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nyheder2019juni28

Researchers teleport information within a diamond

Researchers from the Yokohama National University have teleported quantum information securely within the confines of a diamond. The study has big implications for quantum information technology — the future of how sensitive information is shared and stored. The researchers published their results on June 28, 2019 in Communications Physics.

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New property of light discovered

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Spain and the U.S. has announced that they have discovered a new property of light—self-torque. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they happened to spot the new property and possible uses for it.

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Ny sundhedsminister til personalet: Jeres nødråb er opfanget

Den nye sundhedsminister, Magnus Heunicke (S), talte direkte til lægerne og andre, »der har dedikeret deres liv til at hjælpe andre«, da han torsdag overtog posten. Og så viste han sin forgænger den største respekt ved ministeroverdragelsen, hvor der også blev drillet og byttet gaver.

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Do newspaper presidential endorsements matter anymore?

Lots of newspapers endrose cadndiates, but the practice has been questioned in recent years. Perceived bias is a big part of the recent decline of trust in media. One study found endorsements can change people's minds, but only under certain circumstances. Endorsements are an often-contentious part of the increasingly endless American election cycle. Most significant organizations of every kind g

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Here are the states where teens smoke the most pot

The report is based on the most recent data from the National Survey on Drugs Use and Mental Health . Overall, the share of younger Americans (17 and under) who have used marijuana in the past year declined slightly from 2016 to 2017, but some states showed increases. No studies indicate that marijuana legalization causes more teens to start using marijuana. None As marijuana becomes increasingly

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Scientists discover pathway that prevents buildup of Alzheimer's protein

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D-Wave launches its quantum hybrid platform

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App that digitally removes women's clothes shut down

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Daily briefing: Australia’s feral cats ravage native animals

Nature, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02055-z Australia’s feral cats kill 459 million native mammals every year, NASA will send a nuclear-powered drone to explore Titan and why calloused bare feet are better than cushioned shoes.

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A Baffling Murder Case. An Unimaginable Tragedy.

At 3:10 p.m. on October 2, 1998, 13-year-old Gregory Witman returned home from school. Seven minutes later, his 15-year-old brother, Zachary, who was home sick that day, dialed 911. “Is he breathing?” the operator asked. “No. I gotta call my mom!” Zachary said. Police arrived on the scene to find Gregory dead in a pool of his own blood on the laundry-room floor. He had been stabbed more than 100

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Moments of clarity in dementia patients at end of life: Glimmers of hope?

It happens unexpectedly: a person long thought lost to the ravages of dementia, unable to recall the events of their lives or even recognize those closest to them, will suddenly wake up and exhibit surprisingly normal behavior, only to pass away shortly thereafter. This phenomenon, which experts refer to as terminal or paradoxical lucidity, has been reported since antiquity, yet there have been ve

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A New and Terrifying Tick, a 3D-Printed Shoe Sole, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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The state of multiple antibiotic resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Cape Coast, Ghana

The study was conducted to investigate the level of contamination of raw meat and Ghanaian coins in circulation at Cape Coast Metropolis. In all, 10 raw meat were sampled each from chevron and beef from Kotokuraba market, and 400 Ghanaian coin currencies retrieved from food vendors, students, transport operators and banks were used in this study.

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Amphibians infected by ranavirus found in Atlantic rain forest

Ranavirus is linked to amphibian decline or extinction in other parts of the world, but in Brazil, it has been reported only in captive animals.

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New NASA Contest Seeks Way to Grow a Space Garden

Space Garden NASA needs your help figuring out how to grow gardens and crops in outer space. To that end, the space agency’s so-called “ Growing Beyond Earth ” contest is now open for submissions. The challenge is to come up with a design for a “3D growing space” that fits within a 50-centimeter cube and can help supply astronauts on future missions into space with fresh fruits and vegetables. St

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What can trigger violence in postcolonial Africa?

Democracy is probably not in the cards for Sudan any time soon.

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In search for alien life, NASA to send ‘Dragonfly’ drone to Titan

The Dragonfly rotorcraft will collect samples of the moon's surface, take photos, measure possible titanquakes, and search for signs of microbial life. It would be the second time NASA has landed a spacecraft on Titan. The mission is part of NASA's Frontiers programs, in which teams compete for funding for ambitious space missions. None NASA's plans to send a flying drone to Saturn's moon Titan t

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Newborn Shrimp Often Undergo Sex Reversal, but Ocean Acidification Could Disturb That Natural Process

Chemicals in microalgae are crucial for these bright green shrimp's sexual development, but ocean acidification could change that

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'DeepNude' app to 'undress' women shut down after furor

The creators of an application allowing users to virtually "undress" women using artificial intelligence have shut it down after a social media uproar over its potential for abuse.

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X-ray imaging provides clues to fracture in solid-state batteries

Solid-state batteries—a new battery design that uses all solid components—have gained attention in recent years because of their potential to hold much more energy while simultaneously avoiding the safety challenges of their liquid-based counterparts.

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New material shows high potential for quantum computing

A joint team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is getting closer to confirming the existence of an exotic quantum particle called Majorana fermion, crucial for fault-tolerant quantum computing—the kind of quantum computing that addresses errors during its operation.

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Nonnative pear trees are showing up in US forests

A popular imported tree that became a neighborhood favorite in the 1990s now threatens to crowd out native trees in some Eastern forests.

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'Ghost Base' Perched on a Growing Ice Chasm in Antarctica Is Running on Its Own

A remote science station in Antarctica forced to close over the polar winter by a dangerous ice chasm is completely empty of human life.

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Medicines made of solid gold to help the immune system

By testing a variety of gold nanoparticles, researchers are providing first evidence of their impact upon human B lymphocytes — the immune cells responsible for antibody production. The use of these nanoparticles is expected to improve the efficacy of pharmaceutical products while limiting potential adverse effects. These results will lead to the development of more targeted and better tolerated

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X-ray imaging provides clues to fracture in solid-state batteries

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have used X-ray computed tomography (CT) to visualize in real time how cracks form near the edges of the interfaces between materials in solid-state batteries. The findings could help researchers find ways to improve the energy storage devices.

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Nonnative pear trees are showing up in US forests

Callery or Bradford pear trees are starting to show up in many eastern forests. Once established, the invasive trees are hard to eradicate, a University of Cincinnati biologist warns.

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Embracing bioinformatics in gene banks

Scientists have explored, within a perspective paper, the upcoming challenges and possibilities of the future of gene banks. They emphasize that the advancement of gene banks into bio-digital resource centers, which collate the germplasm as well as the molecular data of the samples, would be beneficial to scientists, plant breeders and society alike.

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Medicines made of solid gold to help the immune system

By testing a variety of gold nanoparticles, researchers are providing first evidence of their impact upon human B lymphocytes — the immune cells responsible for antibody production. The use of these nanoparticles is expected to improve the efficacy of pharmaceutical products while limiting potential adverse effects. These results will lead to the development of more targeted and better tolerated

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Take two E. coli and call me in the morning

What if the bacteria in your daily probiotic were also able to detect diseases in the gut and indicate when something is awry? New research has created an effective, non-invasive way to quickly identify new bacterial biosensors that can recognize and report the presence of various disease triggers in the gut, helping set the stage for a new frontier of digestive health monitoring and treatment.

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Toxic substances found in the glass and decoration of alcoholic beverage bottles

New research shows that bottles of beer, wine and spirits contain potentially harmful levels of toxic elements, such as lead and cadmium, in their enameled decorations.

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Towards a worldwide inventory of all plants

Declining biodiversity due to human-made habitat destruction and climate change means that information about plant diversity and its distribution across the planet is now crucial for biodiversity conservation.

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Muscling in on the role of vitamin D

A recent study has shed light on the role of vitamin D in muscle cells. The study looked at the role of vitamin D in muscles in mice, and showed that vitamin D signaling (how cells communicate with one another) is needed for normal muscle size and strength.

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New study on gene editing in wildlife finds people are wary

The applications of CRISPR based genetic engineering tools range from changing colors in butterfly wings to developing gene therapies that might one day cure or prevent human diseases. Some scientists are also setting their sights on new uses — saving endangered species and possibly eliminating invasive ones to manage wildlife populations for conservation. However, a University of Central Florida

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New mouse model of Parkinson's disease shows how it spreads from the gut

Parkinson's disease can begin in the gut and spread to the brain via the vagus nerve, researchers report. This pathway was observed in a new mouse model, which recapitulates both motor and non-motor deficits as well as early-stage and late-stage features associated with Parkinson's disease.

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Drugged, Castrated, Eager to Mate: the Lives of Fungi-Infected Cicadas

“This really has all the elements of a sci-fi horror story,” a mycologist said.

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This cheap smartphone sensor could help you tell if old food is safe to eat

The sensor only activates when ammonia is absent, indicating that food is fresh. (Pixabay/) Firat Güder admits it, albeit a bit chagrined. He often leaves unopened yogurt in his office at room temperature for several weeks before he eats it. So far, he’s escaped any ill effects. “They’re still good to eat,” he said. “I have not gotten sick from them yet. Of course, I don’t suggest other people do

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White Holes: Do Black Holes Have Mirror Images?

An artistic representation of a white hole. (Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Discover) It was no less a luminary than Isaac Newton who taught us that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. Push on the wall, and it pushes back. With that in mind, cosmic "white holes" make a lot of sense — they seem inevitable, even. We all know about black holes, those cosmic vacuum c

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Fungi Can Withstand the High Radiation Doses of Outer Space, Scientists Find

This petri dish contains fungus samples collected from the International Space Station. (Credit: NASA/JPL) Anywhere humans go, we bring companions along, in the form of bacteria and mold. Some of them, like gut bacteria, are essential for healthy living. Others are mere tagalongs. As hospitals well know, even the spaces meant to be most clean still teem with microbial life, and the International S

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Oyster Shells Inspire Scientists To Create Glass That's Much Harder to Shatter

(Credit: Lizard/Shutterstock) Crack open an oyster shell and the inner face shimmers in a rainbow of kaleidoscopic colors. This smooth material, known as mother-of-pearl, is beautiful and resilient – so resilient that it has inspired the creation of virtually shatterproof glass. “Our bioinspired glass is 2-3 times more impact resistant than laminated glass and tempered glass — the 'standards' for

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An improved vaccine for bacterial meningitis and bloodstream infections

Researchers have now developed a new vaccine, a native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccine, for meningitis and bloodstream infections caused by 'meningococcal group B' bacteria. This will allow younger people to be vaccinated and will address several limitations of the current vaccinations.

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Confirmation of old theory leads to new breakthrough in superconductor science

Scientists have developed a superconductor that is only one nanometer thick. By studying fluctuations in this ultra-thin material as it transitions into superconductivity, the scientists gained insight into the processes that drive superconductivity. They used the new technology to confirm a 23-year-old theory of superconductors. Their work could have applications in virtually any technology that

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Pig-Pen effect: Mixing skin oil and ozone can produce a personal pollution cloud

When ozone and skin oils meet, the resulting reaction may help remove ozone from an indoor environment, but it can also produce a personal cloud of pollutants that affects indoor air quality, according to a team of researchers.

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Contact Lenses Flushed Down Toilets Pollute Oceans

Contact Lenses Flushed Down Toilets Pollute Oceans What we goes down our drains could harm the environment. Contact Lenses Flushed Down Toilets Pollute Oceans Video of Contact Lenses Flushed Down Toilets Pollute Oceans Earth Friday, June 28, 2019 – 15:15 Sofie Bates, Contributor (Inside Science) – About 20% of people who use contact lenses flush them down the toilet or sink. But when those contac

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Get A Glimpse: Total Solar Eclipse Set To Pass Over South Pacific, South America

The eclipse will happen on July 2. Its path of totality cuts across much of the south Pacific Ocean as well as Argentina and Chile — including a telescope that is one the world's largest. (Image credit: Michael Zeiler, greatamericaneclipse.com)

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There's need to intensify diabetes screening amongst older patients living with HIV

This study examines the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in newly diagnosed HIV-positive patients in Buffalo City Municipality, East London, South Africa.

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New material shows high potential for quantum computing

A joint team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is getting closer to confirming the existence of an exotic quantum particle called Majorana fermion, crucial for fault-tolerant quantum computing — the kind of quantum computing that addresses errors during its operation.

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Low-cost retinal scanner could help prevent blindness worldwide

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a low-cost, portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanner that promises to bring the vision-saving technology to underserved regions throughout the United States and abroad. Thanks to a redesigned, 3D-printed spectrometer, the scanner is 15 times lighter and smaller than current commercial systems and is made from parts costing less than

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Is climate change causing Europe’s intense heat? A scientist weighs in

Science News talks with climate scientist Karsten Haustein about attributing extreme heat events in Europe and South Asia to climate change.

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Facebook Live – Lucie Low and Bob Grant Discuss the Tissue Chips in Space Program

After the launch of four tissue-mimicking microfluidic devices into space, Lucie Low of NIH/NCATS discusses what they could tell us about human health in this Facebook Live.

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NASA's New Exoplanet-Hunting Telescope Has Spotted Its Tiniest Alien World Yet

NASA's new exoplanet-hunting telescope has discovered its smallest planet yet: a world somewhere between the sizes of Earth and its smaller sister, Mars.

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Astronomers Collect 40,000 Used Eclipse Glasses In U.S. For People In South America

"We were contacted by people all over the country who said, 'We'd like to collect glasses for you, how do we become a collection center?' " says Mike Simmons, president of Astronomers Without Borders. (Image credit: NPR)

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Man Found Guilty in a Murder Mystery Cracked By Cousins’ DNA

The trial of William Earl Talbott II hinged on a lead from a genealogy site. The verdict will shape the future of crime-fighting and genetic privacy.

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Feds Bust Dark Web Drug Dealers After They Buy Postage Online

Not Even Once Starting as early as 2017, two men in Southern California used the dark web to sell more than $8.8 million worth of methamphetamine they marketed as Adderall. The operation appeared to be chugging along quite nicely until the dark web drug dealers made a fatal mistake. According to court filings reviewed by Quartz , the men mailed drugs to undercover federal agents using pre-printed

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How a Victorian heart medicine became a gay sex drug

A wild ride through the history of poppers. (Alex Schwartz/) The first time I encountered poppers, I watched a nun do them. I was in fifth grade. It was the final scene of Act 1 of “Nunsense,” a riotous Off-Broadway musical detailing the fundraising antics of an ill-fated but endearing group of convent sisters. One nun had found a suspicious-looking bag in a high school bathroom and presented it

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Kamala Harris Knew What She Was Doing

When Kamala Harris laid into Joe Biden in last night’s debate, she knew what she was doing. In a speech earlier this month, the former vice president had reminisced about being able to work with die-hard segregationists when he was a young senator from Delaware. In sharply criticizing those remarks, and his past position against school busing, Harris was trying to convince the Democratic Party’s

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Allianz Wants to Tackle the Challenge of Creating Sustainable Urban Living

Think the subway car on your morning commute is already packed to the brim? Just wait until 2050. That’s when, according to UN statistics, the global urban population will increase by 2.5 billion . Many cities worldwide are short on resources even now and already wondering how they’ll be able to manage the massive spike in urban dwellers in the years to come. Policy makers must figure out a way t

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New solar technology could produce clean drinking water for millions in need

Solar still produces 12 times the clean water of commercial versions

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Epidemiological review on emerging & re-emerging parasitic infectious diseases in Malaysia

Re-emerging infectious diseases are those that were once a health problem in a particular region or a country and are now emerging again. This review provides epidemiological insights into the reported emerging and re-emerging parasitic infectious diseases in Malaysia over the past two decades.

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Aliens on Icy Moons Could Look Like Organisms Near Seafloor Volcanoes

Underwater Volcanos Astrobiologists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) believe that the answer to what alien life could look like on icy moons – like Saturn’s moon Enceladus – could actually lie deep in the ocean. More specifically, in the Lo’ihi seamount, an underwater volcano at around 3,200 feet below the surface south east off the coast of Hawaii’s Big Island. The researcher

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The Strange Politics of Facial Recognition

Your face is no longer just your face—it’s been augmented. At a football game, your face is currency , used to buy food at the stadium. At the mall, it is a ledger , used to alert salespeople to your past purchases, both online and offline, and shopping preferences. At a protest, it is your arrest history . At the morgue, it is how authorities will identify your body. Facial-recognition technolog

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Corporations’ Social Crusades Often Leave Out Workers

For many American companies, public support for social causes has become an essential part of their business. Earlier this year, Gillette stoked controversy with a campaign urging men to rethink their idea of masculinity. The lingerie brand Aerie has amassed enormous goodwill with years of body-positive underwear ads . Customers have come to expect corporations to take positions, and now even com

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The Books Briefing: What to Read This Summer (A Far-From-Complete List)

(Naomi Elliott) Many a summer-reading list will recommend books to read at the beach, but that model leaves out a lot of warm-weather reading habits. Perhaps you’d like to lie on the grass and leaf through Mary Oliver’s poems about the wonders of the natural world, or pull back the curtain on the political apparatus behind every president’s public image with David Greenberg’s Republic of Spin . M

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What We’re Reading This Summer

Naomi Elliott Hollywood’s Eve , by Lili Anolik Scribner I usually avoid biographies. Too often, they can be dry, overly calculated (particularly if they’re written about a subject who just happens to be running for president), or didactic to a fault. None of these traits appear in Anolik’s exuberant, eyebrow-raising tale of the L.A. writer and so-called “it” girl Eve Babitz. It's a quick but memo

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: About Last Night

Welcome to a special Democratic-debate issue of the Atlantic ’s signature politics newsletter. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. What We’re Watching Today It’s Friday, June 28. ​ (AP / Arsh Raziuddin / The Atlantic ) Ten more Democratic presidential contenders took the stage to persuade people to vote for them (or if you’re Marianne Williamson, to love everyone, but maybe also

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Utrafast magnetism: Electron-phonon interactions examined at BESSY II

How fast can a magnet switch its orientation and what are the microscopic mechanisms at play? These questions are of first importance for the development of data storage and computer chips. Now, an HZB team at BESSY II has for the first time been able to experimentally assess the principal microscopic process of ultra-fast magnetism. The methodology developed for this purpose can also be used to i

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Translating proteins into music, and back

In a surprising marriage of science and art, researchers have developed a system for converting the molecular structures of proteins, the basic building blocks of all living beings, into audible sound that resembles musical passages. Then, reversing the process, they can introduce some variations into the music and convert it back into new proteins never before seen in nature.

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Space Radiation May Kill You, But Your Mold Will Live On

Mold found in the International Space Station proved incredibly resilient to doses of radiation that would kill a human hundreds of times over.

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Gut Microbe Manipulation Could End Climate-Destroying Sheep Farts

Methane Emissions Methane accounts for just 10 percent of the United States’ greenhouse gas emissions, but its long-term impact on the climate is far greater than that of the top emission, carbon dioxide. Most of the U.S.’s methane emissions come from farm animals , which literally burp and fart the harmful gas. This has led some to suggest we transition away from those animals and toward alterna

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June's Stellar Space Pictures

June's Stellar Space Pictures Gaze upon halos of light, streams of interstellar gas, and nearby Earthlike planets this month. 4_crop_nrao19cb05_afrtistimp_05232019.jpg An artist's impression of the interstellar gas surrounding the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way. Image credits: NRAO/AUI/NSF; S. Dagnello Space Friday, June 28, 2019 – 15:45 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (

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Artificial DNA can control release of active ingredients from drugs

A drug with three active ingredients that are released in sequence at specific times: What was once a pharmacologist's dream is now much closer to reality. With a combination of hydrogels and artificial DNA, nanoparticles can be released in sequence under conditions similar to those in the human body.

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Protein linked to aggressive skin cancer

Almost 300,000 people worldwide develop malignant melanoma each year. The disease is the most serious form of skin cancer and the number of cases reported annually is increasing, making skin cancer one of Sweden's most common forms of cancer. A research team has studied a protein that regulates a gene which is linked to metastasis of malignant melanoma.

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Artificial DNA can control release of active ingredients from drugs

A drug with three active ingredients that are released in sequence at specific times: What was once a pharmacologist's dream is now much closer to reality. With a combination of hydrogels and artificial DNA, nanoparticles can be released in sequence under conditions similar to those in the human body.

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Teens who can describe negative emotions can stave off depression

Teenagers who can describe their negative emotions in precise and nuanced ways are better protected against depression than their peers who can't. That's the conclusion of a new study about negative emotion differentiation, or NED — the ability to make fine-grained distinctions between negative emotions and apply precise labels.

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Chinese Casinos Use AI, Facial Recognition to Spot Suckers

The House Wins Casinos in China’s Macau territory have started to deploy high-tech surveillance tools to keep an eye on their customers. But they’re not worried about security . Rather, the casinos use artificial intelligence and facial recognition to spot which customers are about to hand over the most money, according to The Los Angeles Times . In a bizarre real-world version of big data analyt

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What can trigger violence in postcolonial Africa?

Why do civil wars and coups d'état occur more frequently in some sub-Saharan African countries than others. What makes violence more likely? A University of Rochester study finds the origins in precolonial political organization. In short, African countries that include ethnic groups that were organized as states prior to European colonization are at much higher risk for violence.

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Ending needless chemotherapy for breast cancer

A diagnostic test developed at The University of Queensland might soon determine if a breast cancer patient requires chemotherapy or would receive no benefit from this gruelling treatment.

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Fossilized Dino Bones Are Home to Diverse Microbial Communities

A study fails to detect ancient proteins among the microbes, adding to the debate about whether peptides can survive tens of millions of years underground.

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Most Candidates Are Running for President. Joe Biden Is Still Strolling.

MIAMI —By the time the Democratic candidates began to deliver their closing statements at last night’s debate, most of the roughly 375 reporters in the spin room were already out of their chairs, getting in position to grab interviews with the competitors and their teams. Former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper popped in first, followed almost immediately by one of his home state’s senators, M

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If Artificial Intelligence becomes widespread, will Robots' Rights be the next big Civil Rights movement?

I just had a package delivered by Amazon Prime Now, and imagined very soon a robot might be doing that. Then I imagined once we create lots of robots, they will be everywhere, and humans might want to have "robot-free" zones. But then the robots might think this is unfair treatment and will demand to be allowed everywhere. Is this likely? Why or why not? submitted by /u/SuperCoolRobotPerson [link

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Virtual Reality Is Changing The Future Of Healthcare.

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MIT spin-off attempting to commercialize nuclear fusion raises $115M Series A

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How DNA ‘hotspots’ snarl the search for cancer genes

Nature, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02011-x Clusters of mutations can mislead researchers.

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S.Africa halts Cape Town octopus fishing after 2 whales die

South Africa on Friday halted octopus fishing off Cape Town after two whales died when they became entangled in lines attached to octopus traps, the government said.

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Role of initial magnetic disorder: A time-dependent ab initio study of ultrafast demagnetization mechanisms

Despite more than 20 years of development, the underlying physics of the laser-induced demagnetization process is still debated. We present a fast, real-time time-dependent density functional theory (rt-TDDFT) algorithm together with the phenomenological atomic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert model to investigate this problem. Our Hamiltonian considers noncollinear magnetic moment, spin-orbit coupling (S

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Autofocals: Evaluating gaze-contingent eyeglasses for presbyopes

As humans age, they gradually lose the ability to accommodate, or refocus, to near distances because of the stiffening of the crystalline lens. This condition, known as presbyopia, affects nearly 20% of people worldwide. We design and build a new presbyopia correction, autofocals, to externally mimic the natural accommodation response, combining eye tracker and depth sensor data to automatically

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Emission of circularly polarized light by a linear dipole

Controlling the polarization state and the propagation direction of photons is a fundamental prerequisite for many nanophotonic devices and a precursor for future on-chip communication, where the emission properties of individual emitters are particularly relevant. Here, we report on the emission of partially circularly polarized photons by a linear dipole. The underlying effect is linked to the

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The cold Leidenfrost regime

Superhydrophobicity (observed at room temperature) and Leidenfrost phenomenon (observed on very hot solids) are classical examples of nonwetting surfaces. It was found that combining the two effects by heating water-repellent materials leads to a marked yet unexplained decrease of the Leidenfrost temperature of water. We discuss here how heat enhances superhydrophobicity by favoring a "cold Leide

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First analysis of ancient burned human skeletal remains probed by neutron and optical vibrational spectroscopy

Burned skeletal remains are abundant in archaeological and paleontological sites, the result of fire or of ancient funerary practices. In the burning process, the bone matrix suffers structural and dimensional changes that interfere with the reliability of available osteometric methods. Recent studies showed that these macroscopic changes are accompanied by microscopic variations are reflected in

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Architecting highly hydratable polymer networks to tune the water state for solar water purification

Water purification by solar distillation is a promising technology to produce fresh water. However, solar vapor generation, is energy intensive, leading to a low water yield under natural sunlight. Therefore, developing new materials that can reduce the energy requirement of water vaporization and speed up solar water purification is highly desirable. Here, we introduce a highly hydratable light-

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Ni-catalyzed deaminative cross-electrophile coupling of Katritzky salts with halides via CboxhN bond activation

The reductive cross-coupling of sp 3 -hybridized carbon centers represents great synthetic values and insurmountable challenges. In this work, we report a nickel-catalyzed deaminative cross-electrophile coupling reaction to construct C(sp)C(sp 3 ), C(sp 2 )C(sp 3 ), and C(sp 3 )C(sp 3 ) bonds. A wide range of coupling partners including aryl iodides, bromoalkynes, or alkyl bromides are stitched w

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Creation of two-dimensional layered Zintl phase by dimensional manipulation of crystal structure

The discovery of new families, beyond graphene, of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has always attracted great attention. However, it has been challenging to artificially develop layered materials with honeycomb atomic lattice structure composed of multicomponents such as hexagonal boron nitride. Here, through the dimensional manipulation of a crystal structure from sp 3 -hybridized 3D-ZnSb

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Solvent-dependent segmental dynamics in intrinsically disordered proteins

Protein and water dynamics have a synergistic relationship, which is particularly important for intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), although the details of this coupling remain poorly understood. Here, we combine temperature-dependent molecular dynamics simulations using different water models with extensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation to examine the importance of distinct m

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S.Africa halts Cape Town octopus fishing after 2 whales die

South Africa on Friday halted octopus fishing off Cape Town after two whales died when they became entangled in lines attached to octopus traps, the government said.

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Original 'Star Wars' creators lift lid on special effects challenges

Remember the scene when Luke Skywalker failed his first attempt to blow up the Death Star? Or when C3PO chased him up the stairs of his Tatooine desert home?

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Groups remove 40 tons of fishing nets from Pacific Ocean

Environmentalists cleaning up plastic in the ocean pulled 40 tons (36 metric tons) of abandoned fishing nets this month from an area known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

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Grain-free food may be linked to dog heart disease: health authority

Recent years have seen a surge in grain-free dog and cat foods, as increasing numbers of pet owners cast aside kibble packed with cheap corn, wheat and barley fillers for what they believe is a healthier alternative.

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Confirmation of old theory leads to new breakthrough in superconductor science

Phase transitions occur when a substance changes from a solid, liquid or gaseous state to a different state—like ice melting or vapor condensing. During these phase transitions, there is a point at which the system can display properties of both states of matter simultaneously. A similar effect occurs when normal metals transition into superconductors—characteristics fluctuate and properties expec

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Climate Change Update: France Just Hit Highest Recorded Temp

Record Temperatures Europe is on fire, figuratively and — in the case of Spain’s Catalonia region — literally. A town in southern France called Villevieille just reached the country’s hottest-ever recorded temperature of 45.1 degrees Celsius (113 Fahrenheit) — hotter than the recorded highs in the Saharan desert. While some are saying , the extreme weather is directly linked to climate change. To

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Physicists Just Teleported Quantum Information Inside a Diamond

Diamonds Are Forever Researchers have teleported quantum information across cities and even into space . Now, a team from Japan’s Yokohama National University has managed something no one has ever done before. They teleported quantum information within a diamond — an achievement that could shape how we share and store sensitive information in the future. Spooky Action The sci-fi version of “telep

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Roberts’s Rules of Misrepresentation

Chief Justice John Roberts would like the Trump administration to stop leaving a paper trail. Conservatives were outraged Thursday when Roberts joined the Court’s Democratic appointees in at least temporarily blocking the addition of a citizenship question to the U.S. census because the Commerce Department had plainly lied about the purpose of that change. Roberts did not argue that a citizenship

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Grain-free food may be linked to dog heart disease: health authority

Recent years have seen a surge in grain-free dog and cat foods, as increasing numbers of pet owners cast aside kibble packed with cheap corn, wheat and barley fillers for what they believe is a healthier alternative.

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New study examines 2017-2018 Thomas Fire debris flows

Shortly before the beginning of the 2017-2018 winter rainy season, one of the largest fires in California (USA) history (Thomas fire) substantially increased the susceptibility of steep slopes in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties to debris flows. On 9 Jan. 2018, before the fire was fully contained, an intense burst of rain fell on the portion of the burn area above Montecito, California. The rain

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Big Data Supercharged Gerrymandering. It Could Help Stop It Too

The Supreme Court decided Thursday not to address partisan gerrymandering—but there are other ways to fight it.

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How to make your own butter

Nothin' better than fresh butter on fresh bread. (Deposit Photos/) It's pretty basic of me to say that I have been obsessed with The Great British Bake Off for the past few years. But I, like many other amateur bakers and millennials, love to lose myself in that white tent, where the only thing that matters is whether meringue will hold the shape of a hot air balloon in the British summer heat. I

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After Decades of Hunting, Physicists Claim They've Made Quantum Material from Depths of Jupiter

A team of researchers have posted a paper in which they claim to have achieved a holy grail of materials science: creating metallic hydrogen in a laboratory.

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Airplane Contrails Are Making Climate Change Worse

Airplane contrails, also known as the ice clouds formed by airplane farts, could contribute substantially to climate change. This will be accentuated in the future as air travel ramps up. (Credit: Gajus/Shutterstock) More than 40,000 airplanes crisscross the skies above the U.S. every day. The engines propelling the metal birds through the wild blue yonder leave behind distinct line-shaped clouds

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Scientists Are Taking the Fight Against Deepfakes to Another Level

(Credit: meyer_solutions/Shutterstock) Deepfake videos are hard for untrained eyes to detect because they can be quite realistic. Whether used as personal weapons of revenge, to manipulate financial markets or to destabilize international relations, videos depicting people doing and saying things they never did or said are a fundamental threat to the longstanding idea that “seeing is believing.” N

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Italy fines Facebook over Cambridge Analytica case

Italy's data protection watchdog slammed Facebook Friday with a fine of one million euros ($1.1 million) for violating privacy laws over the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

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Archaeologists Discover Ancient Baptismal Font Hidden Inside Jesus' Traditional Birthplace

A baptismal font dating to the 6th or 7th century A.D. was just found — hidden inside another baptismal font — in the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem.

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NASA needs your help: Do you know how to grow plants in space?

Do you know how to maintain a family-sized garden without unlimited soil, natural sunlight and Earth's gravity? If the answer is yes, then call NASA.

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The US opioid epidemic is driving a spike in infectious diseases

Nature, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02019-3 Researchers around the country are scrambling to understand these outbreaks, but lack solid data on case numbers.

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NASA to land first woman on the moon. 'It would be out of this world.'

From 1969 to 1972, six NASA missions named for the Greek god Apollo successfully landed 12 men on the surface of the moon; Neil, "Buzz," two men named Alan, two men named Charles, Edgar, David, James, John, Jack and Eugene.

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A Radical Way to Stop Heroin Overdoses

Naloxone is a miracle cure for people who have overdosed from heroin or fentanyl, but it comes with a major downside. Though the drug can revive someone who has overdosed, that person often experiences severe opioid-withdrawal symptoms immediately after recovery. “We had a lot of paramedics telling us that someone would be in an ambulance, knocked out, and then receive naloxone, and they would ru

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Confirmation of old theory leads to new breakthrough in superconductor science

Scientists at Harvard have developed a superconductor that is only one nanometer thick. By studying fluctuations in this ultra-thin material as it transitions into superconductivity, the scientists gained insight into the processes that drive superconductivity. They used the new technology to confirm a 23-year-old theory of superconductors developed by scientist Valerii Vinokur from the U.S. Depar

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An improved vaccine for bacterial meningitis and bloodstream infections

Researchers have now developed a new vaccine, a native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccine, for meningitis and bloodstream infections caused by 'meningococcal group B' bacteria. This will allow younger people to be vaccinated and will address several limitations of the current vaccinations.

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New Geosphere study examines 2017-2018 Thomas Fire debris flows

Shortly before the beginning of the 2017-2018 winter rainy season, one of the largest fires in California (USA) history (Thomas fire) substantially increased the susceptibility of steep slopes in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties to debris flows. On 9 Jan. 2018, before the fire was fully contained, an intense burst of rain fell on the portion of the burn area above Montecito, California.

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University of Chicago Medical Center's data sharing with Google puts patient privacy at risk, lawsuit alleges

About two years ago, the University of Chicago Medical Center touted a new, ambitious partnership with tech giant Google, one aimed at finding patterns in patients' medical records that might help predict medical issues.

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Drone skal lede efter livets byggesten på Saturns største måne

Nasa planlægger en mission til Titan i 2026.

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Google's next undersea internet cable will link Africa and Europe

Google has announced its third private undersea internet cable will run between Europe and Africa. One end will make landfall in Portgual. While you might expect the cable would connect …

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Report: Apple to shift assembly of Mac Pro from US to China

A newspaper is reporting that Apple will manufacture its new Mac Pro computer in China, shifting away from a U.S. assembly line it had been using for that product in recent years.

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Report: Apple to shift assembly of Mac Pro from US to China

A newspaper is reporting that Apple will manufacture its new Mac Pro computer in China, shifting away from a U.S. assembly line it had been using for that product in recent years.

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Google’s Next Subsea Internet Cable to Connect Africa and Europe

Deep Connection Google announced Friday that the company plans on building its third international, under-sea internet cable. The company is calling the cable “Equiano” and told Reuters that it expects the cable to be at least partially operational by some time in 2021, when a link between Portugal and South Africa will be completed. The project suggests that, just like Amazon and other tech gian

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What’s the Point of Another North Korea Summit?

When Donald Trump visits South Korea this weekend, he’ll have plenty to discuss with President Moon Jae-in: trade, China, their troubled military alliance. But the question on everyone’s mind is whether the U.S. president will hold a surprise third summit with North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong Un. After all, Trump has a suspiciously high number of North Korea advisers in his delegation. Kim just met

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Six North Atlantic Right Whales Have Died So Far This Year

Canadian officials are investigating the deaths and implementing regulations to reduce the number of ships that strike the endangered species or snag them in fishing gear.

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Design chief departure adds to uncertainty at Apple

The departure of chief designer Jony Ive adds to uncertainty at Apple as the California tech giant shifts into new segments like services and streaming media amid a slowdown in sales of the hugely profitable iPhone.

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The Infrastructure Mess Causing Countless Internet Outages

You may not have heard of the Border Gateway Protocol, but you definitely know when it goes wrong.

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Heart risk raised by sitting in front of the TV, not by sitting at work

Sitting while watching television, but not sitting at work, is associated with a greater risk of heart attack, stroke, or early death, researchers have found.

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Snails show that variety is the key to success if you want to remember more

Neuroscientists have revealed the factors that impact on memory interference, showing that a change is as good as a rest when it comes to retaining more information. They also discovered that timing plays a key role, as old information can effectively be replaced by new information when learning takes place during a memory lapse.

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Current green growth policies are not enough to reach Paris Agreement climate targets

New research suggests that green growth climate mitigation policies are not sufficient for reaching the ambitious targets of the Paris Agreement, to limit global warming to well below 2°C by the end of the century.

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Italy fines Facebook over Cambridge Analytica case

Italy's data protection watchdog slammed Facebook Friday with a fine of one million euros ($1.1 million) for violating privacy laws over the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

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World’s First AI Universe Simulator Knows Things It Shouldn’t

Great Mystery Since we can’t travel billions of years back in time — not yet, anyways — one of the best ways to understand how our universe evolved is to create computer simulations of the process using what we do know about it. Most of those simulations fall into one of two categories: slow and more accurate, or fast and less accurate. But now, an international team of researchers has built an A

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Tics don’t go away with time, kids just control them

Researchers studying kids shortly after tics appear have discovered that tics don’t go away completely over time; rather, most children simply exhibit tics less when others are watching. Learning how kids suppress their tics may provide insight to help others at risk for significant tic disorders. At least 20 percent of elementary school-age children develop tics such as excessive blinking, throa

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Pig-Pen effect: Mixing skin oil and ozone can produce a personal pollution cloud

When ozone and skin oils meet, the resulting reaction may help remove ozone from an indoor environment, but it can also produce a personal cloud of pollutants that affects indoor air quality, according to a team of researchers.

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Red tide still killing dolphins off the coast of Florida

It's been six months since Florida was officially red tide free, but the effects of the last breakout can still be seen in an increased dolphin mortality rate, according to a report by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration.

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Germany swelters in record June temperatures

Germany experienced temperatures more than four degrees higher in June than the average during an international reference period for tracking climate change, the national weather service said Friday.

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Cyprus discovers 'first undisturbed Roman shipwreck'

Cyprus has found its first undisturbed Roman shipwreck complete with ancient cargo off its southern coast, the antiquities department said Thursday, noting the discovery could illuminate regional …

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Facebook's digital currency may flourish in the analog world

Europeans and Americans have their Visa and Mastercards. For everyone else, here comes … Libra?

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New Lab-Grown Mini Brains Are the Most Advanced Yet

Home-Grown For years, scientists have been working to improve upon their lab-grown organelles, which are simplified versions of human organs that could be used to test out new pharmaceuticals or other medical treatments . Now, a team of Japanese researchers has developed a mini brain that shows not only the complex three-dimensional structure of the cerebral cortex, but also coordinated neural ac

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Researchers decipher the history of supermassive black holes in the early universe

Astrophysicists at Western University have found evidence for the direct formation of black holes that do not need to emerge from a star remnant. The production of black holes in the early universe, formed in this manner, may provide scientists with an explanation for the presence of extremely massive black holes at a very early stage in the history of our universe.

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Synthetic bacterial memory circuits enable microbial diagnostics for sensing biomolecules in the gut

Millions of people take capsules of probiotics with the goal of improving their digestion, but what if those bacteria were also able to detect diseases in the gut and indicate when something is awry? New research from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has created an effective, non-invasive way to quickly identify new bacterial biosensors that can recognize a

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Synthetic bacterial memory circuits enable microbial diagnostics for sensing biomolecules in the gut

Millions of people take capsules of probiotics with the goal of improving their digestion, but what if those bacteria were also able to detect diseases in the gut and indicate when something is awry? New research from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has created an effective, non-invasive way to quickly identify new bacterial biosensors that can recognize a

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Cockroaches may soon be unstoppable—thanks to fast-evolving insecticide resistance

New study finds most common insecticides are no match for German cockroaches

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Embracing bioinformatics in gene banks

Scientists from the IPK have explored, within a perspective paper, the upcoming challenges and possibilities of the future of gene banks. They emphasise that the advancement of gene banks into bio-digital resource centres, which collate the germplasm as well as the molecular data of the samples, would be beneficial to scientists, plant breeders and society alike.

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University researchers find WhatsApp can be good for our health

Academics at Edge Hill University have found that spending time on social media, specifically WhatsApp, is good for our wellbeing.Dr Linda Kaye, a senior lecturer in Psychology found that the text-based messaging app, which offers users group chat functions, has a positive impact on psychological wellbeing.The research found that the more time people spent on WhatApp per day, the less lonely they

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Scientists find thirdhand smoke affects cells in humans

Thirdhand smoke can damage epithelial cells in the respiratory system by stressing cells and causing them to fight for survival, a research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found. The finding could assist physicians treating patients exposed to thirdhand smoke.

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More Scientists Dismissed for Undisclosed Foreign Ties, Says NIH

Researchers who failed to disclose affiliations and funding sources from other countries are under investigation, and some universities are letting them go discretely and refunding grant money to the agency.

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Poor lung cancer screening guidelines miss too many African American smokers

Under current guidelines, far fewer African American smokers are eligible for lung cancer screenings, according to a new study. (Deposit Photos/) The current guidelines for lung cancer screening were established by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) in 2013 with pretty good reasoning: A national trial of over 50,000 former or current heavy smokers found that annual CT scans

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Apollo 11 tapes bought for $218 may sell for millions after nearly being lost

Tapes identified in 2008 as the only surviving original recording of the first moon landing in 1969 are to go up for auction in July When Gary George bought a truckload of videotapes for $218 from a US government surplus auction more than 40 years ago, he planned to sell them to television stations – to record over. Fortunately, he decided to hold on to the three tapes labelled “Apollo 11 EVA”, w

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The Biggest Offshore Wind Project in the US Is Underway

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Amazon's big AI push: Good for your shopping, worrisome for jobs

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Cockroach 'Superbugs' Becoming Near-Impossible to Kill

Roach-killing arsenals may soon become obsolete.

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The 'Lost City' of Atlantis Massif Could Reveal How Life Survives on Dark, Alien Water Worlds

Simple chemical reactions on hydrothermal vents could power life on dark worlds like Saturn’s world, Enceladus.

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An AI app that “undressed” women shows how deepfakes harm the most vulnerable

DeepNude has now been taken offline, but it won’t be the last time such technology is used to target vulnerable populations.

5h

Microsoft continues to distance Cortana from Windows 10

Microsoft’s virtual assistant may soon lose its residency in Windows 10. As highlighted by The Verge, Microsoft has added a standalone beta version of Cortana to the Windows Store that is now …

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Massive Asteroid Explodes Above Puerto Rico Mere Hours After Detection

Brace for Impact A giant asteroid the size of a car showed up on the University of Hawaii’s survey telescopes mere hours before it entered the Earth’s atmosphere about 240 miles south of San Juan, Puerto Rico. At the time of first observation, the asteroid was just farther out than our Moon – at about 500,000 km from Earth (the Moon sits at 384,400 km). Luckily, it didn’t pose any real threat to

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How One Mom Changed Other Parents’ Minds About Their Children’s Sexuality

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series about the gay-rights movement and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. In the 1980s, when residents of the Washington, D.C., area called a hotline set up for parents of lesbian and gay people, it was often Paulette Goodman’s home phone that rang. “I heard such awful stories,” she told me, mentioning one gay man who called after being rele

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Horror for Dummies: The 9 Best Killer Doll Movies to Stream Right Now

There's a new 'Child's Play' and a new 'Annabelle' film currently in theaters. But you don't have to leave the house for scary dolls.

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Researchers May Finally Have Created Metallic Hydrogen

Scientists have been trying to produce metallic hydrogen for decades, but no one has managed to show incontrovertible evidence of success yet. A team of researchers at France’s Atomic Energy Commission is the latest to claim success via a paper posted to the online arXiv server. The post Researchers May Finally Have Created Metallic Hydrogen appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Researchers decipher the history of supermassive black holes in the early universe

Astrophysicists at Western University have found evidence for the direct formation of black holes that do not need to emerge from a star remnant. The production of black holes in the early universe, formed in this manner, may provide scientists with an explanation for the presence of extremely massive black holes at a very early stage in the history of our universe.

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Take two E. coli and call me in the morning

What if the bacteria in your daily probiotic were also able to detect diseases in the gut and indicate when something is awry? New research from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has created an effective, non-invasive way to quickly identify new bacterial biosensors that can recognize and report the presence of various disease triggers in the gut, helping se

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Teens who can describe negative emotions can stave off depression

Teenagers who can describe their negative emotions in precise and nuanced ways are better protected against depression than their peers who can't. That's the conclusion of a new study about negative emotion differentiation, or NED–the ability to make fine-grained distinctions between negative emotions and apply precise labels.

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Opioids study shows high-risk counties across the country, suggests local solutions

Dozens of counties in the Midwest and South are at the highest risk for opioid deaths in the United States, say University of Michigan researchers.

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Study examines changes in health equity in US over 25 years

A survey study based on 25 years of data from more than 5.4 million people in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System suggests more work is needed on health equity in the United States.

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Birth, child outcomes associated with moms using opioids during pregnancy

In utero exposure to opioids was associated with higher risks for short- and long-term adverse outcomes including preterm birth and neurodevelopmental and physical health disorders in children. This observational study analyzed clinical and epidemiological data for a group of 8,509 mother-child pairs collected at birth starting in 1998, and 3,153 children who continued to be followed after birth u

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Medically unnecessary ambulance rides soar after ACA expansion

CU Denver researcher discovered that medically unnecessary ambulance rides have drastically increased due to the expansion of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Dispatches for minor injuries like abrasions and muscle sprains have risen by 37% in NYC, an increase equivalent to approximately 239 additional dispatches a month, or 2,868 per year. When patients bear a smaller portion of the cost, researche

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Raise Your Hand If You’ve Ever Felt Personally Victimized by This Debate

“We’re not gonna hold back in making sure the candidates stick to time,” the Today Show host Savannah Guthrie threatened at the start of last night’s Democratic debate, the second in as many days. The 60-second constraint the network imposed on the 10 candidates meant that responses would have to be formed from pre-planned atoms of ideas, cleverly fused into stable molecules of coherent political

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Trump Allies’ Radical Indifference to a Sexual-Assault Allegation

Updated on June 28, 2019, at 12:09 p.m. ET “What was she, like, the 28th or something?” one former White House official pondered to me. In a separate conversation, another offered a different guess: “Twenty-two? Twenty-three?” They were talking about E. Jean Carroll, the longtime Elle advice columnist who, for the first time last week, publicly accused Donald Trump of assaulting her in a Bergdorf

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Måler skridtspænding på grise: »Hvis jeg ikke havde været lektor på DTU, havde du sagt, at jeg var bindegal«

PLUS. I fem år er Esben Larsen taget ud til landmænd, hvis dyr opfører sig mærkeligt. Han har dokumenteret, at gylle kan fungere som batteri, men tvivler på, om han har været til hjælp.

6h

In Chennai Water Crisis, Climate Change and Mismanagement to Blame

Chennai — India’s sixth largest city — is running out of water. A combination of climate change and “bad governance” are to blame, according to a local climate expert, who warns that a similar situation could easily play out across other parts of the country.

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'DeepNude' app to 'undress' women shut down after furor

The creators of an application allowing users to virtually "undress" women using artificial intelligence have shut it down after a social media uproar over its potential for abuse.

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Wicked Hot Boston: How can you help beat extreme heat?

Imagine a smoldering hot day in downtown Boston: temperatures have reached over 90 degrees Fahrenheit, and the sidewalks and streets are absorbing the strong heat from the sun and radiating it back into the air. Days like this are becoming hotter and more frequent. This “silent storm” causes more deaths in the US than all other weather hazards combined. Heat impacts human health, infrastructure, a

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Hypersonic Space Catapult Startup Signs Military Contract

Space Sling California-based startup SpinLaunch, which specializes in a launch system capable of catapulting small payloads into space at hypersonic speeds, just signed a contract with the U.S. Department of Defense’s Innovation Unit (DIU). In the company’s words, details about the technology itself are still very sparse, but the plan is to develop a “kinetic energy-based launch system that will

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The next big thing is coming from the Bronx, again | Jon Gray

"The hood is good," says Jon Gray of the Bronx, New York-based creative collective Ghetto Gastro. Working at the intersection of food, design and art, Gray and his team work to honor the soul and history of their community, while also applying their unbridled creativity and expansive imagination to unexpected, otherworldly collaborations. Learn more about how they're creating and investing in thei

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Crystals and Their Weirdness

Let’s talk crystals for a few minutes. Those of us (like me) who are familiar with chemistry and biology, but who are not crystallographers themselves, will know the broad outlines of X-ray crystallography, and can appreciate its extension to diffracting electrons instead of X-rays. But there are a lot of odd and subtle things that creep into the topic of crystal structure when you look closely,

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Democrat vs. Democrat: How Health Care Is Dividing the Party

An issue that united the party in 2018 has potential to fracture it in 2020.

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Here’s how to get the best advice at work

Asking for advice at work is an essential way to learn, to course correct, and to improve. Colleagues with different expertise across your company can provide insight into their career paths if you're considering a move, thoughts on workplace best practices if you're new to a position, or advice on how to handle specific, often stressful, situations. People often think that asking several people

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Using these emotion words may shield teens from depression

Describing their negative emotions in precise and nuanced ways may protect teenagers from depression, a new study shows. “Adolescents who use more granular terms such as ‘I feel annoyed,’ or ‘I feel frustrated,’ or ‘I feel ashamed’—instead of simply saying ‘I feel bad’—are better protected against developing increased depressive symptoms after experiencing a stressful life event,” says Lisa Starr

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A Single Day Exposed the Central Tension Driving American Politics

The same explosive question rumbled through this week’s Supreme Court ruling on the 2020 census and the two nights of Democratic presidential debates: How will America respond to the propulsive demographic, social, and economic changes remaking the nation? The juxtaposition of these two events, purely coincidental, underscored how much of American politics in the years ahead is likely to turn on

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Study: Society pays heavy price for failure to diagnose and treat conduct disorder

A new study published in Nature Reviews reviewed evidence from research conducted around the world and estimated the prevalence of conduct disorder to be around 3 percent in school-aged children and a leading cause of referral to child and adolescent mental health services. Yet paradoxically it is one of the least widely recognized or studied psychiatric disorders, and funding for research into it

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Researchers look to unlock post-traumatic stress disorder puzzle

A team of Penn State and University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine researchers is attempting to answer a question that has long puzzled experts: Why do some individuals suffer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after experiencing trauma, and others do not?

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Study connects low social engagement to amyloid levels and cognitive decline

A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital found that higher brain amyloid-β in combination with lower social engagement in elderly men and women was associated with greater cognitive decline over three years.

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Sexuality shifts perceptions of who is ‘American’

People tend to perceive gay and lesbian Asian Americans as more “American” than those they presume are straight, research finds. Perceptions of Asian Americans, the fastest growing racial group in the US, as “foreign” persist. A new study, the latest in research to examine stereotypes, identity, and ideas about who is “American,” focuses on how sexual orientation and race come together to influen

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The Biggest Offshore Wind Project in the US Is Underway

From the steady growth in market share of electric cars to continuous improvement and expansion of solar energy technology, it appears the world is going renewable—the age of fossil fuels is slowly but surely being left behind. For whatever reason, wind power doesn’t get as much love as solar, but it’s growing quickly, with massive new projects underway in the US, UK, and other parts of the world

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An Ancient City’s Demise Hints at a Hidden Risk of Sea-Level Rise

Sometime in the third century B.C. , an earthquake struck the eastern Mediterranean. In Thonis-Heracleion, past its peak but still one of Egypt’s greatest ports, the ground began to shake, and the soil gave way. The city had been built upon low-lying islets, bits of silt and clay left behind from the Nile’s summer floods. Temples would have towered over the city, where each year, priests would fo

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An Alzheimer's Vaccine: Not far From Becoming Reality

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Protein linked to aggressive skin cancer

Almost 300,000 people worldwide develop malignant melanoma each year. The disease is the most serious form of skin cancer and the number of cases reported annually is increasing, making skin cancer one of Sweden's most common forms of cancer. A research team at Lund University in Sweden has studied a protein that regulates a gene which is linked to metastasis of malignant melanoma.

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In the drive to decrease low-value care, many don't assess the right impacts on patients

Health care institutions and providers face mounting pressure to wring more value out of every dollar spent on caring for their patients. A new review shows that most efforts to decrease low-value care have based their measurement of success on how much they reduced the overall use of certain tests and treatments. Far fewer looked at whether these efforts actually ensured that patients got more ap

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Utrafast magnetism: Electron-phonon interactions examined at BESSY II

How fast can a magnet switch its orientation and what are the microscopic mechanisms at play ? These questions are of first importance for the development of data storage and computer chips. Now, an HZB team at BESSY II has for the first time been able to experimentally assess the principal microscopic process of ultra-fast magnetism. The methodology developed for this purpose can also be used to

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New method divides patients with ulcerative colitis in groups

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a way of using gene expression conserved across species to divide patients with the inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis into two distinct groups. The findings are published in the journal Nature Communications, and the researchers hope that the method can also be used to subdivide other autoimmune diseases.

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Artificial DNA can control release of active ingredients from drugs

A drug with three active ingredients that are released in sequence at specific times: Thanks to the work of a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), what was once a pharmacologist's dream is now much closer to reality. With a combination of hydrogels and artificial DNA, nanoparticles can be released in sequence under conditions similar to those in the human body.

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Technology allows researchers to see patients' real-time pain while in the clinic

Many patients, especially those who are anesthetized or emotionally challenged, cannot communicate precisely about their pain.

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European heatwave: France hits highest recorded temperature of 45.1°C

A heatwave has hit Europe. France has recorded its highest ever temperature at 45.1°C and a wildfire is raging in Spain after a pile of chicken dung caught fire

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Is the lean start-up method really universally applicable?

After Eric Ries' publication of The Lean Startup in 2011, the underlying method quickly spread among entrepreneurs, entrepreneurship educators, incubators, accelerators, and large corporations. The lean startup (LSU) method has since become one of the cornerstones of entrepreneurship education in business schools around the world.

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NASA is going back to Titan, looking for signs of life

Cheers erupt as plans for the Dragonfly rover are unveiled. Richard A Lovett was there.

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Why Friendship Is Like Improv

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week, she talks with three of the co-founders of the Upright Citizens Brigade sketch-comedy and improv troupe. Matt Besser, Matt Walsh, and Ian Roberts—along with Amy Poehler—took the group from the Chicago improv s

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Medicines made of solid gold to help the immune system

By testing a variety of gold nanoparticles, researchers (UNIGE and Swansea) are providing first evidence of their impact upon human B lymphocytes — the immune cells responsible for antibody production. The use of these nanoparticles is expected to improve the efficacy of pharmaceutical products while limiting potential adverse effects. These results will lead to the development of more targeted a

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My health: Consumers empowered by sharing medical 'selfies'

Taking medical 'selfies' and sharing them with a doctor empowers and reassures healthcare consumers, and can improve doctor-patient relationships, a two-part study led by Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia has found. The findings have been published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

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Ny teknologi skal give mere præcise grundvandsmodeller

Nyudviklet magnetfelt-teknologi fra Aarhus Universitet kan være med til at skabe et langt mere præcist 3D-billede af grundvandsressourcer og jordbundsforhold. Det kan bl.a. bruges til at passe bedre på vores drikkevand.

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Closing in on a fast radio burst in a galaxy far, far away

Keith Bannister and Shivani Bhandari from Australia’s CSIRO describe how a ‘new killer app’ helped with an important breakthrough.

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Is ‘high-functioning autism’ a misleading term?

Australian researchers suggest it’s time we found a more accurate description. Lyndal Byford reports.

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Some prehistoric crocs were vegetarians

The shape of their teeth tells a complex story. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Agricultural work linked to malnutrition in India

Economic contribution comes at a cost for women and children. Biplab Das reports.

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Going for the bounce

Scientists working on new ways to stop water hanging around.

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Multifaceted design optimization for superomniphobic surfaces

In materials science, surfaces that strongly repel low surface tension liquids are classified 'superoleophobic," while high surface tension liquid repellants are 'superhydrophobic' and surfaces that display both characteristics are 'superomniphobic." Superomniphobic surfaces are at the frontiers of surface design for a vast array of applications. In a recent study, J. R. Panter and co-workers at t

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How we closed in on the location of a fast radio burst in a galaxy far, far away

Astronomers have spent the past dozen years hunting for fast radio bursts (FRBs) – flashes of radio waves that come from outer space and last just milliseconds. And after a dozen years of work we still don't know exactly what causes them, only that it must be something very powerful, as they've clearly travelled a long way (billions of light-years).

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New type of glass inspired by nature is more resistant to impacts

Using the iridescent mother-of-pearl often found lining seashells, researchers have engineered a new composite glass with a greatly boosted resistance to impacts.

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From Miniature Satellites to Giant Sun Shields–the Extreme Technology Transforming Space Engineering

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first Apollo moon landing . This was possible thanks to an extraordinary acceleration of space technology . Within a remarkably short period of time leading up to the event, engineers had mastered rocket propulsion, on-board computing, and space operations, partially thanks to an essentially unlimited budget. Since the days of these heroic endeavors, sp

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Win 4 Weekend Tickets to the BlueDot Festival 2019 in the U.K.

Four tickets, two adults and two children, are up for grabs which could take you to this simply stunning festival celebrating all things space, culture and music.

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How the local strength of faith can impact a company's ethical behavior

Companies are less likely to engage in unethical accounting practices when their headquarters are in areas of high religious observance, new research by academics at the universities of Sussex and East London has revealed.

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Hedebølge på ferien? Slap af, spis salt og tjek din urin

Du skal ikke kun huske at drikke vand, når vejret bliver brændende varmt.

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Planet in triple-star system may be our best chance to find alien life

An exoplanet 22.5 light years away that orbits in a system with three stars has the perfect conditions for us to search its atmosphere for signs of alien life

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“There Is Only Trump”

Like the swallows of San Juan Capistrano, conservative intellectuals always return to panels on the future of the Republican Party. I’ve been covering these gatherings for almost 20 years. But I’ve never heard a conversation quite like yesterday’s between the National Review editor Rich Lowry and Karl Rove, the political architect of George W. Bush’s victories. These men didn’t describe and handi

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It’s Still the Trump Show

Former Vice President Joe Biden called President Donald Trump a tool of Wall Street who has “ripped” out the nation’s soul. The author Marianne Williamson accused Trump of exploiting people’s fears. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont cast Trump as a “pathological liar” and a “racist.” Trump might as well have been gripping a podium of his own last night, so prominently did he figure into the two-h

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‘As a Father …’

The 2020 Democratic primary—in which six women and 18 men are currently running—has already been buzzed about as the first election in which multiple mothers will seriously compete for the presidency , a pursuit traditionally undertaken only by fathers. On the debate stage Wednesday and Thursday, however, the Democratic primary field seemed like it was made up of something more like dads and fema

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Second Democratic Debate Highlights Divergence on Green New Deal

Climate change once again received relatively little attention on the debate stage — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Roman road and possible mine discovered during Cornish archaeological excavations

Archaeologists have discovered a Roman road and possible ancient mine during excavations in Cornwall as they work to discover more about the history of the county.

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Mini 'magic' MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately

Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a prototype mini MRI scanner that fits around a patient's leg.

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Skoltech scientists found a way to control the electrical characteristics of optical memory devices

A group of researchers from Skoltech, the Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics of RAS, and N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry of RAS, led by Skoltech Professor P.A. Troshin, discovered a relationship between the structure of photochromic molecules and electrical characteristics of memory devices built using these compounds. Their findings open new opportunities for rational design

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Short sleep duration and sleep variability blunt weight loss

High sleep variability and short sleep duration are associated with difficulties in losing weight and body fat.

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Rebroadcast: Nature PastCast, June 1876

Nature, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01883-3 We delve into the archives to tell the stories behind some of Nature’s biggest papers.

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This Molecular “Claw” Pulls Uranium From Irradiated Mice

Uranium Poisoning In 2008, a spike in birth defects and other abnormalities led to the discovery that hundreds of children in India suffered from uranium poisoning — the amount of the heavy metal in one child’s body was 60 times the maximum safe limit . A decade later, researchers found that the nation’s ground water still contained unsafe levels of uranium. India’s citizens aren’t the only ones

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Lack of data on missing migrant children leads to gaps in protection

A new report highlights the need for better data on migrant deaths and disappearances, particularly those of missing migrant children.

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How to improve corporate social and environmental responsibility

Social and environmental responsibility in globalized supply chains are hard to police. That task often falls to nongovernmental organizations, or NGOs, that publicize abuses and call out irresponsible corporations and industries.

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When CubeSats meet an asteroid

SA's Hera mission for planetary defense, being designed to survey the smallest asteroid ever explored, is really three spacecraft in one. The main mothership will carry two briefcase-sized CubeSats, which will touch down on the target body. A French team has been investigating what might happen at that initial instant of alien contact.

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Image: Gulf of Taranto

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Gulf of Taranto, located on the inner heel of southern Italy.

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Optimal quantum computation linked to gravity

Information and gravity may seem like completely different things, but one thing they have in common is that they can both be described in the framework of geometry. Building on this connection, a new paper suggests that the rules for optimal quantum computation are set by gravity.

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New device squeezes samples with 1.6 billion atmospheres per second

A new super-fast high-pressure device at DESY's X-ray light source PETRA III allows scientists to simulate and study earthquakes and meteorite impacts more realistically in the lab. The new-generation dynamic diamond anvil cell (dDAC), developed by scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), DESY, the European Synchrotron Radiation Source ESRF, and the universities of Oxford, Ba

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All-time hottest temperature in France recorded at 44.3C: weather service

France recorded its all-time hottest temperature of 44.3 degrees Celsius (111.7 degrees Fahrenheit) on Friday as the country and much of Europe basked in an early summer heatwave, state weather forecaster Meteo-France said.

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Dutch government presents measures to cut carbon emissions

The Dutch government is presenting a comprehensive raft of measures aimed at slashing the Netherlands' emission of carbon blamed for warming the Earth's atmosphere by 50% by 2030.

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Tesla says Shanghai car fire caused by failed battery module

Tesla says a fire in one of its cars in Shanghai was caused by the failure of a single battery module and investigators found no defects in the car's systems.

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VW trucks division Traton coasts on stock market launch

German auto giant Volkswagen offered part of its heavy trucks division Traton on the stock market Friday as it looks to raise fresh capital, in what could be the first step towards reshaping the sprawling 12-brand group.

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The Psychology Podcast Recap (June 2019): Good Porn and the Quest for a Moral Life

The Psychology Podcast Recap for June 2019 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Veterinarian says summer pests, heat and activities pose risks to pets

Summer is here and along with the fun days spent outside with your pet comes the itching and scratching from the fleas, ticks and mosquitoes, as well heat-related issues.

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Veterinarian says summer pests, heat and activities pose risks to pets

Summer is here and along with the fun days spent outside with your pet comes the itching and scratching from the fleas, ticks and mosquitoes, as well heat-related issues.

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Female jockey performance in jump racing underestimated by betting public

Female jump jockeys may be being underestimated by the betting public, suggests analysis conducted at the University of Liverpool Management School by Ph.D. student, Vanessa Cashmore.

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Why US elections cause international stock market declines

New research from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed the full economic impact US elections have on international financial markets.

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Why you might want to leave those dandelions alone

Nothing can threaten a velvety green lawn like vagabond dandelions—but it isn't all bad, says a University of Alberta gardening expert.

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SpaceX launch puts UMass Lowell research into orbit

An Air Force satellite launched into orbit this week via SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket carries an instrument built by UMass Lowell researchers to conduct experiments in space.

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Old whaling logbooks offer new insights into modern-day climate conditions

In September 1871, a fleet of 33 American whaling ships navigating through Arctic waters came upon a disastrous impasse. Mountains of ice pack, some clumped nearly mast high, formed a natural blockade around the convoy. Crews anxiously waited for winds to bail their ships out from the pulverizing grip of the ice, but it never blew their way. Ice tore into hulls and as the shredded vessels surrende

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Why you might want to leave those dandelions alone

Nothing can threaten a velvety green lawn like vagabond dandelions—but it isn't all bad, says a University of Alberta gardening expert.

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Nasa klar med ny mission: Ocotokopter skal søge efter liv på Titan

En plutoniumdrevet octokopter-drone bliver sendt mod Saturns måne Titan i 2026 i jagt på liv i den bizarre verden af metansøer og nitrogen-atmosfære.

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How to improve corporate social and environmental responsibility

New research led by the University of California, Riverside shows NGOs are more likely to sway companies into ethical behavior with carefully targeted reports that consider a range of factors affecting the companies and industries. The report also finds that too much pressure can actually backfire. The study suggests that vertical integration, where companies own and control all steps of the produ

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Students chowing down tuna in dining halls are unaware of mercury exposure risks

Some students are helping themselves to servings of tuna well beyond the amounts recommended to avoid consuming too much mercury. Researchers surveyed students on their tuna consumption habits and knowledge of mercury exposure risks, and also measured the mercury levels in hair samples. Hair mercury levels were closely correlated with how much tuna the students said they ate. And for some, the mea

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Botox cousin can reduce malaria in an environmentally friendly way

Researchers at the universities in Stockholm and Lund, in collaboration with researchers from the University of California, have found a new toxin that selectively targets mosquitos. This can lead to innovative and environmentally friendly approaches to reduce malaria. The results are presented in an article published in Nature Communications.

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Tumour treating fields in glioblastoma: Indication of a benefit

The additional application of the new treatment method prolongs survival, as a recent study shows. However, it can also be burdensome for patients.

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Image: The heat is on across Europe

With some places expecting to be hit with air temperatures of over 40°C in the next days, much of Europe is in the grip of a heatwave—and one that is setting record highs for June. According to meteorologists this current bout of sweltering weather is down to hot air being drawn from north Africa.

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Libra: Facebook's cryptocurrency will not help the billions of people currently excluded from banks

When Facebook unveiled its new digital currency libra, it explicitly said the initiative was intended to address the problems faced by the world's unbanked: the 1.7 billion people without a bank account. As well as facing inconvenience, these people generally pay over the odds for financial services like bank transfers or overdrafts.

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Polymer-coated gold nanospheres do not impair the innate immune function of human B lymphocytes

Over the past 20 years, the use of nanoparticles in medicine has steadily increased. However, their safety and effect on the human immune system remains an important concern. By testing a variety of gold nanoparticles, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and collaborators are providing first evidence of their impact upon human B lymphocytes—the immune cells responsible for antibody pro

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Researchers explore use of new materials to create more efficient solar cells

A team of Florida State University researchers is pioneering innovative ways for solar cells to absorb and use infrared light, a portion of the solar spectrum that is typically unavailable for solar cell technology.

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Did comet impacts jump-start life on Earth?

Comets screaming through the atmosphere of early Earth at tens of thousands of miles per hour likely contained measurable amounts of protein-forming amino acids. Upon impact, these amino acids self-assembled into significantly larger nitrogen-containing aromatic structures that are likely constituents of polymeric biomaterials.

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Criminal cybersquatters

Cybersquatting was rife in the early days of the World Web of the 1990s. An individual would register a domain name that was perhaps associated with an organisation or company and even a trademarked term. The cybersquatter might then use the domain for their own purposes whatever they might be or endeavour to sell the domain to the organisation. At first, it was unclear whether cybersquatting was

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Biodegradable coating to help achieve food security

Associate Professor David Leung's biodegradable coating can help achieve food security in an environmentally friendly and consumer-conscious way.

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Gaia's asteroid discoveries

Animated view of more than 14 000 asteroids in our Solar System from the catalogue in the second data release of ESA's Gaia satellite, published in 2018.

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Did comet impacts jump-start life on Earth?

Comets screaming through the atmosphere of early Earth at tens of thousands of miles per hour likely contained measurable amounts of protein-forming amino acids. Upon impact, these amino acids self-assembled into significantly larger nitrogen-containing aromatic structures that are likely constituents of polymeric biomaterials.

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Sockeye salmon are leaving home a year early

An ample buffet of freshwater food, which climate change has brought on, is altering the life history of one of the world’s most important salmon species, according to new research. Sockeye salmon in Alaska’s Bristol Bay region are skipping an entire year in freshwater because climate change has produced more favorable conditions in lakes and streams, which allow the young fish to grow and put on

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Biodegradable coating to help achieve food security

Associate Professor David Leung's biodegradable coating can help achieve food security in an environmentally friendly and consumer-conscious way.

8h

Welp, We Might Be Getting a 'Final Fantasy XIV' TV Show

Hopefully it'll turn out better than the game itself.

8h

A New Approach to Treat Mental Illness: Electrical Engineering

Opinion: An electrical device has the potential to treat Alzheimer’s, PTSD, and other brain disorders. But do the risks outweigh the potential?

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Faster, cleaner, less expensive method of dry cleaning

The most commonly used chemical in the dry cleaning industry is a solvent called perchloroethylene, or PERC. The Environmental Protection Agency has classified the chemical as a likely carcinogen, and the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration has linked acute exposure to it as causing dizziness, blurred vision and loss of coordination.

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Adapting to Climate Change in Alaska

In the first of three posts, an ecologist looks at how citizens and planners are responding to the threat — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Adapting to Climate Change in Alaska

In the first of three posts, an ecologist looks at how citizens and planners are responding to the threat — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Despite concerns, Americans say they’ve got social support

Americans’ perceptions of available social support have remained steady and, in some cases, may even be strengthening, according to a new study. In the study, which examined data that spans nearly two decades, survey respondents reported that their access to help from friends and family—a key measure of social support—has increased slightly over time, says Ashton Verdery, assistant professor of s

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What squid neurons and an octopus on ecstasy can teach us about ourselves

Cephalopods—the group of animals that includes octopus, squid, and cuttlefish—are well known for their incredible color-changing abilities. But these tentacled weirdos have also played a vital role in our evolving understanding of the human nervous system.

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Ancient DNA help scientists study human evolution: 'It's like a time capsule'

Archaeologists learn about the past by piecing together artifacts from material culture: the tools, artwork and architecture left behind that tell us how ancient humans lived. But imagine being able to study their DNA, to learn about how different groups of people were related to each other, where they came from or even what kinds of diseases they had?

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SuperCam instrument integrated on NASA's Mars 2020 rover

The French/American SuperCam instrument has been delivered early June to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and has been integrated this week on NASA's Mars 2020 rover. The French space agency, CNES, together with university institutes in France, developed the multi-purpose camera to remotely analyze minerals, chemistry, sounds, and test for compounds associated with life, together with the Los Alam

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What squid neurons and an octopus on ecstasy can teach us about ourselves

Cephalopods—the group of animals that includes octopus, squid, and cuttlefish—are well known for their incredible color-changing abilities. But these tentacled weirdos have also played a vital role in our evolving understanding of the human nervous system.

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A family of insect new to Britain discovered in the Natural History Museum's Wildlife Garden

A new paper published today (28 June) reports a new family of flies has been discovered in the UK for the first time. The Cottony cushion scale parasite fly (Cryptochetum iceryae) is part of the Cryptochetidae family of flies. Specimens were discovered by the Natural History Museum's Senior Curator of Hymenoptera, David Notton, in the museum's wildlife garden, and identified with help from scienti

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Global agriculture: Impending threats to biodiversity

A new study compares the effects of expansion vs. intensification of cropland use on global agricultural markets and biodiversity, and finds that the expansion strategy poses a particularly serious threat to biodiversity in the tropics.

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Researchers teleport information within a diamond

Researchers from the Yokohama National University have teleported quantum information securely within the confines of a diamond. The study has big implications for quantum information technology—the future of sharing and storing sensitive information. The researchers published their results on June 28, 2019, in Communications Physics.

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Engineers report a new low-power lighting technology

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences have designed and tested a prototype cathodoluminescent lamp for general lighting. The new lamp, which relies on the phenomenon of field emission, is more reliable, durable, and luminous than its analogues available worldwide. The development was reported in the Journal

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Size matters: Color imaging of gene expression in electron microscopy

Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen have developed a method to visualize gene expression of cells with an electron microscope. Although electron microscopy currently provides the most detailed look into cells, it cannot differentiate which genetic programs run inside individual cells. The new method can now have a closer look by using genetically programmed nanospheres of different sizes as

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French scientists claim to have created metallic hydrogen

Scientists have long speculated that at the heart of a gas giant, the laws of material physics exhibit remarkable characteristics. In these kinds of extreme pressure environments, hydrogen gas is compressed to the point that it actually becomes a metal. For years, scientists have been looking for a way to create metallic hydrogen synthetically because of the endless applications it would offer.

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Beam Powered Spaceships

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Mini neural networks mimic the human cerebrum

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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It’s official: Maine to go 80% renewable by 2030

submitted by /u/toyota_tacoma_black [link] [comments]

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A family of insect new to Britain discovered in the Natural History Museum's Wildlife Garden

A new paper published today (28 June) reports a new family of flies has been discovered in the UK for the first time. The Cottony cushion scale parasite fly (Cryptochetum iceryae) is part of the Cryptochetidae family of flies. Specimens were discovered by the Natural History Museum's Senior Curator of Hymenoptera, David Notton, in the museum's wildlife garden, and identified with help from scienti

8h

Influence of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine jumps 25%

The Journal of Nuclear Medicine again ranks among the top 5 medical imaging journals in the world. JNM continues to lead among nuclear medicine journals, with the highest impact factor (7.354), the highest immediacy index, the highest number of citations, the highest 5-year impact factor, the highest number of citable articles, and the highest influence score.

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Study finds increased moisture facilitated decline in African fires

The amount of area burned across Africa declined by 18.5 percent between 2002 and 2016, according to a new study, and this reduction was likely driven by an increase in plant-available moisture and not solely changes in human behavior, as previous studies have found.

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‘Nice people finish last’ with investors, ‘Shark Tank’ shows

What criteria do investors use to decide on funding a startup after hearing a pitch? First impressions, according to a new working paper. Good looks matter, but not as much an entrepreneur’s perceived competence and confidence, the study indicates. In fact, if you’re only attractive and likable, you’re likely to get a lower offer than someone who exudes confidence. Xing Huang, assistant professor

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Botoxkusin kan minska malaria på miljövänligt sätt

Botox (botulinumneurotoxiner) och giftet som orsakar stelkramp tillhör samma familj och är bland de giftigaste substanser som hittills upptäckts. Tidigare har man trott att de uteslutande är giftiga för ryggradsdjur som människor, möss och fåglar. Men nu har forskare hittat ett gift som angriper malariamyggor. – Vi har upptäckt ett nervgift, PMP1, som är selektivt inriktat mot malariamyggor. Den

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New 737 Max Flaw Keeps Jet Grounded as Past Boeing Problems Surface

The FAA and Boeing have found new flaws in the 737 Max, even as the airline's overall safety record comes into closer examination. The post New 737 Max Flaw Keeps Jet Grounded as Past Boeing Problems Surface appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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The Second Debate Gives Democrats Three Reasons to Worry

Democrats who watched the second debate on Thursday probably thought their party had a good night. It did not, and they should worry. Their first worry is the weakness of former Vice President Joe Biden. He has led the Democratic pack—and he polls well with the larger public—on the strength of his offer of a return to normality after the maelstrom of the Trump presidency. The big doubt about Bide

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When US pulls overseas abortion funding, abortion rates go up not down

Withholding aid from clinics that offer abortion services leads to a rise in terminations – perhaps because the clinics often provide contraception services too

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Analysis of the parietal anatomy of Old World monkeys

The Paleoneurology group at the CENIEH, coordinated by Emiliano Bruner, has just published a paper in the journal American Journal of Primatology on the variations and differences in the parietal lobes of different species of cercopithecids, known as the Old World monkeys.

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A peculiar ground-state phase for 2-D superconductors

The application of large enough magnetic fields results in the disruption of superconducting states in materials, even at drastically low temperature, thereby changing them directly into insulators—or so was traditionally thought. Now, scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), the University of Tokyo and Tohoku University report curious multi-state transitions of these superconduct

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Study investigates how financial crises reduce life satisfaction

Higher uncertainty in financial markets has a direct impact on people's life satisfaction. While this statement might seem obvious, it has now been scientifically proven in an empirical analysis focusing on recent crisis developments across European countries. The study was led by Assistant Professor Lena Tonzer at MLU and IWH.

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Storing carbon dioxide underground: An effective tool against climate change?

Can carbon dioxide (CO2) stored below the ocean floor be detected when it leaks? And what does this mean for the environment? An EU-funded study strives to answer these questions.

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Learning from a circular economy pioneer

Back in the 1990s, 60 percent of waste went to landfill in the Swedish city of Lund. Today it's less than 2 percent, and the region is a pioneer of the burgeoning circular economy.

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Analysis of the parietal anatomy of Old World monkeys

The Paleoneurology group at the CENIEH, coordinated by Emiliano Bruner, has just published a paper in the journal American Journal of Primatology on the variations and differences in the parietal lobes of different species of cercopithecids, known as the Old World monkeys.

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What E. Jean Carroll Means for #MeToo

Last week, The Cut published E. Jean Carroll’s astonishing account of the “hideous” men she’s encountered over the years, an excerpt from her upcoming book that ends with her detailing a brutal assault by Donald Trump. Carroll is about my mother’s age, and I thought about her stories, and about my own, and about the ways men used to behave with impunity, and the ways they still do. Carroll’s narr

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Image of the Day: Tactile Information

Thicker calluses don’t dull sensitivity in feet.

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Latest claim of turning hydrogen into a metal may be the most solid yet

If true, the study would complete a decades-long quest to find the elusive material. But such claims have been made prematurely many times before.

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Mucus: The Body's Unsung Hero

The slimy stuff has a surprisingly wide array of beneficial biological functions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New Balance's Latest Shoes Come With 3D-Printed Soles

3D printing has other benefits besides personalization. It keeps manufacturing in the United States.

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Mucus: The Body's Unsung Hero

The slimy stuff has a surprisingly wide array of beneficial biological functions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mold In Space

There are bacteria and mold aboard the International Space Station (ISS). This should come as no surprise, as these organisms follow humans everywhere we go. In fact it’s claimed that the ISS astronauts spend several hours per week cleaning mold off the ISS and wiping everything down. However, this first hand report by ISS astronaut Clayton C. Anderson says he did his cleaning duty every Saturday

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When US pulls overseas abortion funding, abortion rates go up not down

Withholding aid from clinics that offer abortion services leads to a rise in terminations – perhaps because the clinics often provide contraception services too

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Remains of Genoa bridge demolished one year after deadly disaster

The two remaining towers of Italy’s Morandi bridge have been destroyed with explosives, but the lethal collapse in 2018 still has not been fully explained

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Gettysburg Address stored in DNA using a binary code made of holes

Previous attempts at DNA storage have encoded data in the genetic code, but an alternative approach just uses a series of tiny holes

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Can parks help cities fight crime?

The relationship between parks and crime remains the subject of debate . Some scholars say parks and other urban green spaces prevent violence. When vacant lots and deteriorating urban spaces are transformed into more appealing and useful places for residents, violence and crime typically decline in the immediate vicinity. In a study of public housing developments in Chicago, researchers found 52

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NASA Will Send Flying ‘Dragonfly’ Robot to Saturn’s Moon Titan

NASA has given the green light to the Dragonfly mission, a project to send a multi-rotor flying vehicle to the surface of Saturn's moon Titan in search of alien life. This mission is on track to make history in more ways than one. The post NASA Will Send Flying ‘Dragonfly’ Robot to Saturn’s Moon Titan appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Tavlekridtets Rolls-Royce

PLUS. Da en japansk kridtproducent lukkede, hamstrede matematikere kridt i kassevis til resten af karrieren.

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Impossible Foods boss says we should tax meat to boost veg-based diets

Impossible Foods' plant-based burgers will soon be cheaper than beef ones, steaks are coming, and the company will never sell out, says CEO Patrick Brown

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'Destroyed' Trump golf course dunes to lose special status

The sand dunes where Donald Trump built his golf resort are to lose their special environmental status.

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Why Didn't Chernobyl's Radiation Kill the Plants There?

Here's why plant life is so resilient to radiation and nuclear disaster.

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Cyanide-Laced Meteorites May Have Seeded Earth's First Life

Researchers have found cyanide on primitive meteorites.

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First 'Undisturbed Roman Shipwreck' in Cyprus Just Discovered

Archaeologists diving off the southeastern coast of Cyprus just discovered an ancient treasure: the first known "undisturbed Roman shipwreck" in the country's history.

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Taser Maker Says It Won't Use Facial Recognition in Bodycams

Axon, the maker of Tasers and police bodycams, said it won't deploy facial recognition systems, after a company ethics board recommended against it.

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Want Your Kid to Play Pro Soccer? Sign Her Up for Basketball

Elite athletes are specializing in their sports earlier and earlier, but some sports medicine experts say that won't help you make it to the pros.

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5 Queer People on How They Found Their Chosen Families

Whether online or IRL, here's how five LGBTQ+ people found their community.

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4,000-Year-Old Burial Revealed on Britain's 'Island of Druids'

The island is most famous today for its supposed links to the Druids, who were described by the Roman general Julius Caesar

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In Photos: Island of the Druids

The island of Anglesey, overlooking the Irish Sea, has been linked for centuries with ancient and magical mysteries. The island has been linked with the magical order of priests called the Druids.

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No. “Big Data” Does Not Support Chiropractic Care for Infants

A new study claims to have used "big data" to help answer the question of infant chiropractic effectiveness, but it's just another collection of anecdotes that adds nothing to our understanding of infant medicine.

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70 procent: Selv hvis landbruget helt stopper med at udlede CO2, er vi kun halvvejs

PLUS. Hvis Danmarks CO2-udledning skal reduceres med 70 procent fra 1990-niveau, så skal vi udlede 23 millioner tons CO2 mindre, end vi gør i dag. Det svarer cirka til hele udledningen fra transportsektoren og landbruget til sammen.

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Dragonfly: Drone helicopter to fly on Saturn's moon, Titan

Nasa will fly a $1bn drone helicopter on Saturn's moon, Titan, in the 2030s.

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Efter otte års arbejde og ni måneders forsinkelser: Københavns Cityring åbner 29. september

17 nye stationer skal stå klar i slutningen af september til udvidelsen af Københavns metro.

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S-togenes lokoførere nedlægger arbejde på grund af it-bøvl

Problemer med lønsystem betyder at ansatte ikke har fået udbetalt løntillæg.

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Low-income, less educated women least likely to access infertility care

Despite similar rates of infertility among all socioeconomic groups, white women, women with higher education levels, and women with higher incomes are at least twice as likely to seek treatment as other groups of women, new research suggests.

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First AI Model of the Universe Knows Science it was Never Taught

submitted by /u/sanem48 [link] [comments]

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How the Brain and Body Work Together to Create Thinking

In "Mind in Motion: How Action Shapes Thought," a Stanford psychology professor draws on many lines of evidence, from the way we talk about movement and space to the way we gesture and the way we use maps and numbers, to argue that it's the combination of brain-plus-body that creates our mental world.

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The most desired people in the job market? “Glue people.“

In researching his new book How to Win in a Winner-Take-All World , economics journalist Neil Irwin discovered that what makes people succeed in a highly competitive job market is what he calls being a "glue person." Glue people are people who pull teams together to make them greater than the sum of their parts. They are typically specialists in one area but can also understand other specializati

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Hidden Brain: How Private Prisons Affect Sentencing

In many states, convicted criminals are being housed in private prisons. New research finds that when a private prison opens, the length of criminal sentences modestly increases.

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Megan Rapinoe Is On to Him, and Trump Can’t Stand It

President Donald Trump doesn’t understand a basic principle that I learned from my mother in elementary school: If you treat people with respect, they’ll likely respect you in return. Trump took to Twitter on Wednesday to blast Megan Rapinoe, a co-captain of the U.S. women’s national soccer team, after the soccer magazine Eight by Eight posted a video of her saying that if the women win the World

11h

The Gerrymandering Ruling Was Bad, but the Alternatives Were Worse

The Supreme Court made a painfully flawed decision yesterday on partisan gerrymandering. In fact, the decision has only one point in its favor: It is better than the alternatives. There was no good answer, but the Court chose the least bad one. If that sounds like a reluctant endorsement, it is. Like nearly every sentient American nowadays, I think partisan gerrymanders have gone too far. In the

11h

Why Rita Moreno Almost Quit Show Business

Rita Moreno’s performance as Anita in the 1961 movie West Side Story is the role that made the actor’s career, but she almost quit before shooting started. The first line in her solo number, “America,” was supposed to go, “Puerto Rico, you ugly island, island of tropic diseases,” and Moreno, who’d moved from Puerto Rico at the age of 5, couldn’t bear to slander her beloved home. In the end, Steph

11h

The Struggle for Gay Rights Is Over

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series about the gay-rights movement and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. I briefly wondered if I had wandered into the wrong conference. In January 2018, the National LGBTQ Task Force held its annual Creating Change conference at a hotel around the corner from where I live in Washington, D.C. Creating Change, which bills itself as the “fore

11h

The earliest known galaxy merger occurred shortly after the Big Bang

Telescopes show two distant blobs of stars and gas swirling around each other in the young universe.

11h

Senators Try—Again—to Solve the Nuclear Waste Debacle

A bipartisan group is trying to find a place, or perhaps many places, to bury nuclear waste by making it harder for everyone to say no.

11h

The Terrifying Unknowns of an Exotic Invasive Tick

The Asian longhorned tick showed up in the US last year and has flourished in unexpected places. And it's biting humans.

11h

Fejlmonteret bolt stod bag brint-eksplosion i Norge

En monteringsfejl var ifølge en konsulentundersøgelse årsag til eksplosionen på en tankstation i Sandvika i Norge.

11h

Arbitrary waveform AC line filtering applicable to hundreds of volts based on aqueous electrochemical capacitors

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10886-7 AC to DC conversion is important for renewable power sources, and requires suitable filtering capacitors. Here the authors report a series-connected configuration of aqueous hybrid electrochemical capacitors for alternate current line filtering of arbitrary waveforms in wide frequency and voltage ranges.

11h

PLK1 facilitates chromosome biorientation by suppressing centromere disintegration driven by BLM-mediated unwinding and spindle pulling

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10938-y The kinase PLK1 has important roles during cell division, including mitotic entry and bipolar spindle formation. Here, the authors show that PLK1 also functions in centromere protection, with loss leading to DNA unwinding by Bloom’s syndrome helicase and subsequent collapse of chromosome alignment.

11h

DNA double-strand breaks in telophase lead to coalescence between segregated sister chromatid loci

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10742-8 The mechanism regulating DNA repair in late anaphase or telophase is not yet clear. Here authors reveal that DNA double strand breaks in telophase causes a partial reversal of sister chromosome segregation which could create an opportunity of using the sister for repair in telophase.

11h

MFS transporter from Botrytis cinerea provides tolerance to glucosinolate-breakdown products and is required for pathogenicity

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10860-3 Plant glucosinolates are important in defense against fungal pathogens. Here, the authors identify a major facilitator superfamily transporter protein of the pathogen Botrytis cinerea, mfsG, that plays a role in efflux and detoxification of glucosinolate-breakdown products during plant–pathogen interactions.

11h

Creating fluorescent quantum defects in carbon nanotubes using hypochlorite and light

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10917-3 Creating fluorescent defects in single-walled carbon nanotubes is a promising way to modify their optical properties, but defect generation is still difficult to control. Here, the authors report an efficient method to incorporate high-quality oxygen defects in carbon nanotubes using only hypochlorite and light.

11h

Early evidence of molariform hypsodonty in a Triassic stem-mammal

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10719-7 Hypsodonty is a durable pattern of dentition seen in mammals with abrasive diets. Here, Melo and colleagues describe new fossils of the stem-mammal Menadon besairiei from the Late Triassic, which show the convergent evolution of hypsodonty before mammals.

11h

Lead halide perovskites for photocatalytic organic synthesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10634-x While photoredox catalysis provides organic chemistry new avenues for chemical reactions, typical photocatalysts require expensive noble metals and show modest stabilities. Here, authors examine lead halide perovskites nanocrystals as stable and tunable photoredox catalysts for organic synthesis.

11h

DNA requirement in FANCD2 deubiquitination by USP1-UAF1-RAD51AP1 in the Fanconi anemia DNA damage response

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10408-5 In the Fanconi anemia pathway, deubiquitination of FANCD2 is a fundamental regulatory step. Here, the authors have developed a set of biochemical tools to reconstitute FANCD2 deubiquitination by recombinant USP1-UAF1-RAD51AP1 and reveal critical mechanistic details of the process.

11h

‘Very Smart People,’ but a Keyless Car’s Downside Killed Them

A couple with careers in academia and science died of carbon-monoxide poisoning. A second congressional bill has been introduced to mandate safety features.

12h

Gene activity database could spare thousands of mice

A comprehensive database of gene activity in mice across ten disease models, which could significantly reduce animal use worldwide, has been developed by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, which gives a full picture of the immune response to different pathogens.

12h

Global agriculture: Impending threats to biodiversity

A new study compares the effects of expansion vs. intensification of cropland use on global agricultural markets and biodiversity, and finds that the expansion strategy poses a particularly serious threat to biodiversity in the tropics.

12h

Going the distance: Brain cells for 3D vision discovered

Scientists at Newcastle University have discovered neurons in insect brains that compute 3D distance and direction. Understanding these could help vision in robots.

12h

When the dinosaurs died, lichens thrived

When the asteroid hit, dinosaurs weren't the only ones that suffered. Clouds of ash blocked the sun and cooled the planet's temperature, devastating plant life. But fungi, which decompose dead stuff, did well. So what happened to the lichens, which are made of a plant and fungus living together as one organism? There aren't many lichen fossils, so to figure it out, scientists used DNA to look back

12h

Intensified East Asian winter monsoon during the last geomagnetic reversal transition

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45466-8 Intensified East Asian winter monsoon during the last geomagnetic reversal transition

12h

Effect of cold provocation on vessel density in eyes with primary open angle glaucoma: An optical coherence tomography angiography study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45386-7 Effect of cold provocation on vessel density in eyes with primary open angle glaucoma: An optical coherence tomography angiography study

12h

Interleukin-18 as a drug repositioning opportunity for inflammatory bowel disease: A Mendelian randomization study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45747-2 Interleukin-18 as a drug repositioning opportunity for inflammatory bowel disease: A Mendelian randomization study

12h

Geographical assignment of polar bears using multi-element isoscapes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45874-w Geographical assignment of polar bears using multi-element isoscapes

12h

Label propagation defines signaling networks associated with recurrently mutated cancer genes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45603-3 Label propagation defines signaling networks associated with recurrently mutated cancer genes

12h

Sponge diversity in Eastern Tropical Pacific coral reefs: an interoceanic comparison

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45834-4 Sponge diversity in Eastern Tropical Pacific coral reefs: an interoceanic comparison

12h

Raman scattering yields cubic crystal grain orientation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45782-z Raman scattering yields cubic crystal grain orientation

12h

Experimental study of the influence of mode excitation on mode instability in high power fiber amplifier

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45787-8 Experimental study of the influence of mode excitation on mode instability in high power fiber amplifier

12h

Sommarläsning – och lyssning – på Vetenskap & hälsa

Nu tar redaktionen sommarledigt och återkommer igen den 12 augusti. Vi önskar alla våra läsare en riktigt skön sommar och bjuder på ett par läs- och lyssningstips!

12h

Hør ugens Transformator: Mysteriet i kostalden

Ifølge utallige målinger er vandet i en bestemt kostald helt rent. Men hvorfor kan køerne så finde på at drikke urin i stedet? Og så har den lavere afgift på diesel kostet den danske stat 42 milliarder kroner.

12h

The Democrats Want to Make Nice With Europe

As Donald Trump jetted off to Japan this week for an international conference, airing his many grievances with the U.S. allies he was about to meet, 10 Democratic presidential candidates were back in Florida with a message for America’s old friends: Your long nightmare could soon be over. And they seemed particularly keen on making things right with European countries that Trump claims are not sp

12h

When the dinosaurs died, lichens thrived

When an asteroid smacked into the Earth 66 million years ago, it triggered mass extinctions all over the planet. The most famous victims were the dinosaurs, but early birds, insects, and other life forms took a hit too. The collision caused clouds of ash to block the sun and cool the planet's temperature, devastating plant life. But a new study in Scientific Reports shows that while land plants st

12h

Gene activity database could spare thousands of mice

A comprehensive database of gene activity in mice across ten disease models, which could significantly reduce animal use worldwide, has been developed by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, which gives a full picture of the immune response to different pathogens.

12h

When the dinosaurs died, lichens thrived

When an asteroid smacked into the Earth 66 million years ago, it triggered mass extinctions all over the planet. The most famous victims were the dinosaurs, but early birds, insects, and other life forms took a hit too. The collision caused clouds of ash to block the sun and cool the planet's temperature, devastating plant life. But a new study in Scientific Reports shows that while land plants st

12h

Gene activity database could spare thousands of mice

A comprehensive database of gene activity in mice across ten disease models, which could significantly reduce animal use worldwide, has been developed by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, which gives a full picture of the immune response to different pathogens.

12h

Smart materials provide real-time insight into wearers' emotions

Researchers from Lancaster University's School of Computing and Communications have worked with smart materials on wrist-worn prototypes that can aid people diagnosed with depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorders in monitoring their emotions.

12h

En problemsøgende og munter mand indtager Sundhedsministeriet

Landets nye sundheds- og ældreminister, Magnus Heunicke (S), bliver betegnet som fællesskabssøgende og optimistisk af kolleger og familie. Og så er han altid klar på at løse problemer, hvis han selv skal sige det.

12h

Danskerne ♡ data: Mobiltrafikken fortsætter i vejret

Danskere streamer, downloader og surfer i stigende grad på internettet på grund af billige flatrate-mobilabonnementer og flere fibernet-abonnementer på bekostning af DSL.

12h

Amerikansk Novo-konkurrent opnår mere effektiv dosering af diabetes-middel

USA-baserede Eli Lillys ugentlige diabetesmiddel, Trulicity, står i skyggen af Novos Ozempic herhjemme. Men efter Trulicity har bestået et fase 3-studie med højere dosis end det allerede er godkendt til, kan amerikanerne tage konkurrencen op.

13h

Apollo 11 review – stunning return to an incredible journey

Featuring previously unseen footage, this electrifying documentary marks 50 years since the first moon landing Sometimes gush is the only appropriate response and the amazingness never gets any less amazing. The 50-year anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon launch has now been marked by this fascinating documentary, which presents newly discovered colour footage of the build-up with the buzzcut whole

13h

Historiske danske plantesamlinger giver nyt håb for astma- og allergipatienter

30.000 ark med danske græsser fra herbariet i samlingerne på Statens Naturhistoriske Museum…

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13h

Autism kopplat till kraftigt ökad risk för självmord

Att leva med autism innebär ofta många svårigheter i vardagen, till exempel i samspel med andra, i studier och arbetsliv, samt när det gäller färdigheter som behövs för att ta hand om sig själv och sitt hem. Det är välkänt att många individer med autism har psykisk ohälsa. Forskarna bakom den aktuella studien har analyserat data för alla individer med autismspektrumdiagnos (ASD) i det svenska nat

13h

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Nobody wants EVs, says BMW

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14h

14h

An E-Ferry For A Morning Commute? Of Course It's In San Francisco

submitted by /u/chopchopped [link] [comments]

14h

Google endorses 'international tax deal' for multinationals

Google said Thursday it supports a global agreement on taxation that could allocate more taxes from multinationals to jurisdictions outside their home countries.

14h

Papua New Guinea deploys army to help volcano emergency

Troops have been sent to help thousands of people displaced by a volcanic eruption on a remote archipelago in Papua New Guinea, the prime minister said Friday, as a second volcano erupted.

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Sea slugs use algae's bacterial 'weapons factory' in three-way symbiotic relationship

Delicate yet voracious, the sea slug Elysia rufescens grazes cow-like on bright green tufts of algae, rooting around to find the choicest bits.

14h

Sea slugs use algae's bacterial 'weapons factory' in three-way symbiotic relationship

Delicate yet voracious, the sea slug Elysia rufescens grazes cow-like on bright green tufts of algae, rooting around to find the choicest bits.

14h

Toxic substances found in the glass and decoration of alcoholic beverage bottles

Bottles of beer, wine and spirits contain potentially harmful levels of toxic elements, such as lead and cadmium, in their enamelled decorations, a new study shows.

14h

NIST presents first real-world test of new smokestack emissions sensor designs

In collaboration with industry, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have completed the first real-world test of a potentially improved way to measure smokestack emissions in coal-fired power plants. The researchers are presenting their work this week at the 2019 International Flow Measurement Conference (FLOMEKO) in Lisbon, Portugal.

14h

NJIT conducts the largest-ever simulation of the Deepwater Horizon spill

In a 600-ft.-long saltwater wave tank on the coast of New Jersey, a team of New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) researchers is conducting the largest-ever simulation of the Deepwater Horizon spill to determine more precisely where hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil dispersed following the drilling rig's explosion in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010.

14h

What journalism professors are teaching students—about their futures

As the journalism industry rapidly evolves, what are professors in the field telling students about their job prospects?

14h

Controlling deadly malaria without chemicals

Scientists have finally found malaria's Achilles' heel, a neurotoxin that isn't harmful to any living thing except Anopheles mosquitoes that spread malaria.

14h

Controlling deadly malaria without chemicals

Scientists have finally found malaria's Achilles' heel, a neurotoxin that isn't harmful to any living thing except Anopheles mosquitoes that spread malaria.

14h

Law allowing parents to withdraw children from RE education should be overturned

A law allowing parents to withdraw their children from religious education should be overturned, headteachers from across England have argued in a new large study.

14h

Boeing shares hit as FAA finds new 737 MAX issue

Shares of Boeing tumbled Thursday, a day after US regulators identified a new issue in the Boeing 737 MAX that will likely slow the plane's return to service following two deadly crashes.

14h

Volkswagen sets modest starting price for truck flotation

German car giant Volkswagen said Thursday it would set a starting price of 27 euros ($31) per share when it floats truck division Traton, at the low end of its previous ambitions.

15h

Mules, tools and old bricks: Rebuilding China's Great Wall

Nature, time, neglect and millions of footsteps have taken their toll on the Great Wall of China leaving much of it crumbling, but repairing it can be painstaking—and controversial—work.

15h

Berlin allotment holders dig in against property developers

Birds tweet and shears snip as one of Berlin's many urban gardeners tends her city centre allotment, but behind the tranquil scene a battle is raging over the real estate.

15h

France prepares for new heat record, as Spain battles wildfire

Temperatures in France are expected to reach a record-breaking high on Friday, as Europe continues to endure a sweltering heatwave which sparked an out-of-control wildfire in Spain.

15h

Apple's star designer Jony Ive to set up own firm

Apple's longtime design chief Jony Ive, who played a key role in the development of the iPhone and other iconic products, is leaving the tech giant to set up his own firm, Apple said Thursday.

15h

Benin leaps into 21st century with new national map

The last time that cartographers mapped Benin, Elvis Presley had just released "Jailhouse Rock," the Soviets had launched Sputnik—and the country was still a colony named French Dahomey.

15h

NASA will fly a drone to Titan to search for life

For its next mission in our solar system, NASA plans to fly a drone copter to Saturn's largest moon Titan in search of the building blocks of life, the space agency said Thursday.

15h

Restored Mission Control comes alive 50 years after Apollo

Gone is the haze of cigarette, cigar and pipe smoke. Gone are the coffee, soda and pizza stains. With only a few exceptions, NASA's Apollo-era Mission Control has been restored to the way it looked 50 years ago when two men landed on the moon.

15h

'Pokémon Masters' is pitting old trainers against each other this summer

Pokémon Masters is landing on iOS and Android sometime this summer, The Pokémon Company's chief Tsunekazu Ishihara has announced. Ishihara and the game's …

15h

Pink noise boosts deep sleep in mild cognitive impairment patients

Gentle sound stimulation played during deep sleep enhanced deep sleep for people with mild cognitive impairment, who are at risk for Alzheimer's disease, a new study found. Those whose brains responded the most robustly to the sound stimulation showed an improved memory response the following day. These results suggest improving sleep is a promising novel approach to stave off dementia. The techno

15h

What happens when we can't test scientific theories? – Science Weekly podcast

String theory gained traction 35 years ago but scientists have not found any evidence to suggest it is correct. Does this matter? And should it be tested? Ian Sample debates this with Eleanor Knox , David Berman and Peter Woit Continue reading…

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What happens when we can't test scientific theories? – Science Weekly podcast

String theory gained traction 35 years ago but scientists have not found any evidence to suggest it is correct. Does this matter? And should it be tested? Ian Sample debates this with Eleanor Knox, David Berman and Peter Woit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

16h

Datalov står i vejen for, at flere tusinde alvorligt syge danskere får behandling

Omtrent 3000 danskere med hepatitis C må ikke blive informeret om en ny, effektiv behandling på grund af lovgivning.

16h

The biggest loser in the presidential debates: Planet Earth

Twenty Democratic candidates had a chance to tell voters why climate change should be America’s top political priority. They mostly blew it.

16h

Photos of the Week: Mermaid Parade, Scarlet Sails, Moss Man

The Monte Cristo Challenge in France, a wild-mare roundup in Andalusia, bagpipes at the Department of Justice, a Spinosaurus in Philadelphia, the Women’s World Cup in France, mud people in the Philippines, a SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch in Florida, Boeing 737 Max airplanes in Seattle, flooding in Brazil, a bee-wearing record attempt in Turkey, and much more

16h

Controlling deadly malaria without chemicals

Scientists have finally found malaria's Achilles' heel, a neurotoxin that isn't harmful to any living thing except Anopheles mosquitoes that spread malaria.

17h

Toxic substances found in the glass and decoration of alcoholic beverage bottles

New research by the University of Plymouth shows that bottles of beer, wine and spirits contain potentially harmful levels of toxic elements, such as lead and cadmium, in their enamelled decorations.

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VR Headset Sales for 2019 Are Already Impressive

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17h

Tiny flying insect robot has four wings and weighs under a gram

submitted by /u/Revolution77 [link] [comments]

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The Green New Deal Finally Makes a Debate Appearance

A number of Democratic primary candidates have proclaimed their support for the Green New Deal or something like it. But the first person to actually endorse it on the debate stage either Wednesday or Thursday night was Senator Kamala Harris of California. (Former Governor John Hickenlooper was the first to mention the idea, saying that he “admired the sense of urgency” but that “we can’t promise

17h

The Confrontation That Laid Bare the Democratic Party’s Evolution

“As the only,” Senator Kamala Harris interjected during the second Democratic debate, in Miami, “as the only black person onstage, I would like to speak on the issue of race.” She directed her attention at Joe Biden. The former vice president’s record on civil rights—and his fond remembrances of segregationist senators—has recently faced a wave of scrutiny. He’s argued that his ability to work wi

17h

It-professor om plan for EFI-afløser: »Jeg kan ikke huske, at jeg før har været så positiv«

Til august skal den første kommune tilsluttes Skatteforvaltningens nye milliardprojekt af et gældsinddrivelsessystem. Planen ser fornuftig ud, mener it-professor Søren Lauesen fra IT-Universitetet.

17h

Revealed: The secret life of the spittlebug

Citizen scientists have provided a wealth of new data on an insect that makes blobs of spittle on plants.

17h

NASA announces plans to send a drone to explore Titan for signs of life

Get ready for Dragonfly’s autonomous flight on Saturn’s largest moon.

17h

‘My Time Is Up. I’m Sorry.’

For the first 65 minutes of Thursday night’s Democratic debate in Miami, Joe Biden was standing at the catbird dais. The former vice president was enjoying his status as the front-runner. When he spoke, he speechified as though the others were just onstage coincidentally, not rivals for the nomination. And when Representative Eric Swalwell called on him to “pass the torch,” Biden just grinned and

18h

Bernie Sanders’s Ideas Dominated the Second Debate

Updated at 11:30 p.m. ET on June 27, 2019. Joe Biden is the current front-runner of the Democratic Party. He’s leading all other primary candidates, in several polls, by double digits. And many party strategists believe that the working-class-whispering former vice president is the only candidate who can beat Donald Trump. But at tonight’s Democratic primary debate, many of the questions posed—an

18h

NASA's new mission to Titan is looking for life in all the right places

Taking advantage of Titan’s dense atmosphere and low gravity, Dragonfly will explore dozens of locations across the icy world. (NASA/JHU-APL/) The next few decades could bring a cascade of discoveries on extraterrestrial life. NASA announced on Thursday its decision to green-light Dragonfly, a octocopter drone designed to sniff out signs of life-giving chemistry on Saturn's largest moon, Titan. C

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What Is the Human Microbiome, Exactly? – Facts So Romantic

Microbiome metaphors influence scientific understanding and can shape medical treatment. Illustration by vrx / Shutterstock Are you an ecosystem? Your mouth, skin, and gut are home to whole communities of microscopic organisms, whose influence on your body ranges from digesting your food to training your immune system and, possibly, impacting your mood and behavior. What are these tiny tenants, a

18h

Biden’s Odd Slip of the Tongue

In the midst of a flurry of health-care-related questions during the second Democratic presidential debate, Joe Biden said something that was either a very strange slip of the tongue or a very bold appeal to voters’ populist rage. “We can deal with the insurance companies by, No. 1, putting insurance executives in jail for the misleading advertising, what they’re doing on opioids, what they’re do

18h

Pete Buttigieg Takes Aim at Religious Hypocrisy

Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, called out Republicans for what he described as moral hypocrisy during the second night of the first Democratic presidential debates, in Miami. The conversation had turned to the border, where Donald Trump’s administration has continued to separate families seeking asylum and is detaining children in facilities reportedly without soap or toothbrus

18h

Kamala Harris Seizes the Moment. Again.

Give Kamala Harris credit for a keen sense of timing. Within the first 20 minutes, night two of the first Democratic presidential-primary debates had descended into the circus that many in the party had feared: a cacophony of unintelligible noise, as 10 candidates crammed onto a single stage all tried to talk over one another, gesturing to the moderators, desperate for a chance to speak, to attac

19h

Final Fantasy XIV is being adapted into a live-action TV show – CNET

From the people bringing you The Witcher to Netflix.

19h

'Giant wombat' fossil discovered by council workers in Australia

Fossilised jaw of baby diprotodon, a type of megafauna extinct for millennia, extracted in NSW by Australian Museum A “giant wombat” fossil has been discovered by local council workers in the Monaro region of southern New South Wales. Two Snowy Monaro regional council employees found the fossilised jaw of a baby diprotodon last Friday at an undisclosed location that is known for such paleontologi

19h

Bluetooth connectivity makes the new Philips Hue smart lightbulbs simpler and more complex

It's getting tougher to tell what's inside lightbulbs. (Philips/) The Philips Hue smart light bulbs are a truly quintessential smart home gadgets. And light bulbs are actually one of the simplest examples of how a smart home really does come in handy. However, the Hue bulbs have, until now, relied on a stand-alone hub—a piece of hardware that connects to your network and relays commands out to th

19h

Shape-shifting, colour-switching ‘octopus’ emerges from a 3D printer

Nature, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02005-9 Recipe includes specialized polymer and pigments that change colour when temperature rises or falls.

19h

Nasa vill landa flygande robot på månen Titan

Temperaturer på kring minus 180 och hav av flytande metan avskräcker inte Nasa. I jakten på livets byggstenar planerar USA:s rymdstyrelse att skicka en flygande robot till Titan.

19h

French Scientists Say They've Created Metallic Hydrogen

But some tough questions still remain.

19h

Reply to McLean et al.: Collections are critical [Letters (Online Only)]

McLean et al. (1) point to biorepositories as important sources of historical information that can successfully inform disease control by identifying potential novel pathogens. They highlight “modern biospecimen infrastructure,” such as museums and independent collections. Indeed, scientists increasingly recognize the need for expertise in taxonomy, curation of specimens, and the…

20h

Crystal structure of jumping spider rhodopsin-1 as a light sensitive GPCR [Applied Biological Sciences]

Light-sensitive G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)—rhodopsins—absorb photons to isomerize their covalently bound retinal, triggering conformational changes that result in downstream signaling cascades. Monostable rhodopsins release retinal upon isomerization as opposed to the retinal in bistable rhodopsins that “reisomerize” upon absorption of a second photon. Understanding the mechanistic differ

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A speculative claim of mass mortalities of honeybee colonies caused by fipronil in France is not supported by published field data [Letters (Online Only)]

Holder et al. (1) speculate that fipronil (a phenylpyrazole insecticide), rather than imidacloprid (a neonicotinoid), caused mass mortalities of honeybees (Apis mellifera) in France. The paper provides laboratory experimental data contributing to the knowledge of the toxicity of fipronil and its sulfone metabolite to honeybees. However, its claim that “fipronil…

20h

High-resolution contrast-enhanced microCT reveals the true three-dimensional morphology of the murine placenta [Applied Biological Sciences]

Genetic engineering of the mouse genome identified many genes that are essential for embryogenesis. Remarkably, the prevalence of concomitant placental defects in embryonic lethal mutants is highly underestimated and indicates the importance of detailed placental analysis when phenotyping new individual gene knockouts. Here we introduce high-resolution contrast-enhanced microfocus computed tomogra

20h

Ingroup vigilance in collectivistic cultures [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Collectivistic cultures have been characterized as having harmonious, cooperative ingroup relationships. However, we find evidence that people in collectivistic cultures are more vigilant toward ingroup members, mindful of their possible unethical intentions. Study 1 found that Chinese participants were more vigilant than Americans in within-group competitions, anticipating more unethical behavior

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Laminar segregation of sensory coding and behavioral readout in macaque V4 [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Neurons in sensory areas of the neocortex are known to represent information both about sensory stimuli and behavioral state, but how these 2 disparate signals are integrated across cortical layers is poorly understood. To study this issue, we measured the coding of visual stimulus orientation and of behavioral state by…

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Paf1C regulates RNA polymerase II progression by modulating elongation rate [Biochemistry]

Elongation factor Paf1C regulates several stages of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription cycle, although it is unclear how it modulates Pol II distribution and progression in mammalian cells. We found that conditional ablation of Paf1 resulted in the accumulation of unphosphorylated and Ser5 phosphorylated Pol II around promoter-proximal…

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Solar refinery turns light and air into liquid fuel

A new technology produces liquid hydrocarbon fuels exclusively from sunlight and air. Carbon-neutral fuels are crucial for making aviation and maritime transport sustainable. The new solar plant produces synthetic liquid fuels that release as much CO 2 during their combustion as previously extracted from the air for their production. The system extracts CO 2 and water directly from ambient air an

20h

AI created 3x as many jobs as it killed last year

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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Steven Levy on Jony Ive’s Design Legacy

Apple’s lead designer, who retired from the company, changed the expectations not just of technology design, but the role of design in consumer products.

20h

New Zealand woman wakes to find giant, mud-spurting geyser in garden

Visitors flock to see volcanic phenomenon that threatens to engulf property in Rotorua When Rotorua resident Susan Gedye was awoken at 2am by “a lot of shaking and jolting” she thought it was an earthquake. But then she headed downstairs at her suburban home and saw that her kitchen windows had steamed up and a large mud geyser had appeared in her garden. Continue reading…

21h

See remarkable NASA photos of a new volcano eruption

Astronauts and satellites take memorable photos of the Raikoke volcano eruption in the Kuril Islands. The eruption is the first in volcano since 1924. The plume of the eruption got as high as 17 km (10 mi). None As far as out-of-this-world pictures go, NASA got an amazing opportunity to snap photos of an erupting volcano from the International Space Station. On June 22nd, 2019, the Raikoke Volcan

21h

It's Official: NASA's Sending a Mission to Titan, a Top Candidate For Alien Life

Saturn's moon might harbour "life as we don't know it".

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Hovedbrud for forskere: Der sker noget uforklarligt med vandet i en sjællandsk kostald

PLUS. Slagelse: Ifølge utallige målinger er vandet i en bestemt stald helt rent. Men hvorfor kan køerne så finde på at drikke urin i stedet? Og hvordan kan der være 10 volts spænding i en vandstuds? Svaret får forskerne til at klø sig i nakken.

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Bagsiden: Hjælp dykkerne med den dumme badebro

Ugens ekstraopgave: Er der en ingeniør til stede?

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Tænkeboks: Stangen slipper væggen 1,31 m over gulvet

Her får du løsningen på opgaven fra uge 25!

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Astronomers just made one giant leap in solving a bizarre cosmic mystery

A view from CSIRO’s Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope antenna 29, with the phased array feed receiver in the center, Southern Cross on the left and the Moon on the right. (CSIRO/Alex Cherney/) What comes to mind when you try to picture the most powerful object in the universe? Maybe an atomic bomb, or an ultra-powerful sun, right? Well, let me introduce you to the Fast Radio Burst

21h

Robotic arm packs boxes with A.I. guidance

Using artificial intelligence to control a robotic arm provides a more efficient way to pack boxes. “We can achieve low-cost, automated solutions that are easily deployable. The key is to make minimal but effective hardware choices and focus on robust algorithms and software,” says the study’s senior author Kostas Bekris, an associate professor in the computer science department at Rutgers Univer

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1 neuron may be enough for recording brain data

Physicists studying the brain have shown how measuring signals from a single neuron may be as good as capturing information from many neurons at once using big, expensive arrays of electrodes. The new work continues the discussion about how the brain seems to function in a “critical” state, operating at the cusp between two phases of activity in a way that offers advantages for information transm

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NASA Announces New Dragonfly Drone Mission to Titan

Dragonfly, with its eight rotors, will explore Saturn's moon Titan by flight, the first for an off-world mission. (Credit: Johns Hopkins APL) Today, NASA announced the next mission in their New Frontiers program to explore the solar system. Dragonfly, a drone lander, will explore Saturn’s largest moon Titan. Titan is the only solar system moon with an extensive atmosphere and standing bodies of li

21h

Male Bats Up Mating Odds with Mouth Morsels

Males that allow females to take food right out of their mouths are more likely to sire offspring with their dining companions.

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How to fight LGBT health disparities

LGBT health disparities persist, but research indicates ways to ease them. In honor of Pride Month and the anniversary of the Stonewall riots , Julia Raifman, an assistant professor at the Boston University School of Public Health, shares her research, which examines LGBT health and health inequities in the United States. Here, she spotlights the health disparities affecting sexual minorities, th

21h

Ozone and your skin oils mix to create ‘Pig-Pen effect’

When ozone and skin oils meet, the resulting reaction may help remove ozone indoors, but it can also produce a personal cloud of pollutants that affects indoor air quality, report researchers. In a computer model of indoor environments, the researchers show that when ozone, a form of oxygen that can be toxic, reacts with skin oils carried by soiled clothes, it produces a range of volatile and sem

22h

Consider older adults as ‘leaders in innovation’

The hobbies and activities of older adults can be sources of innovation to benefit the entire community, research suggests. Older adults are often leaders in innovation who use their knowledge and creativity to revitalize communities, improve the environment, and pass on skills and hobbies, says John Carroll, professor of information sciences and technology and an associate of the Institute for C

22h

Team solves mystery of California’s ‘weird’ turquoise water

In June 2015, the unusual blue-green hue of the water off of Santa Barbara, California had scientists scratching their heads. Now they know it stemmed from an algae bloom. “When the water off the coast of California starts to look like you’re in the Caribbean, that’s really weird,” says lead study author Paul Matson, a former postdoctoral scholar with Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez, a professor in the

22h

How Did the Universe Begin?

Or has the universe always been?

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Seven-country study reveals viruses as new leading cause of global childhood pneumonia

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and other viruses now appear to be the main causes of severe childhood pneumonia in low- and middle-income countries, highlighting the need for vaccines against these pathogens, according to a study from a consortium of scientists from around the world, led by a team at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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The Lancet Global Health: Mexico City Policy linked to 40% increase in abortions in sub-Saharan African countries reliant on US foreign aid

The most comprehensive study to measure the impact of the Mexico City policy between 1995 and 2014 finds that abortion rates rose substantially among women in sub-Saharan African countries with high exposure to the policy relative to countries less exposed. In addition, the use of modern contraception declined and pregnancies increased. This pattern of more frequent abortions and lower contracepti

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G20 leaders: Achieving universal health coverage should top your agenda

G20 leaders meeting in Japan this week should focus on fulfilling their obligations to improve and expand their nations' health care systems.

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Two-in-one drug combining Herceptin with chemotherapy keeps women's breast cancers at bay

Guiding chemotherapy to a tumor by attaching it to the antibody-based target drug Herceptin (trastuzumab) is effective at treating women with breast cancer who have no other treatment options, a new clinical trial shows.The two-in-one treatment kept breast cancer at bay in women with a type of the disease called HER2-positive breast cancer who had stopped responding to existing drugs.

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Using artificial intelligence to deliver personalized radiation therapy

New Cleveland Clinic-led research shows that artificial intelligence (AI) can use medical scans and health records to personalize the dose of radiation therapy used to treat cancer patients.Published today in The Lancet Digital Health, the research team developed an AI framework based on patient computerized tomography (CT) scans and electronic health records.

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Menstrual symptoms linked to nearly 9 days of lost productivity through presenteeism every year

Menstrual period symptoms may be linked to nearly nine days of lost productivity every year through presenteeism, suggests the largest study of its kind, published in the online journal BMJ Open.

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Mum's workplace exposure to solvents may heighten child's autism risk

A mother's workplace exposure to solvents may heighten her child's risk of autism, suggests research published online in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

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We battled hordes of tourists to put a weather station in Everest's 'death zone'

Celebrations after setting up the world’s highest weather station. (Mark Fisher, National Geographic/) Perched at almost 28,000 feet on Everest, we paced back-and-forth, attempting to stave off frostbite as temperatures hovered close to -22 Fahrenheit and our drill batteries became too cold to work. Our ambition to install the highest automatic weather station in history looked destined for failu

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Viruses—not bacteria—cause most childhood pneumonia

Largest recent study highlights the need for new vaccines

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What are some excuses we might hear in the future?

"Sorry, gonna be late for work, my car drove me out of state last night." submitted by /u/the_inductive_method [link] [comments]

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Our remote work future will benefit workers with disabilities

submitted by /u/OGBigMcLargeHuge [link] [comments]

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Male Bats Up Mating Odds with Mouth Morsels

Males that allow females to take food right out of their mouths are more likely to sire offspring with their dining companions. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Male Bats Up Mating Odds with Mouth Morsels

Males that allow females to take food right out of their mouths are more likely to sire offspring with their dining companions. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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With Dragonfly, NASA is heading back to Saturn’s moon Titan

NASA’s next robotic mission to explore the solar system is headed to Saturn’s largest moon, Titan.

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Veggie Surprise: Teeth Of Ancient Crocs Reveal That Some Very Likely Ate Plants

What do you imagine an ancient croc snacking on? Maybe a fish or a bird? For some relatives of modern crocodiles, a safer guess would be a big bunch of flowers. (Image credit: Jorge Gonzalez)

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The Opioid Crisis: How the candidates would solve it

The opioid crisis in this country has drawn the attention of several presidential candidates. A few of the largest, most well thought out plans are examined here. Experts agree a huge investment in treatment is needed over a long period of time. There is an opioid crisis in the United States. About 48,000 Americans died of opioid overdoes in 2017, an average of 130 per day. This is more than the

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Author Correction: A rare genetic variant of BPIFB4 predisposes to high blood pressure via impairment of nitric oxide signaling

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45691-1 Author Correction: A rare genetic variant of BPIFB4 predisposes to high blood pressure via impairment of nitric oxide signaling

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Jony Ive's Leaving Apple, Twitter's Policing Politicians, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Author Correction: Climatic controls of decomposition drive the global biogeography of forest-tree symbioses

Nature, Published online: 28 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1342-9 Author Correction: Climatic controls of decomposition drive the global biogeography of forest-tree symbioses

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A Strange Dinosaur's Unusual Strut

A newly named dinosaur balanced on one toe of each foot — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers validate optimum composites structure created with additive manufacturing

Creating objects out of polymers using additive manufacturing techniques is perfect for a prototype, but not for structural materials that require strength or stiffness. A new trend is to use polymer composite materials reinforced with carbon fibers, much like rebar in a cement sidewalk. The question is, what pattern of carbon fibers results in the stiffest material.

23h

Functional hair follicles grown from stem cells

Scientists have created natural-looking hair that grows through the skin using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), a major scientific achievement that could revolutionize the hair growth industry.

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Sea slugs use algae's bacterial 'weapons factory' in three-way symbiotic relationship

The sea slug Elysia rufescens fights predators by wielding toxic chemicals that it acquires from eating algae. A team has discovered that these chemicals are made by bacteria living inside the algae, highlighting a surprising three-way dependence among sea slugs, algae and bacteria.

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Jony Ive Is Leaving Apple

The legendary designer is starting a new creative agency and signing Apple as its client.

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NASA Will Go Looking for Alien Life

NASA is going back to the moon—just not the one you’re thinking of. The space agency announced today that it will launch a robotic mission to Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, in 2026. The mission, named Dragonfly, will deliver a dronelike spacecraft to the surface. The space copter, which indeed resembles its eponymous insect, will hop from one spot to another, making measurements of the ground

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What journalism professors are teaching students — about their futures

A new study finds educators are encouraging aspiring journalists to look for work outside the news business.

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What Is Stockholm Syndrome?

A rare psychological occurrence, Stockholm syndrome is when hostages develop positive feelings toward their captors during an abduction incident.

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New technology gives insight into how nanomaterials form and grow

A new form of electron microscopy allows researchers to examine nanoscale tubular materials while they are 'alive' and forming liquids — a first in the field.

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How Overeating Changes Our Brains to Make It Harder to Diet

(Credit: Fh Photo/ Shutterstock) Eating is one of the great pleasures of living. And knowing when to stop, a wonderful virtue. For some people, the decision to stop doesn’t come easy. And can we blame them? Eating is awesome! But there comes a point where never feeling full turns into a problem — a heavy problem. There are many health risks associated with overeating. From increased risk of heart

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New Compound Successfully Removes Uranium from Mouse Bones and Kidneys

(Credit: AlexLMX/Shutterstock) If you’re a TV junkie, there’s a good chance you’ve seen Chernobyl, HBO’s show about the 1986 nuclear disaster of the same name. It shows, in horrifying detail, how the meltdown and explosion of part of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant spewed massive amounts of radiation from radioactive elements and isotopes into the atmosphere. How that radiation poisoned first re

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Functional hair follicles grown from stem cells

Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys have created natural-looking hair that grows through the skin using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), a major scientific achievement that could revolutionize the hair growth industry. The findings were presented today at the annual meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) and received a Merit Award. A newly formed compan

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NASA is sending a drone to fly around Titan looking for signs of life

The Dragonfly mission, a quadcopter that will flit around Saturn’s hazy moon Titan to look for evidence of life, has been selected by NASA to launch in 2026

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New study ranks the animals we fear most. Here's what they are.

Researchers in the Czech Republic ranked 25 animals we fear most in a new online survey. While predatory animals evoke fear, they rarely raise our sense of disgust. By contrast, parasites, spiders, and snakes make us fearful and repulsed. None Cats may rule the internet, but spiders dominate our nightmares. That's the consensus of a group of psychologists in the Czech Republic. In a new study , p

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Scientists Are Calling for More Dogs in Space

Long-Range Fetch All dogs go to heaven. But in the future, more of them might take a pit stop at the International Space Station along the way. At least, that’s according to University of Chicago microbial ecologist Jack Gilbert, who called for more dogs in space during a NASA presentation on improving astronauts’ health on Thursday. Jack ends his talk with a plea for more dogs in space! For incr

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Largest-ever simulation of the Deepwater Horizon spill

A team of researchers is conducting the largest-ever simulation of the Deepwater Horizon spill to determine more precisely where hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil dispersed following the drilling rig's explosion in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010.

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New technology gives insight into how nanomaterials form and grow

A new form of electron microscopy allows researchers to examine nanoscale tubular materials while they are 'alive' and forming liquids — a first in the field.

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Pathway discovered that prevents buildup of Alzheimer's protein

Scientists have discovered a pathway that functions like a car wash to prevent the buildup of a toxic protein associated with Alzheimer's disease.

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How inhaled fungal spores cause fatal meningitis

Pathogenic fungal spores capitalize on host immune cells to escape the lung and gain access to the brain to cause fatal disease in mice, according to a new study. These insights into the interactions between pathogenic fungal spores and lung immune cells provide new opportunities for understanding spore-mediated fungal diseases.

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Google Maps can now warn you about how crowded buses and trains are

Google is updating its Maps app so you can see how full you local bus or train is when you're planning your commute.

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Design chief departure adds to uncertainty at Apple

The departure of chief designer Jony Ive adds to uncertainty at Apple as the California tech giant shifts into new segments like services and streaming media amid a slowdown in sales of the …

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Identification technology swings to focus on heartbeat

A laser from a distance can identify people by their heartbeat. The Pentagon has the technology in a new device, which was developed for the Pentagon after US Special Forces requested it. The …

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Nasa to send Dragonfly drone to explore Titan, Saturn's largest moon

Major new mission part of Nasa’s New Frontiers Program Scientists to study whether Titan could support microbial life Nasa is sending a nuclear-powered drone to Saturn’s largest moon to explore multiple locations in search of habitability and life. Related: Mars rover's large methane discovery excites scientists Continue reading…

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The Quiet Force of YouTuber Etika's Gaze

We will never know for certain what more Desmond Amofah wanted to communicate—but we can hazard a guess.

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UI researchers validate optimum composites structure created with additive manufacturing

Creating objects out of polymers using additive manufacturing techniques is perfect for a prototype, but not for structural materials that require strength or stiffness. A new trend is to use polymer composite materials reinforced with carbon fibers, much like rebar in a cement sidewalk. The question is, what pattern of carbon fibers results in the stiffest material. University of Illinois researc

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Breaking: NASA Announces Mission to Saturn’s Largest Moon Titan

Project Dragonfly NASA just selected its next major planetary science mission via a telecast — and it’s more ambitious than ever. As part of project Dragonfly, NASA is planning to send a small spacecraft to Saturn’s moon Titan, a moon with an extremely dense atmosphere. As its namesake suggests, the craft would release a microwave-sized rotorcraft — think of it as a tiny helicopter drone — to fly

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NASA drone will soar over Saturn's largest moon

Nature, Published online: 27 June 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02027-3 The Dragonfly mission will explore Titan's atmosphere and hydrocarbon lakes.

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Sea slugs use algae's bacterial 'weapons factory' in three-way symbiotic relationship

The sea slug Elysia rufescens fights predators by wielding toxic chemicals that it acquires from eating algae. A Princeton-led team has discovered that these chemicals are made by bacteria living inside the algae, highlighting a surprising three-way dependence among sea slugs, algae and bacteria.

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Three ways your environment affects your intelligence

Euthenics refers to the practice of improving humanity's environment in order to maximize its potential. Throughout history, we've tweaked our surroundings in such a way as to directly enhance our intelligence. These examples underscore the importance of environmental regulation and policies; otherwise, we might just be throwing away our potential. None Every few years, researchers administer IQ

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Spacewatch: ESA greenlights Comet Interceptor mission

Spacecraft will travel to an as-yet unidentified comet and map it in three dimensions The European Space Agency (ESA) has selected a comet interceptor for the first of its new class of “fast” missions. These must launch within eight years of selection and weigh less than 1,000kg so they can hitchhike into space on an already scheduled launch. Continue reading…

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Despite the ACA, millions of Americans with cardiovascular disease still can't get care

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death for Americans, yet millions with CVD or cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) still can't access the care they need, even years after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). While 9.8 million Americans with CVD/CVRF gained new coverage, 20.6 million remain uninsured, and approximately 13% of black and 29% of Hispanic adults in th

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Researchers criticize study calling for expansion of genetic testing for breast cancer

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have criticized a recent study calling into question guidelines on genetic testing for hereditary breast cancer.

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20 percent off an Anker digital alarm clock and other exciting deals happening today

For more deals and product chatter, check out our exclusive Facebook group . Anker (Amazon/) Get Anker's newly released Soundcore Wakey clock for 20 percent off when you use the code NEWSPK3300 at checkout. The device is perfect for a bedside table because of its built-in wireless charger for your smartphone, white-noise features, and a speaker that can be used via Bluetooth, FM radio, or using a

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Megan Rapinoe Makes Resistance Look Effortless

Gather your children in front of the flatscreen and instruct them to fix their eyes on no. 15, the winger with lavender hair. Have them watch as she gallivants down the left flank and flummoxes a defender with a stutter step. Have them listen to her unguarded pregame disquisitions on tactics, Donald Trump, haute couture, and well, every facet of human existence. Tell them that Megan Rapinoe is he

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Bridging the LGBTQ Generation Gap

The LGBTQ community is often referred to as a “family,” with the connotation being that it is a supportive, close-knit group of people. According to researchers , however, the analogy is particularly salient when it comes to another, not-so-positive aspect of families: generation gaps. More than 60 percent of LGBTQ elders report feeling an isolating lack of companionship; two in five feel disconn

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Is Solar Worth It for You? Use This Simple Cost Benefit Estimator to Find Out.

In theory we’d all like to make the switch to solar energy . It’s better for the planet, and unless your town has an evil billionaire with a dastardly plot to block out the sun , the cost of sunlight will always be free. The only problem? Not everyone stands to realize the same rate of return on the investment. So, is solar worth it for you? It depends on numerous factors, including your home’s a

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NASA Will Send a Helicopter to Hunt for Life on Saturn's Biggest Moon

The Dragonfly mission will spend two years flying around the surface of Titan, studying the moon’s composition and searching for signs of life.

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Airplane Contrails Might Actually be a Problem for the Environment

Inside The Lines Those chemtrail conspiracy theorists may have been right about something, though not for the reasons they think. According to a new study, the contrails of exhaust fumes and soot given off by airplanes could be shaping the weather by contributing to climate change more than previously thought. That’s where any similarities to the baseless chemtrail conspiracy theories end, though

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NASA will fly a billion-dollar quadcopter to Titan, Saturn’s methane-rich moon

Dragonfly mission will search for the primordial ingredients of life

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New NASA Mission Will Fly Titan's Frigid Skies to Search for Life's Beginnings

Dragonfly, a nuclear-powered drone, will visit Saturn’s largest moon in the 2030s — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Just how many cups of coffee is it safe to drink a day?

A study of hundreds of thousands of people finds the upper safe limit for coffee consumption. Too much coffee puts drinkers at an increased cardiovascular risk. Say no to that seventh cup. The UK Biobank is a gift that keeps on giving. It's a massive database of medical data belonging to some 500,000 volunteers, tracking their health as they make their way through life. We've written about it bef

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New NASA Mission Will Fly Titan's Frigid Skies to Search for Life's Beginnings

Dragonfly, a nuclear-powered drone, will visit Saturn’s largest moon in the 2030s — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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UMN researcher studies hip fracture probability on women in late life

New University of Minnesota Medical School research evaluates the impact of multimorbidity on the probability of hip fractures.

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NIST presents first real-world test of new smokestack emissions sensor designs

In collaboration with industry, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have completed the first real-world test of a potentially improved way to measure smokestack emissions in coal-fired power plants.

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NJIT conducts the largest-ever simulation of the Deepwater Horizon spill

A team of New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) researchers is conducting the largest-ever simulation of the Deepwater Horizon spill to determine more precisely where hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil dispersed following the drilling rig's explosion in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010.

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What journalism professors are teaching students — about their futures

A new study from Rice University and Rutgers University finds educators are encouraging aspiring journalists to look for work outside the news business.

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Is the Citizenship Question Dead?

“Our review is deferential, but we are ‘not required to exhibit a naiveté from which ordinary citizens are free,’” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for a majority of the Supreme Court today in Department of Commerce v. New York , the closely watched case testing whether the Trump administration could add a citizenship question to the 2020 census questionnaire. The chief justice was quoting not a

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Just how many cups of coffee is it safe to drink a day?

A study of hundreds of thousands of people finds the upper safe limit for coffee consumption. Too much coffee puts drinkers at an increased cardiovascular risk. Say no to that seventh cup. The UK Biobank is a gift that keeps on giving. It's a massive database of medical data belonging to some 500,000 volunteers, tracking their health as they make their way through life. We've written about it bef

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New NASA Mission Will Fly Titan's Frigid Skies to Search for Life's Beginnings

Dragonfly, a nuclear-powered drone, will visit Saturn’s largest moon in the 2030s — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Airline group advocates more training for Boeing 737 Max

A trade group representing hundreds of airlines is renewing its push for additional pilot training and coordination among global aviation regulators to ensure that the Boeing 737 Max is safe before it is allowed to fly again after two deadly crashes.

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Trump Slams Tech Titans, White House Announces Social Media Summit

Going Off During an interview with Fox Business Network on Wednesday morning, U.S. President Donald Trump blasted several of the biggest tech companies in the world, arguing that they’re all run by Democrats and biased against conservatives. Roughly four hours later, the White House announced plans to host a social media summit on July 11, meaning Trump is presumably just a few weeks away from ha

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'Crypto' Outbreaks Linked to Swimming Pools Are on the Rise, CDC Says

Not to spoil your summer pool fun, but outbreaks of "crypto," a swimming-related diarrheal illness, are on the rise.

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UN climate talks: Delegates back IPCC report without targets

Delegates agree a "compromise" on a key report but some say it's a surrender to fossil fuel producers.

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Bio-Rad Launches New single-cell ATAC-Seq solution

Bio-Rad today announced the launch of its scATAC-Seq solution, a single-cell assay for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing.

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New research raises prospect of better anti-obesity drugs

Scientists have found a group of brain cells that influence body mass in two ways, by controlling how much we eat as well as how much energy we burn. The findings could lead to new drugs to help people shed weight.

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What agility and agile mean for you

SIOP has published a new white paper that explores critical elements for organizational effectiveness amid turbulence. This white paper provides an overview of the increasingly common terms 'agility' and 'agile' along with practical implications for leaders who are operating in complex, changing environments.

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Kosmisk blinkning från en massiv galax

Den 24 september 2018 nådde en kort puls av radiostrålning jorden från ett okänt fenomen i universum. Det var en radioblixt, en typ av fenomen som gäckat forskare sedan den första blixten av det här slaget upptäcktes 2007. Den här gången lyckades forskarna spåra källan till en galax 3,6 miljarder ljusår bort.

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Capuchin monkeys have refined their tool use over 3,000 years

Archaeologists dug into the ground of an area of a Brazilian national park known to be frequented by capuchin monkeys. They found that over the past 3,000 years, the stone tools that the monkeys use have evolved and changed, marking the first time this kind of development has been observed in a non-human species. The findings underscore the intelligence of the capuchin monkeys and serve as a para

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Harvard’s RoboBee Flies Using Solar Power

Past versions of the RoboBee needed external power to fly, but the new RoboBee has its own solar panels for untethered flight. The post Harvard’s RoboBee Flies Using Solar Power appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Musk: Roadster to Go 0-60 in 2.1 Seconds “Before Thruster Option”

Rocket Roadster Tesla CEO Elon Musk just revealed on Twitter that the base model of the hotly-anticipated Roadster will accelerate from zero to 60 mph in just over two seconds “before adding rocket thruster option.” The electric car company originally announced the Roadster in November 2017 — a performance convertible that could reach 60 mph in just 1.9 seconds. Musk also teased an optional Space

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U.S. in Top 10 of most dangerous countries for women

India tops a global ranking of most dangerous countries for women Most other countries in the Top 10 cluster together in an Indo-Arab-African window of 'female-unfriendliness' One outlier: the United States – 10 th most dangerous country for women Worst for women The worst countries in the world to be a woman? Places torn apart by war, or societies stifled by centuries of male patriarchy, a recen

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The origins of Satanism: A humanist history?

Pop culture has painted our perceptions of Satanism more than historical facts. For most of its history, the term "Satanism: was an epithet used against religious enemies, not a movement bound by a shared set of beliefs. Today, the Satanists philosophy has more in common with empiricism or atheism than faith-based religions. None Imagine a Satanist. If you're like most Americans, that mental imag

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New AI tool captures top players' strategies in RNA video game

A new artificial-intelligence tool captures strategies used by top players of an internet-based videogame to design new RNA molecules.

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You No Longer Own Your Face

If 20 people are in a coffee shop, then there are at least 21 cameras: One embedded in each person’s phone and, usually, at least one tucked high in the corner. What you say may be overheard and tweeted; you might even appear in the background of another patron’s selfie or Skype session. But that doesn’t stop even the most privacy-wary people from entering coffee shops. They accept the risk inher

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Police cam maker nixes facial recognition deployment

Police equipment manufacturer Axon said Thursday it decided against deploying facial recognition on its body cameras after an ethics review found the technology "is not yet reliable enough."

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HPV Vaccines Are Reducing Infections, Warts — and Probably Cancer

An analysis covering 66 million young people has found plummeting rates of precancerous lesions and genital warts after vaccination against the human papillomavirus.

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Arby's created a carrot made out of meat and it tastes the same

submitted by /u/holyfruits [link] [comments]

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Chasing Rainbows review – boldly going into the white, male space race

Hoxton Hall, London Donna Berlin is intense as an astronaut in Oneness Sankara’s play about the emotional cost of female ambition ‘I would like to tell you a story about being the first,” Ama Baptiste tells us. Ama was the first in her family to go to university, the first to get a master’s degree and the first Caribbean woman in space. She speaks while hanging in midair centre-stage in an astron

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Stacking Graphene Creates Entirely New Quantum States

Unavoidable Errors The qubits – the basic units of quantum communication – central to quantum computers are incredibly fragile , prone to switching between states at the slightest disruption. This has made error correction a major focus of quantum computer developers — they need to find a way to keep the systems functioning even if an individual qubit is corrupted. Not only that, but they have to

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Experiment reverses the direction of heat flow

A study used quantum correlations to make heat flow from a colder to a hotter medium without adding external energy, affording a deeper understanding of the second law of thermodynamics.

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New AI tool captures top players' strategies in RNA video game

A new artificial-intelligence tool captures strategies used by top players of an internet-based videogame to design new RNA molecules.

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Researchers unlock mysteries of complex microRNA oncogenes

A new collaborative study uncovers novel functions for polycistronic microRNAs and showing how cancers such as lymphoma twist these functions to reorganize the information networks that control gene expression.

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People's motivations bias how they gather information

A new study suggests people stop gathering evidence earlier when the data supports their desired conclusion than when it supports the conclusion they wish was false.

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Cosmic cat and mouse: Astronomers capture and tag a fleeting radio burst

Gemini Observatory provides critical observations that confirm the distance to a mysterious, very short-lived, radio outburst from a galaxy several billions of light years away.

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