensor could improve hearing tests

Researchers have figured out the math that describes how the cochlea, the part of the ear that processes speech, works. The research could help improve hearing tests and devices that restore some hearing to the deaf. Inside the ear, a snail-shaped organ called the cochlea takes in pressure information from the eardrum and turns it into nerve impulses that are sent to the brain. A full understandi

21min

Why Elephants Rarely Get Cancer

Why Elephants Rarely Get Cancer They have multiple copies of a gene that causes mutated cells to commit suicide. Why Elephants Rarely Get Cancer Video of Why Elephants Rarely Get Cancer Creature Wednesday, June 26, 2019 – 11:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) – “I’ve always been so enamored with elephants — one of the things that’s just amazing to me is that elephants have such an inc

22min

Scientists Describe 'Super-Weird' Whale: First Confirmed Beluga-Narwhal Hybrid

Creature Skull was donated by an Inuit hunter in 1990. 06/20/2019 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor To read more…

22min

The Difference a Half Mile Can Make

In recent years, Raj Chetty has become economist-famous for cataloguing American inequality, assembling enormous data sets showing which Americans tend to get ahead. More to the point, his work shows where Americans tend to get ahead: Chetty, a Harvard economics professor, has focused on how where one grows up shapes one’s economic prospects. Chetty’s research demonstrates just how unevenly “upwa

24min

Yesterday Imagines a World Where the Beatles Never Existed

It’s hard to understand exactly why Richard Curtis, Britain’s prime purveyor of romantic comedies for the last three decades, decided to pivot to speculative science fiction. His talents have long resided in winsome, low-concept narratives of love, sex, and marriage, the quainter the better. He made a name for himself writing movies about going to a bunch of weddings (and a funeral), falling in l

24min

Professors need to be entertaining to prevent students from watching YouTube in class

Students think it is instructors' responsibility to ensure they don't surf the web in class, according to a new study.

26min

The case of the poisoned songbirds

Researchers from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife's Wildlife Investigations Laboratory present their results from a toxicological investigation into a mortality event involving songbirds in a new publication in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

26min

Solving the knotty question of soft-pretzel aroma

Whether at Oktoberfest, the movie theater or a shopping mall, the enticing aroma of soft pretzels is unmistakable. Now, researchers have identified the key compounds that give these twisted knots their distinctive scent. They report their results in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

26min

Does likelihood of survival differ between patients with single vs. multiple primary melanomas?

Patients with multiple primary melanomas had a higher likelihood of dying than those with a single primary melanoma in a study that used data from registries in the Netherlands. This observational study included nearly 57,000 patients (54,645 with a single primary melanoma and 2,284 with multiple primary melanomas).

26min

First snapshots of trapped CO2 molecules shed new light on carbon capture

Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have taken the first images of carbon dioxide molecules within a molecular cage — part of a highly porous nanoparticle known as a MOF, or metal-organic framework, with great potential for separating and storing gases and liquids.

26min

Study: No outcome differences after hernia surgery by medical doctors vs surgeons in Ghana

New research published June 26, 2019 in JAMA Surgery and co-led by Temple's Jessica H. Beard, M.D., M.P.H., examines one approach to tackling a shortage of surgeons available to perform inguinal hernia repair in sub-Saharan Africa: training medical doctors to perform the surgery. The research team found no statistically significant differences in hernia recurrence, post-surgery complications, pati

26min

New mouse model of Parkinson's disease shows how it spreads from the gut

Parkinson's disease can begin in the gut and spread to the brain via the vagus nerve, researchers report June 26 in the journal Neuron. This pathway was observed in a new mouse model, which recapitulates both motor and non-motor deficits as well as early-stage and late-stage features associated with Parkinson's disease.

26min

New research shows Parkinson's disease origins in the gut

In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found additional evidence that Parkinson's disease originates among cells in the gut and travels up the body's neurons to the brain. The study, described in the June issue of the journal Neuron, offers a new, more accurate model in which to test treatments that could prevent or halt Parkinson's disease progression.

26min

Mouse Model Shows How Parkinson's Disease Begins in the Gut

Johns Hopkins's Ted Dawson discusses his lab's demonstration that misfolded alpha-synuclein can move from the stomach to the brain and cause physical and cognitive symptoms.

27min

We’ve Never Been This Close to Making Electric Flight a Reality

Betting on Electric Israeli startup Eviation Aircraft made a big splash at the Paris Air Show last week with a prototype of their $4 million commercial electric airliner, the Alice. The early success of the company — which has already sold a “double digit” number of orders to a U.S. regional airline — could represent a turning point in aviation, drastically cutting both emissions and the cost of

28min

Bill Wehrum, an Architect of Trump Administration’s Pro-Coal Rules, to Leave E.P.A.

The official, William L. Wehrum, helped to write Trump administration rules weakening climate change protections and supporting the coal industry.

30min

Radioaktivt udslip på Seattle-hospital kan tage måneder at rydde op

13 mennesker blev udsat for stråling med en radioaktiv isotop, da den skulle fjernes fra et apparat til bestråling af vævsprøver på UW Medicine Harborview Medical Center. Oprydningen står på frem til efteråret.

35min

How to ask for help — and get a "yes" | Heidi Grant

Asking for help is tough. But to get through life, you have to do it all the time. So how do you get comfortable asking? In this actionable talk, social psychologist Heidi Grant shares four simple rules for asking for help and getting it — while making the process more rewarding for your helper, too.

36min

Cities with certain racist tweets see more hate crimes

Cities with a higher incidence of a certain kind of racist tweets report more actual hate crimes related to race, ethnicity, and national origin, a new study of 532 million tweets indicates. Researchers analyzed the location and linguistic features of tweets from between 2011 and 2016 and trained a machine learning model—one form of artificial intelligence—to identify and analyze two types of twe

37min

Growing evidence suggests Parkinson's disease starts in gut

Research shows key proteins in disease can spread from gastrointestinal tract to brain Evidence that Parkinson’s disease may start off in the gut is mounting, according to new research showing proteins thought to play a key role in the disease can spread from the gastrointestinal tract to the brain. The human body naturally forms a protein called alpha-synuclein which is found, among other places

39min

The Simple Idea Behind Einstein’s Greatest Discoveries

The flashier fruits of Albert Einstein’s century-old insights are by now deeply embedded in the popular imagination: Black holes, time warps and wormholes show up regularly as plot points in movies, books, TV shows. At the same time, they fuel cutting-edge research, helping physicists pose questions about the nature of space, time, even information itself. Perhaps ironically, though, what is argu

40min

In her light: space fiction

A short story about nanosatellites, love, and freedom

41min

Diving into water treatment strategies for swimming pools

With summer in full swing, many people are cooling off in swimming pools. However, some of the substances that are made when chlorine in the water reacts with compounds in human sweat, urine or dirt aren't so refreshing. Now, researchers have compared the effectiveness of different water treatment processes in mitigating these so-called disinfection byproducts (DBPs). They report their results in

41min

To increase bike commuters, look to neighborhoods

People agree that bike commuting improves health, reduces air pollution and eases traffic, a recent survey suggests. But that wasn't enough to get most people to commute by bike. New research indicates that a person's neighborhood may play a large role in influencing the decision to commute by bike.

41min

UIC, AbbVie scientists develop a novel device to screen advanced crystalline materials

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and AbbVie Inc. have developed a novel device that will help scientists and pharmaceutical companies more effectively screen and test formation of drug substance — active pharmaceutical ingredient (API).

41min

Computer scientists predict lightning and thunder with the help of artificial intelligence

Together with Germany's National Meteorological Service, the Deutscher Wetterdienst, computer science professor Jens Dittrich and his doctoral student Christian Schön from Saarland University are working on a system that is supposed to predict local thunderstorms more precisely than before.

41min

First snapshots of trapped CO2 molecules shed new light on carbon capture

Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have taken the first images of carbon dioxide molecules within a molecular cage—part of a highly porous nanoparticle known as a MOF, or metal-organic framework, with great potential for separating and storing gases and liquids.

45min

What We Know About the Causes and Symptoms of ADHD

The disorder makes it difficult to concentrate, and usually manifests itself during childhood. But the exact causes are still unknown.

45min

How a 2020 Underdog Is Preparing for His Moment in the National Spotlight

You would be forgiven for mistaking Representative Tim Ryan of Ohio for Seth Moulton, the 40-year-old Massachusetts representative who is also running for president, and who joined Ryan in a leadership challenge to Nancy Pelosi back in 2016. You might also be excused for confusing him with Eric Swalwell, a similarly aged California congressman-turned presidential candidate—or, if you squint, mayb

46min

Steam Power: Still Moving Us, Even in the 21st Century

It's in our power plants, underneath New York City and in our buffets. In a digital world, steam is still very much relevant.

1h

TV advertisers can measure the impact of their spots with second-screen searching

Researchers from the University of Houston, University of Minnesota, and University of California-San Diego published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing, which finds that TV ads lead to a variety of online responses and that advertisers can use these signals to enrich their media planning and ad evaluations.

1h

Novel Antibody-Drug Conjugates: Characterization Tools and Formulation/Process Development

In this webinar, learn about antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and their function, how to analyze and characterize ADCs, and developing ADC processes and formulations.

1h

New forest treatment helps trees adapt better to climatic change

Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR), the Andalusian Institute of Agricultural Research and Training, Fishing, Food and Organic Production (IFAPA), and the Pyrenean Institute of Ecology of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) confirm that pine trees subjected to water stress manage their resources better when they have less competition in their immediate environment.

1h

Cascade exacerbates storage diseases

In rare, hereditary storage diseases such as Sandhoff's disease or Tay-Sachs syndrome, the metabolic waste from accumulating gangliosides cannot be properly disposed of in the nerve cells because important enzymes are missing. The consequences are grave: They range from movement restrictions to blindness, mental decline and early death. Scientists at the University of Bonn now demonstrate why thes

1h

Older adults' independence is most significant factor for vulnerability in hot weather

Efforts to support older people during extreme heat should focus on those who lack independence or have pre-existing health issues, according to an expert from the University of Warwick.

1h

Immunological discovery opens new possibilities for using antibodies

Researchers from the University of Turku have discovered a new route that transports subcutaneously administered antibodies into lymph nodes in just a few seconds. The discovery enables targeted therapies for the immune system.

1h

In the Energy Drink Market, Advertising and Science Collide

As the regulatory status of energy drinks continues to be debated, a growing number of consumers and public health advocates are asking how a product loaded with caffeine and other stimulants became so popular among young people. Lax regulation, marketing, and scientific uncertainty are partly to blame.

1h

Tracing the Internal Queer Revolution

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series about the gay-rights movement and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. T he very first Pride parade in Los Angeles was organized alphabetically. Towards the front of the march, The Advocate newspaper presented “a carload of groovy guys in bikini swimsuits,” as described by the Reverend Troy Perry in his memoir Lord Is My Shepherd and He K

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Lightyear One is a solar car with a range of 450 miles

submitted by /u/pmz [link] [comments]

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ALMA pinpoints the formation site of planet around nearest young star

Researchers using ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) found a small dust concentration in the disk around TW Hydrae, the nearest young star. It is highly possible that a planet is growing or about to be formed in this concentration. This is the first time that the exact place where cold materials are forming the seed of a planet has been pinpointed in the disk around a young star.

1h

Bleach-induced transformation for humidity-durable air filters

Adding hydroquinone, a skin-bleaching ingredient, to a well-known 'metal organic framework' changes its copper ions in a way that makes this porous material exceptionally stable in water.

1h

Greek priests to bless beetle-devastated forest

A church in northern Greece on Wednesday said it would bless a hilltop forest recently devastated by bark beetle attacks.

1h

Unique chance to confirm methane spikes – and perhaps life – on Mars

NASA’s Curiosity rover has detected a brief burp of methane on Mars, and we may be able to confirm the signal because satellites were monitoring the same region

1h

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‘Halos’ of invisible matter drive galactic ecosystems

New research digs into how galactic halos interact with the rest of their galaxies. Take a look at any galaxy in the universe through a telescope or in pictures from observatories and you might think you have a good idea of its shape. Think again—roughly half of a galaxy’s matter is invisible. But scientists have since discovered this missing mass in halos of cool gas surrounding galaxies. Unders

1h

Significant UK air quality improvements over past 40 years cut death rates

Emission reductions due to policy interventions have reduced air pollutant concentrations and health impacts of UK air pollution since 1970.

1h

Studying the human brain through craniovascular traits

Arteries and veins leave their marks on the bones of the cranium, and these traces can be used in anthropology, bioarchaeology and paleontology to investigate the blood system in extinct species or past populations. This week, the Journal of Anatomy is publishing an article by lead author Emiliano Bruner, paleoneurologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH),

1h

Dronefoto: Skive Fjord er farvet rød af alger

En usædvanligt langvarig opblomstring af planktonalgen Mesodinium rubrum har farvet fjorden massivt rød.

1h

Studying the human brain through craniovascular traits

Arteries and veins leave their marks on the bones of the cranium, and these traces can be used in anthropology, bioarchaeology and paleontology to investigate the blood system in extinct species or past populations. This week, the Journal of Anatomy is publishing an article by lead author Emiliano Bruner, paleoneurologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH),

1h

Should beavers be brought back across England?

Beavers were first reintroduced to Scotland in 2009 and a further trial is taking place in England until next year.

1h

The Global Data War Heats Up

World leaders who gather in Osaka, Japan, for the G20 summit this week will begin a conversation on worldwide data governance—and though they are deeply divided on the question of who should control data, some nations could seek to devise a system that excludes China. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who is hosting this year’s summit, says he sees data governance as a priority. Indeed, the fac

1h

Ahead of Democratic debate, Apple News offers up a guide to the candidates – CNET

Twenty candidates will take the stage this week, and Apple News has a rundown for you.

1h

Soon, Alexa Will Know When You’re About to Die

Right before you have a heart attack you start to gasp for breath in a uniquely identifiable pattern. Naturally, researchers taught an Amazon Echo how to notice it and call for help. The post Soon, Alexa Will Know When You’re About to Die appeared first on ExtremeTech .

1h

MIT Created a Robot That Maps 3D Objects by Touch

In the digital world, sight and sound had a bit of a head start, but our other senses have few practical applications. But that's not the case with robots, and MIT just leveraged an incredible new sensor to let a robot "see" with its fingers. The post MIT Created a Robot That Maps 3D Objects by Touch appeared first on ExtremeTech .

1h

Ledarskapsutveckling sker i vardagen

Många organisationer verkar i ett sammanhang med ökad komplexitet och hög förändringstakt – och är därför allt mer beroende av ledarnas och medarbetarnas kompetenser, vilket driver ett behov av att utveckla ledare, medarbetare och effektiva organisationsformer. Ledarskapsutveckling är en miljardindustri, samtidigt som det ur ett akademiskt perspektiv saknas central på forskning inom området. I et

1h

A Right Whale Grandmother Dies

It was the second North Atlantic right whale to die in the Gulf of St. Lawrence recently, dealing another setback to the endangered population.

1h

Methane emissions from oil and gas exploration are under-reported

Wetlands in Canada's boreal forest contain deep deposits of carbon-rich soils, made up of decomposed vegetation (peat) that has accumulated over thousands of years. Globally, peatlands store twice as much carbon as all of the world's forests combined. Protecting this carbon store is critical in the fight against climate change.

1h

Tech can empower refugee communities if they're allowed to design how it works

In Lebanon, around 350,000 Syrian refugees don't have access to enough safe and nutritious food. To stem the crisis, the World Food Programme (WFP) of the United Nations introduced an electronic voucher system to distribute food aid. People are given debit cards loaded with "e-vouchers" that they can use in certain shops to buy food.

1h

Sartorius debuts the Intellicyt iQue3 at CYTO® 2019

Sartorius will be showcasing the latest addition to its cellular analysis portfolio on booth #103 at this year’s CYTO® conference and exhibition, with the launch of the Intellicyt iQue3.

1h

Planets in multiple-star systems may be habitable

But don’t expect life to be easy, or even stable. Richard A Lovett reports.

1h

We will rock you: the world prepares for Asteroid Day

Events are planned in 192 countries, so there’s something for everyone. Jeff Glorfeld reports

1h

The observation of topologically protected magnetic quasiparticles

A team of researchers from Tohoku University, J-PARC, and Tokyo Institute of Technology conducted an in-depth study of magnetic quasiparticles called 'triplons.' The team conducted the study with a low-dimensional quantum magnet, Ba2CuSi2O6Cl2, using neutron inelastic scattering by AMATERAS at J-PARC. Their findings lead to the discovery of a new 'topologically protected triplon edge state' in the

1h

Making Algorithms More Like Kids: What Can Four-Year-Olds Do That AI Can’t?

Instead of trying to produce a programme to simulate the adult mind, why not rather try to produce one which simulates the child’s? If this were then subjected to an appropriate course of education one would obtain the adult brain. Alan Turing famously wrote this in his groundbreaking 1950 paper Computing Machinery and Intelligence , and laid the framework for generations of machine learning scie

1h

Eating Crap as a Teen Can Permanently Affect Men’s Fertility

Permanent Damage Teen guys with dreams of one day having kids might want to rethink their after-school snack. A new Harvard University-led study found that eating a “Western diet” – one packed with high-fat and processed foods, such as pizza, chips, and red meat – as a teenager leads to a lower sperm count and damaged sperm-producing Sertoli cells. While a change in diet can increase sperm counts

1h

Quantum ghost imaging improved by using five-atom correlations

In conventional imaging methods, a beam of photons (or other particles) is reflected off the object to be imaged. After the beam travels to a detector, the information gathered there is used to create a photograph or other type of image. In an alternative imaging technique called "ghost imaging," the process works a little differently: an image is reconstructed from information that is detected fr

1h

Earthquake impact on submarine slopes: Subtle erosion versus significant strengthening

Active margins, where an oceanic plate slides under a continental plate, may cause earthquakes and tsunamis. Further, they are known for shifting sediments from margin slopes into deep ocean trenches. Geologists now found evidence of earthquake-triggered surface sediment erosion on a submarine slope close to the area of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake.

1h

Malaysia busts attempt to smuggle over 5,000 terrapins

Malaysian customs officers arrested two Indian men attempting to smuggle over 5,000 terrapins through the country to be sold as pets, officials said Wednesday.

1h

Malaysia busts attempt to smuggle over 5,000 terrapins

Malaysian customs officers arrested two Indian men attempting to smuggle over 5,000 terrapins through the country to be sold as pets, officials said Wednesday.

1h

Bulk baby green oysters

An artificial colour change illuminates how molluscs arrive at their adult lodgings.

1h

Expedeon AG introduces Lightning-Link Metal Labeling Kits to support single cell analysis

Novel antibody labeling immunoassay technology for multiplex immune profiling addresses one of the fastest growing, billion-dollar life science market sectors

1h

Unlocking secrets of the ice worm

The ice worm is one of the largest organisms that spends its entire life in ice and Washington State University scientist Scot Hotalilng is one of the only people on the planet studying it.

1h

Frontline heroes hailed in the war against devil cancers

Residents of Tasmania's D'Entrecasteaux Channel Peninsula, Kingborough and Huon Valley communities are being hailed as the frontline heroes in the war against two deadly transmissible cancers affecting Tasmanian devils—Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) and Devil Facial Tumour 2 (DFT2).

1h

Unlocking secrets of the ice worm

The ice worm is one of the largest organisms that spends its entire life in ice and Washington State University scientist Scot Hotalilng is one of the only people on the planet studying it.

1h

Frontline heroes hailed in the war against devil cancers

Residents of Tasmania's D'Entrecasteaux Channel Peninsula, Kingborough and Huon Valley communities are being hailed as the frontline heroes in the war against two deadly transmissible cancers affecting Tasmanian devils—Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) and Devil Facial Tumour 2 (DFT2).

1h

Marseille closes some beaches to swimming amid pollution concerns

France's second city and key tourist hub Marseille has enforced temporary swimming bans on several beaches amid pollution concerns, disappointing locals and tourists hoping to take a dip as temperatures soar.

1h

EU probes whether US Broadcom hindered competition

The European Union opened Wednesday an investigation to determine whether US semi-conductor giant Broadcom may be violating the bloc's competition rules and hurting rivals.

1h

Monte Carlo simulations for neutron experiments

Achieving a good signal-to-background ratio in neutron scattering experiments is a crucial factor in instrument and sample environment design. However, in current Monte Carlo simulation software, not all neutron interactions are considered. If all the neutron interactions that contribute to the background can be included, the expected signal-to-background ratios can be simulated and used to design

1h

Net-zero: climate-saving target or delay tactic?

With Britain set to become the first major economy to commit in law to reaching a target of net-zero emissions by 2050, what is carbon neutrality, and how will nations reach it?

1h

New research identifies Fukushima reactor material in environment

Through the analysis of specific fallout particles in the environment, a joint UK-Japan team of scientists has uncovered new insights into the sequence of events that led to the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011.

2h

Entrenched stereotypes keeping women from military front lines, professors' new book says

For more than a century, it was culturally unacceptable for women to join men in the front lines of combat in the U.S. military. Even though the policy banning women from combat roles has been rescinded, their integration into the front line and special operations has been slow and met with resistance. Two University of Kansas researchers have published a book on factors that have slowed the integ

2h

Mapping the world's largest terrestrial carbon store

A group of researchers have reported how much peatland there is in the world. Peatlands can store carbon (C) and help regulate the climate. But peatland degradation is releasing carbon into the atmosphere. To conserve peatlands and halt their contribution to atmospheric carbon, researchers need to understand their extent, status, and C stocks.

2h

Bleach-induced transformation for humidity-durable air filters

A molecule-trapping material that normally degrades in water remains stable after two years of humidity exposure when treated with a common skin bleach.

2h

ALMA pinpoints the formation site of planet around nearest young star

Researchers using ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) found a small dust concentration in the disk around TW Hydrae, the nearest young star. It is highly possible that a planet is growing or about to be formed in this concentration. This is the first time that the exact place where cold materials are forming the seed of a planet has been pinpointed in the disk around a young star.

2h

Frontline heroes hailed in the war against devil cancers

Residents of Tasmania's D'Entrecasteaux Channel Peninsula, Kingborough and Huon Valley communities are being hailed as the frontline heroes in the war against two deadly transmissible cancers affecting Tasmanian devils — Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD) and Devil Facial Tumor 2 (DFT2).

2h

Read how TV advertisers can measure the impact of their spots with second-screen searching

A new study proposes a framework to evaluate TV ad spots according to their immediate effects on consumers' online search activities.

2h

Trump's tweets reveal hidden unity between Democrats, Republicans

Democrats and Republicans may stand on opposite ends of the political spectrum, but both parties share a hidden agreement surrounding President Donald Trump's online behavior, found a new University at Buffalo study.

2h

Study: Internet perpetuates job market inequality

Recent research finds the internet is giving both employers and job seekers access to more information, but has not made the hiring process more meritocratic. Instead, lower-wage jobs have become "black holes," with intense competition for positions, while many higher-wage jobs are going to targeted candidates and are open to only limited competition.

2h

Facebook's crypto currency faces pre-G20 examination

Heading in to the G20 summit, Facebook is on notice from powerful regulators including the Fed chief that its ambitious plans for a global crypto-currency face piercing scrutiny.

2h

French consumer group launches class action against Google

A French consumer rights group said Wednesday that it has launched a class action lawsuit against US tech giant Google for violating the EU's strict data privacy laws.

2h

Papua New Guinea volcano erupts sending residents fleeing

Papua New Guinea's volatile Ulawun volcano—designated one of the world's most hazardous—erupted Wednesday, spewing lava high in the air and sending residents fleeing.

2h

Huawei says 5G 'business as usual' despite US sanctions

Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei said Wednesday that its 5G business has not been impacted by the recent US sanctions amid a prolonged trade war between the world's two largest economies.

2h

Tooth enamel analyses offer insights into the diet and habitat of T. rex relative tarbosaurus

Together with an international team, Senckenberg scientist Hervé Bocherens studied the fossilized teeth of the carnivorous dinosaur Tarbosaurus bataar. Based on stable isotopes, the researchers were able to draw inferences regarding the habitat and feeding habits of this relative of T. rex, who lived around 70 million years ago. According to the results, the carnivores were not very picky in their

2h

Low-temperature aqueous alteration of Martian zircon during the late Amazonian period

Many accounts at present support the presence of liquid water on Mars, where hydrated minerals testify to past processes of aqueous weathering in Martian meteorites such as NWA 7533/7034. Planetary scientists aim to estimate the timing of weathering on the Martian crust to help understand its evolution, the availability of liquid water and habitability on Mars. In a recent study, Martin Guitreau a

2h

COSMIC-2 soars into orbit aboard SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket

COSMIC-2, a mission of six satellites designed to improve weather forecasts and space weather monitoring, blasted into orbit at 2:30 a.m. ET today, June 25, from Cape Canaveral, Florida, aboard a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket.

2h

Current green growth policies are not enough to reach Paris Agreement climate targets

New research suggests that green growth climate mitigation policies are not sufficient for reaching the ambitious targets of the Paris Agreement, to limit global warming to well below 2°C by the end of the century.

2h

Ny centerdirektør på Rigshospitalet

Rasmus Møgelvang er ny direktør for Center for Hjerte-, Kar-, Lunge- og Infektionssygdomme på Rigshospitalet. Han tiltræder 1. august 2019.

2h

Climate change: bees are disorientated by flowers' changing scents

Coffee, apples, honey – were it not for the precious work of pollinators, countless things that we eat and drink would not exist, totalling more than 30% of global food production. Most pollinators are insects, particularly from the bee family (close to a thousand species in France alone), along with butterflies and diptera, such as syrphids.

2h

Study of emotional response to the interaction between hand and stone tool

The paleoneurology team at the CENIEH has just published a cognitive archaeology paper on emotion and attention when handling Lower Paleolithic tools, in which around 50 volunteers participated

2h

Adventures of a space archaeologist

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01972-3 A personal take on panning out to see the past both grips and frustrates Jo Marchant.

2h

Proposal to close UK mouse-research centre is ‘major threat’

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02002-y Country’s mouse-genetics programme is at risk, say researchers at MRC Harwell Institute.

2h

Unlocking secrets of the ice worm

WSU researchers have identified an ice worm on Vancouver Island that is closely related to ice worms 1,200 miles away in southern Alaska. The researchers believe the genetic intermingling is the result of birds carrying the glacier-bound worms (or their eggs) up and down the west coast.

2h

Factors orthopaedic surgeons should consider when prescribing opioids

Orthopaedic surgeons are the third-highest physician prescribers of opioids, writing more than 6 million prescriptions a year. Because over-dispensing of opioids is a factor contributing to the ongoing opioid epidemic, researchers at Johns Hopkins surveyed orthopaedic providers to better understand what drives their prescribing practices and to identify gaps in knowledge and potentially worrisome

2h

Muscling in on the role of vitamin D

A recent study conducted at the Westmead Institute for Medical Research has shed light on the role of vitamin D in muscle cells. The study looked at the role of vitamin D in muscles in mice, and showed that vitamin D signaling (how cells communicate with one another) is needed for normal muscle size and strength.

2h

Climate change: bees are disorientated by flowers' changing scents

Coffee, apples, honey – were it not for the precious work of pollinators, countless things that we eat and drink would not exist, totalling more than 30% of global food production. Most pollinators are insects, particularly from the bee family (close to a thousand species in France alone), along with butterflies and diptera, such as syrphids.

2h

Study of emotional response to the interaction between hand and stone tool

The paleoneurology team at the CENIEH has just published a cognitive archaeology paper on emotion and attention when handling Lower Paleolithic tools, in which around 50 volunteers participated

2h

The observation of topologically protected magnetic quasiparticles

A team of researchers from Tohoku University, J-PARC, and Tokyo Institute of Technology conducted an in-depth study of magnetic quasiparticles called "triplons." The team conducted the study with a low-dimensional quantum magnet, Ba2CuSi2O6Cl2, using neutron inelastic scattering by AMATERAS at J-PARC. Their findings lead to the discovery of a new "topologically protected triplon edge state" in the

2h

Facebook's Libra has staggering potential: State control of money could end

The UN recognises 180 currencies worldwide as legal tender, all of them issued by nation states. It does not recognise cryptocurrencies like bitcoin in this way, even if communities of enthusiasts have been treating them as a means of exchange for over a decade now.

2h

Knowing what leads to building collapses can help make African cities safer

It's a sadly familiar image in several developing countries' media reports: people frantically searching the rubble of a collapsed building for survivors.

2h

Hubble is the ultimate multitasker: Discovering asteroids while it's doing other observations

It looks like a poster of the famous Hubble Deep Field, marked with white streaks by a child, or put away carelessly and scratched in the process. But it's not. The white streaks aren't accidents; they're the paths of asteroids.

2h

Chiral zero sound found in Weyl semimetals

A pair of researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology has found that a chiral zero sound (CZS) effect can be induced in Weyl semimetals. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, Zhida Song and Xi Dai describe their experiments with Weyl semimetals and what they found.

2h

Highest energy photons ever recorded coming from Crab Nebula

A very large team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and Japan has measured the highest energy photon ever recorded. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their study of data from the Tibet Air Shower Gamma Collaboration and what they found.

2h

Everest: I journeyed into the 'death zone' to install the world's highest weather station

Perched at almost 8,500 metres on Everest, we paced back-and-forth, attempting to stave off frostbite as temperatures hovered close to -30°C and our drill batteries became too cold to work. Our ambition to install the highest automatic weather station in history looked destined for failure.

2h

Larry Page-backed Kitty Hawk partners with Boeing on flying car development

Kitty Hawk, one of the flying car startups backed by Google founder and Alphabet CEO Larry Page, announced that it’s partnering with Boeing to develop its semi-autonomous flying …

2h

The guts of an Apple iPhone show exactly what Trump gets wrong about trade

Crack open an iPhone and you'll begin to see why President Donald Trump's ongoing trade war with China doesn't make sense.

2h

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I Scraped Millions of Venmo Payments. Your Data Is at Risk

Opinion: Venmo makes sending and receiving money a social affair. But those emoji-laden payment descriptions leave you exposed to cyberattacks.

2h

Google's Matías Duarte on the History of Smartphone Notifications

A conversation with Matías Duarte, one of the designers of Android, about how notifications grew from an idea to a relentless buzz.

2h

The AI-Fueled, Anxious Hopefulness of Disney's 'Smart House'

Twenty years ago the Disney Channel original film presented a world where humans were far less afraid of digital assistants than we are now.

2h

Several IVF attempts can signal higher risk for any eventual pregnancy

Women who undergo repeated cycles of IVF are more likely to have problems with their placenta if they later become pregnant

2h

Banning mobile phones in schools: beneficial or risky? Here's what the evidence says

Victorian education minister James Merlino's announcement mobile phones will be banned for all students at state primary and secondary schools is certainly a bold move.

2h

Tech may beat tape measure to predict lymphedema risk

Technology may be better than a tape measure for assessing a woman’s risk for lymphedema, painful swelling in the arm after breast cancer surgery. Researchers compared bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) and the traditional tape measure method to see which was better at identifying women who should use compression sleeves and gauntlets to reduce lymphatic fluid in the arm and prevent progression to l

2h

Methylmercury precipitates heart failure by increasing Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission

Researchers from National Institute for Physiological Sciences revealed the molecular mechanism underlying increase the risk of heart failure during hemodynamic load by methylmercury exposure. They found that exposure of mice to extremely low-dose methylmercury increases cardiac fragility after pressure overload through Drp1-mediated mitochondrial hyperfission in mice, and that depolysulfidation o

2h

AbbVie, Allergan, Ugh

News broke yesterday morning (first at the Wall Street Journal , I believe) that Abbvie has agreed to acquire Allergan. This is one of the larger pharma mergers of recent years, and regular readers of this site will have a pretty good idea of the sigh and roll of the eyes with which I greet it. I think Ed Silverman at Stat ‘s Pharmalot does a good job capturing the mood: Over the past couple of y

2h

Fremtidens energiingeniører vil møde nye krav

PLUS. Hvad betyder omvæltningerne i energibranchen for unge ingeniører og studerende?

2h

Late start to monsoon season? Maybe not.

Fireworks atop "A" Mountain on July 4 commemorate Independence Day, but also usually mark the start of monsoon thunderstorms, according to local wisdom.

2h

The art of the Roman deal

Romans are depicted as slashing and burning their way across countries in order to secure their empire. But a University of Michigan archeologist suggests that the Romans may have trapped more flies with honey.

2h

High-powered laser diodes can reduce residual stress in metal 3-D printed parts

In 3-D printing, residual stress can build up in parts during the printing process due to the expansion of heated material and contraction of cold material, generating forces that can distort the part and cause cracks that can weaken or tear a part to pieces, especially in metals.

2h

Paternal age over 51 years reduces success rate in IVF and ICSI

While female fertility comes to an irrevocable end with the menopause (at a consistently average age of 51 years), men are not constrained by similar biological senescence. Studies have shown that sperm counts may decline and DNA damage in sperm cells may increase over time, but the celebrity fatherhood of ageing actors and rock stars perpetuates the myth that male fertility might last forever.

3h

Quantifying and understanding well-to-well contamination in microbiome research

When Amnon Amir, Jon Sanders, and their colleagues began using positive control samples of Vibrio fischeri in plate-based extractions as a way to validate results, they unexpectedly observed that many of the surrounding samples would also show Vibrio fischeri in their composition. They set out to design an experiment to quantify this problem, which led to the newly published paper "Quantifying and

3h

Novel watermelon rootstock knocks out disease and pests

A new watermelon line, developed by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Clemson University scientists, gets to the root of the problem of a major disease and pest of watermelon crops in the southern United States.

3h

Big data and innovations for healthy bees

Big data, an interactive platform and six different technological innovations are the core of the recently started Horizon 2020 project B-GOOD (http://b-good-project.eu/) in its 4-year mission to pave the way toward healthy and sustainable beekeeping across the European Union.

3h

New approaches to investigate the molecular causes of amyloid formation

More than 24 million people worldwide suffer from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or Huntington's. The molecular causes of these diseases have so far been little investigated. A team of scientists from Leipzig University and the Technical University of Dresden, as well as the Kurt Schwabe Institute Meinsberg, is now looking into these molecular mechanisms with new appro

3h

Modeling Earth's chemistry: Making the invisible visible

An incredibly complex system lives beneath our feet, transporting metals to Earth's crust and undergoing a myriad of chemical reactions that influence our daily lives. These environmental interactions affect everything from our ability to use soil to produce food and the cleanliness of our drinking water to how we might mitigate our changing climate. Humans have a huge impact on Earth's subsurface

3h

Quantifying and understanding well-to-well contamination in microbiome research

When Amnon Amir, Jon Sanders, and their colleagues began using positive control samples of Vibrio fischeri in plate-based extractions as a way to validate results, they unexpectedly observed that many of the surrounding samples would also show Vibrio fischeri in their composition. They set out to design an experiment to quantify this problem, which led to the newly published paper "Quantifying and

3h

Novel watermelon rootstock knocks out disease and pests

A new watermelon line, developed by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Clemson University scientists, gets to the root of the problem of a major disease and pest of watermelon crops in the southern United States.

3h

Detecting deepfakes by looking closely reveals a way to protect against them

Deepfake videos are hard for untrained eyes to detect because they can be quite realistic. Whether used as personal weapons of revenge, to manipulate financial markets or to destabilize international relations, videos depicting people doing and saying things they never did or said are a fundamental threat to the longstanding idea that "seeing is believing." Not anymore.

3h

Breathable lava suits: volcanologist field-tested and approved

When working near lava at 1,300 to 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, the terms 'lightweight' and 'comfortable' might not apply to a volcanologist's protective clothing.

3h

Sydney declares a climate emergency – what does that mean in practice?

Late on Monday night, the City of Sydney became the first state capital in Australia to officially declare a climate emergency. With climate change considered a threat to human life, Sydney councillors unanimously supported a motion put forward by Lord Mayor Clover Moore to mobilise city resources to reduce carbon emissions and minimise the impact of future change.

3h

Big data and innovations for healthy bees

Big data, an interactive platform and six different technological innovations are the core of the recently started Horizon 2020 project B-GOOD (http://b-good-project.eu/) in its 4-year mission to pave the way toward healthy and sustainable beekeeping across the European Union.

3h

Universitetsalliance bliver pilot for et "europæisk universitet"

Europa-Kommissionen har netop udvalgt universitetsalliancen 4EU+, som Københavns Universitet er…

3h

Video: ESA defending Earth

Hera will show us things we've never seen before. Astrophysicist and and Queen guitarist Brian May tells the story of the ESA mission that would be humanity's first-ever spacecraft to visit a double asteroid.

3h

The microstructure of paracetamol

Infrared (IR) microspectroscopy at the Australian Synchrotron provided insights into the molecular orientation inside the microstructure of a particular form of paracetamol (form II), which contributed to better water solubility and compressibility than the more stable commercially used product.

3h

Rapid cross-resistance bringing cockroaches closer to invincibility

Cockroaches are serious threats to human health. They carry dozens of types of bacteria, such as E. coli and salmonella, that can sicken people. And the saliva, feces and body parts they leave behind may not only trigger allergies and asthma but could cause the condition in some children.

3h

Rapid cross-resistance bringing cockroaches closer to invincibility

Cockroaches are serious threats to human health. They carry dozens of types of bacteria, such as E. coli and salmonella, that can sicken people. And the saliva, feces and body parts they leave behind may not only trigger allergies and asthma but could cause the condition in some children.

3h

Preparing protocols for making deuterated biomolecules

Neutron techniques are good for studying light atoms like hydrogen—great for biological molecules that contain large numbers of them. Neutrons are particularly sensitive to isotopic substitution of hydrogen (1H) with deuterium (2H) and this allows contrast techniques to be used to study molecules in detail. For this, users need to prepare deuterated versions of the biological molecules that they w

3h

Ice-squeezed aquifers might create marsquakes

As the Mars InSight lander begins listening to the interior of Mars, some scientists are already proposing that some marsquakes could be signals of groundwater beneath the frozen surface of the Red Planet.

3h

Celebrating Asteroid Day with ESA and the world

Summer in the Northern hemisphere has arrived and with it the long, sunny days and hot, sticky nights.

3h

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Robots 'to replace 20 million factory jobs'

submitted by /u/_Deleted_Deleted [link] [comments]

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Calling Innovators To Join The Circular Economy Challenge

submitted by /u/thinkB4WeSpeak [link] [comments]

3h

How the antibiotic chloramphenicol causes damage to eukaryotes

A group of scientists from Japan led by Professor Takashi Kamakura of Tokyo University of Science has demonstrated the molecular and cellular basis of the toxic effects of the antibiotic chloramphenicol on eukaryotic cells. Concluding their study published in Scientific Reports, they write, "Identification of the molecular target of chloramphenicol may lead to better elucidation and resolution of

3h

Trump's tweets reveal hidden unity between Democrats, Republicans

Democrats and Republicans may stand on opposite ends of the political spectrum, but when it comes to President Donald Trump's tweets, they have more in common than meets the eye.

3h

How the antibiotic chloramphenicol causes damage to eukaryotes

A group of scientists from Japan led by Professor Takashi Kamakura of Tokyo University of Science has demonstrated the molecular and cellular basis of the toxic effects of the antibiotic chloramphenicol on eukaryotic cells. Concluding their study published in Scientific Reports, they write, "Identification of the molecular target of chloramphenicol may lead to better elucidation and resolution of

3h

Unprecedented 3-D images of human ear anatomy for hearing restoration

Using advanced techniques at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan, scientists have created three-dimensional images of the complex interior anatomy of the human ear, information that is key to improving the design and placement of cochlear implants.

3h

Translating proteins into music, and back

In a surprising marriage of science and art, researchers at MIT have developed a system for converting the molecular structures of proteins, the basic building blocks of all living beings, into audible sound that resembles musical passages. Then, reversing the process, they can introduce some variations into the music and convert it back into new proteins never before seen in nature.

3h

Making music from proteins (video)

Composers string notes of different pitch and duration together to create music. Similarly, cells join amino acids with different characteristics together to make proteins. Now, researchers have bridged these two seemingly disparate processes by translating protein sequences into musical compositions and then using artificial intelligence to convert the sounds into brand-new proteins. They report

3h

Natural ingredients in supplements, nutraceuticals get a new type of barcode

Increasingly, shoppers are choosing nutraceuticals, cosmetics and herbal remedies with natural ingredients, and these products are readily available in many drug stores and supermarkets. But some consumers, health professionals and policy makers have raised concerns about the safety, quality and effectiveness of some of these health products. Now, researchers in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Fo

3h

VR-projekt skal hjælpe studerende med eksamensangst

Simulerede eksamenssituationer skal give studerende mulighed for at blive mere komfortable med at sidde foran underviser og censor i et forsøg på at gennemleve det angstfremkaldende scenarie.

3h

The Magic of Dowsing Keeps Holding On

FAR WEST TEXAS —Before Jeff Boyd became the city of Marfa’s public-works director, he had a long career underwater. As a commercial saturation diver, one of the most specialized kinds of divers around, he would spend his days some 400 feet below the surface, breathing a mixture of helium and oxygen, for month-long stretches. Normal air would kill at that depth. It was around that time, when he wo

3h

New approaches to investigate the molecular causes of amyloid formation

More than 24 million people worldwide suffer from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or Huntington's. The molecular causes of these diseases have so far been little investigated. A team of scientists from Leipzig University and the Technical University of Dresden, as well as the Kurt Schwabe Institute Meinsberg, is now looking into these molecular mechanisms with new appro

3h

Researchers explore architectural design of quantum computers

A recent study led by Princeton University researchers, in collaboration with University of Maryland and IBM, explored the architectural design of quantum computers (QC). In a paper presented at the 2019 ACM/IEEE International Symposium on Computer Architecture, the researchers performed the largest real-system evaluation of quantum computers to date, using seven quantum computers from IBM, Rigett

3h

Can parks help cities fight crime?

The relationship between parks and crime remains the subject of debate.

3h

Organic farming enhances honeybee colony performance

Bees are valuable to humans not only because they produce honey, but also because they pollinate wildflowers and food crops. They exclusively eat nectar and pollen. So in areas where intensive agriculture is practised, they suffer from the thin supply of flowers in May and June, when cultivated oilseed rape (colza) and sunflower are not in bloom. During that period, pollen collection, honey produc

3h

Modelling galactic settlement

What looks like a still of an exploding firework is actually taken from an ESA simulation of humankind's expansion across the stars, produced for an international competition. Each dot is a habitable star system, with the colored stripes representing interstellar expeditions between them.

3h

Solar steam generators could be made with wood, fabric or sponges

As the global population grows, fresh water supplies are more precious than ever. While scientists and engineers know how to purify water, making those methods sustainable and energy efficient is another question.

3h

The older you get, the harder you seek: The mating secrets of Africa's bull elephants

Males of many species slow down in their pursuit of females as they age. Not so with elephants. A new study published today reveals that bull elephants increase the energy they put into reproduction as they get older.

3h

Modeling Earth's chemistry: Making the invisible visible

An incredibly complex system lives beneath our feet, transporting metals to Earth's crust and undergoing a myriad of chemical reactions that influence our daily lives. These environmental interactions affect everything from our ability to use soil to produce food and the cleanliness of our drinking water to how we might mitigate our changing climate. Humans have a huge impact on Earth's subsurface

3h

Ultraviolet light-based coating shows promise in self-disinfecting surfaces in medical facilities, public areas

The World Health Organization warns that antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest global threats and predicts that worldwide death rates from this threat could skyrocket past 10 million a year by 2050, becoming more deadly than cancer, which kills 8.2 million people worldwide each year.

3h

Organic farming enhances honeybee colony performance

Bees are valuable to humans not only because they produce honey, but also because they pollinate wildflowers and food crops. They exclusively eat nectar and pollen. So in areas where intensive agriculture is practised, they suffer from the thin supply of flowers in May and June, when cultivated oilseed rape (colza) and sunflower are not in bloom. During that period, pollen collection, honey produc

3h

The older you get, the harder you seek: The mating secrets of Africa's bull elephants

Males of many species slow down in their pursuit of females as they age. Not so with elephants. A new study published today reveals that bull elephants increase the energy they put into reproduction as they get older.

3h

Media Literacy Is Key

Media literacy is an important component to teaching science and critical thinking. We'll add that to our to-do list.

3h

4 ways to move beyond gridlock in touchy debates

Working toward understanding around divisive issues such as gun violence, climate change, and immigration isn’t impossible, says Craig Rood, but he admits it won’t be easy. If we truly want to make progress on these difficult issues, Rood says we must understand how we got to this point and be willing to let go of the “us versus them” mentality. “My goal is not to advocate for a particular policy

3h

Trading in futures

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01990-1 A sound investment?

3h

Mars methane spike, stem-cell clinics and India’s space plans

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01984-z The week in science: 21–27 June 2019.

3h

Natural ingredients in supplements, nutraceuticals get a new type of barcode

Increasingly, shoppers are choosing nutraceuticals, cosmetics and herbal remedies with natural ingredients, and these products are readily available in many drug stores and supermarkets. But some consumers, health professionals and policy makers have raised concerns about the safety, quality and effectiveness of some of these health products. Now, researchers in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Fo

3h

Interior wall brings breath of fresh air to home of the future

More than 3.8 million deaths worldwide each year are blamed on household air pollution, and scientists are turning to many strategies to try to clean the air in homes and business, including the use of everyday plants.

3h

Image of the Day: Stowaway

Previously undetected cyanobacteria are symbionts of dinoflagellates.

3h

Facebook’s Libra Cryptocurrency Betrays the Company’s True Ambitions

The social network wants to enable easy, inexpensive global commerce, sure. But its ultimate goals are a little more … geopolitical.

3h

Amazon Fire 7 Kids Edition 2019 Review: Good for Tiny Hands

Worry-free tablets like the 2019 Fire 7 are great for small, sticky hands. Read our full review of it, and FreeTime Unlimited.

3h

How to evaluate computers that don’t quite exist

Developers debate way to measure the power of quantum computers

3h

Natural ingredients in supplements, nutraceuticals get a new type of barcode

Increasingly, shoppers are choosing nutraceuticals, cosmetics and herbal remedies with natural ingredients, and these products are readily available in many drug stores and supermarkets. But some consumers, health professionals and policy makers have raised concerns about the safety, quality and effectiveness of some of these health products. Now, researchers in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Fo

3h

Joe Biden Won’t Say If He Backs the Trade Deal He Helped Sell

Toward the end of his vice presidency, Joe Biden was a prime player in the administration’s bid to win support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the failed trade deal that was supposed to be the crowning achievement of Barack Obama’s presidency-long “pivot to Asia.” Biden liked to hold up two maps of the Pacific region—one shaded in blue to show America’s influence in the region if the deal pass

3h

To retain more info at the doctor, relax first

If we can relax and become calm before seeing the doctor, we’ll likely pay attention to and better comprehend written health messages, according to new research. Researchers tested whether increasing one’s positive self through meditation can lessen negative feelings prior to getting the health information. “An intense negative emotion can lead to a patient to focus on only one or two pieces of i

3h

US chip firm says it can 'lawfully' sell some items to Huawei

US semiconductor firm Micron Technology said Tuesday it has resumed some sales to Chinese technology giant Huawei despite a ban imposed by President Donald Trump on national security grounds.

3h

Bystander effect: Famous psychology result could be completely wrong

A famous result in psychology says that people fail to intervene when they see people in violent situations, but a review of CCTV footage finds that isn't true

3h

Greenland Ice Sheet: 'More than 50 hidden lakes' detected

Only a handful of liquid water lakes had previously been detected under the kilometres-thick ice sheet.

4h

US meteorologists worried over 5G roll-out

Weather forecasters think parts of the 5G network could interfere with meteorology communications.

4h

SpaceX Successfully Launches, Partially Recovers Falcon Heavy

Elon Musk's SpaceX notched up some notable wins this morning, including a strong demonstration of Falcon Heavy's overall capabilities for the US Air Force. The post SpaceX Successfully Launches, Partially Recovers Falcon Heavy appeared first on ExtremeTech .

4h

How Has Netflix Changed Entertainment?

Subscribe to Crazy/Genius : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play The numbers are staggering: thousands of films and TV shows available to 160 million subscribers in 190 countries. Netflix has changed the entertainment business; that much is obvious. But how has it changed the meaning of video entertainment in our culture—and the way movies and television shows are made? In this episo

4h

Lessons learnt from doing research amid a humanitarian crisis

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01989-8 Carrying on with data collection and model creation can be harrowing, but there are rewards in the chance to make a difference.

4h

Doctors at many stem-cell clinics don’t have relevant training

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01999-6 Few US clinics offering unproven treatments employ physicians with expertise in all the conditions they offer to treat, finds survey.

4h

AIs that diagnose diseases are starting to assist and replace doctors

Digital doctors are already in use, but there are big questions about how they work. Are we ready for the rise of AI healthcare?

4h

I travelled to a future where AI cameras track your every move

Donna Lu investigates the murky world of security tech. She finds cameras packed with artificial intelligence, fingerprint scanners and a live owl

4h

Five schemes for cheaper space launches—and five cautionary tales

Spaceplanes, giant rockets, tethers and catapults

4h

How to fight a war in space (and get away with it)

Satellites are so crucial that attacking them could be seen as an act of war. The bad news is, it may have already happened.

4h

The NASA engineers struggling to build a better heat shield

As bigger probes get sent into space, the problem of how to slow them down again is getting harder

4h

All the new Mars missions being launched in 2020

China, the US, and the European Space Agency are sending vehicles to explore the red planet. They’ll be joined by a Russian lander and an Emirati orbiter.

4h

Does the world need a 3D-printed rocket?

Relativity Space, a well-funded startup, is going all-in on additive manufacturing. But is that too much of a good thing?

4h

The world’s smallest big rocket company

Dave Masten builds rockets on a shoestring in the desert—can he help NASA reinvent itself as a lean, agile enterprise?

4h

The case for sending people back to the moon

Hard to justify in practical terms, a return to the moon nonetheless seems almost inevitable

4h

Next stop: Alpha Centauri

Starshot wants to build the world’s most powerful laser and aim it at the closest star. What could go wrong?

4h

What Neil Armstrong got wrong

Space technology has changed the world—but not in the way the dreamers of the 1960s imagined it would

4h

Can SpaceX and Blue Origin best a decades-old Russian rocket engine design?

The story of the RD-180, the big rocket engine that could

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Editor’s letter: where to?

An introduction to our special issue on space

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How the asteroid-mining bubble burst

A short history of the space industry’s failed (for now) gold rush

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How music about space became music about drugs

The rise and fall of space rock, from David Bowie to Radiohead

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Where does space begin?

The not-so-final frontier

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The write stuff: ten of the best astronaut memoirs

Very short excerpts from books about space by people who have been there

4h

Peru’s famous Nazca Lines may include drawings of exotic birds

Pre-Inca people depicted winged fliers from far away in landscape art.

4h

Senators Want Facebook to Put a Price on Your Data. Is That Possible?

A bill introduced by senators Mark Warner and Josh Hawley would require big tech companies to disclose the data they collect and value it for each user.

4h

The Democratic Debates Will Be About Climate—Disguised as Other Issues

Every issue the presidential hopefuls will debate this week is deeply tied to climate change. The question is what the candidates will do about it.

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How to Watch the 2020 Democratic Primary Debate Wednesday and Thursday

Twenty candidates. Two nights. A bunch of 60-second answers. Probably at least one meme. Here's how to watch.

4h

One Boy’s Dream Vacation to Bauma, a Festival of Giant Construction Equipment

The author brought his 5-year-old son to the world’s largest building industry expo. “Hi, Dad,” he says from the seat of a hulking dump truck. “I’m ginormous!”

4h

Who gets to send radio waves in space?

Satellites aren’t much use if they can’t communicate

4h

Behandlerfarmaceuter kan aflaste praktiserende læger

Den nye uddannelse til behandlerfarmaceut og den medfølgende autorisation til at genordinere receptpligtige lægemidler, kan være med til at aflaste landets pressede lægevagter. Det vurderer formand for PLO’s kommuneudvalg.

4h

What's So Funny? The Science of Why We Laugh

Psychologists, neuroscientists and philosophers are trying to understand humor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

What's So Funny? The Science of Why We Laugh

Psychologists, neuroscientists and philosophers are trying to understand humor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Så många procent sämre hälsa får en arbetslös

– Studien understryker vilken vinst för folkhälsan det faktiskt innebär att minska arbetslösheten. De hälsomässiga aspekterna hamnar tyvärr ofta i skymundan när arbetslöshet diskuteras, säger Fredrik Norström, forskare vid Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa vid Umeå universitet. Att arbetslöshet gör folk sjukare är ett sedan länge känt faktum. Det finns sedan tidigare studier som vis

5h

What's So Funny? The Science of Why We Laugh

Psychologists, neuroscientists and philosophers are trying to understand humor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Astronomers Have Decoded a Weird Signal Coming from a Strange, 3-Body Star System

There's a strange object in the Milky Way that blinks at us once or twice a day, and a team of scientists think they've figured out why.

5h

The Most Energetic Light Ever Seen Just Showered Down from the Skies Above Tibet

These photons have trillions of times more energy than a garden variety light particle coming from the sun.

5h

Sitting in Front of the TV May Be Worse for Your Heart Than Sitting at a Desk

People with desk jobs may not need to feel so guilty about all those sedentary hours in an office chair.

5h

New unprinting method can help recycle paper and curb environmental costs

Imagine if your printer had an 'unprint' button that used pulses of light to remove toner, curbing environmental impacts compared with conventional paper recycling.

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Snails show that variety is the key to success if you want to remember more

Neuroscientists at the University of Sussex have revealed the factors that impact on memory interference, showing that a change is as good as a rest when it comes to retaining more information. They also discovered that timing plays a key role, as old information can effectively be replaced by new information when learning takes place during a memory lapse.

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PLO-formand: Jeg håber bare mest på en handlekraftig sundhedsminister

Det er svært at være uenig med nye regerings fokus på almen praksis, og meget står og falder med den nye sundhedsministers handlekraft, siger PLO-formand.

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Midtjyske praksislæger skal rådgive kommunalt ansatte

Region Midtjylland og 19 kommuner i regionen har fundet 3 mio. kr., som skal bruges på at aflønne egnens praktiserende læger for rådgivning af kommunalt ansatte i akutfunktionerne. Aftalen træder i kraft 1. september og skal forebygge indlæggelser.

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Hyppige målinger afværger legionærsyge på Regionshospital i Viborg

Regionshospitalet Viborg fandt i marts legionella i hospitalets vandrør via deres hyppige målinger. Ifølge hospitalet er ingen blevet syge.

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How Men and Women Spend Their Time

In one of my many failed schemes to introduce a more equitable division of labor into my home, I stuck lined Post-it Notes on the refrigerator. “Please write down the chores you do. At the end of the week, we’ll figure out if anything needs to change.” I recorded my contributions zealously: cooking, dishes, laundry, sweeping, swiping (bathrooms). Although they did a few household tasks—a load of

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‘Don’t Go After Old Uncle Joe Too Fast’

Few Americans know what it’s like to stand onstage for a nationally televised presidential debate. And the few who do have strong partisan biases. With both of those things in mind, I listened Monday as Chris Christie, the former New Jersey governor and a Republican candidate in 2016, discussed the upcoming Democratic debates during an interview with the Atlantic editor Jeffrey Goldberg at the As

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The Gangs of Kalorama

Burner phones, FBI stakeouts, search warrants—Season 6 of The Wire ? No, just our social betters street fighting their children’s way into elite colleges. In March, we got Operation Varsity Blues, which charged a group of wealthy parents and an alleged conman with conspiring to get lackluster students into posh colleges in a scheme so improbably complex that it triggered the use of the RICO statu

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Report for America Revives Possibilities for Local Journalism

Because I’m not a politician, I don’t have to wear an American-flag lapel pin. (I’ve never seen a photo of, say, Dwight Eisenhower, or FDR, or JFK, wearing a flag pin. Richard Nixon did it sometimes. It became de rigueur some time after the 9/11 attacks of 2001.) But this is the story of a pin I’ve started wearing recently. The pin says Report for America , as you can see below. You could read th

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Graphene goes to space

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Setting the standard for Machine Learning

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Komplex genetik bakom barns födelsevikt

Att låg födelsevikt kan kopplas till komplikationer under både graviditet och förlossning är ett känt faktum. Likaså att dessa barn i högre utsträckning får högt blodtryck som vuxna. Kopplingarna till genetik och miljö har dock varit oklara, men genom att tydligt skilja effekterna av barns respektive mödrars genetik på födelsevikten klarnar också bilden hur födelsevikten förhåller sig till olika

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The infrared Universe

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01970-5 Michael Rowan-Robinson finds an account of NASA’s Spitzer mission gripping but narrowly focused.

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Why a great education means engaging with controversy

During times of war or national crisis in the U.S., school boards and officials are much more wary about allowing teachers and kids to say what they think. If our teachers avoid controversial questions in the classroom, kids won't get the experience they need to know how to engage with difficult questions and with criticism. Jonathan Zimmerman argues that controversial issues should be taught in

5h

Ingeniøren, der så Danmarks potentiale som industriland

Alexander Foss’ visioner lever videre i den fond, der i 1919 blev stiftet i hans navn, og som stadig støtter de gode ideer.

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Snails show that variety is the key to success if you want to remember more

A change is as good as a rest when it comes to remembering more, according to new research by neuroscientists at the University of Sussex.

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Snails show that variety is the key to success if you want to remember more

A change is as good as a rest when it comes to remembering more, according to new research by neuroscientists at the University of Sussex.

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Ny virus med navnet Silex ødelægger IoT-enheder

En 14-årig dreng står angiveligt bag malwaren, som han planlægger at udbygge og gøre mere destruktiv.

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Matematikernes vilde job: De forhindrer cyberangreb, designer computerspil og laver milliard-investeringer

Mange matematikere har job, der er anderledes, end hvad de fleste nok forestiller sig. Nogle afværger…

6h

Svag udmelding om forskning i regeringsaftalen

Den nye regering har nøjagtig samme målsætning som den gamle, når det gælder forskning.

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Sundhedsstyrelsen samler anbefalinger for praktiserende læger et sted

Praktiserende læger skal nu kun kigge ét sted for at finde alle anbefalinger fra nationale kliniske retningslinjer.

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Researchers discover more than 50 lakes beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet

Researchers have discovered 56 previously uncharted subglacial lakes beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet bringing the total known number of lakes to 60. Although these lakes are typically smaller than similar lakes in Antarctica, their discovery demonstrates that lakes beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet are much more common than previously thought.

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We need to talk about chloramphenicol — how does this antibiotic cause damage to eukaryotes?

A group of scientists from Japan — led by Professor Takashi Kamakura of Tokyo University of Science — has demonstrated, for the first time, the molecular and cellular basis of the 'adverse' effects of the antibiotic chloramphenicol on eukaryotic cells.

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Environmental destruction linked to African population raises questions about family sizes

Africa is projected to be home to nearly 3 billion people by 2100, but rapid population growth will cause widespread environmental degradation unless effective family planning becomes widespread policy, according to new research that tracked increased population pressures on the continent's ecosystems.

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Heart risk raised by sitting in front of the TV, not by sitting at work, finds study

Sitting while watching television, but not sitting at work, is associated with a greater risk of heart attack, stroke, or early death, Columbia researchers have found.

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Binge watching TV increases heart health risks more than a desk job among African Americans

Among African Americans, television watching proved more of a heart health threat than sitting at a desk job.African Americans who watched more than four hours of television every day faced a 50% greater risk of heart disease and premature death compared with those who watched less than two hours.However, African Americans who watched regular TV but also engaged in moderate to vigorous physical ac

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Move over, DNA: ancient proteins are starting to reveal humanity’s history

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01986-x Proteins dating back more than one million years have been extracted from some fossils, and could help to answer some difficult questions about archaic humans.

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Modelling the dynamics of EBV transmission to inform a vaccine target product profile and future vaccination strategy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45381-y Modelling the dynamics of EBV transmission to inform a vaccine target product profile and future vaccination strategy

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Recent morphologic evolution of the German Wadden Sea

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45683-1 Recent morphologic evolution of the German Wadden Sea

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Identification of the fructose transporter GLUT5 (SLC2A5) as a novel target of nuclear receptor LXR

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45803-x Identification of the fructose transporter GLUT5 ( SLC2A5 ) as a novel target of nuclear receptor LXR

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Chloramphenicol inhibits eukaryotic Ser/Thr phosphatase and infection-specific cell differentiation in the rice blast fungus

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41039-x Chloramphenicol inhibits eukaryotic Ser/Thr phosphatase and infection-specific cell differentiation in the rice blast fungus

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Contextual influences in the peripheral retina of patients with macular degeneration

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45648-4 Contextual influences in the peripheral retina of patients with macular degeneration

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Effect of NIR laser therapy by MLS-MiS source against neuropathic pain in rats: in vivo and ex vivo analysis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45469-5 Effect of NIR laser therapy by MLS-MiS source against neuropathic pain in rats: in vivo and ex vivo analysis

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Erosion and deposition beneath the Subantarctic Front since the Early Oligocene

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45815-7 Erosion and deposition beneath the Subantarctic Front since the Early Oligocene

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Piezoelectric needle sensor reveals mechanical heterogeneity in human thyroid tissue lesions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45730-x Piezoelectric needle sensor reveals mechanical heterogeneity in human thyroid tissue lesions

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Oppo Showcases World's First Under-Display Selfie Camera For Smartphones

In the ongoing quest to offer a truly full-front display on a smartphone, Oppo just unveiled the first-ever selfie camera that sits underneath the screen of a handset. The design means not …

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Trump Heads Into the G20 on Shaky Ground—And the World Knows It

When he ran for president, Donald Trump said he wasn’t going to telegraph his moves to America’s adversaries. He’s been doing just that. He said he wouldn’t draw “red lines” and then ignore them. That’s happening too. He vowed the United States on his watch would be a military colossus so feared that “nobody’s going to mess with us.” People are messing with us. Trump leaves for Japan today for a

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Rigspolitiet afviser at besvare tekniske spørgsmål om fejl i teleoplysninger

Med henvisning til folketingsvalget, regeringsforhandlingerne og ønsket fra offentligheden om at starte en undersøgelse af teleskandalen vil Rigspolitiet på nuværende tidspunkt ikke svare på spørgsmål om sagen.

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Why So Many Horses Have Died at Santa Anita

There were 30 horse deaths in six months. Many blame a culture of chasing profits and a racing surface trainers say was unsafe.

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As Coal Fades in the U.S., Natural Gas Becomes the Climate Battleground

Utilities are facing a choice: embrace natural gas, or shift more aggressively to renewable power? The decision will have a major climate impact.

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Regeringsaftale sætter mål for klima og miljø

Mette Frederiksen (S) bliver Danmarks næste statsminister, da en aftale med Radikale Venstre, SF og Enhedslisten sikrer, at hun ikke har et flertal imod sig. Energi, transport og landbrug får ifølge aftalen travlt med grøn omstilling.

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Environmental destruction linked to African population raises questions about family sizes

Africa is projected to be home to nearly 3 billion people by 2100, but rapid population growth will cause widespread environmental degradation unless effective family planning becomes widespread policy, according to new research that tracked increased population pressures on the continent's ecosystems.

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Researchers discover more than 50 lakes beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet

Researchers have discovered 56 previously uncharted subglacial lakes beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet bringing the total known number of lakes to 60.

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Det vil en ny regering på sundhedsområdet

Socialdemokratiet, SF, Enhedslisten og Radikale har indgået en politisk aftale, der skal danne grundlaget for en socialdemokratisk mindretalsregering. Sundhedsvæsenet skal være bedre, mener de. Men aftalen giver ikke mange svar på hvordan.

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Huawei: Danmark sakker bagud med 5G

PLUS. Den tekniske direktør for Huawei i Norden, Mads Arnbjørn Rasmussen frygter at Danmark taber i digitaliseringskapløbet, hvis ikke myndighederne sætter turbo på udrulningen af 5G

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A Mystery Disease Is Killing Children, and Questions Linger About Lychees

Researchers said the fruit was behind annual outbreaks of a fatal syndrome in eastern India. But local doctors say that theory can’t explain all the cases.

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ICSI has no outcome benefits over conventional IVF in routine non-male infertility cases

Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), the world's favored means of fertilization in assisted reproduction, offers no benefit over conventional in vitro fertilization in fertility treatments without a male factor indication, according to results of a large multicenter study.

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Blind children in Chile get solar eclipse experience

A group of children at a Chilean school for the blind used sound and braille Tuesday to experience conditions that resemble a total solar eclipse.

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A Martian methane belch melts away

The mystery of the Martian methane continues.

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Robots to take 20 mn jobs, worsening inequality: study

Robots are expected to take over some 20 million manufacturing jobs worldwide by 2030, extending a trend of worsening social inequality while boosting overall economic output, a new study shows.

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Coal dust and smog plague lives on S.Africa's Highveld

Tumelo has again lost several days at school because of sickness.

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'Flying salt shakers of death:' Fungal-infected zombie cicadas explained

If cicadas made horror movies, they'd probably study the actions of their counterparts plagued by a certain psychedelic fungus.

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E-bikes encounter rocky road to approval despite popularity

Gordon Goodwin and his wife are rediscovering their passion for bicycling in their senior years thanks to new electric-assist bikes. The electric motors provide a gentle kick, making it easier for them to pedal up hilly roads around Maine's Acadia National Park.

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NASA to open moon rock samples sealed since Apollo missions

Inside a locked vault at Johnson Space Center is treasure few have seen and fewer have touched.

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US chip firm says it can 'lawfully' sell some items to Huawei

US semiconductor firm Micron Technology said Tuesday it has resumed some sales to Chinese technology giant Huawei despite a ban imposed by President Donald Trump on national security grounds.

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Cyanide compounds discovered in meteorites may hold clues to the origin of life

Cyanide and carbon monoxide are both deadly poisons to humans, but compounds containing iron, cyanide, and carbon monoxide discovered in carbon-rich meteorites by a team of scientists at Boise State University and NASA may have helped power life on early Earth. The extraterrestrial compounds found in meteorites resemble the active site of hydrogenases, which are enzymes that provide energy to bact

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'Flying salt shakers of death:' Fungal-infected zombie cicadas explained

If cicadas made horror movies, they'd probably study the actions of their counterparts plagued by a certain psychedelic fungus.

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Pine woodland restoration creates haven for birds in Midwest, study finds

Millions of acres of pine woodlands once covered a large portion of the Midwest. But as humans logged these trees and suppressed natural fires, the woodlands gave way to dense forests with thick leaf litter and tree species that were less fire-resistant, leading to more intense and unpredictable fires as well as the loss of native bird habitats.

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Pine woodland restoration creates haven for birds in Midwest, study finds

Millions of acres of pine woodlands once covered a large portion of the Midwest. But as humans logged these trees and suppressed natural fires, the woodlands gave way to dense forests with thick leaf litter and tree species that were less fire-resistant, leading to more intense and unpredictable fires as well as the loss of native bird habitats.

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'Triple whammy' threatens UN action on climate change

Efforts by Saudi Arabia, the EU and Japan are seen as part of a backlash against UN climate action.

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Robotter kan nu lugte og mærke (næsten) ligesom mennesker

Sanserne er nødvendige, når robotter skal begå sig i menneskets kaotiske verden.

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World's first raspberry-picking robot to debut in 2020

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

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Managing the ups and downs of coffee production

Each day, more than 2 billion cups of coffee are consumed worldwide.

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Managing the ups and downs of coffee production

Each day, more than 2 billion cups of coffee are consumed worldwide.

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Conservation efforts for giant South American river turtles have protected 147,000 females

By analyzing records in countries of the Amazon and Orinoco basins—which include Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador—a paper published today in Oryx—The International Journal of Conservation, categorized 85 past and present initiatives or projects that work to preserve the South American River Turtle, or charapa (Podocnemis expansa), a critically endangered species. These projec

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Lessons from Columbine: New technology provides insight during active shooter situations

Run, hide, fight. It has become a mantra for how to act during an active shooter situation. The idea is to escape the situation or protect oneself, and counter the gunman as a last resort.

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Research reveals exotic quantum states in double-layer graphene

Researchers from Brown and Columbia Universities have demonstrated previously unknown states of matter that arise in double-layer stacks of graphene, a two-dimensional nanomaterial. These new states, known as the fractional quantum Hall effect, arise from the complex interactions of electrons both within and across graphene layers.

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Conservation efforts for giant South American river turtles have protected 147,000 females

By analyzing records in countries of the Amazon and Orinoco basins—which include Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador—a paper published today in Oryx—The International Journal of Conservation, categorized 85 past and present initiatives or projects that work to preserve the South American River Turtle, or charapa (Podocnemis expansa), a critically endangered species. These projec

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Women's agricultural labor a key factor in malnutrition in India

Recognition of Indian women's roles in both agriculture and domestic work is key to improving household nutrition outcomes, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).

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Why I’m climate striking against Fox News on Friday | Alexandria Villaseñor

The news media is society’s alarm clock – it needs to wake us up This past Saturday, I was among hundreds of activists with the group Extinction Rebellion NYC who protested outside the New York Times headquarters in midtown Manhattan to demand better coverage of the climate crisis. Protesters lay down on Eighth Avenue, staging a “die-in” to block traffic. We draped a banner the length of the Time

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Apple acquires self-driving startup Drive.ai – Roadshow

iPhone maker has acquired the startup's assets and hired many of its engineers.

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A new 'golden' age for electronics?

Scientists have created materials that shrink uniformly in all directions when heated under normal everyday conditions, using a cheap and industrially scalable process. This potentially opens up a new paradigm of thermal-expansion control that will make electronic devices more resilient to temperature changes.

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Study: Social robots can benefit hospitalized children

A new study demonstrates, for the first time, that 'social robots' used in support sessions held in pediatric units at hospitals can lead to more positive emotions in sick children.

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Vaccine critic Yehuda Shoenfeld elected member of Israel Academy

Yehuda Shoenfield is either a genius or a quack of autoimmunity research, depending on which side you stand in the antivax debate. He is also apparently a plagiarist, even Wikipedia is not safe. And this is why he is now a Member of Israel Academy of Sciences.

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Wheat Plants "Sneeze" And Spread Disease

Wheat plants' leaves repel water, which creates the perfect conditions for dew droplets to catapult off the leaves—taking pathogenic spores for the ride. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Helping physics teachers who don't know physics

A shortage of high school physics teachers has led to teachers with little-to-no training taking over physics classrooms, reports show. This has led to additional stress and job dissatisfaction for those teachers — and a difficult learning experience for their students. But new research indicates that focused physics professional development for teachers — even those who have no prior physics tr

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Milk: Best drink to reduce burn from chili peppers

People who order their Buffalo wings especially spicy and sometimes find them to be too 'hot,' should choose milk to reduce the burn, according to researchers, who also suggest it does not matter if it is whole or skim.

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Machine learning reveals how strongly interacting electrons behave at atomic level

A team of scientists collaborating across theoretical and experimental physics and computer science, have developed and trained a new Machine Learning (ML) technique, to finally understand how electrons behave in important quantum materials.

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A new 'golden' age for electronics?

Scientists have created materials that shrink uniformly in all directions when heated under normal everyday conditions, using a cheap and industrially scalable process. This potentially opens up a new paradigm of thermal-expansion control that will make electronic devices more resilient to temperature changes.

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Video games offer clues to help curb animal disease outbreaks

As Asia and Europe battle African swine fever outbreaks, new research shows how farmers' risk attitudes affect the spread of infectious animal diseases and offers a first-of-its kind model for testing disease control and prevention strategies. Getting just 10% of risk tolerant farmers to adopt biosecurity measures resulted in a significant reduction of disease, but keeping the disease under contro

10h

Scientists closer to unraveling mechanisms of speech processing in the brain

A new study that sheds light on how the brain processes language could lead to a better understanding of autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental conditions.

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Better care needed for people displaying first symptoms of bipolar disorder

Better care and more research into treatments for people experiencing a first manic episode are urgently needed, according to researchers. The study describes patchy and inconsistent care, widespread failure to detect bipolar disorder early enough, and a lack of guidance on how to treat people experiencing mania for the first time.

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Tapping into the way cells communicate

For the first time, scientists can record cells communicating in real time, opening the floodgates for new developments in cell therapy and other areas within cell biology.

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Speeding up single-cell genomics research

Time-saving method makes it possible to profile gene regulation in tens of thousands of individual human cells in a single day. Approach combines microfluidics and novel software to scale up single-cell ATAC-seq, which identifies parts of the tightly packaged genome that are more open and accessible to regulatory proteins. Profiling individual cells can clarify how genes function – in which specif

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Tapping into the way cells communicate

For the first time, scientists can record cells communicating in real time, opening the floodgates for new developments in cell therapy and other areas within cell biology.

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People prefer to donate time — even when charities lose out

Each year during the holiday season, soup kitchens and charities alike are flooded with offers to volunteer. But is a donation of your time most beneficial to the charity, or would a financial contribution provide more value? Researchers wondered what drives volunteering — especially when a monetary donation would have more impact.

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Algorithm designed to map universe, solve mysteries

Researchers have developed an algorithm designed to visualize models of the universe in order to solve some of physics' greatest mysteries.

11h

Research reveals exotic quantum states in double-layer graphene

Researchers have demonstrated previously unknown states of matter that arise in double-layer stacks of graphene, a two-dimensional nanomaterial. These new states, known as the fractional quantum Hall effect, arise from the complex interactions of electrons both within and across graphene layers.

11h

Conservation efforts for giant South American river turtles have protected 147,000 females

By analyzing records in countries of the Amazon and Orinoco basins — which include Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador — researchers categorized 85 past and present initiatives or projects that work to preserve the South American River Turtle, or charapa (Podocnemis expansa), a critically endangered species. These projects are protecting more than 147,000 female turtles across

11h

How dung beetles know where to roll their dung balls

When the South African dung beetle rolls its dung ball through the savannah, it must know the way as precisely as possible. Scientists have now discovered that it does not orient itself solely on the position of the sun.

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Women exposed to common antibacterial chemical more likely to break a bone

Women exposed to triclosan are more likely to develop osteoporosis, according to a new study.

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Certain cells secrete a substance in the brain that protects neurons

Researchers have discovered a secret sauce in the brain's vascular system that preserves the neurons needed to keep dementia and other diseases at bay.

11h

Lessons from Columbine: New technology provides insight during active shooter situations

A Purdue University researcher and students created a computer model, based on the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School, which looks at what happens to victims caught in shooter situations to provide better training for schools and other organizations.

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From simple tools to high-level buy-in, how doctors can help cancer patients quit tobacco

A simple set of decision-support tools combined with institutional buy-in can help increase the number of cancer patients who engage in treatment to help them quit tobacco, data from researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania show.

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Researchers reveal lack of evidence for drugs prescribed to treat chronic pain in children

A new study has highlighted an 'unacceptable disparity' in the evidence base for treating chronic pain in children.

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Managing the ups and downs of coffee production

Research could bring new coffee varieties to market faster and improve yields.

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Organic farming enhances honeybee colony performance

A team of researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the University of La Rochelle is now the first to have demonstrated that organic farming benefits honeybee colonies, especially when food is scarce in late spring. The scientists analyzed six years of data collected through a unique system for monitoring domesticated bees that is unparalleled in Europe. Their findings are published in the Journal of A

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Injury more likely due to abuse when child was with male caregiver

The odds of child physical abuse vs. accidental injury increased substantially when the caregiver at the time of injury was male, according to a new study published in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Bystanders will intervene to help victims of aggressive public disputes

Bystanders will intervene in nine out of 10 public fights to help victims of aggression and violence reveals the largest ever study of real-life conflicts captured by CCTV.The findings overturn the impression of the 'walk on by society' where victims are ignored by bystanders.The consistent helping rate found across different national and urban contexts supports earlier research 'suggesting that t

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Wheat Plants "Sneeze" And Spread Disease

Wheat plants' leaves repel water, which creates the perfect conditions for dew droplets to catapult off the leaves—taking pathogenic spores for the ride. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Puppy love: Choosing the perfect pooch poses challenges similar to dating

A psychologists who study relationship choice have found that when it comes to picking a canine companion, what people say they want in a dog isn't always in line with what they choose.

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National trash: Reducing waste produced in US national parks

When you think of national parks, you might picture the vast plateaus of the Grand Canyon, the intricate wetlands of the Everglades, or the inspiring viewscapes of the Grand Tetons. You probably don't envision 100 million pounds of mashed water bottles, barbecue-smudged paper plates, and crumpled coffee cups — but that is the staggering quantity of garbage that is generated in our National Parks

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Kommune opfordrede forældre til at indsende børns psykiske diagnoser via usikker mail

En opfordring i forbindelse med et projekt under Københavns Kommune har sat følsomme persondata på spil og kan være i strid med GDPR, vurderer jurist. Kommunen kalder nu selv forløbet for »en klar fejl.«

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Wheat Plants "Sneeze" And Spread Disease

Wheat plants' leaves repel water, which creates the perfect conditions for dew droplets to catapult off the leaves—taking pathogenic spores for the ride. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Netflix will lose 'The Office' in 2021

The US adaptation of the Ricky Gervais-led British original remains one of the most popular series on Netflix, despite coming to an end with its 9th season back in 2013. The documentary style …

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Why rich countries are more prone to ‘vaccine hesitancy’

Social media has prompted what Unicef calls a ‘real infection of misinformation’

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Robots could take 20 million manufacturing jobs by 2030

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Fireflies inspire new energy-saving LED light bulbs.

submitted by /u/InfectedUrsidae [link] [comments]

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India's sixth biggest city is almost entirely out of water

submitted by /u/POMCube [link] [comments]

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An Ancient System Could Stop Modern-Day Peru Running Out of Water

We still have a lot to learn from the past.

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Air pollution can ruin the health benefits of 'walkable' neighborhoods

The strength of the health benefits that come with living in a walkable area depend on other environmental factors, like air pollution. (Deposit Photos/) Living in a walkable neighborhood, where people can easily get to the store, to work, and around town under their own power, is usually associated with better health—studies show that those neighborhoods are associated with increased physical ac

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Arnold Schwarzenegger Stars in a New Ad Plugging Electric Cars

The former Terminator and California governor poses as a sleazy car salesman and makes patently ridiculous arguments against going electric.

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You can try the iOS 13 and iPadOS betas right now, but you probably shouldn’t

The new Photos app offers more robust options when it comes to image editing and organization. (Apple/) Just a few weeks ago at its developers' conference , Apple announced the upcoming iOS 13 and iPadOS 13 updates. It was a big moment within the Apple universe because it officially separates the iPhone and the iPad into different, albeit similar software worlds. Now, both operating systems have

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U.S. Navy began testing advanced version of long-range electromagnetic weapon

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Bone Up On What's Inside You

Author and self-described fossil fanatic Brian Switek talks about his new book Skeleton Keys: The Secret Life of Bone. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Quick test checks for malaria drug resistance

Biomedical engineers report having cracked the code to quickly diagnosing anti-malarial drug resistance. They are working to apply the method to help patients with HIV, tuberculosis, and a host of other diseases. One of the keys to quickly diagnosing anti-malarial drug resistance—potentially saving lives—lies in testing whole blood instead of extracting DNA, eliminating processing steps that can

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Floating wind farms just became a serious business

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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NASA caught a sudden whiff of methane on Mars, but don’t hold your breath for space cows

Curious and curiouser. (NASA/) Methane is back in the news, but this time not in the dreadful harbinger-of-climate-doom kind of way. The New York Times reported over the weekend that NASA's Curiosity rover had stumbled upon surprisingly high methane levels in the Martian atmosphere near the Gale Crater—at least three times higher than Curiosity measured in 2013. The announcement, confirmed by NAS

16h

Americans aren’t so optimistic about economic mobility

Americans overestimate the future income for children from wealthy and middle-income families, but underestimate that of children from poor ones, according to a new study. The research, which appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , runs counter to popular perceptions, as well as to some previous research, that holds Americans, overall, have optimistic views of eco

16h

UK has halved air pollution deaths since 1970 but must still do more

The share of premature deaths in the UK linked to air pollution has dropped significantly because of action on emissions – but there is still a long way to go

16h

Questions and demos teach robots what humans want

Researchers are developing better, faster ways of providing human guidance to autonomous robots. They have combined two different ways of setting goals for robots into a single process, which performed better than either of its parts alone in both simulations and real-world experiments. Told to optimize for speed while racing down a track in a computer game, a car pushes the pedal to the metal… a

16h

Blue color tones in fossilized prehistoric feathers

Examining fossilized pigments, scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered new insights into blue color tones in prehistoric birds.

16h

Improving cancer treatment is 'major priority' for public

Enhancing cancer treatment is a 'major priority' for the UK public, which also thinks that the NHS needs more resources to provide 'excellent cancer care,' finds a new national survey led by UCL.

16h

Mathematical models converge on PGC1{alpha} as the key metabolic integrator of SIRT1 and AMPK regulation of the circadian clock [Letters (Online Only)]

How the mammalian circadian clock interacts with metabolism and its possible implications in metabolic diseases are actively studied. In PNAS, Foteinou et al. (1) propose a mathematical model of the circadian clock that incorporates the metabolic sensor SIRT1 and validate it with cell experiments. Their findings shed light on conflicting…

16h

Reply to Furlan et al.: The role of SIRT1 in cell autonomous clock function [Letters (Online Only)]

As the mathematical model developed by Woller et al. (1) also considers the role of SIRT1 in circadian clock, we regret not citing this work. However, we feel the inferences drawn in Furlan et al.’s (2) letter conflate 2 distinct studies with disparate purposes and methods. In Foteinou et al….

16h

Allosteric modulation of a human protein kinase with monobodies [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Despite being the subject of intense effort and scrutiny, kinases have proven to be consistently challenging targets in inhibitor drug design. A key obstacle has been promiscuity and consequent adverse effects of drugs targeting the ATP binding site. Here we introduce an approach to controlling kinase activity by using monobodies…

16h

The combination of TPL2 knockdown and TNF{alpha} causes synthetic lethality via caspase-8 activation in human carcinoma cell lines [Cell Biology]

Most normal and tumor cells are protected from tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced apoptosis. Here, we identify the MAP3 kinase tumor progression locus-2 (TPL2) as a player contributing to the protection of a subset of tumor cell lines. The combination of TPL2 knockdown and TNFα gives rise to a synthetic…

16h

The energetic basis for hydroxyapatite mineralization by amelogenin variants provides insights into the origin of amelogenesis imperfecta [Chemistry]

Small variations in the primary amino acid sequence of extracellular matrix proteins can have profound effects on the biomineralization of hard tissues. For example, a change in one amino acid within the amelogenin protein can lead to drastic changes in enamel phenotype, resulting in amelogenesis imperfecta, enamel that is defective…

16h

A Lotus japonicus cytoplasmic kinase connects Nod factor perception by the NFR5 LysM receptor to nodulation [Plant Biology]

The establishment of nitrogen-fixing root nodules in legume–rhizobia symbiosis requires an intricate communication between the host plant and its symbiont. We are, however, limited in our understanding of the symbiosis signaling process. In particular, how membrane-localized receptors of legumes activate signal transduction following perception of rhizobial signaling molecules has mostly…

16h

Atlastin-mediated membrane tethering is critical for cargo mobility and exit from the endoplasmic reticulum [Cell Biology]

Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane junctions are formed by the dynamin-like GTPase atlastin (ATL). Deletion of ATL results in long unbranched ER tubules in cells, and mutation of human ATL1 is linked to hereditary spastic paraplegia. Here, we demonstrate that COPII formation is drastically decreased in the periphery of ATL-deleted cells….

16h

Asymmetries between achromatic and chromatic extraction of 3D motion signals [Neuroscience]

Motion in depth (MID) can be cued by high-resolution changes in binocular disparity over time (CD), and low-resolution interocular velocity differences (IOVD). Computational differences between these two mechanisms suggest that they may be implemented in visual pathways with different spatial and temporal resolutions. Here, we used fMRI to examine how…

16h

Structural bases for F plasmid conjugation and F pilus biogenesis in Escherichia coli [Microbiology]

Bacterial conjugation systems are members of the large type IV secretion system (T4SS) superfamily. Conjugative transfer of F plasmids residing in the Enterobacteriaceae was first reported in the 1940s, yet the architecture of F plasmid-encoded transfer channel and its physical relationship with the F pilus remain unknown. We visualized F-encoded…

16h

Cyanobacterial viruses exhibit diurnal rhythms during infection [Environmental Sciences]

As an adaptation to the daily light–dark (diel) cycle, cyanobacteria exhibit diurnal rhythms of gene expression and cell cycle. The light–dark cycle also affects the life cycle of viruses (cyanophages) that infect the unicellular picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, which are the major primary producers in the oceans. For example, the…

16h

Arabinogalactan protein-rare earth element complexes activate plant endocytosis [Plant Biology]

Endocytosis is essential to all eukaryotes, but how cargoes are selected for internalization remains poorly characterized. Extracellular cargoes are thought to be selected by transmembrane receptors that bind intracellular adaptors proteins to initiate endocytosis. Here, we report a mechanism for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) of extracellular lanthanum [La(III)] cargoes, which requires…

16h

Dissecting fat-tailed fluctuations in the cytoskeleton with active micropost arrays [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The ability of animal cells to crawl, change their shape, and respond to applied force is due to their cytoskeleton: A dynamic, cross-linked network of actin protein filaments and myosin motors. How these building blocks assemble to give rise to cells’ mechanics and behavior remains poorly understood. Using active micropost…

16h

Sfrp4 repression of the Ror2/Jnk cascade in osteoclasts protects cortical bone from excessive endosteal resorption [Medical Sciences]

Loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt inhibitor secreted frizzled receptor protein 4 (SFRP4) cause Pyle’s disease (OMIM 265900), a rare skeletal disorder characterized by wide metaphyses, significant thinning of cortical bone, and fragility fractures. In mice, we have shown that the cortical thinning seen in the absence of Sfrp4 is associated…

16h

Water is not a dynamic polydisperse branched polymer [Letters (Online Only)]

In PNAS, Naserifar and Goddard (1) report that their RexPoN water model under ambient conditions comprises a “dynamic polydisperse branched polymer,” which they speculate explains the existence of the liquid–liquid critical point (LLCP) in the supercooled region. The observable they rely on to support this is the oxygen–oxygen radial distribution…

16h

Dynamic secretome of bone marrow-derived stromal cells reveals a cardioprotective biochemical cocktail [Systems Biology]

Transplanted stromal cells have demonstrated considerable promise as therapeutic agents in diverse disease settings. Paracrine signaling can be an important mediator of these therapeutic effects at the sites of acute or persistent injury and inflammation. As many stromal cell types, including bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs), display tissue-specific responses, there…

16h

Consecutive seeding and transfer of genetic diversity in metastasis [Medical Sciences]

During metastasis, only a fraction of genetic diversity in a primary tumor is passed on to metastases. We calculate this fraction of transferred diversity as a function of the seeding rate between tumors. At one extreme, if a metastasis is seeded by a single cell, then it inherits only the…

16h

Plasmonics sheds light on the nanotechnology of daguerreotypes [Commentaries]

The capturing of images has become one of our most universal and commonplace technologies. As a digital electronic technology, it has permanently transformed society by revolutionizing personal recording and interpersonal communication. It has also revolutionized modern science, changing the way data are obtained and expanding our ability to study complex…

16h

Vibrio cholerae filamentation promotes chitin surface attachment at the expense of competition in biofilms [Microbiology]

Collective behavior in spatially structured groups, or biofilms, is the norm among microbes in their natural environments. Though biofilm formation has been studied for decades, tracing the mechanistic and ecological links between individual cell morphologies and the emergent features of cell groups is still in its infancy. Here we use…

16h

Structures of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase in malaria parasites reveal a unique structural relay mechanism for activation [Medical Sciences]

The cyclic guanosine-3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) was identified >25 y ago; however, efforts to obtain a structure of the entire PKG enzyme or catalytic domain from any species have failed. In malaria parasites, cooperative activation of PKG triggers crucial developmental transitions throughout the complex life cycle. We have determined…

16h

Integration of renewable deep eutectic solvents with engineered biomass to achieve a closed-loop biorefinery [Applied Physical Sciences]

Despite the enormous potential shown by recent biorefineries, the current bioeconomy still encounters multifaceted challenges. To develop a sustainable biorefinery in the future, multidisciplinary research will be essential to tackle technical difficulties. Herein, we leveraged a known plant genetic engineering approach that results in aldehyde-rich lignin via down-regulation of cinnamyl…

16h

Learning to predict the cosmological structure formation [Astronomy]

Matter evolved under the influence of gravity from minuscule density fluctuations. Nonperturbative structure formed hierarchically over all scales and developed non-Gaussian features in the Universe, known as the cosmic web. To fully understand the structure formation of the Universe is one of the holy grails of modern astrophysics. Astrophysicists survey…

16h

Cochlear partition anatomy and motion in humans differ from the classic view of mammals [Applied Physical Sciences]

Mammals detect sound through mechanosensitive cells of the cochlear organ of Corti that rest on the basilar membrane (BM). Motions of the BM and organ of Corti have been studied at the cochlear base in various laboratory animals, and the assumption has been that the cochleas of all mammals work…

16h

Hybridization of singular plasmons via transformation optics [Applied Physical Sciences]

Surface plasmon resonances of metallic nanostructures offer great opportunities to guide and manipulate light on the nanoscale. In the design of novel plasmonic devices, a central topic is to clarify the intricate relationship between the resonance spectrum and the geometry of the nanostructure. Despite many advances, the design becomes quite…

16h

Intravital 2-photon imaging reveals distinct morphology and infiltrative properties of glioblastoma-associated macrophages [Neuroscience]

Characterized by a dismal survival rate and limited response to therapy, glioblastoma (GBM) remains one of the most aggressive human malignancies. Recent studies of the role of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in the progression of GBMs have demonstrated that TAMs are significant contributors to tumor growth, invasion, and therapeutic resistance. TAMs,…

16h

Enabling microbial syringol conversion through structure-guided protein engineering [Biochemistry]

Microbial conversion of aromatic compounds is an emerging and promising strategy for valorization of the plant biopolymer lignin. A critical and often rate-limiting reaction in aromatic catabolism is O-aryl-demethylation of the abundant aromatic methoxy groups in lignin to form diols, which enables subsequent oxidative aromatic ring-opening. Recently, a cytochrome P450…

16h

EBV infection is associated with histone bivalent switch modifications in squamous epithelial cells [Medical Sciences]

Epstein−Barr virus (EBV) induces histone modifications to regulate signaling pathways involved in EBV-driven tumorigenesis. To date, the regulatory mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we show that EBV infection of epithelial cells is associated with aberrant histone modification; specifically, aberrant histone bivalent switches by reducing the transcriptional activation…

16h

Structured, uncertainty-driven exploration in real-world consumer choice [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Making good decisions requires people to appropriately explore their available options and generalize what they have learned. While computational models can explain exploratory behavior in constrained laboratory tasks, it is unclear to what extent these models generalize to real-world choice problems. We investigate the factors guiding exploratory behavior in a…

16h

Robust single-cell Hi-C clustering by convolution- and random-walk-based imputation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Three-dimensional genome structure plays a pivotal role in gene regulation and cellular function. Single-cell analysis of genome architecture has been achieved using imaging and chromatin conformation capture methods such as Hi-C. To study variation in chromosome structure between different cell types, computational approaches are needed that can utilize sparse and…

16h

Histone H2B monoubiquitination regulates heart development via epigenetic control of cilia motility [Developmental Biology]

Genomic analyses of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) have identified significant contribution from mutations affecting cilia genes and chromatin remodeling genes; however, the mechanism(s) connecting chromatin remodeling to CHD is unknown. Histone H2B monoubiquitination (H2Bub1) is catalyzed by the RNF20 complex consisting of RNF20, RNF40, and UBE2B. Here, we…

16h

Visualizing probabilistic models and data with Intensive Principal Component Analysis [Applied Mathematics]

Unsupervised learning makes manifest the underlying structure of data without curated training and specific problem definitions. However, the inference of relationships between data points is frustrated by the “curse of dimensionality” in high dimensions. Inspired by replica theory from statistical mechanics, we consider replicas of the system to tune the…

16h

Chemical depletion of phagocytic immune cells in Anopheles gambiae reveals dual roles of mosquito hemocytes in anti-Plasmodium immunity [Immunology and Inflammation]

Mosquito immunity is composed of both cellular and humoral factors that provide protection from invading pathogens. Immune cells known as hemocytes, have been intricately associated with phagocytosis and innate immune signaling. However, the lack of genetic tools has limited hemocyte study despite their importance in mosquito anti-Plasmodium immunity. To address…

16h

The VEGF receptor neuropilin 2 promotes homologous recombination by stimulating YAP/TAZ-mediated Rad51 expression [Medical Sciences]

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in tumor cells mediated by neuropilins (NRPs) contributes to the aggressive nature of several cancers, including triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), independently of its role in angiogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms by which VEGF–NRP signaling contributes to the phenotype of such cancers is a significant and…

16h

Impact of jamming criticality on low-temperature anomalies in structural glasses [Applied Physical Sciences]

We present a mechanism for the anomalous behavior of the specific heat in low-temperature amorphous solids. The analytic solution of a mean-field model belonging to the same universality class as high-dimensional glasses, the spherical perceptron, suggests that there exists a cross-over temperature above which the specific heat scales linearly with…

16h

Long noncoding RNA LINC00673-v4 promotes aggressiveness of lung adenocarcinoma via activating WNT/{beta}-catenin signaling [Cell Biology]

It is well recognized that metastasis can occur early in the course of lung adenocarcinoma (LAD) development, and yet the molecular mechanisms driving this capability of rapid metastasis remain incompletely understood. Here we reported that a long noncoding RNA, LINC00673, was up-regulated in LAD cells. Of note, we first found…

16h

Axonal pathology in hPSC-based models of Parkinson’s disease results from loss of Nrf2 transcriptional activity at the Map1b gene locus [Neuroscience]

While mutations in the SNCA gene (α-synuclein [α-syn]) are causal in rare familial forms of Parkinson’s disease (PD), the prevalence of α-syn aggregates in the cortices of sporadic disease cases emphasizes the need to understand the link between α-syn accumulation and disease pathogenesis. By employing a combination of human pluripotent…

16h

A heuristic derived from analysis of the ion channel structural proteome permits the rapid identification of hydrophobic gates [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Ion channel proteins control ionic flux across biological membranes through conformational changes in their transmembrane pores. An exponentially increasing number of channel structures captured in different conformational states are now being determined; however, these newly resolved structures are commonly classified as either open or closed based solely on the physical…

16h

Systematic mapping of cell wall mechanics in the regulation of cell morphogenesis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Walled cells of plants, fungi, and bacteria come with a large range of shapes and sizes, which are ultimately dictated by the mechanics of their cell wall. This stiff and thin polymeric layer encases the plasma membrane and protects the cells mechanically by opposing large turgor pressure derived mechanical stresses….

16h

Tethering guides fusion-competent trans-SNARE assembly [Biochemistry]

R-SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor receptor), Q-SNAREs, and Sec1/Munc18 (SM)-family proteins are essential for membrane fusion in exocytic and endocytic trafficking. The yeast vacuolar tethering/SM complex HOPS (homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting) increases the fusion of membranes bearing R-SNARE to those with 3Q-SNAREs far more than it enhances their trans-SNARE…

16h

Structural basis for adenylation and thioester bond formation in the ubiquitin E1 [Biochemistry]

The ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like (Ubl) protein-conjugation cascade is initiated by E1 enzymes that catalyze Ub/Ubl activation through C-terminal adenylation, thioester bond formation with an E1 catalytic cysteine, and thioester bond transfer to Ub/Ubl E2 conjugating enzymes. Each of these reactions is accompanied by conformational changes of the E1 domain…

16h

Contemporary loss of migration in monarch butterflies [Evolution]

The annual migration of the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus is in peril. In an effort to aid population recovery, monarch enthusiasts across North America participate in a variety of conservation efforts, including captive rearing and release of monarch butterflies throughout the summer and autumn. However, the impact of captive breeding…

16h

Single-cell genomics unveiled a cryptic cyanobacterial lineage with a worldwide distribution hidden by a dinoflagellate host [Ecology]

Cyanobacteria are one of the most important contributors to oceanic primary production and survive in a wide range of marine habitats. Much effort has been made to understand their ecological features, diversity, and evolution, based mainly on data from free-living cyanobacterial species. In addition, symbiosis has emerged as an important…

16h

Myosin IIA suppresses glioblastoma development in a mechanically sensitive manner [Cell Biology]

The ability of glioblastoma to disperse through the brain contributes to its lethality, and blocking this behavior has been an appealing therapeutic approach. Although a number of proinvasive signaling pathways are active in glioblastoma, many are redundant, so targeting one can be overcome by activating another. However, these pathways converge…

16h

Scaling trajectories of cities [Social Sciences]

Urban scaling research finds that agglomeration effects—the higher-than-expected outputs of larger cities—follow robust “superlinear” scaling relations in cross-sectional data. But the paradigm has predictive ambitions involving the dynamic scaling of individual cities over many time points and expects parallel superlinear growth trajectories as cities’ populations grow. This prediction has not…

16h

Nogo-A targeted therapy promotes vascular repair and functional recovery following stroke [Neuroscience]

Stroke is a major cause of serious disability due to the brain’s limited capacity to regenerate damaged tissue and neuronal circuits. After ischemic injury, a multiphasic degenerative and inflammatory response is coupled with severely restricted vascular and neuronal repair, resulting in permanent functional deficits. Although clinical evidence indicates that revascularization…

16h

Plant functional traits and climate influence drought intensification and land-atmosphere feedbacks [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The fluxes of energy, water, and carbon from terrestrial ecosystems influence the atmosphere. Land–atmosphere feedbacks can intensify extreme climate events like severe droughts and heatwaves because low soil moisture decreases both evaporation and plant transpiration and increases local temperature. Here, we combine data from a network of temperate and boreal…

16h

Tracking the evolution of CNS remyelinating lesion in mice with neutral red dye [Neuroscience]

Animal models of central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, including toxin-induced focal demyelination and immune-mediated demyelination through experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), have provided valuable insights into the mechanisms of neuroinflammation and CNS remyelination. However, the ability to track changes in transcripts, proteins, and metabolites, as well as cellular populat

16h

Correction for Litvinov et al., Unique transmembrane domain interactions differentially modulate integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 and {alpha}IIb{beta}3 function [Corrections]

BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Unique transmembrane domain interactions differentially modulate integrin αvβ3 and αIIbβ3 function,” by Rustem I. Litvinov, Marco Mravic, Hua Zhu, John W. Weisel, William F. DeGrado, and Joel S. Bennett, which was first published June 3, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1904867116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 12295–12300)….

16h

Structure-guided examination of the mechanogating mechanism of PIEZO2 [Neuroscience]

Piezo channels are mechanically activated ion channels that confer mechanosensitivity to a variety of different cell types. Piezos oligomerize as propeller-shaped homotrimers that are thought to locally curve the membrane into spherical domes that project into the cell. While several studies have identified domains and amino acids that control important…

16h

PUCHI regulates very long chain fatty acid biosynthesis during lateral root and callus formation [Plant Biology]

Lateral root organogenesis plays an essential role in elaborating plant root system architecture. In Arabidopsis, the AP2 family transcription factor PUCHI controls cell proliferation in lateral root primordia. To identify potential targets of PUCHI, we analyzed a time course transcriptomic dataset of lateral root formation. We report that multiple genes…

16h

Discovery of endoplasmic reticulum calcium stabilizers to rescue ER-stressed podocytes in nephrotic syndrome [Medical Sciences]

Emerging evidence has established primary nephrotic syndrome (NS), including focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), as a primary podocytopathy. Despite the underlying importance of podocyte endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the pathogenesis of NS, no treatment currently targets the podocyte ER. In our monogenic podocyte ER stress-induced NS/FSGS mouse model, the podocyte…

16h

Noninvasive preimplantation genetic testing for aneuploidy in spent medium may be more reliable than trophectoderm biopsy [Genetics]

Preimplantation genetic testing for aneuploidy (PGT-A) with trophectoderm (TE) biopsy is widely applied in in vitro fertilization (IVF) to identify aneuploid embryos. However, potential safety concerns regarding biopsy and restrictions to only those embryos suitable for biopsy pose limitations. In addition, embryo mosaicism gives rise to false positives and false…

16h

An interoceptive illusion of effort induced by false heart-rate feedback [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Interoception, or the sense of the internal state of the body, is key to the adaptive regulation of our physiological needs. Recent theories contextualize interception within a predictive coding framework, according to which the brain both estimates and controls homeostatic and physiological variables, such as hunger, thirst, and effort levels,…

16h

Correction for Chao et al., Systematic assessment of the sex ratio at birth for all countries and estimation of national imbalances and regional reference levels [Corrections]

SOCIAL SCIENCES Correction for “Systematic assessment of the sex ratio at birth for all countries and estimation of national imbalances and regional reference levels,” by Fengqing Chao, Patrick Gerland, Alex R. Cook, and Leontine Alkema, which was first published April 15, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1812593116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 9303–9311)….

16h

dTcf/Pangolin suppresses growth and tumor formation in Drosophila [Developmental Biology]

Wnt/Wingless (Wg) signaling controls many aspects of animal development and is deregulated in different human cancers. The transcription factor dTcf/Pangolin (Pan) is the final effector of the Wg pathway in Drosophila and has a dual role in regulating the expression of Wg target genes. In the presence of Wg, dTcf/Pan…

16h

Decoding team and individual impact in science and invention [Economic Sciences]

Scientists and inventors increasingly work in teams, raising fundamental questions about the nature of team production and making individual assessment increasingly difficult. Here we present a method for describing individual and team citation impact that both is computationally feasible and can be applied in standard, wide-scale databases. We track individuals…

16h

Multimodal cue integration in the dung beetle compass [Neuroscience]

South African ball-rolling dung beetles exhibit a unique orientation behavior to avoid competition for food: after forming a piece of dung into a ball, they efficiently escape with it from the dung pile along a straight-line path. To keep track of their heading, these animals use celestial cues, such as…

16h

Context shapes early diversity in abstract thought [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Early abstract reasoning has typically been characterized by a “relational shift,” in which children initially focus on object features but increasingly come to interpret similarity in terms of structured relations. An alternative possibility is that this shift reflects a learned bias, rather than a typical waypoint along a universal developmental…

16h

Chronic, sublethal effects of high temperatures will cause severe declines in southern African arid-zone birds during the 21st century [Ecology]

Birds inhabiting hot, arid regions are among the terrestrial organisms most vulnerable to climate change. The potential for increasingly frequent and intense heat waves to cause lethal dehydration and hyperthermia is well documented, but the consequences of sublethal fitness costs associated with chronic exposure to sustained hot weather remain unclear….

16h

The hominid ilium is shaped by a synapomorphic growth mechanism that is unique within primates [Anthropology]

The human ilium is significantly shorter and broader than those of all other primates. In addition, it exhibits an anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) that emerges via a secondary center of ossification, which is unique to hominids (i.e., all taxa related to the human clade following their phyletic separation from…

16h

Correction for Geng et al., Prostate cancer-associated mutations in speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) regulate steroid receptor coactivator 3 protein turnover [Corrections]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Prostate cancer-associated mutations in speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) regulate steroid receptor coactivator 3 protein turnover,” by Chuandong Geng, Bin He, Limei Xu, Christopher E. Barbieri, Vijay Kumar Eedunuri, Sue Anne Chew, Martin Zimmermann, Richard Bond, John Shou, Chao Li, Mirjam Blattner, David M. Lonard, Francesca Demichelis,…

16h

Strigolactone promotes cytokinin degradation through transcriptional activation of CYTOKININ OXIDASE/DEHYDROGENASE 9 in rice [Plant Biology]

Strigolactones (SLs), a group of terpenoid lactones derived from carotenoids, are plant hormones that control numerous aspects of plant development. Although the framework of SL signaling that the repressor DWARF 53 (D53) could be SL-dependently degraded via the SL receptor D14 and F-box protein D3 has been established, the downstream…

16h

The sRNA DicF integrates oxygen sensing to enhance enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli virulence via distinctive RNA control mechanisms [Microbiology]

To establish infection, enteric pathogens integrate environmental cues to navigate the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and precisely control expression of virulence determinants. During passage through the GIT, pathogens encounter relatively high levels of oxygen in the small intestine before transit to the oxygen-limited environment of the colon. However, how bacterial pathogens…

16h

Americans overestimate the intergenerational persistence in income ranks [Social Sciences]

Recent research suggests that intergenerational income mobility has remained low and stable in America, but popular discourse routinely assumes that Americans are optimistic about mobility prospects in society. Examining these 2 seemingly contradictory observations requires a careful measurement of the public’s perceptions of mobility. Unlike most previous work that measures…

16h

Signs of the color blue have been found in a fossil for the first time

Scientists think they’ve spotted hints of blue plumage in a fossilized bird from 48 million years ago.

16h

Blue color tones in fossilized prehistoric feathers

Examining fossilised pigments, scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered new insights into blue colour tones in prehistoric birds.

16h

Catastrophes may help explain ‘population paradox’

New research may explain what scientists call “the forager population paradox.” Over most of human history—150,000 years or so—the population growth rate has hovered at near zero. Yet, when we study the contemporary populations that are our best analogs for the past, they demonstrate positive growth. If population growth rates among our early ancestors matched those of subsistence populations fro

16h

Absence and Evidence

Guest commentary by Michael Tobis, a retired climate scientist. He is a software developer and science writer living in Ottawa, Ontario. A recent opinion piece by economist Ross McKitrick in the Financial Post, which attracted considerable attention in Canada, carried the provocative headline “This scientist proved climate change isn’t causing extreme weather – so politicians attacked”. In fact,

16h

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