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nyheder2019juni27

'Mystical' psychedelic compound found in normal brains

A study in rats has revealed the presence of naturally occurring DMT, an increasingly popular hallucinogen.

9h

Coral found to prefer eating microplastic to natural food

A team of researchers from Boston University, Roger Williams University, the New England Aquarium, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School and UMass Boston, reports that one type of coral prefers to eat microplastics over natural food. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes experiments they conducted with Astrangia poculata, a type of cora

6h

Magnus Heunicke er ny sundhedsminister

Tidligere transportminister Magnus Heunicke (S) indtager Sundhedsministeriet.

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New Type of Glass Inspired by Nature is More Resistant to Impacts

New Type of Glass Inspired by Nature is More Resistant to Impacts By mimicking the structure of mother-of-pearl, scientists have made a glass that's less likely to shatter when hit. MotherOfPearl_topNteaser.jpg Green abalone shell displaying mother-of-pearl interior. Image credits: James St. John via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Technology Thursday, June 27, 2019 – 15:00 Charles Q. Choi,

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Five dead endangered right whales found in Canadian waters

Five critically endangered North Atlantic right whales have been found dead in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence this month, Canadian officials said Thursday.

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Too many antioxidants can give you cancer, and other facts about the misunderstood molecules

You can have too much of a good thing. (Deposit Photos/) Vitamin E might make lung cancer spread faster—that's probably something you never expected to hear. We're used to the message that vitamins are good for us. But actually, the latest news about lung cancer isn't all that new. Researchers have known for a while that certain antioxidants seems to increase cancer risk, ever since a 1996 clinic

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Five dead endangered right whales found in Canadian waters

Five critically endangered North Atlantic right whales have been found dead in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence this month, Canadian officials said Thursday.

4min

Police cam maker nixes facial recognition deployment

Police equipment manufacturer Axon said Thursday it decided against deploying facial recognition on its body cameras after an ethics review found the technology "is not yet reliable enough."

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A Building for All Senses

In typical buildings, accommodations for the visually or hearing-impaired tend to be small and scattered: braille on signs and beside elevator buttons; flashing lights on fire alarms; guardrails abutting stairs or ramps. Since the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) established design requirements in 1990, these little touches have become commonplace, markers of the effort to universalize space

12min

Meteorites Carrying Cyanide Could Have Given Ancient Life on Earth a Boost

Meteorites are thought to have delivered many of the materials necessary for life, which might even include deadly cyanide. (Credit: NASA's GSFC Conceptual Image Lab) Science is still uncertain as to how exactly life first arose. While experiments with electricity and simple ingredients can make amino acids, the building blocks of proteins and the framework for all living things as we know them, h

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Astronomers Pinpoint Location of a Single Fast Radio Burst for First Time

The Australian SKA Pathfinder radio telescope is the first to pinpoint the source of a non-repeating Fast Radio Burst. (Credit: CSIRO/Andrew Howells) Fast Radio Bursts are one of space’s great mysteries. Discovered for the first time only in 2007, they are massively powerful bursts of radio waves that last for just a fraction of a second. The vast majority of these signals occur once, and then nev

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Democrats Divided on "Medicare for All" in First Debate

Senator Elizabeth Warren and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio were the only candidates in the first night in favor of eliminating private insurance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Deciphering how the brain encodes color and shape

There are hundreds of thousands of distinct colors and shapes that a person can distinguish visually, but how does the brain process all of this information? Scientists previously believed that the visual system initially encodes shape and color with different sets of neurons and then combines them much later. But a new study from Salk researchers, published in Science on June 27, 2019, shows that

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NASA's terra satellite eyes tropical storm Alvin

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Storm Alvin had organized and strengthened into a strong tropical storm, just over 500 miles from Mexico's Baja California peninsula.

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NeurosciANTS

You probably walk past thousands of ants every day and give them no more than a passing glance, but the ecological impact of an entire ant colony is comparable to that of enormous animals like elephants. Together in colonies that can surpass 300 million individuals, ants have a profound effect on the landscapes they colonize, … Continue reading NeurosciANTS

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New technology gives insight into how nanomaterials form and grow

A new form of electron microscopy allows researchers to examine nanoscale tubular materials while they are "alive" and forming liquids—a first in the field.

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Terra satellite eyes tropical storm Alvin

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Storm Alvin had organized and strengthened into a strong tropical storm, just over 500 miles from Mexico's Baja California peninsula.

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New AI tool captures top players' strategies in RNA video game

A new artificial-intelligence tool captures strategies used by top players of an internet-based videogame to design new RNA molecules. Rohan Koodli and colleagues at the Eterna massive open laboratory present the tool, called EternaBrain, in PLOS Computational Biology. Eterna is directed by the lab of Prof. Rhiju Das at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California.

25min

Rethink environmental regulations in Africa, study urges

Conflict over resource extraction is rampant in sub-Saharan Africa, with small-scale miners violently pitted against multinational mining corporations—and the state security forces that protect them—for access. Attempts to solve the problem by imposing Western environmental systems and regulations aren't working. But it's not for the reasons most experts might suspect, according to a new Illinois

25min

Police Body Camera Maker Decides Against Using Facial Recognition

Body Cam Ethics Axon, the biggest supplier of police body cameras and software in the U.S. just called it quits on using artificial intelligence-powered facial recognition systems for its devices, The New York Times reports . “Face recognition technology is not currently reliable enough to ethically justify its use,” the company’s independent ethics board concluded in a review . Formerly called T

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New AI tool captures top players' strategies in RNA video game

A new artificial-intelligence tool captures strategies used by top players of an internet-based videogame to design new RNA molecules. Rohan Koodli and colleagues at the Eterna massive open laboratory present the tool, called EternaBrain, in PLOS Computational Biology. Eterna is directed by the lab of Prof. Rhiju Das at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California.

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Study examines association of naloxone coprescription laws on naloxone rx dispensing

In a new study published in JAMA Network Open, University of Kentucky researchers, in collaboration with researchers from Ferris State University, examined whether legal mandates on naloxone coprescription in certain states increased naloxone dispensing.

29min

Experiment reverses the direction of heat flow

A study led by Brazilian scientists used quantum correlations to make heat flow from a colder to a hotter medium without adding external energy, affording a deeper understanding of the second law of thermodynamics.

29min

New AI tool captures top players' strategies in RNA video game

A new artificial-intelligence tool captures strategies used by top players of an internet-based videogame to design new RNA molecules. Rohan Koodli and colleagues at the Eterna massive open laboratory present the tool, called EternaBrain, in PLOS Computational Biology. Eterna is directed by the lab of Prof. Rhiju Das at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California.

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Author Correction: Regulation of T cell afferent lymphatic migration by targeting LTβR-mediated non-classical NFκB signaling

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10952-0 Author Correction: Regulation of T cell afferent lymphatic migration by targeting LTβR-mediated non-classical NFκB signaling

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The repressive role of Arabidopsis H2A.Z in transcriptional regulation depends on AtBMI1 activity

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10773-1 Arabidopsis H2A.Z plays an important role in regulating gene expression in response to stressors; however, the underlying mechanism is still puzzling. Here, the authors show that monoubiquitination of H2A.Z by AtBMI1 is required for H2A.Z-mediated transcriptional repression.

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Complex electronic structure and compositing effect in high performance thermoelectric BiCuSeO

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10476-7 Though BiCuSeO is a promising thermoelectric material, further study of its electronic structure-property relationship and compositing effect is required to optimize the performance. Here, the authors observe three power factor maxima in BiCuSeO with the increasing Pb-doping content.

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ABCB1 protects bat cells from DNA damage induced by genotoxic compounds

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10495-4 Bats possess an extended lifespan compared to most mammals of their size, and have a low cancer incidence. Here the authors show that several bat species exhibit resistance to genotoxic agents that is in part attributable to high expression of the ABCB1 transporter.

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Author Correction: Microbially induced potassium enrichment in Paleoproterozoic shales and implications for reverse weathering on early Earth

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11042-x Author Correction: Microbially induced potassium enrichment in Paleoproterozoic shales and implications for reverse weathering on early Earth

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Bioinspired extracellular vesicles embedded with black phosphorus for molecular recognition-guided biomineralization

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10761-5 Bone regeneration is of interest for treating a wide range of medical conditions. Here, the authors report on bioinspired matrix vesicles loaded with black phosphorus nanosheets and cell-specific aptamers for bone regeneration and demonstrate bone defect repair in vivo.

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Momentum-dependent power law measured in an interacting quantum wire beyond the Luttinger limit

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10613-2 Power laws are usually associated with a scale invariance due to the absence of a length scale. Here, Jin et al. report experimental evidence of a new type of power law in a GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum-well heterostructure, suggesting existence of a new type of universality that emerges at finite energy and momen

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Intrinsic enzymatic properties modulate the self-propulsion of micromotors

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10726-8 Self-propulsion of biocatalytic micro- and nanomotors is facilitated by enzymes converting substrates into products. Here, the authors show that intrinsic enzymatic properties such as conformational changes are crucial for the self-propulsion of silica microcapsules modified with urease.

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Iceland will skip whaling this year: company

No whales will be harpooned off the waters around Iceland this year, as the island nation's two whaling companies have decided to abandon the summer whaling season for the first time in 17 years.

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Twitter acts against politicians' rule-breaking tweets

Twitter said Thursday it would label and "deprioritize" tweets from officials and politicians that violate its rules—a move potentially affecting the prodigious output of US President Donald Trump.

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Mexico struggles to understand, solve, seaweed invasion

Mexico has spent $17 million to remove over a half-million tons of sargassum seaweed from its Caribbean beaches, and the problem doesn't seem likely to end any time soon, experts told an international conference Thursday.

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Mystery radio waves from space tracked to a surprising home galaxy

For the second time, astronomers have tracked a strange blast of radio waves from space to its host galaxy – and it is strangely different from the first one

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We jump to conclusions even when it pays to wait for the facts

We give up collecting data more quickly when information fits what we want to be true, even if this leaves us worse off – but there are ways to improve your thinking

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Shatterproof phone screens could be made from seashell-like glass

A type of glass that can deform like plastic by mimicking the properties of mother-of-pearl could be used for everything from car windows to foldable phones

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New kind of light is a vortex beam that twists faster as it moves

A laser beam can be twisted and move like a vortex, and for the first time researchers have made one that has different twists along the length of the beam

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Our brains replay experiences when we rest to help us make decisions

When we rest, neurons fire to replay recent experiences – and doing so seems to improve our ability to use those experiences to make future decisions

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Why Science Can Be So Indecisive On Nutrition

Do you know if eggs are good for you? What about coffee, red wine, or chocolate? Most people probably have a yes-or-no impulse about each of these things, thanks to the amount of media coverage given to studies looking for health benefits or detriments for individual foods. And no matter what you say, you’re probably right, according to at least some of that science—findings often reverse or cont

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Iceland will skip whaling this year: company

No whales will be harpooned off the waters around Iceland this year, as the island nation's two whaling companies have decided to abandon the summer whaling season for the first time in 17 years.

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The best tips and tricks for YouTube Music

YouTube Music: sunglasses not included. (Luke Dahlgren via Unsplash/) As far as Google-owned music streaming services go, Google Play Music is the past and YouTube Music is the future, even if the company hasn't completely merged the older service into the newer one yet. Whether you've already switched to the latter or are thinking about investing the $10 a month you need to gain unlimited access

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Study of Microbiome's Importance in Autism Triggers Swift Backlash

Independent scientists say the original analysis is flawed; the authors stand by their work and are seeking outside statisticians to reanalyze the data.

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Our Brain Uses a Not-So-Instant Replay to Make Decisions

Neural processing centers repeat recent sequences of events to lay down new memories used for abstract thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Our Brain Uses a Not-So-Instant Replay to Make Decisions

Neural processing centers repeat recent sequences of events to lay down new memories used for abstract thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Astronomers Traced a Mysterious Radio Burst to a Distant Galaxy

Cosmic Sleuthing Astronomers who detected a mysterious, fleeting radio signal from space finally figured out where it came from. The radio burst, which only lasted for one millisecond, originated from the outer reaches of a distant galaxy, from which it spent 4 billion years traveling to Earth. In this case, astronomers at Chile’s Gemini South telescope were able to track the radio signal’s origi

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This Fungal Hallucinogen Makes Cicadas Orgy Till Their Butts Literally Fall Off

Their bodies may disintegrate, but these bugs don’t care.

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Ultivue Raises $22 Million in Series C Funding

Ultivue, the innovation leader in tissue biomarker identification and quantification assays for translational and pathology research labs, today announced the close of a $22 Million Series C funding led by new investor Northpond Ventures and fueled by existing investors including ARCH Venture Partners, 6 Dimensions Capital, Yonghua Capital, and Applied Ventures.

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Researchers unlock mysteries of complex microRNA oncogenes

A new collaborative study, led by researchers at McGill University's Goodman Cancer Research Centre (GCRC), and published in the journal Molecular Cell, uncovers novel functions for polycistronic microRNAs and showing how cancers such as lymphoma twist these functions to reorganize the information networks that control gene expression.

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Cosmic cat and mouse: Astronomers capture and tag a fleeting radio burst

Gemini Observatory provides critical observations that confirm the distance to a mysterious, very short-lived, radio outburst from a galaxy several billions of light years away.

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Insects need empathy

In February, environmentalists in Germany collected 1.75 million signatures for a 'save the bees law.' Citizens can stop insect declines by halting habitat loss and fragmentation, producing food without pesticides and limiting climate change, say the authors of this Perspectives piece in Science.

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New Zealand and Australian researchers observe 70-year-old prediction, with wide-reaching effects

As you stir milk into a cup of coffee, you will see fluid turbulence in action — rapid mixing that has defied deep scientific understanding. A collaboration between researchers at the University of Otago, New Zealand, and University of Queensland, Australia, set out to learn more about the everyday enigma of turbulence by using the remarkable properties of superfluids, strange quantum fluids able

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Researchers discriminate between mutations that promote cancer growth and those that don't

Until now, researchers believed recurrent mutations (hotspot mutations) in cancer tumors were the important mutations (driver mutations) that promoted cancer progression. A new University of California, Irvine-led study indicates this is not always true.

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Researchers verify 70-year-old theory of turbulence in fluids

Pilots and air travellers know turbulence can be powerful, but science has struggled to fully explain the phenomenon.Now, a University of Queensland study has confirmed a 70-year-old theory and is expected to help address "huge problems" in global engineering and transport.

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A snapshot in time: Study captures fleeting cell differences that can alter disease risk

In cinema and science fiction, one small change in the past can have major, sometimes life-changing effects in the future. Using a series of snapshots, researchers recently captured such so-called 'butterfly effects' in heart muscle cell development, and say this new view into the sequence of gene expression activity may lead to better understanding disease risk.

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New method reveals how well TB antibiotics reach their targets

Scientists have developed a new technique that enables them to visualise how well antibiotics against tuberculosis (TB) reach their pathogenic targets inside human hosts.

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Freeze frame: Researchers solve how cells unfold proteins

Using cryo-EM, researchers capture how Cdc48, harvested directly from yeast cells, unfolds proteins.

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Computational tool predicts how gut microbiome changes over time

A new computational modeling method uses snapshots of which types of microbes are found in a person's gut to predict how the microbial community will change over time. The tool, developed by Liat Shenhav, Leah Briscoe and Mike Thompson from the Halperin lab, University of California Los Angeles, and colleagues at the Mizrahi lab at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, is presented in PLOS Computational

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Model predicts bat species with the potential to spread deadly Nipah virus in India

Since its discovery in 1999, Nipah virus has been reported almost yearly in Southeast Asia, with Bangladesh and India being the hardest hit. In a new study, published today in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, scientists used machine learning to identify bat species with the potential to host Nipah virus, with a focus on India — the site of a 2018 outbreak. Four new bat species were flagged as su

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Order from chaos: Australian vortex studies are first proof of decades-old theory

Two Australian studies published this week offer the first proof of a 70-year-old theory of turbulence.Turbulence, with its seemingly random and chaotic motion of the fluid, is a notoriously difficult problem, for which there is no general theoretical description. (In fact, the Clay Mathematics Institute offers a million dollar prize to anyone that comes up with a theory of turbulence.)

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A Trojan horse? Immune cells ferry deadly fungus from mouse lung into the blood

A report today (June 27) in PLOS Pathogens shows how inhaled fungal spores exit the lung and trigger a fatal infection in mice.

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Discovered: A new property of light

Researchers have discovered that light can possess a new property, self-torque.

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Astronomers make history in a split second

In a world first, an Australian-led international team of astronomers has determined the precise location of a powerful one-off burst of cosmic radio waves. The discovery was made with CSIRO's new Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope in Western Australia. The galaxy from which the burst originated was then imaged by three of the world's largest optical telescopes —

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How obesity re-wires the brain's neurological food suppression system

Overeating, by cutting the brain's natural brakes on food intake, may result in neurological changes that continue to fuel pathological eating and lead to obesity, reports a new study in mice.

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'Mother-of-pearl' inspired glass shatters the impact performance of alternatives

Inspired by the properties of nacre — the opalescent biological composite found inside seashells — researchers have engineered a new glass that's ductile yet tough, and highly impact-resistant.

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Pinpointing the extragalactic origin of a single fast radio burst

The origin of a single, transient radio pulse has been pinpointed to a distant galaxy several billion light years away, representing the first localization of a non-repeating fast radio burst (FRB).

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Mutational 'hotspots' in cancer genomes may not necessarily drive cancer growth

A study by investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center has found that, contrary to common assumptions, the fact that a specific genetic mutation frequently arises in particular tumors may not signify that the mutation drives cancer development and progression.

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The world needs a global system to detect and halt the spread of emerging crop diseases

Climate change and global trade drive the spread, emergence, and re-emergence of crop disease, and containment action is often inefficient, especially in low-income countries. A Global Surveillance System (GSS) to strengthen and interconnect crop biosecurity systems could go a long way to improving global food security, argues a team of experts in the June 28, 2019 issue of Science.

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'Shooting stars' during cell development impact risk for disease

Fleeting differences in gene expression between individuals that occur at different points in time during cell development may have consequences on the ultimate risk for disease in mature tissues and cell types.

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Reducing delays in identifying visceral leishmaniasis

Women in Indian states with endemic visceral leishmaniasis — also known as Kala Azar — should be encouraged to seek care for persistent fever without delay. Raised awareness about the disease and its symptoms, and the prioritization of women's care-seeking over household work could help reduce fatalities and potentially reduce overall transmission, according to research by independent consultant

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How inhaled fungal spores cause fatal meningitis

Pathogenic fungal spores capitalize on host immune cells to escape the lung and gain access to the brain to cause fatal disease in mice, according to a study published June 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Christina Hull of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and colleagues. These insights into the interactions between pathogenic fungal spores and lung immune cells provide ne

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People's motivations bias how they gather information

A new study suggests people stop gathering evidence earlier when the data supports their desired conclusion than when it supports the conclusion they wish was false. Filip Gesiarz, Donal Cahill and Tali Sharot of University College London, UK report in PLOS Computational Biology.

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The Power of One Push-Up

The numbers used to assess health are, for the most part, not helpful. There are the vital signs: heart and respiratory rates and body temperature. Sometimes blood pressure. These are critical in emergencies. If you’ve been stabbed in the chest, paramedics want to know no numbers more than these. But in day-to-day life, the normalcy of those numbers is expected. It doesn’t so much grant you a cle

54min

One Percent of North Atlantic Right Whales Have Died This Month

She was called Punctuation, after the small scars on her head that looked like commas and dashes. She was a North Atlantic right whale, one of an estimated 411 left in the world. She was one of just 100 reproductively active females left. She was mother to at least eight calves, and a grandmother to at least two grand-calves. She was around 40 years old when her body was found floating in the Gul

54min

Photos From a Month of Pride

We’re in the last few days of June—a month celebrated around the world as LGBTQ Pride month—commemorated with colorful parades, vocal protests, public art, and events. The events are a time for celebration, and for recognizing accomplishments and progress that has been made as a community, cheered on by supporters, neighbors, and advocates. Many of the month’s events work to continue to raise awa

54min

Trees for water quality credits

The more naturally verdant an area is, the more likely it will contribute to the general health of the habitats and the organisms in and around it. Sometimes, though, tracing these qualities to specific benefits can be a challenge.

55min

Solving the knotty question of soft-pretzel aroma

Whether at Oktoberfest, the movie theater or a shopping mall, the enticing aroma of soft pretzels is unmistakable. Now, researchers have identified the key compounds that give these twisted knots their distinctive scent.

55min

Facebook enlists plain English to clarify how it makes money

Facebook is updating its terms and services guidelines to clarify how it makes money from the personal information of its users. The changes reflect its ongoing attempts to satisfy regulators …

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Migræne hos gravide øger risikoen for højt blodtryk og tidlig fødsel

Men hvis du får den rette medicin, kan du mindske risikoen.

57min

Our Brain Uses a Not-So-Instant Replay to Make Decisions

Neural processing centers repeat recent sequences of events to lay down new memories used for abstract thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Freeze frame: Researchers solve how cells unfold proteins

A happy cell is a balanced cell, but for every stupendously twisted protein it creates, it must tear the old ones asunder. That means untangling a convoluted pretzel-like mass for recycling. Cdc48 plays a critical role in unraveling the spent proteins.

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Science in South Asia

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News at a glance

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Unwelcome advice?

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Majorana on a hinge

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Clustering vortices

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A measured sniffer

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Observation of a Majorana zero mode in a topologically protected edge channel

Superconducting proximity pairing in helical edge modes, such as those of topological insulators, is predicted to provide a unique platform for realizing Majorana zero modes (MZMs). We used scanning tunneling microscopy measurements to probe the influence of proximity-induced superconductivity and magnetism on the helical hinge states of bismuth(111) films grown on a superconducting niobium subst

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Impact-resistant nacre-like transparent materials

Glass has outstanding optical properties, hardness, and durability, but its applications are limited by its inherent brittleness and poor impact resistance. Lamination and tempering can improve impact response but do not suppress brittleness. We propose a bioinspired laminated glass that duplicates the three-dimensional "brick-and-mortar" arrangement of nacre from mollusk shells, with periodic th

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Giant vortex clusters in a two-dimensional quantum fluid

Adding energy to a system through transient stirring usually leads to more disorder. In contrast, point-like vortices in a bounded two-dimensional fluid are predicted to reorder above a certain energy, forming persistent vortex clusters. In this study, we experimentally realize these vortex clusters in a planar superfluid: a 87 Rb Bose-Einstein condensate confined to an elliptical geometry. We de

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Evolution of large-scale flow from turbulence in a two-dimensional superfluid

Nonequilibrium interacting systems can evolve to exhibit large-scale structure and order. In two-dimensional turbulent flow, the seemingly random swirling motion of a fluid can evolve toward persistent large-scale vortices. To explain such behavior, Lars Onsager proposed a statistical hydrodynamic model based on quantized vortices. Here, we report on the experimental confirmation of Onsager’s mod

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Obesity remodels activity and transcriptional state of a lateral hypothalamic brake on feeding

The current obesity epidemic is a major worldwide health concern. Despite the consensus that the brain regulates energy homeostasis, the neural adaptations governing obesity are unknown. Using a combination of high-throughput single-cell RNA sequencing and longitudinal in vivo two-photon calcium imaging, we surveyed functional alterations of the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA)—a highly conserved

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Color and orientation are jointly coded and spatially organized in primate primary visual cortex

Previous studies support the textbook model that shape and color are extracted by distinct neurons in primate primary visual cortex (V1). However, rigorous testing of this model requires sampling a larger stimulus space than previously possible. We used stable GCaMP6f expression and two-photon calcium imaging to probe a very large spatial and chromatic visual stimulus space and map functional mic

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Subcellular antibiotic visualization reveals a dynamic drug reservoir in infected macrophages

Tuberculosis, caused by the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis , remains the world’s deadliest infectious disease. Sterilizing chemotherapy requires at least 6 months of multidrug therapy. Difficulty visualizing the subcellular localization of antibiotics in infected host cells means that it is unclear whether antibiotics penetrate all mycobacteria-containing compartments in the ce

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Mechanism of {beta}2AR regulation by an intracellular positive allosteric modulator

Drugs targeting the orthosteric, primary binding site of G protein–coupled receptors are the most common therapeutics. Allosteric binding sites, elsewhere on the receptors, are less well-defined, and so less exploited clinically. We report the crystal structure of the prototypic β 2 -adrenergic receptor in complex with an orthosteric agonist and compound-6FA, a positive allosteric modulator of th

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Dynamic genetic regulation of gene expression during cellular differentiation

Genetic regulation of gene expression is dynamic, as transcription can change during cell differentiation and across cell types. We mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) throughout differentiation to elucidate the dynamics of genetic effects on cell type–specific gene expression. We generated time-series RNA sequencing data, capturing 16 time points during the differentiation of induc

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New Products

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Passenger hotspot mutations in cancer driven by APOBEC3A and mesoscale genomic features

Cancer drivers require statistical modeling to distinguish them from passenger events, which accumulate during tumorigenesis but provide no fitness advantage to cancer cells. The discovery of driver genes and mutations relies on the assumption that exact positional recurrence is unlikely by chance; thus, the precise sharing of mutations across patients identifies drivers. Examining the mutation l

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Bridging functional nanocomposites to robust macroscale devices

At the intersection of the outwardly disparate fields of nanoparticle science and three-dimensional printing lies the promise of revolutionary new "nanocomposite" materials. Emergent phenomena deriving from the nanoscale constituents pave the way for a new class of transformative materials with encoded functionality amplified by new couplings between electrical, optical, transport, and mechanical

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Sequential replay of nonspatial task states in the human hippocampus

Sequential neural activity patterns related to spatial experiences are "replayed" in the hippocampus of rodents during rest. We investigated whether replay of nonspatial sequences can be detected noninvasively in the human hippocampus. Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while resting after performing a decision-making task with sequential structure. Hippocampal fM

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Generation of extreme-ultraviolet beams with time-varying orbital angular momentum

Light fields carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) provide powerful capabilities for applications in optical communications, microscopy, quantum optics, and microparticle manipulation. We introduce a property of light beams, manifested as a temporal OAM variation along a pulse: the self-torque of light. Although self-torque is found in diverse physical systems (i.e., electrodynamics and general

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A liquid-like spindle domain promotes acentrosomal spindle assembly in mammalian oocytes

Mammalian oocytes segregate chromosomes with a microtubule spindle that lacks centrosomes, but the mechanisms by which acentrosomal spindles are organized and function are largely unclear. In this study, we identify a conserved subcellular structure in mammalian oocytes that forms by phase separation. This structure, which we term the liquid-like meiotic spindle domain (LISD), permeates the spind

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Majorana on a hinge

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Clustering vortices

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Mysterious 'Fast Radio Burst' Traced Back to Its Home Galaxy for First Time Ever

For the first time, astronomers tracked an incredibly fast, insanely bright radio wave back to its source — 3.6 billion light-years away.

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Baffling radio burst traced to a galaxy 3.6 billion light-years away

Signal’s rapid-fire arrival times at telescope array pinpoint its origin

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Sweet, fatty foods could remodel the brain to drive overeating

As mice become obese, neurons that tamp down on feeding get quiet

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The world needs a global system to detect and halt the spread of emerging crop diseases

More than 20 percent of the five staple crops that provide half the globe's caloric intake are lost to pests each year. Climate change and global trade drive the spread, emergence, and re-emergence of crop disease, and containment action is often inefficient, especially in low-income countries. A Global Surveillance System (GSS) to strengthen and interconnect crop biosecurity systems could go a lo

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Computational tool predicts how gut microbiome changes over time

A new computational modeling method uses snapshots of which types of microbes are found in a person's gut to predict how the microbial community will change over time. The tool, developed by Liat Shenhav, Leah Briscoe and Mike Thompson from the Halperin lab, University of California Los Angeles, and colleagues at the Mizrahi lab at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, is presented in PLOS Computational

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Immediate, science-based community action can stop insect decline

This year, German environmentalists collected 1.75 million signatures for a 'save the bees' law requiring an immediate transition toward organic farming. But to create healthy ecosystems worldwide, people in communities across the globe will need to take similar action based on empathy for insects—and not only for bees and butterflies—according to entomologists Yves Basset from the Smith-sonian Tr

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In a first, telescopes tracked a lone fast radio burst to a faraway galaxy

First-time observations suggest that the cause of one-time fast radio bursts is different from what triggers repeatedly flashing radio bursts.

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In mice, a high-fat diet cuts a ‘brake’ used to control appetite

A fatty diet changes the behavior of key appetite-regulating cells in a mouse brain.

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A Howling Cosmic Signal Came From a Faraway Galaxy

They never would have found it if Tony hadn’t gotten sick. In September, astronomers were scanning the night sky with a radio telescope in Australia. They were looking for mysterious, powerful signals that originate well beyond the Milky Way and deep in space. Thousands of these signals, known as fast radio bursts, reach the planet each day, but they’re not easy to detect. The signals arrive with

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As Bad as Citizens United

Today’s Supreme Court ruling that the Constitution doesn’t bar even extreme partisan gerrymandering is the worst election-related decision since Citizens United , which in 2010 opened the floodgates for corporate money in campaigns. The Court just stacked the deck in favor of parties over voters—and laid the groundwork for yet more polarization. Most congressional districts are not competitive. R

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Astronomers make history in a split second

In a world first, an Australian-led international team of astronomers has determined the precise location of a powerful one-off burst of cosmic radio waves.

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The world needs a global system to detect and halt the spread of emerging crop diseases

More than 20 percent of the five staple crops that provide half the globe's caloric intake are lost to pests each year. Climate change and global trade drive the spread, emergence, and re-emergence of crop disease, and containment action is often inefficient, especially in low-income countries. A Global Surveillance System (GSS) to strengthen and interconnect crop biosecurity systems could go a lo

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People's motivations bias how they gather information

A new study suggests people stop gathering evidence earlier when the data supports their desired conclusion than when it supports the conclusion they wish was false. Filip Gesiarz, Donal Cahill and Tali Sharot of University College London, U.K. report in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Computational tool predicts how gut microbiome changes over time

A new computational modeling method uses snapshots of which types of microbes are found in a person's gut to predict how the microbial community will change over time. The tool, developed by Liat Shenhav, Leah Briscoe and Mike Thompson from the Halperin lab, University of California Los Angeles, and colleagues at the Mizrahi lab at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, is presented in PLOS Computational

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Immediate, science-based community action can stop insect decline

This year, German environmentalists collected 1.75 million signatures for a 'save the bees' law requiring an immediate transition toward organic farming. But to create healthy ecosystems worldwide, people in communities across the globe will need to take similar action based on empathy for insects—and not only for bees and butterflies—according to entomologists Yves Basset from the Smith-sonian Tr

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Order from chaos: Australian vortex studies are first proof of 70-year-old theory of turbulence in fluids

Two Australian studies published this week offer the first proof of a 70-year-old theory of turbulence.

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Freeze frame: Researchers solve how cells unfold proteins

A happy cell is a balanced cell, but for every stupendously twisted protein it creates, it must tear the old ones asunder. That means untangling a convoluted pretzel-like mass for recycling. Cdc48 plays a critical role in unraveling the spent proteins.

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Mysterious Outburst's Quiet Cosmic Home Yields More Questions Than Answers

For the first time, astronomers have pinpointed the location of a nonrepeating fast radio burst, and the result defies expectations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rethink environmental regulations in Africa, study urges

Conflict over resource extraction is rampant in sub-Saharan Africa, with small-scale miners violently pitted against multinational mining corporations — and the state security forces that protect them — for access. Attempts to solve the problem by imposing Western environmental systems and regulations aren't working. But it's not for the reasons most experts might suspect, according to a new Ill

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New technology gives insight into how nanomaterials form and grow

A new form of electron microscopy allows researchers to examine nanoscale tubular materials while they are 'alive' and forming liquids — a first in the field.

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Mysterious Outburst's Quiet Cosmic Home Yields More Questions Than Answers

For the first time, astronomers have pinpointed the location of a nonrepeating fast radio burst, and the result defies expectations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: 5-4

Welcome to a special Democratic-debate issue of the Atlantic ’s signature politics newsletter. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. What We’re Watching Today It’s Thursday, June 27. ​ (Carlo Allegri / Reuters / Wilfredo Le / AP / The Atlantic ) Put on your thinking caps and bust out your college language credit. Night one of the Democratic debates—more than two hours broken down

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Jason—a secretive group of Cold War science advisers—is fighting to survive in the 21st century

After near-death experience, top scientists seek a long-term home in the U.S. government

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NASA to Announce New Mission Live: Titan Drone or Comet Chaser?

The two spacecraft, Dragonfly and Caesar, are finalists in a competition that is not unlike “Shark Tank” for deep space exploration.

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New Turbulence Models Could Predict Galaxy Formation

Rippling Out Scientists found a way to make sense of particularly chaotic events in nature. Thanks to a new set of equations for modeling turbulence, scientists can now better predict things like how galaxies form in distant space, complex weather patterns here on Earth, and nuclear fusion. According to the research , published this Spring in the journal Physical Review Letters , turbulence may s

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The Supreme Court's Message: Win or Go Home

The words to the victor go the spoils never appear in a pair of major Supreme Court decisions that Chief Justice John Roberts delivered today, but they might as well have. By upholding partisan gerrymandering in virtually any instance that does not involve racial discrimination, the Supreme Court enshrined the nation’s modern form of winner-take-all politics into law today. Roberts, writing for t

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Twitter acts against politicians' rule-breaking tweets

Twitter said Thursday it would label and "deprioritize" tweets from officials and politicians that violate its rules—a move potentially affecting the prodigious output of US President Donald …

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NASA Sends Tiny Atomic Clock to Space

Spacecraft rely on extremely accurate measurements of time to coordinate maneuvers, and these systems will become even more important as we aim for distant destinations. That's why NASA is testing a new type of mercury-ion atomic clock which is smaller and more versatile. The post NASA Sends Tiny Atomic Clock to Space appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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This Remote Atlantic Island Is Being Covered in a 'Crust' of Plastic Trash

Researchers have discovered yet another new form of plastic pollution infesting Earth's oceans and beaches — and it's real crusty.

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What Gets Lost When Polls Become the Story

When endeavoring to stay informed about a 2020 campaign landscape that features dozens of candidates, it can be tempting to rely on political polling as a shortcut to news-gathering. Each day, it seems, the candidates multiply. How can anyone be expected to keep track of the changing attitudes, ideologies, and behaviors that they inspire in voters? The overemphasis on polling in coverage of polit

2h

The Loudest Voice Stops Short of Revealing Roger Ailes

Toward the end of the third episode of The Loudest Voice , the Fox News impresario Roger Ailes (played by Russell Crowe), his wife, Beth (Sienna Miller), and their 8-year-old son, Zach, clamber into the back of a chauffeur-driven SUV for a summer tour of Ailes’s hometown. “Heartland of the country, here we go,” Ailes says benevolently, like a clean-shaven Santa. The next shots in the Showtime ser

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Extreme exercise can strain the heart without causing permanent damage

Researchers have found no evidence of elevated cardiac risk in runners who completed a 24-hour ultramarathon (24UM), despite the transient elevation of blood biomarkers that measure cardiac health. According to the study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier, trained runners were more likely than their novice counterparts to experience raised levels, reflecting the greater cardiac load and

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Patrick Staff: The Prince of Homburg review – escape to dreamland

Dundee Contemporary Arts Inspired by a 19th-century play, Staff examines ideas of freedom, dissidence and the queer body through sculpture, installation and film If Trump, Brexit and Boris Johnson – to name a few culprits – leave you feeling extremely tired, you’re not alone. London and LA-based artist Patrick Staff ’s new exhibition at Dundee Contemporary Arts deals with the widespread condition

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Trees for water quality credits

The more naturally verdant an area is, the more likely it will contribute to the general health of the habitats and the organisms in and around it. Sometimes, though, tracing these qualities to specific benefits can be a challenge.

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Is Facebook listening to me? Why those ads appear after you talk about things

My editor, Michelle, was at a birthday party for her son's friend recently, when the mom mentioned a company she liked called Joymode. Minutes later, an ad for Joymode appeared on Michelle's Facebook news feed.

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New basic understanding of how lung cancer spreads: antioxidants implicated

Lung cancer cells use antioxidants, endogenous or dietary, to spread in the body by activating a protein called BACH1 and increasing the uptake and use of sugar, researchers report in two independent studies. The studies pave the way for new therapeutic strategies for lung cancer.

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Goat milk formula could benefit infant gut health

Research suggests goat milk infant formula has similar prebiotic properties to breast milk and could play a role in supporting healthy gut function in infants.

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Music develops the spoken language of the hearing-impaired

Researchers have compiled guidelines for international use for utilizing music to support the development of spoken language. The guidelines are suitable for the parents of children with hearing impairments, early childhood education providers, teachers, speech therapists and other rehabilitators of children with hearing disabilities, as well as the hearing-impaired themselves.

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Some extinct crocs were vegetarians

Based on careful study of fossilized teeth, scientists have found that multiple ancient groups of crocodyliforms — the group including living and extinct relatives of crocodiles and alligators — were not the carnivores we know today. Evidence suggests that a veggie diet arose in the distant cousins of modern crocodylians at least three times.

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Are testosterone-boosting supplements effective? Not likely

Research points toward t-boosting supplements as having little or no known effect.

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Unlocking secrets of the ice worm

Researchers have identified an ice worm on Vancouver Island that is closely related to ice worms 1,200 miles away in southern Alaska. The researchers believe the genetic intermingling is the result of birds carrying the glacier-bound worms (or their eggs) up and down the west coast.

2h

The observation of topologically protected magnetic quasiparticles

A team of researchers conducted an in-depth study of magnetic quasiparticles called 'triplons.' The team conducted the study with a low-dimensional quantum magnet, Ba2CuSi2O6Cl2, using neutron inelastic scattering by AMATERAS at J-PARC. Their findings lead to the discovery of a new 'topologically protected triplon edge state' in the aforementioned compound.

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Amazon’s Re:Mars AI Conference Was Like a “Cloud Computing Cult”

Targeted Ads Earlier this month, Amazon hosted its re:MARS artificial intelligence conference that showcased emerging tech like tiny autonomous vehicles and robotic prosthetic limbs. But the event, celebrated as a glimpse into the future of technology, may have actually been a thinly-veiled advertisement for the future of Amazon, according to The Verge . After walking the floor and attending the

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Mark Zuckerberg to regulators: We need your help to protect elections

As public trust in Facebook's ability to wield its power responsibly has fractured in the face of a series of privacy breaches and other scandals, the company has been facing fresh calls for regulation from numerous quarters of the federal government.

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Society pays heavy price for failure to diagnose and treat conduct disorder

A new Nature Reviews article suggests much more needs to be done to improve diagnosis and treatment for children with behaviour problems.

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Life data economics: calling for new models to assess the value of human data

After the collapse of the blockchain bubble a number of research organisations are developing platforms to enable individual ownership of life data and establish the data valuation and pricing models.

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Brain structure determines individual differences regarding music sensitivity

The white matter structure in the brain reflects music sensitivity, according to a study by the research group on Cognition and Brain Plasticity of the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UB) and the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (UB-IDIBELL).

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FEFU scientists likely found way to grow new teeth for patients

A group of histologists and dentists from School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), teamed up with Russian and Japanese colleagues and found cells that are probably responsible for the formation of human dental tissue. Researchers propose to apply the study outcome within the development of bioengineering techniques in dentistry aimed at growing new dental tissue for patients.

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Autism health challenges could be explained by problem behaviors

For years, researchers have documented both gastrointestinal issues and problematic behaviors, such as aggression, in many children with autism spectrum disorder.

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Trees for water quality credits

In a new study, UC Santa Barbara Bren School professor Arturo Keller links reforestation to water quality credits.

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'Can you hear me, now?' A new strategy 'raises the volume' of gut-body communication

A model system enables the study of enteroendocrine cells, one of the most important moderators of communication between the gut and the rest of the body.

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Some Ancient Crocodiles Went Vegan

This American alligator, like crocodiles and other related species, is a meat-eating power biter. (Credit: US Fish & Wildlife Service) Someone says "crocodiles" and the image that comes to mind is probably a toothy one. Modern crocodilians are power biters, and many species are apex predators. But it wasn't always that way. Paleontologists believe that multiple extinct species preferred plants ove

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Hydrogel delivers one-two punch to bone infections

A new double-duty hydrogel attacks bacteria to treat bone infections and encourages regrowth with a single application. Automobile accidents, combat wounds, cancer treatments, and other conditions may require surgery that can lead to difficult-to-treat bone infections that delay healing. The injectable hydrogel, a network of cross-linked polymer chains, contains the enzyme lysostaphin and the bon

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Video: The chemistry behind black powder

Old-school gunpowder is really called "black powder," and it was so crucial to the Revolutionary War effort that early Americans went to great (and gross) lengths to make it.

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Elon Musk Compares Rocket Rides to Disney Roller Coaster

Very High Roller On Wednesday, Elon Musk took to Twitter to answer users’ questions about Starship, the massive rocket SpaceX plans to use to deliver humans to Mars . When asked about the company’s other intention for the spacecraft formerly known as the Big Falcon Rocket — transporting people from one part of Earth to another in under an hour — he responded with an unexpected analogy , comparing

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The observation of topologically protected magnetic quasiparticles

A team of researchers conducted an in-depth study of magnetic quasiparticles called 'triplons.' The team conducted the study with a low-dimensional quantum magnet, Ba2CuSi2O6Cl2, using neutron inelastic scattering by AMATERAS at J-PARC. Their findings lead to the discovery of a new 'topologically protected triplon edge state' in the aforementioned compound.

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Diving into water treatment strategies for swimming pools

With summer in full swing, many people are cooling off in swimming pools. However, some of the substances that are made when chlorine in the water reacts with compounds in human sweat, urine or dirt aren't so refreshing. Now, researchers have compared the effectiveness of different water treatment processes in mitigating these so-called disinfection byproducts (DBPs).

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The case of the poisoned songbirds

Researchers present their results from a toxicological investigation into a mortality event involving songbirds.

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The two faces of the Jekyll gene

Genes which are specific to a species or group of species can reflect important genetic changes within lineages. Often, such lineage-specific genes are found to play a role within sexual reproduction, thus promoting reproductive isolation and, consequently, speciation. Whilst investigating the Jekyll gene which is essential for the procreation of barley, researchers have discovered that Jekyll occ

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Managing the ups and downs of coffee production

Research could bring new coffee varieties to market faster and improve yields.

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Greenpeace sounds alarm about North Atlantic shark fishing

Greenpeace is warning about overfishing of endangered sharks in the North Atlantic, often by Spanish and Portuguese boats.

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Opinion: 10 Ways to Support New Mothers in STEM

A support group for mothers is a model for practical, inexpensive steps to ease women's transition to motherhood–and hopefully retain them in science.

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Under Greenland's Glaciers, Dozens of Pristine, Jewel-Like Lakes Have Been Discovered

Hidden beneath Greenland’s Ice Sheet like an enormous necklace of sparkly blue and oddly shaped beads, scientists have discovered 56 previously unknown and gem-like lakes.

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Greenpeace sounds alarm about North Atlantic shark fishing

Greenpeace is warning about overfishing of endangered sharks in the North Atlantic, often by Spanish and Portuguese boats.

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How to produce natural gas while storing carbon dioxide

New research shows that injecting air and carbon dioxide into methane ice deposits buried beneath the Gulf of Mexico could unlock vast natural gas energy resources while helping fight climate change by trapping the carbon dioxide underground.

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Facebook enlists plain English to clarify how it makes money

Facebook is updating its terms and services guidelines to clarify how it makes money from the personal information of its users. The changes reflect its ongoing attempts to satisfy regulators in the U.S. and Europe, which have urged the company to make sure users know what they are signing up for.

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Apple recalls some MacBook Pro laptops due to fire hazard

Apple is recalling some MacBook Pro laptops due to a fire hazard.

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Spanish court rules Deliveroo riders are employees

A Spanish court ruled Thursday that online food delivery group Deliveroo wrongly hired 97 riders as self-employed contractors instead of as regular workers, which costs less for the firm.

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EU okays IBM's $34 bn buyout of Red Hat

The EU's powerful anti-trust authority on Thursday cleared the buyout by IBM of open source software company Red Hat, one of the biggest tech mergers in history which the computing giant said would enhance its cloud offerings.

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Facebook starting nominations 'soon' for content oversight panel

Facebook said Thursday it would soon open up nominations for a new 40-member oversight panel to make tough decisions on content moderation, saying it would be independent of governments and management of the social networking giant.

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Natural biodiversity protects rural farmers' incomes from tropical weather shocks

A big data study covering more than 7,500 households across 23 tropical countries shows that natural biodiversity could be effective insurance for rural farmers against drought and other weather-related shocks.

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Study shows how to produce natural gas while storing carbon dioxide

New research at The University of Texas at Austin shows that injecting air and carbon dioxide into methane ice deposits buried beneath the Gulf of Mexico could unlock vast natural gas energy resources while helping fight climate change by trapping the carbon dioxide underground.

2h

If the Beatles Had Been One Man

M onths before shooting began on Yesterday , the director Danny Boyle ( Slumdog Millionaire ) presented a wish list of Beatles songs to his star, Himesh Patel, an actor best known for his work on the British soap opera EastEnders . In Boyle’s film, written by Richard Curtis ( Four Weddings and a Funeral ), Patel’s Jack Malik, an aspiring musician, becomes the only man in the world to remember the

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Joe Biden’s Haunted Legacy in Iraq

I f Joe Biden wins the 2020 presidential election, he will be haunted by an old problem: the U.S. war in Iraq. It’s an issue he has struggled with since 2002, when he cast a Senate vote that led to the U.S. invasion, and throughout his time as vice president—and one at the heart of an identity crisis engulfing the Democratic Party on foreign policy. Uncertainty over how and when the U.S. should e

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Natural biodiversity protects rural farmers' incomes from tropical weather shocks

A big data study covering more than 7,500 households across 23 tropical countries shows that natural biodiversity could be effective insurance for rural farmers against drought and other weather-related shocks.

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Seven climate questions we’d ask the Democratic presidential candidates tonight

Because seven minutes in a two-hour debate on the most pressing topic of our time is ridiculous.

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Extinct 11-Foot "Super-Ostrich" Was As Massive As a Polar Bear

The giant bird roamed Europe more than 2 million years ago — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Higher salt intake can cause gastrointestinal bloating

A study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that individuals reported more gastrointestinal bloating when they ate a diet high in salt.

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Natural biodiversity protects rural farmers' incomes from tropical weather shocks

A big data study covering more than 7,500 households across 23 tropical countries shows that natural biodiversity could be effective insurance for rural farmers against drought and other weather-related shocks. Farmers in areas with greater biodiversity took less of an income hit from droughts than their peers who farmed amid less biodiversity.

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Drag-and-drop data analytics

Northstar, an interactive data-science system developed by MIT and Brown University researchers, lets users drag-and-drop and manipulate data, and use a virtual data scientist tool to generate machine-learning models that run prediction tasks on datasets, on a user-friendly touchscreen interface.

2h

A Few Thoughts about Deepfakes

The real way to combat them is with blockchain technology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Natural selection can’t explain this bug’s bizarre horn

A Buffalo treehopper with resplendent headgear. (USGS/) Treehoppers ( Membracidae ) are, in most respects, nothing special. Abundant everywhere but Antarctica, there are about 3,200 species of this cicada ( Cicadoidea ) and leafhopper (Cicadellidae) relative. Each individual measures between two and twenty millimeters. They live for a few months, during which they feed on sap. They have some soci

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Solar farm in Kings Park to power 1,000 homes

A 27-acre Kings Park property that started as a landfill during the 1940s and then became a golf driving range in the '80s is now home to a solar farm.

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Space station mold survives high doses of ionizing radiation

The International Space Station, like all human habitats in space, has a nagging mold problem. Astronauts on the ISS spend hours every week cleaning the inside of the station's walls to prevent mold from becoming a health problem.

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Study: Tesla Autopilot misleading, overestimated more than similar technology

More than any other driver-assist system out there today, people overestimate what Tesla's Autopilot can do, according to a new study.

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Climate impact of clouds made from airplane contrails may triple by 2050

In the right conditions, airplane contrails can linger in the sky as contrail cirrus—ice clouds that can trap heat inside the Earth's atmosphere. Their climate impact has been largely neglected in global schemes to offset aviation emissions, even though contrail cirrus have contributed more to warming the atmosphere than all CO2 emitted by aircraft since the start of aviation. A new study publishe

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Found: A sweet way to make everyday things almost indestructible

The secret to making clothing practically indestructible could be the same thing that makes us grow out of it: sugar.

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Daily briefing: Triumphant success of HPV vaccine

Nature, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02026-4 Hope for the end of cervical cancer in some countries, the fledgling field of palaeoproteomics and one scientist’s story of surviving China’s gaokao — the biggest exam in the world.

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Found: A sweet way to make everyday things almost indestructible

The secret to making clothing practically indestructible could be the same thing that makes us grow out of it: sugar.

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Extinct 11-Foot "Super-Ostrich" Was As Massive As a Polar Bear

The giant bird roamed Europe more than 2 million years ago — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Safe, low-cost, modular, self-programming robots

Many work processes would be almost unthinkable today without robots. But robots operating in manufacturing facilities have often posed risks to workers because they are not responsive enough to their surroundings. To make it easier for people and robots to work in close proximity in the future, Prof. Matthias Althoff of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a new system: IMPROV.

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SimBlock: A simulator for testing improvements to real-world blockchain networks

Kazuyuki Shudo, his colleagues, and the Cybersecurity Research Center at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) developed a public blockchain simulator called "SimBlock" for use in testing blockchain performance and security. The software can run on a single PC. It is now publicly available as open source.

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How to produce natural gas while storing carbon dioxide

New research shows that injecting air and carbon dioxide into methane ice deposits buried beneath the Gulf of Mexico could unlock vast natural gas energy resources while helping fight climate change by trapping the carbon dioxide underground.

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How you charge your mobile phone could compromise its battery lifespan

Researchers have found that use of inductive charging, whilst highly convenient, risks depleting the life of mobile phones using typical LIBs (lithium-ion batteries).

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Neuronal Parkinson inclusions are different than expected

An international team of researchers challenges the conventional understanding of the cause of Parkinson's disease. The researchers have shown that the inclusions in the brain's neurons, characteristic of Parkinson's disease, are comprised of a membranous medley rather than protein fibrils.

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Boosting amino acid derivative may be a treatment for schizophrenia

Many psychiatric drugs act on the receptors or transporters of certain neurotransmitters in the brain. However, there is a great need for alternatives, and research is looking at other targets along the brain's metabolic pathways. Lack of glycine betaine contributes to brain pathology in schizophrenia, and new research shows that betaine supplementation can counteract psychiatric symptoms in mice.

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To remember more, get more consistent sleep

Shifting sleep times and reduced sleep quality have a negative effect on the ability of older adults to recall information about past events, according to a new study. The study also found unexpected racial differences in the type of sleep patterns tied to lower memory performance across both younger and older African American research participants. Although further investigation will be needed t

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Twitter Will Quarantine Politicians’ Tweets If They Violate Rules—Finally

The company has been criticized for ignoring when tweets by government officials, namely President Trump, appear to violate its policies on hateful conduct.

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The Inescapable Challenge of Talking While Female

At first, it seemed like the Democrats’ first primary debate would be an exercise in politeness. As the candidates tried to introduce themselves and their agendas to potential voters, minutes went by without so much as a small skirmish, despite legitimate, and often significant, policy differences. Then suddenly, New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio halted the “Yes, and” chorus—opening the door for

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EPA refuses to give Congress documents on rejection of NASA flight after Hurricane Harvey

Congressional Democrats are chiding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for thwarting a House committee's investigation into the agency's actions during Hurricane Harvey.

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Cryo-electron microscopy reveals structures of protein that maintains cell membranes

Using cutting-edge electron microscopy, researchers from Aarhus University have determined the first structures of a lipid-flippase. The discoveries provide a better understanding of the basics of how cells work and stay healthy, and can eventually increase our knowledge of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

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Protein scissors for cellular transport

In many ways, a cell is like a city. Proteins or people do daily work to keep the economy going, and items are imported and exported for trade. Imports are shipped into cells by way of endocytosis. Before reaching their final destination, they are kept at the early endosome, a structure that determines whether the material will be disposed, recycled or delivered to a specific region in the cell. A

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NASA's TESS mission finds its smallest planet yet

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has discovered a world between the sizes of Mars and Earth orbiting a bright, cool, nearby star. The planet, called L 98-59b, marks the tiniest discovered by TESS to date.

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Growing embryonic tissues on a chip

It's no surprise that using human embryos for biological and medical research comes with many ethical concerns. Correct though it is to proceed with caution in these matters, the fact is that much science would benefit from being able to study human biology more accurately.

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Why Avengers: Infinity War was so successful —according to… ecology

Mathematical tools developed to analyze interactions in natural ecosystems help explain which films in the Marvel Universe make the most money.

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A Few Thoughts about Deepfakes

The real way to combat them is with blockchain technology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Space station mold survives high doses of ionizing radiation

The International Space Station, like all human habitats in space, has a nagging mold problem. Astronauts on the ISS spend hours every week cleaning the inside of the station's walls to prevent mold from becoming a health problem. New research being presented at the 2019 Astrobiology Science Conference, co-hosted by AGU and NASA June 24-28, finds mold spores may also survive on the outside walls o

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Researchers find fecal marker could help diagnose early signs of chronic gut conditions

Small molecules found in fecal matter could provide clues to the early inflammation found in chronic gut conditions, such as intestinal bowel disease (IBD), and serve as new biomarkers for diagnosis, according to a study led by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.

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Cryo-electron microscopy reveals structures of protein that maintains cell membranes

Using cutting-edge electron microscopy, researchers from Aarhus University have determined the first structures of a lipid-flippase. The discoveries provide a better understanding of the basics of how cells work and stay healthy, and can eventually increase our knowledge of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

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Protein scissors for cellular transport

In many ways, a cell is like a city. Proteins or people do daily work to keep the economy going, and items are imported and exported for trade. Imports are shipped into cells by way of endocytosis. Before reaching their final destination, they are kept at the early endosome, a structure that determines whether the material will be disposed, recycled or delivered to a specific region in the cell. A

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Growing embryonic tissues on a chip

It's no surprise that using human embryos for biological and medical research comes with many ethical concerns. Correct though it is to proceed with caution in these matters, the fact is that much science would benefit from being able to study human biology more accurately.

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Robot Arm Uses Bacteria in Its Fingers to “Taste” Its Environment

Bacterial Taste Buds By embedding engineered bacteria into the fingers of a robot arm, researchers have created a biohybrid bot that can “taste” — and they think it could lead to a future in which robots are better equipped to respond to the world around them. For their study , which was published in the journal Science Robotics on Wednesday, a team from the University of California, Davis, and C

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Rich defects boosting the oxygen evolution reaction

The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) with sluggish reaction kinetics and large over-potential is the severe reaction in water splitting that seems promising for energy storage and conversion. However, it is still the bottleneck reaction of the water-splitting system because of the slow kinetics and large over-potential during the anodic polarization process. Therefore, it is crucial to develop high

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The New 'Charlie's Angels' Trailer Is Here

Kristen Stewart should have probably been playing a spy this whole time.

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Atomic motion captured in 4-D for the first time

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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New Laser Can Identify People From a Distance By Their Heartbeat

Jetson Laser The U.S. Special Forces are developing a device that can detect a person’s unique cardiac signature using an IR laser from a distance. The Pentagon’s special project nicknamed “Jetson” can work from a 200 meter distance — improved versions could enable even longer distances. Steward Remaly, of the Pentagon’s Combatting Terrorism Technical Support Office who worked on the project, cla

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Found: A sweet way to make everyday things almost indestructible

A natural 'armor' made of sugar shocked even scientists with its durability.

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A peculiar ground-state phase for superconductor NbSe2 — It's a Bose metal!

The application of large enough magnetic fields results in the disruption of superconducting states in materials even at drastically low temperature, thereby changing them directly into insulators — or so was traditionally thought. Now, scientists at Tokyo Tech, The University of Tokyo and Tohoku University report curious multi-state transitions of these superconductors: going from superconductor

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NASA's TESS mission finds its smallest planet yet

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has discovered a world between the sizes of Mars and Earth orbiting a bright, cool, nearby star. The planet, called L 98-59b, marks the tiniest discovered by TESS to date.

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What Is CBD?

If you know someone who enjoys cannabis, you've probably heard the letters 'CBD' thrown around lately. Short for cannabidiol, CBD is the focus of a new area of cannabis research.

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John Roberts Says Partisan Gerrymandering Is Not His Problem

In a crushing blow to voting-rights advocates, the Supreme Court today ruled that claims of partisan gerrymandering are outside its purview. Ruling on two cases in which plaintiffs alleged that congressional districts were drawn with such exaggeratedly distorting effects that they violated the Constitution—one involving Republicans in North Carolina, the other Democrats in Maryland—the five conse

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A Rare Photo of a Rarely Photographed Crisis

It’s hard to describe the thought process that ensues when you first look at a photograph of two dead bodies—one of a man and one of a small child clinging to him—floating in the shallow water near a riverbank. Partly because the process of making sense of it is just so fast; the tragedy that has occurred is communicated, beyond a shadow of a doubt, immediately. A photograph that has been circula

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The evolution of cybersecurity: Veracode’s Chris Wysopal

Since the advent of the internet and after countless, massive breaches, the global community continues to struggle with cyber security and to treat it as an afterthought.

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Industrigiganter vil genskabe tilliden til IoT med blockchain

PLUS. For at undgå leverandørafhængighed og sikre opbakning til nye former for datadeling arbejder industrigiganter som Bosch og bilproducenten Jaguar med at indføre blockchain-teknologier. Analysevirksomheden Gartner har dog skruet ned for sine forventninger til blockchain.

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Naturally-Occurring “Mystical” Psychedelic Found in Mammal Brains

Natural Ayahuasca Researchers from the University of Michigan found widespread traces of naturally-occurring dimethyltryptamine (DMT) in lab rat brains. It’s same substance that’s found in Ayahuasca, a concoction used by indigenous peoples from the Amazon basin as part of their hallucinogenic religious ceremonies. Jimo Borjigin, PhD at the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, who c

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Disgust and attraction are all in the timing for animals

An animal’s learning relies not only on what experiences it acquires, but also on when it acquires them, according to a new study in fruit flies. As animals explore their environment, they learn to master it. By discovering what sounds tend to precede predator’s attack, for example, or what smells predict dinner, they develop a kind of biological clairvoyance—a way to anticipate what’s coming nex

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Astronomers Spotted a Car-Size Asteroid Just Hours Before Impact

Astronomers discovered a car-size asteroid hours before it slammed into Earth and burned up in the atmosphere this past weekend, news sources report.

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Miniature brains grown in the lab have human-like neural activity

Neurons in lab-grown ‘mini brains’ can be coaxed into communicating with each other, which might help in disease research – while also raising ethical questions

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Ancient crocodile cousins evolved vegetarianism at least three times

During the dinosaur era, many crocodile-like reptiles ate plants rather than guzzling meat – suggesting it was once a common lifestyle for crocodiles

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How to Understand the Universe When You’re Stuck Inside of It

The universe is kind of an impossible object. It has an inside but no outside; it’s a one-sided coin. This Möbius architecture presents a unique challenge for cosmologists, who find themselves in the awkward position of being stuck inside the very system they’re trying to comprehend. It’s a situation that Lee Smolin has been thinking about for most of his career. A physicist at the Perimeter Inst

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The Infrastructure of Joy

I’m not generally known as a happy person. I don’t think that’s because I’m unhappy, exactly, or because I’m a cynic or a naysayer, even though I have my moments . No, I think it’s because I’m allergic to the idea of happiness as anything but a shorthand for some vague and abstract notion of contentment. Being happy is great, but it’s also amorphous and lava-lampy. If you ask me whether I’m hungr

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Democrats Wrestle Over What Their Party Stands For

MIAMI—On one side of the street stood a group of Republicans waving a Donald Trump flag under a giant banner that declared SOMOS CAPITALISTA . On the other idled an ice-cream truck that had been commandeered by Joe Biden superfans offering free cones of “Biden-berry blue,” noting the flavor is “Obama’s favorite too!” When the moon is full and the tide is high, this street often floods, a sign of

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Crocodiles Went Through a Vegetarian Phase, Too

Ancestors of modern crocodiles evolved to survive on a plant diet at least three times, researchers say.

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UT study shows how to produce natural gas while storing carbon dioxide

New research at The University of Texas at Austin shows that injecting air and carbon dioxide into methane ice deposits buried beneath the Gulf of Mexico could unlock vast natural gas energy resources while helping fight climate change by trapping the carbon dioxide underground.

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Growing embryonic tissues on a chip

Researchers at EPFL have developed a method to stimulate human stem cells to organize themselves into ordered layers of different cell types. Published in Nature Methods, the method is based on microfluidics and can help better understand how tissues are formed in the embryo, setting the stage for fabricating functional tissues and organs for drug testing and transplantation.

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Is use of social media, photo editing apps associated with acceptance of cosmetic surgery?

An online survey study suggests how people feel about cosmetic surgery may be associated with what social media and photo editing apps they use. Most of the 252 survey participants were white and women, with an average age of almost 25, and had not previously undergone any cosmetic surgeries. Self-esteem and acceptance of cosmetic surgery attitudes were measured.

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Health disparity for blacks exists within lung screening guidelines

Guidelines that determine which smokers qualify for CT scans are excluding a significant number of African Americans who develop lung cancer, according to a study released today in JAMA Oncology.

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Evaluation of USPSTF lung cancer screening guidelines for African-American smokers

An observational study suggests the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) lung cancer screening guidelines may be too conservative for African-American smokers and that some eligibility criteria changes could result in more screenings of African-American smokers at high risk for lung cancer. The study looked at new lung cancer cases in a predominantly low-income and African-American populatio

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One simple change cut unnecessary imaging for cancer patients in half

Most 'nudges' seek to increase a behavior, but this is one of the few employed to reduce it.

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Pathway discovered that prevents buildup of Alzheimer's protein

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered a pathway that functions like a car wash to prevent the buildup of a toxic protein associated with Alzheimer's disease. The report appeared online today in the journal Cell.

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Some extinct crocs were vegetarians

Based on careful study of fossilized teeth, scientists Keegan Melstom and Randall Irmis at the Natural History Museum of Utah at the University of Utah have found that multiple ancient groups of crocodyliforms — the group including living and extinct relatives of crocodiles and alligators — were not the carnivores we know today. Evidence suggests that a veggie diet arose in the distant cousins o

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Too many antioxidants may cause lung cancer spread

A new study explains why lung cancer spreads faster in patients with certain genetic changes, and suggests that taking vitamin E, long thought of as preventive, may cause the same spread.

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New basic understanding of how lung cancer spreads

Lung cancer cells use antioxidants, endogenous or dietary, to spread in the body by activating a protein called BACH1 and increasing the uptake and use of sugar, Swedish and American researchers report in two independent studies. The studies, which are published in the eminent scientific journal Cell, pave the way for new therapeutic strategies for lung cancer.

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Nutritional cues regulate pancreatic tumor's 'cell drinking'

Desperate for nutrients, rapidly growing pancreatic tumors resort to scavenging 'fuel' through an alternative supply route, called macropinocytosis. Blocking this process, often described as 'cellular drinking,' could lead to tumor-starving drugs. Now, scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys have identified a signaling pathway that regulates macropinocytosis, the nutritional cue that triggers the p

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Malaria hijacks your genes to invade your liver

Duke University researchers have identified more than 100 'hijacked' human genes that malaria parasites commandeer to take up residence inside their victim's liver during the silent early stages of infection, before symptoms appear. Before their work only a few such genes were known. The findings could lead to new ways to stop malaria parasites before people get sick and help keep the disease from

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Men ask most of the questions at scientific conferences; we can choose to change that

Even in a majority-women audience at an academic conference, men ask questions most of the time, researchers report on June 27, 2019 in The American Journal of Human Genetics. After analyzing participation in Q&As at the American Society of Human Genetics and Biology of Genomes conferences over four years, the study authors found that public discussion and policy change focused on gender equity ca

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Some crocs of the past were plant eaters

Based on careful study of tooth remains, researchers have found that ancient groups of crocodyliforms — the group including living and extinct relatives of crocodiles and alligators — were not the carnivores we know today, as reported in the journal Current Biology on June 27, 2019. In fact, the evidence suggests that a veggie diet arose in the distant cousins of modern crocodylians at least thr

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Solar energy could turn the Belt and Road Initiative green

The region covered by the Belt and Road Initiative has significant potential to be powered by solar energy, researchers report n the journal Joule. Less than 4% of the maximum solar potential of the region could meet the BRI's electricity demand for 2030. The research suggests a possible solution to reduce BRI countries' need for fossil fuels as they develop. This is the first time the renewable e

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Researchers grow active mini-brain-networks

Cerebral organoids are artificially grown, 3D tissue cultures that resemble the human brain. Now, researchers from Japan report functional neural networks derived from these organoids in a study publishing June 27, 2019 in the journal Stem Cell Reports. Although the organoids aren't actually 'thinking,' the researchers' new tool — which detects neural activity using organoids — could provide a m

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Some Ancient Crocodiles Went Vegan

This American alligator, like crocodiles and other related species, is a meat-eating power biter. (Credit: US Fish & Wildlife Service) Someone says "crocodiles" and the image that comes …

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Malaria hijacks your genes to invade your liver

In the search for new weapons against malaria, most drug development has focused on the parasites that cause the disease. But Duke University researchers are trying a different tack. Instead of targeting the malaria parasite directly, the idea is to discover drugs aimed at the human cell machinery conscripted to do malaria's dirty work.

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Multiple sclerosis: Endogenous retrovirus HERV-W key to nerve tissue damage

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) affecting brain and spinal cord. In collaboration with colleagues from the USA and Canada, a team of Düsseldorf-based researchers led by Prof. Dr. Patrick Küry from the Department of Neurology has discovered a new way in which nerve tissue is damaged by an endogenous retrovirus. They authors have published their f

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Safe, low-cost, modular, self-programming robots

Many work processes would be almost unthinkable today without robots. But robots operating in manufacturing facilities have often posed risks to workers because they are not responsive enough to their surroundings. To make it easier for people and robots to work in close proximity in the future, Prof. Matthias Althoff of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a new system: IMPROV.

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Antioxidants may encourage the spread of lung cancer rather than prevent it

Antioxidants protect lung cancer cells from free radicals, but also spur metastasis, two new studies suggest.

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Some ancient crocodiles may have chomped on plants instead of meat

Fossil teeth of extinct crocodilyforms suggest that some ate plants and that herbivory evolved at least three times in crocs of the Mesozoic Era.

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Men ask most of the questions at scientific conferences; we can choose to change that

Even in a majority-women audience at an academic conference, men ask questions most of the time, researchers report on June 27th in The American Journal of Human Genetics. After analyzing participation in Q&As at the American Society of Human Genetics and Biology of Genomes conferences over four years, the study authors found that public discussion and policy change focused on gender equity can ma

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Malaria hijacks your genes to invade your liver

In the search for new weapons against malaria, most drug development has focused on the parasites that cause the disease. But Duke University researchers are trying a different tack. Instead of targeting the malaria parasite directly, the idea is to discover drugs aimed at the human cell machinery conscripted to do malaria's dirty work.

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Some extinct crocs were vegetarians

Based on careful study of fossilized teeth, scientists Keegan Melstom and Randall Irmis at the Natural History Museum of Utah at the University of Utah have found that multiple ancient groups of crocodyliforms—the group including living and extinct relatives of crocodiles and alligators—were not the carnivores we know today, as reported in the journal Current Biology on June 27. In fact, the evide

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You are not alone in your loneliness | Jonny Sun

Being open and vulnerable with your loneliness, sadness and fear can help you find comfort and feel less alone, says writer and artist Jonny Sun. In an honest talk filled with his signature illustrations, Sun shares how telling stories about feeling like an outsider helped him tap into an unexpected community and find a tiny sliver of light in the darkness.

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Boeing Completes CST-100 Starliner Parachute Testing

SpaceX is looking at a delay after the loss of a Dragon 2 capsule during engine tests. Meanwhile, Boeing is back on track after completing its final and most challenging parachute test. The post Boeing Completes CST-100 Starliner Parachute Testing appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Climate Comes Up at Democratic Debate but with Few New Details

The brief mentions were not enough to satisfy environmentalists pushing for a climate-focused debate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The far-future ocean: Warm yet oxygen-rich

The oceans are losing oxygen. Numerous studies based on direct measurements in recent years have shown this. Since water can dissolve less gas as temperatures rise, these results were not surprising. In addition to global warming, factors such as eutrophication of the coastal seas also contribute to the ongoing deoxygenation. Will the oceans become completely oxygen-depleted at some point in the f

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Dangerous Debris From India’s Exploded Satellite Still Orbiting Earth

Controversial Missile Test When Indian authorities shot down a satellite with a missile on March 27, they estimated that the remains of the satellite would decay within 45 days. But that’s not quite what happened. Six weeks later — past that promised date — astronomers from the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics are still tracking some 41 debris objects left out of 400 originally identif

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New cuprate superconductor may challenge classical wisdom

Superconductivity is one of the most mysterious phenomena in nature in that materials can conduct electrical current without any resistance. Cuprates hold the record high superconducting temperature at ambient pressure so far, but understanding their superconducting mechanism remains one of the great challenges of physical sciences listed as one of 125 quests announced by Science.

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New insights into membrane trafficking regulated by ER fusion protein

Prof. Hu Junjie from the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his collaborators reported that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusogen atlastin (ATL) was involved in regulating cargo mobility and COPII formation in the ER. Their finding, published in PNAS on June 25, provides important insight into the physiological role of the tubular ER network.

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Reducing overtesting in the emergency department could save millions

A new study finds there's excessive imaging testing being performed in the emergency department. A reduction could save millions in health care costs.

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The far-future ocean: Warm yet oxygen-rich

The higher the temperature, the less gases are dissolved in the water. This simple physical relationship explains, among other things, the measurable loss of oxygen in the warming ocean. In Nature Communications, however, scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have published a model study suggesting that despite warming and centuries of deoxygenation the ocean will con

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Protein offers protection against nerve degeneration in ALS model

Increasing the levels of the anti-aging protein hormone Klotho improves the neurological deficits and prolongs life span in an experimental model with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). In addition, brain immune cells called microglia play an important role in protecting the brain against inflammation and, likely, motor neuron loss in this model.

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Why the British Take Glory in Defeat

For a country with a rich history of victories, Britain has a curious tendency to celebrate the defeats. Boris Johnson, the runaway favorite to succeed Theresa May as prime minister, sparked controversy this week following a pledge to take the United Kingdom out of the European Union by October 31 “do or die.” Rory Stewart, one of more than a dozen candidates who challenged Johnson for the leader

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New insights into membrane trafficking regulated by ER fusion protein

Prof. Hu Junjie from the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his collaborators reported that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusogen atlastin (ATL) was involved in regulating cargo mobility and COPII formation in the ER. Their finding, published in PNAS on June 25, provides important insight into the physiological role of the tubular ER network.

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KAL’s cartoon

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Astronomers Spot Glowing Shrouds of Gas Around Distant Galaxies

These two Hubble images show gravitationally lensed galaxies and their halos (pink), as well as the galaxy clusters (yellow) responsible for the lensing. Gravitational lensing often results in more than one image of a single galaxy (right), or sometimes smears that light out into a ring (left). (Credit: ESO/NASA/ESA/A. Claeyssens) Galaxies are not just the glowing stars and gas you see through a t

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Hybrid airliners could come to dominate the skies

They use both orthodox engines and electric motors in an optimum mix

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In fighting cancer, look to what other animals do

Big species have fewer tumours than small ones

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Vegetarian crocodiles once roamed the world

A lesson in not stereotyping on the basis of modern examples

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How to Remember Everything

Every spring, teenagers and grown-ups travel from around the country to enter the U.S.A. Memory Championship. The competitors, called “memory athletes,” accomplish incredible cognitive feats over the course of the event. In 2016, Katherine He, then in high school, memorized a 50-line poem in 15 minutes. Alex Mullen, who won the competition that year, memorized the order of a deck of playing cards

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What If Teachers Didn’t Focus So Much on Individual Achievement?

Editor’s Note: In the next five years, most of America’s most experienced teachers will retire. The Baby Boomers are leaving behind a nation of more novice educators. In 1988, a teacher most commonly had 15 years of experience. Less than three decades later, that number had fallen to just three years leading a classroom . The Atlantic’ s “On Teaching” project is crisscrossing the country to talk

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Do you feel the other closer to you when she/he contingently responds to your action?

Researchers from University of Toyama and Toyohashi University of Technology have found that social contingency modulates one's perceptual representation of the environment. Participants who could display an image of a smiling person with the button press were found to perceive an afterimage of the same person smaller than participants who were unable to display the smiling image. Thus, when one's

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Applying pressure is way toward generating more electricity from waste heat

The ability of a thermoelectric material to produce electricity from waste heat was improved more than twofold by a Japan-based research team led by Osaka University. The researchers applied pressure to the material to induce a Lifshitz phase transition and, in a world-first, found a direct link between the Lifshitz transition and changes in the material's thermoelectric properties. Understanding

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Music develops the spoken language of the hearing-impaired

Finnish researchers have compiled guidelines for international use for utilising music to support the development of spoken language. The guidelines are suitable for the parents of children with hearing impairments, early childhood education providers, teachers, speech therapists and other rehabilitators of children with hearing disabilities, as well as the hearing-impaired themselves.

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New insights into membrane trafficking regulated by ER fusion protein

Prof. HU Junjie from the Institute of Biophysics and his collaborators reported that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusogen atlastin (ATL) was involved in regulating cargo mobility and COPII formation in the ER. Their finding provides important insight into the physiological role of the tubular ER network.

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Infant mortality is higher for low-skilled parents

Infants of women with a short-term education are more likely to die within the first year of life. In more than half of cases, the cause of death is premature childbirth and low foetal weight. This is shown by research from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital.

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Helping select the cells with the most potential

Little is known about the mechanisms by which mammalian cells grow and differentiate during the handful of days between fertilization of the egg and implantation of the blastocyst in the uterus. Osaka University researchers have demonstrated that cell competition between neighboring blastocyst cells is dependent upon activation of components of the 'Hippo' tumor-suppression pathway. Such competiti

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Nuclear stress test helps identify heart attack risk in people with diabetes

Abnormal results on a nuclear stress test are associated with a significantly increased risk of cardiac-related deaths, especially among people with diabetes, according to a new multi-center study.

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First taste of space for Spacebus Neo satellite

The thermal vacuum test campaign of the first Spacebus Neo satellite was completed on 25 June. Less than 100 metres from the Mediterranean Sea, the Konnect satellite has spent the past six weeks being exposed to the cold emptiness of space.

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Handlers Thought This Owl Was Male for 23 Years —Then He Laid an Egg

Everyone, possibly even the owl, was surprised.

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Great Recession unemployment fed left-wing populism; unauthorized immigration flows feed right-wing populism

In the past decade, there has been a great rise in populism in many western democracies. This has led to the emergence of radical and populist politicians. In his Ph.D. research, Shuai Chen investigates the influence of recent unemployment during the Great Recession and the vast influx of unauthorized immigrants on the growth of populism. He shows there is a difference between the populism caused

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Could social media actually improve mental health?

Regular use of social media and the internet can improve the mental health of adults and ward off depression and anxiety, a new study reports. Communication technologies and social media platforms make it easier to maintain relationships and access health information, says Keith Hampton, professor of media and information at Michigan State University. So why do they often get a bad rap? Because u

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The Whirlpool does Warhol

Art meets science as we see a galaxy in different lights

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Looking for the lights of alien cities

The search for ET is getting more sophisticated. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Early humans may have shared Europe with a giant bird

Fossilised remains suggest it was 10 times heavier than an emu. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Delaware insurer says 95K people's data could've been taken

Delaware's insurance department says social security numbers and other personal data of almost 100,000 people may have been comprised over nearly a decade due to a breach at a large vision and dental insurer.

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“Climate Apartheid” Is Imminent. Only the Rich Will Survive.

“Climate Apartheid” If our global climate change catastrophe continues unchecked , vast swaths of the world will likely become harsher and far less hospitable for humanity. When that happens, an even greater rift will appear between the global haves and have-nots, as many people will be left without the means to escape the worst effects of the climate crisis, according to a new report published T

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A Completely New Way to Picture DNA in Cells

Just how are things organized in a living cell? What’s next to what, in three dimensions? That is, of course, a really hard question to answer, but we’re going to have to be able to answer it in a lot of contexts (and at high resolution) if we’re ever going to understand what’s going on down there. There’s a new paper out that has a completely different way of dealing with the problem when it com

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That Viral 'Gyro Drop' Ride Was Fake. Here's How You Can Tell

A popular video about an amusement park ride with a crazy drop turned out to be fake. This physics analysis spells it out.

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‘We Have Been Lazy on Hate’

After the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, Farah Pandith worked in the Bush and Obama administrations as they tried to combat violent Islamist extremism. Starting in 2009, as the State Department’s special representative to Muslim communities, she began meeting with Muslim youths in almost 100 countries. In her estimation, the United States is not doing enough to prevent Millennials and mem

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Astronomers model how humanity could colonize the Milky Way

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Robots may care for you in old age – and your children will teach them

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Robots 'to replace 20 million factory jobs' by 2030

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Is it worth getting an annual medical check-up?

Evidence suggests they are ineffective in some cases and can lead to unnecessary testing. Paul Biegler reports.

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Social conditions may influence sperm quality

In mice at least, a bit of blokey competition can help, research suggests. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Dung beetles use sky and wind to find direction

It takes a surprisingly complex set of inputs to roll a ball of poo in a straight line. Andrew Masterson reports.

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A chaos found only on Mars

The cracked, uneven, jumbled landscape seen in this image from ESA's Mars Express forms an intriguing type of terrain that cannot be found on Earth: chaotic terrain.

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High pressure creates new neighbours for beryllium

The rare element beryllium is mainly known for being a component of emeralds, aquamarines, and other precious stones. However, in Nature Communications, an international team of scientists from the University of Bayreuth now reports on a very unusual discovery: Under a pressure 880,000 times higher than the pressure of the Earth's atmosphere, beryllium atoms in a phosphate crystal surround themsel

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Air Canada to buy tour operator Transat for Can$520 million

Canada's flagship airline Air Canada announced Thursday it has reached a deal to buy tour operator Transat for Can$520 million (US$396 million) in cash or Can$13 per share.

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German chemical giant BASF says to slash 6,000 jobs

Massive German chemical company BASF said Thursday it would slash 6,000 jobs worldwide by 2021, as the company slims down its organisation in pursuit of fatter margins.

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Scientists Can Now Clone Brain Organoids. Here’s Why That Matters

An army of free-floating minibrain clones are heading your way! No, that’s not the premise of a classic sci-fi brain-in-jars blockbuster. Rather, a team at Harvard has figured out a way to “clone” brain organoids, in the sense that every brain blob, regardless of what type of stem cell it originated from, developed nearly identically into tissues that mimic the fetal human cortex. No, they didn’t

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The Wizard Takes on an Arctic Storm | Deadliest Catch

Captain Keith and the Wizard head straight into the heart of arctic storm Elsa. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitter.

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Old at heart: Solution to red giants' age paradox

Four years ago, several red giant stars were discovered to pose a paradox: even though they are built from old stellar material, their large masses indicate a younger age. Scientists led by the MPS have now solved the contradiction. Several of the investigated red giants must have merged with others during an advanced stage of stellar evolution, they conclude. In these cases, mass is not a suitabl

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Dementia study links gene with damage to brain connections

Insights into how a gene that increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease disrupts brain cells have been revealed by scientists.

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New cuprate superconductor may challenge the classical wisdom

Superconductivity is one of the most mysterious phenomena in nature in that the materials can conduct electrical current without any resistance. The recent discovery by Prof. JIN Changqing's team at Institute of Physics on a new high Tc superconductor Ba 2 CuO 4-δ shows two unique features: an exceptionally compressed local octahedron and heavily over-doped hole carriers.

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Simple, accurate and inexpensive: A new method for exploring groundwater

Water is a vital resource for people and the environment. One of the most important sources is groundwater which is renewed from precipitation or surface water. Population growth as well as agriculture and industry strongly influence the quantity and quality of groundwater. To be able to investigate groundwater resources more easily, cost-effectively and comprehensively than in the past, researche

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A low-temperature method for making high-performance thermoelectric materials

Some of the vast amount of wasted energy that machines and devices emit as heat could be recaptured using an inexpensive nanomaterial developed at KAUST. This thermoelectric nanomaterial could capture the heat lost by devices, ranging from mobile phones to vehicle engines, and turn it directly back into useful electricity.

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The often-heard complaint that motorcycles can influence the outcome of races is justified

In professional cycling, in-race motorcycles such as TV motorcycles drive in between the riders. In the slipstream behind the motorcycle, cyclists can gain time. For the first time, the exact extent of this advantage has been scientifically investigated. It turns out to be even more advantageous than expected. Using computer simulations and wind tunnel measurements, Professor Bert Blocken of Eindh

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African countries and the state of their environments: the best and the worst

Social and economic changes in Africa are being driven by increasing prosperity and heavy foreign investment. Money has been poured into activities such as road building, forestry expansion, livestock intensification and increasing urbanisation. All have increased pressure on the continent's environment.

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New Philips Hue smart bulbs don't need a hub

The Philips Hue light bulb lineup is often recognized as the best smart lighting you can buy for your house. But if you're new to the smart home game, there's one catch: you …

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Image: Fire red lines

One of the largest wildfires recorded in Arizona, US, has been burning since 8 June, destroying vast swathes of vegetation across the Superstition Mountains east of Phoenix.

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Are Our Minds Just Our Brains?

A debate on minds, matter and mechanism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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You Won’t Be Able to Tell This House Is Made From Plastic Bottles

Bottles, Baby At first glance, the newly constructed beachfront home in Meteghan River, Nova Scotia, looks like any other. It has a kitchen, three bedrooms, a pair of bathrooms, a roof… But while the house’s appearance is unremarkable, the structure is wholly unique — because JD Composites built it from more than 600,000 recycled plastic bottles. “There are four major companies building this mate

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Children living in countryside outperform children living in metropolitan area in motor skills

Residential density is related to children's motor skills, engagement in outdoor play and organised sports. that Finnish children living in the countryside spent more time outdoors and had better motor skills than their age peers in the metropolitan area. On the other hand, children living in the metropolitan area participated the most in organised sports.

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Meals on Wheels drivers good early warning system for senior's health and safety issues

Meal delivery drivers bringing food to homebound seniors can be an effective early-warning system for health and safety problems, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society by researchers at the West Health Institute, Brown University and Meals on Wheels America.

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Cryo-electron microscopy at reveals structures of protein that maintains cell membranes

Using cutting-edge electron microscopy, researchers from Aarhus University have determined the first structures of a lipid-flippase. The discoveries provide a better understanding of the basics of how cells work and stay healthy, and can eventually increase our knowledge of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

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Lightning bolt underwater

Electrochemical cells help recycle CO2. However, the catalytic surfaces get worn down in the process. Researchers at the Collaborative Research Centre 1316 'Transient atmospheric plasmas: from plasmas to liquids to solids' at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) are exploring how they might be regenerated at the push of a button using extreme plasmas in water.

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Breakthrough in how cells link together has implications in the proliferation of cancer

The discovery, which builds on Dr. Rafael Garcia-Mata's research focus of how cancer cells spread throughout the body, is intriguing because it explains the behavior of cells that are by far the most common starting place for cancer.

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Rich defects boosting the oxygen evolution reaction

The morphology and electronic structure of LDHs were simultaneously tuned to improve the OER catalytic activity by mild solvothermal reduction using ethylene glycol. The increased surface area, the introduction of oxygen vacancies and the construction of hierarchical structure greatly enhanced the electro-catalytic activity of LDHs for OER: a low over-potential of 276 mV, and a small Tafel slope o

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Disrupted sleep in one's 50s, 60s raises risk of Alzheimer's disease

PET brain scans of healthy older adults show that those reporting lower sleep quality through their 50s and 60s have higher levels of tau protein, a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Previous studies link poor sleep to beta-amyloid tangles also, suggesting that protein tangles in the brain may cause some of the memory problems of AD and dementia. In addition, out-of-sync brain waves during slee

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Protein scissors for cellular transport

The movement of material in and out a cell, endocytosis, depends on proteins that cut the membrane to form vesicles encapsulating the transported materials. Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) discover the role of the protein ANKHD1 and its ankyrin repeat domains. The finding suggests the mechanism resembles other vesiculation proteins and gives clarity to an essent

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How did elephants evolve such a large brain? Climate change is part of the answer

Elephants have long captivated our attention, partly because of their sheer size and majesty. But we're also struck by their complex behaviour. In some ways, we're fascinated because this behaviour echoes our most humane feelings. For instance, elephants have repeatedly been observed using tools and grieving their dead.

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Printing liquid metals in three-dimensional structures

In a recent study on materials science and nanomedicine, Young-Geun Park and co-workers at the departments of Nanoscience, Nanomedicine and Materials Science and Engineering in the Republic of Korea developed an unconventional 3-D printing approach. The scientists engineered a high-resolution, reconfigurable 3-D printing strategy using liquid metals to form stretchable, 3-D constructs. Using the t

5h

Portable gas detection shrinks to new dimensions

A sensor for detecting toxic gases is now smaller, faster and more reliable. Its performance sets it up for integration in a highly sensitive portable system for detecting chemical weapons. Better miniature sensors can also rapidly detect airborne toxins where they occur, providing key information to help emergency personnel respond safely and effectively to an incident.

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Huawei staff pair up with Chinese military on research

Huawei employees have teamed up with Chinese military scientists to carry out research, a collaboration that challenges the telecom giant's assertion that it has no ties to the country's government or armed forces.

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Amazon partners with Rite Aid for package pickup nationwide

Amazon will add more than 1,500 package pickup locations in a partnership with the national pharmacy chain Rite Aid.

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Terminally ill patients highlight vital end-of-life talks

Interviews with terminally ill patients and their families highlight the importance and complexities of discussions about place of care and place of death, report researchers. Katrin Gerber of the National Ageing Research Institute and Queensland University of Technology; Barbara Hayes of Northern Health; and Christina Bryant, an associate professor at the University of Melbourne, explain their w

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How did elephants evolve such a large brain? Climate change is part of the answer

Elephants have long captivated our attention, partly because of their sheer size and majesty. But we're also struck by their complex behaviour. In some ways, we're fascinated because this behaviour echoes our most humane feelings. For instance, elephants have repeatedly been observed using tools and grieving their dead.

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Old at heart: A solution to red giants' age paradox

Four years ago, several red giant stars were discovered to pose a paradox: even though they are built from very old stellar material, their large masses indicate a clearly younger age. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (Germany), Aarhus University (Denmark), and The Ohio State University (U.S.) have now solved the apparent contradiction. For the first time, they in

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Mimicking the ultrastructure of wood with 3-D printing for green products

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in 3-D printing with a wood-based ink in a way that mimics the unique "ultrastructure" of wood. Their research could revolutionise the manufacturing of green products. Through emulating the natural cellular architecture of wood, they now present the ability to create green products derived from trees, with unique properties—e

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A new quasi-2D superconductor that bridges a ferroelectric and an insulator

Researchers at the Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute and the Southern Scientific Center of RAS, in Russia, have recently fabricated quasi-2-D superconductors at the interface between a ferroelectric Ba0.8Sr0.2TiO3 film and an insulating parent compound of La2CuO4. Their study, presented in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, is the first to achieve superconductivity in a heterostruct

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Sweltering Europe braces for peak of record heatwave

Europeans braced Thursday for the expected peak of a sweltering heatwave that has sent temperatures soaring above 40 degrees Celsius (104 Fahrenheit), with schools in France closing and wildfires in Spain spinning out of control.

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Ford to cut 12,000 jobs in Europe as part of restructuring

Carmaker Ford said Thursday it is shedding 12,000 jobs in Europe to increase profitability, part of a global trend of cost cuts by automakers facing shifting consumer tastes and heavy investments in electric cars.

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Amazon is watching, listening and tracking you. Here's how to stop it

Amazon is not only watching over your shopping, TV viewing, music listening and book reading histories, it's also listening to you at home or in the car.

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Patients see multiple clinicians on one visit, thanks to new scheduling protocol

A new patient-centered scheduling protocol is improving the quality, efficiency and convenience of multiprovider health care, according to a recently published paper from the University of Texas at Austin.

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Low-carb 'keto' diet ('Atkins-style') may modestly improve cognition in older adults

In a pilot study of 14 older adults with mild cognitive problems suggestive of early Alzheimer's disease, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet may improve brain function and memory.

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Elevated first trimester blood pressure increases risk for pregnancy hypertensive disorders

Elevated blood pressure in the first trimester of pregnancy, or an increase in blood pressure between the first and second trimesters, raises the chances of a high blood pressure disorder of pregnancy, according to a study funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health.

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3D printed prosthetic hand can guess how you play rock, paper, scissors

A new 3D-printed prosthetic hand can learn the wearers' movement patterns to help amputee patients perform daily tasks, reports a study published this week in Science Robotics.

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Radio Atlantic: The Other Republican

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) Former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld has experience taking down a Republican president. He began his career in politics as one of the first lawyers hired to investigate Watergate for the House of Representatives. Working alongside another low-level staffer, named Hillary Clinton, his job was to define what cons

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Giant bird nearly as heavy as a polar bear lorded it over Pleistocene Europe

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01996-9 Fossil find suggests that enormous birds roamed both northern and southern hemispheres.

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Generating more electricity from waste heat by applying pressure

Researchers at Osaka University have been able to enhance the power factor of a promising thermoelectric material by more than 100% by varying the pressure, paving the way for new materials with improved thermoelectric properties. Thermoelectric materials have the unique ability to generate electricity from temperature differences and therefore could potentially be used to convert otherwise wasted

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Astronomers discover eight buried dual AGN candidates

Astronomers discovered eight buried dual AGN candidates, the largest sample of hidden accreting supermassive black holes in late stage galaxy mergers, selected using NASA's Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) space telescope. This result will be presented by graduate student Ryan Pfeifle of George Mason University (Fairfax, Virginia, U.S.) at the annual meeting of the European Astronomical

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Aussie birds turn down their thermostat to save energy in winter

Research published in Biology Letters by scientists at Western Sydney University provides the first clear evidence that a species of perching bird (the passerines) can employ torpor—an energy-saving mechanism whereby the body temperature of an animal is temporarily reduced in a controlled way during resting.

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Team successfully locates incoming asteroid

For the first time, astronomers at the University of Hawaiʻi have demonstrated that their ATLAS and Pan-STARRS survey telescopes can provide sufficient warning to move people away from the impact site of an incoming asteroid. They detected a small asteroid prior to its entering the Earth's atmosphere near Puerto Rico on the morning of June 22, 2019.

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Aussie birds turn down their thermostat to save energy in winter

Research published in Biology Letters by scientists at Western Sydney University provides the first clear evidence that a species of perching bird (the passerines) can employ torpor—an energy-saving mechanism whereby the body temperature of an animal is temporarily reduced in a controlled way during resting.

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Maps and images at the start of the space race opened the door for lunar and planetary exploration

The maps and images created by a small UA team at the start of the space race opened the door for lunar and planetary exploration 50 years ago.

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Ultra-short period brown dwarf discovered

An international team of astronomers has detected a new brown dwarf with an ultra-short orbital period that transits an active M-dwarf star. The newfound object, designated NGTS-7Ab, turns out to be the shortest period transiting brown dwarf around a main or pre-main sequence star discovered to date. The finding is detailed in a paper published June 19 on the arXiv pre-print server.

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Why some rebel groups force kids to fight: it depends on how they are funded

To sustain their operations, armed groups must have a steady supply of recruits. These serve to fill their fighting ranks and to replace those lost to injury, death, or desertion.

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Main instrument for NASA's WFIRST mission completes milestone review

In order to know how the universe will end, we must know what has happened to it so far. This is just one mystery NASA's forthcoming Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission will tackle as it explores the distant cosmos. The spacecraft's giant camera, the Wide Field Instrument (WFI), will be fundamental to this exploration.

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The 20 Most Bike-Friendly Cities on the Planet

The 2019 Copenhagenize Index ranks the world's urban hubs on how much they're doing to promote life on two wheels.

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8 Essential Books in the Queer Comics Canon

Want more comics with LGBTQ+ characters? Start here.

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Repour Wine Saver Review: A Cheap Way to Keep Your Wine from Spoiling

This simple gadget keeps a bottle of wine tasting fresh for days on end.

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Desalination Is Booming as Cities Run out of Water

In California alone there are 11 desalination plants, with 10 more proposed. But there are big downsides to making seawater drinkable.

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Jake Gyllenhaal Is the Real Star of Spider-Man: Far From Home

A moviemaking lifetime ago, before the dawn of cinematic universes and elaborate studio deals for comic-book intellectual property, Jake Gyllenhaal almost played Spider-Man. This was back in the early 2000s, when contract negotiations with Tobey Maguire got tense enough that Columbia Pictures briefly extended an offer to the hotshot young star Gyllenhaal to play the hero in Spider-Man 2 . He neve

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Lightning bolt underwater

Electrochemical cells help recycle CO2. However, the catalytic surfaces get worn down in the process. Researchers at the Collaborative Research Centre 1316 "Transient atmospheric plasmas: from plasmas to liquids to solids" at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) are exploring how they might be regenerated at the push of a button using extreme plasmas in water. In a first, they deployed optical spectrosco

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To build a goldfish, start with a blueprint

Scientists drafted the blueprint for how to build a common goldfish. Now they'll use it to find out what gives ornamental goldfish their nuanced features, gaining insight into human health.

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Goat milk formula could benefit infant gut health: Study

Research suggests goat milk infant formula has similar prebiotic properties to breast milk and could play a role in supporting healthy gut function in infants.

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Study shows that financial crises lower life satisfaction

Financial crises not only result in severe disruptions to the economic system, they also affect people's life satisfaction. A new study by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and the Halle Institute for Economic Research shows: Weaker members of society are more affected by increased uncertainty during crisis times, even if they aren't speculating on the stock market themselves. This could p

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The Mysterious Microbes That May Explain What Happened When Life Became Complex

The Mysterious Microbes That May Explain What Happened When Life Became Complex Microbiologists are debating how a group of ancient microbes fits into the emergence of the first complex organisms. asgard-archaea_color.jpg An artist's impression of the relationships between the Asgard archea Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physic

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To build a goldfish, start with a blueprint

Scientists drafted the blueprint for how to build a common goldfish. Now they'll use it to find out what gives ornamental goldfish their nuanced features, gaining insight into human health.

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Tunguska revisited: 111-year-old mystery impact inspires new, more optimistic asteroid predictions

Every single day, many tons of tiny rocks—smaller than pebbles—hit the Earth's atmosphere and disintegrate. Between frequent shooting stars we wish on in the night sky and the massive extinction-level asteroids that we hope we never see, there is a middle ground of rocks sized to make it through the atmosphere and do serious damage to a limited area. Now, new research from NASA indicates that the

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Plant seeding and panspermia

The first detection of an interstellar asteroid/comet-like object visiting the Solar system two years ago has sparked ideas about the possibility of interstellar travel. New research from the Technion–Israel Institute of Technology suggests that such objects also raise far reaching implications about the origins of planets across the galaxy, and possibly even the initial formation of the Solar sys

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New species of loquat-killing beetle identified

If you live in an area where winter temperatures routinely drop below freezing, you may have never even heard of the evergreen loquat tree and its delicious fruit. But it may be troubling to hear that a new bark beetle pest of loquats has been identified in China by the University of Florida's Forest Entomology Lab. A new paper describing the beetle has just been published in the journal Insects.

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Citizens' assemblies: how to bring the wisdom of the public to bear on the climate emergency

A new form of politics is gaining steam as a solution to the climate crisis. Six parliamentary committees in the UK are to commission a citizens' assembly, in which randomly selected citizens will consider how to combat climate breakdown and achieve the pathway to net zero emissions.

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Fetter spelar roll när astma utvecklas

Människans immunförsvar har till uppgift att känna av vår miljö och reagera mot ämnen som kan vara farliga. Vid astma är immunsystemet överaktivt, vilket leder till inflammation i lungorna och symtom som hosta, pipande andning och andningssvårigheter. Immunförsvarsceller som kallas Th2-celler, en typ av T-celler, spelar en central roll i inflammationen vid astma. Tidigare har det varit svårt att

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New species of loquat-killing beetle identified

If you live in an area where winter temperatures routinely drop below freezing, you may have never even heard of the evergreen loquat tree and its delicious fruit. But it may be troubling to hear that a new bark beetle pest of loquats has been identified in China by the University of Florida's Forest Entomology Lab. A new paper describing the beetle has just been published in the journal Insects.

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Step up to leadership for mid-career growth

Nature, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01936-7 It’s easy to get stuck in an endless whirl of grants and papers. Jeffrey McDonnell offers tips for becoming a leader in your field to ascend to the next professional level.

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Galleri: Apollo 11-filmen viser enestående billeder

'Apollo 11' har i dag premiere i foreløbig tre københavnske biografer. Den viser hidtil usete optagelser fra missionen, der satte første mand på Månen.

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Trailer: 'Apollo 11' viser nærbillederne fra den verdenskendte mission

11.000 timers optagelser fra 1969 – plus det løse – klippet sammen til et 93 minutters nærgående portræt. Ikke af første mand på Månen, men af den omfattende mission, der havde tusindvis af mennesker på arbejde.

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Highway medians are a food source for wildlife, study shows

Small animals such as weasels, mink and chipmunks are using highway medians as food sources, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.

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Coral found to prefer eating microplastic to natural food

A team of researchers from Boston University, Roger Williams University, the New England Aquarium, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School and UMass Boston, reports that one type of coral prefers to eat microplastics over natural food. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes experiments they conducted with Astrangia poculata, a type of cora

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Towards a worldwide inventory of all plants

Declining biodiversity due to man-made habitat destruction and climate change means that information about plant diversity and its distribution across the planet is now crucial for biodiversity conservation. With the Global Inventory of Floras and Traits (GIFT), a team of researchers from the Department of Biodiversity, Macroecology and Biogeography at the University of Göttingen has taken an impo

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Professor Anders H. Lund bliver ny direktør for BRIC

Den nye direktør for BRIC, Københavns Universitet, begynder 1. juli i år. Det bliver professor…

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Highway medians are a food source for wildlife, study shows

Small animals such as weasels, mink and chipmunks are using highway medians as food sources, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.

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Towards a worldwide inventory of all plants

Declining biodiversity due to man-made habitat destruction and climate change means that information about plant diversity and its distribution across the planet is now crucial for biodiversity conservation. With the Global Inventory of Floras and Traits (GIFT), a team of researchers from the Department of Biodiversity, Macroecology and Biogeography at the University of Göttingen has taken an impo

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I ny Apollo-dokumentar kan du næsten lugte brændstoffet

PLUS. 50-året for månelandingen nærmer sig, og en ny dokumentarfilm i biograferne indeholder masser af helt usminket og nærværende drama fra dengang.

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Cost-effective, large scale graphene with AIXTRON systems

Today, Graphene Flagship partner AIXTRON showcased two systems that enable cost effective graphene production for applications in consumer electronics, sensors and photonic applications.

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The two faces of the Jekyll gene

Genes specific to a species or group of species can reflect important genetic changes within lineages. Often, such lineage-specific genes are found to play a role within sexual reproduction, thus promoting reproductive isolation and, consequently, speciation. Whilst investigating the Jekyll gene which is essential for the procreation of barley, researchers from the IPK in Gatersleben have discover

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VESA Announces DisplayPort 2.0 Standard For 8K, HDR, All Points Beyond

The DisplayPort 2.0 standard is finished, with support for 8K displays (stretching all the way to 16K in the future), and new efficiency and visual fidelity features. The post VESA Announces DisplayPort 2.0 Standard For 8K, HDR, All Points Beyond appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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The two faces of the Jekyll gene

Genes specific to a species or group of species can reflect important genetic changes within lineages. Often, such lineage-specific genes are found to play a role within sexual reproduction, thus promoting reproductive isolation and, consequently, speciation. Whilst investigating the Jekyll gene which is essential for the procreation of barley, researchers from the IPK in Gatersleben have discover

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The extreme technology transforming space engineering

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first Apollo moon landing. This was possible thanks to an extraordinary acceleration of space technology. Within a remarkably short period of time leading up to the event, engineers had mastered rocket propulsion, on-board computing and space operations, partially thanks to an essentially unlimited budget.

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It turns out planes are even worse for the climate than we thought

Aeroplane contrails have a larger warming effect than all the CO2 emitted by planes that has accumulated in the atmosphere since the first ever flight

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A new way to make droplets bounce away

MIT researchers have found a way to minimize the contact between falling droplets and surfaces they land on, which could help to improve everything from preventing ice buildup on airplane wings to making waterproof fabrics more effective.

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Climate impact of clouds made from airplane contrails may triple by 2050

In the right conditions, airplane contrails can linger in the sky as contrail cirrus — ice clouds that can trap heat inside the atmosphere. Their climate impact has been largely neglected in schemes to offset aviation emissions, even though contrail cirrus have contributed more to warming than all CO2 emitted by aircraft since the start of aviation. A new Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics study f

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Experiment reverses the direction of heat flow

Heat flows from hot to cold objects. When a hot and a cold body are in thermal contact, they exchange heat energy until they reach thermal equilibrium, with the hot body cooling down and the cold body warming up. This is a natural phenomenon we experience all the time. It is explained by the second law of thermodynamics, which states that the total entropy of an isolated system always tends to inc

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Australian plant 'kangaroo paw' may hold clues to understanding biodiversity down under

A new study on kangaroo paws by The University of Western Australia and researchers at Kings Park and Botanic Gardens has challenged existing views that plants favour long distance rather than short distance pollination to reproduce.

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Australian plant 'kangaroo paw' may hold clues to understanding biodiversity down under

A new study on kangaroo paws by The University of Western Australia and researchers at Kings Park and Botanic Gardens has challenged existing views that plants favour long distance rather than short distance pollination to reproduce.

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The Bystander Effect

Social psychology is the study of how people behave in social situations, so it deals with the complex interactions between personality, culture, and social pressures on how we behave and in turn are affected by each other. I took a social psychology course in college and it really opened my eyes. This was one of the first courses I took that challenged my assumptions in a profound way, because t

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Democrats Still Don’t Know How to Talk About Climate Change

I’ll be honest: It was just nice to hear them talk about climate change. Not that they did it very well or entirely coherently. But still—more than eight minutes of discussion about climate policy! Among national politicians! On broadcast TV! What a concept! And they’ll do it again tonight! Climate policy can sometimes feel like, I don’t know, the fiber of American politics: Everyone knows they n

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The lowdown on Libra: what consumers need to know about Facebook's new cryptocurrency

Cryptocurrencies have become a global phenomenon in the past few years. Now Facebook is launching it's own cryptocurrency, in association with Visa, MasterCard, Uber and others. The stated aim of Libra is to "enable a simple global currency and financial infrastructure that empowers billions of people".

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VESA Publishes DisplayPort 2.0 Spec With Triple The Bandwidth And 16K Support

It's been three years since the DisplayPort standard was last updated, so a replacement has been a long time coming. This week, the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) officially …

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Amazon partners with Rite Aid for package pickup nationwide

Amazon will add more than 1,500 package pickup locations in a partnership with the national pharmacy chain Rite Aid.

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Pig-Pen effect: Mixing skin oil and ozone can produce a personal pollution cloud

When ozone and skin oils meet, the resulting reaction may help remove ozone from an indoor environment, but it can also produce a personal cloud of pollutants that affects indoor air quality, according to a team of researchers.

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Pesticides found in monarchs' milkweed near farm fields

Conservation organizations across the United States plant milkweed to combat the loss of monarch butterflies, whose populations have declined around 90 percent in the last two decades. Where they plant may be important, according to a Purdue University study that finds evidence of agricultural pesticides on milkweed near farm fields.

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Family trauma increases likeliness of youth homelessness

Each year, more than four million young people in the United States experience some form of homelessness. Identifying exactly when and why that happens could open the door to better solutions.

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Pesticides found in monarchs' milkweed near farm fields

Conservation organizations across the United States plant milkweed to combat the loss of monarch butterflies, whose populations have declined around 90 percent in the last two decades. Where they plant may be important, according to a Purdue University study that finds evidence of agricultural pesticides on milkweed near farm fields.

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How effectively does cinnamon treat diabetes?

Cinnamon is often touted as a "natural" supplement that's effective for treating diabetes. The evidence (still) isn't convincing.

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Acer Swift 7 Laptop Review (2019): Mostly Wonderful

The new Acer ultrabook is ultrathin, ultralight, and gets all-day battery life. It's a road warriors dream.

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The Health Effects of Wildfire Smoke May Last a Lifetime

Emerging research suggests exposure to wildfire smoke may alter the immune system for years.

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Older adults can serve communities as engines of everyday innovation

Encouraging hobbies and activities is more than an important part of healthy aging. According to a team of Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology researchers, these passions of older adults can be sources of innovation that benefit the entire community.

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A new way to make droplets bounce away

In many situations, engineers want to minimize the contact of droplets of water or other liquids with surfaces they fall onto. Whether the goal is keeping ice from building up on an airplane wing or a wind turbine blade, or preventing heat loss from a surface during rainfall, or preventing salt buildup on surfaces exposed to ocean spray, making droplets bounce away as fast as possible and minimizi

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Image of the Day: Photo ID

Marine biologists identify smalleye stingrays using the white spots on their backs.

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Frysning af æg blev en glidebane uden evidens

Små spinkle studier har fået læger over hele verden til at øge brugen af frosne æg i fertilitetsbehandling. Nu er det tid til et paradigmeskift, mener dansk forsker.

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Scientists Simulate Human Colonization of the Milky Way

NASA's JPL challenged scientists around the world to devise a process to colonize the galaxy in the most efficient way possible. It might take a few million years, but simulations show how we could do it. The post Scientists Simulate Human Colonization of the Milky Way appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Record-breaking DNA comparisons drive fast forensics

Forensic investigators arrive at the scene of a crime to search for clues. There are no known suspects, and every second that passes means more time for the trail to run cold. A DNA sample is discovered, collected, and then sent to a nearby forensics laboratory. There, it is sequenced and fed into a program that compares its genetic contents to DNA profiles stored in the FBI's National DNA Index S

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Record-breaking DNA comparisons drive fast forensics

Forensic investigators arrive at the scene of a crime to search for clues. There are no known suspects, and every second that passes means more time for the trail to run cold. A DNA sample is discovered, collected, and then sent to a nearby forensics laboratory. There, it is sequenced and fed into a program that compares its genetic contents to DNA profiles stored in the FBI's National DNA Index S

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Pig-Pen effect: Mixing skin oil and ozone can produce a personal pollution cloud

When ozone and skin oils meet, the resulting reaction may help remove ozone from an indoor environment, but it can also produce a personal cloud of pollutants that affects indoor air quality, according to a team of researchers.

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Image: A whirlpool 'Warhol' from NASA's Spitzer telescope

Unlike Andy Warhol's famous silkscreen grids of repeating images rendered in different colors, the varying hues of this galaxy represent how its appearance changes in different wavelengths of light—from visible light to the infrared light seen by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

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Atomic motion captured in 4-D for the first time

Everyday transitions from one state of matter to another—such as freezing, melting or evaporation—start with a process called "nucleation," in which tiny clusters of atoms or molecules (called "nuclei") begin to coalesce. Nucleation plays a critical role in circumstances as diverse as the formation of clouds and the onset of neurodegenerative disease.

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Long-term study reveals public health benefits from air pollution reductions

Research led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) tracked the levels of emissions of a variety of air pollutants between 1970 and 2010—a period in which there was a raft of national and European legislation to tackle pollution. Oxford's Environmental Change Institute (ECI) joined the CEH and the Universities of Birmingham, Edinburgh and Exeter to carry out this interdisciplinary study.

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Proposed set of conservation laws find order in the chaos of turbulence

Turbulence can be found in places large and small, from exploding supernovae and sprawling ocean currents, to the unstable plasmas that form within tiny fusion fuel cells bombarded with lasers.

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Apple Hires Chief ARM CPU Architect Mike Filippo As Company Reportedly Looks To Dump Intel

Apple has managed to poach an experienced chip engineer from ARM as the company ramps up its effort to design more of its iPhone and other hardware in-house. In addition, Apple is reportedly …

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Video: The future of sunscreen begins with cuttlefish

The pigments in the skin of cephalopods, including squid, octopus, and cuttlefish, can absorb ultraviolet radiation.

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Facebook's Libra might be the best bet for cryptocurrency

Facebook's recent announcement of plans to launch a new digital currency called Libra was met with a skeptical or even alarmed response from lawmakers, regulators and leaders of foreign governments concerned about the impact on the global financial system. After all, the social media behemoth has been widely criticized in recent years for privacy violations and facilitating hate speech. Is Faceboo

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Signs of 'Hidden Consciousness' May Predict Who Will Emerge from a Coma

People who showed signs of hidden consciousness after a brain injury were more likely to eventually recover.

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Man Learns the Hard Way That Mixing Pufferfish and Cocaine Is a Very Bad Idea

A combination of cocaine and toxic pufferfish liver sent a Florida man to the emergency room, according to a new case report.

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Electric Cars Still Face a Major Roadblock

I have an old Jeep that’s on its last legs. We’ve rebuilt the transmission and replaced most of the suspension, at a cost that far outstrips the hypothetical value of the car. It runs, but just. It burns oil like a refinery and gets terrible gas mileage to boot. Replacing it with an electric car seems like a no-brainer. Used lease returns for the less expensive models, such as the Nissan Leaf or

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Övervikt, fetma och kostens betydelse för tarmfloran

Tarmflorans roll för sjukdom och hälsa har seglat upp som ett av vår tids hetaste forskningsområden. I sin avhandling har Louise Brunkwall, nutritionist och forskare i genetisk epidemiologi vid Lunds universitet, studerat övervikt, fetma och kostens betydelse i relation till våra tarmbakterier.

7h

UFOs Remain Elusive Despite Decades of Study

The UFO-investigating group MUFON turns 50 next month. What have we learned over the past five decades?

7h

Extinct 11-Foot 'Super-Ostrich' Was As Massive As a Polar Bear

The brawny bird lived alongside humans, who may have hunted the giant.

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'Google brain' implants could mean end of school, says AI expert

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Ancient DNA reveals Neanderthal migration and interbreeding

DNA from 120,000-year-old bones sheds light on the ancestry of Neanderthals in Europe, revealing a remarkable 80,000 years of genetic continuity, interbreeding with a mystery hominin and migrations

7h

Attempts to 'erase the science' at UN climate talks

Delegates are concerned that some countries are trying to minimise a key scientific report about climate change

8h

Why meerkats and mongooses have a cooperative approach to raising their pups

Raising children can be a tough job, especially when doing it alone, but some animals like meerkats and mongooses work together to raise their young. Studies of these cooperative creatures are revealing how this highly social behaviour evolved and is shedding light on the roots of our own species' collaborative abilities.

8h

Turtle study shows hearts can be programmed to survive without oxygen

University of Manchester and University of North Texas scientists are the first to show that an embryonic living heart can be programmed to survive the effects of a low oxygen environment in later life.

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Why meerkats and mongooses have a cooperative approach to raising their pups

Raising children can be a tough job, especially when doing it alone, but some animals like meerkats and mongooses work together to raise their young. Studies of these cooperative creatures are revealing how this highly social behaviour evolved and is shedding light on the roots of our own species' collaborative abilities.

8h

Turtle study shows hearts can be programmed to survive without oxygen

University of Manchester and University of North Texas scientists are the first to show that an embryonic living heart can be programmed to survive the effects of a low oxygen environment in later life.

8h

At 75, Taking Care of Mom, 99: ‘We Did Not Think She Would Live This Long’

The phenomenon some experts call “aging together” — people in their 60s and 70s, usually women, helping much older relatives — can take a financial toll.

8h

The Cypherpunks Tapping Bitcoin via Ham Radio

For a small group of bitcoin enthusiasts, the internet is a vulnerability. They're using satellites, ham radios, and mesh networks to stay current on the cryptocurrency.

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#KimOhNo: Be Grateful That Kim Kardashian Is Bad at Puns

She's calling her new shapewear line "Kimono"—which is both terrible and terribly useful.

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Why We Need Court Jesters in Space – Issue 73: Play

The great polar explorer Roald Amundsen credited expedition cook Adolf Henrik Lindstrøm as having “rendered greater and more valuable services to the Norwegian polar expedition than any other man.” He was citing not only Lindstrøm’s vaunted prowess as a chef, but his keen sense of humor, with which he regularly defused conflicts among the isolated crew members. Lindstrøm’s joviality is seen by be

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The Unique Neurology of the Sports Fan’s Brain – Issue 73: Play

Sports fans aren’t typically in the mood for academic research in the minutes before a big game. But Paul Bernhardt, an aspiring young behavioral scientist at Georgia State University, was determined. Armed with a bag of sterile vials, Bernhardt inched through the crowd at Atlanta’s Omni arena, politely asking anyone decked out in either University of Georgia or Georgia Tech basketball garb—the t

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Playing Video Games Makes Us Fully Human – Issue 73: Play

I have an agonizing decision to make. Should I save a governing body that has never done a thing for me? It doesn’t even contain a single person from my race. The aliens of the galactic Council decided long ago that my people should not be trusted, that we were aggressive, entitled, and short-sighted. I’m a soldier engaged in a fight to save the entire galaxy. And now the Council wants my help to

8h

Christ in the Camps

I am a stumbling, doubting, failing, fearful Christian, so I fit right in with the rest of them. I was raised by atheists who, for complicated reasons, sent me to a Catholic school when I was 11, assuming that I was too smart to believe any of the abracadabra and would just focus on the classes. But they had some other tricks up their sleeves, those Catholics. The first was prayer, which just abo

8h

A Deeper Understanding of Breast Cancer

AI finds new insights into molecular tumor properties using images of cells and tissue — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Streamlined Pathway to Drug Approval

My son's case shows that an emphasis on patient experience data could foster drug development breakthroughs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Deeper Understanding of Breast Cancer

AI finds new insights into molecular tumor properties using images of cells and tissue — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Streamlined Pathway to Drug Approval

My son's case shows that an emphasis on patient experience data could foster drug development breakthroughs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cyprus discovers 'first undisturbed Roman shipwreck'

Cyprus has found its first undisturbed Roman shipwreck complete with ancient cargo off its southern coast, the antiquities department said Thursday, noting the discovery could illuminate regional trading history.

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To Clean Drinking Water, Just Add Microbes

A new approach to water treatment could be cheaper, produce less waste and possibly help fix nitrate pollution in California — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Laboratory experiments show that semiconductor nanowires can be tuned over wide energy ranges

Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers. That is, provided that the tiny semiconductors convert electric energy into light, and vice versa, at the right wavelengths. A research team at the German Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) has managed to produce nanowires with operating wavelengths that can be freely selecte

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'Prob-eye-otics' could be the future of eye disease treatment

The eye has a collection of microbes living on the surface that keep it healthy. (photoJS/Shutterstock.com/) You may be familiar with the idea that your gut and skin are home to a collection of microbes—fungi, bacteria and viruses—that are vital for keeping you healthy. But did you know that your eyes also host a unique menagerie of microbes? Together, they’re called the eye microbiome. When thes

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Driverless car proponents love this stat. Too bad it's a wreck.

Are We There Yet In " Are We There Yet ?" Dan Albert looks at the past, present, and autonomous future of the automobile. (Deposit Photos/) The driverless car stars daily in the news, in opinion columns, and the business pages. It is on the tip of everyone’s tongue. The robot car will disrupt the car culture, reinvent mobility, and unleash trillions of dollars of economic activity. Best of all th

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To Clean Drinking Water, Just Add Microbes

A new approach to water treatment could be cheaper, produce less waste and possibly help fix nitrate pollution in California — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Swimming in the sea completely changes the microbes on your skin

A dip in the sea can completely change the microbes on your skin, replacing your natural mix with bacteria from the ocean

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Discrimination drives LGBT+ scientists to think about quitting

Nature, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02013-9 Despite progress, many physical scientists from sexual and gender minorities experience exclusion or harassment at work, finds UK survey.

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Tiny robot bee powered by light takes flight

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02007-7 Machine carries ultra-lightweight solar cells — and weighs less than a paper clip.

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I Was Lured Into Monsanto’s GMO Crusade. Here’s What I Learned.

During my young but very active career as a blogger, I’d written article after article and tweeted ad nauseam about how genetically modified organisms weren’t the cause of the myriad problems attributed to them. However, I gradually began to sense that there was something very wrong with the GMO gospel.

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Ny hovedpine for Boeing: Piloter opdager "katastrofal fejl" i 737 Max

Den amerikanske luftfartsmyndighed har fundet en ny fejl i passagerflyet. Denne gang er det flyvecomputeren, der reagerer for langsomt på input.

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America has outgrown its ‘Judeo-Christian’ label. What’s next?

America wasn't always known as Judeo-Christian nation. Rather, it used to be considered a Protestant nation. As Jews and Catholics began to represent a larger share of the nation, activists realized that America needed to reinvent itself if the voices of these growing groups were to be heard. In this way, the "Judeo-Christian" label was conceived. Today, that label doesn't quite fit anymore. What

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What Facebucks Can Do for the Global Poor

This month, Facebook announced it was making an investment in crypto. More specifically, the company and its partners issued a long-anticipated white paper unveiling a new digital currency, a management mechanism for it, and a platform for its development . It is called Libra, a kind of half pun : The name refers to an ancient unit of measure, as well as sounding like the French and Spanish word

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Before Stonewall, There Was a Bookstore

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series about the gay-rights movement and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. On July 4, 1965—five years before Stonewall—39 activists from D.C., New York, and Philadelphia marched on the place where the Declaration of Independence had been signed roughly two centuries earlier. They wanted to remind the nation that their rights of “life, liberty

9h

Ny regering vil spare energi i bygninger ved at skrue tiden 10 år tilbage

PLUS. Socialdemokratiet og støttepartierne vil genindføre krav om energibesparelser i kommunale og regionale bygninger, genoplive strategien for bæredygtigt byggeri og De Radikale vil halvere CO2-udledningen fra nybyggeri på 11 år.

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12.000 folkeskoleelever skal skifte kodeord efter hack

Folkeskoleelever i Vejle Kommune skal skifte kodeord efter en elev har hacket systemet, oplyser kommunen.

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WeTransfer hacket da filer blev sendt til de forkerte

Et hackerangreb er årsagen til at WeTransfer sendte filer til de forkerte, oplyser fildelingstjenesten.

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Britain adopts 2050 net zero emissions target

Britain on Thursday became the world's first major economy to adopt the tough new target of lowering fossil fuel emissions to a level of net zero by 2050.

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3D-printade produkter av ved

Genom att efterlikna den naturliga cellulära arkitekturen i trä, presenterar forskarna vid Chalmers nu möjligheten att skapa gröna produkter, sprungna ur trä, med unika egenskaper. Hur trä växer styrs av en genetisk kod, vilken ger det unika egenskaper i form av porositet och vridstyvhet. Samtidigt är trä ett väldigt begränsat material när det kommer till bearbetning. Till skillnad från metaller

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Den cykelglade sønderjyde, overraskelsen og den magtfulde: Her er ministrene, Ingeniøren vil holde i ørerne

Klima, energi, miljø og transport er kerneområder for Ingeniøren. Her har du oversigten over de ministre, der kommer til at have disse emner som ressortområder.

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Scientists discover how plants breathe — and how humans shaped their 'lungs'

Eperts led by the Institute for Sustainable Food at the University of Sheffield reveal how plants provide a steady flow of air to every cell. Study shows humans have bred wheat plants to have fewer pores on their leaves and use less water. Findings pave the way to develop more drought-resistant crops.

9h

Urinary tract and other infections may trigger different kinds of stroke

Several infections have been identified as possible stroke triggers, with urinary tract infections showing the strongest link with ischemic stroke.Healthcare providers need to be aware that stroke can be triggered by infections, researchers noted.

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Heart-healthy effects of soy consistent over time, University of Toronto meta-study finds

Researchers at the University of Toronto have found a consistent cholesterol-lowering effect for soy protein, with pooled data from dozens of clinical trials that span the last two decades. The study calls into question the US Food and Drug Administration's current proposal to revoke the health claim for soy protein and heart disease.

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The Pentagon has a laser that can identify people from a distance—by their heartbeat

The Jetson prototype can pick up on a unique cardiac signature from 200 meters away, even through clothes.

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Carbon cycle instability and orbital forcing during the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45763-2 Carbon cycle instability and orbital forcing during the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum

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Facilitation and inhibition of firing activity and N-methyl-D-aspartate-evoked responses of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells by alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor selective compounds in vivo

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45796-7 Facilitation and inhibition of firing activity and N-methyl-D-aspartate-evoked responses of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells by alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor selective compounds in vivo

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Skin Carotenoid Index in a large Japanese population sample

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45751-6 Skin Carotenoid Index in a large Japanese population sample

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Deciphering the genetic basis of root morphology, nutrient uptake, yield, and yield-related traits in rice under dry direct-seeded cultivation systems

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45770-3 Deciphering the genetic basis of root morphology, nutrient uptake, yield, and yield-related traits in rice under dry direct-seeded cultivation systems

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GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphisms in outcomes of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with cisplatin chemoradiation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45808-6 GSTM1 , GSTT1 and GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphisms in outcomes of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with cisplatin chemoradiation

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Coupling of Redox and Structural States in Cytochrome P450 Reductase Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45690-2 Coupling of Redox and Structural States in Cytochrome P450 Reductase Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

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A model of the entrance pupil of the human eye

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45827-3 A model of the entrance pupil of the human eye

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Effect of Leptin Deficiency on the Skeletal Response to Hindlimb Unloading in Adult Male Mice

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45587-0 Effect of Leptin Deficiency on the Skeletal Response to Hindlimb Unloading in Adult Male Mice

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How Do You Talk to Children About Climate Change?

The key is understanding what climate change is. “A lot of people, when they talk to children, are processing their own anxiety and fears,” a psychologist said.

10h

Scientists discover how plants breathe—and how humans shaped their 'lungs'

Scientists have discovered how plants create networks of air channels—the lungs of the leaf—to transport carbon dioxide (CO2) to their cells.

10h

Scientists discover how plants breathe—and how humans shaped their 'lungs'

Scientists have discovered how plants create networks of air channels—the lungs of the leaf—to transport carbon dioxide (CO2) to their cells.

10h

How a Forgotten White House Team Gained Power in the Trump Era

That Alex Azar, the secretary of health and human services, was generally opposed to major new restrictions on fetal-tissue research wasn’t necessarily relevant. What mattered was that Joe Grogan—the faceless director of a little-known White House office called the Domestic Policy Council (DPC)—felt differently. It was the end of May, and the two camps had been sparring for several weeks over the

10h

Yoga positivt för intagna

– Det är möjligt att en positiv utveckling av karaktärsmognaden också kan vara en skyddsfaktor mot risken för återfall i kriminalitet, men det behöver undersökas vidare, säger Nóra Kerekes, professor i medicinsk vetenskap med inriktning psykiatri, på Högskolan Väst. Under de senaste åren visar ny forskning att regelbunden yoga ger positiva effekter på intagnas psykiska välmående och beteende. – D

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Scientists successfully transfer first test tube rhino embryo

Scientists in Europe said Tuesday they've successfully transferred a test tube rhino embryo back into a female whose eggs were fertilized in vitro, as part of an effort to save another nearly extinct sub-species of the giant horned mammal.

10h

Børneordfører bliver forskningsminister

Ane Halsboe-Jørgensen er udnævnt til uddannelses- og forskningsminister.

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Forskere: Hæv aldersgrænsen for køb af alkohol til 18 år

Vidensråd foreslår i ny rapport at hæve aldersgrænsen for salg af al alkohol…

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Scientists successfully transfer first test tube rhino embryo

Scientists in Europe said Tuesday they've successfully transferred a test tube rhino embryo back into a female whose eggs were fertilized in vitro, as part of an effort to save another nearly extinct sub-species of the giant horned mammal.

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Zuckerberg says US govt inaction allowed fake news to spread

Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg said Wednesday that a lack of action by US authorities on fake political content on the platform after the 2016 US election helped pave the way for a subsequent avalanche of online disinformation.

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Spain wildfire out of control amid Europe heatwave

A forest fire in Spain raged out of control on Thursday amid a Europe-wide heatwave, devouring land despite the efforts of hundreds of firefighters who worked through the night, local authorities said.

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LGBTQ Asian-Americans seen as more 'American'

For Asian-Americans who are gay or lesbian, their sexual orientation may make them seem more 'American' than those who are presumed straight. A new University of Washington study, the latest in research to examine stereotypes, identity and ideas about who is 'American,' focuses on how sexual orientation and race come together to influence others' perceptions.

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Author Correction: New insights into mitral heart valve prolapse after chordae rupture through fluid–structure interaction computational modeling

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44072-y Author Correction: New insights into mitral heart valve prolapse after chordae rupture through fluid–structure interaction computational modeling

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LGBTQ Asian-Americans seen as more 'American'

The fastest-growing racial group in the United States—Asian Americans—is also one that is consistently perceived as "foreign."

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All Aboard the U.K.'s First Hydrogen Train

submitted by /u/pmz [link] [comments]

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Bill de Blasio Tries to Rock the Democratic Boat

Bill de Blasio was one of the last Democrats to enter the presidential-primary race, and as evidenced by his placement on the far edge of the stage last night, one of the last to squeeze into the first primary debate. But he was the first to rock the party boat, the first to interrupt a rival, and the first to pick a policy fight. For good or ill, the New York City mayor stood taller than his fel

11h

Why your foot calluses might be good for you

Before you take a pumice stone to your foot calluses just because they're unsightly, you might want to consider the idea that they are actually nature's shoes.

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Why your foot calluses might be good for you

Before you take a pumice stone to your foot calluses just because they're unsightly, you might want to consider the idea that they are actually nature's shoes.

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EA's Origin had security flaws that could have put up to 300M at risk for identity theft

Video game publisher Electronic Arts has tightened some openings cybersleuths found in its Origin online network that could have exposed more than 300 million video game players to identity theft and account losses.

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How Hackers Turn Microsoft Excel's Own Features Against It

A pair of recent findings show how hackers can compromise Excel users without any fancy exploits.

12h

LSU veterinarians get Pedro the turtle moving

Pedro the turtle has learned to roll with it, thanks to the zoological medicine service at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine's Veterinary Teaching Hospital. When Pedro, an adult male box turtle, was adopted by his owners, he was missing one of his back legs. But after recently escaping from his outdoor enclosure, he was missing the other rear leg.

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LSU veterinarians get Pedro the turtle moving

Pedro the turtle has learned to roll with it, thanks to the zoological medicine service at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine's Veterinary Teaching Hospital. When Pedro, an adult male box turtle, was adopted by his owners, he was missing one of his back legs. But after recently escaping from his outdoor enclosure, he was missing the other rear leg.

12h

US FAA: Boeing must address new issue on 737 MAX

US regulators said Wednesday Boeing must address a new "potential risk" in the Boeing 737 MAX, further clouding the timeframe for resuming service on the planes after two deadly crashes.

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Game console makers oppose China tariffs

Game console makers Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo have joined forces in opposing expanded tariffs on China, saying the plan would make their products unaffordable for the coming holiday season.

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Canada, Netherlands to pilot test epassports for transatlantic flights

Canada and the Netherlands announced Wednesday the launch of a pilot project for paperless travel between the two countries.

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Desert-dwelling carnivorous dinosaur found in Brazil

A desert-based carnivorous dinosaur that used claws to capture small prey 90 million years ago has been unearthed in southern Brazil, scientists said Wednesday.

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US FAA: Boeing must address new issue on 737 MAX

US regulators said Wednesday Boeing must address a new "potential risk" in the Boeing 737 MAX, further clouding the timeframe for resuming service on the planes after two deadly crashes.

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Selfies: five times more deadly than shark attacks

Selfies, which have become a global sensation in the last decade or so, have remarkably killed five times more people than shark attacks.

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Five things to know about the selfie economy

Long dismissed as a symptom of narcissistic youth culture, the not-so-humble selfie has become big business.

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'Deepfakes' pose conundrum for Facebook, Zuckerberg says

Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg said Wednesday the leading social network is struggling to find ways to deal with "deepfake" videos which have the potential to deceive and manipulate users on a massive scale.

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Huawei warns US patent curbs would hurt global tech

Chinese tech giant Huawei warned Thursday a U.S. senator's proposal to block the company from pursuing damages in patent courts would be a "catastrophe for global innovation."

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Is a great iron fertilization experiment already underway?

It's no secret that massive dust storms in the Saharan Desert occasionally shroud the North Atlantic Ocean with iron, but it turns out these natural blankets aren't the only things to sneeze at. Iron released by human activities contributes as much as 80 percent of the iron falling on the ocean surface, even in the dusty North Atlantic Ocean, and is likely underestimated worldwide, according to a

12h

Fruit bats can transform echoes into images

Bats are creatures of the night and are accustomed to complete darkness. They harness their hypersensitive hearing to feed, to fend off prey and to mate.

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Researchers find that probiotic bacteria reduces the impact of white-nose syndrome in bats

It is widely accepted that probiotic bacteria are beneficial to human health, but what if they could also be used to reduce wildlife disease and conserve biodiversity?

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Fruit bats can transform echoes into images

Bats are creatures of the night and are accustomed to complete darkness. They harness their hypersensitive hearing to feed, to fend off prey and to mate.

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Researchers find that probiotic bacteria reduces the impact of white-nose syndrome in bats

It is widely accepted that probiotic bacteria are beneficial to human health, but what if they could also be used to reduce wildlife disease and conserve biodiversity?

12h

Climate warming could increase malaria risk in cooler regions

Malaria parasites develop faster in mosquitoes at lower temperatures than previously thought, according to researchers at Penn State and the University of Exeter. The findings suggest that even slight climate warming could increase malaria risk to hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of people—including travelers—in areas that are currently too cold for malaria parasites to complete their devel

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Researchers reach milestone in use of nanoparticles to kill cancer with heat

Researchers at Oregon State University have developed an improved technique for using magnetic nanoclusters to kill hard-to-reach tumors.

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Climate warming could increase malaria risk in cooler regions

Malaria parasites develop faster in mosquitoes at lower temperatures than previously thought, according to researchers at Penn State and the University of Exeter. The findings suggest that even slight climate warming could increase malaria risk to hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of people—including travelers—in areas that are currently too cold for malaria parasites to complete their devel

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3-D body mapping could identify, treat organs, cells damaged from medical conditions

Medical advancements can come at a physical cost. Often following diagnosis and treatment for cancer and other diseases, patients' organs and cells can remain healed but damaged from the medical condition.

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