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nyheder2019juni29

Officials Warn of Wasp ‘Super Nests’ in Alabama

A colony can grow to be as big as a Volkswagen Beetle and can have 15,000 wasps. The last time scientists saw such an unusually high number of enormous nests was in 2006.

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Magic mushrooms follow cannabis for potential health benefits

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Jeg vil være solbrun uden at smadre min hud: Her er videnskabens råd

Solbadning, solarium eller selvbruner. Hvad er den sundeste løsning?

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Starwatch: a young crescent moon to watch out for

After a total solar eclipse visible in South America, the end of the week will deliver a treat Towards the end of the week and moving into the weekend, look out for a young crescent moon in the western sky just after sunset. Having passed directly in front of the sun on 2 July to create a total solar eclipse visible from parts of South America, the moon will then become visible in the evening sky

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The Night King reigns in Australia

Leader of the White Walkers also flies.

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White House insists Trump Huawei reversal not 'catastrophic mistake'

Larry Kudlow defends move on sales ban after China talksRubio and Barasso among Republicans concerned by ployWhite House economic adviser Larry Kudlow insisted on Sunday Donald Trump is not …

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See More Teams

It’s just so easy to let moments of personal glory overshadow the collaborative marvels that made them possible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists achieve teleportation breakthrough

Scientists figure out how to teleport information within a diamond. The study took advantage of defects in the diamond's structure. The achievement has implications for quantum computing. None Scientists from the Yokohama National University in Japan achieved the feat of teleporting quantum information within a diamond. Their study is an important step in the field of quantum information technolo

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Spy Agencies Turn to AI to Stay Ahead of Adversaries

submitted by /u/quantumcipher [link] [comments]

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Scientist Encourages Other Women Scientists to Make Themselves Heard

Geneticist Natalie Telis noticed few women asking questions at scientific conferences. So she publicized the problem and set about to make a change. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Cool reprieve for parts of Europe as Germany roasts

A welcome dip in temperatures came to parts of Europe on Sunday, bringing relief to areas which have sweltered through a widespread, deadly heatwave for nearly a week.

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'10 steps ahead': Kenya's tech war on wildlife poachers

Every morning, at the far perimeter of the wildlife reserve capped by Mount Kenya, a khaki-clad ranger meticulously sweeps the earth of animal footprints, covering their tracks from any poachers.

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'10 steps ahead': Kenya's tech war on wildlife poachers

Every morning, at the far perimeter of the wildlife reserve capped by Mount Kenya, a khaki-clad ranger meticulously sweeps the earth of animal footprints, covering their tracks from any poachers.

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After decades, Japan courts controversy resuming commercial whaling

Japanese fishermen set sail on Monday to hunt whales commercially for the first time in more than three decades after Tokyo's controversial withdrawal from the International Whaling Commission (IWC) triggered outrage from environmental groups.

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Giant Beijing airport set to open on eve of China's 70th birthday

Beijing is set to open an eye-catching multi-billion dollar airport resembling a massive shining starfish, to accommodate soaring air traffic in China and celebrate the Communist government's 70th anniversary in power.

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Spain wildfire triggers more evacuations

Spanish authorities ordered the evacuation Sunday of around 40 homes as a raging wildfire advanced in the centre of the country and temperatures soared.

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UN chief urges action to avert climate change 'catastrophe'

UN chief Antonio Guterres said climate-related devastation was striking the planet on a weekly basis and warned Sunday that urgent action must be taken to avoid a catastrophe.

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American Airlines tech leader talks about outages, hackers

A government report this month highlighted the frequency of computer outages at airlines, which can stop passengers from checking in for flights, and even prevent planes from taking off.

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Baby lobster numbers spell trouble for shellfish population

Baby lobsters are continuing to appear in high numbers off some parts of Canada while tailing off in New England, raising questions about what the valuable shellfish's population will look like in several years.

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After decades, Japan courts controversy resuming commercial whaling

Japanese fishermen set sail on Monday to hunt whales commercially for the first time in more than three decades after Tokyo's controversial withdrawal from the International Whaling Commission (IWC) triggered outrage from environmental groups.

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Baby lobster numbers spell trouble for shellfish population

Baby lobsters are continuing to appear in high numbers off some parts of Canada while tailing off in New England, raising questions about what the valuable shellfish's population will look like in several years.

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Attenborough Tells Glastonbury Crowd That Plastic Ban Will Have an Impact

The naturalist David Attenborough appeared onstage Sunday at the British festival, which barred single-use plastic bottles this year.

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Freak blast or taste of the future? French wine-makers count heatwave cost

"It's a warning," Catherine Bernard said gravely as she surveyed rows of withered vines at her wine estate in southern France, where a blazing Sun scorched part of the harvest.

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How one Bluetooth adapter can change the way you use your car

The on-board diagnostics (OBD) port isn't just for your mechanic. (Deposit Photos/) If your car is less than 24 years old, it has a small white diagnostics port that mechanics use to analyze problems and gather data about your vehicle. But by simply pairing your smartphone with a cheap Bluetooth adapter, you can harness that power for yourself and turn your regular car into a smart car. The plug,

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Scientists teleport quantum information in a diamond

Scientists figure out how to teleport information within a diamond. The study took advantage of defects in the diamond's structure. The achievement has implications for quantum computing. None Scientists from the Yokohama National University in Japan achieved the feat of teleporting quantum information within a diamond. Their study is an important step in the field of quantum information technolo

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Prime Day 2019 starts July 15 — these are the best deals available so far – CNET

Prime Day will offer over 1 million deals, but some good ones can be had right now. Here's everything you need to know about the event, including money-saving tips and tricks.

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Scientist Encourages Other Women Scientists to Make Themselves Heard

Geneticist Natalie Telis noticed few women asking questions at scientific conferences. So she publicized the problem and set about to make a change. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Former Equifax exec gets 4 months in prison for insider trading after breach – CNET

Former CIO sold all his shares in the company 10 days before the breach was publicly revealed.

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What We Can Learn from These Marvelous Out-of-Context Rocks

Come visit some very unusual sedimentary rocks on Seattle's Richmond Beach — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Space miners race to an asteroid worth quintillions

16 Psyche is an asteroid full of metal in the asteroid belt that could be worth $700 quintillion. NASA plans to visit 16 Psyche by 2026. Commercial mining of faraway asteroids could still be decades away and some set closer targets, like the moon. None Would you like to be a billionaire? All you have to do is figure out how to go into space and mine 16 Psyche , an asteroid made of gold and other

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Electric cars: New vehicles to emit noise to aid safety

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Machine learning collaborations accelerate materials discovery

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Japanese Researchers Teleport Quantum Information into a Diamond

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Can AI Save the Internet from Fake News?

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Face-Reading AI Will Tell Police When Suspects Are Hiding Truth

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Glastonbury: Sir David Attenborough hails plastic ban

The naturalist takes to the Pyramid Stage to thank festival-goers shortly before Kylie Minogue's performance.

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Lichens thrived while those around them fell

Mass extinction allowed new combinations to rise up, DNA analysis shows. Nick Carne reports.

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Apple reportedly vows improvements to News+ after lackluster start

Apple's News+ service might be in line for a shakeup not long after its debut. Business Insider sources claim that publishers' revenue from News+ is well below what Apple …

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Animals do have memories, and can help us crack Alzheimer’s

For almost as long as modern science has been around, the idea that animals can remember past experiences seemed so preposterous that few researchers bothered to study it. Surely only humans, with our big, sophisticated brains, could be capable of 'episodic' memories – recalling a trip to the grocery store last Saturday, for example. Animals, in their constant striving for survival, as the popula

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Earth 2.0: same same, but better

Astrobiologists are thinking beyond just finding a near twin. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Lichens thrived while those around them fell

Mass extinction allowed new combinations to rise up, DNA analysis shows. Nick Carne reports.

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From Cameras to Kayaks, All the Stuff We Loved This Month

Plus: The all-new Mac Pro, Instant Pot's ace blender, and even a bidet.

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Can AI Save the Internet from Fake News?

There’s an old proverb that says “seeing is believing.” But in the age of artificial intelligence, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to take anything at face value—literally. The rise of so-called “ deepfakes ,” in which different types of AI-based techniques are used to manipulate video content , has reached the point where Congress held its first hearing last month on the potential abuses of

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Can we create a pregnancy test for endangered marsupials?

New research suggests we may have to change our thinking. Oliver Griffith from Australia’s University of Melbourne reports.

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Making decisions, one leg at a time

Footage shows octopus tentacles making independent decisions. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Science history: the invention of the Linotype machine

Ottmar Mergenthaler created the “eighth wonder of the world”, according to Thomas Edison. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Ack! I need chocolate! The science of PMS food cravings

Premenstrual food cravings are the punchline of endless jokes. Like most good jokes, they're funny because they're true. Certain parts of a woman's menstrual cycle do seem to go hand in hand with the desire for chocolate ice cream and potato chips. I hear about this every day from my OBGYN patients . Researchers have studied food cravings for years; one of the most cited studies dates back to 195

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USA’s største CCS-projekt skal producere ammoniak næsten uden CO2-udledning

PLUS. Et amerikansk projekt skal ændre gødningsindustriens enorme CO2-aftryk ved at opsamle og lagre CO2 fra produktionen.

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Decades long surveys suggest the deleterious effects of smoking may extend to detrimental personality changes

There is increasing recognition that while our personality traits are stable enough to shape our lives profoundly, they are also partly malleable, so that our choices and experiences can feedback and influence the kind of people we become. A new study in the Journal of Research in Personality shines a light on a highly consequential behaviour that captures this dynamic – smoking cigarettes. The r

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Bike-Friendly Cities, a New Urbanism, and More Car News This Week

Copenhagenize Design published its list of the world's top 20 cities for cyclists, and Sidewalk Labs unveiled a plan to remake part of Toronto.

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The Democratic Debates Top This Week's Internet News Roundup

A friendly reminder: The 2020 election is still 17 months away.

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If You're On the Moon, Does the Earth Appear to Go Through Phases?

From the surface of the moon, you'd be able to watch Earth wax and wane through phases.

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Quantum Computing for English Majors

The poet who discovered Shor’s algorithm answers questions about quantum computers and other mysteries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Normalization of Meeting Kim Jong Un

It all started, as it often does these days, with a tweet from President Donald Trump: “I will be leaving Japan for South Korea (with President Moon). While there, if Chairman Kim of North Korea sees this, I would meet him at the Border/DMZ just to shake his hand and say Hello(?)!” Thirty-two hours later, Trump shook hands with the North Korean leader, Kim Jong Un, and became the first sitting Am

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Scientists Study Human Cancer Genes In Plants

There are human cancer genes in plants. Scientists at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee are studying what they and other human genes are doing there.

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Suicide Isn't Just a Personal Issue

It wasn’t all that long ago that many people wouldn’t say “cancer” in polite conversation. Because the disease was so deadly and so poorly understood, mentioning that someone had The Big C could seem to imply that the person had brought the misery of the disease on himself or herself. Although that stigma persists in some ways—lung cancer, for example, is still culturally tied with tobacco use—th

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Imagining Post-Trump Nationalism

America is in a period of tug-of-war politics, with cultural elites fighting to determine which views should be excluded from public life. For decades, overt racism has been stigmatized in polite society and penalized by the government; while racial disparities persist everywhere from the prison system to public education, many Americans regard openly racist views with horror, and quickly move to

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Teens Are Probably Drinking Too Much Caffeine

Earlier this year, a half-dozen students from City Hill Middle School, in Naugatuck, Connecticut, traveled with their science teacher, Katrina Spina, to the state capital to testify in support of a bill that would ban sales of energy drinks to children under the age of 16. Having devoted three months to a chemistry unit studying the ingredients in and potential health impacts of common energy dri

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Greed Is to Blame for the Radicalization of YouTube and Facebook

Opinion: Social media has become the modern-day version of conspiracy-theorizing supermarket tabloids. When will these platforms be held accountable?

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A ‘Sonic Black Hole' Could Help Solve a Cosmic Paradox

If a sound-trapping fluid on Earth really does behave like a black hole, its behavior could offer insight into the famous information paradox.

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Too much iron may cause skin infections

According to a large-scale new study, iron levels that are excessively high may cause bacterial skin infections, such as cellulitis and abscesses.

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Scientists’ $250m fund aims to keep start-ups in the UK

Wide range of investors include Unilever, Aviva, Sky and billionaire businessmen

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Coca-Cola kan tvinge forskere til at stoppe forskning, når det passer dem

Udenlandske og danske dokumenter viser, at firmaet kan stoppe den forskning, de støtter.

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There's One Other Ocean Creature That Scares The Hell Out of Great White Sharks

"White sharks will immediately vacate their preferred hunting ground and will not return for up to a year."

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Creating the First Visual History of Queer Life Before Stonewall

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series about the gay-rights movement and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. Fifty years ago at a grungy, Mafia-owned bar in Greenwich Village, a group of gay, lesbian, and trans patrons who had long endured the harassment of random police raids reached a breaking point. Spontaneously and collectively, they refused to be herded into a paddy wag

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Microsoft's Ebook Apocalypse Shows the Dark Side of DRM

Microsoft has closed its ebook store—and will soon make their customers' libraries disappear along with it.

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What Boeing’s 737 MAX Has to Do With Cars: Software

Investigators believe faulty software contributed to two fatal crashes. A newly discovered fault will likely will keep the 737 MAX grounded until the fall.

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Stoler du på forskning? 8 kneb, virksomheder kan bruge til at påvirke resultatet

Købte forskere, nedsabling af resultater og datafifleri sker også i Danmark, lyder det fra flere forskere.

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Microsoft starts public tests for 'Halo: Reach' on PC

Halo: Reach is now playable on PC… for a handful of very early adopters. Microsoft and 343 Industries have shared a slew of Master Chief Collection update news, including word that …

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Democrats Need to Talk About Their Faith

Just over a year ago, before the frenzy of the midterm elections hit full swing, I traveled to Ohio to campaign with Senator Sherrod Brown, who was running for reelection. I told the crowds about the Sherrod I know from the weekly prayer breakfast he hosts in the Capitol, every Wednesday when the Senate is in session. When I brought up his faith at our first campaign stop, though, a funny thing h

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Bill Barr’s Dangerous Pursuit of Executive Power

Buried behind our president’s endless stream of lies and malicious self-serving remarks are actions that far transcend any reasonable understanding of his legal authority. Donald Trump disdains, more than anything else, the limitations of checks and balances on his power. Witness his assertion of a right to flout all congressional subpoenas; his continuing refusal to disclose his tax returns, not

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An Unlikely Solution to Germany's East-West Divide

MASSEN, Germany—On a mild spring evening, Frauke Hildebrandt maneuvered through choked highways and accelerated down county roads, driving straight across her home state of Brandenburg deep into coal country. It was rush hour and Hildebrandt was running a little late. She was the guest of honor at a gathering here in Massen, a quiet, tidy village along the state’s southeastern rim, and a small gr

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Fri forskning? Emails viser, at stort forskningscenter arbejder for industrien

Danske forskere tilknyttet ‘International Live Sciences Institute’ afviser kritikken. Sådan foregår det ikke her, lyder det.

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Spørg Fagfolket laver husforsøg: Hvor meget længere holder kaffen sig varm i et termokrus?

En læser vil gerne vide, om termokopper er så gode, som producenterne påstår. Ingeniøren har gjort forsøget.

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George Church – How to Turn Science Fiction into Science Fact

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The science of influencing people: six ways to win an argument

Hidebound views on subjects such as the climate crisis and Brexit are the norm – but the appliance of science may sway stubborn opinions “I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters of religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s,” wrote Mark Twain. Having written a book about our most common reasoning errors, I would argue that Twain was being rather uncha

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How the 2019 eclipse will differ from 2017’s — and what that means for science

This year’s total solar eclipse is visible late in the day from a relatively small slice of South America.

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The five: extinct megafauna

Following last week’s discovery of the remains of a giant bird, we look at some of the most formidable beasts on record Last week, researchers published a paper about the remains of a giant flightless bird found in a Crimean cave. Pachystruthio dmanisensis is believed to be from a family of prehistoric birds with powerful legs and large beaks, present across North America, Asia and Europe. The gig

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We could kill cancer cells by hijacking their odd electrical current

A recently discovered bioelectrical current could be turned against itself to switch off and kill cancer cells

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Musikkens fundament er statistisk mekanik

PLUS. At en oktav er inddelt i 12 halvtoner kan forklares med statistisk mekanik og en kamp mellem orden og uorden, som også kendes fra termodynamik.

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Apollo 11 review – a front-row seat for the moon landing

Composed entirely of archive footage, this documentary invests the historic mission with a tense immediacy Given that we all know how the mission turned out, this documentary about the Apollo 11 lunar landing shouldn’t be as nervily tense as it is. But the archive-only approach – unlike the 2007 picture In the Shadow of the Moon, there are no contemporary interviews, just material recorded at the

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Parenting tips on avoiding toxics aren't enough – we need real action to protect our kids | Sonya Lunder

The onus of protecting children from chemicals should fall on manufacturers and regulators, not parents The other week I got an urgent email from a friend. His wife is newly pregnant and he was concerned that her super fragrant, aerosol “dry shampoo” was toxic. Could I review the ingredients and let him know what to do? This type of request is common for me. As a scientist and anti-toxin advocate

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Oregon Is About to Get a Lot More Hazardous

State leadership is failing its citizens – and there will be a body count. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tre anledningar till att tiden inte finns

På kvantnivå finns ingen framtid eller dåtid. Att vi ser tiden som linjär är för att vår hjärna är skapad så, säger kända fysikern Carlo Rovelli. Se hans tre bästa argument för att vi har fått tiden om bakfoten i videon ovan.

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Order from chaos: Vortex studies are first proof of decades-old theory

Two Australian studies published this week offer the first proof of a 70-year-old theory of turbulence. Turbulence, with its seemingly random and chaotic motion of the fluid, is a notoriously difficult problem, for which there is no general theoretical description. (In fact, the Clay Mathematics Institute offers a million dollar prize to anyone that comes up with a theory of turbulence.)

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Freeze frame: Researchers solve how cells unfold proteins

Using cryo-EM, researchers capture how Cdc48, harvested directly from yeast cells, unfolds proteins.

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Researchers observe 70-year-old prediction, with wide-reaching effects

As you stir milk into a cup of coffee, you will see fluid turbulence in action — rapid mixing that has defied deep scientific understanding. Researchers set out to learn more about the everyday enigma of turbulence by using the remarkable properties of superfluids, strange quantum fluids able to flow endlessly without any friction.

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Immediate, science-based community action can mitigate insect decline

Environmentalists in Germany collected 1.75 million signatures for a 'save the bees law.' Citizens believe they can stop insect declines by halting habitat loss and fragmentation, producing food without pesticides and limiting climate change.

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Order from chaos: Vortex studies are first proof of decades-old theory

Two Australian studies published this week offer the first proof of a 70-year-old theory of turbulence. Turbulence, with its seemingly random and chaotic motion of the fluid, is a notoriously difficult problem, for which there is no general theoretical description. (In fact, the Clay Mathematics Institute offers a million dollar prize to anyone that comes up with a theory of turbulence.)

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Researchers observe 70-year-old prediction, with wide-reaching effects

As you stir milk into a cup of coffee, you will see fluid turbulence in action — rapid mixing that has defied deep scientific understanding. Researchers set out to learn more about the everyday enigma of turbulence by using the remarkable properties of superfluids, strange quantum fluids able to flow endlessly without any friction.

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In the future machines will take our jobs, and that's okay.

submitted by /u/casual-captain [link] [comments]

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Study explains exactly why captivity is bad for orcas

Researchers present a detailed catalogue of the hardships captive orcas face and the damage done to them. The study draws parallels between known human chronic stresses and entertainment and research facility conditions. The evidence offers a damning response to perplexed apologies offered by proprietors of such parks, aquariums, and zoos when an orca dies. None Free Willy came out in 1993, follo

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Smart materials provide real-time insight into wearers' emotions

Researchers have worked with smart materials on wrist-worn prototypes that can aid people diagnosed with depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorders in monitoring their emotions.

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Researchers teleport information within a diamond

Researchers have teleported quantum information securely within the confines of a diamond. The study has big implications for quantum information technology — the future of how sensitive information is shared and stored.

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Deciphering how the brain encodes color and shape

There are hundreds of thousands of distinct colors and shapes that a person can distinguish visually, but how does the brain process all of this information? Scientists previously believed that the visual system initially encodes shape and color with different sets of neurons and then combines them much later. But a new study shows that there are neurons that respond selectively to particular comb

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Elevated first trimester blood pressure increases risk for pregnancy hypertensive disorders

Elevated blood pressure in the first trimester of pregnancy, or an increase in blood pressure between the first and second trimesters, raises the chances of a high blood pressure disorder of pregnancy, according to a study funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health.

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MS patients at a greater risk of cancer, new study suggests

New results of a 65-year follow-up study of nearly 7,000 Norwegian patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) suggest that patients may have a greater overall risk of developing cancer than the general population, with an especially high risk of cancer in respiratory organs, urinary organs and the central nervous system.

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Berlin freezes rent for five years

Rent prices in Berlin have risen 129 percent in the past decade. In response to growing public pressure, the Berlin city government has enacted a plan to freeze rent prices for five years. The majority of economic research on rent controls suggest that this may backfire, but only time will tell. None Like many once affordable cities, the Berlin rental market is facing a gentrification crisis. At

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Atomic 'patchwork' using heteroepitaxy for next generation semiconductor devices

Researchers have grown atomically thin crystalline layers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) with varying composition over space, continuously feeding in different types of TMDC to a growth chamber to tailor changes in properties. Examples include 20nm strips surrounded by different TMDCs with atomically straight interfaces, and layered structures. They also directly probed the electronic

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Drag-and-drop data analytics

Northstar, an interactive data-science system, lets users drag-and-drop and manipulate data, and use a virtual data scientist tool to generate machine-learning models that run prediction tasks on datasets, on a user-friendly touchscreen interface.

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It’s 2019. Where are our smart glasses?! | The Verge

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Lightyear One: The first solar-powered car you can buy

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Harry Potter: Wizards Unite is great until you start paying for it – CNET

Commentary: It's easy to max out your free storage space for magical items you need to play the game.

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Tetris Royale is Tetris 99 meets mobile, and it's now in the works – CNET

Gaming company N3twork is developing a mobile rival to the Nintendo Switch battle royale game.

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Stop Robocalls, Telemarketers, and Unwanted Texts for Good With Uncall

The life of a typical cell phone user is full of daily annoyances. Many of those annoyances have to do with social media and the internet, but let’s not forget the stressful random calls and texts from unfamiliar numbers. Scammers and robocallers somehow got a hold of your phone number, and now you have to deal with their calls and texts at all hours of the day or night. Most people treat this as

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Study: Social robots can benefit hospitalized children

A new study demonstrates, for the first time, that "social robots" used in support sessions held in pediatric units at hospitals can lead to more positive emotions in sick children. Many hospitals host interventions in pediatric units, where child life specialists will provide clinical interventions to hospitalized children for developmental and coping support. This involves play, preparation, ed

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Autism: More Than Meets the Eye

How ability can grow out of seeming disability — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Autism: More Than Meets the Eye

How ability can grow out of seeming disability — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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4 things laptop buyers waste money on

A new laptop is nice, but it's even nicer when you know you didn't spend too much for no reason. (Anete Lūsiņa via Unsplash/) Experts agree that the average lifespan of a laptop is somewhere in the neighborhood of three to four years. A desktop should last about five. Computer Hope , a long-running computer help website, concluded—based on multiple studies of the total cost of owning a computer—t

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Paris to plant mini urban forests to combat climate change

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3D body mapping could identify, treat organs, cells damaged from medical conditions

A team has come up with 3D body mapping technology to help treat organs and cells damaged by cancer and other medical issues.

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Mimicking the ultrastructure of wood with 3D-printing for green products

Researchers have succeeded in 3D printing with a wood-based ink in a way that mimics the unique 'ultrastructure' of wood. Their research could revolutionize the manufacturing of green products. Through emulating the natural cellular architecture of wood, they now present the ability to create green products derived from trees, with unique properties — everything from clothes, packaging, and furni

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How Stonewall Reversed a Long History of Justifying Police Surveillance

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series about the gay-rights movement and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. In early June, during an otherwise unremarkable safety briefing at New York Police Department headquarters in lower Manhattan, Police Commissioner James O'Neill stood in front of a crowd and apologized for his department’s behavior during the Stonewall riots, some fift

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Trump hints at softer stance on China's Huawei

President Donald Trump said on Saturday that US companies could sell equipment to Chinese telecom giant Huawei, indicating a potentially softer position on a key sticking point in the US-China …

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Louisiana asks public help with invasive Asian swamp eels

An invasive species of swamp eel has been found in New Orleans, and a state biologist says it's the first time this species has been found in the United States.

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Louisiana asks public help with invasive Asian swamp eels

An invasive species of swamp eel has been found in New Orleans, and a state biologist says it's the first time this species has been found in the United States.

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Found: A sweet way to make everyday things almost indestructible

A natural 'armor' made of sugar shocked even scientists with its durability.

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Scientists find thirdhand smoke affects cells in humans

Thirdhand smoke can damage epithelial cells in the respiratory system by stressing cells and causing them to fight for survival, a research team has found. The finding could assist physicians treating patients exposed to thirdhand smoke.

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Found: A sweet way to make everyday things almost indestructible

A natural 'armor' made of sugar shocked even scientists with its durability.

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Disrupted sleep in one's 50s, 60s raises risk of Alzheimer's disease

PET brain scans of healthy older adults show that those reporting lower sleep quality through their 50s and 60s have higher levels of tau protein, a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Previous studies link poor sleep to beta-amyloid tangles also, suggesting that protein tangles in the brain may cause some of the memory problems of AD and dementia. In addition, out-of-sync brain waves during slee

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Breast milk donations kept my tiny daughters alive

A drop of breast milk – enough to feed a kitten – fed one mother’s twins, but formal support for donations is under-funded I wanted to donate breast milk even before I had my now four-month-old daughter, Gallia, whose birth has made it possible. It is she, I suppose, who is performing the act of generosity, sharing her dinner with those not born so lucky. Gallia has recently acquired what I belie

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Rethink environmental regulations in Africa, study urges

Conflict over resource extraction is rampant in sub-Saharan Africa, with small-scale miners violently pitted against multinational mining corporations — and the state security forces that protect them — for access. Attempts to solve the problem by imposing Western environmental systems and regulations aren't working. But it's not for the reasons most experts might suspect, according to a new stu

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Computational tool predicts how gut microbiome changes over time

A new computational modeling method uses snapshots of which types of microbes are found in a person's gut to predict how the microbial community will change over time.

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'Shooting stars' during cell development impact risk for disease

Fleeting differences in gene expression between individuals that occur at different points in time during cell development may have consequences on the ultimate risk for disease in mature tissues and cell types.

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'Can you hear me, now?' A new strategy 'raises the volume' of gut-body communication

A model system enables the study of enteroendocrine cells, one of the most important moderators of communication between the gut and the rest of the body.

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Brain structure determines individual differences regarding music sensitivity

The white matter structure in the brain reflects music sensitivity, according to a new study.

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Extreme exercise can strain the heart without causing permanent damage

Researchers have found no evidence of elevated cardiac risk in runners who completed a 24-hour ultramarathon (24UM), despite the transient elevation of blood biomarkers that measure cardiac health. According to the study, trained runners were more likely than their novice counterparts to experience raised levels, reflecting the greater cardiac load and pituitary-adrenocortical response to extremel

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Fecal marker could help diagnose early signs of chronic gut conditions

Small molecules found in fecal matter could provide clues to the early inflammation found in chronic gut conditions, such as intestinal bowel disease (IBD), and serve as new biomarkers for diagnosis, according to a study.

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Natural biodiversity protects rural farmers' incomes from tropical weather shocks

A big data study covering more than 7,500 households across 23 tropical countries shows that natural biodiversity could be effective insurance for rural farmers against drought and other weather-related shocks. Farmers in areas with greater biodiversity took less of an income hit from droughts than their peers who farmed amid less biodiversity.

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Iconic Fossil Feather Probably Didn't Belong to Archaeopteryx

A new analysis of a famous fossil suggests that there may be more feathered dinosaurs in Germany’s lithographic limestone than we currently know — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Going the distance: Brain cells for 3D vision discovered

Scientists have discovered neurons in insect brains that compute 3D distance and direction. Understanding these could help vision in robots.

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Pink noise boosts deep sleep in mild cognitive impairment patients

Gentle sound stimulation played during deep sleep enhanced deep sleep for people with mild cognitive impairment, who are at risk for Alzheimer's disease, a new study found. Those whose brains responded the most robustly to the sound stimulation showed an improved memory response the following day. These results suggest improving sleep is a promising novel approach to stave off dementia. The techno

7h

Students chowing down tuna in dining halls are unaware of mercury exposure risks

Some students are helping themselves to servings of tuna well beyond the amounts recommended to avoid consuming too much mercury. Researchers surveyed students on their tuna consumption habits and knowledge of mercury exposure risks, and also measured the mercury levels in hair samples. Hair mercury levels were closely correlated with how much tuna the students said they ate. And for some, the mea

7h

Mini 'magic' MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately

Researchers have developed a prototype mini MRI scanner that fits around a patient's leg.

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How to improve corporate social and environmental responsibility

New research shows NGOs are more likely to sway companies into ethical behavior with carefully targeted reports that consider a range of factors affecting the companies and industries. The report also finds that too much pressure can actually backfire. The study suggests that vertical integration, where companies own and control all steps of the production process, can be economically feasible and

7h

Medically unnecessary ambulance rides soar after ACA expansion

A researcher discovered that medically unnecessary ambulance rides have drastically increased due to the expansion of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Dispatches for minor injuries like abrasions and muscle sprains have risen by 37% in NYC, an increase equivalent to approximately 239 additional dispatches a month, or 2,868 per year. When patients bear a smaller portion of the cost, researchers argue

7h

Global agriculture: Impending threats to biodiversity

A new study compares the effects of expansion vs. intensification of cropland use on global agricultural markets and biodiversity, and finds that the expansion strategy poses a particularly serious threat to biodiversity in the tropics.

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Opioids study shows high-risk counties across the country, suggests local solutions

Dozens of counties in the Midwest and South are at the highest risk for opioid deaths in the United States, say researchers.

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Going the distance: Brain cells for 3D vision discovered

Scientists have discovered neurons in insect brains that compute 3D distance and direction. Understanding these could help vision in robots.

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #26

A chronological listing of news articles posted on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Jun 23 through Sat, June 29, 2019 Editor's Pick When Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez met Greta Thunberg: 'Hope is contagious' Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Greta Thunberg. Photograph: Stephen Voss, Anna Schori/The Guardian Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez enters a boardroom at her constituency

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Men ask most of the questions at scientific conferences; we can choose to change that

Even in a majority-women audience at an academic conference, men ask questions most of the time, researchers report. After analyzing participation in conferences over four years, the study authors found that public discussion and policy change focused on gender equity can make a significant difference.

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Malaria hijacks your genes to invade your liver

Researchers have identified more than 100 'hijacked' human genes that malaria parasites commandeer to take up residence inside their victim's liver during the silent early stages of infection, before symptoms appear. Before their work only a few such genes were known. The findings could lead to new ways to stop malaria parasites before people get sick and help keep the disease from spreading, via

8h

Nutritional cues regulate pancreatic tumor's 'cell drinking'

Desperate for nutrients, rapidly growing pancreatic tumors resort to scavenging 'fuel' through an alternative supply route, called macropinocytosis. Blocking this process, often described as 'cellular drinking,' could lead to tumor-starving drugs. Now, scientists have identified a signaling pathway that regulates macropinocytosis, the nutritional cue that triggers the process and key metabolic dif

8h

Being a 'morning person' linked to lower risk of breast cancer

Being a morning person (popularly known as larks) is associated with a lower risk of developing breast cancer than being an evening person (popularly known as owls), finds a new study.

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Milestone reached in use of nanoparticles to kill cancer with heat

Researchers have developed an improved technique for using magnetic nanoclusters to kill hard-to-reach tumors.

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Hopes rise for an end to ‘heartless’ rationing of IVF

Health chiefs reinstate UK patients’ access to fertility treatment as minister says postcode lottery is unacceptable After years of savage rationing of IVF treatment, NHS bodies in England are again making it available to childless women, raising fertility campaigners’ hopes of an end to a “heartless” policy. The NHS clinical commissioning groups in Herts Valley and South Norfolk reinstated patien

8h

Researchers decipher the history of supermassive black holes in the early universe

Astrophysicists have found evidence for the direct formation of black holes that do not need to emerge from a star remnant. The production of black holes in the early universe, formed in this manner, may provide scientists with an explanation for the presence of extremely massive black holes at a very early stage in the history of our universe.

8h

How well TB antibiotics reach their targets

Scientists have developed a new technique that enables them to visualise how well antibiotics against tuberculosis (TB) reach their pathogenic targets inside human hosts.

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Researchers discriminate between mutations that promote cancer growth and those that don't

Until now, researchers believed recurrent mutations (hotspot mutations) in cancer tumors were the important mutations (driver mutations) that promoted cancer progression. A new study indicates this is not always true.

8h

Higher salt intake can cause gastrointestinal bloating

A new study found that individuals reported more gastrointestinal bloating when they ate a diet high in salt.

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The world needs a global system to detect and halt the spread of emerging crop diseases

Climate change and global trade drive the spread, emergence, and re-emergence of crop disease, and containment action is often inefficient, especially in low-income countries. A Global Surveillance System (GSS) to strengthen and interconnect crop biosecurity systems could go a long way to improving global food security, argues a team of experts.

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NASA Reopens Apollo Mission Control Room That Once Landed Men on Moon

The restored room is a museum piece, and yet it is alive, as though engineers stepped out briefly but would be right back.

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Udseendet er afgørende: Du vælger hund, som du vælger kæreste

Vi ønsker os noget, men vælger noget andet. Sådan er det både med kæreste og hund.

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The short-term climate collapse thread

If you're paying attention, human civilization is absolutely fucked. Even though the IPCC reports are known for low-balling it, oil-producing countries are now in the process of silencing them: https://www.climatechangenews.com/2019/06/27/un-report-1-5c-blocked-climate-talks-saudi-arabia-disputes-science/ >"methane emissions were actually 100 times higher than the fertilizer industry’s self-repor

9h

Denmark's new government raises climate change to highest priority

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

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U.S. Meteorologists 'Deeply Concerned' Over 5G Roll-Out

submitted by /u/Kunphen [link] [comments]

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Subaru, Mazda join Toyota's self-driving vehicle venture

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Renewable energy accounts for 38.4 pct of China's power capacity: report

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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"Terrorist Fiske Jab" Revisited

This very blog forms a large part of a newly published study on research methods blogs in psychology. The paper has a spicy backstory. Back in 2016, psychologist Susan Fiske caused much consternation with a draft article which branded certain (unnamed) bloggers as being “bullies” and “destructo-critics” who “destroy lives” through “methodological terrorism.” Fiske's post (which later appeared in a

9h

Cash Days Final: Big Chief vs. Daddy Dave | Street Outlaws

Big Chief looks to win his first Cash Days final against Daddy Dave! Don't miss new episodes of Street Outlaws at Mondays 9p! Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://twitter

9h

This Week’s Awesome Stories From Around the Web (Through June 29)

MINIATURIZATION Self-Assembling Microrobots Can Be Programmed to Form a Tiny Steerable Car Luke Dormehl | Digital Trends “Remember the way that different ‘Zords’ in Power Rangers joined to together to form a larger Megazord? It’s basically that—only with self-assembling robots between 40 to 50 micrometers in size. That’s around half the diameter of a single human hair.” ROBOTICS Unleashed, Robo-I

9h

Japan whaling: Commercial hunts to resume despite outcry

Hunters could be back in Japanese waters from 1 July, ending a three-decade halt to commercial whaling.

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Europe heatwave: Why are temperatures on the continent soaring?

As the continent bakes in sweltering temperatures, experts explain what's happening – and why now.

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The Pentagon Developed a Laser That Identifies People by Their Heartbeat

The "Jetson" system uses a laser to measure a person's heartbeat, which is apparently almost as distinctive as other biometric indicators. The post The Pentagon Developed a Laser That Identifies People by Their Heartbeat appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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‘If You Want, I’ll Go On’: Trump’s Rambling News Conference

For those of you who didn’t get to see President Donald Trump’s news conference early Saturday, let’s recap what he said: Former Secretary of State John Kerry broke the law in talking to Iran about its nuclear program. Jimmy Carter was a terrible president. Russian President Vladimir Putin says he didn’t interfere in the 2016 elections, and, come on, how many times are you going to push the guy o

9h

Sådan kan vi udnytte Jordens kraftkilder

Hvilke fremtidsmuligheder og tekniske fantasier findes der i udnyttelsen af sol, vind, jordvarme, bølge- og atomenergi – det er emnet for et kapitel i ‘Opfindelsernes Bog’ fra 1923. Den er en af de ingeniørbøger, der er blevet indskannet og nu kan læses i Ingeniørens digitale arkiv.

10h

The Biggest Dinosaur to Ever Walk the Earth Just Wants to Text You

Máximo the titanosaur wishes you'd drop him a line.

10h

There's a Petition to Cancel *Good Omens*, But Who Cares?

The show doesn't take itself too seriously—and neither should viewers.

10h

Myspace Employees Used to Spy on Users

Robert Mueller will testify, malware wrecks IoT, and more of the week's top security news.

10h

Stupid Humans

If we’re a dud cosmic experiment, is there hope? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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North Carolina Tries To Clean Up Its Electricity

North Carolina's governor is promising to quickly cut greenhouse emissions but will need to convince Duke Energy, the state's dominant utility, to abandon coal and gas in favor of solar and wind. (Image credit: Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

10h

Are Bananas Doomed?

Could our most beloved fruit go extinct?

10h

A Practical Approach to Police Bias

Last year, the Innocence Project helped exonerate nine people who had served a combined 200 years in prison. Some of the cases seemed to be built on strong evidence. A detective claimed Keith Hardin made incriminating statements. A forensic dentist testified that Alfred Swinton was responsible for bite marks left on a murder victim. An eye witness stated that he saw Johnny Tall Bear beating a man

11h

Chris Moukarbel (filmmaker) – The closest thing to actual magic

"For a lot of those kids drag was more punk than punk. Ok, you could shave your head and put on a spike collar… or you could throw on a wig and heels and traipse around Times Square. That was brave. That was radical." Lady Gaga writes a hook and the whole world suddenly takes notice…I always thought of it as casting a spell. It's the closest thing to actual magic. Because imagine an incantation t

11h

Space Photos of the Week: Here Comes the Sun

Plus, photobombing asteroids, rainbow galaxies, and more.

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Discrimination Drives LGBT+ Scientists to Think About Quitting

Despite progress, many physical scientists from sexual and gender minorities experience exclusion or harassment at work, finds UK survey — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

How the iPhone Helped Save the Planet

Over the last 12 years, smartphones have helped dematerialize our consumption of countless other products.

12h

Transit Agencies Turn to Uber for the Last Mile

Transit systems worry about losing passengers to ride-hail services. But some agencies are also testing using Uber in place of low-ridership lines.

12h

All ThinkGeek Items Are 75% Off, Google Speakers on Sale Now

From a wood burning stove to the Bob Ross blanket, we scoured the web for the best deals this weekend.

12h

Spain hit by more wildfires as heatwave continues

Spain was hit by more wildfires as temperatures remained sky-high in the Europe-wide heatwave, authorities said Saturday, just as firefighters finally managed to contain another blaze.

12h

Trump hints at softer stance on China's Huawei

President Donald Trump said on Saturday that US companies could sell equipment to Chinese telecom giant Huawei, indicating a potentially softer position on a key sticking point in the US-China trade war.

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Europe sizzles on sixth day of deadly heatwave

Europe sweltered Saturday on the sixth day of a widespread, deadly heatwave that has fuelled record-breaking temperatures, huge blazes and pollution peaks.

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In what ways have we're gone backwards technology-wise?

My example is supersonic travel. Thought Concorde retiring was a big backwards step. submitted by /u/Killieboy16 [link] [comments]

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NASA: Intense work under way on rocket for future moonshots

Crews are working around the clock at a NASA rocket factory, intent on meeting a new fall 2020 deadline to test launch a mega-rocket designed to propel astronauts to the moon and beyond, a space agency official said Friday.

12h

Guardians of Apollo: the curators preserving the Moon mission's legacy

Lying on a workshop counter that is closed to the public at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum's annex near Washington Dulles airport, Neil Armstrong's gloves look almost as good as new.

12h

Ice sheet collapse: The greatest unknown in climate science

The science of glaciology and ice sheets is quite new, as methods to measure melting glaciers were only realized with the advent of aviation and lasers. The world's sea levels are rising 3mm per year, and of that Greenland's ice sheet contributes 1mm – it is losing between 250 to 300 billion tons of ice per year. Three millimeters total is not much, but ice sheets don't always operate in a linear

13h

Debate Moderators Don’t Know Much About National Security

Viewers of the Democratic presidential debates learned quite a bit this week—from Joe Biden’s views of school busing to Marianne Williamson’s plan to defeat President Donald Trump with love. But I’d bet the next president will be consumed by an issue not a single person mentioned: cyber threats. Sure, the moderators asked a few candidates what they thought the biggest foreign-policy threat was. T

13h

Democrats Don’t Want to Talk About the Economy

Over four hours of debate among what felt like a thousand Democratic candidates, a few notable topics scarcely came up. There was no heated tussle over jobs plans. No argument over how to set the national debt on a better path, and no proposals to balance the budget or change the country’s entitlement structure. There was less discussion of getting work to America’s forgotten communities than in

13h

A Public Library Brings Opportunity to the Blind

The Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library, a branch of the New York Public Library system, is in the Flatiron district of Manhattan. It looks like another storefront, opening onto a sidewalk with overhead construction scaffolding, like so many buildings in New York City these days. I have visited many, many public libraries around the U.S., but I had never visited a braille library. So

13h

You’re Probably Complaining the Wrong Way

The words vent and complain are often used interchangeably, but really, they refer to two different forms of expression, each with its own aims. Venting is about seeking validation and sympathy, whereas complaining comes with a concrete end goal—in many cases, getting someone else to do something differently. Generally speaking, the psychologist Guy Winch says, people do a lot of venting, but “we

13h

Did the U.S. and Mexico Just Link Their Immigration Policies?

A tactical win can constitute a strategic blunder, a battle won that makes it more likely you lose the war. President Donald Trump and his most ardent supporters may in time come to feel this way about the agreement the administration reached with the Mexican government earlier this month. The June 7 deal may seem to amount to a big victory for Trump, the result of a Tweetzkrieg threatening to im

13h

Thom Yorke’s Beautiful New Nightmare

Thom Yorke’s new album is inspired by Carl Jung’s theories of the unconsciousness and by the way the brain processes the world in sleep, which is to say, simply, it’s about dreaming. A red flag, no? Heavy-handed TV sequences about dead characters and the postcardification of Salvador Dali’s melting watches have made art of the subconscious all too ordinary, and everyone knows that there’s little

13h

Reparations Are Not the Answer

Juneteenth—the annual celebration of when enslaved people in Texas learned of their freedom—brought two hearings this year on Capitol Hill. The first was widely covered. The House Judiciary Committee looked at H.R. 40 , a proposal to create a commission to study reparations for slavery and subsequent discrimination. Witnesses debated the utility and justice of pursuing financial reparations to ri

13h

Solbilen Lightyear One har motor i alle hjul

Rækkevidde: op mod 800 kilometer. Pris: ca. 1 million kr.

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Grønlands gletsjere forsvinder: Tre gange Bornholms areal smeltet på få år

Gletsjerne på Grønland er blevet væsentligt mindre de sidste 20 år.

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No flights, a four-day week and living off-grid: what climate scientists do at home to save the planet

What changes have the experts made to their own lives to tackle the climate emergency? ‘We need to reduce our capacity and urge to consume’ Continue reading…

14h

Deadly drug-resistant fungal disease has ‘infested' New York City

An infectious and potentially lethal fungal disease has affected more than 600 people in New York city – the biggest outbreak in the US so far

15h

Ugens debat: Det kniber med batterierne

Analysen af den europæiske bilindustris forhold til elbiler i sidste uges Inge­niøren fik mange læsere på banen i kommentarfeltet. Mange var enige i analysen – men kun få optimistiske på industriens vegne.

16h

'Save your money': no evidence brain health supplements work, say experts

Worldwide panel says it cannot recommend healthy people take ‘memory supplements’ Dietary supplements such as vitamins do nothing to boost brain health and are simply a waste of money for healthy people, experts have said. According to figures from the US, sales of so-called “memory supplements” doubled between 2006 and 2015, reaching a value of $643m, while more than a quarter of adults over the

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The Impossible Burger is the US's most popular late-night sn

submitted by /u/addpulp [link] [comments]

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Seminarier på Almedalen 2019

För besökare på Almedalen 2019 rekomenderar vi nedanstående två seminarier: 1 juli kl 13:30: Vad är bra eller dålig populärvetenskap? Länk: http://program.almedalsveckan.info/event/user-view/58625 3 juli kl 9:00: Alternativ medicin – alternativ etik? Länk: http://program.almedalsveckan.info/event/user-view/57047 Mer info nedan: Vad är bra eller dålig populärvetenskap? Med anledning av debatt i vi

16h

Skræmmende app piller digitalt tøjet af kvinder

Selvom skaberen fik kolde fødder, er en kunstig intelligens, der digitalt skræller tøjet af kvinder, stadig derude.

17h

Plan to sell 50m meals made from electricity, water and air

Solar Foods hopes wheat flour-like product will hit target in supermarkets within two years A Finnish company that makes food from electricity, water and air has said it plans to have 50m meals’ worth of its product sold in supermarkets within two years. Solar Foods is also working with the European Space Agency to supply astronauts on a mission to Mars after devising a method it says creates a p

18h

My health: Consumers empowered by sharing medical 'selfies'

Taking medical 'selfies' and sharing them with a doctor empowers and reassures healthcare consumers, and can improve doctor-patient relationships, a new study has found.

18h

Botox cousin can reduce malaria in an environmentally friendly way

Researchers have found a new toxin that selectively targets mosquitoes. This can lead to innovative and environmentally friendly approaches to reduce malaria.

18h

Society pays heavy price for failure to diagnose and treat conduct disorder

A new study reviewed evidence from research conducted around the world and estimated the prevalence of conduct disorder to be around 3 percent in school-aged children and a leading cause of referral to child and adolescent mental health services. Yet paradoxically it is one of the least widely recognized or studied psychiatric disorders, and funding for research into it lags far behind many other

18h

Atomic 'patchwork' using heteroepitaxy for next generation semiconductor devices

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have grown atomically thin crystalline layers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) with varying composition over space, continuously feeding in different types of TMDC to a growth chamber to tailor changes in properties. Examples include 20nm strips surrounded by different TMDCs with atomically straight interfaces, and layered structures. They

19h

Så blev kontroversiell teknik en lösning på klimatkrisen

Geoengineering har på allvar börjat diskuteras som en lösning för att nå utsläppsmålen. Detta trots att forskningen är långt ifrån utvecklad och kanske aldrig kommer att kunna verka i stor skala, enligt en ny avhandling.

19h

The future of last-mile delivery is electric

submitted by /u/davidwholt [link] [comments]

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Less than half of US children under 15 are white, census shows

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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America's Demographic Destiny Can't Be Ignored

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The Atlantic cod’s migratory supergene comes at a cost

Our appetite for cod has had disastrous results. (Deposit Photos/) Human eating habits tend to have devastating consequences. No species embodies the ravages of our appetite like the Atlantic cod. In the early 1990s Atlantic cod populations that had sustained maritime cities on either side of the ocean for centuries crashed. Numbers fell to 3 percent of what they had been in the 1970s, and in 199

21h

Low-cost retinal scanner could help prevent blindness worldwide

Biomedical engineers have developed a low-cost, portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanner that promises to bring the vision-saving technology to underserved regions throughout the United States and abroad. Thanks to a redesigned, 3D-printed spectrometer, the scanner is 15 times lighter and smaller than current commercial systems and is made from parts costing less than a tenth the retail

21h

New material shows high potential for quantum computing

Scientists are getting closer to confirming the existence of an exotic quantum particle called Majorana fermion, crucial for fault-tolerant quantum computing — the kind of quantum computing that addresses errors during its operation.

21h

Gene activity database could spare thousands of mice

A comprehensive database of gene activity in mice across ten disease models could significantly reduce animal use worldwide. It gives a full picture of the immune response to different pathogens.

21h

Safe, low-cost, modular, self-programming robots

Many work processes would be almost unthinkable today without robots. But robots operating in manufacturing facilities have often posed risks to workers because they are not responsive enough to their surroundings. To make it easier for people and robots to work in close proximity in the future, scientists have developed a new system: IMPROV.

21h

Scientists discover how plants breathe — and how humans shaped their 'lungs'

Experts reveal how plants provide a steady flow of air to every cell. Study shows humans have bred wheat plants to have fewer pores on their leaves and use less water. Findings pave the way to develop more drought-resistant crops.

21h

Long-term statin use associated with lower glaucoma risk

A new study brings the connection between statin use and risk of glaucoma into sharper focus. Investigators have found that using statins for five or more years is associated with lower risk of primary open-angle glaucoma.

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NASA Will Send A Drone To Buzz Around Saturn's Largest Moon

The space agency wants to learn more about Titan, an icy body that fascinates scientists because of its similarity to Earth. (Image credit: NASA/JHU-APL)

21h

Nonnative pear trees are showing up in US forests

Callery or Bradford pear trees are starting to show up in many eastern forests. Once established, the invasive trees are hard to eradicate, a biologist warns.

21h

Moments of clarity in dementia patients at end of life: Glimmers of hope?

It happens unexpectedly: a person long thought lost to the ravages of dementia, unable to recall the events of their lives or even recognize those closest to them, will suddenly wake up and exhibit surprisingly normal behavior, only to pass away shortly thereafter. This phenomenon, which experts refer to as terminal or paradoxical lucidity, has been reported since antiquity, yet there have been ve

21h

A primate's response to death

Researchers review 200 years of documentation on how non-human primates respond to death. Researchers infer that non-human primates have some aspects of death awareness but, thus far, only humans conceptualize it at a higher order.

21h

When the dinosaurs died, lichens thrived

When the asteroid hit, dinosaurs weren't the only ones that suffered. Clouds of ash blocked the sun and cooled the planet's temperature, devastating plant life. But fungi, which decompose dead stuff, did well. So what happened to the lichens, which are made of a plant and fungus living together as one organism?

21h

Last week in tech: Jony Ive left Apple, 'The Office' is quitting Netflix, and we tried the iOS 13 beta

BMW's electric motorcycle concept would communicate with electronic ride wear that could have built-in lights. (BMW/) You don't need to be the kind of gadget enthusiast who scours obscure websites for product info to appreciate Jony Ive's influence on the gadget world. Apple's chief design officer is largely responsible for a handful of iconic products, including the iPhone, the iPad, and the Mac

22h

Common knowledge, coordination, and strategic mentalizing in human social life [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

People often coordinate for mutual gain, such as keeping to opposite sides of a stairway, dubbing an object or place with a name, or assembling en masse to protest a regime. Because successful coordination requires complementary choices, these opportunities raise the puzzle of how people attain the common knowledge that…

22h

Optimal control strategies for inhibition of protein aggregation [Chemistry]

Protein aggregation has been implicated in many medical disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Potential therapeutic strategies for these diseases propose the use of drugs to inhibit specific molecular events during the aggregation process. However, viable treatment protocols require balancing the efficacy of the drug with its toxicity, while accounting…

22h

Regulation of nuclear epigenome by mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy [Genetics]

Diseases associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are highly variable in phenotype, in large part because of differences in the percentage of normal and mutant mtDNAs (heteroplasmy) present within the cell. For example, increasing heteroplasmy levels of the mtDNA tRNALeu(UUR) nucleotide (nt) 3243A > G mutation result successively in diabetes,…

22h

Long-term expansion and differentiation of adult murine epidermal stem cells in 3D organoid cultures [Cell Biology]

Mammalian epidermal stem cells maintain homeostasis of the skin epidermis and contribute to its regeneration throughout adult life. While 2D mouse epidermal stem cell cultures have been established decades ago, a long-term, feeder cell- and serum-free culture system recapitulating murine epidermal architecture has not been available. Here we describe an…

22h

Nonparametric inference of interaction laws in systems of agents from trajectory data [Applied Mathematics]

Inferring the laws of interaction in agent-based systems from observational data is a fundamental challenge in a wide variety of disciplines. We propose a nonparametric statistical learning approach for distance-based interactions, with no reference or assumption on their analytical form, given data consisting of sampled trajectories of interacting agents. We…

22h

Direct detection of atmospheric atomic bromine leading to mercury and ozone depletion [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Bromine atoms play a central role in atmospheric reactive halogen chemistry, depleting ozone and elemental mercury, thereby enhancing deposition of toxic mercury, particularly in the Arctic near-surface troposphere. However, direct bromine atom measurements have been missing to date, due to the lack of analytical capability with sufficient sensitivity for ambient…

22h

Predicting microbial growth in a mixed culture from growth curve data [Evolution]

Determining the fitness of specific microbial genotypes has extensive application in microbial genetics, evolution, and biotechnology. While estimates from growth curves are simple and allow high throughput, they are inaccurate and do not account for interactions between costs and benefits accruing over different parts of a growth cycle. For this…

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Unexpected host dependency of Antarctic Nanohaloarchaeota [Ecology]

In hypersaline environments, Nanohaloarchaeota (Diapherotrites, Parvarchaeota, Aenigmarchaeota, Nanoarchaeota, Nanohaloarchaeota [DPANN] superphylum) are thought to be free-living microorganisms. We report cultivation of 2 strains of Antarctic Nanohaloarchaeota and show that they require the haloarchaeon Halorubrum lacusprofundi for growth. By performing growth using enrichments and fluorescence-a

22h

The next chapter of human-plague science [Letters (Online Only)]

In PNAS, Jones et al. (1) provide an expert history of human–plague interactions across central Asia, and we support their thesis that zoonotic systems are best regulated using “control” rather than “eradication” strategies. Nonetheless, a control strategy is incomplete if it fails to acknowledge the critical role that modern biospecimen…

22h

X-ray imaging provides clues to fracture in solid-state batteries

Researchers have used X-ray computed tomography (CT) to visualize in real time how cracks form near the edges of the interfaces between materials in solid-state batteries. The findings could help researchers find ways to improve the energy storage devices.

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France records all-time highest temperature of 45.9C

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Space station mold survives 200 times the radiation dose that would kill a human

New study suggests that fungi are an overlooked interplanetary contamination threat

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Infant mortality is higher for low-skilled parents

Infants of women with a short-term education are more likely to die within the first year of life. In more than half of cases, the cause of death is premature childbirth and low fetal weight.

23h

Dementia study links gene with damage to brain connections

Insights into how a gene that increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease disrupts brain cells have been revealed by scientists.

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Children living in countryside outperform children living in metropolitan area in motor skills

Residential density is related to children's motor skills, engagement in outdoor play and organized sports. Finnish children living in the countryside spent more time outdoors and had better motor skills than their age peers in the metropolitan area. On the other hand, children living in the metropolitan area participated the most in organized sports.

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The Infectious Idealism of the U.S. Women’s National Team

Updated at 11:54 a.m. ET on June 29, 2019. The United States may no longer be its old hegemonic self in the realm of geopolitics. But in this World Cup, the women’s national soccer team has seemed like a juggernaut from the time of Pax Americana—a team with supreme self-confidence and an almost evangelical sense of mission. There have been moments, these past few weeks, when their swagger has vee

23h

Restricted permit-only access to Yosemite National Park's Half Dome summit, anticipated to improve hiker safety, did not

According to a new study, implementation in 2010 of permit-only access to Yosemite National Park's Half Dome cable handrails along the final ascent of this iconic landmark reduced the number of people on the summit at one time, but this did not result in a significant reduction in the overall toll of associated human suffering and mortality, or search and rescue (SAR) activity and costs.

23h

The fundamental physics of frequency combs sheds light on nature's problem-solving skills

Nature has a way of finding optimal solutions to complex problems. For example, despite the billions of ways for a single protein to fold, proteins always fold in a way that minimizes potential energy. This kind of optimization is explained by what's known as a variational principle: any other deformation — or variation — of the shape found by the protein would require more energy. Now, research

23h

The water future of Earth's 'third pole'

One-seventh of the world's population depends on rivers flowing from Asia's high mountain ranges for water to drink and to irrigate crops. Rapid changes in the region's climate are likely to influence food and water security in India, Pakistan, China and other nations. NASA keeps a space-based eye on changes like these worldwide to better understand the future of our planet's water cycle.

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Undercounting of agroforestry skews climate change mitigation planning and reporting

Scientists expose the lack of measurement of and reporting on agroforestry in international climate agreements. This has strong implications for accounting for both how much carbon IS being sequestered and how much COULD BE sequestered, given national planning and potential climate finance.

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Experimental physicists redefine ultrafast, coherent magnetism

For the first time ever, experimental physicists have been able to influence the magnetic moment of materials in sync with their electronic properties. The coupled optical and magnetic excitation within one femtosecond corresponds to an acceleration by a factor of 200 and is the fastest magnetic phenomenon that has ever been observed.

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Building a bridge to the quantum world

Entanglement is one of the main principles of quantum mechanics. Physicists have found a way to use a mechanical oscillator to produce entangled radiation. This method might prove extremely useful when it comes to connecting quantum computers.

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The RoboBee flies solo

The RoboBee — the insect-inspired microrobot — has become the lightest vehicle ever to achieve sustained flight without the assistance of a power cord. After decades of work, the researchers achieved untethered flight by making several important changes to the RoboBee, including the addition of a second pair of wings. That change, along with less visible changes to the actuators and transmission

23h

Networks of gene activity control organ development

For the first time, researchers have decoded in two large studies the genetic programs that control the evolution of major organs in humans and other selected mammals before and after birth. Molecular biologists demonstrated that all the organs studied exhibit fundamental and original gene activity networks that must have originated early on in mammalian evolution.

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Theranos Founder Elizabeth Holmes Has Trial Date Set for Summer 2020

Elizabeth Holmes, the disgraced founder of catastrophically failed blood testing startup Theranos, will face trial next year, with jury selection slated for July 28, 2020 and the trial itself …

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Spain's So Unbearably Hot Right Now, a Manure Pile Spontaneously Ignited a Forest Fire

"We're facing a serious fire on a scale not seen for 20 years."

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One in 10 people have 'near-death' experiences, according to new study

The new findings were presented at the 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress. Experiences most frequently reported by participants in their study included: abnormal time perception (87 per cent), exceptional speed of thought (65 per cent), exceptionally vivid senses (63 per cent) and feeling separated from, or out of their body (53 per cent).

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The Aerodynamics of a Soccer Ball

The Aerodynamics of a Soccer Ball When it comes to scoring a goal, soccer ball design is crucial to a player's success. 00-soccer-kick_cropped.jpg Women's National Soccer Team forward Megan Rapinoe warms up for a game on May 26, 2019 in preparation for the 2019 Women's World Cup. Image credits: Leonard Zhukovsky/ Shutterstock Sports Friday, June 28, 2019 – 08:15 Rodrigo Pérez Ortega, Contributor

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Hey GrubHub, What the Fuck??

GrubHub / Seamless—the aggregation and delivery service that earns its money by eating away at the already thin profit margins of local restaurants—is accused of, well, finding a new and unusual …

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Bumble's new video chat and call options let you meet before you meet up

The Internet and mobile devices have revolutionized the dating process, negating the need to actually “get out there” and meet someone face to face. It’s been a boon for those that are painfully …

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Building Mad Max Inspired Vehicles of Destruction! | Savage Builds

Adam Savage and two of his favorite builder colleagues will design and build three bad-ass motorized monsters of destruction inspired by Mad Max and other post-apocalyptic worlds. Stream Full Episodes of Savage Builds: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/savage-builds/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter

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Octopus arms can make decisions on their own

Unlike vertebrates, two-thirds of an octopus' neurons are in its tentacles. Tentacles respond to the surrounding environment without help from the head's brain. If something this weird is here on our own Earth, what could be out there in space? None The venue at which Dominic Sivitilli shares his latest research on octopuses is telling enough: an astrobiology conference, AbSciCon2019 . At this ye

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France Suffers Through Hottest Day In Its History — 113 Fahrenheit

It comes as much of Europe, including Spain and Germany, sees record-breaking temperatures. (Image credit: Zakaria Abdelkafi/AFP/Getty Images)

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Rebalancing Our Relationship With Tech

A conversation with Aza Raskin of the Center for Humane Technology. Also, we discuss Jony Ive’s departure from Apple.

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Reducing the psychological distress of patients diagnosed with a common, retinal disease

A new study from City, University of London suggests that effective communication from eye health professionals may help reduce patient fears after they are diagnosed with the 'dry' form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Dry AMD is a currently incurable, progressive disease of the macular, the central part of the retina through which we see the world directly in front of us.

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NASA’s Restored Mission Control Shows the Glory Days of the Apollo Era

Activists have finished a massive restoration project to bring the original Apollo Mission Control facility back to its original state. The post NASA’s Restored Mission Control Shows the Glory Days of the Apollo Era appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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